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Sample records for association study analysis

  1. Functional analysis of variance for association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Vsevolozhskaya

    Full Text Available While progress has been made in identifying common genetic variants associated with human diseases, for most of common complex diseases, the identified genetic variants only account for a small proportion of heritability. Challenges remain in finding additional unknown genetic variants predisposing to complex diseases. With the advance in next-generation sequencing technologies, sequencing studies have become commonplace in genetic research. The ongoing exome-sequencing and whole-genome-sequencing studies generate a massive amount of sequencing variants and allow researchers to comprehensively investigate their role in human diseases. The discovery of new disease-associated variants can be enhanced by utilizing powerful and computationally efficient statistical methods. In this paper, we propose a functional analysis of variance (FANOVA method for testing an association of sequence variants in a genomic region with a qualitative trait. The FANOVA has a number of advantages: (1 it tests for a joint effect of gene variants, including both common and rare; (2 it fully utilizes linkage disequilibrium and genetic position information; and (3 allows for either protective or risk-increasing causal variants. Through simulations, we show that FANOVA outperform two popularly used methods - SKAT and a previously proposed method based on functional linear models (FLM, - especially if a sample size of a study is small and/or sequence variants have low to moderate effects. We conduct an empirical study by applying three methods (FANOVA, SKAT and FLM to sequencing data from Dallas Heart Study. While SKAT and FLM respectively detected ANGPTL 4 and ANGPTL 3 associated with obesity, FANOVA was able to identify both genes associated with obesity.

  2. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  3. GPFrontend and GPGraphics: graphical analysis tools for genetic association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanze Denny

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most software packages for whole genome association studies are non-graphical, purely text based programs originally designed to run with UNIX-like operating systems. Graphical output is often not intended or supposed to be performed with other command line tools, e.g. gnuplot. Results Using the Microsoft .NET 2.0 platform and Visual Studio 2005, we have created a graphical software package to analyze data from microarray whole genome association studies, both for a DNA-pooling based approach as well as regular single sample data. Part of this package was made to integrate with GenePool 0.8.2, a previously existing software suite for GNU/Linux systems, which we have modified to run in a Microsoft Windows environment. Further modifications cause it to generate some additional data. This enables GenePool to interact with the .NET parts created by us. The programs we developed are GPFrontend, a graphical user interface and frontend to use GenePool and create metadata files for it, and GPGraphics, a program to further analyze and graphically evaluate output of different WGA analysis programs, among them also GenePool. Conclusions Our programs enable regular MS Windows users without much experience in bioinformatics to easily visualize whole genome data from a variety of sources.

  4. A strategy analysis for genetic association studies with known inbreeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Giacco Stefano

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association studies consist in identifying the genetic variants which are related to a specific disease through the use of statistical multiple hypothesis testing or segregation analysis in pedigrees. This type of studies has been very successful in the case of Mendelian monogenic disorders while it has been less successful in identifying genetic variants related to complex diseases where the insurgence depends on the interactions between different genes and the environment. The current technology allows to genotype more than a million of markers and this number has been rapidly increasing in the last years with the imputation based on templates sets and whole genome sequencing. This type of data introduces a great amount of noise in the statistical analysis and usually requires a great number of samples. Current methods seldom take into account gene-gene and gene-environment interactions which are fundamental especially in complex diseases. In this paper we propose to use a non-parametric additive model to detect the genetic variants related to diseases which accounts for interactions of unknown order. Although this is not new to the current literature, we show that in an isolated population, where the most related subjects share also most of their genetic code, the use of additive models may be improved if the available genealogical tree is taken into account. Specifically, we form a sample of cases and controls with the highest inbreeding by means of the Hungarian method, and estimate the set of genes/environmental variables, associated with the disease, by means of Random Forest. Results We have evidence, from statistical theory, simulations and two applications, that we build a suitable procedure to eliminate stratification between cases and controls and that it also has enough precision in identifying genetic variants responsible for a disease. This procedure has been successfully used for the beta-thalassemia, which is

  5. Power analysis for genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies are a promising new tool for deciphering the genetics of complex diseases. To choose the proper sample size and genotyping platform for such studies, power calculations that take into account genetic model, tag SNP selection, and the population of interest are required. Results The power of genome-wide association studies can be computed using a set of tag SNPs and a large number of genotyped SNPs in a representative population, such as available through the HapMap project. As expected, power increases with increasing sample size and effect size. Power also depends on the tag SNPs selected. In some cases, more power is obtained by genotyping more individuals at fewer SNPs than fewer individuals at more SNPs. Conclusion Genome-wide association studies should be designed thoughtfully, with the choice of genotyping platform and sample size being determined from careful power calculations.

  6. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke J; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects.......Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects....

  7. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Evangelou (Evangelos); J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); S.D. Bos (Steffan); T. Esko (Tõnu); D.S. Evans (Daniel); S. Metrustry (Sarah); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); K.K. Tsilidis (Konstantinos); N.K. Arden (Nigel); N. Aslam (Nadim); N. Bellamy (Nicholas); F. Birrell (Fraser); F.J. Blanco; A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan); K. Chapman (Kay); A.G. Day-Williams (Aaron); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Doherty (Michael); G. Engström; H.T. Helgadottir (Hafdis); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); H. Jonsson (Helgi); A. Keis (Aime); J.C. Keurentjes (J. Christiaan); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); P.A. Lind (Penelope); A. McCaskie (Andrew); N.G. Martin; A.L. Milani (Alfredo); G.W. Montgomery; R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); M.C. Nevitt (Michael); P. Nilsson (Peter); W.E.R. Ollier (William); N. Parimi (Neeta); A. Rai (Ashok); S.H. Ralston; M.R. Reed (Mike); J.A. Riancho (José); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); C. Rodriguez-Fontenla (Cristina); L. Southam (Lorraine); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); G.A. Wallis (Gillian); J.M. Wilkinson (Mark); A. Gonzalez (Antonio); N.E. Lane; L.S. Lohmander (Stefan); J. Loughlin (John); A. Metspalu (Andres); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); I. Jonsdottir (Ingileif); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects. Methods: We performed a two-stage meta-analysis

  8. Genetic Association Analysis under Complex Survey Sampling: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan-Yu; Tao, Ran; Kalsbeek, William D.; Zeng, Donglin; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Graff, Mariaelisa; Koch, Gary G.; North, Kari E.; Heiss, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The cohort design allows investigators to explore the genetic basis of a variety of diseases and traits in a single study while avoiding major weaknesses of the case-control design. Most cohort studies employ multistage cluster sampling with unequal probabilities to conveniently select participants with desired characteristics, and participants from different clusters might be genetically related. Analysis that ignores the complex sampling design can yield biased estimation of the genetic association and inflation of the type I error. Herein, we develop weighted estimators that reflect unequal selection probabilities and differential nonresponse rates, and we derive variance estimators that properly account for the sampling design and the potential relatedness of participants in different sampling units. We compare, both analytically and numerically, the performance of the proposed weighted estimators with unweighted estimators that disregard the sampling design. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods through analysis of MetaboChip data in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, which is the largest health study of the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States aimed at identifying risk factors for various diseases and determining the role of genes and environment in the occurrence of diseases. We provide guidelines on the use of weighted and unweighted estimators, as well as the relevant software. PMID:25480034

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study and Linkage Analysis of the Healthy Aging Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minster, Ryan L; Sanders, Jason L; Singh, Jatinder;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Healthy Aging Index (HAI) is a tool for measuring the extent of health and disease across multiple systems. METHODS: We conducted a genome-wide association study and a genome-wide linkage analysis to map quantitative trait loci associated with the HAI and a modified HAI weighted...

  10. Genome-wide association study to identify common variants associated with brachial circumference: a meta-analysis of 14 cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Boraska

    Full Text Available Brachial circumference (BC, also known as upper arm or mid arm circumference, can be used as an indicator of muscle mass and fat tissue, which are distributed differently in men and women. Analysis of anthropometric measures of peripheral fat distribution such as BC could help in understanding the complex pathophysiology behind overweight and obesity. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic variants associated with BC through a large-scale genome-wide association scan (GWAS meta-analysis. We used fixed-effects meta-analysis to synthesise summary results across 14 GWAS discovery and 4 replication cohorts comprising overall 22,376 individuals (12,031 women and 10,345 men of European ancestry. Individual analyses were carried out for men, women, and combined across sexes using linear regression and an additive genetic model: adjusted for age and adjusted for age and BMI. We prioritised signals for follow-up in two-stages. We did not detect any signals reaching genome-wide significance. The FTO rs9939609 SNP showed nominal evidence for association (p<0.05 in the age-adjusted strata for men and across both sexes. In this first GWAS meta-analysis for BC to date, we have not identified any genome-wide significant signals and do not observe robust association of previously established obesity loci with BC. Large-scale collaborations will be necessary to achieve higher power to detect loci underlying BC.

  11. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  12. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; Maloney, Cliona M.; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; de Boer, Anthonius; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goe, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshal, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondah, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Christie, Jason D.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Maerz, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Watkins, Hugh; Grant, Struan F. A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Kumari, Meena; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and

  13. Principal components analysis corrects for stratification in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alkes L; Patterson, Nick J; Plenge, Robert M; Weinblatt, Michael E; Shadick, Nancy A; Reich, David

    2006-08-01

    Population stratification--allele frequency differences between cases and controls due to systematic ancestry differences-can cause spurious associations in disease studies. We describe a method that enables explicit detection and correction of population stratification on a genome-wide scale. Our method uses principal components analysis to explicitly model ancestry differences between cases and controls. The resulting correction is specific to a candidate marker's variation in frequency across ancestral populations, minimizing spurious associations while maximizing power to detect true associations. Our simple, efficient approach can easily be applied to disease studies with hundreds of thousands of markers.

  14. Association between seminal plasma zinc level and asthenozoospermia: a meta-analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taravati, A; Tohidi, F

    2016-08-01

    Zinc is proposed to have an important role in the morphology, viability and motility of spermatozoa. There are inconsistent reports on the association between seminal plasma zinc concentration and male infertility. For this purpose, papers reporting the level of seminal zinc among asthenozoospermic groups were selected and used for further analysis. This meta-analysis of previous published studies was performed to obtain more precise information on the association between seminal plasma zinc and asthenozoospermia. Relevant studies for inclusion were identified after preliminary investigation of research papers published on electronic databases up to February 2015. Eight reports and 475 subjects were finally included in the meta-analysis. In the overall analysis, a statistically significant reduction in seminal plasma zinc concentrations was observed in asthenozoospermic infertile men. Random-effects method was used to evaluate the summary effect size due to the presence of significant heterogeneity. The effect of zinc on asthenozoospermia was significant (Hedge's G effect size = -0.506, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -0.998 to -0.014, P = 0.044). Taken together, despite of significant statistical heterogeneity between studies, our findings were indicative of significant association between zinc concentration and asthenozoospermia. In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that seminal plasma zinc concentration is negatively associated with male infertility.

  15. A mega-analysis of genome-wide association studies for major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, Patrick F.; Daly, Mark J.; Ripke, Stephan; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Wray, Naomi R.; Neale, Benjamin; Levinson, Douglas F.; Breen, Gerome; Byrne, Enda M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Rietschel, Marcella; Hoogendijk, Witte; Ripke, Stephan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Ripke, Stephan; Weissman, Myrna M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Breuer, Rene; Cichon, Sven; Degenhardt, Franziska; Frank, Josef; Gross, Magdalena; Herms, Stefan; Hoefels, Susanne; Maier, Wolfgang; Mattheisen, Manuel; Noeethen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Schulze, Thomas G.; Steffens, Michael; Treutlein, Jens; Boomsma, Dorret I.; De Geus, Eco J.; Hoogendijk, Witte; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Jung-Ying, Tzeng; Lin, Dan-Yu; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Nolen, Willem A.; Penninx, Brenda P.; Smit, Johannes H.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van Grootheest, Gerard; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zitman, Frans G.; Coryell, William H.; Knowles, James A.; Lawson, William B.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Potash, James B.; Scheftner, William A.; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M.; Holsboer, Florian; Muglia, Pierandrea; Tozzi, Federica; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; De Geus, Eco J.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; MacIntyre, Donald J.; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Alan; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Penninx, Brenda P.; Ripke, Stephan; Smit, Johannes H.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van Grootheest, Gerard; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zitman, Frans G.; van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.; Holsboer, Florian; Lucae, Susanne; Binder, Elisabeth; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Ripke, Stephan; Czamara, Darina; Kohli, Martin A.; Ising, Marcus; Uhr, Manfred; Bettecken, Thomas; Barnes, Michael R.; Breen, Gerome; Craig, Ian W.; Farmer, Anne E.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; McGuffin, Peter; Muglia, Pierandrea; Byrne, Enda; Gordon, Scott D.; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Hickie, Ian B.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant M.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Wray, Naomi R.; Hamilton, Steven P.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Slager, Susan L.; Oskarsson, Hoegni; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Steinberg, Stacy; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir; Levinson, Douglas F.; Potash, James B.; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M.; Guipponi, Michel; Lewis, Glyn; O'Donovan, Michael; Tansey, Katherine E.; Uher, Rudolf; Coryell, William H.; Knowles, James A.; Lawson, William B.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Potash, James B.; Scheftner, William A.; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M.; Castro, Victor M.; Churchill, Susanne E.; Fava, Maurizio; Gainer, Vivian S.; Gallagher, Patience J.; Goryachev, Sergey; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Perlis, Roy H.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Weilburg, Jeffrey B.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Preisig, Martin; Grabe, Hans J.; Nauck, Matthias; Schulz, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; Voelzke, Henry; Landen, Mikael; Lichtenstein, Paul; Magnusson, Patrik; Pedersen, Nancy; Viktorin, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of major depressive disorder (MDD) have met with limited success. We sought to increase statistical power to detect disease loci by conducting a GWAS mega-analysis for MDD. In the MDD discovery phase, we analyzed more than 1.2 million autosomal and X chro

  16. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, Eli A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Costenbader, Karen H.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; De Jager, Philip L.; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T.; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Reid, David M.; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P.; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Toes, Rene E. M.; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    To identify new genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody-positive individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 rheum

  17. Methods for meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A limitation of many genome-wide association studies (GWA) in animal breeding is that there are many loci with small effect sizes; thus, larger sample sizes (N) are required to guarantee suitable power of detection. For increasing N, results from different GWA can be combined in a meta-analysis (MA-...

  18. Meta-analysis of genome wide association studies for pork quality traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given the importance of pork quality in the meat processing industry, genome-wide association studies were performed for eight meat quality traits and also, a meta-analysis (MA) of GWA was implemented combining independent results from pig populations. Data from three pig datasets (USMARC, Commercia...

  19. Imputation-based analysis of association studies: candidate regions and quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Servin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new framework for the analysis of association studies, designed to allow untyped variants to be more effectively and directly tested for association with a phenotype. The idea is to combine knowledge on patterns of correlation among SNPs (e.g., from the International HapMap project or resequencing data in a candidate region of interest with genotype data at tag SNPs collected on a phenotyped study sample, to estimate ("impute" unmeasured genotypes, and then assess association between the phenotype and these estimated genotypes. Compared with standard single-SNP tests, this approach results in increased power to detect association, even in cases in which the causal variant is typed, with the greatest gain occurring when multiple causal variants are present. It also provides more interpretable explanations for observed associations, including assessing, for each SNP, the strength of the evidence that it (rather than another correlated SNP is causal. Although we focus on association studies with quantitative phenotype and a relatively restricted region (e.g., a candidate gene, the framework is applicable and computationally practical for whole genome association studies. Methods described here are implemented in a software package, Bim-Bam, available from the Stephens Lab website http://stephenslab.uchicago.edu/software.html.

  20. Higher Caffeinated Coffee Intake Is Associated with Reduced Malignant Melanoma Risk: A Meta-Analysis Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Liu

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies have determined the associations between coffee intake level and skin cancer risk; however, the results were not yet conclusive. Herein, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the cohort and case-control studies for the association between coffee intake level and malignant melanoma (MM risk.Studies were identified through searching the PubMed and MEDLINE databases (to November, 2015. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled under the random-effects model.Two case-control studies (846 MM patients and 843 controls and five cohort studies (including 844,246 participants and 5,737 MM cases were identified. For caffeinated coffee, the pooled relative risk (RR of MM was 0.81 [95% confidential interval (95% CI = 0.68-0.97; P-value for Q-test = 0.003; I2 = 63.5%] for those with highest versus lowest quantity of intake. In the dose-response analysis, the RR of MM was 0.955 (95% CI = 0.912-0.999 for per 1 cup/day increment of caffeinated coffee consumption and linearity dose-response association was found (P-value for nonlinearity = 0.326. Strikingly, no significant association was found between the decaffeinated coffee intake level and MM risk (pooled RR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.81-1.05; P-value for Q-test = 0.967; I2 = 0%; highest versus lowest quantity of intake.This meta-analysis suggested that caffeinated coffee might have chemo-preventive effects against MM but not decaffeinated coffee. However, larger prospective studies and the intervention studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  1. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Eli A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody positive RA cases and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 RA cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 novel RA risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P

  2. Association factor analysis between osteoporosis with cerebral artery disease: The STROBE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, Bora; Im, Soo Bin

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical association factors between osteoporosis and cerebral artery disease in Korean population. Two hundred nineteen postmenopausal women and men undergoing cerebral computed tomography angiography were enrolled in this study to evaluate the cerebral artery disease by cross-sectional study. Cerebral artery disease was diagnosed if there was narrowing of 50% higher diameter in one or more cerebral vessel artery or presence of vascular calcification. History of osteoporotic fracture was assessed using medical record, and radiographic data such as simple radiography, MRI, and bone scan. Bone mineral density was checked by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We reviewed clinical characteristics in all patients and also performed subgroup analysis for total or extracranial/ intracranial cerebral artery disease group retrospectively. We performed statistical analysis by means of chi-square test or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test or Wilcoxon's rank sum test for continuous variables. We also used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the factors associated with the prevalence of cerebral artery disease. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. All statistical analyses were performed using R (version 3.1.3; The R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) and SPSS (version 14.0; SPSS, Inc, Chicago, Ill, USA). Of the 219 patients, 142 had cerebral artery disease. All vertebral fracture was observed in 29 (13.24%) patients. There was significant difference in hip fracture according to the presence or absence of cerebral artery disease. In logistic regression analysis, osteoporotic hip fracture was significantly associated with extracranial cerebral artery disease after adjusting for multiple risk factors. Females with osteoporotic hip fracture were associated with total calcified cerebral artery

  3. Pathway analysis for genome-wide association study of lung cancer in Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruyang Zhang

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified a number of genetic variants associated with lung cancer risk. However, these loci explain only a small fraction of lung cancer hereditability and other variants with weak effect may be lost in the GWAS approach due to the stringent significance level after multiple comparison correction. In this study, in order to identify important pathways involving the lung carcinogenesis, we performed a two-stage pathway analysis in GWAS of lung cancer in Han Chinese using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA method. Predefined pathways by BioCarta and KEGG databases were systematically evaluated on Nanjing study (Discovery stage: 1,473 cases and 1,962 controls and the suggestive pathways were further to be validated in Beijing study (Replication stage: 858 cases and 1,115 controls. We found that four pathways (achPathway, metPathway, At1rPathway and rac1Pathway were consistently significant in both studies and the P values for combined dataset were 0.012, 0.010, 0.022 and 0.005 respectively. These results were stable after sensitivity analysis based on gene definition and gene overlaps between pathways. These findings may provide new insights into the etiology of lung cancer.

  4. Methods for meta-analysis in genetic association studies: a review of their potential and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavvoura, Fotini K; Ioannidis, John P A

    2008-02-01

    Meta-analysis offers the opportunity to combine evidence from retrospectively accumulated or prospectively generated data. Meta-analyses may provide summary estimates and can help in detecting and addressing potential inconsistency between the combined datasets. Application of meta-analysis in genetic associations presents considerable potential and several pitfalls. In this review, we present basic principles of meta-analytic methods, adapted for human genome epidemiology. We describe issues that arise in the retrospective or the prospective collection of relevant data through various sources, common traps to consider in the appraisal of evidence and potential biases that may interfere. We describe the relative merits and caveats for common methods used to trace inconsistency across studies along with possible reasons for non-replication of proposed associations. Different statistical models may be employed to combine data and some common misconceptions may arise in the process. Several meta-analysis diagnostics are often applied or misapplied in the literature, and we comment on their use and limitations. An alternative to overcome limitations arising from retrospective combination of data from published studies is to create networks of research teams working in the same field and perform collaborative meta-analyses of individual participant data, ideally on a prospective basis. We discuss the advantages and the challenges inherent in such collaborative approaches. Meta-analysis can be a useful tool in dissecting the genetics of complex diseases and traits, provided its methods are properly applied and interpreted.

  5. Insights into pancreatic cancer etiology from pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. and the etiology of this highly lethal disease has not been well defined. To identify genetic susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer, we conducted pathway analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS data in 3,141 pancreatic cancer patients and 3,367 controls with European ancestry.Using the gene set ridge regression in association studies (GRASS method, we analyzed 197 pathways identified from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. We used the logistic kernel machine (LKM test to identify major contributing genes to each pathway. We conducted functional enrichment analysis of the most significant genes (P<0.01 using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID.Two pathways were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons (P<0.00025 and in replication testing: neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, (Ps<0.00002, and the olfactory transduction pathway (P = 0.0001. LKM test identified four genes that were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer after Bonferroni correction (P<1×10(-5: ABO, HNF1A, OR13C4, and SHH. Functional enrichment analysis using DAVID consistently found the G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway (including both neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction and olfactory transduction pathways to be the most significant pathway for pancreatic cancer risk in this study population.These novel findings provide new perspectives on genetic susceptibility to and molecular mechanisms of pancreatic cancer.

  6. MetaSeq: privacy preserving meta-analysis of sequencing-based association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Angad Pal; Zafer, Samreen; Pe'er, Itsik

    2013-01-01

    Human genetics recently transitioned from GWAS to studies based on NGS data. For GWAS, small effects dictated large sample sizes, typically made possible through meta-analysis by exchanging summary statistics across consortia. NGS studies groupwise-test for association of multiple potentially-causal alleles along each gene. They are subject to similar power constraints and therefore likely to resort to meta-analysis as well. The problem arises when considering privacy of the genetic information during the data-exchange process. Many scoring schemes for NGS association rely on the frequency of each variant thus requiring the exchange of identity of the sequenced variant. As such variants are often rare, potentially revealing the identity of their carriers and jeopardizing privacy. We have thus developed MetaSeq, a protocol for meta-analysis of genome-wide sequencing data by multiple collaborating parties, scoring association for rare variants pooled per gene across all parties. We tackle the challenge of tallying frequency counts of rare, sequenced alleles, for metaanalysis of sequencing data without disclosing the allele identity and counts, thereby protecting sample identity. This apparent paradoxical exchange of information is achieved through cryptographic means. The key idea is that parties encrypt identity of genes and variants. When they transfer information about frequency counts in cases and controls, the exchanged data does not convey the identity of a mutation and therefore does not expose carrier identity. The exchange relies on a 3rd party, trusted to follow the protocol although not trusted to learn about the raw data. We show applicability of this method to publicly available exome-sequencing data from multiple studies, simulating phenotypic information for powerful meta-analysis. The MetaSeq software is publicly available as open source.

  7. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Eli A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke JH; Costenbader, Karen H.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; De Jager, Phillip L.; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T.; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; Reid, David M.; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P.; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Riel, Piet LCM; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Toes, Rene E. M.; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    To identify novel genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody positive RA cases and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 RA cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 novel RA risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P<5×10−8) in analysis of all 41,282 samples. The associated SNPs are near genes of known immune function, including IL6ST, SPRED2, RBPJ, CCR6, IRF5, and PXK. We also refined the risk alleles at two established RA risk loci (IL2RA and CCL21) and confirmed the association at AFF3. These new associations bring the total number of confirmed RA risk loci to 31 among individuals of European ancestry. An additional 11 SNPs replicated at P<0.05, many of which are validated autoimmune risk alleles, suggesting that most represent bona fide RA risk alleles. PMID:20453842

  8. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L;

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  9. CONAN: copy number variation analysis software for genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichmann Heinz-Erich

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs revolutionized our perception of the genetic regulation of complex traits and diseases. Copy number variations (CNVs promise to shed additional light on the genetic basis of monogenic as well as complex diseases and phenotypes. Indeed, the number of detected associations between CNVs and certain phenotypes are constantly increasing. However, while several software packages support the determination of CNVs from SNP chip data, the downstream statistical inference of CNV-phenotype associations is still subject to complicated and inefficient in-house solutions, thus strongly limiting the performance of GWAS based on CNVs. Results CONAN is a freely available client-server software solution which provides an intuitive graphical user interface for categorizing, analyzing and associating CNVs with phenotypes. Moreover, CONAN assists the evaluation process by visualizing detected associations via Manhattan plots in order to enable a rapid identification of genome-wide significant CNV regions. Various file formats including the information on CNVs in population samples are supported as input data. Conclusions CONAN facilitates the performance of GWAS based on CNVs and the visual analysis of calculated results. CONAN provides a rapid, valid and straightforward software solution to identify genetic variation underlying the 'missing' heritability for complex traits that remains unexplained by recent GWAS. The freely available software can be downloaded at http://genepi-conan.i-med.ac.at.

  10. Capturing the spectrum of interaction effects in genetic association studies by simulated evaporative cooling network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A McKinney

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human genetic studies of several disorders suggests that interactions between alleles at multiple genes play an important role in influencing phenotypic expression. Analytical methods for identifying Mendelian disease genes are not appropriate when applied to common multigenic diseases, because such methods investigate association with the phenotype only one genetic locus at a time. New strategies are needed that can capture the spectrum of genetic effects, from Mendelian to multifactorial epistasis. Random Forests (RF and Relief-F are two powerful machine-learning methods that have been studied as filters for genetic case-control data due to their ability to account for the context of alleles at multiple genes when scoring the relevance of individual genetic variants to the phenotype. However, when variants interact strongly, the independence assumption of RF in the tree node-splitting criterion leads to diminished importance scores for relevant variants. Relief-F, on the other hand, was designed to detect strong interactions but is sensitive to large backgrounds of variants that are irrelevant to classification of the phenotype, which is an acute problem in genome-wide association studies. To overcome the weaknesses of these data mining approaches, we develop Evaporative Cooling (EC feature selection, a flexible machine learning method that can integrate multiple importance scores while removing irrelevant genetic variants. To characterize detailed interactions, we construct a genetic-association interaction network (GAIN, whose edges quantify the synergy between variants with respect to the phenotype. We use simulation analysis to show that EC is able to identify a wide range of interaction effects in genetic association data. We apply the EC filter to a smallpox vaccine cohort study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and infer a GAIN for a collection of SNPs associated with adverse events. Our results suggest an important

  11. A Method for Gene-Based Pathway Analysis Using Genomewide Association Study Summary Statistics Reveals Nine New Type 1 Diabetes Associations

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This is the final version. It was first published by Wiley at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/gepi.21853/abstract. Pathway analysis can complement point-wise single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in exploring genomewide association study (GWAS) data to identify specific disease-associated genes that can be candidate causal genes. We propose a straightforward methodology that can be used for conducting a gene-based pathway analysis using summary GWAS statistics in combina...

  12. Moving towards system genetics through multiple trait analysis in genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eShriner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Association studies are a staple of genotype-phenotype mapping studies, whether they are based on single markers, haplotypes, candidate genes, genome-wide genotypes, or whole genome sequences. Although genetic epidemiological studies typically contain data collected on multiple traits which themselves are often correlated, most analyses have been performed on single traits. Here, I review several methods that have been developed to perform multiple trait analysis. These methods range from traditional multivariate models for systems of equations to recently developed graphical approaches based on network theory. The application of network theory to genetics is termed systems genetics and has the potential to address long-standing questions in genetics about complex processes such as coordinate regulation, homeostasis, and pleiotropy.

  13. Association between anxiety and hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yu Pan,1,2,* Wenpeng Cai,1,* Qi Cheng,3,* Wei Dong,1 Ting An,4 Jin Yan1 1Department of Psychology and Mental Health, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 2Department of Psychology, Peoples Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, 3Department of Child and Adolescent Behavioral Medicine, The 102 Hospital of PLA, Changzhou, 4Department of Internal Medicine, The PLA Second Artillery Force General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Epidemiological studies have repeatedly investigated the association between anxiety and hypertension. However, the results have been inconsistent. This study aimed to summarize the current evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies that evaluated this association. Methods: Seven common databases were searched for articles published up to November 2014. Cross-sectional and prospective studies that reported an association between the two conditions in adults were included. Data on prevalence, incidence, unadjusted or adjusted odds ratios or hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were extracted or calculated by the authors. The pooled odds ratio was calculated separately for cross-sectional and prospective studies using random-effects models. The Q test and I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. A funnel plot and modified Egger linear regression test were used to estimate publication bias. Results: The search yielded 13 cross-sectional studies (n=151,389, and the final pooled odds ratio was 1.18 (95% CI 1.02–1.37; PQ<0.001; I2=84.9%. Eight prospective studies with a total sample size of 80,146 and 2,394 hypertension case subjects, and the pooled adjusted hazard ratio was 1.55 (95% CI 1.24–1.94; PQ<0.001; I2=84.6%. The meta-regression showed that location, diagnostic criteria for anxiety, age, sex, sample size, year of publication, quality, and years of follow-up (for prospective study were not

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otowa, Takeshi; Hek, Karin; Lee, Minyoung; Byrne, Enda M.; Mirza, Saira S.; Nivard, Michel G.; Bigdeli, Timothy; Aggen, Steven H.; Adkins, Daniel; Wolen, Aaron; Fanous, Ayman; Keller, Matthew C.; Castelao, Enrique; Kutalik, Zoltan; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Homuth, Georg; Nauck, Matthias; Teumer, Alexander; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Direk, Nese; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Henders, Anjali K.; Medland, Sarah E.; Gordon, Scott; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Pergadia, Michelle; van der Most, Peter J.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van Oort, Floor V.A.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Preisig, Martin; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Boomsma, Dorret; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant; Maher, Brion S.; van den Oord, Edwin J.; Wray, Naomi R.; Tiemeier, Henning; Hettema, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, namely generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and phobias, are common, etiologically complex conditions with a partially genetic basis. Despite differing on diagnostic definitions based upon clinical presentation, anxiety disorders likely represent various expressions of an underlying common diathesis of abnormal regulation of basic threat-response systems. We conducted genome-wide association analyses in nine samples of European ancestry from seven large, independent studies. To identify genetic variants contributing to genetic susceptibility shared across interview-generated DSM-based anxiety disorders, we applied two phenotypic approaches: (1) comparisons between categorical anxiety disorder cases and super-normal controls, and (2) quantitative phenotypic factor scores derived from a multivariate analysis combining information across the clinical phenotypes. We used logistic and linear regression, respectively, to analyze the association between these phenotypes and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms. Meta-analysis for each phenotype combined results across the nine samples for over 18 000 unrelated individuals. Each meta-analysis identified a different genome-wide significant region, with the following markers showing the strongest association: for case-control contrasts, rs1709393 located in an uncharacterized non-coding RNA locus on chromosomal band 3q12.3 (P=1.65×10−8); for factor scores, rs1067327 within CAMKMT encoding the calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase on chromosomal band 2p21 (P=2.86×10−9). Independent replication and further exploration of these findings are needed to more fully understand the role of these variants in risk and expression of anxiety disorders. PMID:26754954

  15. Implementing meta-analysis from genome-wide association studies for pork quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal Rubio, Y L; Gualdrón Duarte, J L; Bates, R O; Ernst, C W; Nonneman, D; Rohrer, G A; King, D A; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Cantet, R J C; Steibel, J P

    2015-12-01

    Pork quality plays an important role in the meat processing industry. Thus, different methodologies have been implemented to elucidate the genetic architecture of traits affecting meat quality. One of the most common and widely used approaches is to perform genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, a limitation of many GWA in animal breeding is the limited power due to small sample sizes in animal populations. One alternative is to implement a meta-analysis of GWA (MA-GWA) combining results from independent association studies. The objective of this study was to identify significant genomic regions associated with meat quality traits by performing MA-GWA for 8 different traits in 3 independent pig populations. Results from MA-GWA were used to search for genes possibly associated with the set of evaluated traits. Data from 3 pig data sets (U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, commercial, and Michigan State University Pig Resource Population) were used. A MA was implemented by combining -scores derived for each SNP in every population and then weighting them using the inverse of estimated variance of SNP effects. A search for annotated genes retrieved genes previously reported as candidates for shear force (calpain-1 catalytic subunit [] and calpastatin []), as well as for ultimate pH, purge loss, and cook loss (protein kinase, AMP-activated, γ 3 noncatalytic subunit []). In addition, novel candidate genes were identified for intramuscular fat and cook loss (acyl-CoA synthetase family member 3 mitochondrial []) and for the objective measure of muscle redness, CIE a* (glycogen synthase 1, muscle [] and ferritin, light polypeptide []). Thus, implementation of MA-GWA allowed integration of results for economically relevant traits and identified novel genes to be tested as candidates for meat quality traits in pig populations.

  16. Incidence of Cancer in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Shang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine cancer incidence in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AASV derived from population-based cohort studies by means of meta-analysis.Relevant electronic databases were searched for studies characterizing the associated risk of overall malignancy in patients with AASV. Standardized incidence rates (SIRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to evaluate the strength of association. We tested for publication bias and heterogeneity and stratified for site-specific cancers.Six studies (n = 2,578 were eventually identified, of which six provided the SIR for overall malignancy, five reported the SIR for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, four for leukemia, five for bladder cancer, three for lymphoma, three for liver cancer, four for lung cancer, three for kidney cancer, four for prostate cancer, four for colon cancer and four for breast cancer. Overall, the pooled SIR of cancer in AASV patients was 1.74 (95%CI = 1.37-2.21, with moderate heterogeneity among these studies (I(2 = 65.8%, P = 0.012. In sub-analyses for site-specific cancers, NMSC, leukemia and bladder cancer were more frequently observed in patients with AASV with SIR of 5.18 (95%CI = 3.47-7.73, 4.89 (95%CI = 2.93-8.16 and 3.84 (95%CI = 2.72-5.42 respectively. There was no significant increase in the risk of kidney cancer (SIR = 2.12, 95%CI = 0.66-6.85, prostate cancer (SIR = 1.45, 95%CI = 0.87-2.42, colon cancer (SIR = 1.26, 95%CI = 0.70-2.27, and breast cancer (SIR = 0.95, 95%CI = 0.50-1.79. Among these site-specific cancers, only NMSC showed moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 55.8%, P = 0.06. No publication bias was found by using the Begg's test and Egger's test.This meta-analysis shows that AASV patients treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYC are at increased risk of late-occurring malignancies, particularly of the NMSC, leukemia and bladder cancer. However, there is no significant association between AASV and kidney cancer, prostate cancer

  17. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Camp, Nicola J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S.; Smedby, Karin E.; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S.; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R.; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M.; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Weiner, George J.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K.; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Strom, Sara S.; Leis, Jose F.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Caporaso, Neil E.; Norman, Aaron D.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María- Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Travis, Ruth C.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E.; Snowden, John A.; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10−11), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10−8) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10−8), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10−11) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10−7) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10−8) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10−7). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  18. Analysis of Case-Control Association Studies: SNPs, Imputation and Haplotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2009-11-01

    Although prospective logistic regression is the standard method of analysis for case-control data, it has been recently noted that in genetic epidemiologic studies one can use the "retrospective" likelihood to gain major power by incorporating various population genetics model assumptions such as Hardy-Weinberg-Equilibrium (HWE), gene-gene and gene-environment independence. In this article we review these modern methods and contrast them with the more classical approaches through two types of applications (i) association tests for typed and untyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (ii) estimation of haplotype effects and haplotype-environment interactions in the presence of haplotype-phase ambiguity. We provide novel insights to existing methods by construction of various score-tests and pseudo-likelihoods. In addition, we describe a novel two-stage method for analysis of untyped SNPs that can use any flexible external algorithm for genotype imputation followed by a powerful association test based on the retrospective likelihood. We illustrate applications of the methods using simulated and real data. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2009.

  19. Quantitative analysis of torrential rainfall associated with typhoon landfall: A case study of typhoon Haitang (2005)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caijun Yue

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of torrential rainfall associated with typhoon Haitang (2005) is carried out using a modified moist ageostrophic Q vector and data from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulation.Four major factors determining the ascending motion associated with torrential rainfall have been studied:large-scale and convective condensational heating,topographic lifting and friction.The results show that the convective condensational heating plays a major role in the torrential rainfall process,and the large-scale condensational heating is secondary before the landfall of typhoon Haitang,and vice versa after the landfall.The topographic lifting affects the formation of rainfall,whereas the topographic friction has important impacts on torrential rainfall after the landfall.The rainfall amounts forced by the topographic friction and lifting have similar horizontal distributions,but the magnitudes of the former are 2-3 times larger than those of the latter.The rainfall amounts forced by topography (lifting and friction) and modified moist ageostrophic Q vector have different horizontal distributions,and the magnitudes of the former are 2-5 times larger than those of the latter.Synthetic analysis shows that the typhoon rainfall may be motivated by modified moist ageostrophic Q vector and enhanced further by the topographic effects.

  20. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of follicular lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skibola Christine F

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma represents a diverse group of hematological malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL is one of the most common subtypes. Family and epidemiological studies suggest an important genetic role in the etiology of FL. In recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS of FL, several genetic susceptibility loci have been identified on chromosome 6p21.33 (rs6457327 and 6p21.32 (rs10484561, rs2647012 in the human leukocyte antigen class I and class II regions. To identify new genetic variants and further elucidate the genetic basis of FL, a meta-analysis was performed of the top 1000 SNPs associated with FL risk from two GWAS in the US, Denmark and Sweden (592 cases, 1541 controls, with independent validation in 107 cases and 681 controls. Results rs9275517 and rs3117222 in the HLA class II region were validated and inversely associated with FL risk (rs9275517: OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.55-0.73, p = 4.03 × 10-11; rs3117222: OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.57-0.77, p = 1.45 × 10-7. rs9275517, which is in high linkage disequilibrium with rs2647012 (r2 = 0.9, was no longer associated with FL after conditioning on rs2647012. The rs3117222 association was independent of established FL SNPs, but not of the HLA-DPB1*0301 allele. Using publicly available gene expression profiles with matching genotype information, we found that rs3117222 also was significantly correlated with increased HLA-DPB1 expression. Conclusions By performing a meta-analysis of two GWAS of FL, we further validated the relevance of HLA-DPB1*0301 as a protective allele in the pathogenesis of FL. Moreover, the protective rs3117222 A allele correlated with increased levels of HLA-DPB1, suggesting a possible disease mechanism involving HLA-DPB1 expression regulation. Our results add further support to the major role of HLA genetic variation in the pathogenesis of FL.

  1. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS inc...

  2. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; den Heijer, Martin; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Doerr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R.; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O'Connell, Jeff; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Campbell, Harry; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Muenzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne B.; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Voelker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian; Dorr, M.; Munzel, T.; Volker, U.

    2012-01-01

    Background-Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts.

  3. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murabito, Joanne M; White, Charles C; Kavousi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based coh...

  4. Common genetic variation near the phospholamban gene is associated with cardiac repolarisation : Meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. Nolte (Ilja); C. Wallace (Chris); S.J. Newhouse (Stephen); D. Waggott (Daryl); J. Fu (Jingyuan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); R. Gwilliam (Rhian); S. Demissie (Serkalem); I. Savelieva (Irina); D. Zheng (Dongling); C. Dalageorgou (Chrysoula); M. Farrall (Martin); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); J. Connell (John); M.J. Brown (Morris); A. Dominiczak (Anna); M. Lathrop (Mark); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); L.V. Wain (Louise); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); K. Rice (Kenneth); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); A. Pfeufer (Arne); S. Sanna (Serena); D.E. Arking (Dan); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); T.D. Spector (Tim); N.D. Carter (Nicholas); S. Jeffery (Steve); M. Tobin (Martin); M. Caulfield (Mark); H. Snieder (Harold); A.D. Paterson (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); Y. Jamshidi (Yalda)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify loci affecting the electrocardiographic QT interval, a measure of cardiac repolarisation associated with risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, we conducted a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) including 3,558 subjects from the Tw

  5. Common Genetic Variation Near the Phospholamban Gene Is Associated with Cardiac Repolarisation : Meta-Analysis of Three Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, Ilja M.; Wallace, Chris; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Waggott, Daryl; Fu, Jingyuan; Soranzo, Nicole; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panos; Savelieva, Irina; Zheng, Dongling; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Farrall, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J.; Connell, John; Brown, Morris; Dominiczak, Anna; Lathrop, Mark; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Wain, Louise V.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Rice, Kenneth; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Pfeufer, Arne; Sanna, Serena; Arking, Dan E.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Spector, Tim D.; Carter, Nicholas D.; Jeffery, Steve; Tobin, Martin; Caulfield, Mark; Snieder, Harold; Paterson, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Jamshidi, Yalda

    2009-01-01

    To identify loci affecting the electrocardiographic QT interval, a measure of cardiac repolarisation associated with risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, we conducted a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) including 3,558 subjects from the TwinsUK and BR

  6. SNP-based pathway enrichment analysis for genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkin Steven G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently we have witnessed a surge of interest in using genome-wide association studies (GWAS to discover the genetic basis of complex diseases. Many genetic variations, mostly in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, have been identified in a wide spectrum of diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and psychiatric diseases. A common theme arising from these studies is that the genetic variations discovered by GWAS can only explain a small fraction of the genetic risks associated with the complex diseases. New strategies and statistical approaches are needed to address this lack of explanation. One such approach is the pathway analysis, which considers the genetic variations underlying a biological pathway, rather than separately as in the traditional GWAS studies. A critical challenge in the pathway analysis is how to combine evidences of association over multiple SNPs within a gene and multiple genes within a pathway. Most current methods choose the most significant SNP from each gene as a representative, ignoring the joint action of multiple SNPs within a gene. This approach leads to preferential identification of genes with a greater number of SNPs. Results We describe a SNP-based pathway enrichment method for GWAS studies. The method consists of the following two main steps: 1 for a given pathway, using an adaptive truncated product statistic to identify all representative (potentially more than one SNPs of each gene, calculating the average number of representative SNPs for the genes, then re-selecting the representative SNPs of genes in the pathway based on this number; and 2 ranking all selected SNPs by the significance of their statistical association with a trait of interest, and testing if the set of SNPs from a particular pathway is significantly enriched with high ranks using a weighted Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We applied our method to two large genetically distinct GWAS data sets of schizophrenia, one

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies eight new loci for type 2 diabetes in east Asians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng; Long, Jirong; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Sim, Xueling; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wu, Ying; Go, Min Jin; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Kwak, Soo Heon; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Yamamoto, Ken; Adair, Linda S.; Aung, Tin; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Gao, Yutang; Hu, Frank B.; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jeannette Jen-Mai; Lee, Nanette R.; Li, Yun; Liu, Jian Jun; Lu, Wei; Nakamura, Jiro; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Tay, Wan Ting; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wong, Tien Yin; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; So, Wing Yee; Ohnaka, Keizo; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Hara, Kazuo; Cho, Young Min; Cho, Nam H.; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Bao, Yuqian; Hedman, Asa K.; Morris, Andrew P.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Park, Kyong Soo; Jia, Weiping; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Lee, Jong-Young; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Teo, Yik Ying; Tai, E. Shyong; Shu, Xiao Ou; Mohlke, Karen L.; Kato, Norihiro; Han, Bok-Ghee; Seielstad, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in east Asian populations. We followed our stage 1 meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases with T2D and 11,865 controls) with a stage 2 in silico replication analysis (5

  8. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients f

  9. Statistical Analysis of Genetic Data in Twin Studies and Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, A.

    2007-01-01

    In studies in human genetics we want to answer questions such as: how important are genetic effects on a phenotype; what kind of action and interaction exists between gene products in the pathways between genotypes and phenotype; are the genetic effects on a phenotype consistent across sexes; do

  10. A case study on the identification of confounding factors for gene disease association analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu; Li, Lihua; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the expression of genes arises from a variety of sources. It is important to remove sources of variation between arrays of non-biological origin. Non-biological variation, caused by lurking confounding factors, usually attracts little attention, although it may substantially influence the expression profile of genes. In this study, we proposed a method which is able to identify the potential confounding factors and highlight the non-biological variations. We also developed methods and statistical tests to study the confounding factors and their influence on the homogeneity of microarray data, gene selection, and disease classification. We explored an ovarian cancer gene expression profile and showed that data batches and arraying conditions are two confounding factors. Their influence on the homogeneity of data, gene selection, and disease classification are statistically analyzed. Experiments showed that after normalization, their influences were removed. Comparative studies further showed that the data became more homogeneous and the classification quality was improved. This research demonstrated that identifying and reducing the impact of confounding factors is paramount in making sense of gene-disease association analysis.

  11. A meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies of survival to age 90 years or older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Anne B; Walter, Stefan; Lunetta, Kathryn L

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) may yield insights into longevity. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of GWAS in Caucasians from four prospective cohort studies: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart S...

  12. Genome-wide association studies of mri-defined brain infarcts: Meta-analysis from the charge consortium

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose-Previous studies examining genetic associations with MRI-defined brain infarct have yielded inconsistent findings. We investigated genetic variation underlying covert MRI infarct in persons without histories of transient ischemic attack or stroke. We performed meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of white participants in 6 studies comprising the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. Methods-Using 2.2 mi...

  13. P-value based analysis for shared controls design in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaykin, Dmitri V; Kozbur, Damian O

    2010-11-01

    An appealing genome-wide association study design compares one large control group against several disease samples. A pioneering study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium that employed such a design has identified multiple susceptibility regions, many of which have been independently replicated. While reusing a control sample provides effective utilization of data, it also creates correlation between association statistics across diseases. An observation of a large association statistic for one of the diseases may greatly increase chances of observing a spuriously large association for a different disease. Accounting for the correlation is also particularly important when screening for SNPs that might be involved in a set of diseases with overlapping etiology. We describe methods that correct association statistics for dependency due to shared controls, and we describe ways to obtain a measure of overall evidence and to combine association signals across multiple diseases. The methods we describe require no access to individual subject data, instead, they efficiently utilize information contained in P-values for association reported for individual diseases. P-value based combined tests for association are flexible and essentially as powerful as the approach based on aggregating the individual subject data.

  14. Oscillatory neuronal dynamics associated with manual acupuncture: a magnetoencephalography study using beamforming analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eAsghar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG enables non-invasive recording of neuronal activity, with reconstruction methods providing estimates of underlying brain source locations and oscillatory dynamics from externally recorded neuromagnetic fields. The aim of our study was to use MEG to determine the effect of manual acupuncture on neuronal oscillatory dynamics. A major problem in MEG investigations of manual acupuncture is the absence of onset times for each needle manipulation. Given that beamforming (spatial filtering analysis is not dependent upon stimulus-driven responses being phase-locked to stimulus onset, we postulated that beamforming could reveal source locations and induced changes in neuronal activity during manual acupuncture. In a beamformer analysis, a two-minute period of manual acupuncture needle manipulation delivered to the ipsilateral right LI-4 (Hegu acupoint was contrasted with a two-minute baseline period. We considered oscillatory power changes in the theta (4-8Hz, alpha (8-13Hz, beta (13-30Hz and gamma (30-100Hz frequency bands. We found significant decreases in beta band power in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus. In the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere, we found significant power decreases in beta and gamma frequency bands in only the superior frontal gyrus. No significant power modulations were found in theta and alpha bands. Our results indicate that beamforming is a useful analytical tool to reconstruct underlying neuronal activity associated with manual acupuncture. Our main finding was of beta power decreases in primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus, which opens up a line of future investigation regarding whether this contributes towards an underlying mechanism of acupuncture.

  15. Airborne asbestos exposures associated with gasket and packing replacement: a simulation study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madl, Amy K; Hollins, Dana M; Devlin, Kathryn D; Donovan, Ellen P; Dopart, Pamela J; Scott, Paul K; Perez, Angela L

    2014-08-01

    Exposures to airborne asbestos during the removal and installation of internal gaskets and packing associated with a valve overhaul were characterized and compared to published data according to different variables (e.g., product, equipment, task, tool, setting, duration). Personal breathing zone and area samples were collected during twelve events simulating gasket and packing replacement, clean-up and clothing handling. These samples were analyzed using PCM and TEM methods and PCM-equivalent (PCME) airborne asbestos concentrations were calculated. A meta-analysis was performed to compare these data with airborne asbestos concentrations measured in other studies involving gaskets and packing. Short-term mechanic and assistant airborne asbestos concentrations during valve work averaged 0.013f/cc and 0.008f/cc (PCME), respectively. Area samples averaged 0.008f/cc, 0.005f/cc, and 0.003f/cc (PCME) for center, bystander, and remote background, respectively. Assuming a tradesman conservatively performs 1-3 gasket and/or packing replacements daily, an average 8-h TWA was estimated to be 0.002-0.010f/cc (PCME). Combining these results in a meta-analysis of the published exposure data showed that the majority of airborne asbestos exposures during work with gaskets and packing fall within a consistent and low range. Significant differences in airborne concentrations were observed between power versus manual tools and removal versus installation tasks. Airborne asbestos concentrations resulting from gasket and packing work during a valve overhaul are consistent with historical exposure data on replacement of asbestos-containing gasket and packing materials involving multiple variables and, in nearly all plausible scenarios, result in average airborne asbestos concentrations below contemporaneous occupational exposure limits for asbestos.

  16. Association between alcohol consumption and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a meta-analysis of five observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Meng; Yu, Sufang; Dou, Jianrui; Jin, Wu; Cai, Xiang; Mao, Yiyang; Zhu, Daojian; Yang, Rumei

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between alcohol consumption and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Published literature on the association between alcohol consumption and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was retrieved from the PubMed and Embase databases. Two authors independently extracted the data. The quality of the identified studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed and publication bias was assessed. Five articles, including one cohort study and seven case-control studies, and a total of 431,943 participants, were identified. The odds ratio for the association between alcohol consumption and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was 0.57 (95 % confidence interval 0.51-0.64). Subgroup and sensitivity analyses confirmed the result. Evidence for publication bias was detected. Alcohol consumption reduced the risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis compared with non-drinking. Alcohol, therefore, has a potentially neuroprotective effect on the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  17. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neale, B.M.; Medland, S.E.; Ripke, S.; Asherson, P.; Franke, B.; Lesch, K.P.; Faraone, S.V.; Nguyen, T.T.; Schafer, H.; Holmans, P.; Daly, M.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Freitag, C.; Reif, A.; Renner, T.J.; Romanos, M.; Romanos, J.; Walitza, S.; Warnke, A.; Meyer, J.; Palmason, H.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Vasquez, A.A.; Lambregts-Rommelse, N.N.J.; Gill, M.; Anney, R.J.; Langely, K.; O'Donovan, M.; Williams, N.; Owen, M.; Thapar, A.; Kent, L.; Sergeant, J.A.; Roeyers, H.; Mick, E.; Biederman, J.; Doyle, A.; Smalley, S.; Loo, S.; Hakonarson, H.; Elia, J.; Todorov, A.; Miranda, A.; Mulas, F.; Ebstein, R.P.; Rothenberger, A.; Banaschewski, T.; Oades, R.D.; Sonuga-Barke, E.; McGough, J.; Nisenbaum, L.; Middleton, F.; Hu, X.; Nelson, S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded signifi

  18. Simultaneous analysis of all SNPs in genome-wide and re-sequencing association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive J Hoggart

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Testing one SNP at a time does not fully realise the potential of genome-wide association studies to identify multiple causal variants, which is a plausible scenario for many complex diseases. We show that simultaneous analysis of the entire set of SNPs from a genome-wide study to identify the subset that best predicts disease outcome is now feasible, thanks to developments in stochastic search methods. We used a Bayesian-inspired penalised maximum likelihood approach in which every SNP can be considered for additive, dominant, and recessive contributions to disease risk. Posterior mode estimates were obtained for regression coefficients that were each assigned a prior with a sharp mode at zero. A non-zero coefficient estimate was interpreted as corresponding to a significant SNP. We investigated two prior distributions and show that the normal-exponential-gamma prior leads to improved SNP selection in comparison with single-SNP tests. We also derived an explicit approximation for type-I error that avoids the need to use permutation procedures. As well as genome-wide analyses, our method is well-suited to fine mapping with very dense SNP sets obtained from re-sequencing and/or imputation. It can accommodate quantitative as well as case-control phenotypes, covariate adjustment, and can be extended to search for interactions. Here, we demonstrate the power and empirical type-I error of our approach using simulated case-control data sets of up to 500 K SNPs, a real genome-wide data set of 300 K SNPs, and a sequence-based dataset, each of which can be analysed in a few hours on a desktop workstation.

  19. On the analysis of genome-wide association studies in family-based designs: a universal, robust analysis approach and an application to four genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Won

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For genome-wide association studies in family-based designs, we propose a new, universally applicable approach. The new test statistic exploits all available information about the association, while, by virtue of its design, it maintains the same robustness against population admixture as traditional family-based approaches that are based exclusively on the within-family information. The approach is suitable for the analysis of almost any trait type, e.g. binary, continuous, time-to-onset, multivariate, etc., and combinations of those. We use simulation studies to verify all theoretically derived properties of the approach, estimate its power, and compare it with other standard approaches. We illustrate the practical implications of the new analysis method by an application to a lung-function phenotype, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 in 4 genome-wide association studies.

  20. The association between maternal dietary micronutrient intake and neonatal anthropometry - secondary analysis from the ROLO study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horan, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are necessary for fetal growth. However increasingly pregnant women are nutritionally replete and little is known about the effect of maternal micronutrient intakes on fetal adiposity in mothers with increased BMI. The aim of this study was to examine the association of maternal dietary micronutrient intake with neonatal size and adiposity in a cohort at risk of macrosomia.

  1. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies ten loci influencing allergic sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnelykke, Klaus; Matheson, Melanie C.; Pers, Tune H.; Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P.; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A.; Warrington, Nicole M.; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K.; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H.; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Duffy, David L.; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F.; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S.; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C.; Husemoen, Lise L.; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P.; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J.; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Knight, Julian C.; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J.; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (present in allergic sensitization) has a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the t

  2. Implementing Meta-analysis for genome-wide association studies of pork quality traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pork quality is a critical concern in the meat industry. Implementation of genome-wide association studies (GWA) allows identification of genomic regions that explain a substantial portion of the variation of relevant traits. It is also important to determine the consistency of results of GWA across...

  3. Implementing meta-analysis from genome-wide association studies for pork quality traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pork quality plays an important role in the meat processing industry, thus different methodologies have been implemented to elucidate the genetic architecture of traits affecting meat quality. One of the most common and widely used approaches is to perform genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Howe...

  4. Association of CD247 polymorphisms with rheumatoid arthritis: a replication study and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teruel

    Full Text Available Given the role of CD247 in the response of the T cells, its entailment in autoimmune diseases and in order to better clarify the role of this gene in RA susceptibility, we aimed to analyze CD247 gene variants previously associated with other autoimmune diseases (rs1052237, rs2056626 and rs864537 in a large independent European Caucasian population. However, no evidence of association was found for the analyzed CD247 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with RA and with the presence/absence of anti-cyclic citrullinated polypeptide. We performed a meta-analysis including previously published GWAS data from the rs864537 variant, revealing an overall genome-wide significant association between this CD247 SNP and RA with anti-CCP (OR = 0.90, CI 95% = 0.87-0.93, Poverall = 2.1×10(-10. Our results show for first time a GWAS-level association between this CD247 polymorphism and RA risk.

  5. Association of the 5HTR2A gene with suicidal behavior: CASE-control study and updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Castro Thelma Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polymorphism rs6313 (T102C has been associated with suicidal behavior in case–control and meta-analysis studies, but results and conclusions remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between T102C with suicidal behavior in a case–control study and, to assess the combined evidence – this case–control study and available data from other related studies – we carried out a meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a case–control study that included 161 patients with suicide attempts and 244 controls; we then performed a meta-analysis. The following models were evaluated in the meta-analysis: A C allele vs T allele; B T allele vs C allele; C Caucasian population, D Asian population, and E suicide attempters with schizophrenia. Results We found an association between attempted suicide and control participants for genotype (χ2=6.28, p=0.04, df=2 and allele (χ2=6.17, p=0.01, df=1, OR 1.48 95% IC: 1.08-2.03 frequencies in the case–control study. The meta-analysis, comprising 23 association studies (including the present one, showed that the rs6313 polymorphism is not associated with suicidal behavior for the following comparisons:T allele vs C allele (OR: 1.03; 95% CI 0.93-1.13; p(Z=0.44; C allele vs T allele: (OR:0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.08; p(Z=0.22; Caucasians (OR:1.09; 95% CI: 0.96-1.23, and Asians (OR:0.96; 95% CI: 0.84-1.09. Conclusion Our results showed association between the rs6313 (T102C polymorphism and suicidal behavior in the case–control study. However, the meta-analysis showed no evidence of association. Therefore, more studies are necessary to determine conclusively an association between T102C and suicidal behavior.

  6. Analysis of binary responses with outcome-specific misclassification probability in genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekaya R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Romdhane Rekaya,1–3 Shannon Smith,4 El Hamidi Hay,5 Nourhene Farhat,6 Samuel E Aggrey3,7 1Department of Animal and Dairy Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 2Department of Statistics, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, 3Institute of Bioinformatics, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 4Zoetis, Kalamazoo, MI, 5United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, 6Carolinas HealthCare System Blue Ridge, Morganton, NC, 7Department of Poultry Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA Abstract: Errors in the binary status of some response traits are frequent in human, animal, and plant applications. These error rates tend to differ between cases and controls because diagnostic and screening tests have different sensitivity and specificity. This increases the inaccuracies of classifying individuals into correct groups, giving rise to both false-positive and false-negative cases. The analysis of these noisy binary responses due to misclassification will undoubtedly reduce the statistical power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS. A threshold model that accommodates varying diagnostic errors between cases and controls was investigated. A simulation study was carried out where several binary data sets (case–control were generated with varying effects for the most influential single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and different diagnostic error rate for cases and controls. Each simulated data set consisted of 2000 individuals. Ignoring misclassification resulted in biased estimates of true influential SNP effects and inflated estimates for true noninfluential markers. A substantial reduction in bias and increase in accuracy ranging from 12% to 32% was observed when the misclassification procedure was invoked. In fact, the majority of influential SNPs that were not identified using the noisy data were captured using the

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Höhn, René; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Montgomery, Grant W; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Iglesias, Adriana I; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hauser, Michael A; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P; Spector, Timothy D; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L; Wolfs, Roger C W; Lemij, Hans G; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Jonas, Jost B; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Klaver, Caroline C W; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A; Lotery, Andrew J; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A B; Young, Terri L; Wiggs, Janey L; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R; Hewitt, Alex W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J

    2014-09-22

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important disease-related optic nerve parameter. In 21,094 individuals of European ancestry and 6,784 individuals of Asian ancestry, we identify 10 new loci associated with variation in VCDR. In a separate risk-score analysis of five case-control studies, Caucasians in the highest quintile have a 2.5-fold increased risk of primary open-angle glaucoma as compared with those in the lowest quintile. This study has more than doubled the known loci associated with optic disc cupping and will allow greater understanding of mechanisms involved in this common blinding condition.

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Höhn, René; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Montgomery, Grant W; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Iglesias, Adriana I; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hauser, Michael A; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P; Spector, Timothy D; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L; Wolfs, Roger C W; Lemij, Hans G; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Jonas, Jost B; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Klaver, Caroline C W; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A; Lotery, Andrew J; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A B; Young, Terri L; Wiggs, Janey L; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R; Hewitt, Alex W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important dise

  9. Power analysis for case–control association studies of samples with known family histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biao; Han, Younghun; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide case–control studies have been widely used to identify genetic variants that predispose to human diseases. Such studies are powerful in detecting common genetic variants with moderate effects, but quickly lose power as allele frequency and genotype relative risk decrease. Because patients with one or more affected relatives are more likely to inherit disease-predisposing alleles of a genetic disease than patients without family histories of the disease, sampling patients with affected relatives almost always increases the frequency of disease predisposing alleles in cases and improves the power of case–control association studies. This paper evaluates the power of case–control studies that select cases and/or controls according to their family histories of disease. Our results showed that this study design can dramatically increase the power of a case–control association study for a wide range of disease types. Because each additional affected relative of a patient reduces the required sample size roughly by a pair of case and control, inclusion of cases with affected relatives can dramatically decrease the required sample size and thus the cost of such studies. PMID:20383776

  10. PERSPECTIVES OF FACTORIAL ANALYSIS IN STUDYING ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN IMMUNE SYSTEM PARAMETERS AND CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS IN GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Solovyeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  When studying functional features of immune system, a lot of quantitative and functional parameters are determined. A multifactorial analysis allows of detecting interdependent immunological parameters and defining them as significant factors. In present study, four factors are revealed, which are associated with certain clinical characteristics of gastric cancer (tumor invasion depth, lymph node status and distant metastases, tumor stage, histological type. The data obtained are of interest, with regard of systemic approach to functional studies of immune functions.

  11. Retrospective analysis of main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human complex traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology of multifactorial human diseases involves complex interactions between numerous environmental factors and alleles of many genes. Efficient statistical tools are demanded in identifying the genetic and environmental variants that affect the risk of disease development....... This paper introduces a retrospective polytomous logistic regression model to measure both the main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human discrete and continuous complex traits. In this model, combinations of genotypes at two interacting loci or of environmental exposure...... regression model can be used as a convenient tool for assessing both main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human multifactorial diseases involving genetic and non-genetic factors as well as categorical or continuous traits....

  12. Association of Body Mass Index with Depression, Anxiety and Suicide-An Instrumental Variable Analysis of the HUNT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Håkon Bjørngaard

    Full Text Available While high body mass index is associated with an increased risk of depression and anxiety, cumulative evidence indicates that it is a protective factor for suicide. The associations from conventional observational studies of body mass index with mental health outcomes are likely to be influenced by reverse causality or confounding by ill-health. In the present study, we investigated the associations between offspring body mass index and parental anxiety, depression and suicide in order to avoid problems with reverse causality and confounding by ill-health.We used data from 32,457 mother-offspring and 27,753 father-offspring pairs from the Norwegian HUNT-study. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and suicide death from national registers. Associations between offspring and own body mass index and symptoms of anxiety and depression and suicide mortality were estimated using logistic and Cox regression. Causal effect estimates were estimated with a two sample instrument variable approach using offspring body mass index as an instrument for parental body mass index.Both own and offspring body mass index were positively associated with depression, while the results did not indicate any substantial association between body mass index and anxiety. Although precision was low, suicide mortality was inversely associated with own body mass index and the results from the analysis using offspring body mass index supported these results. Adjusted odds ratios per standard deviation body mass index from the instrumental variable analysis were 1.22 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.43 for depression, 1.10 (95% CI: 0.95, 1.27 for anxiety, and the instrumental variable estimated hazard ratios for suicide was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.30, 1.63.The present study's results indicate that suicide mortality is inversely associated with body mass index. We also found support for a positive association between body mass index and depression, but not

  13. Pathway analysis for genome-wide association study of basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, a pathway-based approach has been developed to evaluate the cumulative contribution of the functionally related genes for genome-wide association studies (GWASs, which may help utilize GWAS data to a greater extent. METHODS: In this study, we applied this approach for the GWAS of basal cell carcinoma (BCC of the skin. We first conducted the BCC GWAS among 1,797 BCC cases and 5,197 controls in Caucasians with 740,760 genotyped SNPs. 115,688 SNPs were grouped into gene transcripts within 20 kb in distance and then into 174 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, 205 BioCarta pathways, as well as two positive control gene sets (pigmentation gene set and BCC risk gene set. The association of each pathway with BCC risk was evaluated using the weighted Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. One thousand permutations were conducted to assess the significance. RESULTS: Both of the positive control gene sets reached pathway p-values<0.05. Four other pathways were also significantly associated with BCC risk: the heparan sulfate biosynthesis pathway (p  =  0.007, false discovery rate, FDR  =  0.35, the mCalpain pathway (p  =  0.002, FDR  =  0.12, the Rho cell motility signaling pathway (p  =  0.011, FDR  =  0.30, and the nitric oxide pathway (p  =  0.022, FDR  =  0.42. CONCLUSION: We identified four pathways associated with BCC risk, which may offer new insights into the etiology of BCC upon further validation, and this approach may help identify potential biological pathways that might be missed by the standard GWAS approach.

  14. Genetic model selection in genome-wide association studies: robust methods and the use of meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagos, Pantelis G

    2013-06-01

    In genetic association studies (GAS) as well as in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the mode of inheritance (dominant, additive and recessive) is usually not known a priori. Assuming an incorrect mode of inheritance may lead to substantial loss of power, whereas on the other hand, testing all possible models may result in an increased type I error rate. The situation is even more complicated in the meta-analysis of GAS or GWAS, in which individual studies are synthesized to derive an overall estimate. Meta-analysis increases the power to detect weak genotype effects, but heterogeneity and incompatibility between the included studies complicate things further. In this review, we present a comprehensive summary of the statistical methods used for robust analysis and genetic model selection in GAS and GWAS. We then discuss the application of such methods in the context of meta-analysis. We describe the theoretical properties of the various methods and the foundations on which they are based. We also present the available software implementations of the described methods. Finally, since only few of the available robust methods have been applied in the meta-analysis setting, we present some simple extensions that allow robust meta-analysis of GAS and GWAS. Possible extensions and proposals for future work are also discussed.

  15. BCL9 and C9orf5 are associated with negative symptoms in schizophrenia: meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Xu

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a chronic and debilitating psychiatric condition affecting slightly more than 1% of the population worldwide and it is a multifactorial disorder with a high degree of heritability (80% based on family and twin studies. Increasing lines of evidence suggest intermediate phenotypes/endophenotypes are more associated with causes of the disease and are less genetically complex than the broader disease spectrum. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are attractive intermediate phenotypes based on their clinical and treatment response features. Therefore, our objective was to identify genetic variants underlying the negative symptoms of schizophrenia by analyzing two genome-wide association (GWA data sets consisting of a total of 1,774 European-American patients and 2,726 controls. Logistic regression analysis of negative symptoms as a binary trait (adjusted for age and sex was performed using PLINK. For meta-analysis of two datasets, the fixed-effect model in PLINK was applied. Through meta-analysis we identified 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with negative symptoms with p<5×10(-5. Especially we detected five SNPs in the first two genes/loci strongly associated with negative symptoms of schizophrenia (P(meta-analysis<6.22×10(-6, which included three SNPs in the BCL9 gene: rs583583 showed the strongest association at a P(meta-analysis of 6.00×10(-7 and two SNPs in the C9orf5 (the top SNP is rs643410 with a p = 1.29 ×10(-6. Through meta-analysis, we identified several additional negative symptoms associated genes (ST3GAL1, RNF144, CTNNA3 and ZNF385D. This is the first report of the common variants influencing negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These results provide direct evidence of using of negative symptoms as an intermediate phenotype to dissect the complex genetics of schizophrenia. However, additional studies are warranted to examine the underlying mechanisms of these disease-associated SNPs in these genes.

  16. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 39 studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The associations between vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk were comprehensively investigated to clarify issues that remain controversial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An electronic search was conducted of several databases, including PubMed, the Cochrane library, Web of Science, EMBASE, CBM and CNKI, for papers that describe the association between Fok1, poly-A repeat, Bsm1, Taq1 or Apa1 polymorphisms of the VDR gene and breast cancer risk. Summary odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated based on a fixed-effect model (FEM or random-effect model (REM, depending on the absence or presence of significant heterogeneity. A total of 39 studies met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of high-quality studies showed that the Fok1 polymorphism of the VDR gene was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (ff vs. Ff+FF, OR: 1.09, 95%CI: 1.02 to 1.16, p = 0.007. No significant associations were observed between the other polymorphisms and breast cancer risk. No positive results were detected by pooling the results of all relevant studies. CONCLUSION: A meta-analysis of high-quality studies demonstrated that the Fok1 polymorphism of the VDR gene was closely associated with breast cancer risk.

  17. Association between selenium intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Jianfeng; Liu, Xudong; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Guozhuan; Liang, Lishuang

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the association between the intake of selenium and risk of pancreatic cancer is still conflicting. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from epidemiological studies of selenium intake with the risk of pancreatic cancer. Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and Web of Knowledge to July 2016. The random-effect model was used. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias were conducted. Data from six studies including 1424 pancreatic cancer cases were used in this meta-analysis. Pooled results suggested that highest selenium intake amount compared with lowest amount was significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer [summary relative risk (RR)=0.659, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.489–0.889, I2=47.6%]. The associations were significant both in case–control studies [RR=0.618, 95%CI=0.399–0.956, I2=59.1%] and Americas [RR=0.570, 95%CI=0.357–0.909, I2=65.6%]. No publication bias was found. Our analysis suggested that the higher intake of selenium might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27623938

  18. Television viewing and incident cardiovascular disease: prospective associations and mediation analysis in the EPIC Norfolk Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien Wijndaele

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although television viewing time is detrimentally associated with intermediate cardiovascular risk factors, the relationship with incident total (i.e. combined fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD, non-fatal CVD and coronary heart disease is largely unknown. This study examined whether television viewing time is associated with these three outcomes, independently of physical activity energy expenditure and other confounding variables. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A population-based cohort of 12,608 men and women (aged 61.4±9.0, free from stroke, myocardial infarction and cancer at baseline in 1998-2000 were followed up until 2007 (6.9±1.9 years. Participants self-reported education, smoking, alcohol use, antihypertensive, lipid lowering and antidepressant medication, disease history, total energy intake, sleep duration, physical activity and television viewing. BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c were measured by standardized procedures; a clustered metabolic risk score was constructed. Every one hour/day increase in television viewing was associated with an increased hazard for total (HR = 1.06, 95%CI = 1.03-1.08; 2,620 cases, non-fatal CVD (HR = 1.06, 95%CI = 1.03-1.09; 2,134 cases, and coronary heart disease (HR = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.03-1.13; 940 cases, independent of gender, age, education, smoking, alcohol, medication, diabetes status, CVD family history, sleep duration and physical activity energy expenditure. Energy intake, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, HbA(1c and the clustered metabolic risk score only partially mediated these associations. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the most prevalent leisure time (sedentary behaviour, television viewing, independently contributes to increased CVD risk. Recommendations on reducing television viewing time should be considered.

  19. Common genetic variation near the phospholamban gene is associated with cardiac repolarisation: meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja M Nolte

    Full Text Available To identify loci affecting the electrocardiographic QT interval, a measure of cardiac repolarisation associated with risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, we conducted a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWAS including 3,558 subjects from the TwinsUK and BRIGHT cohorts in the UK and the DCCT/EDIC cohort from North America. Five loci were significantly associated with QT interval at P<1x10(-6. To validate these findings we performed an in silico comparison with data from two QT consortia: QTSCD (n = 15,842 and QTGEN (n = 13,685. Analysis confirmed the association between common variants near NOS1AP (P = 1.4x10(-83 and the phospholamban (PLN gene (P = 1.9x10(-29. The most associated SNP near NOS1AP (rs12143842 explains 0.82% variance; the SNP near PLN (rs11153730 explains 0.74% variance of QT interval duration. We found no evidence for interaction between these two SNPs (P = 0.99. PLN is a key regulator of cardiac diastolic function and is involved in regulating intracellular calcium cycling, it has only recently been identified as a susceptibility locus for QT interval. These data offer further mechanistic insights into genetic influence on the QT interval which may predispose to life threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.

  20. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies eight new loci for type 2 diabetes in east Asians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng;

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in east Asian populations. We followed our stage 1 meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases with T2D and 11,865 controls) with a stage 2 in silico replication analysis....... GLIS3, which is involved in pancreatic beta cell development and insulin gene expression, is known for its association with fasting glucose levels. The evidence of an association with T2D for PEPD and HNF4A has been shown in previous studies. KCNK16 may regulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion...... (5,843 cases and 4,574 controls) and a stage 3 de novo replication analysis (12,284 cases and 13,172 controls). The combined analysis identified eight new T2D loci reaching genome-wide significance, which mapped in or near GLIS3, PEPD, FITM2-R3HDML-HNF4A, KCNK16, MAEA, GCC1-PAX4, PSMD6 and ZFAND3...

  1. Analysis of Liquid Bead Microarray Antibody Assay Data for Epidemiologic Studies of Pathogen-Cancer Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombara, Danny V.; Hughes, James P.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Galloway, Denise A.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Potter, John D.; Manhart, Lisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Liquid bead microarray antibody (LBMA) assays are used to assess pathogen-cancer associations. However, studies analyze LBMA data differently, limiting comparability. Methods We generated 10,000 Monte Carlo-type simulations of log-normal antibody distributions (exposure) with 200 cases and 200 controls (outcome). We estimated type I error rates, statistical power, and bias associated with t-tests, logistic regression with a linear exposure and with the exposure dichotomized at 200 units, 400 units, the mean among controls plus two standard deviations, and the value corresponding to the optimal sensitivity and specificity. We also applied these models, and data visualizations (kernel density plots, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, predicted probability plots, and Q-Q plots), to two empirical datasets to assess the consistency of the exposure-outcome relationship. Results All strategies had acceptable type I error rates (0.03≤P≤0.048), except for the dichotomization according to optimal sensitivity and specificity, which had a type I error rate of 0.27. Among the remaining methods, logistic regression with a linear predictor (Power=1.00) and t-tests (Power=1.00) had the highest power to detect a mean difference of 1.0 MFI (median fluorescence intensity) on the log scale and were unbiased. Dichotomization methods upwardly biased the risk estimates. Conclusion These results indicate that logistic regression with linear predictors and unpaired t-tests are superior to logistic regression with dichotomized predictors for assessing disease associations with LBMA data. Logistic regression with continuous linear predictors and t-tests are preferable to commonly used LBMA dichotomization methods. PMID:26071614

  2. Meta-Analysis of the Association Between Whole and Refined Grain Consumption and Stroke Risk Based on Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianguo; Huang, Qingfeng; Shi, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Jian; Lan, Qing

    2016-10-01

    The association between whole and refined grain consumption and stroke risk remains unclear. A search using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed through February 29, 2016. Seven prospective studies with a total of 446 451 subjects and 5892 stroke events were included. The summary relative risk (SRR) of stroke for the high versus low consumption was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83-1.14) for total grains, 0.92 (95% CI = 0.72-1.17) for whole grains, and 0.99 (95% CI = 0.84-1.16) for refined grains. Diets rich in whole grains were inversely associated with ischemic stroke risk (SRR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.60-0.95). Our meta-analysis revealed that whole and refined grain consumption is not associated with total stroke risk; however, whole grain consumption is associated with reduced ischemic stroke risk.

  3. Evaluation of association of HNF1B variants with diverse cancers: collaborative analysis of data from 19 genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Elliott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have found type 2 diabetes-associated variants in the HNF1B gene to exhibit reciprocal associations with prostate cancer risk. We aimed to identify whether these variants may have an effect on cancer risk in general versus a specific effect on prostate cancer only.In a collaborative analysis, we collected data from GWAS of cancer phenotypes for the frequently reported variants of HNF1B, rs4430796 and rs7501939, which are in linkage disequilibrium (r(2 = 0.76, HapMap CEU. Overall, the analysis included 16 datasets on rs4430796 with 19,640 cancer cases and 21,929 controls; and 21 datasets on rs7501939 with 26,923 cases and 49,085 controls. Malignancies other than prostate cancer included colorectal, breast, lung and pancreatic cancers, and melanoma. Meta-analysis showed large between-dataset heterogeneity that was driven by different effects in prostate cancer and other cancers. The per-T2D-risk-allele odds ratios (95% confidence intervals for rs4430796 were 0.79 (0.76, 0.83] per G allele for prostate cancer (p<10(-15 for both; and 1.03 (0.99, 1.07 for all other cancers. Similarly for rs7501939 the per-T2D-risk-allele odds ratios (95% confidence intervals were 0.80 (0.77, 0.83 per T allele for prostate cancer (p<10(-15 for both; and 1.00 (0.97, 1.04 for all other cancers. No malignancy other than prostate cancer had a nominally statistically significant association.The examined HNF1B variants have a highly specific effect on prostate cancer risk with no apparent association with any of the other studied cancer types.

  4. Bayesian analysis of censored response data in family-based genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Greco M, Fabiola; Pattaro, Cristian; Minelli, Cosetta; Thompson, John R

    2016-09-01

    Biomarkers are subject to censoring whenever some measurements are not quantifiable given a laboratory detection limit. Methods for handling censoring have received less attention in genetic epidemiology, and censored data are still often replaced with a fixed value. We compared different strategies for handling a left-censored continuous biomarker in a family-based study, where the biomarker is tested for association with a genetic variant, S, adjusting for a covariate, X. Allowing different correlations between X and S, we compared simple substitution of censored observations with the detection limit followed by a linear mixed effect model (LMM), Bayesian model with noninformative priors, Tobit model with robust standard errors, the multiple imputation (MI) with and without S in the imputation followed by a LMM. Our comparison was based on real and simulated data in which 20% and 40% censoring were artificially induced. The complete data were also analyzed with a LMM. In the MICROS study, the Bayesian model gave results closer to those obtained with the complete data. In the simulations, simple substitution was always the most biased method, the Tobit approach gave the least biased estimates at all censoring levels and correlation values, the Bayesian model and both MI approaches gave slightly biased estimates but smaller root mean square errors. On the basis of these results the Bayesian approach is highly recommended for candidate gene studies; however, the computationally simpler Tobit and the MI without S are both good options for genome-wide studies.

  5. Goldsurfer2 (Gs2: A comprehensive tool for the analysis and visualization of genome wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Michael R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association (GWA studies are now being widely undertaken aiming to find the link between genetic variations and common diseases. Ideally, a well-powered GWA study will involve the measurement of hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in thousands of individuals. The sheer volume of data generated by these experiments creates very high analytical demands. There are a number of important steps during the analysis of such data, many of which may present severe bottlenecks. The data need to be imported and reviewed to perform initial quality control (QC before proceeding to association testing. Evaluation of results may involve further statistical analysis, such as permutation testing, or further QC of associated markers, for example, reviewing raw genotyping intensities. Finally significant associations need to be prioritised using functional and biological interpretation methods, browsing available biological annotation, pathway information and patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD. Results We have developed an interactive and user-friendly graphical application to be used in all steps in GWA projects from initial data QC and analysis to biological evaluation and validation of results. The program is implemented in Java and can be used on all platforms. Conclusion Very large data sets (e.g. 500 k markers and 5000 samples can be quality assessed, rapidly analysed and integrated with genomic sequence information. Candidate SNPs can be selected and functionally evaluated.

  6. Red and processed meat intake is associated with higher gastric cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcheng Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Red and processed meat was concluded as a limited-suggestive risk factor of gastric cancer by the World Cancer Research Fund. However, recent epidemiological studies have yielded inconclusive results. METHODS: We searched Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to April 2013 for both cohort and case-control studies which assessed the association between red and/or processed meat intake and gastric cancer risk. Study-specific relative risk estimates were polled by random-effect or fixed-effect models. RESULTS: Twelve cohort and thirty case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Significant associations were found between both red (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.22-1.73 and processed (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.26-1.65 meat intake and gastric cancer risk generally. Positive findings were also existed in the items of beef (RR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.57, bacon (RR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.17-1.61, ham (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.00-2.06, and sausage (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.16-1.52. When conducted by study design, the association was significant in case-control studies (RR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.33-1.99 but not in cohort studies (RR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.90-1.17 for red meat. Increased relative risks were seen in high-quality, adenocarcinoma, cardia and European-population studies for red meat. And most subgroup analysis confirmed the significant association between processed meat intake and gastric cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that consumption of red and/or processed meat contributes to increased gastric cancer risk. However, further investigation is needed to confirm the association, especially for red meat.

  7. Gene-based meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies implicates new loci involved in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägg, Sara; Ganna, Andrea; Van Der Laan, Sander W;

    2015-01-01

    ) approach to assign variants to genes and to calculate gene-based P-values based on simulations. The VEGAS method was applied to each cohort separately before a gene-based meta-analysis was performed. In Stage 1, two known (FTO and TMEM18) and six novel (PEX2, MTFR2, SSFA2, IARS2, CEP295 and TXNDC12) loci......To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 loci with single variants associated with body mass index (BMI). This approach may miss loci with high allelic heterogeneity; therefore, the aim of the present study was to use gene-based meta-analysis to identify regions...... with high allelic heterogeneity to discover additional obesity susceptibility loci. We included GWAS data from 123 865 individuals of European descent from 46 cohorts in Stage 1 and Metabochip data from additional 103 046 individuals from 43 cohorts in Stage 2, all within the Genetic Investigation...

  8. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarche...

  9. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Elks (Cathy); J.R.B. Perry (John); P. Sulem (Patrick); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); N. Franceschini (Nora); C. He (Chunyan); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); J.A. Visser (Jenny); E.M. Byrne (Enda); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); T. Esko (Tõnu); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); D.L. Koller (Daniel); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); P. Lin (Peng); M. Mangino (Massimo); M. Marongiu (Mara); P.F. McArdle (Patrick); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); L. Stolk (Lisette); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); J.H. Zhao; E. Albrecht (Eva); T. Corre (Tanguy); E. Ingelsson (Erik); C. Hayward (Caroline); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); S. Ulivi (Shelia); N. Warrington (Nicole); L. Zgaga (Lina); H. Alavere (Helene); N. Amin (Najaf); T. Aspelund (Thor); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I. Barroso (Inês); G. Berenson (Gerald); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); H. Blackburn (Hannah); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.E. Buring (Julie); F. Busonero; H. Campbell (Harry); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); W. Chen (Wei); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); P. d' Adamo (Pio); U. de Faire (Ulf); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Döring (Angela); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); T. Foroud (Tatiana); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Gasparini (Paolo); F. Geller (Frank); C. Gieger (Christian); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.S. Hall (Alistair); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); L. Ferreli (Liana); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Hofman (Albert); F.B. Hu (Frank); T. Illig (Thomas); M.R. Järvelin; A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D. Karasik (David); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); T.O. Kilpelänen (Tuomas); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Kraft (Peter); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); S. Li (Shengxu); J. Liu (Jianjun); D. Levy (Daniel); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Melbye (Mads); V. Mooser (Vincent); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M.A. Nalls (Michael); P. Navarro (Pau); M. Nelis (Mari); A.R. Ness (Andrew); K. Northstone (Kate); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.S. Plump (Andrew); A. Pouta (Anneli); E. Porcu (Eleonora); T. Rafnar (Thorunn); J.P. Rice (John); S.M. Ring (Susan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Sala (Cinzia); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S. Sanna (Serena); D. Schlessinger; N.J. Schork (Nicholas); A. Scuteri (Angelo); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); U. Sovio (Ulla); S.R. Srinivasan (Sathanur); D.P. Strachan (David); M.L. Tammesoo; E. Tikkanen (Emmi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); K. Tsui (Kim); L. Tryggvadottir (Laufey); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M. Uda (Manuela); R.M. van Dam (Rob); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); N.J. Wareham (Nick); D. Waterworth (Dawn); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.F. Wilson (James); A.F. Wright (Alan); L. Young (Lauren); G. Zhai (Guangju); W.V. Zhuang; L.J. Bierut (Laura); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H.A. Boyd (Heather); L. Crisponi (Laura); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M.J. Econs (Michael); T.B. Harris (Tamara); D. Hunter (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A. Metspalu (Andres); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); P.M. Ridker (Paul); T.D. Spector (Tim); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); K. Stefansson (Kari); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J. Murabito (Joanne); K. Ong (Ken); M.N. Weedon (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTo identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10 -60) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10 -33), we identified 30

  10. TATES: efficient multivariate genotype-phenotype analysis for genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie van der Sluis

    Full Text Available To date, the genome-wide association study (GWAS is the primary tool to identify genetic variants that cause phenotypic variation. As GWAS analyses are generally univariate in nature, multivariate phenotypic information is usually reduced to a single composite score. This practice often results in loss of statistical power to detect causal variants. Multivariate genotype-phenotype methods do exist but attain maximal power only in special circumstances. Here, we present a new multivariate method that we refer to as TATES (Trait-based Association Test that uses Extended Simes procedure, inspired by the GATES procedure proposed by Li et al (2011. For each component of a multivariate trait, TATES combines p-values obtained in standard univariate GWAS to acquire one trait-based p-value, while correcting for correlations between components. Extensive simulations, probing a wide variety of genotype-phenotype models, show that TATES's false positive rate is correct, and that TATES's statistical power to detect causal variants explaining 0.5% of the variance can be 2.5-9 times higher than the power of univariate tests based on composite scores and 1.5-2 times higher than the power of the standard MANOVA. Unlike other multivariate methods, TATES detects both genetic variants that are common to multiple phenotypes and genetic variants that are specific to a single phenotype, i.e. TATES provides a more complete view of the genetic architecture of complex traits. As the actual causal genotype-phenotype model is usually unknown and probably phenotypically and genetically complex, TATES, available as an open source program, constitutes a powerful new multivariate strategy that allows researchers to identify novel causal variants, while the complexity of traits is no longer a limiting factor.

  11. Pathway analysis of expression-related SNPs on genome-wide association study of basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Liang, Liming; De Vivo, Immaculata; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have primarily focused on the association between individual genetic markers and risk of disease. We applied a novel approach that integrates skin expression-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNPs) and pathway analysis for GWAS of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) to identify potential novel biological pathways. We evaluated the associations between 70,932 skin eSNPs and risk of BCC among 2,323 cases and 7,275 controls of European ancestry, and then assigned them to the pathways defined by KEGG, GO, and BioCarta databases. Three KEGG pathways (colorectal cancer, actin cytoskeleton, and BCC), two GO pathways (cellular component disassembly in apoptosis, and nucleus organization), and four BioCarta pathways (Ras signaling, T cell receptor signaling, natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and links between Pyk2 and Map Kinases) showed significant association with BCC risk with p-value<0.05 and FDR<0.2. These pathways also ranked at top in sensitivity analyses. Two positive controls in KEGG, the hedgehog pathway and the BCC pathway, showed significant association with BCC risk in both main and sensitivity analyses. Our results indicate that SNPs that are undetectable by conventional GWASs are significantly associated with BCC when tested as pathways. Biological studies of these gene groups suggest their potential roles in the etiology of BCC. PMID:27367190

  12. Association Between Television Viewing Time and All-Cause Mortality: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiang-Wei; Zhao, Long-Gang; Yang, Yang; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2015-12-01

    Findings on the association between television (TV) viewing and all-cause mortality in epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of data from prospective cohort studies to quantify this association. Relevant articles were identified by searching MEDLINE (PubMed; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) and EMBASE (Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, the Netherlands) from inception to March 1, 2015, and reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. Study-specific results were pooled using a random-effects model. Of 2,578 citations identified by the search strategy, 10 cohort studies (61,494 deaths among 647,475 individuals) met the inclusion criteria. The summary relative risk of all-cause mortality for the highest category of TV viewing time versus the lowest was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.20, 1.47), with heterogeneity among studies (I(2) = 66.7%, P(heterogeneity) = 0.001). In dose-response meta-analysis, TV viewing time was statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality risk in a J-shaped fashion (P(nonlinearity) = 0.001). These results indicate that prolonged TV viewing time might increase the risk of all-cause mortality. Given the high prevalence of excessive TV viewing, public health recommendations or interventions aimed at decreasing the amount of TV viewing time in modern societies are warranted.

  13. Meta-analysis of three diabetes population studies: association of inactive ALDH2 genotype with maternal inheritance of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, C; Taniyama, M; Kuriyama, S; Muramatsu, T; Atsumi, Y; Matsuoka, K; Suzuki, Y

    2004-12-01

    To date, there have been three population studies that examined the association of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotype with inheritance of diabetes. Here, we summarize the results by meta-analysis. The study 1 consisted of 212 type 2 diabetics who did not have renal failure. The study 2 consisted of 73 type 2 diabetics who had renal failure. The study 3 consisted of 230 type 1 diabetics. In total, 515 subjects were examined for the association of ALDH2 genotype with inheritance of diabetes. Out of 515 subjects, 307 (60%) had active ALDH2 (ALDH2*1/ALDH2*1) and 208 (40%) had inactive ALDH2 (175 had ALDH2*1/ALDH2*2 and 33 had ALDH2*2/ALDH2*2). As for family history, 25 subjects (8.1%) in the active ALDH2 group had a diabetic mother, compared with 43 (20.6%) in the inactive ALDH2 group. Twenty-nine subjects (9.4%) in the active ALDH2 group had a diabetic father, compared with 14 (6.7%) in the inactive ALDH2 group. The percentage of diabetic mother was higher in the inactive ALDH2 group, the differences were statistically significant (P maternal trait of diabetes inheritance. In conclusion, meta-analysis using three diabetes population studies strongly confirmed the association between ALDH2 inactivity and maternal inheritance.

  14. Evaluation of a Two-Stage Approach in Trans-Ethnic Meta-Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Studies.

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    Hong, Jaeyoung; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Dupuis, Josée; Liu, Ching-Ti

    2016-05-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has achieved great success in detecting loci underlying human diseases. Incorporating GWAS results from diverse ethnic populations for meta-analysis, however, remains challenging because of the possible heterogeneity across studies. Conventional fixed-effects (FE) or random-effects (RE) methods may not be most suitable to aggregate multiethnic GWAS results because of violation of the homogeneous effect assumption across studies (FE) or low power to detect signals (RE). Three recently proposed methods, modified RE (RE-HE) model, binary-effects (BE) model and a Bayesian approach (Meta-analysis of Transethnic Association [MANTRA]), show increased power over FE and RE methods while incorporating heterogeneity of effects when meta-analyzing trans-ethnic GWAS results. We propose a two-stage approach to account for heterogeneity in trans-ethnic meta-analysis in which we clustered studies with cohort-specific ancestry information prior to meta-analysis. We compare this to a no-prior-clustering (crude) approach, evaluating type I error and power of these two strategies, in an extensive simulation study to investigate whether the two-stage approach offers any improvements over the crude approach. We find that the two-stage approach and the crude approach for all five methods (FE, RE, RE-HE, BE, MANTRA) provide well-controlled type I error. However, the two-stage approach shows increased power for BE and RE-HE, and similar power for MANTRA and FE compared to their corresponding crude approach, especially when there is heterogeneity across the multiethnic GWAS results. These results suggest that prior clustering in the two-stage approach can be an effective and efficient intermediate step in meta-analysis to account for the multiethnic heterogeneity.

  15. No association between the sigma receptor type 1 gene and schizophrenia: results of analysis and meta-analysis of case-control studies

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    Imamura Takaki

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of evidence have supported possible roles of the sigma receptors in the etiology of schizophrenia and mechanisms of antipsychotic efficacy. An association study provided genetic evidence that the sigma receptor type 1 gene (SIGMAR1 was a possible susceptibility factor for schizophrenia, however, it was not replicated by a subsequent study. It is necessary to evaluate further the possibility that the SIGMAR1 gene is associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia. Methods A case-control association study between two polymorphisms of the SIGMAR1 gene, G-241T/C-240T and Gln2Pro, and schizophrenia in Japanese population, and meta-analysis including present and previous studies. Results There was no significant association of any allele or genotype of the polymorphisms with schizophrenia. Neither significant association was observed with hebephrenic or paranoid subtype of schizophrenia. Furthermore, a meta-analysis including the present and previous studies comprising 779 controls and 636 schizophrenics also revealed no significant association between the SIGMAR1 gene and schizophrenia. Conclusion In view of this evidence, it is likely that the SIGMAR1 gene does not confer susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  16. Association between dietary fiber and lower risk of all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

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    Yang, Yang; Zhao, Long-Gang; Wu, Qi-Jun; Ma, Xiao; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2015-01-15

    Although in vitro and in vivo experiments have suggested that dietary fiber might have beneficial effects on health, results on the association between fiber intake and all-cause mortality in epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to quantitatively assess this association. Pertinent studies were identified by searching articles in PubMed and Web of Knowledge through May 2014 and reviewing the reference lists of the retrieved articles. Study-specific risk estimates were combined using random-effects models. Seventeen prospective studies (1997-2014) that had a total of 67,260 deaths and 982,411 cohort members were included. When comparing persons with dietary fiber intakes in the top tertile with persons whose intakes were in the bottom tertile, we found a statistically significant inverse association between fiber intake and all-cause mortality, with an overall relative risk of 0.84 (95% confidence interval: 0.80, 0.87; I(2) = 41.2%). There was a 10% reduction in risk for per each 10-g/day increase in fiber intake (relative risk = 0.90; 95% confidence interval: 0.86, 0.94; I(2) = 77.2%). The combined estimate was robust across subgroup and sensitivity analyses. No publication bias was detected. A higher dietary fiber intake was associated with a reduced risk of death. These findings suggest that fiber intake may offer a potential public health benefit in reducing all-cause mortality.

  17. A genome-wide analysis of population structure in the Finnish Saami with implications for genetic association studies.

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    Huyghe, Jeroen R; Fransen, Erik; Hannula, Samuli; Van Laer, Lut; Van Eyken, Els; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Aikio, Pekka; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2011-03-01

    The understanding of patterns of genetic variation within and among human populations is a prerequisite for successful genetic association mapping studies of complex diseases and traits. Some populations are more favorable for association mapping studies than others. The Saami from northern Scandinavia and the Kola Peninsula represent a population isolate that, among European populations, has been less extensively sampled, despite some early interest for association mapping studies. In this paper, we report the results of a first genome-wide SNP-based study of genetic population structure in the Finnish Saami. Using data from the HapMap and the human genome diversity project (HGDP-CEPH) and recently developed statistical methods, we studied individual genetic ancestry. We quantified genetic differentiation between the Saami population and the HGDP-CEPH populations by calculating pair-wise F(ST) statistics and by characterizing identity-by-state sharing for pair-wise population comparisons. This study affirms an east Asian contribution to the predominantly European-derived Saami gene pool. Using model-based individual ancestry analysis, the median estimated percentage of the genome with east Asian ancestry was 6% (first and third quartiles: 5 and 8%, respectively). We found that genetic similarity between population pairs roughly correlated with geographic distance. Among the European HGDP-CEPH populations, F(ST) was smallest for the comparison with the Russians (F(ST)=0.0098), and estimates for the other population comparisons ranged from 0.0129 to 0.0263. Our analysis also revealed fine-scale substructure within the Finnish Saami and warns against the confounding effects of both hidden population structure and undocumented relatedness in genetic association studies of isolated populations.

  18. Effects of environment, genetics and data analysis pitfalls in an esophageal cancer genome-wide association study.

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    Alexander Statnikov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of new high-throughput genotyping technologies has allowed fast evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on a genome-wide scale. Several recent genome-wide association studies employing these technologies suggest that panels of SNPs can be a useful tool for predicting cancer susceptibility and discovery of potentially important new disease loci. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present paper we undertake a careful examination of the relative significance of genetics, environmental factors, and biases of the data analysis protocol that was used in a previously published genome-wide association study. That prior study reported a nearly perfect discrimination of esophageal cancer patients and healthy controls on the basis of only genetic information. On the other hand, our results strongly suggest that SNPs in this dataset are not statistically linked to the phenotype, while several environmental factors and especially family history of esophageal cancer (a proxy to both environmental and genetic factors have only a modest association with the disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The main component of the previously claimed strong discriminatory signal is due to several data analysis pitfalls that in combination led to the strongly optimistic results. Such pitfalls are preventable and should be avoided in future studies since they create misleading conclusions and generate many false leads for subsequent research.

  19. The associations between VEGF gene polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liyuan; Zhang, Lina; Xing, Wenhua; Zhuo, Renjie; Lin, XiaLu; Hao, Yanhua; Wu, Qunhong; Zhao, Jinshun

    2014-01-01

    AIMS. Published data on the associations of VEGF polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) susceptibility are inconclusive. A systematic meta-analysis was undertaken to clarify this topic. METHODS. Data were collected from the following electronic databases: PubMed, Embase, OVID, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and Cochrane Library with the last report up to January 10, 2014. ORs and 95% CIs were calculated for VEGF-2578C/A (rs699947), -1154G/A (rs1570360), -460T/C (rs833061), -634G>C (rs2010963), and +936C/T (rs3025039) in at least two published studies. Meta-analysis was performed in a fixed/random effect model by using the software STATA 12.0. RESULTS. A total of 11 studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. A significant relationship between VEGF+936C/T (rs3025039) polymorphism and DR was found in a recessive model (OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.20-8.41, and P(z) = 0.01) in Asian and overall populations, while a significant association was also found between -460T/C (rs833061) polymorphism and DR risk under a recessive model (OR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.12-4.01, and P(z) = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that +936C/T (rs3025039) is likely to be associated with susceptibility to DR in Asian populations, and the recessive model of -460T/C (rs833061) is associated with elevated DR susceptibility.

  20. The Associations between VEGF Gene Polymorphisms and Diabetic Retinopathy Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis of 11 Case-Control Studies

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    Liyuan Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Published data on the associations of VEGF polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR susceptibility are inconclusive. A systematic meta-analysis was undertaken to clarify this topic. Methods. Data were collected from the following electronic databases: PubMed, Embase, OVID, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE, and Cochrane Library with the last report up to January 10, 2014. ORs and 95% CIs were calculated for VEGF–2578C/A (rs699947, –1154G/A (rs1570360, –460T/C (rs833061, −634G>C (rs2010963, and +936C/T (rs3025039 in at least two published studies. Meta-analysis was performed in a fixed/random effect model by using the software STATA 12.0. Results. A total of 11 studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. A significant relationship between VEGF+936C/T (rs3025039 polymorphism and DR was found in a recessive model (OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.20–8.41, and P(z=0.01 in Asian and overall populations, while a significant association was also found between –460T/C (rs833061 polymorphism and DR risk under a recessive model (OR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.12–4.01, and P(z=0.02. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that +936C/T (rs3025039 is likely to be associated with susceptibility to DR in Asian populations, and the recessive model of –460T/C (rs833061 is associated with elevated DR susceptibility.

  1. Association between physical activity and all cancer mortality: Dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies.

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    Li, Yingjun; Gu, Mengjia; Jing, Fangyuan; Cai, Shaofang; Bao, Chengzhen; Wang, Jianbing; Jin, Mingjuan; Chen, Kun

    2016-02-15

    The relationship between physical activity (PA) before cancer diagnosis and all cancer mortality among the general population is not well defined because of inconsistent results from published studies. Thus, the lack of a meta-analysis that addresses that issue prompted the current report. We conducted a literature search of PubMed and Web of Science to identify all relevant epidemiological studies published before February 28, 2015. We performed categorical and dose-response meta-analyses to evaluate and quantify the association between pre-diagnosis PA and all cancer mortality. A total of 32 prospective cohort studies involving 59,362 cancer deaths were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled relative risks (RRs) of all cancer mortality were 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.76-0.85)] for highest versus lowest PA group and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.82-0.88) for PA versus non/occasional PA group. Dose-response analysis showed that the increment in pre-diagnosis PA level was associated with a decreased risk of cancer death continuously. Moreover, an increment of 10 MET-h/week was related to a 7% lower risk for all cancer mortality (RR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.91-0.95). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis provides evidence of an inverse association between pre-diagnosis PA and all cancer mortality among the general population. High-quality epidemiological studies that employ standardized PA assessments and unified definitions of PA levels should be developed in future.

  2. Pathway analysis of bladder cancer genome-wide association study identifies novel pathways involved in bladder cancer development

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    Chen, Meng; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Scheet, Paul A.; Huang, Maosheng; Chang, David W.; Dinney, Colin P.; Silverman, Debra T.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are designed to identify individual regions associated with cancer risk, but only explain a small fraction of the inherited variability. Alternative approach analyzing genetic variants within biological pathways has been proposed to discover networks of susceptibility genes with additional effects. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) may complement and expand traditional GWAS analysis to identify novel genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer risk. We selected three GSEA methods: Gen-Gen, Aligator, and the SNP Ratio Test to evaluate cellular signaling pathways involved in bladder cancer susceptibility in a Texas GWAS population. The candidate genetic polymorphisms from the significant pathway selected by GSEA were validated in an independent NCI GWAS. We identified 18 novel pathways (P < 0.05) significantly associated with bladder cancer risk. Five of the most promising pathways (P ≤ 0.001 in any of the three GSEA methods) among the 18 pathways included two cell cycle pathways and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and unfolded protein response pathways. We validated the candidate polymorphisms in the NCI GWAS and found variants of RAPGEF1, SKP1, HERPUD1, CACNB2, CACNA1C, CACNA1S, COL4A2, SRC, and CACNA1C were associated with bladder cancer risk. Two CCNE1 variants, rs8102137 and rs997669, from cell cycle pathways showed the strongest associations; the CCNE1 signal at 19q12 has already been reported in previous GWAS. These findings offer additional etiologic insights highlighting the specific genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer development. GSEA may be a complementary tool to GWAS to identify additional loci of cancer susceptibility.

  3. Genome-wide association study knowledge-driven pathway analysis of alcohol dependence implicates the calcium signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Danni; Li Jinming; Guo Yanfang

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence (AD) is a serious and common public health problem.The identification of genes that contribute to the AD variation will improve our understanding of the genetic mechanism underlying this complex disease.Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene genetic association studies identified individual genes as candidates for alcohol phenotypes,but efforts to generate an integrated view of accumulative genetic variants and pathways under alcohol drinking are lacking.Methods We applied enrichment gene set analysis to existing genetic association results to identify pertinent pathways to AD in this study.A total of 1 438 SNPs (P <1.0×10-3) associated to alcohol drinking related traits have been collected from 31 studies (10 candidate gene association studies,19 GWAS of SNPs,and 2 GWAS of copy number variants).Results Among all of the KEGG pathways,the calcium signaling pathway (hsa04020) showed the most significant enrichment of associations (21 genes) to alcohol consumption phenotypes (P=5.4×10-5).Furthermore,the calcium signaling pathway is the only pathway that turned out to be significant after multiple test adjustments,achieving Bonferroni P value of 0.8×10-3 and FDR value of 0.6×10-2,respectively.Interestingly,the calcium signaling pathway was previously found to be essential to regulate brain function,and genes in this pathway link to a depressive effect of alcohol consumption on the body.Conclusions Our findings,together with previous biological evidence,suggest the importance of gene polymorphisms of calcium signaling pathway to AD susceptibility.Still,further investigations are warranted to uncover the role of this pathway in AD and related traits.

  4. Evaluation of the association between acne and smoking: systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies

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    Alice Mannocci

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Acne vulgaris is one of the most common skin diseases with a multifactorial pathogenesis. Examination of the literature regarding the contribution of smoking to acne shows contradictory results. The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis about the association between acne and smoking.

    Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis, when possible were performed. The literature review was based on Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar searches using the keywords “(smoking OR tobacco OR nicotine OR cigarettes AND acne”. Only cross-sectional studies were included. Meta-analyses were performed using the RevMan software version 5 for Windows. Four different meta-analyses were carried out: one evaluating the association between smoking habit and acne, one including data stratified by gender, one for studies with a quality score > 6, and one relating to acne classification.

    Results: Six studies were selected. The first meta-analysis, including all studies, showed a non significant role of smoke in the development of acne: OR 1.05 (95% CI: 0.66–1.67 with random effect estimate. The second meta-analyses, including data stratified by gender, showed a OR=0.99 (95% CI: 0.57–1.73 for males and a OR of 1.45 (95% CI: 0.08–24.64 for females, using random effect for the heterogeneity in both cases. The third meta-analysis, included studies with a quality score >6 resulted in an estimated OR= 0.69 (95% CI: 0.55–0.85: in this case it was possible to use the fixed effect estimate. The last meta-analysis, concerning the severity grading, showed a non-significant result: OR=1.09 (95% CI: 0.61–1.95 using the random effect approach.

    Conclusions: The first two meta-analyses found no signification association between smoking and

  5. Combined analysis of three genome-wide association studies on vWF and FVIII plasma levels

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    Cohen William

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated levels of factor VIII (FVIII and von Willebrand Factor (vWF are well-established risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, in particular venous thrombosis. Although high, the heritability of these traits is poorly explained by the genetic factors known so far. The aim of this work was to identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that could influence the variability of these traits. Methods Three independent genome-wide association studies for vWF plasma levels and FVIII activity were conducted and their results were combined into a meta-analysis totalling 1,624 subjects. Results No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP reached the study-wide significance level of 1.12 × 10-7 that corresponds to the Bonferroni correction for the number of tested SNPs. Nevertheless, the recently discovered association of STXBP5, STX2, TC2N and CLEC4M genes with vWF levels and that of SCARA5 and STAB2 genes with FVIII levels were confirmed in this meta-analysis. Besides, among the fifteen novel SNPs showing promising association at p -5 with either vWF or FVIII levels in the meta-analysis, one located in ACCN1 gene also showed weak association (P = 0.0056 with venous thrombosis in a sample of 1,946 cases and 1,228 controls. Conclusions This study has generated new knowledge on genomic regions deserving further investigations in the search for genetic factors influencing vWF and FVIII plasma levels, some potentially implicated in VT, as well as providing some supporting evidence of previously identified genes.

  6. Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer

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    Duell, Eric J.; Yu, Kai; Risch, Harvey A.; Olson, Sara H.; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M.; Jiao, Li; Dong, Xiaoqun; Wheeler, Bill; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Klein, Alison P.; LaCroix, Andrea; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Agalliu, Ilir; Albanes, Demetrius; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Buring, Julie E.; Canzian, Federico; Chang, Kenneth; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Gaziano, J.Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Hunter, David J.; Hutchinson, Amy; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kraft, Peter; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Patel, Alpa V.; Rabe, Kari G.; Riboli, Elio; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Watters, Joanne; Yu, Herbert; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2012-01-01

    Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case–control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P < 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 × 10−6, 1.6 × 10−5, 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 × 10−5), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P < 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H. pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer. PMID:22523087

  7. Integrating pathway analysis and genetics of gene expression for genome-wide association study of basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Liang, Liming; Morar, Nilesh; Dixon, Anna L; Lathrop, G Mark; Ding, Jun; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C; Kraft, Peter; Qureshi, Abrar A; Han, Jiali

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have primarily focused on marginal effects for individual markers and have incorporated external functional information only after identifying robust statistical associations. We applied a new approach combining the genetics of gene expression and functional classification of genes to the GWAS of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) to identify potential biological pathways associated with BCC. We first identified 322,324 expression-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (eSNPs) from two existing GWASs of global gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (n = 955), and evaluated the association of these functionally annotated SNPs with BCC among 2,045 BCC cases and 6,013 controls in Caucasians. We then grouped them into 99 KEGG pathways for pathway analysis and identified two pathways associated with BCC with p value <0.05 and false discovery rate (FDR) <0.5: the autoimmune thyroid disease pathway (mainly HLA class I and II antigens, p < 0.001, FDR = 0.24) and Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway (p = 0.02, FDR = 0.49). Seventy-nine (25.7%) out of 307 significant eSNPs in the JAK-STAT pathway were associated with BCC risk (p < 0.05) in an independent replication set of 278 BCC cases and 1,262 controls. In addition, the association of JAK-STAT signaling pathway was marginally validated using 16,691 eSNPs identified from 110 normal skin samples (p = 0.08). Based on the evidence of biological functions of the JAK-STAT pathway on oncogenesis, it is plausible that this pathway is involved in BCC pathogenesis.

  8. Analysis of eight genes modulating interferon gamma and human genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis: a case-control association study

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    Hoal Eileen G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon gamma is a major macrophage-activating cytokine during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative pathogen of tuberculosis, and its role has been well established in animal models and in humans. This cytokine is produced by activated T helper 1 cells, which can best deal with intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis. Based on the hypothesis that genes which regulate interferon gamma may influence tuberculosis susceptibility, we investigated polymorphisms in eight candidate genes. Methods Fifty-four polymorphisms in eight candidate genes were genotyped in over 800 tuberculosis cases and healthy controls in a population-based case-control association study in a South African population. Genotyping methods used included the SNPlex Genotyping System™, capillary electrophoresis of fluorescently labelled PCR products, TaqMan® SNP genotyping assays or the amplification mutation refraction system. Single polymorphisms as well as haplotypes of the variants were tested for association with TB using statistical analyses. Results A haplotype in interleukin 12B was nominally associated with tuberculosis (p = 0.02, but after permutation testing, done to assess the significance for the entire analysis, this was not globally significant. In addition a novel allele was found for the interleukin 12B D5S2941 microsatellite. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of using larger sample sizes when attempting validation of previously reported genetic associations. Initial studies may be false positives or may propose a stronger genetic effect than subsequently found to be the case.

  9. Detailed analysis of association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms and subclinical atherosclerosis: The Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Jose D; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Post, Wendy S; Polak, Joseph F; Budoff, Matthew J; Bluemke, David A

    2016-06-01

    Previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genome wide association studies (GWAS) of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in participants of mostly European descent were tested for association with subclinical cardiovascular disease (sCVD), coronary artery calcium score (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The data in this data in brief article correspond to the article Common Genetic Variants and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [1]. This article includes the demographic information of the participants analyzed in the article as well as graphical displays and data tables of the association of the selected SNPs with CAC and of the meta-analysis across ethnicities of the association of CIMT-c (common carotid), CIMT-I (internal carotid), CAC-d (CAC as dichotomous variable with CAC>0) and CAC-c (CAC as continuous variable, the log of the raw CAC score plus one) and CVD. The data tables corresponding to the 9p21 fine mapping experiment as well as the power calculations referenced in the article are also included.

  10. Replication of 6 obesity genes in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from diverse ancestries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Jun; Zhu, Hu; He, Hao; Wu, Ke-Hao; Li, Jian; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Papasian, Christopher J; Bouchard, Claude; Pérusse, Louis; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem with a significant genetic component. Multiple DNA polymorphisms/genes have been shown to be strongly associated with obesity, typically in populations of European descent. The aim of this study was to verify the extent to which 6 confirmed obesity genes (FTO, CTNNBL1, ADRB2, LEPR, PPARG and UCP2 genes) could be replicated in 8 different samples (n = 11,161) and to explore whether the same genes contribute to obesity-susceptibility in populations of different ancestries (five Caucasian, one Chinese, one African-American and one Hispanic population). GWAS-based data sets with 1000 G imputed variants were tested for association with obesity phenotypes individually in each population, and subsequently combined in a meta-analysis. Multiple variants at the FTO locus showed significant associations with BMI, fat mass (FM) and percentage of body fat (PBF) in meta-analysis. The strongest association was detected at rs7185735 (P-value = 1.01×10(-7) for BMI, 1.80×10(-6) for FM, and 5.29×10(-4) for PBF). Variants at the CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG loci demonstrated nominal association with obesity phenotypes (meta-analysis P-values ranging from 1.15×10(-3) to 4.94×10(-2)). There was no evidence of association with variants at ADRB2 and UCP2 genes. When stratified by sex and ethnicity, FTO variants showed sex-specific and ethnic-specific effects on obesity traits. Thus, it is likely that FTO has an important role in the sex- and ethnic-specific risk of obesity. Our data confirmed the role of FTO, CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG in obesity predisposition. These findings enhanced our knowledge of genetic associations between these genes and obesity-related phenotypes, and provided further justification for pursuing functional studies of these genes in the pathophysiology of obesity. Sex and ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility across populations of diverse ancestries may contribute to a more targeted prevention and customized

  11. Replication of 6 Obesity Genes in a Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies from Diverse Ancestries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Jun; Zhu, Hu; He, Hao; Wu, Ke-Hao; Li, Jian; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Papasian, Christopher J.; Bouchard, Claude; Pérusse, Louis; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem with a significant genetic component. Multiple DNA polymorphisms/genes have been shown to be strongly associated with obesity, typically in populations of European descent. The aim of this study was to verify the extent to which 6 confirmed obesity genes (FTO, CTNNBL1, ADRB2, LEPR, PPARG and UCP2 genes) could be replicated in 8 different samples (n = 11,161) and to explore whether the same genes contribute to obesity-susceptibility in populations of different ancestries (five Caucasian, one Chinese, one African-American and one Hispanic population). GWAS-based data sets with 1000 G imputed variants were tested for association with obesity phenotypes individually in each population, and subsequently combined in a meta-analysis. Multiple variants at the FTO locus showed significant associations with BMI, fat mass (FM) and percentage of body fat (PBF) in meta-analysis. The strongest association was detected at rs7185735 (P-value = 1.01×10−7 for BMI, 1.80×10−6 for FM, and 5.29×10−4 for PBF). Variants at the CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG loci demonstrated nominal association with obesity phenotypes (meta-analysis P-values ranging from 1.15×10−3 to 4.94×10−2). There was no evidence of association with variants at ADRB2 and UCP2 genes. When stratified by sex and ethnicity, FTO variants showed sex-specific and ethnic-specific effects on obesity traits. Thus, it is likely that FTO has an important role in the sex- and ethnic-specific risk of obesity. Our data confirmed the role of FTO, CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG in obesity predisposition. These findings enhanced our knowledge of genetic associations between these genes and obesity-related phenotypes, and provided further justification for pursuing functional studies of these genes in the pathophysiology of obesity. Sex and ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility across populations of diverse ancestries may contribute to a more targeted prevention and customized

  12. Replication of 6 obesity genes in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from diverse ancestries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jun Tan

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health problem with a significant genetic component. Multiple DNA polymorphisms/genes have been shown to be strongly associated with obesity, typically in populations of European descent. The aim of this study was to verify the extent to which 6 confirmed obesity genes (FTO, CTNNBL1, ADRB2, LEPR, PPARG and UCP2 genes could be replicated in 8 different samples (n = 11,161 and to explore whether the same genes contribute to obesity-susceptibility in populations of different ancestries (five Caucasian, one Chinese, one African-American and one Hispanic population. GWAS-based data sets with 1000 G imputed variants were tested for association with obesity phenotypes individually in each population, and subsequently combined in a meta-analysis. Multiple variants at the FTO locus showed significant associations with BMI, fat mass (FM and percentage of body fat (PBF in meta-analysis. The strongest association was detected at rs7185735 (P-value = 1.01×10(-7 for BMI, 1.80×10(-6 for FM, and 5.29×10(-4 for PBF. Variants at the CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG loci demonstrated nominal association with obesity phenotypes (meta-analysis P-values ranging from 1.15×10(-3 to 4.94×10(-2. There was no evidence of association with variants at ADRB2 and UCP2 genes. When stratified by sex and ethnicity, FTO variants showed sex-specific and ethnic-specific effects on obesity traits. Thus, it is likely that FTO has an important role in the sex- and ethnic-specific risk of obesity. Our data confirmed the role of FTO, CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG in obesity predisposition. These findings enhanced our knowledge of genetic associations between these genes and obesity-related phenotypes, and provided further justification for pursuing functional studies of these genes in the pathophysiology of obesity. Sex and ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility across populations of diverse ancestries may contribute to a more targeted prevention and

  13. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is inversely associated with metabolic syndrome occurrence: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godos, Justyna; Zappalà, Gaetano; Bernardini, Sergio; Giambini, Ilio; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel

    2017-03-01

    Diet plays a role in the onset and progression of metabolic disorders, including metabolic syndrome (MetS). We aimed to systematically review and conduct a quantitative meta-analysis of results from observational cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies on adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern and risk of MetS. Literature databases including PubMed, SCOPUS and EMBASE were searched from the beginning to May 2016. Eight cross-sectional and four prospective studies were included in this meta-analysis, accounting for a total of 33,847 individuals and 6342 cases of MetS. High adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a risk of MetS (RR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.71, 0.92). Regarding individual components of the MetS, the inverse associations were significant for waist circumference, blood pressure and low HDL-C levels. In conclusion, adoption of a Mediterranean dietary pattern was associated with lower risk of the MetS and it can be proposed for the primary prevention of the MetS.

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies ten loci influencing allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Matheson, Melanie C; Pers, Tune Hannes

    2013-01-01

    the top SNP at each of 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association with allergic sensitization from three to ten, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2...

  15. Association of Catechin Molecules in Water: Quantitative Binding Study and Complex Structure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Tomomi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-22

    Associations between catechin molecules were investigated by (1)H NMR titration experiments. Eight green tea catechins formed self-assembled dimers in water, and gallate-type catechins had a greater tendency to self-associate than non-gallate-type catechins. All eight catechins also associated as 1:1 heterodimer complexes. Investigation of complex formation of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCg) and epigallocatechin (EGC) with the other catechins showed that the affinity between EGCg and 2,3-trans-gallate-type catechins was remarkably high, and the binding affinity of EGCg for ECg was also rather strong. In contrast, the non-gallate-type catechin EGC exhibited generally low binding affinity for other catechins. Structural analyses of the complexes by ROESY experiments and density functional theory calculations demonstrated that the higher binding abilities of gallate-type catechins are due to providing multiple intermolecular interactions that remain effective in an aqueous environment, such as aromatic/aromatic or CH/π interactions.

  16. Pathway Analysis Using Genome-Wide Association Study Data for Coronary Restenosis – A Potential Role for the PARVB Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Jeffrey J. W.; Trompet, Stella; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Koch, Werner; Kastrati, Adnan; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Quax, Paul H. A.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) still remains a significant limitation of the procedure. The causative mechanisms of restenosis have not yet been fully identified. The goal of the current study was to perform gene-set analysis of biological pathways related to inflammation, proliferation, vascular function and transcriptional regulation on coronary restenosis to identify novel genes and pathways related to this condition. Methods The GENetic DEterminants of Restenosis (GENDER) databank contains genotypic data of 556,099SNPs of 295 cases with restenosis and 571 matched controls. Fifty-four pathways, related to known restenosis-related processes, were selected. Gene-set analysis was performed using PLINK, GRASS and ALIGATOR software. Pathways with a p<0.01 were fine-mapped and significantly associated SNPs were analyzed in an independent replication cohort. Results Six pathways (cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions pathway, IL2 signaling pathway, IL6 signaling pathway, platelet derived growth factor pathway, vitamin D receptor pathway and the mitochondria pathway) were significantly associated in one or two of the software packages. Two SNPs in the cell-ECM interactions pathway were replicated in an independent restenosis cohort. No replication was obtained for the other pathways. Conclusion With these results we demonstrate a potential role of the cell-ECM interactions pathway in the development of coronary restenosis. These findings contribute to the increasing knowledge of the genetic etiology of restenosis formation and could serve as a hypothesis-generating effort for further functional studies. PMID:23950981

  17. Analysis of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP studies in Egyptian University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Fathy

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: It is important to establish large-scale multi center national studies to explore incidence of VAP, all possible risk factors (whether preventable or non preventable, causative organisms, and mortality due to VAP and its economic aspect.

  18. A Conservative Meta-Analysis of Linkage and Linkage-Association Studies of Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2005-01-01

    Linkage studies of complex phenotypes such as reading ability/disability (developmental dyslexia or reading disorder) and related componential processes, where the effects attributable to individual genes appear to be modest, are critically dependent on the nature and composition of the samples and the phenotypes analyzed. Thus, it might be…

  19. Study on traffic noise level of Sylhet by multiple regression analysis associated with health hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Alam, M. Jobair Bin Alam, M. M. Rahman, A. K. Dikshit, S. K. Khan

    Full Text Available The study reports the level of traffic-induced noise pollution in Sylhet City. For this purpose noise levels have been measured at thirty-seven major locations of the city from 7 am to 11 pm during the working days. It was observed that at all the locations the level of noise remains far above the acceptable limit for all the time. The noise level on the main road near residential area, hospital area and educational area were above the recommended level (65dBA. It was found that the predictive equations are in 60-70% correlated with the measured noise level. The study suggests that vulnerable institutions like school and hospital should be located about 60m away from the roadside unless any special arrangement to alleviate sound is used.

  20. Genetic Control of Canine Leishmaniasis: Genome-Wide Association Study and Genomic Selection Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Quilez; Verónica Martínez; Woolliams, John A; Armand Sanchez; Ricardo Pong-Wong; Kennedy, Lorna J.; Quinnell, Rupert J.; Ollier, William E R; Xavier Roura; Lluís Ferrer; Laura Altet; Olga Francino

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current disease model for leishmaniasis suggests that only a proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease, while others are asymptomatically infected due to immune control of infection. The factors that determine whether individuals progress to clinical disease following Leishmania infection are unclear, although previous studies suggest a role for host genetics. Our hypothesis was that canine leishmaniasis is a complex disease with multiple loci responsible for...

  1. Genetic control of canine leishmaniasis: genome-wide association study and genomic selection analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Quilez; Verónica Martínez; Woolliams, John A.; Armand Sanchez; Ricardo Pong-Wong; Kennedy, Lorna J; Rupert J Quinnell; William E. R. Ollier; Xavier Roura; Lluís Ferrer; Laura Altet; Olga Francino

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current disease model for leishmaniasis suggests that only a proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease, while others are asymptomatically infected due to immune control of infection. The factors that determine whether individuals progress to clinical disease following Leishmania infection are unclear, although previous studies suggest a role for host genetics. Our hypothesis was that canine leishmaniasis is a complex disease with multiple loci responsible for...

  2. A comprehensive analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci for the Romanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rădăvoi, George Daniel; Pricop, Cătălin; Jinga, Viorel; Mateş, Dana; Rădoi, Viorica Elena; Jinga, Mariana; Ursu, Radu Ioan; Bratu, Ovidiu Gabriel; Mischianu, Dan Liviu Dorel; Iordache, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine a large dataset of single nucleotide polymorphism known to be associated with prostate cancer from previous genome-wide association studies and create a dataset of single nucleotide polymorphisms that can be used in replication studies for the Romanian population. This study will define a list of markers showing a significant association with this phenotype. We propose the results of this study as a starting point for any Romanian genome-wide association studies researching the genetic susceptibility for prostate cancer.

  3. Genome-wide association study and biological pathway analysis for response to Eimeria maxima in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamzic, Edin; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Hérault, Frédéric;

    2015-01-01

    Background Coccidiosis is the most common and costly disease in the poultry industry and which caused by protozoans from the genus of Eimeria. The current control of coccidiosis, based on the use of anticoccidial drugs and vaccination, faces serious obstacles such as drug resistance and the high...... costs for development of efficient vaccines, respectively. Therefore, the present control programs must be expanded with complementary approaches such as the use of genetics for improvement of the host’s response to Eimeria infections. Recently, we have performed a large-scale challenge study on Cobb500...

  4. Twenty bone-mineral-density loci identified by large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadeneira, Fernando; Styrkársdottir, Unnur; Estrada, Karol; Halldórsson, Bjarni V; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Richards, J Brent; Zillikens, M Carola; Kavvoura, Fotini K; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Cupples, L Adrienne; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Demissie, Serkalem; Grundberg, Elin; Hofman, Albert; Kong, Augustine; Karasik, David; van Meurs, Joyce B; Oostra, Ben; Pastinen, Tomi; Pols, Huibert A P; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Soranzo, Nicole; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Williams, Frances M K; Wilson, Scott G; Zhou, Yanhua; Ralston, Stuart H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Spector, Timothy; Kiel, Douglas P; Stefansson, Kari; Ioannidis, John P A; Uitterlinden, André G

    2009-11-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a heritable complex trait used in the clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis and the assessment of fracture risk. We performed meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies of femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD in 19,195 subjects of Northern European descent. We identified 20 BMD loci that reached genome-wide significance (GWS; P GPR177), 2p21 (SPTBN1), 3p22 (CTNNB1), 4q21.1 (MEPE), 5q14 (MEF2C), 7p14 (STARD3NL), 7q21.3 (FLJ42280), 11p11.2 (LRP4, ARHGAP1, F2), 11p14.1 (DCDC5), 11p15 (SOX6), 16q24 (FOXL1), 17q21 (HDAC5) and 17q12 (CRHR1). The meta-analysis also confirmed at GWS level seven known BMD loci on 1p36 (ZBTB40), 6q25 (ESR1), 8q24 (TNFRSF11B), 11q13.4 (LRP5), 12q13 (SP7), 13q14 (TNFSF11) and 18q21 (TNFRSF11A). The many SNPs associated with BMD map to genes in signaling pathways with relevance to bone metabolism and highlight the complex genetic architecture that underlies osteoporosis and variation in BMD.

  5. The Association Between Noncancer Pain, Cognitive Impairment, and Functional Disability: An Analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Debra K.; Paice, Judith A.; Bilir, S. Pinar; Rockwood, Kenneth; Herr, Keela; Ersek, Mary; Emanuel, Linda; Dale, William

    2010-01-01

    Background. Noncancer pain and cognitive impairment affect many older adults and each is associated with functional disability, but their combined impact has yet to be rigorously studied. Methods. This is a cross-sectional analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging. Pain was collapsed from a 5-point to a dichotomous scale (no and very mild vs moderate and greater). Cognitive status was dichotomized from the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (0–100) to no (>77) or mild-moderate (77–50) impairment. Five Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and seven Activities of Daily Living (ADL) were self-rated as “accomplished without any help” (0), “with some help” (1), or “completely unable to do oneself” (2) and then summed to create a composite score of 0–10 and 0–14, respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to determine the associations between self-reported functional status with moderate or greater pain, cognitive impairment, and the interaction of the two. Results. A total of 5,143 (90.2%) participants were eligible, 1,813 (35.6%) reported pain at a moderate intensity or greater and 727 (14.3%) were cognitively impaired. The median IADL and ADL summary scores increased among the pain and cognition categories in the following order: no pain and cognitively intact (0.63 SD 1.24, 0.23 SD 0.80), pain and cognitively intact (1.18 SD 1.69, 0.57 SD 1.27), no pain and cognitively impaired (1.64 SD 2.22, 0.75 SD 1.57), and pain and cognitively impaired (2.27 SD 2.47, 1.35 SD 2.09), respectively. Multivariate linear regression found IADL summary scores were associated with pain, coefficient .17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07–0.26), p < .01; cognitive impairment, coefficient .67 (95% CI 0.51–0.83), p < .01; and an interaction effect of pain with cognitive impairment, coefficient .24 (95% CI 0.01–0.49), p = .05. ADL summary scores were associated with pain coefficient .10 (95% CI 0.04–0.17), p < .01 and

  6. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Six New Loci for Serum Calcium Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. O'Seaghdha (Conall); H. Wu (Hongsheng); Q. Yang (Qiong); K. Kapur (Karen); I. Guessous (Idris); P. Zuber (Patrick); A. Köttgen (Anna); C. Stoudmann (Candice); A. Teumer (Alexander); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); M. Mangino (Massimo); A. Dehghan (Abbas); W. Zhang (Weihua); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); G. Li (Guo); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); L. Portas (Laura); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); C. Hayward (Caroline); K. Lohman (Kurt); K. Matsuda (Koichi); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); D. Firsov (Dmitri); R. Sorice; S. Ulivi (Shelia); A.C. Brockhaus (A. Catharina); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); A. Mahajan (Anubha); F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A. Mace (Aurelien); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.E. Arking (Dan); C. Tanikawa (Chizu); Y. Nakamura (Yusuke); M.J. Brown (Morris); J.-M. Gaspoz (Jean-Michel); J.-M. Theler (Jean-Marc); D.S. Siscovick (David); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); P. Vollenweider (Peter); V. Vitart (Veronique); A.F. Wright (Alan); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); M. Boban (Mladen); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Navarro (Pau); E.M. Brown (Edward); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); J. Ding (Jinhui); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Singleton (Andrew); S. Girotto; D. Ruggiero; A.P. d' Adamo (Adamo Pio); A. Robino (Antonietta); T. Meitinger (Thomas); C. Meisinger (Christa); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Starr (John); J.C. Chambers (John); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); B. Winkelmann; J. Huang (Jian); D. Murgia (Daniela); S.H. Wild (Sarah); H. Campbell (Harry); A.D. Morris (Andrew); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); U. Vol̈ker (Uwe); M. Hannemann (Mario); R. Biffar (Reiner); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); S.-Y. Shin; P. Lescuyer (Pierre); H. Henry (Hughes); C. Schurmann (Claudia); P. Munroe (Patricia); P. Gasparini (Paolo); N. Pirastu (Nicola); M. Ciullo; C. Gieger (Christian); W. März (Winfried); L. Lind (Lars); T.D. Spector (Timothy); G.D. Smith; I. Rudan (Igor); J.F. Wilson (James); O. Polasek (Ozren); I.J. Deary (Ian); M. Pirastu (Mario); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); Y. Liu (Yongmei); B. Kestenbaum (Bryan); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); M. Nauck (Matthias); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); O. Bonny (Olivier); C. Fox (Craig); M. Bochud (Murielle)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCalcium is vital to the normal functioning of multiple organ systems and its serum concentration is tightly regulated. Apart from CASR, the genes associated with serum calcium are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 39,400 individuals from 17 populati

  7. Vaccines are not associated with autism: an evidence-based meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Luke E; Swerdfeger, Amy L; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-06-17

    There has been enormous debate regarding the possibility of a link between childhood vaccinations and the subsequent development of autism. This has in recent times become a major public health issue with vaccine preventable diseases increasing in the community due to the fear of a 'link' between vaccinations and autism. We performed a meta-analysis to summarise available evidence from case-control and cohort studies on this topic (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar up to April, 2014). Eligible studies assessed the relationship between vaccine administration and the subsequent development of autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Two reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods, and outcomes. Disagreement was resolved by consensus with another author. Five cohort studies involving 1,256,407 children, and five case-control studies involving 9,920 children were included in this analysis. The cohort data revealed no relationship between vaccination and autism (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.92 to 1.06) or ASD (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.20), nor was there a relationship between autism and MMR (OR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.01), or thimerosal (OR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.77 to 1.31), or mercury (Hg) (OR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.07). Similarly the case-control data found no evidence for increased risk of developing autism or ASD following MMR, Hg, or thimerosal exposure when grouped by condition (OR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.83 to 0.98; p=0.02) or grouped by exposure type (OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.76 to 0.95; p=0.01). Findings of this meta-analysis suggest that vaccinations are not associated with the development of autism or autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the components of the vaccines (thimerosal or mercury) or multiple vaccines (MMR) are not associated with the development of autism or autism spectrum disorder.

  8. Gene Network Analysis and Functional Studies of Senescence-associated Genes Reveal Novel Regulators of Arabidopsis Leaf Senescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghai Li; Jinying Peng; Xing Wen; Hongwei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Plant leaf senescence has been recognized as the last phase of plant development,a highly ordered process regulated by genes known as senescence associated genes (SAGs).However,the function of most of SAGs in regulating leaf senescence as well as regulators of those functionally known SAGs are still unclear.We have previously developed a curated database of genes potentially associated with leaf senescence,the Leaf Senescence Database (LSD).In this study,we built gene networks to identify common regulators of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana using promoting or delaying senescence genes in LSD.Our results demonstrated that plant hormones cytokinin,auxin,nitric oxide as well as small molecules,such as Ca2+,delay leaf senescence.By contrast,ethylene,ABA,SA and JA as well as small molecules,such as oxygen,promote leaf senescence,altogether supporting the idea that phytohormones play a critical role in regulating leaf senescence.Functional analysis of candidate SAGs in LSD revealed that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY75 and a Cys2/His2-type transcription factor AZF2 are positive regulators of leaf senescence and loss-of-function of WRKY75 or AZF2 delayed leaf senescence.We also found that silencing of a protein phosphatase,AtMKP2,promoted early senescence.Collectively,LSD can serve as a comprehensive resource for systematic study of the molecular mechanism of leaf senescence as well as offer candidate genes for functional analyses.

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from the CHARGE consortium identifies common variants associated with carotid intima media thickness and plaque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bis (Joshua); M. Kavousi (Maryam); N. Franceschini (Nora); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); U. Schminke (Ulf); W.S. Post (Wendy S.); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); H.S. Markus (Hugh S.); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J. Baumert (Jens); T. Münzel (Thomas); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); A. Dehghan (Abbas); K.E. North (Kari); B.A. Oostra (Ben); S. Bevan (Steve); E.M. Stoegerer (Eva Maria); C. Hayward (Caroline); O. Raitakari (Olli); C. Meisinger (Christa); A. Schillert (Arne); S. Sanna (Serena); H. Völzke (Henry); Y.C. Cheng (Yu Ching); B. Thorsson (Bolli); C.S. Fox (Caroline); K. Rice (Kenneth); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); V. Nambi (Vijay); E. Halperin (Eran); K. Petrovic (Katja); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); R.B. Schnabel (Renate); M. Dörr (Marcus); A. Parsa (Afshin); T. Aspelund (Thor); S. Demissie (Serkalem); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); K.D. Taylor (Kent); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); D.J. Couper (David); M. Sitzer (Matthias); M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Illig (Thomas); P.S. Wild (Philipp); M. Orrù (Marco); J. Lüdemann (Jan); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); C.C. White (Charles); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); A. Hofman (Albert); J. Seissler (Jochen); T. Zeller (Tanja); G. Usala; F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); L.J. Launer (Lenore); R.B. D'Agostino (Ralph); D.H. O'Leary (Daniel H.); C. Ballantyne (Christie); J.P. Thiery (Joachim); A. Ziegler (Andreas); E. Lakatta (Edward); R.K. Chilukoti (Ravi Kumar); T.B. Harris (Tamara); P.A. Wolf (Philip); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.F. Polak (Joseph F.); X. Li (Xiaohui); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); M. Uda (Manuela); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); N. Klopp (Norman); J.F. Wilson (James); J. Viikari (Jorma); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); S. Blankenberg (Stefan); A.B. Newman (Anne); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); G. Heiss (Gerardo); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); A. Scuteri (Angelo); G. Homuth (Georg); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCarotid intima media thickness (cIMT) and plaque determined by ultrasonography are established measures of subclinical atherosclerosis that each predicts future cardiovascular disease events. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 31,211 participants of European

  10. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Visser, Jenny A; Byrne, Enda M; Cousminer, Diana L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lin, Peng; Mangino, Massimo; Marongiu, Mara; McArdle, Patrick F; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; van Wingerden, Sophie H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Albrecht, Eva; Corre, Tanguy; Ingelsson, Erik; Hayward, Caroline; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Smith, Erin N; Ulivi, Shelia; Warrington, Nicole M; Zgaga, Lina; Alavere, Helen; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Inês; Berenson, Gerald S; Bergmann, Sven; Blackburn, Hannah; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Wei; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; d'Adamo, Pio; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Deloukas, Panos; Döring, Angela; Smith, George Davey; Easton, Douglas F; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R; Foroud, Tatiana; Garcia, Melissa; Gasparini, Paolo; Geller, Frank; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E; Ferreli, Liana; Heath, Andrew C; Hernandez, Dena G; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiel, Douglas P; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraft, Peter; Launer, Lenore J; Laven, Joop S E; Li, Shengxu; Liu, Jianjun; Levy, Daniel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Mooser, Vincent; Murray, Jeffrey C; Murray, Sarah S; Nalls, Michael A; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peltonen, Leena; Pennell, Craig E; Pharoah, Paul; Polasek, Ozren; Plump, Andrew S; Pouta, Anneli; Porcu, Eleonora; Rafnar, Thorunn; Rice, John P; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schork, Nicholas J; Scuteri, Angelo; Segrè, Ayellet V; Shuldiner, Alan R; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Strachan, David P; Tammesoo, Mar-Liis; Tikkanen, Emmi; Toniolo, Daniela; Tsui, Kim; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tyrer, Jonathon; Uda, Manuela; van Dam, Rob M; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Wichmann, H Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Young, Lauren; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Bierut, Laura J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Econs, Michael J; Harris, Tamara B; Hunter, David J; Loos, Ruth J F; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Ridker, Paul M; Spector, Tim D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G; Widen, Elisabeth; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K; Murray, Anna

    2010-12-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarche loci (all P < 5 × 10⁻⁸) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P < 1.9 × 10⁻⁶). The new loci included four previously associated with body mass index (in or near FTO, SEC16B, TRA2B and TMEM18), three in or near other genes implicated in energy homeostasis (BSX, CRTC1 and MCHR2) and three in or near genes implicated in hormonal regulation (INHBA, PCSK2 and RXRG). Ingenuity and gene-set enrichment pathway analyses identified coenzyme A and fatty acid biosynthesis as biological processes related to menarche timing.

  11. Eight genetic loci associated with variation in lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass and activity and coronary heart disease: meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from five community-based studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grallert, Harald; Dupuis, Josée; Bis, Joshua C.; Dehghan, Abbas; Barbalic, Maja; Baumert, Jens; Lu, Chen; Smith, Nicholas L.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Roberts, Robert; Khuseyinova, Natalie; Schnabel, Renate B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Fontes, João Daniel; Meisinger, Christa; Keaney, John F.; Lemaitre, Rozenn; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ellis, Stephen; Hazen, Stanley L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Nelson, Jeanenne J.; März, Winfried; Schunkert, Heribert; McPherson, Ruth M.; Stirnadel-Farrant, Heide A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Gieger, Christian; Siscovick, David; Hofman, Albert; Illig, Thomas; Cushman, Mary; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Larson, Martin G.; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Tracy, Russell P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) generates proinflammatory and proatherogenic compounds in the arterial vascular wall and is a potential therapeutic target in coronary heart disease (CHD). We searched for genetic loci related to Lp-PLA2 mass or activity by a genome-wide association study as part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. Methods and results In meta-analyses of findings from five population-based studies, comprising 13 664 subjects, variants at two loci (PLA2G7, CETP) were associated with Lp-PLA2 mass. The strongest signal was at rs1805017 in PLA2G7 [P = 2.4 × 10−23, log Lp-PLA2 difference per allele (beta): 0.043]. Variants at six loci were associated with Lp-PLA2 activity (PLA2G7, APOC1, CELSR2, LDL, ZNF259, SCARB1), among which the strongest signals were at rs4420638, near the APOE–APOC1–APOC4–APOC2 cluster [P = 4.9 × 10−30; log Lp-PLA2 difference per allele (beta): −0.054]. There were no significant gene–environment interactions between these eight polymorphisms associated with Lp-PLA2 mass or activity and age, sex, body mass index, or smoking status. Four of the polymorphisms (in APOC1, CELSR2, SCARB1, ZNF259), but not PLA2G7, were significantly associated with CHD in a second study. Conclusion Levels of Lp-PLA2 mass and activity were associated with PLA2G7, the gene coding for this protein. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity was also strongly associated with genetic variants related to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. PMID:22003152

  12. Associations of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with hypertension and hypertension in pregnancy: a meta-analysis from 114 studies with 15411 cases and 21970 controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyi Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several epidemiological studies have investigated the associations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms with hypertension (H or hypertension in pregnancy (HIP. However, the results were controversial. We therefore performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to provide empirical evidences on the associations. METHODOLOGIES: The English and Chinese databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to evaluate the strength of the associations. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, cumulative meta-analysis and assessment of publication bias were performed in our study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 114 studies with 15411 cases and 21970 controls were included, 111 studies with 15094 cases and 21633 controls for the C677T polymorphism and 21 with 2533 cases and 2976 controls for the A1298C polymorphism. Overall, the C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with H and HIP (H & HIP: OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.17-1.34; H: OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.20-1.53; HIP: OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.08-1.32. Stratified analysis by ethnicity revealed a significant association among East Asians and Caucasians, but not among Latinos, Black Africans, and Indians and Sri Lankans. In the stratified analyses according to source of controls, genotyping method, sample size and study quality, significant associations were observed in all the subgroups, with the exception of population based subgroup in H studies and large sample size and "others" genotyping method subgroups in HIP studies. For the A1298C polymorphism, no significant association was observed either in overall or subgroup analysis under all genetic models. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that the MTHFR C677T rather than A1298C polymorphism may be associated with H & HIP, especially among East Asians and Caucasians.

  13. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Kerns

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08–4.69, p-value 4.16 × 10−8 and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90–3.86, p-value = 3.21 × 10−8. These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling.

  14. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Sarah L; Dorling, Leila; Fachal, Laura; Bentzen, Søren; Pharoah, Paul D P; Barnes, Daniel R; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Carballo, Ana M; Dearnaley, David P; Peleteiro, Paula; Gulliford, Sarah L; Hall, Emma; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carracedo, Ángel; Sia, Michael; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson N; Sydes, Matthew R; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Parliament, Matthew; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Burnet, Neil G; Dunning, Alison M; Barnett, Gillian C; West, Catharine M L

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08-4.69, p-value 4.16×10(-8)) and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90-3.86, p-value=3.21×10(-8)). These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling.

  15. Accounting for selection and correlation in the analysis of two-stage genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David S; Prevost, A Toby; Bowden, Jack

    2016-10-01

    The problem of selection bias has long been recognized in the analysis of two-stage trials, where promising candidates are selected in stage 1 for confirmatory analysis in stage 2. To efficiently correct for bias, uniformly minimum variance conditionally unbiased estimators (UMVCUEs) have been proposed for a wide variety of trial settings, but where the population parameter estimates are assumed to be independent. We relax this assumption and derive the UMVCUE in the multivariate normal setting with an arbitrary known covariance structure. One area of application is the estimation of odds ratios (ORs) when combining a genome-wide scan with a replication study. Our framework explicitly accounts for correlated single nucleotide polymorphisms, as might occur due to linkage disequilibrium. We illustrate our approach on the measurement of the association between 11 genetic variants and the risk of Crohn's disease, as reported in Parkes and others (2007. Sequence variants in the autophagy gene IRGM and multiple other replicating loci contribute to Crohn's disease susceptibility. Nat. Gen. 39: (7), 830-832.), and show that the estimated ORs can vary substantially if both selection and correlation are taken into account.

  16. Functional Analysis of a Novel Genome-Wide Association Study Signal in SMAD3 That Confers Protection From Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Adam W.; Martinuk, Amy; Silva, Anada;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—: A recent genome-wide association study meta-analysis identified an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism in SMAD3, rs56062135C>T, the minor allele (T) which associates with protection from coronary artery disease. Relevant to atherosclerosis, SMAD3 is a key contributor to transformi...

  17. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei;

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 popul...

  18. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in East Asian-ancestry populations identifies four new loci for body mass index

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Wanqing; Zheng,Wei; Okada, Yukinori; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Li, Huaixing; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yang, Xiaobo; He, Jiang; Wu, Ying; He, Meian; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Recent genetic association studies have identified 55 genetic loci associated with obesity or body mass index (BMI). The vast majority, 51 loci, however, were identified in European-ancestry populations. We conducted a meta-analysis of associations between BMI and ∼2.5 million genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms among 86 757 individuals of Asian ancestry, followed by in silico and de novo replication among 7488–47 352 additional Asian-ancestry individuals. We identified four ...

  19. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels.Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185 participants from 15 population-based studies. We sought replication for the genome-wide significant and suggestive loci in a replication panel comprising 16 540 individuals from 10 independent stud...

  20. ERAP1 variants are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in East Asian population: a new Chinese case-control study and meta-analysis of published series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Zhang, X

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) has been confirmed to be associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Caucasian. However, whether they are associated with AS in East Asian population remains unidentified. We investigated this relationship by a new Chinese case-control study and a meta-analysis of published series. 368 cases and 460 controls were recruited in the Chinese case-control study. Genotyping was completed using the chip-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Allelic associations were analysed using contingency tables. In the meta-analysis, up to 2748 cases and 2774 controls from seven different studies and the new Chinese study were combined using Review Manager software version 5.1.1. Mantel-Haenszel or Inverse Variance test was used to calculate fixed or random-effects pooled ORs. In the new Chinese study, strong association with AS was observed for marker rs10050860, rs27434 and rs1065407 at P value of meta-analysis showed that rs27037 and rs30187 were strongly associated with AS (P < 0.00001). Significant association was also observed for rs27434 (P = 0.001). No association was shown for rs27044 (P = 0.70). We concluded that ERAP1 variants are associated with AS in East Asian population, indicating a common pathogenic mechanism for AS in East Asians and Caucasians.

  1. The SNP rs931794 in 15q25.1 Is Associated with Lung Cancer Risk: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis.

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    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common human malignant diseases and the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The rs931794, a SNP located in 15q25.1, has been suggested to be associated with lung cancer risk. Nevertheless, several genetic association studies yielded controversial results.A hospital-based case-control study involving 611 cases and 1062 controls revealed the variant of rs931794 was related to increased lung cancer risk. Stratified analyses revealed the G allele was significantly associated with lung cancer risk among smokers. Following meta-analysis including 6616 cases and 7697 controls confirmed the relevance of rs931794 variant with increased lung cancer risk once again. Heterogeneity should be taken into account when interpreting the consequences. Stratified analysis found ethnicity, histological type and genotyping method were not the sources of between-study heterogeneity. Further sensitivity analysis revealed that the study "Hsiung et al (2010" might be the major contributor to heterogeneity. Cumulative meta-analysis showed the trend was increasingly obvious with adding studies, confirming the significant association.Results from our current case-control study and meta-analysis offered insight of association between rs931794 and lung cancer risk, suggesting the variant of rs931794 might be related with increased lung cancer risk.

  2. Association between transportation noise and cardiovascular disease: A meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies among adult populations from 1980 to 2010

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    Dibyendu Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is hypothesized that exposure to transportation noise is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease among adult population. The present study further explores this association in the light of new findings. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of studies reported during the last 3 decades on the association of transportation noise exposure with cardiovascular disease endpoints among adult population in cross-sectional studies. Materials and Methods: Relative risks were pooled from 12 studies by using an inverse-variance weighted fixed-effects model. The cardiovascular health outcomes included ischemic heart disease, myocardial infraction, angina pectoris, electrocardiogram-ischemia and cardiovascular medication. Results: The pooled risk estimate (95% confidence interval of 1.04 (0.96-1.12, shows a positive but nonsignificant association. The sensitivity analysis, conducted by excluding studies one by one, resulted in a positive and significant risk estimate. Contrary to the earlier meta-analysis, this study observed heterogeneity among subgroups and produced significant positive results to show that there exists an association between air traffic noise exposure and cardiovascular disease. It was also observed that the risk of cardiovascular disease due to exposure to transportation noise has increase to significant levels over the last 30 years. Conclusion: It can be concluded that though the association between transportation noise exposure and cardiovascular disease is evident, but not at a significant level. This study although provides evidence that air traffic noise is a serious cause of concern.

  3. A risk factor analysis of healthcare-associated fungal infections in an intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study

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    Yang Su-Pen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of fungal healthcare-associated infection (HAI has increased in a major teaching hospital in the northern part of Taiwan over the past decade, especially in the intensive care units (ICUs. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that were responsible for the outbreak and trend in the ICU. Methods Surveillance fungal cultures were obtained from “sterile” objects, antiseptic solutions, environment of infected patients and hands of medical personnel. Risk factors for comparison included age, gender, admission service, and total length of stay in the ICU, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores at admission to the ICU, main diagnosis on ICU admission, use of invasive devices, receipt of hemodialysis, total parenteral nutrition (TPN use, history of antibiotic therapy before HAI or during ICU stay in no HAI group, and ICU discharge status (ie, dead or alive. Univariable analysis followed by multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors for ICU fungal HAIs and ICU mortality. Results There was a significant trend in ICU fungal HAIs from 1998 to 2009 (P Candida albicans (27.3%, Candida tropicalis (6.6%, Candida glabrata (6.6%, Candida parapsilosis (1.9%, Candida species (0.8%, and other fungi (1.9%. Candida albicans accounted for 63% of all Candida species. Yeasts were found in the environment of more heavily infected patients. The independent risk factors (P P  Conclusions There was a secular trend of an increasing number of fungal HAIs in our ICU over the past decade. Patients with ICU fungal HAIs had a significantly higher mortality rate than did patients without ICU HAIs. Total parenteral nutrition was a significant risk factor for all types of ICU fungal HAIs, and its use should be monitored closely.

  4. A method for detecting epistasis in genome-wide studies using case-control multi-locus association analysis

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    Galan Jose

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The difficulty in elucidating the genetic basis of complex diseases roots in the many factors that can affect the development of a disease. Some of these genetic effects may interact in complex ways, proving undetectable by current single-locus methodology. Results We have developed an analysis tool called Hypothesis Free Clinical Cloning (HFCC to search for genome-wide epistasis in a case-control design. HFCC combines a relatively fast computing algorithm for genome-wide epistasis detection, with the flexibility to test a variety of different epistatic models in multi-locus combinations. HFCC has good power to detect multi-locus interactions simulated under a variety of genetic models and noise conditions. Most importantly, HFCC can accomplish exhaustive genome-wide epistasis search with large datasets as demonstrated with a 400,000 SNP set typed on a cohort of Parkinson's disease patients and controls. Conclusion With the current availability of genetic studies with large numbers of individuals and genetic markers, HFCC can have a great impact in the identification of epistatic effects that escape the standard single-locus association analyses.

  5. Analysis of functional and pathway association of differential co-expressed genes: a case study in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-hui; Liu, Yu-feng; Li, Ke-ning; Duanmu, Hui-zi; Chang, Zhi-qiang; Li, Zhen-qi; Zhang, Shan-zhen; Xu, Yan

    2012-02-01

    Drug addiction has been considered as a kind of chronic relapsing brain disease influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. At present, many causative genes and pathways related to diverse kinds of drug addiction have been discovered, while less attention has been paid to common mechanisms shared by different drugs underlying addiction. By applying a co-expression meta-analysis method to mRNA expression profiles of alcohol, cocaine, heroin addicted and normal samples, we identified significant gene co-expression pairs. As co-expression networks of drug group and control group constructed, associated function term pairs and pathway pairs reflected by co-expression pattern changes were discovered by integrating functional and pathway information respectively. The results indicated that respiratory electron transport chain, synaptic transmission, mitochondrial electron transport, signal transduction, locomotory behavior, response to amphetamine, negative regulation of cell migration, glucose regulation of insulin secretion, signaling by NGF, diabetes pathways, integration of energy metabolism, dopamine receptors may play an important role in drug addiction. In addition, the results can provide theory support for studies of addiction mechanisms.

  6. Opposite Associations between Individual KIAA0319 Polymorphisms and Developmental Dyslexia Risk across Populations: A Stratified Meta-Analysis by the Study Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shanshan; Niu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kong, Rui; Wang, Jia; Liu, Lingfei; Luo, Xiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Song, Ranran

    2016-01-01

    KIAA0319 at the DYX2 locus is one of the most extensively studied candidate genes for developmental dyslexia (DD) owing to its important role in neuronal migration. Previous research on associations between KIAA0319 genetic variations and DD has yielded inconsistent results. It is important to establish a more precise estimate of the DD risk associated with these genetic variations. We carried out a meta-analysis of association studies involving KIAA0319 polymorphisms and DD risk. The results of pooled analysis indicated that none of the six investigated markers in or near the KIAA0319 gene are associated with DD. However, a stratified analysis by the study population revealed opposite associations involving KIAA0319 rs4504469 in European and Asian subgroups. The stratified analysis also showed that the KIAA0319 rs9461045 minor allele (T allele) has a protective effect in Asians. This meta-analysis has allowed us to establish the effects of specific KIAA0319 polymorphisms on DD risk with greater precision, as they vary across populations; analyzing one single nucleotide polymorphism at a time could not fully explain the genetic association for DD. PMID:27464509

  7. The genetic variant on chromosome 10p14 is associated with risk of colorectal cancer: results from a case-control study and a meta-analysis.

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    Qin Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs10795668, located at 10p14, was first identified to be significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC by a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 2008; however, another GWAS and following replication studies yielded conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of 470 cases and 475 controls in a Chinese population and then performed a meta-analysis, integrating the current study and 9 publications to evaluate the association between rs10795668 and CRC risk. Heterogeneity among studies and publication bias were assessed by the χ²-based Q statistic test and Egger's test, respectively. RESULTS: In the case-control study, significant association between the SNP and CRC risk was observed, with per-A-allele OR of 0.71 (95%CI: 0.54-0.94, P = 0.017. The following meta-analysis further confirmed the significant association, with per-A-allele OR of 0.91 (95%CI: 0.89-0.93, P(heterogeneity >0.05 in European population and 0.86 (95%CI: 0.78-0.96, P(heterogeneity <0.05 in Asian population. Besides, sensitivity analyses and publication bias assessment indicated the robust stability and reliability of the results. CONCLUSIONS: Results from our case-control study and the followed meta-analysis confirmed the significant association of rs10795668 with CRC risk.

  8. An Optimal Bahadur-Efficient Method in Detection of Sparse Signals with Applications to Pathway Analysis in Sequencing Association Studies.

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    Hongying Dai

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing data pose a severe curse of dimensionality, complicating traditional "single marker-single trait" analysis. We propose a two-stage combined p-value method for pathway analysis. The first stage is at the gene level, where we integrate effects within a gene using the Sequence Kernel Association Test (SKAT. The second stage is at the pathway level, where we perform a correlated Lancaster procedure to detect joint effects from multiple genes within a pathway. We show that the Lancaster procedure is optimal in Bahadur efficiency among all combined p-value methods. The Bahadur efficiency,[Formula: see text], compares sample sizes among different statistical tests when signals become sparse in sequencing data, i.e. ε →0. The optimal Bahadur efficiency ensures that the Lancaster procedure asymptotically requires a minimal sample size to detect sparse signals ([Formula: see text]. The Lancaster procedure can also be applied to meta-analysis. Extensive empirical assessments of exome sequencing data show that the proposed method outperforms Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA. We applied the competitive Lancaster procedure to meta-analysis data generated by the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium to identify pathways significantly associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol.

  9. An Optimal Bahadur-Efficient Method in Detection of Sparse Signals with Applications to Pathway Analysis in Sequencing Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongying; Wu, Guodong; Wu, Michael; Zhi, Degui

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing data pose a severe curse of dimensionality, complicating traditional "single marker-single trait" analysis. We propose a two-stage combined p-value method for pathway analysis. The first stage is at the gene level, where we integrate effects within a gene using the Sequence Kernel Association Test (SKAT). The second stage is at the pathway level, where we perform a correlated Lancaster procedure to detect joint effects from multiple genes within a pathway. We show that the Lancaster procedure is optimal in Bahadur efficiency among all combined p-value methods. The Bahadur efficiency,[Formula: see text], compares sample sizes among different statistical tests when signals become sparse in sequencing data, i.e. ε →0. The optimal Bahadur efficiency ensures that the Lancaster procedure asymptotically requires a minimal sample size to detect sparse signals ([Formula: see text]). The Lancaster procedure can also be applied to meta-analysis. Extensive empirical assessments of exome sequencing data show that the proposed method outperforms Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). We applied the competitive Lancaster procedure to meta-analysis data generated by the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium to identify pathways significantly associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol.

  10. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: the DAMAGE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; van 't Riet, Esther;

    2009-01-01

    ). After a meta-analysis, only one SNP in SIRT4 (rs2522138) remained significant (P=0.01). Extending the second stage with samples from the Danish Steno Study (n=1220 participants) resulted in a common odds ratio (OR) of 0.92 (0.85-1.00), P=0.06. Moreover, in a large meta-analysis of three genome...

  11. Genetic loci associated with plasma phospholipid n-3 fatty acids: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from the CHARGE Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozenn N Lemaitre

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs can derive from diet or from α-linolenic acid (ALA by elongation and desaturation. We investigated the association of common genetic variation with plasma phospholipid levels of the four major n-3 PUFAs by performing genome-wide association studies in five population-based cohorts comprising 8,866 subjects of European ancestry. Minor alleles of SNPs in FADS1 and FADS2 (desaturases were associated with higher levels of ALA (p = 3 x 10⁻⁶⁴ and lower levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, p = 5 x 10⁻⁵⁸ and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, p = 4 x 10⁻¹⁵⁴. Minor alleles of SNPs in ELOVL2 (elongase were associated with higher EPA (p = 2 x 10⁻¹² and DPA (p = 1 x 10⁻⁴³ and lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, p = 1 x 10⁻¹⁵. In addition to genes in the n-3 pathway, we identified a novel association of DPA with several SNPs in GCKR (glucokinase regulator, p = 1 x 10⁻⁸. We observed a weaker association between ALA and EPA among carriers of the minor allele of a representative SNP in FADS2 (rs1535, suggesting a lower rate of ALA-to-EPA conversion in these subjects. In samples of African, Chinese, and Hispanic ancestry, associations of n-3 PUFAs were similar with a representative SNP in FADS1 but less consistent with a representative SNP in ELOVL2. Our findings show that common variation in n-3 metabolic pathway genes and in GCKR influences plasma phospholipid levels of n-3 PUFAs in populations of European ancestry and, for FADS1, in other ancestries.

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies six new Loci for serum calcium concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conall M O'Seaghdha

    Full Text Available Calcium is vital to the normal functioning of multiple organ systems and its serum concentration is tightly regulated. Apart from CASR, the genes associated with serum calcium are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 39,400 individuals from 17 population-based cohorts and investigated the 14 most strongly associated loci in ≤ 21,679 additional individuals. Seven loci (six new regions in association with serum calcium were identified and replicated. Rs1570669 near CYP24A1 (P = 9.1E-12, rs10491003 upstream of GATA3 (P = 4.8E-09 and rs7481584 in CARS (P = 1.2E-10 implicate regions involved in Mendelian calcemic disorders: Rs1550532 in DGKD (P = 8.2E-11, also associated with bone density, and rs7336933 near DGKH/KIAA0564 (P = 9.1E-10 are near genes that encode distinct isoforms of diacylglycerol kinase. Rs780094 is in GCKR. We characterized the expression of these genes in gut, kidney, and bone, and demonstrate modulation of gene expression in bone in response to dietary calcium in mice. Our results shed new light on the genetics of calcium homeostasis.

  13. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies and Network Analysis-Based Integration with Gene Expression Data Identify New Suggestive Loci and Unravel a Wnt-Centric Network Associated with Dupuytren’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kerstin; Siegert, Sabine; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Du, Juanjiangmeng; Casper, Ramona; Dolmans, Guido H.; Werker, Paul M.; Tinschert, Sigrid; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Nothnagel, Michael; Nürnberg, Peter; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dupuytren´s disease, a fibromatosis of the connective tissue in the palm, is a common complex disease with a strong genetic component. Up to date nine genetic loci have been found to be associated with the disease. Six of these loci contain genes that code for Wnt signalling proteins. In spite of this striking first insight into the genetic factors in Dupuytren´s disease, much of the inherited risk in Dupuytren´s disease still needs to be discovered. The already identified loci jointly explain ~1% of the heritability in this disease. To further elucidate the genetic basis of Dupuytren´s disease, we performed a genome-wide meta-analysis combining three genome-wide association study (GWAS) data sets, comprising 1,580 cases and 4,480 controls. We corroborated all nine previously identified loci, six of these with genome-wide significance (p-value Dupuytren´s disease. PMID:27467239

  14. Use of meta-analysis to combine candidate gene association studies: application to study the relationship between the ESR PvuII polymorphism and sow litter size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Leopoldo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article investigates the application of meta-analysis on livestock candidate gene effects. The PvuII polymorphism of the ESR gene is used as an example. The association among ESR PvuII alleles with the number of piglets born alive and total born in the first (NBA1, TNB1 and later parities (NBA, TNB is reviewed by conducting a meta-analysis of 15 published studies including 9329 sows. Under a fixed effects model, litter size values were significantly lower in the "AA" genotype groups when compared with "AB" and "BB" homozygotes. Under the random effects model, the results were similar although differences between "AA" and "AB" genotype groups were not clearly significant for NBA and TNB. Nevertheless, the most noticeable result was the high and significant heterogeneity estimated among studies. This heterogeneity could be assigned to error sampling, genotype by environment interaction, linkage or epistasis, as referred to in the literature, but also to the hypothesis of population admixture/stratification. It is concluded that meta-analysis can be considered as a helpful analytical tool to synthesise and discuss livestock candidate gene effects. The main difficulty found was the insufficient information on the standard errors of the estimated genotype effects in several publications. Consequently, the convenience of publishing the standard errors or the concrete P-values instead of the test significance level should be recommended to guarantee the quality of candidate gene effect meta-analyses.

  15. Associations of IL-23R polymorphisms with ankylosing spondylitis in East Asian population: a new case-control study and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Zhang, X; Li, J; Wang, Y

    2012-04-01

    Interleukin-23 receptor (IL-23R) has been confirmed to be associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Caucasian. However, whether they are associated with AS in East Asian population remains unidentified. Here, we conducted a new case-control study investigating this relationship in Chinese Han population and then performed a meta-analysis in East Asian population. The Chinese Han study included 200 cases and 200 controls. Genotyping was completed using the chip-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Allelic associations were analysed using contingency tables. In the meta-analysis, 1384 cases and 1710 controls from five different studies and the new Chinese Han study were combined using Review Manager software Version 5.1.1. Mantel-Haenszel test was used to calculate fixed effects pooled ORs. No association with AS was observed in the Chinese Han study. Meta-analysis showed that no SNP was significantly associated with AS in East Asian population. In conclusion, we found no evidence for association between IL-23R and AS in East Asian population. Major attention should be paid to other genes belonged to IL-23 signalling pathway network in the future.

  16. Blood cis-eQTL analysis fails to identify novel association signals among sub-threshold candidates from genome-wide association studies in restless legs syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C Schulte

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a common neurologic disorder characterized by nightly dysesthesias affecting the legs primarily during periods of rest and relieved by movement. RLS is a complex genetic disease and susceptibility factors in six genomic regions have been identified by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS. For some complex genetic traits, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs are enriched among trait-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. With the aim of identifying new genetic susceptibility factors for RLS, we assessed the 332 best-associated SNPs from the genome-wide phase of the to date largest RLS GWAS for cis-eQTL effects in peripheral blood from individuals of European descent. In 740 individuals belonging to the KORA general population cohort, 52 cis-eQTLs with pnominal<10(-3 were identified, while in 976 individuals belonging to the SHIP-TREND general population study 53 cis-eQTLs with pnominal<10(-3 were present. 23 of these cis-eQTLs overlapped between the two cohorts. Subsequently, the twelve of the 23 cis-eQTL SNPs, which were not located at an already published RLS-associated locus, were tested for association in 2449 RLS cases and 1462 controls. The top SNP, located in the DET1 gene, was nominally significant (p<0.05 but did not withstand correction for multiple testing (p = 0.42. Although a similar approach has been used successfully with regard to other complex diseases, we were unable to identify new genetic susceptibility factor for RLS by adding this novel level of functional assessment to RLS GWAS data.

  17. Blood cis-eQTL Analysis Fails to Identify Novel Association Signals among Sub-Threshold Candidates from Genome-Wide Association Studies in Restless Legs Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Eva C.; Schramm, Katharina; Schurmann, Claudia; Lichtner, Peter; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Berger, Klaus; Fietze, Ingo; Gross, Nadine; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Oertel, Wolfgang; Bachmann, Cornelius G.; Paulus, Walter; Zimprich, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Schminke, Ulf; Nauck, Matthias; Illig, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Prokisch, Holger; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurologic disorder characterized by nightly dysesthesias affecting the legs primarily during periods of rest and relieved by movement. RLS is a complex genetic disease and susceptibility factors in six genomic regions have been identified by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). For some complex genetic traits, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) are enriched among trait-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). With the aim of identifying new genetic susceptibility factors for RLS, we assessed the 332 best-associated SNPs from the genome-wide phase of the to date largest RLS GWAS for cis-eQTL effects in peripheral blood from individuals of European descent. In 740 individuals belonging to the KORA general population cohort, 52 cis-eQTLs with pnominal<10−3 were identified, while in 976 individuals belonging to the SHIP-TREND general population study 53 cis-eQTLs with pnominal<10−3 were present. 23 of these cis-eQTLs overlapped between the two cohorts. Subsequently, the twelve of the 23 cis-eQTL SNPs, which were not located at an already published RLS-associated locus, were tested for association in 2449 RLS cases and 1462 controls. The top SNP, located in the DET1 gene, was nominally significant (p<0.05) but did not withstand correction for multiple testing (p = 0.42). Although a similar approach has been used successfully with regard to other complex diseases, we were unable to identify new genetic susceptibility factor for RLS by adding this novel level of functional assessment to RLS GWAS data. PMID:24875634

  18. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for 13 Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, William A.; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Taylor, Philip R.; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Purdue, Mark P.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M.; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K. C.; Chang, Ellen T.; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S.; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M.; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Diver, W. Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J.; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L.; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Hosain, G. M. Monawar; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kelly, Rachel S.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert J.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M.; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Link, Brian K.; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E.; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E.; Novak, Anne J.; Oberg, Ann L.; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H.; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A.; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F.; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T.; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J.; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S.; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M.; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Villano, Danylo J.; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J.; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M.; Cerhan, James R.; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M.; Smedby, Karin E.; Teras, Lauren R.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S.; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E.; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T.; Slager, Susan L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. Methods: Between 2007 and 2014, the US National Cancer Institute has generated data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 49 492 cancer case patients and 34 131 control patients. We apply novel mixed model methodology (GCTA) to this GWAS data to estimate the heritability of individual cancers, as well as the proportion of heritability attributable to cigarette smoking in smoking-related cancers, and the genetic correlation between pairs of cancers. Results: GWAS heritability was statistically significant at nearly all sites, with the estimates of array-based heritability, hl 2, on the liability threshold (LT) scale ranging from 0.05 to 0.38. Estimating the combined heritability of multiple smoking characteristics, we calculate that at least 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 37%) and 7% (95% CI = 4% to 11%) of the heritability for lung and bladder cancer, respectively, can be attributed to genetic determinants of smoking. Most pairs of cancers studied did not show evidence of strong genetic correlation. We found only four pairs of cancers with marginally statistically significant correlations, specifically kidney and testes (ρ = 0.73, SE = 0.28), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and pediatric osteosarcoma (ρ = 0.53, SE = 0.21), DLBCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (ρ = 0.51, SE =0.18), and bladder and lung (ρ = 0.35, SE = 0.14). Correlation analysis also indicates that the genetic architecture of lung cancer differs between a smoking population of European ancestry and a nonsmoking Asian population, allowing for the possibility that the genetic etiology for the same disease can vary by population and environmental exposures. Conclusion: Our

  19. Genome-wide meta-analysis of observational studies shows common genetic variants associated with macronutrient intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J.S. Ngwa; F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A.C. Frazier-Wood (Alexis); D.K. Houston (Denise); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J. Luan; V. Mikkilä (Vera); F. Renström (Frida); E. Sonestedt (Emily); J.H. Zhao (Jing); A.Y. Chu (Audrey); L. Qi (Lu); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.C. De Oliveira Otto (Marcia); E.J. Dhurandhar (Emily); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); I. Johansson (Ingegerd); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); K. Lohman (Kurt); A. Manichaikul (Ani); N.M. McKeown (Nicola ); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); A.B. Singleton (Andrew); K. Stirrups (Kathy); J. Viikari (Jorma); Z. Ye (Zheng); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I. Barroso (Inês); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); A. Hofman (Albert); Y. Liu (Yongmei); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); K.E. North (Kari); M. Dimitriou (Maria); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Langenberg (Claudia); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.B. Hu (Frank); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); O. Raitakari (Olli); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Johnson (Anthony); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.A. Schrack (Jennifer); R.D. Semba; D.S. Siscovick (David); D.K. Arnett (Donna); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P.W. Franks (Paul); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer )

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Macronutrient intake varies substantially between individuals, and there is evidence that this variation is partly accounted for by genetic variants. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with macronutrient intake. D

  20. Genome-wide association studies of mri-defined brain infarcts: Meta-analysis from the charge consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Debette (Stéphanie); J.C. Bis (Joshua); M. Fornage (Myriam); H.A. Schmid (Herbert); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); S. Sigurdsson (Stefan); G. Heiss (Gerardo); M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); A. van der Lugt (Aad); C. DeCarli (Charles); T. Lumley (Thomas); D.S. Knopman (David); C. Enzinger (Christian); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); C. Dufouil (Carole); D.J. Catellier (Diane); F. Fazekas (Franz); T. Aspelund (Thor); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A. Beiser (Alexa); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); C. Tzourio (Christophe); D.K. Shibata (Dean); M. Tscherner (Maria); T.B. Harris (Tamara); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); L.D. Atwood (Larry); K. Rice (Kenneth); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Kelly-Hayes (Margaret); M. Cushman (Mary Ann); Y. Zhu (Yicheng); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hofman (Albert); J.R. Romero (Jose Rafael); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); L.J. Launer (Lenore); W.T. Longstreth Jr

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose-Previous studies examining genetic associations with MRI-defined brain infarct have yielded inconsistent findings. We investigated genetic variation underlying covert MRI infarct in persons without histories of transient ischemic attack or stroke. We performed meta

  1. Analysis of Associations Between Contemporaneous Job Corps Performance Measures and Impact Estimates from the National Job Corps Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Fortson; Peter Z. Schochet

    2011-01-01

    Conducted in 1993, the National Job Corps Study (NJCS) found Job Corps improved education and training outcomes, reduced criminal activity, and improved earnings and employment outcomes. However, impacts on key outcomes were not associated with overall center performance measures. This study analyzed the relationship between unadjusted and regression-adjusted Job Corps performance measures and center-level impact estimates from the NJCS and found the adjusted performance ratings were uncorrel...

  2. Association between consumption of soy and risk of cardiovascular disease: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhaoli; Zhang, Xinyue; Li, Chunlin; Jiao, Shouchun; Dong, Wenyao

    2017-01-01

    Background The relationships between dietary intake of soy foods and risk of cardiovascular disease are uncertain. The aims of this study were to evaluate and summarize the evidence on the association between consumption of soy and risk of cardiovascular disease (including stroke and coronary heart disease). Methods We systematically searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from their inception up to 22 February 2016. We included only observational studies, and used random-effects models to calculate summary relative risks (SRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A total of 10 prospective cohort and seven case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. There were a total of 17,269 cardiovascular disease events, including 6265 stroke events, 10,806 coronary heart disease events, and 198 other cardiovascular disease events. A significant negative association was shown between soy intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (SRR = 0.84 95% CI: 0.75-0.94; pheterogeneitycardiovascular disease (SRR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64-1.00). A significant negative association was shown for the association between soy intake and risk of stroke (SRR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68-0.99) and coronary heart disease (SRR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.72-0.95). There were no associations between soy isoflavones consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Conclusion Overall evidence indicated that consumption of soy was negatively associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and coronary heart disease risk.

  3. Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals no gain in power for association studies of common variants in the Finnish Saami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, Jeroen R; Fransen, Erik; Hannula, Samuli; Van Laer, Lut; Van Eyken, Els; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana; Aikio, Pekka; Stephan, Dietrich A; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-05-01

    The Saami from Fennoscandia are believed to represent an ancient, genetically isolated population with no evidence of population expansion. Theoretical work has indicated that under this demographic scenario, extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) is generated by genetic drift. Therefore, it has been suggested that the Saami would be particularly suited for genetic association studies, offering a substantial power advantage and allowing more economic study designs. However, no study has yet assessed this claim. As part of a GWAS for a complex trait, we evaluated the relative power for association studies of common variants in the Finnish Saami. LD patterns in the Saami were very similar to those in the non-African HapMap reference panels. Haplotype diversity was reduced and, on average, levels of LD were higher in the Saami as compared with those in the HapMap panels. However, using a 'hidden' SNP approach we show that this does not translate into a power gain in association studies. Contrary to earlier claims, we show that for a given set of common SNPs, genomic coverage attained in the Saami is similar to that in the non-African HapMap panels. Nevertheless, the reduced haplotype diversity could potentially facilitate gene identification, especially if multiple rare variants play a role in disease etiology. Our results further indicate that the HapMap is a useful resource for genetic studies in the Saami.

  4. Association between interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese Han population: a case-control study and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Jiatian; Sokolove, Jeremy; Zhu, Kai; Zhang, Yuanchao; Sun, Hongsheng; Evangelou, Evangelos; Pan, Zhenglun

    2014-07-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association in the interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Chinese Han population from Shandong Province. Target regions of IL-6 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyped. A logistic regression analysis was performed to detect potential associations in our case-control sample, the odd ratio(OR) and 95% confidence intervals(CIs) were calculated. Furthermore, we systematically tracked all the published studies in the field and performed a meta-analysis for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) under study. 256 RA patients and 331 healthy controls were recruited into the case-control study. We found allele frequencies of rs1800795, rs1800797 and rs1474347 in RA patients differ from control subjects (P = 0.016, 0.024, 0.020, respectively). Significant difference was observed in haplotype frequencies of GCCGCT between RA patients and controls (P = 0.0001, OR = 4.066, 95%CI = 1.891 ~ 8.746), while GGCGCT frequencies was found lower in RA than controls (P = 0.006, OR = 0.669, 95%CI = 0.501 ~ 0.894). The results of the meta-analysis showed association polymorphism within the IL-6 promoter with RA. These findings suggest that rare IL-6 gene polymorphisms may associate with RA susceptibility in Han Chinese populations; however further studies are needed to assess the validity of the association of IL-6 with RA.

  5. Cumulative association between age-related macular degeneration and less studied genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1: a meta and gene-cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weihong; Dong, Shuqian; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Haina; Dai, Fei; Yang, Jingyun

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the cumulative effect of the less studied genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1 on age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We performed an extensive literature search for studies on the association between AMD and the less studied genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1. Multiple meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the association between individual genetic variants and AMD. A gene-cluster analysis was used to investigate the cumulative effect of these less studied genetic variants on AMD. A total of 23 studies from 20 published papers met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. Several genetic variants in the gene cluster are significantly associated with AMD in our meta-analyses or in individual studies. Gene-cluster analysis reveals a strong cumulative association between these genetic variants in this gene cluster and AMD (p studies in our meta-analyses; and rs3793917, the SNP with the largest sample size, were not significantly associated with AMD (both p's > 0.12). Sensitivity analyses reveal significant association of AMD with rs2736911 in Chinese but not in Caucasian, with c.372_815del443ins54 in Caucasian but not in Chinese, and with rs1049331 in both ethnic groups. These less studied genetic variants have a significant cumulative effect on wet AMD. Our study provides evidence of the joint contribution of genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1 to AMD risk, in addition to the two widely studied genetic variants whose association with AMD was well established.

  6. Polyphenol intake is associated with low-grade inflammation, using a novel data analysis from the Moli-sani study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounis, George; Bonaccio, Marialaura; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Costanzo, Simona; de Curtis, Amalia; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Sieri, Sabina; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Cerletti, Chiara; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2016-01-01

    The association of polyphenol content of human diet with low-grade inflammation is not yet fully understood. It was the objective of this study to evaluate the association of flavonoid and lignan intake with frequently used and easily applicable in clinical practice low-grade inflammation biomarkers, in a novel holistic approach. A total of 5,948 women and 5,965 men (aged ≥ 35 years) were analysed from the Moli-sani cohort, randomly recruited from the general population. The EPIC-FFQ was used for dietary assessment. Flavonol, flavone, flavanone, flavanol, anthocyanin, isoflavone and lignan intakes were calculated using Eurofir eBASIS and the polyphenol antioxidant content (PAC)-score was constructed to assess the total content of diet in these nutrients. CRP levels, WBC and PLT count and granulocyte to lymphocyte ratio were conceived as low-grade inflammation biomarkers. INFLA-score was constructed summarizing synergistic effects of these biomarkers. The INFLA-score was negatively associated with PAC-score in different levels of adjustment, in both genders (for all β-coefinflammation status (i.e. higher quartile of INFLA-score) in men and women (odds ratio [ORs] 0.92 to 0.95, pinflammation biomarkers in a large population based study. For the first time low-grade inflammation was evaluated in a holistic way through INFLA-score and was associated with polyphenol content of diet.

  7. Vitamin D receptor rs2228570 polymorphism and invasive ovarian carcinoma risk: pooled analysis in five studies within the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J;

    2011-01-01

    The association of invasive ovarian carcinoma risk with the functional polymorphism rs2228570 (aka rs10735810; FokI polymorphism) in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene was examined in 1820 white non-Hispanic cases and 3479 controls in a pooled analysis of five population-based case-control studies...

  8. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J.; Chen, Gary K.; Lindstrom, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O.; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berg, Christine D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M.; Buring, Julie E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L.; Diasio, Robert B.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gerty, Susan M.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Giles, Graham G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A.; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B.; John, Esther M.; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M.; Lee, I-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J.; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J.; Palmer, Julie R.; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F.; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Severi, Gianluca; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, JoEllen; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Van Den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A.; Vachon, Celine M.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of E

  9. Study of association and molecular analysis of human papillomavirus in breast cancer of Indian patients: Clinical and prognostic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Saimul; Dasgupta, Hemantika; Roychowdhury, Anirban; Bhattacharya, Rittwika; Mukherjee, Nupur; Roy, Anup; Mandal, Gautam Kumar; Alam, Neyaz; Biswas, Jaydip; Mandal, Shyamsundar; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes tumors primarily Cervical cancer. Recently, inconsistent reports came up in Breast cancer (BC) too. In India, despite treatment 70,218 BC patients die each year. So, we explored the association of HPV, if any, with BC prognosis in Indian pre-therapeutic (PT) and Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) patients with subsequent analysis of HPV profile. Methods HPV prevalence was checked and analysis of physical status, copy number, genome variation, promoter methylation and expression (mRNA and protein) of the prevalent subtype was done. Results High prevalence of HPV was observed in both PT (64.0%) and NACT (71.0%) cases with significant association with younger (20–45 yrs) PT patients. Interestingly, HPV infection was significantly increased from adjacent normal breast (9.5%, 2/21), fibro adenomas (30%, 3/10) to tumors (64.8%, 203/313) samples. In both PT and NACT cases, HPV16 was the most prevalent subtype (69.0%) followed by HPV18 and HPV33. Survival analysis illustrated hrHPV infected PT patients had worst prognosis. So, detailed analysis of HPV16 profile was done which showed Europian-G350 as the most frequent HPV16 variant along with high rate of integration. Moreover, low copy number and hyper-methylation of P97 early promoter were concordant with low HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNA and protein expression. Notably, four novel variations (KT020838, KT020840, KT020841 and KT020839) in the LCR region and two (KT020836 and KT020837) in the E6 region were identified for the first time along with two novel E6^E7*I (KU199314) and E6^E7*II (KU199315) fusion transcript variants. Conclusion Thus, significant association of hrHPV with prognosis of Indian BC patients led to additional investigation of HPV16 profile. Outcomes indicated a plausible role of HPV in Indian BC patients. PMID:28245287

  10. Analysis of risk factors associated with precancerous lesion of gastric cancer in patients from eastern China: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Yanmin Wu; Yaofu Fan; Yangyang Jiang; Yao Wang; Hao Liu; Muxin Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between various risk factors and precancerous lesion of gastric cancer (PLGC) in patients from eastern China. Materials and Methods: 501 cases of PLGC and 523 cases of superficial gastritis were included. A comparative study of the relation between different risk factors and PGLC was performed. Results: Statistical differences were noted in a series of indexes including Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection, family history of esophageal cancer (EC), ...

  11. Association between cannabis use and schizotypal dimensions--a meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoke, Andrei; Galliot, Anne-Marie; Richard, Jean-Romain; Ferchiou, Aziz; Baudin, Grégoire; Leboyer, Marion; Schürhoff, Franck

    2014-09-30

    Cannabis consumption can cause abuse and dependence and increase risk of developing psychiatric and somatic disorders. Several literature reviews explored the link between cannabis consumption and schizophrenia but none summarized the rich literature on cannabis and psychometric schizotypy. The aim of our review is to synthesize data from studies that explored the association between cannabis consumption and schizoptypal dimensions. A systematic review of the literature and, when needed, contact with the authors, allowed us to gather data from 29 cross-sectional studies. We compared schizotypy scores between subjects that never used cannabis and subjects that used it at least once ("never vs. ever") and between current users and subjects that do not use cannabis currently ("current vs. other"). We conducted separate analyses for total schizotypy score and each of the three classical schizotypal dimensions (positive, negative, disorganized). For all eight comparisons, the cannabis group ("ever" or "current") had higher schizotypy scores. Differences were in the small or medium range and, with the exception of the negative score in the current vs. other comparison, statistically significant. Cannabis consumption is associated with increased schizotypal traits. More research, using different approaches (e.g. longitudinal studies) is needed to explore the cause of this association.

  12. Risk factors associated with hantavirosis fatality: a regional analysis from a case-control study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Antunes Willemann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Brazil, hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS has a high lethality rate that varies by region. This study aimed to identify the risk factors associated with fatal hantavirosis. Methods: This study was a case-control study that included all laboratory confirmed cases of hantavirosis. The cases were stratified by the different Brazilian regions using data from the Notifiable Diseases Information System. “Cases” were patients who progressed to death, whereas “controls” were patients who were cured. The odds ratio (OR and the adjusted OR were calculated. Results: Overall, 158 cases and 281 controls were included in this study. In the Midwest region, the cases were 60% less likely to present with flank pain, and the time between the beginning of symptoms and death was shorter than the time between the beginning of symptoms and a cure. In the Southeast region, the cases were 60% less likely to present with thrombocytopenia or reside in rural areas compared to those who progressed to a cure. Additionally, the cases sought medical assistance, notification and investigation more quickly than the controls. In the Southern region, the cases that died were 70% less likely to be male compared to the controls. Conclusions: HCPS manifests with nonspecific symptoms, and there are few published studies related to the condition, so determining a patient's therapeutic strategy is difficult. This study presents findings from different Brazilian regions and highlights the need for further investigations to improve comprehension about regional risk factors associated with hantavirosis and to reduce morbimortality.

  13. Common variant of PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) gene is associated with gout susceptibility: A replication study and meta-analysis in Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Toshihide; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Ogata, Hiraku; Kawamura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Naito, Mariko; Kawai, Sayo; Takada, Yuzo; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-12-01

    PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) is a scaffold protein that organizes a transportsome and regulates several transporters' functions including urate and drug transporters. Therefore, PDZK1 in renal proximal tubules may affect serum uric acid levels through PDZK1-binding renal urate transporters. Two previous studies in Japanese male population reported that a PDZK1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs12129861, was not associated with gout. In the present study, we performed a further association analysis between gout and rs12129861 in a different large-scale Japanese male population and a meta-analysis with previous Japanese population studies. We genotyped rs12129861 in 1210 gout cases and 1224 controls of a Japanese male population by TaqMan assay. As a result, we showed that rs12129861 was significantly associated with gout susceptibility (P = 0.016, odds ratio [OR] = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.96). The result of the meta-analysis among Japanese populations also showed a significant association (P = 0.013, OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.75-0.97). Our findings show the significant association between gout susceptibility and common variant of PDZK1 which reportedly regulates the functions of urate transporters in the urate transportsome.

  14. Association between left ventricular regional sympathetic denervation and mechanical dyssynchrony in phase analysis: a cardiac CZT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Giorgetti, Assuero; Kusch, Annette [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Liga, Riccardo [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy); Marzullo, Paolo [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); CNR, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the relationships among myocardial sympathetic innervation, perfusion and mechanical synchronicity assessed with cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) scintigraphy. A group of 29 patients underwent an evaluation of myocardial perfusion with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin CZT scintigraphy and adrenergic innervation with {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) CZT scintigraphy. The summed rest score (SRS), motion score (SMS) and thickening score (STS), as well as the summed {sup 123}I-MIBG defect score (SS-MIBG), were determined. Regional tracer uptake for both {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and {sup 123}I-MIBG was also calculated. Finally, the presence of significant myocardial mechanical dyssynchrony was evaluated in phase analysis on gated CZT images and the region of latest mechanical activation identified. Significant mechanical dyssynchrony was present in 17 patients (59 %) and associated with higher SRS (P = 0.030), SMS (P < 0.001), STS (P = 0.003) and early SS-MIBG (P = 0.037) as well as greater impairments in left ventricular ejection fraction (P < 0.001) and end-diastolic volume (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis a higher end-diastolic volume remained the only predictor of mechanical dyssynchrony (P = 0.047). Interestingly, while in the whole population regional myocardial perfusion and adrenergic activity were strongly correlated (R = 0.68), in patients with mechanical dyssynchrony the region of latest mechanical activation was predicted only by greater impairment in regional {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake (P = 0.012) that overwhelmed the effect of depressed regional perfusion. Left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony is associated with greater depression in contractile function and greater impairments in regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic activity. In patients with dyssynchrony, the region of latest mechanical activation is characterized by a significantly altered adrenergic tone. (orig.)

  15. Association of GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism and risk of head and neck cancers: a meta-analysis of 28 case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntian Lang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1 polymorphism have been considered a risk modifier for developing head and neck cancer (HNC in many studies; however, the results of such studies are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible association between the GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism and risk of HNC. METHOD: We performed a search in the relevant electronic database and a meta-analysis based on 28 published case-control studies that included 6,404 cases and 6,523 controls. To take into account the possibility of heterogeneity across the studies, a Chi-square based I(2-statistic test was performed. Crude pooled odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were assessed using both fixed-effects and random-effects models. RESULTS: The results of this meta-analysis showed that the GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism was not significantly associated with risk of HNC in the overall study population (pooled OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.92-1.09 or in subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, sample size, tumor site or publication year. Moreover, substantial evidence of heterogeneity among the studies was observed. Publication year was identified as the main cause of heterogeneity. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis does not support a significant association between the GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism and risk of HNC.

  16. Meta-analysis of the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer based on case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliu Peng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 is an inducible enzyme converting arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and playing important roles in inflammatory diseases as well as tumor development. Previous studies investigating the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer (CRC risk reported conflicting results. We performed a meta-analysis of all available studies to explore this association. METHODS: All studies published up to October 2013 on the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and CRC risk were identified by searching electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library. The association between COX-2 polymorphisms and CRC risk was assessed by odds ratios (ORs together with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: Ten studies with 6,774 cases and 9,772 controls were included for -1195A>G polymorphism, 13 studies including 6,807 cases and 10,052 controls were available for -765G>C polymorphism, and 8 studies containing 5,121 cases and 7,487 controls were included for 8473T>C polymorphism. With respect to -765G>C polymorphism, we did not find a significant association with CRC risk when all eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. However, in subgroup analyses by ethnicity and cancer location, with a Bonferroni corrected alpha of 0.05/2, statistical significant increased CRC risk was found in the Asian populations (dominant model CC+CG vs. GG: OR = 1.399, 95%CI: 1.113-1.760, P = 0.004 and rectum cancer patients (CC vs. GG: OR = 2.270, 95%CI: 1.295-3.980, P = 0.004; Recessive model CC vs. CG+GG: OR = 2.269, 95%CI: 1.297-3.970, P = 0.004. In subgroup analysis according to source of control, no significant association was detected. With respect to -1195A>G and 8473T>C polymorphisms, no significant association with CRC risk was demonstrated in the overall and subgroup analyses. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis suggests that the COX-2 -765G>C polymorphism may be a risk factor for

  17. Functional analysis of seven genes linked to body mass index and adiposity by genome-wide association studies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, John R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a total of about 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that show significant linkage to body mass index, a widely utilised surrogate measure of adiposity. However, only 8 of these associations have been confirmed by follow-up GWAS using more sophisticated measures of adiposity (computed tomography). Among these 8, there is a SNP close to the gene FTO which has been the subject of considerable work to diagnose its function. The remaining 7 SNPs are adjacent to, or within, the genes NEGR1, TMEM18, ETV5, FLJ35779, LINGO2, SH2B1 and GIPR, most of which are less well studied than FTO, particularly in the context of obesity. This article reviews the available data on the functions of these genes, including information gleaned from studies in humans and animal models. At present, we have virtually no information on the putative mechanism associating the genes FLJ35779 and LINGO2 to obesity. All of these genes are expressed in the brain, and for 2 of them (SH2B1 and GIPR), a direct link to the appetite regulation system is known. SH2B1 is an enhancer of intracellular signalling in the JAK-STAT pathway, and GIPR is the receptor for an appetite-linked hormone (GIP) produced by the alimentary tract. NEGR1, ETV5 and SH2B1 all have suggested roles in neurite outgrowth, and hence SNPs adjacent to these genes may affect development of the energy balance circuitry. Although the genes have central patterns of gene expression, implying a central neuronal connection to energy balance, for at least 4 of them (NEGR1, TMEM18, SH2B1 and GIPR), there are also significant peripheral functions related to adipose tissue biology. These functions may contribute to their effects on the obese phenotype.

  18. Strong association of 677 C>T substitution in the MTHFR gene with male infertility--a study on an indian population and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishi Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is an important enzyme of folate and methionine metabolism, making it crucial for DNA synthesis and methylation. The objective of this study was to analyze MTHFR gene 677C>T polymorphism in infertile male individuals from North India, followed by a meta-analysis on our data and published studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook genotyping on a total of 837 individuals including well characterized infertile (N = 522 and confirmed fertile (N = 315 individuals. The SNP was typed by direct DNA sequencing. Chi square test was done for statistical analysis. Published studies were searched using appropriate keywords. Source of data collection for meta-analysis included 'Pubmed', 'Ovid' and 'Google Scholar'. Those studies analyzing 677C>T polymorphism in male infertility and presenting all relevant data were included in meta-analysis. The genotype data for infertile subjects and fertile controls was extracted from each study. Chi square test was done to obtain odds ratio (OR and p-value. Meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software (Version 2. The frequency of mutant (T allele (p = 0.0025 and genotypes (CT+TT (p = 0.0187 was significantly higher in infertile individuals in comparison to fertile controls in our case-control study. The overall summary estimate (OR for allele and genotype meta-analysis were 1.304 (p = 0.000, 1.310 (p = 0.000, respectively, establishing significant association of 677C>T polymorphism with male infertility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: 677C>T substitution associated strongly with male infertility in Indian population. Allele and genotype meta-analysis also supported its strong correlation with male infertility, thus establishing it as a risk factor.

  19. Reduced Serum Level of Interleukin-10 is Associated with Cerebral Infarction: A Case-Control and Meta-Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifei; Yang, Haiqing; Diao, Zengyan; Li, Yi; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    IL-10 expression limits inflammation and restricts the size of CNS damage from stroke. In this study, we examined the correlation between cerebral infarction (CI) and serum levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) using a combination of case-control study and meta-analysis of published data, with an aim of understanding the relevance of serum IL-10 levels to CI development. This study enrolled a total of 169 CI patients admitted to the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University between May 2011 and November 2014. During the same period, a group of 145 individuals were recruited at the same hospital as healthy controls after thorough physical examination. Serum IL-10 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SPSS 19.0 (IBM, 2010, Chicago, IL, USA) and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 2.0 (CMA 2.0) software were used for data analysis. Serum levels of IL-10 (pg/mL) were significantly lower in CI patients when compared to healthy controls (15.36 ± 3.21 vs. 21.64 ± 5.17, t = 13.12, P IL-10 (pg/mL) compared to healthy controls (LAAS 14.77 ± 5.21, CEI 15.25 ± 5.10, LAC 16.58 ± 4.92, all P IL-10 levels when pair-wise comparisons were made between these three clinical subtypes of CI (all P > 0.05). Logistic regression analysis indicated that, with the exception of triglyceride (TG) and uric acid (UA) levels (both P > 0.05), the other seven parameters, including fasting blood glucose (FPG), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), creatinine (Cr), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), strongly correlated with CI development (all P IL-10 levels and CI (SMD = 1.797, 95% CI 0.785~2.810, P = 0.001). Subgroup analysis based on country showed that low serum levels of IL-10 may be the major risk factor for CI in Croatia (SMD = 2.961, 95% CI 2.480~3.443, P IL-10 serum levels and CI displayed negative relationship in Asians (SMD = 2.522, 95% CI 0.468~4.576, P = 0.016) but not in Caucasians (P > 0

  20. Association of CDKN2B-AS1 rs1333049 with Brain Diseases: A Case-control Study and a Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jikuang; Wu, Xizheng; Nie, Sheng; Gao, Xiang; Sun, Jie; Li, Keqin; Zhang, Tiefeng; Huang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Objective CDKN2B-AS1 polymorphisms were shown to associate with the risk of stroke in European. The goal of this study was to evaluate the contribution of CDKN2B-AS1 rs1333049 to the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and brain tumor (BT) in Han Chinese. Methods A total of 142 HSs, 115 BTs, and 494 controls were included in the current association study. The genotyping test was performed using the melting temperature shift method. Results We failed to validate the association of CDKN2B-AS1 rs1333049 with the risk of brain disease. Significantly higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p=0.027), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p0.05). The meta-analysis of 10 studies among 133,993 individuals concluded that rs1333049 of CDKN2B-AS1 gene was likely to increase a 16% incidence rate of cerebrovascular disease (CD) among various populations (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.08–1.25; pLDL-C, HDL-C and TC in the HS patients. Meta-analysis supported the association between rs1333049 and CD risk in various populations, although we were unable to observe association between rs1333049 and the risk of HSs in Han Chinese. PMID:28138111

  1. Meta-analysis of the INSIG2 association with obesity including 74,345 individuals: does heterogeneity of estimates relate to study design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris M Heid

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism was identified for obesity (BMI> or =30 kg/m(2 in one of the first genome-wide association studies, but replications were inconsistent. We collected statistics from 34 studies (n = 74,345, including general population (GP studies, population-based studies with subjects selected for conditions related to a better health status ('healthy population', HP, and obesity studies (OB. We tested five hypotheses to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. The meta-analysis of 27 studies on Caucasian adults (n = 66,213 combining the different study designs did not support overall association of the CC-genotype with obesity, yielding an odds ratio (OR of 1.05 (p-value = 0.27. The I(2 measure of 41% (p-value = 0.015 indicated between-study heterogeneity. Restricting to GP studies resulted in a declined I(2 measure of 11% (p-value = 0.33 and an OR of 1.10 (p-value = 0.015. Regarding the five hypotheses, our data showed (a some difference between GP and HP studies (p-value = 0.012 and (b an association in extreme comparisons (BMI> or =32.5, 35.0, 37.5, 40.0 kg/m(2 versus BMI<25 kg/m(2 yielding ORs of 1.16, 1.18, 1.22, or 1.27 (p-values 0.001 to 0.003, which was also underscored by significantly increased CC-genotype frequencies across BMI categories (10.4% to 12.5%, p-value for trend = 0.0002. We did not find evidence for differential ORs (c among studies with higher than average obesity prevalence compared to lower, (d among studies with BMI assessment after the year 2000 compared to those before, or (e among studies from older populations compared to younger. Analysis of non-Caucasian adults (n = 4889 or children (n = 3243 yielded ORs of 1.01 (p-value = 0.94 or 1.15 (p-value = 0.22, respectively. There was no evidence for overall association of the rs7566605 polymorphism with obesity. Our data suggested an association with extreme degrees of obesity, and consequently heterogeneous effects from different study designs may

  2. Association between the p53 codon 72 polymorphism and primary open-angle glaucoma risk: Meta-analysis based on 11 case–control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Gohari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The TP53 is important in functions of cell cycle control, apoptosis, and maintenance of DNA integrity. Studies on the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG risk have yielded conflicting results. Published literature from PubMed and Web of Science databases was retrieved. All studies evaluating the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphisms and POAG were included. Pooled odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. Eleven separate studies including 2541 cases and 1844 controls were pooled in the meta-analysis. We did not detect a significant association between POAG risk and p53 codon 72 polymorphism overall population except allele genetic model (C vs. G: OR = 0.961, 95% CI = 0.961–0.820, P = 0.622. In the stratified analysis for Asians and Caucasians, there was an association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and POAG. In the dominant model in the overall population and by ethnicity subgroups, the highest elevated POAG risk was presented. In summary, these results indicate that p53 codon 72 polymorphism is likely an important genetic factor contributing to susceptibility of POAG. However, more case–controls studies based on larger sample size and stratified by ethnicity are suggested to further clarify the relationship between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and POAG.

  3. The Association between Antidepressant Medications and Coronary Heart Disease in Brazil: A Cross-sectional Analysis on the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eKemp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies have highlighted associations between use of antidepressant medications and coronary heart disease (CHD. Tricyclic antidepressants are not recommended in patients with CHD as they may increase morbidity and mortality. However, this class of antidepressants are freely prescribed in public health pharmacies, while access to other classes of antidepressants is restricted in Brazil. Here we examine the associations between antidepressant use and prevalent CHD in a large cohort from Brazil. Methods: Participants included 14,994 civil servants aged 35 to 74 from the baseline assessment of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil. CHD (n=710 included stable angina, myocardial infarction and coronary revascularization. Univariate (unadjusted and multivariate (adjusted logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate odds ratios and confidence intervals. Results: After full adjustment for covariates, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA use (n=156 was associated with a 2-fold increase in prevalent CHD, relative to non-use (n=14,076. Additional sensitivity analysis revealed a three-fold association for myocardial infarction (OR: 2.962, 95% CI: 1.413-6.210 and coronary revascularization (OR: 2.915, 95% CI: 1.275-6.662. There were no significant associations between antidepressant use and stable angina pectoris. Conclusions: Findings highlight a strong association between TCA use and prevalent CHD. While the cross-sectional design is an important limitation of the present study, findings have important implications for the treatment of cardiac patients in Brazil.

  4. Improving Power of Genome-Wide Association Studies with Weighted False Discovery Rate Control and Prioritized Subset Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Yu; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The issue of large-scale testing has caught much attention with the advent of high-throughput technologies. In genomic studies, researchers are often confronted with a large number of tests. To make simultaneous inference for the many tests, the false discovery rate (FDR) control provides a practical balance between the number of true positives and the number of false positives. However, when few hypotheses are truly non-null, controlling the FDR may not provide additional advantages over controlling the family-wise error rate (e.g., the Bonferroni correction). To facilitate discoveries from a study, weighting tests according to prior information is a promising strategy. A ‘weighted FDR control’ (WEI) and a ‘prioritized subset analysis’ (PSA) have caught much attention. In this work, we compare the two weighting schemes with systematic simulation studies and demonstrate their use with a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on type 1 diabetes provided by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. The PSA and the WEI both can increase power when the prior is informative. With accurate and precise prioritization, the PSA can especially create substantial power improvements over the commonly-used whole-genome single-step FDR adjustment (i.e., the traditional un-weighted FDR control). When the prior is uninformative (true disease susceptibility regions are not prioritized), the power loss of the PSA and the WEI is almost negligible. However, a caution is that the overall FDR of the PSA can be slightly inflated if the prioritization is not accurate and precise. Our study highlights the merits of using information from mounting genetic studies, and provides insights to choose an appropriate weighting scheme to FDR control on GWAS. PMID:22496761

  5. Reducing economic disparities between rural and urban areas through integrated development – Case study: analysis of the turnover of companies in the AIDA Association, Alba County, Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Ionela Gavrilă-Paven; Emil Olteanu; Iulian Bogdan Dobra

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a local initiative in Romania, Alba County, which tries to establish general guidelines for the sustainable development of a local community that consists of three towns and eight villages. The analysis conducted in this paper is focused on economic activity. The turnover of the companies located in the eleven localities that compose the Intercommunity Development Association – Alba Iulia have been studied. The authors’ objective is to determine the influenc...

  6. Association between sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks and type 2 diabetes: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, D C; Threapleton, D E; Evans, C E L; Cleghorn, C L; Nykjaer, C; Woodhead, C; Burley, V J

    2014-09-14

    The intake of sugar-sweetened soft drinks has been reported to be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, but it is unclear whether this is because of the sugar content or related lifestyle factors, whether similar associations hold for artificially sweetened soft drinks, and how these associations are related to BMI. We aimed to conduct a systematic literature review and dose-response meta-analysis of evidence from prospective cohorts to explore these issues. We searched multiple sources for prospective studies on sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks in relation to the risk of type 2 diabetes. Data were extracted from eleven publications on nine cohorts. Consumption values were converted to ml/d, permitting the exploration of linear and non-linear dose-response trends. Summary relative risks (RR) were estimated using a random-effects meta-analysis. The summary RR for sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks were 1·20/330 ml per d (95 % CI 1·12, 1·29, Psoft drinks was slightly lower in studies adjusting for BMI, consistent with BMI being involved in the causal pathway. There was no evidence of effect modification, though both these comparisons lacked power. Overall between-study heterogeneity was high. The included studies were observational, so their results should be interpreted cautiously, but findings indicate a positive association between sugar-sweetened soft drink intake and type 2 diabetes risk, attenuated by adjustment for BMI. The trend was less consistent for artificially sweetened soft drinks. This may indicate an alternative explanation, such as lifestyle factors or reverse causality. Future research should focus on the temporal nature of the association and whether BMI modifies or mediates the association.

  7. Synopsis and meta-analysis of genetic association studies in osteoporosis for the focal adhesion family genes: the CUMAGAS-OSTEOporosis information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastanis Alkibiadis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focal adhesion (FA family genes have been studied as candidate genes for osteoporosis, but the results of genetic association studies (GASs are controversial. To clarify these data, a systematic assessment of GASs for FA genes in osteoporosis was conducted. Methods We developed Cumulative Meta-Analysis of GAS-OSTEOporosis (CUMAGAS-OSTEOporosis, a web-based information system that allows the retrieval, analysis and meta-analysis (for allele contrast, recessive, dominant, additive and codominant models of data from GASs on osteoporosis with the capability of update. GASs were identified by searching the PubMed and HuGE PubLit databases. Results Data from 72 studies involving 13 variants of 6 genes were analyzed and catalogued in CUMAGAS-OSTEOporosis. Twenty-two studies produced significant associations with osteoporosis risk under any genetic model. All studies were underpowered (1 (COL1A1 G2046T (all genetic models, COL1A1 G-1997T (allele contrast and dominant model and integrin β-chain β3 (ITGB3 T176C (recessive and additive models. In COL1A1 G2046T, subgroup analysis has shown significant associations for Caucasians, adults, females, males and postmenopausal women. A differential magnitude of effect in large versus small studies (that is, indication of publication bias was detected for the variant COL1A1 G2046T. Conclusion There is evidence of an implication of FA family genes in osteoporosis. CUMAGAS-OSTEOporosis could be a useful tool for current genomic epidemiology research in the field of osteoporosis.

  8. Associations of Supermarket Characteristics with Weight Status and Body Fat: A Multilevel Analysis of Individuals within Supermarkets (RECORD Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Basile; Bean, Kathy; Daniel, Mark; Zenk, Shannon N.; Kestens, Yan; Charreire, Hélène; Leal, Cinira; Thomas, Frédérique; Karusisi, Noëlla; Weber, Christiane; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Simon, Chantal; Merlo, Juan; Pannier, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Previous research on the influence of the food environment on weight status has often used impersonal measures of the food environment defined for residential neighborhoods, which ignore whether people actually use the food outlets near their residence. To assess whether supermarkets are relevant contexts for interventions, the present study explored between-residential neighborhood and between-supermarket variations in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and investigated associations between brands and characteristics of supermarkets and BMI or WC, after adjustment for individual and residential neighborhood characteristics. Methods Participants in the RECORD Cohort Study (Paris Region, France, 2007–2008) were surveyed on the supermarket (brand and exact location) where they conducted their food shopping. Overall, 7 131 participants shopped in 1 097 different supermarkets. Cross-classified multilevel linear models were estimated for BMI and WC. Results Just 11.4% of participants shopped for food primarily within their residential neighborhood. After accounting for participants' residential neighborhood, people shopping in the same supermarket had a more comparable BMI and WC than participants shopping in different supermarkets. After adjustment for individual and residential neighborhood characteristics, participants shopping in specific supermarket brands, in hard discount supermarkets (especially if they had a low education), and in supermarkets whose catchment area comprised low educated residents had a higher BMI/WC. Conclusion A public health strategy to reduce excess weight may be to intervene on specific supermarkets to change food purchasing behavior, as supermarkets are where dietary preferences are materialized into definite purchased foods. PMID:22496738

  9. Spatial Point Pattern Analysis of Human Settlements and Geographical Associations in Eastern Coastal China — A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghao Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatial point pattern of human settlements and their geographical associations are important for understanding the drivers of land use and land cover change and the relationship between environmental and ecological processes on one hand and cultures and lifestyles on the other. In this study, a Geographic Information System (GIS approach, Ripley’s K function and Monte Carlo simulation were used to investigate human settlement point patterns. Remotely sensed tools and regression models were employed to identify the effects of geographical determinants on settlement locations in the Wen-Tai region of eastern coastal China. Results indicated that human settlements displayed regular-random-cluster patterns from small to big scale. Most settlements located on the coastal plain presented either regular or random patterns, while those in hilly areas exhibited a clustered pattern. Moreover, clustered settlements were preferentially located at higher elevations with steeper slopes and south facing aspects than random or regular settlements. Regression showed that influences of topographic factors (elevation, slope and aspect on settlement locations were stronger across hilly regions. This study demonstrated a new approach to analyzing the spatial patterns of human settlements from a wide geographical prospective. We argue that the spatial point patterns of settlements, in addition to the characteristics of human settlements, such as area, density and shape, should be taken into consideration in the future, and land planners and decision makers should pay more attention to city planning and management. Conceptual and methodological bridges linking settlement patterns to regional and site-specific geographical characteristics will be a key to human settlement studies and planning.

  10. Genetic loci associated with plasma phospholipid N-3 fatty acids: A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide association studies from the charge consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); W. Tang (Weihong); A. Manichaikul (Ani); M. Foy (Millennia); E.K. Kabagambe (Edmond); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer ); I.B. King (Irena); L.-C. Weng; S. Bhattacharya (Sayanti); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S.S. Rich (Stephen); D.R. Jacobs (David); A. Cherubini (Antonio); B. McKnight (Barbara); S. Liang (Shuang); X. Gu (Xiangjun); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); C.C. Laurie (Cathy); T. Lumley (Thomas); B.L. Browning (Brian); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); Y.D.I. Chen (Yii-Der Ida); Y. Friedlander (Yechiel); L. Djousse (Luc); J.H.Y. Wu (Jason); D.S. Siscovick (David); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Fornage (Myriam); M.Y. Tsai (Michael); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); L.M. Steffen (Lyn); D.K. Arnett (Donna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLong-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can derive from diet or from α-linolenic acid (ALA) by elongation and desaturation. We investigated the association of common genetic variation with plasma phospholipid levels of the four major n-3 PUFAs by performing genome-wide associa

  11. The association between the TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphism and colorectal cancer: An updated meta-analysis based on 32 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xin; Dai, Shundong; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Shenyi; Jiang, Youhong

    2017-01-01

    Several previous studies evaluated the association between the Arg72Pro (rs1042522) polymorphism in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the results are conflicting. This meta-analysis aimed to shed new light on the precise association between TP53 variants and CRC. We analyzed 32 published case-control studies involving 8,586 cases and 10,275 controls using crude odd ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The meta-analysis was performed using a fixed-effect or random-effects model, as appropriate. We found that the TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was not significantly associated with CRC risk in the overall population. However, subgroup analysis based on ethnicity revealed an increased risk of CRC among Asians (CC vs. GC+GG: OR=1.22, 95% CI: 1.02-1.45), and similar results were found for rectal cancer (CC vs. GC+GG: OR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.120-1.62). These results suggest that the TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphism CC genotype may contribute to an increased risk of CRC, especially for rectal cancer and among Asians. PMID:27901479

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Shriner, Daniel; Chen, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry....... In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA) Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs...... × 10(-8), odds ratio (OR)  = 1.09 to 1.36). Fine-mapping revealed that 88 of 158 previously identified T2D or glucose homeostasis loci demonstrated nominal to highly significant association (2.2 × 10(-23)

  13. Multilevel analysis of self-perception in oral health and associated factors in Southern Brazilian adults: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilisa Carneiro Leão Gabardo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between individual and contextual variables related to self-perception in oral health among residents in the municipality of São Leopoldo, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The cross-sectional design involved 1,100 adults in 38 census tracts. The self-perception was evaluated using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14 tool. A logistic multilevel analysis was performed. The multivariate analysis revealed that those who are of the female gender, older, with lower scores of quality of life and less social support, with poor healthy eating habits, smokers and those living in low-income census tracts presented higher odds of reporting worse oral health self-perception (OHIP-1. We concluded that individual and contextual variables are associated with oral health self-perception. This is essential information for planning health services wishing to meet the health needs of the population.

  14. Association between 17q25.3-rs6465657 polymorphism and prostate cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis based on 19 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Mei; Bai, Xiao-Yan; Li, Shujing; Wu, Huijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified rs6465657 polymorphism at chromosome 17q25.3 as a new prostate cancer (PCa) susceptibility locus in people of European descent. However, subsequent replication studies have yielded inconsistent results among different ethnicities. In this study, a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the relationship between rs6465657 polymorphism and PCa risk. Methods All the articles involved were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, EBSCO databases, and Google Scholar before December 2015. The odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence internals (95% CIs) were pooled under the allele model. Fourteen eligible articles with 19 studies were finally included. Results In the overall population, the 17q25.3-rs6465657C allele was found to be significantly associated with increased risk of PCa compared to the T allele (OR =1.097; 95% CI: 1.061–1.134; P<0.001). In the subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity, significantly increased risk was found in the Caucasian population (OR =1.120; 95% CI: 1.078–1.162; P<0.001), while the difference of OR did not reach the statistical significance in the Asian or African-American population. The analyses of sensitivity indicated the robust stability of the results, and the Begg’s and Egger’s test indicated that no publication bias existed. Conclusion The current meta-analysis suggested that the 17q25.3-rs6465657 polymorphism could be associated with PCa susceptibility, especially in the Caucasians, while this association might be different in other ethnicities. PMID:27524905

  15. Assessment of osteoarthritis candidate genes in a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rodriguez-Fontenla (Cristina); M. Calaza (Manuel); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); N.K. Arden (Nigel); F.J. Blanco; A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan); K. Chapman (Kay); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Doherty (Michael); T. Esko (Tõnu); C.M. Garcés Aletá (Carlos); J.J. Gomez-Reino Carnota (Juan); H.T. Helgadottir (Hafdis); A. Hofman (Albert); I. Jonsdottir (Ingileif); J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); A. McCaskie (Andrew); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); W.E.R. Ollier (William); N. Oreiro (Natividad); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); J.A. Riancho (José); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G.A. Wallis (Gillian); J.M. Wilkinson (Mark); G. Zhai (Guangju); Y. Zhu (Yanyan); D. Felson; J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); J. Loughlin (John); A. Metspalu (Andres); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Gonzalez (Antonio)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective To assess candidate genes for association with osteoarthritis (OA) and identify promising genetic factors and, secondarily, to assess the candidate gene approach in OA. Methods A total of 199 candidate genes for association with OA were identified using Human Genome Epidemiolog

  16. Associations of supermarket characteristics with weight status and body fat: a multilevel analysis of individuals within supermarkets (RECORD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basile Chaix

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous research on the influence of the food environment on weight status has often used impersonal measures of the food environment defined for residential neighborhoods, which ignore whether people actually use the food outlets near their residence. To assess whether supermarkets are relevant contexts for interventions, the present study explored between-residential neighborhood and between-supermarket variations in body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC, and investigated associations between brands and characteristics of supermarkets and BMI or WC, after adjustment for individual and residential neighborhood characteristics. METHODS: Participants in the RECORD Cohort Study (Paris Region, France, 2007-2008 were surveyed on the supermarket (brand and exact location where they conducted their food shopping. Overall, 7 131 participants shopped in 1 097 different supermarkets. Cross-classified multilevel linear models were estimated for BMI and WC. RESULTS: Just 11.4% of participants shopped for food primarily within their residential neighborhood. After accounting for participants' residential neighborhood, people shopping in the same supermarket had a more comparable BMI and WC than participants shopping in different supermarkets. After adjustment for individual and residential neighborhood characteristics, participants shopping in specific supermarket brands, in hard discount supermarkets (especially if they had a low education, and in supermarkets whose catchment area comprised low educated residents had a higher BMI/WC. CONCLUSION: A public health strategy to reduce excess weight may be to intervene on specific supermarkets to change food purchasing behavior, as supermarkets are where dietary preferences are materialized into definite purchased foods.

  17. Analysis of Enhanced Associativity Based Routing Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said A. Shaar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces an analysis to the performance of the Enhanced Associativity Based Routing protocol (EABR based on two factors; Operation complexity (OC and Communication Complexity (CC. OC can be defined as the number of steps required in performing a protocol operation, while CC can be defined as the number of messages exchanged in performing a protocol operation[1]. The values represent the worst-case analysis. The EABR has been analyzed based on CC and OC and the results have been compared with another routing technique called ABR. The results have shown that EABR can perform better than ABR in many circumstances during the route reconstruction.

  18. The filaggrin null genotypes R501X and 2282del4 seem not to be associated with psoriasis: results from general population study and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Carlsen, Berit Christina;

    2012-01-01

    Background Psoriasis vulgaris could be associated with the filaggrin null genotype since certain known susceptibility loci for psoriasis are shared with susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis. Furthermore, filaggrin expression is lowered in psoriatic skin lesions but normally expressed...... in uninvolved skin. So far five relatively small patient-based case-control studies have rejected a possible association between psoriasis and the two most prevalent filaggrin null mutations, 2282del4 and R501X. Objectives To reinvestigate a possible association between psoriasis and filaggrin null mutation...... and R501X mutations. A meta-analysis was undertaken to investigate the relation between filaggrin gene mutations and psoriasis vulgaris. Results The prevalence of self-reported psoriasis was 6.7% among the 3240 respondents. The prevalence of the R501X and 2282del4 filaggrin null genotypes was 9...

  19. Exposure to ionizing radiation during dental X-rays is not associated with risk of developing meningioma: a meta-analysis based on seven case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    Full Text Available Many observational studies have found that exposure to dental X-rays is associated with the risk of development of meningioma. However, these findings are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between exposure to dental X-rays and the risk of development of meningioma.The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Summary odds ratio (OR estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were used to compute the risk of meningioma development according to heterogeneity. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed to further explore the potential heterogeneity. Finally, publication bias was assessed.Seven case-control studies involving 6,174 patients and 19,459 controls were included in the meta-analysis. Neither exposure to dental X-rays nor performance of full-mouth panorex X-rays was associated with an increased risk of development of meningioma (overall: OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.70-1.32; dental X-rays: OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.89-1.25; panorex X-rays: OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.76-1.34. However, exposure to bitewing X-rays was associated with a slightly increased risk of development of meningioma (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.28-2.34. Similar results were obtained in the subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Little evidence of publication bias was observed.Based on the currently limited data, there is no association between exposure to dental X-rays and the risk of development of meningioma. However, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of the heterogeneity among studies. Additional large, high-quality clinical trials are needed to evaluate the association between exposure to dental X-rays and the risk of development of meningioma.

  20. Association of CD14 −159 (−260C/T) polymorphism and asthma risk: an updated genetic meta-analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duan; Yang, Yang; Xu, Jin; Zhou, Zong-Ke; Yu, Hai-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: It has been reported that the cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14) gene −159C/T variant may be associated with asthma risk. However, some studies yielded conflicting results. Therefore, a comprehensive meta-analysis was designed to assess the precise association. Methods: A systematic search in PubMed, Embase (Ovid), China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wan fang databases was conducted up to August 15, 2015. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to pool the effect size. We used I2 to assess heterogeneity, and a funnel plot and Egger test to assess publication bias. Results: In total, 34 studies involving 15,641 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. There was a statistically significant association between CD14 −159C/T polymorphism and asthma risk observed in dominant model (TT+TC vs CC: OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77–0.97, P = 0.012) and codominant model (TC vs CC: OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.78–0.99, P = 0.035) in adults. However, there may be no significant association between CD14 159C/T and atopic and nonatopic asthma risk. Conclusion: In summary, the overall results suggested that the CD14 −159C/T variant may decrease the risk of asthma susceptibility in adults. However, no significant association between CD14 159C/T and atopic and nonatopic asthma susceptibility was identified. More studies with larger sample size are needed to validate the findings from this study. PMID:27684840

  1. Association between EHBP1 rs721048(A>G polymorphism and prostate cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 17 studies involving 150,678 subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao X

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiang Ao,1,* Ying Liu,1,* Xiao-Yan Bai,1 Xinjian Qu,2 Zhaowei Xu,1 Gaolei Hu,1 Min Chen,1 Huijian Wu1,21Laboratory of Molecular Medicine & Pharmacy, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 2Laboratory of Molecular Medicine & Pharmacy, School of Life Science and Medicine, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China*These authors have contributed equally to this workBackground: EHBP1 rs721048(A was first identified as a prostate cancer (PCa risk in Caucasians by genome-wide association study, but subsequent replication studies involving Caucasian and other ethnicities did not produce consistent results. The aim of this study was to obtain a more definite association between rs721048(A and PCa risk.Methods: We comprehensively searched several databases updated to September 2014, including PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Google Scholar. Two authors independently screened and reviewed the eligibility of each study. The quality of the included studies was assessed by the Newcastle–Ottawa scale. The association of rs721048(A and PCa risk was assessed by pooling odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs.Results: A total of 17 studies, including 48,135 cases and 102,543 controls, published between 2008 and 2014 were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the pooled analysis demonstrated that rs721048(A was significantly associated with the risk of PCa under the allele model (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.11–1.17, P=0.000. Subgroup analysis based on ethnicity revealed a ­significant association between rs721048(A and PCa in Caucasian (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.11–1.16, P=0.000, African descent (OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.01–1.23, P=0.025, and Asian (OR=1.35, 95% CI=1.12–1.64, P=0.002.Conclusion: Our results provided strong evidence that rs721048(A could be a risk factor for PCa.Keywords: EHBP1, rs721048, meta-analysis, prostate cancer

  2. UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms in association with obesity susceptibility - a meta-analysis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qian

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Variants of UCP2 and UCP3 genes have been reported to be associated with obesity, but the available data on the relationship are inconsistent. A meta-analysis was performed to determine whether there are any associations between the UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val, and UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms and obesity susceptibility. METHODS: The PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and CNKI, CBMdisc databases were searched for all relevant case-control studies. The fixed or random effect pooled measure was determined on the bias of heterogeneity test among studies. Publication bias was examined by the modified Begg's and Egger's test. RESULTS: Twenty-two published articles with thirty-two outcomes were included in the meta-analysis: 12 studies with a total of 7,390 cases and 9,860 controls were analyzed for UCP2 -866G/A polymorphism with obesity, 9 studies with 1,483 cases and 2,067 controls for UCP2 Ala55Val and 8 studies with 2,180 cases and 2,514 controls for UCP3 -55C/T polymorphism. Using an additive model, the UCP2 -866G/A polymorphism showed no significant association with obesity risk in Asians (REM OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.65-1.01. In contrast, a statistically significant association was observed in subjects of European descent (FEM OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.12. But neither the UCP2 Ala55Val nor the UCP3 -55C/T polymorphism showed any significant association with obesity risk in either subjects of Asian (REM OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.67-1.06 for Ala55Val; REM OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.55-1.28 for -55C/T or of European descent (REM OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.80-1.36 for Ala55Val; FEM OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.97-1.20 for -55C/T. CONCLUSIONS AND INTERPRETATION: Our meta-analysis revealed that the UCP2 -866G/A polymorphism may be a risk factor for susceptibility to obesity in subjects of European descent, but not in individuals of Asian descent. And our results did not support the association between UCP2 Ala55Val, UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms and

  3. Attributable mortality of ventilator-associated pneumonia: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomised prevention studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melsen, W.G.; Rovers, M.M.; Groenwold, R.H.; Bergmans, D.C.; Camus, C.; Bauer, T.T.; Hanisch, E.W.; Klarin, B.; Koeman, M.; Krueger, W.A.; Lacherade, J.C.; Lorente, L.; Memish, Z.A.; Morrow, L.E.; Nardi, G.; Nieuwenhoven, C.A. van; O'Keefe, G.E.; Nakos, G.; Scannapieco, F.A.; Seguin, P.; Staudinger, T.; Topeli, A.; Ferrer, M.; Bonten, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Estimating attributable mortality of ventilator-associated pneumonia has been hampered by confounding factors, small sample sizes, and the difficulty of doing relevant subgroup analyses. We estimated the attributable mortality using the individual original patient data of published rando

  4. Medication-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Ryan (Patrick); D. Madigan (David); P.E. Stang (Paul); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); G. Hripcsak (G.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUndiscovered side effects of drugs can have a profound effect on the health of the nation, and electronic health-care databases offer opportunities to speed up the discovery of these side effects. We applied a "medication-wide association study" approach that combined multivariate analys

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >80,000 subjects identifies multiple loci for C-reactive protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F; Paré, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco JC; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert YL; Schnabel, Renate B; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Albert V; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M; Larson, Martin G; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Freimer, Nelson B; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P; Launer, Lenore J; Buring, Julie E; Yamamoto, Jennifer F; Folsom, Aaron R; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, João D; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H; Kuss, Oliver; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Völzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A; Penninx, Brenda W; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Dörte; Salomaa, Veikko; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Benjamin, Emelia J; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I

    2011-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We aimed to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. Methods and Results We performed a genome wide association (GWA) analysis of CRP in 66,185 participants from 15 population-based studies. We sought replication for the genome wide significant and suggestive loci in a replication panel comprising 16,540 individuals from ten independent studies. We found 18 genome-wide significant loci and we provided evidence of replication for eight of them. Our results confirm seven previously known loci and introduce 11 novel loci that are implicated in pathways related to the metabolic syndrome (APOC1, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, HNF4A, and PTPN2), immune system (CRP, IL6R, NLRP3, IL1F10, and IRF1), or that reside in regions previously not known to play a role in chronic inflammation (PPP1R3B, SALL1, PABPC4, ASCL1, RORA, and BCL7B). We found significant interaction of body mass index (BMI) with LEPR (p<2.9×10−6). A weighted genetic risk score that was developed to summarize the effect of risk alleles was strongly associated with CRP levels and explained approximately 5% of the trait variance; however, there was no evidence for these genetic variants explaining the association of CRP with coronary heart disease. Conclusion We identified 18 loci that were associated with CRP levels. Our study highlights immune response and metabolic regulatory pathways involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. PMID:21300955

  6. Association study and expression analysis of MTNR1A as a candidate gene for body measurement and meat quality traits in Qinchuan cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wucai; Wang, Yaning; Fu, Changzhen; Zan, Lin-Seng

    2015-10-10

    Melatonin receptors, which mediate the functions of melatonin, play an important role in adipocyte differentiation, energy, and lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in bovine melatonin receptor 1A (MTNR1A) and to determine if these SNPs are associated with body measurement traits (BMTs) and meat quality traits (MQTs) in Qinchuan cattle. We identified three synonymous mutations (A455G, A497G, and C635T) and one missense mutation (G489A) p.Asp224Asn in MTNR1A gene in 420 Qinchuan cattle by sequencing. Association analysis indicated that these four SNPs were associated with some of the BMTs and MQTs (P<0.05). Further, 6 combined haplotypes were constructed to guarantee the reliability of analysis results. Individuals with diplotypes H2H2 (AA-GG-GG-CC) had greater chest depth, heart girth, loin muscle area, and more back fat than the other combinations (P<0.05). Pertaining to G489A mutation, RT-PCR study exhibited a higher mRNA expression of MTNR1A gene among individuals with SNP1/2/4-AG-GA-CT genotype than those with SNP1/2/4-AA-GG-CC genotype (P<0.05). These results suggest that the genotype H2H2 could be used as a molecular marker of the combined genotype for future selection for BMTs and MQTs in Qinchuan cattle.

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie C Y Ng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS in individuals of European ancestry. In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs association analysis was conducted in each study under the additive model after adjustment for age, sex, study site, and principal components. Meta-analysis of approximately 2.6 million genotyped and imputed SNPs in all studies was conducted using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effect model. Replications were performed to follow up 21 loci in up to 6,061 cases and 5,483 controls in African Americans, and 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls of European ancestry. We identified three known loci (TCF7L2, HMGA2 and KCNQ1 and two novel loci (HLA-B and INS-IGF2 at genome-wide significance (4.15 × 10(-94association (2.2 × 10(-23 < locus-wide P<0.05. These novel and previously identified loci yielded a sibling relative risk of 1.19, explaining 17.5% of the phenotypic variance of T2D on the liability scale in African Americans. Overall, this study identified two novel susceptibility loci for T2D in African Americans. A substantial number of previously reported loci are transferable to African Americans after accounting for linkage disequilibrium, enabling fine mapping of causal variants in trans-ethnic meta-analysis studies.

  8. Association of CDKN2BAS Polymorphism rs4977574 with Coronary Heart Disease: A Case-Control Study and a Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our study was to explore the significant association between a non-protein coding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs4977574 of CDKN2BAS gene and coronary heart disease (CHD. A total of 590 CHD cases and 482 non-CHD controls were involved in the present association study. A strong association of rs4977574 with CHD was observed in females (genotype: p = 0.002; allele: p = 0.002, odd ratio (OR = 1.57, 95% confidential interval (CI = 1.18–2.08. Moreover, rs4977574 was more likely to be a risk variant of CHD under the recessive model in females (χ2 = 10.29, p = 0.003, OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.31–2.77. A breakdown analysis by age had shown that there was an 87% increased risk of CHD for females younger than 65 years (genotype: χ2 = 14.64, degrees of freedom (df = 2, p = 0.0002; allele: χ2 = 11.31, df = 1, p = 0.0008, OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.30–2.70. Similar observation was also found in males younger than 65 years (genotype: χ2 = 8.63, df = 2, p = 0.04; allele: χ2 = 7.55, df = 1, p = 0.006, OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.11–1.90. p values were adjusted by age, sex, smoking, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C. Meta-analysis of 23 studies among 36,452 cases and 39,781 controls showed a strong association between rs4977574 and the risk of CHD (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.22–1.31.

  9. Association of vitamin D receptor BsmI gene polymorphism with risk of tuberculosis: a meta-analysis of 15 studies.

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    Yu-Jiao Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic variations in vitamin D receptor (VDR may contribute to tuberculosis (TB risk. Many studies have investigated the association between VDR BsmI gene polymorphism and TB risk, but yielded inconclusive results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of 15 publications with a total of 2309 cases and 3568 controls. We assessed the strength of the association between VDR BsmI gene polymorphism and TB risk and performed sub-group analyses by ethnicity, sample size and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE. We found a statistically significant correlation between VDR BsmI gene polymorphism and decreased TB risk in four comparison models: allele model (b vs. B: OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.67, 0.89; Pheterogeneity = 0.004, homozygote model (bb vs. BB: OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.87; Pheterogeneity = 0.001, recessive model (bb vs. Bb+BB: OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.56, 0.88; Pheterogeneity = 0.005 and dominant model (bb+Bb vs. BB: OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61, 0.97; Pheterogeneity = 0.010, especially in studies based on Asian population. Sub-group analyses also revealed that there was a statistically decreased TB risk in "small" studies (0.5. Meta-regression and stratification analysis both showed that the ethnicity and sample size contributed to heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that VDR BsmI gene polymorphism is associated with a significant decreased TB risk, especially in Asian population.

  10. Association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer: a case-control study in Southern Chinese and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD share a common risk factor in cigarette smoking and a large portion of patients with lung cancer suffer from COPD synchronously. We therefore hypothesized that COPD is an independent risk factor for lung cancer. Our aim was to investigate the intrinsic linkage of COPD (or emphysema, chronic bronchitis and asthma and lung cancer. METHODS: The present hospital-based case-control study included 1,069 patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 1,132 age frequency matched cancer-free controls. The odds ratios (ORs for the associations between each previous pulmonary disease and lung cancer were estimated with logistic regression models, adjusting for age, sex, family history of cancer, BMI and pack year smoking. In meta-analysis, the pooled effects of previous pulmonary diseases were analyzed with random effects models; and stratification analyses were conducted on smoking status and ethnicity. RESULTS: In the case-control study, previous COPD was associated with the odds for increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00∼1.68; so were emphysema (OR = 1.55, 95%CI = 1.03∼2.32 and chronic bronchitis (OR = 1.22, 95%CI = 0.99∼1.67; while asthma was associated with odds for decreased risk of lung cancer (OR = 0.29, 95%CI = 0.16∼0.53. These associations were more pronounced in smokers (P<.05 for all strata, but not in non-smokers. In meta-analysis, 35 studies (22,010 cases and 44,438 controls were identified. COPD was significantly associated with the odds for increased risk of lung cancer (pooled OR = 2.76; 95% CI = 1.85-4.11, so were emphysema (OR = 3.02; 95% CI = 2.41-3.79 and chronic bronchitis (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.49-2.36; and these associations were more pronounced in smokers than in non-smokers (P<.001 respectively. No significant association was observed for asthma. CONCLUSION: Previous COPD could increase the risk of lung cancer

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >80 000 subjects identifies multiple loci for C-reactive protein levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F; Paré, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco J C; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert Y L; Schnabel, Renate B; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Albert V; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M; Larson, Martin G; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Freimer, Nelson B; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P; Launer, Lenore J; Buring, Julie E; Yamamoto, Jennifer F; Folsom, Aaron R; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, João D; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H; Kuss, Oliver; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Völzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A; Penninx, Brenda W; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Dörte; Salomaa, Veikko; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 18

  12. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.; Pare, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E.; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert Y. L.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert V.; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M.; Larson, Martin G.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P.; Launer, Lenore J.; Buring, Julie E.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F.; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, Joao D.; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C.; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H.; Kuss, Oliver; Schwabedissen, Henriette E. Meyer Zu; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Voelzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N.; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S.; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I.; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Doerte; Salomaa, Veikko; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M.; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >80 000 subjects identifies multiple loci for C-reactive protein levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.; Paré, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E.; Surakka, Ida; De Geus, Eco J. C.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert Y. L.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert V.; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M.; Larson, Martin G.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P.; Launer, Lenore J.; Buring, Julie E.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F.; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, João D.; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C.; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H.; Kuss, Oliver; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E.; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Völzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N.; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S.; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I.; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Dörte; Salomaa, Veikko; Willems Van Dijk, Ko; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M.; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND - C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. METHODS AND RESULTS - We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66

  14. Four Susceptibility Loci for Gallstone Disease Identified in a Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Amit D; Andersson, Charlotte; Stender, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    .07-1.17; P = 2.55 × 10(-10)), and rs6471717 near CYP7A1 (encodes an enzyme that catalyzes conversion of cholesterol to primary bile acids) (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.08-1.15; P = 8.84 × 10(-9)). Among individuals of African American and Hispanic American ancestry, rs11887534 and rs4245791 were associated...

  15. COMT Val(158) Met genotype is associated with reward learning: a replication study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Frías, N S; Pizzagalli, D A; Carré, J M; Michalski, L J; Nikolova, Y S; Perlis, R H; Fagerness, J; Lee, M R; Conley, E Drabant; Lancaster, T M; Haddad, S; Wolf, A; Smoller, J W; Hariri, A R; Bogdan, R

    2016-06-01

    Identifying mechanisms through which individual differences in reward learning emerge offers an opportunity to understand both a fundamental form of adaptive responding as well as etiological pathways through which aberrant reward learning may contribute to maladaptive behaviors and psychopathology. One candidate mechanism through which individual differences in reward learning may emerge is variability in dopaminergic reinforcement signaling. A common functional polymorphism within the catechol-O-methyl transferase gene (COMT; rs4680, Val(158) Met) has been linked to reward learning, where homozygosity for the Met allele (linked to heightened prefrontal dopamine function and decreased dopamine synthesis in the midbrain) has been associated with relatively increased reward learning. Here, we used a probabilistic reward learning task to asses response bias, a behavioral form of reward learning, across three separate samples that were combined for analyses (age: 21.80 ± 3.95; n = 392; 268 female; European-American: n = 208). We replicate prior reports that COMT rs4680 Met allele homozygosity is associated with increased reward learning in European-American participants (β = 0.20, t = 2.75, P learning (95% CI -0.11 to -0.03; z = 3.2; P < 0.01). These results suggest that variability in dopamine signaling associated with COMT rs4680 influences individual differences in reward which may potentially contribute to psychopathology characterized by reward dysfunction.

  16. No association between MspI allele of the ADRA2A polymorphism and ADHD: meta-analysis of family-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffrin, Nina D; Gruber, June; Glatt, Stephen J; Faraone, Stephen V

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence for a genetic contribution to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), although no candidate genes have attained genome-wide significance to date. Given that the noradrenergic system has been implicated in ADHD, the gene for the α2-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2A) has been hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of ADHD. The present investigation reports results from a meta-analysis of family-based studies that did not find a significant association between the MspI polymorphism of the ADRA2A gene and ADHD.

  17. Prediabetes Is Associated with HNF-4α P2 Promoter Polymorphism rs1884613: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Population and an Updated Meta-Analysis

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    Changyi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Controversy remains for the association between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α P2 promoter polymorphism rs1884613 and type 2 diabetes (T2D. There was no association test of this polymorphism with prediabetes and T2D in the Chinese population. Moreover, an updated meta-analysis in various ethnic groups is needed to establish the contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Methods. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform approach, we genotyped rs1884613 of HNF-4α in the P2 promoter region among 490 T2D patients, 471 individuals with prediabetes, and 575 healthy controls. All the individuals were recruited from 16 community health service centers in Nanshan district in Shenzhen province. Using STATA 11.0 software, meta-analysis was performed to summarize the overall contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Results. Polymorphism rs1884613 was associated with genetic susceptibility to prediabetes in the whole samples (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.16–1.68, P=0.0001 and the female subgrouped samples (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.14–1.92, P=0.003 after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI. In contrast, there was no association of rs1884613 with T2D in the whole samples and male in our case-control study and meta-analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggest that rs1884613 contributes to susceptibility to prediabetes, whereas this polymorphism may not play an important role in the development of T2D.

  18. Prediabetes Is Associated with HNF-4α P2 Promoter Polymorphism rs1884613: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Population and an Updated Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyi; Chen, Sihan; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Zhongwei; Liu, Shengyuan; Peng, Xiaolin; Ma, Jianping; Zhong, Xiaohong; Yan, Yanqiong; Tang, Linlin; Mai, Yifeng; Han, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Controversy remains for the association between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α) P2 promoter polymorphism rs1884613 and type 2 diabetes (T2D). There was no association test of this polymorphism with prediabetes and T2D in the Chinese population. Moreover, an updated meta-analysis in various ethnic groups is needed to establish the contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Methods. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform approach, we genotyped rs1884613 of HNF-4α in the P2 promoter region among 490 T2D patients, 471 individuals with prediabetes, and 575 healthy controls. All the individuals were recruited from 16 community health service centers in Nanshan district in Shenzhen province. Using STATA 11.0 software, meta-analysis was performed to summarize the overall contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Results. Polymorphism rs1884613 was associated with genetic susceptibility to prediabetes in the whole samples (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.16–1.68, P = 0.0001) and the female subgrouped samples (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.14–1.92, P = 0.003) after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). In contrast, there was no association of rs1884613 with T2D in the whole samples and male in our case-control study and meta-analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggest that rs1884613 contributes to susceptibility to prediabetes, whereas this polymorphism may not play an important role in the development of T2D. PMID:25400315

  19. Employers' Demands for Personal Transferable Skills in Graduates: A Content Analysis of 1000 Job Advertisements and an Associated Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Content analysis of 1,000 job ads in marketing, management, finance, and human resource management showed that ads were significantly more likely to ask for specific personal skills relevant to the job category. A survey of 170 companies that placed the ads indicated their motives for stipulating personal skills; two-thirds conducted formal job…

  20. Association between CAG repeat polymorphisms and the risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis by race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeat polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Ah

    2013-11-01

    Although a number of studies have been conducted on the association between prostate cancer and CAG repeat polymorphisms of the androgen receptor gene, this association remains elusive and controversial. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the effects of (CAG)n repeat genetic polymorphisms on the incidence of prostate cancer, particularly as regards race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeats. To collect articles published on the association between CAG repeats and prostate cancer, publications were identified from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database of epidemiological studies published up to October 2011; our identification of publications was not limited by a language barrier. The following search keywords were used: prostate cancer risk, CAG repeat polymorphism, androgen receptor gene and human. Stata version 10 was used for the meta-analysis and the publication bias was measured through the Begg's test and Egger's test. This meta-analysis included 47 studies with 13,346 cases and 15,172 control or non-cases and consisted of 31 reports based on Caucasians, ten on Asians, one on Hispanics and four on combined ethnic groups. The carriers of a shorter CAG repeat sequence had an increased risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for all subjects; OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for prospective studies; OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.15-1.51 for retrospective studies) regardless of the exact length of the CAG repeat, compared with carriers of a longer repeat sequence. In terms of race, the risk of carrying a shorter CAG repeat sequence was 1.10- and 1.83-fold higher than that of a longer repeat sequence in Caucasians and Asians, respectively. For the specific number of CAG repeat polymorphisms, carriers of repeats were observed to have a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.29) compared with carriers with ≥ 22 CAG repeat polymorphisms, particularly for Asians (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.00-4.24). This meta-analysis

  1. A method for detecting epistasis in genome-wide studies using case-control multi-locus association analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Galan Jose; Quintas Antonio; Royo Jose; Sáez María; Bermudo Fernando; González-Pérez Antonio; Gayán Javier; Morón Francisco; Ramirez-Lorca Reposo; Real Luis; Ruiz Agustín

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The difficulty in elucidating the genetic basis of complex diseases roots in the many factors that can affect the development of a disease. Some of these genetic effects may interact in complex ways, proving undetectable by current single-locus methodology. Results We have developed an analysis tool called Hypothesis Free Clinical Cloning (HFCC) to search for genome-wide epistasis in a case-control design. HFCC combines a relatively fast computing algorithm for genome-wide...

  2. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F.; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; van‘t Hof, Femke N.G.; Webb, Thomas R.; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Elmore, James R.; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Ye, Zi; Peissig, Peggy L.; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S.; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Borthwick, Kenneth M.; Smelser, Diane T.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Böttinger, Erwin P.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Carrell, David S.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Franklin, David P.; Carey, David J.; Phillips, Victoria L.; Williams, Michael J.A.; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A.; Vasudevan, Thodor M.; Lewis, David R.; Thomson, Ian A.; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B.; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R.; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R.; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A.; Clough, Rachel E.; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D. Julian A.; Futers, T. Simon; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Bailey, Marc A.; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M.; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Teijink, Joep A.W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lindholt, Jes S.; Hughes, Anne; Bradley, Declan T.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E.; Powell, Janet T.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Goodall, Alison H.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Schadt, Eric E.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; van Sambeek, Marc R.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M.; de Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D.; Harrison, Seamus C.; van Rij, Andre M.; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. Objective: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available genome-wide association studies. Methods and Results: Through a meta-analysis of 6 genome-wide association study data sets and a validation study totaling 10 204 cases and 107 766 controls, we identified 4 new AAA risk loci: 1q32.3 (SMYD2), 13q12.11 (LINC00540), 20q13.12 (near PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335), and 21q22.2 (ERG). In various database searches, we observed no new associations between the lead AAA single nucleotide polymorphisms and coronary artery disease, blood pressure, lipids, or diabetes mellitus. Network analyses identified ERG, IL6R, and LDLR as modifiers of MMP9, with a direct interaction between ERG and MMP9. Conclusions: The 4 new risk loci for AAA seem to be specific for AAA compared with other cardiovascular diseases and related traits suggesting that traditional cardiovascular risk factor management may only have limited value in preventing the progression of aneurysmal disease. PMID:27899403

  3. The association of factor V leiden and prothrombin gene mutation and placenta-mediated pregnancy complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A Rodger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factor V Leiden (FVL and prothrombin gene mutation (PGM are common inherited thrombophilias. Retrospective studies variably suggest a link between maternal FVL/PGM and placenta-mediated pregnancy complications including pregnancy loss, small for gestational age, pre-eclampsia and placental abruption. Prospective cohort studies provide a superior methodologic design but require larger sample sizes to detect important effects. We undertook a systematic review and a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to estimate the association of maternal FVL or PGM carrier status and placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A comprehensive search strategy was run in Medline and Embase. Inclusion criteria were: (1 prospective cohort design; (2 clearly defined outcomes including one of the following: pregnancy loss, small for gestational age, pre-eclampsia or placental abruption; (3 maternal FVL or PGM carrier status; (4 sufficient data for calculation of odds ratios (ORs. We identified 322 titles, reviewed 30 articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria, and included ten studies in the meta-analysis. The odds of pregnancy loss in women with FVL (absolute risk 4.2% was 52% higher (OR = 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-2.19 as compared with women without FVL (absolute risk 3.2%. There was no significant association between FVL and pre-eclampsia (OR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.89-1.70 or between FVL and SGA (OR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.80-1.25. PGM was not associated with pre-eclampsia (OR = 1.25, 95% CI 0.79-1.99 or SGA (OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.92-1.70. CONCLUSIONS: Women with FVL appear to be at a small absolute increased risk of late pregnancy loss. Women with FVL and PGM appear not to be at increased risk of pre-eclampsia or birth of SGA infants. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  4. PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism in association with diabetes and diabetic complications susceptibility: a meta-analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuanfeng; Liu, Xiaoyun; Yang, Fan; Cui, Dai; Shi, Yun; Shen, Chong; Tang, Wei; Yang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the association between the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism and susceptibility to diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetic nephropathy (DN), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic coronary artery disease (CAD). A literature-based search was conducted to identify all relevant studies. The fixed or random effect pooled measure was calculated mainly at the allele level to determine heterogeneity bias among studies. Further stratified analyses and sensitivity analyses were also performed. Publication bias was examined by the modified Begg's and Egger's test. Twenty published articles with twenty-seven outcomes were included in the meta-analysis: 6 studies with a total of 1,333 cases and 3,011 controls were analyzed for the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism with diabetes risk, 7 studies with 1,060 cases and 1,139 controls for DN risk, 10 studies with 1,327 cases and 1,557 controls for DR and 4 studies with 610 cases and 1,042 controls for diabetic CAD risk respectively. Using allelic comparison (4G vs. 5G), the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism was observed to have no significant association with diabetes (REM OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96, 1.20), DN (REM OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.98, 1.25), DR (REM OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.97, 1.22) or diabetic CAD risk (REM OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.81, 1.42), and similar results were obtained in the dominant, recessive and co-dominant models. Our meta-analyses suggest that the PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism might not be a risk factor for DM, DN, DR or diabetic CAD risk in the populations investigated. This conclusion warrants confirmation by further studies.

  5. Genome-wide association study and gene expression analysis identifies CD84 as a predictor of response to etanercept therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF biologic therapy is a widely used treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. It is unknown why some RA patients fail to respond adequately to anti-TNF therapy, which limits the development of clinical biomarkers to predict response or new drugs to target refractory cases. To understand the biological basis of response to anti-TNF therapy, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analysis of more than 2 million common variants in 2,706 RA patients from 13 different collections. Patients were treated with one of three anti-TNF medications: etanercept (n = 733, infliximab (n = 894, or adalimumab (n = 1,071. We identified a SNP (rs6427528 at the 1q23 locus that was associated with change in disease activity score (ΔDAS in the etanercept subset of patients (P = 8 × 10(-8, but not in the infliximab or adalimumab subsets (P>0.05. The SNP is predicted to disrupt transcription factor binding site motifs in the 3' UTR of an immune-related gene, CD84, and the allele associated with better response to etanercept was associated with higher CD84 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (P = 1 × 10(-11 in 228 non-RA patients and P = 0.004 in 132 RA patients. Consistent with the genetic findings, higher CD84 gene expression correlated with lower cross-sectional DAS (P = 0.02, n = 210 and showed a non-significant trend for better ΔDAS in a subset of RA patients with gene expression data (n = 31, etanercept-treated. A small, multi-ethnic replication showed a non-significant trend towards an association among etanercept-treated RA patients of Portuguese ancestry (n = 139, P = 0.4, but no association among patients of Japanese ancestry (n = 151, P = 0.8. Our study demonstrates that an allele associated with response to etanercept therapy is also associated with CD84 gene expression, and further that CD84 expression correlates with disease activity. These findings support a model in which CD84

  6. Hierarchical Parallelization of Gene Differential Association Analysis

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    Dwarkadas Sandhya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray gene differential expression analysis is a widely used technique that deals with high dimensional data and is computationally intensive for permutation-based procedures. Microarray gene differential association analysis is even more computationally demanding and must take advantage of multicore computing technology, which is the driving force behind increasing compute power in recent years. In this paper, we present a two-layer hierarchical parallel implementation of gene differential association analysis. It takes advantage of both fine- and coarse-grain (with granularity defined by the frequency of communication parallelism in order to effectively leverage the non-uniform nature of parallel processing available in the cutting-edge systems of today. Results Our results show that this hierarchical strategy matches data sharing behavior to the properties of the underlying hardware, thereby reducing the memory and bandwidth needs of the application. The resulting improved efficiency reduces computation time and allows the gene differential association analysis code to scale its execution with the number of processors. The code and biological data used in this study are downloadable from http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/biostat/people/faculty/hu.cfm. Conclusions The performance sweet spot occurs when using a number of threads per MPI process that allows the working sets of the corresponding MPI processes running on the multicore to fit within the machine cache. Hence, we suggest that practitioners follow this principle in selecting the appropriate number of MPI processes and threads within each MPI process for their cluster configurations. We believe that the principles of this hierarchical approach to parallelization can be utilized in the parallelization of other computationally demanding kernels.

  7. Health Resource Utilization Associated with Skeletal-Related Events in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: A European Subgroup Analysis from an Observational, Multinational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bahl

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to increase the understanding of health resource utilization (HRU associated with skeletal-related events (SREs occurring in patients with bone metastases secondary to advanced prostate cancer. A total of 120 patients from Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom were enrolled in this observational study. They had bone metastases secondary to prostate cancer and had experienced at least one SRE in the 97 days before giving informed consent. HRU data were collected retrospectively for 97 days before enrolment and prospectively for up to 18–21 months. HRU, including the number and duration of inpatient hospitalizations, number of outpatient and emergency department visits and procedures, was independently attributed by investigators to an SRE. Of the 222 SREs included in this analysis, 26% were associated with inpatient stays and the mean duration per SRE was 21.4 days (standard deviation (SD 17.8 days. Overall, 174 SREs (78% required an outpatient visit and the mean number of visits per SRE was 4.6 (SD 4.6. All SREs are associated with substantial HRU. Preventing SREs in patients with advanced prostate cancer and bone metastases may help to reduce the burden to both patients and European healthcare systems.

  8. A note on the use of the generalized odds ratio in meta-analysis of association studies involving bi- and tri-allelic polymorphisms

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    Mingroni-Netto Regina C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The generalized odds ratio (GOR was recently suggested as a genetic model-free measure for association studies. However, its properties were not extensively investigated. We used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate type-I error rates, power and bias in both effect size and between-study variance estimates of meta-analyses using the GOR as a summary effect, and compared these results to those obtained by usual approaches of model specification. We further applied the GOR in a real meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies in Alzheimer's disease. Findings For bi-allelic polymorphisms, the GOR performs virtually identical to a standard multiplicative model of analysis (e.g. per-allele odds ratio for variants acting multiplicatively, but augments slightly the power to detect variants with a dominant mode of action, while reducing the probability to detect recessive variants. Although there were differences among the GOR and usual approaches in terms of bias and type-I error rates, both simulation- and real data-based results provided little indication that these differences will be substantial in practice for meta-analyses involving bi-allelic polymorphisms. However, the use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful for the synthesis of data from tri-allelic variants, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations (≤10%. This gain in power may depend on knowledge of the direction of the effects. Conclusions For the synthesis of data from bi-allelic variants, the GOR may be regarded as a multiplicative-like model of analysis. The use of the GOR may be slightly more powerful in the tri-allelic case, particularly when susceptibility alleles are less common in the populations.

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in celiac disease and rheumatoid arthritis identifies fourteen non-HLA shared loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zhernakova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology and candidate gene studies indicate a shared genetic basis for celiac disease (CD and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but the extent of this sharing has not been systematically explored. Previous studies demonstrate that 6 of the established non-HLA CD and RA risk loci (out of 26 loci for each disease are shared between both diseases. We hypothesized that there are additional shared risk alleles and that combining genome-wide association study (GWAS data from each disease would increase power to identify these shared risk alleles. We performed a meta-analysis of two published GWAS on CD (4,533 cases and 10,750 controls and RA (5,539 cases and 17,231 controls. After genotyping the top associated SNPs in 2,169 CD cases and 2,255 controls, and 2,845 RA cases and 4,944 controls, 8 additional SNPs demonstrated P<5 × 10(-8 in a combined analysis of all 50,266 samples, including four SNPs that have not been previously confirmed in either disease: rs10892279 near the DDX6 gene (P(combined =  1.2 × 10(-12, rs864537 near CD247 (P(combined =  2.2 × 10(-11, rs2298428 near UBE2L3 (P(combined =  2.5 × 10(-10, and rs11203203 near UBASH3A (P(combined =  1.1 × 10(-8. We also confirmed that 4 gene loci previously established in either CD or RA are associated with the other autoimmune disease at combined P<5 × 10(-8 (SH2B3, 8q24, STAT4, and TRAF1-C5. From the 14 shared gene loci, 7 SNPs showed a genome-wide significant effect on expression of one or more transcripts in the linkage disequilibrium (LD block around the SNP. These associations implicate antigen presentation and T-cell activation as a shared mechanism of disease pathogenesis and underscore the utility of cross-disease meta-analysis for identification of genetic risk factors with pleiotropic effects between two clinically distinct diseases.

  10. Analysis of an alternative method for the study of bromeliad-associated fauna in plants with different foliar organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerson A; Name, Fernando T; Pacheco, Frederico C L; Marcondes, Carlos B

    2010-12-01

    The efficiency of an alternative method of collection (by suction of water) for the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae (Diptera), Scirtidae (Coleoptera) and Coenagrionidae (Odonata) in bromeliads with different foliar architecture in a restinga at Florianópolis, SC, Brazil, was studied. The alternative method was less efficient to collect Culicidae and Chironomidae (Wilcoxon test p 0.05) from Aechmea lindenii. This method was less efficient to collect insects of all groups from Vriesea friburgensis (Wilcoxon test p insects in both species of bromeliads. The higher mobility of immature forms of beetles and dragonflies, and the availability of only one tank in Aechea lindenii, contrasting to several tanks in Vriesea friburgensis that help the suction of these immature, probably influenced the results, which indicated that the suction method should not replace the dismantling in the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae. This method can be useful to get immature forms of Scirtidae and Coenagrionidae in one-tank bromeliads.

  11. Assessing the Association between Natural Food Folate Intake and Blood Folate Concentrations: A Systematic Review and Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Trials and Observational Studies

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    Claire M. Marchetta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Folate is found naturally in foods or as synthetic folic acid in dietary supplements and fortified foods. Adequate periconceptional folic acid intake can prevent neural tube defects. Folate intake impacts blood folate concentration; however, the dose-response between natural food folate and blood folate concentrations has not been well described. We estimated this association among healthy females. A systematic literature review identified studies (1 1992–3 2014 with both natural food folate intake alone and blood folate concentration among females aged 12–49 years. Bayesian methods were used to estimate regression model parameters describing the association between natural food folate intake and subsequent blood folate concentration. Seven controlled trials and 29 observational studies met the inclusion criteria. For the six studies using microbiologic assay (MA included in the meta-analysis, we estimate that a 6% (95% Credible Interval (CrI: 4%, 9% increase in red blood cell (RBC folate concentration and a 7% (95% CrI: 1%, 12% increase in serum/plasma folate concentration can occur for every 10% increase in natural food folate intake. Using modeled results, we estimate that a natural food folate intake of ≥450 μg dietary folate equivalents (DFE/day could achieve the lower bound of an RBC folate concentration (~1050 nmol/L associated with the lowest risk of a neural tube defect. Natural food folate intake affects blood folate concentration and adequate intakes could help women achieve a RBC folate concentration associated with a risk of 6 neural tube defects/10,000 live births.

  12. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for Thirteen Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Wheeler, William A; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Figueroa, Jonine D; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Taylor, Philip R; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A; Purdue, Mark P; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Birmann, Brenda M; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K C; Chang, Ellen T; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Diver, W Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M; Haiman, Christopher A; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hosain, G M Monawar; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R; Kelly, Rachel S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert J; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Link, Brian K; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S; Michaud, Dominique S; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E; Novak, Anne J; Oberg, Ann L; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M; Sanjose, Silvia de; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K; Shanafelt, Tait D; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A; Tinker, Lesley F; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Villano, Danylo J; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M; Cerhan, James R; Ferri, Giovanni M; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M; Smedby, Karin E; Teras, Lauren R; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T; Slager, Susan L; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. METHO

  13. Long-term healthcare costs and functional outcomes associated with lack of remission in schizophrenia: a post-hoc analysis of a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Virginia S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the long-term outcomes for patients with schizophrenia who fail to achieve symptomatic remission. This post-hoc analysis of a 3-year study compared the costs of mental health services and functional outcomes between individuals with schizophrenia who met or did not meet cross-sectional symptom remission at study enrollment. Methods This post-hoc analysis used data from a large, 3-year prospective, non-interventional observational study of individuals treated for schizophrenia in the United States conducted between July 1997 and September 2003. At study enrollment, individuals were classified as non-remitted or remitted using the Schizophrenia Working Group Definition of symptom remission (8 core symptoms rated as mild or less. Mental health service use was measured using medical records. Costs were based on the sites’ medical information systems. Functional outcomes were measured with multiple patient-reported measures and the clinician-rated Quality of Life Scale (QLS. Symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS. Outcomes for non-remitted and remitted patients were compared over time using mixed effects models for repeated measures or generalized estimating equations after adjusting for multiple baseline characteristics. Results At enrollment, most of the 2,284 study participants (76.1% did not meet remission criteria. Non-remitted patients had significantly higher PANSS total scores at baseline, a lower likelihood of being Caucasian, a higher likelihood of hospitalization in the previous year, and a greater likelihood of a substance use diagnosis (all p Conclusions In this post-hoc analysis of a 3-year prospective observational study, the failure to achieve symptomatic remission at enrollment was associated with higher subsequent healthcare costs and worse functional outcomes. Further examination of outcomes for schizophrenia patients who fail to achieve remission at

  14. Microarray Study of Pathway Analysis Expression Profile Associated with MicroRNA-29a with Regard to Murine Cholestatic Liver Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chou Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence demonstrates that microRNA-29 (miR-29 expression is prominently decreased in patients with hepatic fibrosis, which consequently stimulates hepatic stellate cells’ (HSCs activation. We used a cDNA microarray study to gain a more comprehensive understanding of genome-wide gene expressions by adjusting miR-29a expression in a bile duct-ligation (BDL animal model. Methods: Using miR-29a transgenic mice and wild-type littermates and applying the BDL mouse model, we characterized the function of miR-29a with regard to cholestatic liver fibrosis. Pathway enrichment analysis and/or specific validation were performed for differentially expressed genes found within the comparisons. Results: Analysis of the microarray data identified a number of differentially expressed genes due to the miR-29a transgene, BDL, or both. Additional pathway enrichment analysis revealed that TGF-β signaling had a significantly differential activated pathway depending on the occurrence of miR-29a overexpression or the lack thereof. Furthermore, overexpression was found to elicit changes in Wnt/β-catenin after BDL. Conclusion: This study verified that an elevated miR-29a level could alleviate liver fibrosis caused by cholestasis. Furthermore, the protective effects of miR-29a correlate with the downregulation of TGF-β and associated with Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway following BDL.

  15. Lack of association between the tagging SNP A+930-->G of SOCS3 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of four independent study populations.

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    Antje Fischer-Rosinsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3 provides a link between cytokine action and their negative consequences on insulin signalling. Thus SOCS3 is a potential candidate gene for type 2 diabetes (T2DM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on HapMap we identified the polymorphism A+930-->G (rs4969168 as a haplotype tagging SNP (htSNP sufficiently covering the genetic variation of the whole gene. We therefore examined the association between rs4969168 within SOCS3 and T2DM in three independent study populations; one prospective case-cohort study and two cross-sectional study populations. Due to the low frequency of individuals being homozygous for the polymorphism a dominant model of inheritance was assumed. The case-cohort study with 2,957 individuals (764 of them with incident T2DM showed no effect of the polymorphism on diabetes risk (hazard ratio (95%CI: 0.86 (0.66-1.13; p = 0.3. Within the MeSyBePo-study population 325 subjects had T2DM from a total of 1,897 individuals, while the second cross-sectional cohort included 851 cases of T2DM within a total of 1653 subjects. According to the results in the prospective study, no association with T2DM was found (odds ratio (95%CI: 0.78 (0.54-1.12 for MesyBepo and 1.13 (0.90-1.42 for the Leipzig study population. There was also no association with metabolic subtraits such as insulin sensitivity (p = 0.7, insulin secretion (p = 0.8 or the hyperbolic relation of both, the disposition index (p = 0.7. In addition, no evidence for interaction with BMI or sex was found. We subsequently performed a meta-analysis, additionally including the publicly available data from the T2DM-subcohort of the WTCCC (n = 4,855. The overall odds ratio within that meta-analysis was 0.96 (0.88-1.06. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is no strong effect of the common genetic variation within the SOCS3 gene on the development of T2DM.

  16. Overrepresentation of glutamate signaling in Alzheimer's disease: network-based pathway enrichment using meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

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    Eduardo Pérez-Palma

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified several risk loci for Alzheimer's disease (AD. Nonetheless, these loci do not explain the entire susceptibility of the disease, suggesting that other genetic contributions remain to be identified. Here, we performed a meta-analysis combining data of 4,569 individuals (2,540 cases and 2,029 healthy controls derived from three publicly available GWAS in AD and replicated a broad genomic region (>248,000 bp associated with the disease near the APOE/TOMM40 locus in chromosome 19. To detect minor effect size contributions that could help to explain the remaining genetic risk, we conducted network-based pathway analyses either by extracting gene-wise p-values (GW, defined as the single strongest association signal within a gene, or calculated a more stringent gene-based association p-value using the extended Simes (GATES procedure. Comparison of these strategies revealed that ontological sub-networks (SNs involved in glutamate signaling were significantly overrepresented in AD (p<2.7×10(-11, p<1.9×10(-11; GW and GATES, respectively. Notably, glutamate signaling SNs were also found to be significantly overrepresented (p<5.1×10(-8 in the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI study, which was used as a targeted replication sample. Interestingly, components of the glutamate signaling SNs are coordinately expressed in disease-related tissues, which are tightly related to known pathological hallmarks of AD. Our findings suggest that genetic variation within glutamate signaling contributes to the remaining genetic risk of AD and support the notion that functional biological networks should be targeted in future therapies aimed to prevent or treat this devastating neurological disorder.

  17. Association between XRCC1 and XRCC3 polymorphisms with lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis from case-control studies.

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    Guohua Huang

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported the association of X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp, Arg280His, -77T>C, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3 T241M polymorphisms with lung cancer risk, but the results remained controversial. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between lung cancer risk and XRCC1 Arg399Gln (14,156 cases and 16,667 controls from 41 studies, Arg194Trp (7,426 cases and 9,603 controls from 23 studies, Arg280His (6,211 cases and 6,763 controls from 16 studies, -77T>C (2,487 cases and 2,576 controls from 5 studies, and XRCC3 T241M (8,560 cases and 11,557 controls from 19 studies in different inheritance models. We found that -77T>C polymorphism was associated with increased lung cancer risk (dominant model: odds ration [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27-1.66, recessive model: OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.14-2.62, additive model: OR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.24-1.94 when all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. In the stratified and sensitive analyses, significantly decreased lung cancer risk was observed in overall analysis (dominant model: OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.78-0.89; recessive model: OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.81-1.00; additive model: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.74-0.92, Caucasians (dominant model: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76-0.87; recessive model: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.80-0.99; additive model: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.73-0.91, and hospital-based controls (dominant model: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.76-0.88; recessive model: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79-1.00; additive model: OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.71-0.90 for XRCC3 T241M. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that XRCC1 -77T>C shows an increased lung cancer risk and XRCC3 T241M polymorphism is associated with decreased lung cancer risk, especially in Caucasians.

  18. The Association between Overweight and School Policies on Physical Activity: A Multilevel Analysis among Elementary School Youth in the PLAY-On Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherdale, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    The objective is to examine school-level program and policy characteristics and student-level behavioural characteristics associated with being overweight. Multilevel logistic regression analysis were used to examine the school- and student-level characteristics associated with the odds of a student being overweight among 1264 Grade 5-8 students…

  19. Analysis of an alternative method for the study of bromeliad-associated fauna in plants with different foliar organization

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    Gerson A. Müller

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of an alternative method of collection (by suction of water for the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae (Diptera, Scirtidae (Coleoptera and Coenagrionidae (Odonata in bromeliads with different foliar architecture in a restinga at Florianópolis, SC, Brazil, was studied. The alternative method was less efficient to collect Culicidae and Chironomidae (Wilcoxon test p 0.05 from Aechmea lindenii. This method was less efficient to collect insects of all groups from Vriesea friburgensis (Wilcoxon test p A eficiência do método alternativo de coleta (por sucção da água para o estudo de Culicidae e Chironomidae (Diptera, Scirtidae (Coleoptera e Coenagrionidae (Odonata em bromélias com diferentes estruturas foliares de restinga em Florianópolis, SC, Brasil, foi estudada. O método alternativo foi menos eficiente para coletar Culicidae e Chironomidae (teste de Wilcoxon p 0, 05 a partir de Aechmea lindenii. Esse foi menos eficiente para coletar insetos de todos os grupos a partir de Vriesea friburgensis (teste de Wilcoxon p < 0,05. O método alternativo se mostrou eficiente em estimar a diversidade desses insetos nas duas espécies de bromélias. A alta mobilidade das formas imaturas dos coleópteros e libélulas e a disponibilidade de apenas um tanque em Aechea lindenii, em contraste com as várias axilas e Vriesea friburgensis, facilitando a sucção destas formas imaturas provavelmente influenciaram os resultados. Os resultados indicam que o método de sucção não deve substituir o desmanche no estudo de Culicidae e Chironomidae; ele pode ser útil para a obtenção de formas imaturas de Scirtidae e Coenagrionidae em bromélias de um só tanque.

  20. Data Association at the Level of Narrative Plots to Support Analysis of Spatiotemporal Evolvement of Conflict: A Case Study in Nigeria

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    Size Bi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Open data sources regarding conflicts are increasingly enriched by broad social media; these yield a volume of information that exceeds our process capabilities. One of the critical factors is that knowledge extraction from mixed data formats requires systematic, sophisticated modeling. Here, we propose using text mining modeling tools for building associations of heterogeneous semi-structured data to enhance decision-making. Using narrative plots, text representation, and cluster analysis, we provide a data association framework that can mine spatiotemporal data that occur in similar contexts. The framework contains the following steps: (1 a novel text representation is presented to vectorize the textual semantics by learning both co-word features and word orders in a unified form; (2 text clustering technology is employed to associate events of interest with similar events in historical logs, based solely on narrative plots of the events; and (3 the inferred activity procedure is visualized via an evolving spatiotemporal map through the Kriging algorithm. Our results demonstrate that the approach enables deeper discrimination into the trends underlying conflicts and possesses a narrative reasoning forward prediction with a precision of 0.4817, in addition to a high consistency with the conclusions of existing studies.

  1. Association between prenatal exposure to antiretroviral therapy and birth defects: an analysis of the French perinatal cohort study (ANRS CO1/CO11.

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    Jeanne Sibiude

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has major benefits during pregnancy, both for maternal health and to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Safety issues, including teratogenic risk, need to be evaluated. We estimated the prevalence of birth defects in children born to HIV-infected women receiving ART during pregnancy, and assessed the independent association of birth defects with each antiretroviral (ARV drug used. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The French Perinatal Cohort prospectively enrolls HIV-infected women delivering in 90 centers throughout France. Children are followed by pediatricians until 2 y of age according to national guidelines. We included 13,124 live births between 1994 and 2010, among which, 42% (n = 5,388 were exposed to ART in the first trimester of pregnancy. Birth defects were studied using both European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT and Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP classifications; associations with ART were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. Correction for multiple comparisons was not performed because the analyses were based on hypotheses emanating from previous findings in the literature and the robustness of the findings of the current study. The prevalence of birth defects was 4.4% (95% CI 4.0%-4.7%, according to the EUROCAT classification. In multivariate analysis adjusting for other ARV drugs, maternal age, geographical origin, intravenous drug use, and type of maternity center, a significant association was found between exposure to zidovudine in the first trimester and congenital heart defects: 2.3% (74/3,267, adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 2.2 (95% CI 1.3-3.7, p = 0.003, absolute risk difference attributed to zidovudine +1.2% (95% CI +0.5; +1.9%. Didanosine and indinavir were associated with head and neck defects, respectively: 0.5%, AOR = 3.4 (95% CI 1.1-10.4, p = 0.04; 0.9%, AOR = 3.8 (95% CI 1.1-13.8, p = 0

  2. Vegetable intake is associated with reduced breast cancer recurrence in tamoxifen users: a secondary analysis from the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Rock, Cheryl L; Thompson, Patricia A; Caan, Bette J; Cussler, Ellen; Flatt, Shirley W; Pierce, John P

    2011-01-01

    The protective effect of vegetables on the risk of breast cancer recurrence is uncertain. We sought to evaluate the association between breast cancer recurrence and vegetable intake including analyses stratified on tamoxifen use. Experimental evidence of anti-carcinogenic activity of phytochemicals in cruciferous vegetables in combination with tamoxifen led to specific evaluation of this class of vegetables as well. To assess the association between vegetable intake and breast cancer recurrence, vegetable intake from repeat 24-h dietary recalls were examined as a secondary analysis of 3,080 breast cancer survivors enrolled in the Women's Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Study. At the time of enrollment women were, on average, 23.5 months post-diagnosis. The hazard of recurrence, controlling for relevant and significant clinical and demographic variables, with vegetable intake was assessed overall and separately for women taking tamoxifen. WHEL participants reported mean baseline intakes (⁻x, SE) of 3.1 ± 0.05 and 0.5 ± 0.02 servings/day of total and cruciferous vegetables, respectively. Baseline vegetable intake in the highest as compared to lowest tertiles was associated with an overall lower adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence of 0.69, 95% CI 0.55-0.87. Among women taking tamoxifen, the HRs were 0.56, 95% CI 0.41-0.77 for total vegetables and 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.89 for cruciferous vegetable intake. The hazard in women using tamoxifen who reported cruciferous vegetable intake above the median and who were within the highest tertile of total vegetable intake was HR 0.48; 95% CI 0.32-0.70. This secondary analysis in over 3,000 breast cancer survivors suggests that baseline vegetable intake may be associated with a reduction in the risk of breast cancer recurrent or new events particularly for those using tamoxifen. Such associations should be explored further as the possibility that vegetable intake is simply a surrogate for other health

  3. Genetic risk factors for ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (the METASTROKE Collaboration): A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Traylor (Matthew); M. Farrall (Martin); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); C. Sudlow (Cathie); J. Hopewell; Y.-C. Cheng (Yu-Ching); M. Fornage (Myriam); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); R. Malik (Rainer); S. Bevan (Steve); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); M.A. Nalls (Michael); W.T. Longstreth Jr; K.L. Wiggins (Kerri); S. Yadav (Sunaina); E.A. Parati (Eugenio); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); B.B. Worrall (Bradford B.); T. Kittner (Thomas); M.I. Khan (Muhammad); A. Reiner (Alexander); H.T. Helgadottir (Hafdis); S. Achterberg (Sefanja); I. Fernandez-Cadenas (Israel); S. Abboud (Shimon); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Walters; W-M. Chen; E.B. Ringelstein (E. Bernd); M. O'Donnell (Martin); W.K. Ho (Weang Kee); M.F. Pera (Martin ); R. Lemmens (Robin); B. Norrving (Bo); P. Higgins (Peter); M. Benn (Marianne); P. Sale (Patrizio); G. Kuhlenbäumer (Gregor); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); A.M. Vicente (Astrid M); H. Delavaran (Hossein); A. Algra (Ale); G. Davies (Gail); S.A. Oliveira (Sofia); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); I.J. Deary (Ian); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); J. Montaner (Joan); C. Carty (Cara); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); K. Kostulas (Konstantinos); M.T. Ferro (María); N.R. van Zuydam (Natalie); E. Valdimarsson (Einar); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); A. Lindgren (Arne); V. Thijs (Vincent); A. Slowik (Agnieszka); D. Saleheen; G. Paré (Guillaume); K. Berger (Klaus); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A. Hofman (Albert); T.H. Mosley (Thomas); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K.L. Furie (Karen); R. Clarke (Robert); C. Levi (Christopher); S. Seshadri (Sudha); A. Gschwendtner (Andreas); G. Boncoraglio (Giorgio Battista); P. Sharma (Pankaj); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S. Gretarsdottir (Solveig); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P.M. Rothwell (Peter); J. Rosand (Jonathan); J.F. Meschia (James F.); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); C. Kubisch (Christian); H.S. Markus (Hugh)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Various genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been done in ischaemic stroke, identifying a few loci associated with the disease, but sample sizes have been 3500 cases or less. We established the METASTROKE collaboration with the aim of validating associations from previ

  4. Relationship between major depressive disorder and associated painful physical symptoms: analysis of data from two pooled placebo-controlled, randomized studies of duloxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael J; Sheehan, David; Gaynor, Paula J; Marangell, Lauren B; Tanaka, Yoko; Lipsius, Sarah; Ohara, Fumihiro; Namiki, Chihiro

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between painful physical symptoms (PPS) and outcomes in major depressive disorder (MDD). Post-hoc analysis of two identically designed 8-week trials compared the efficacy of 60 mg/day duloxetine (N=523) with that of placebo (N=532) in treating PPS associated with MDD. The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score, the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain score, and the Sheehan Disability Scale global functional impairment score assessed depression symptoms, pain, and functioning, respectively. Remission was defined as a MADRS score of 10 or less, and the BPI response subgroup was defined as a 50% or greater reduction from baseline. Path analyses assessed relationships among variables. Duloxetine-treated patients who had a 50% or greater reduction in BPI score at endpoint had higher rates of remission. Path analysis indicated that 16% of likelihood of remission in depression symptoms was because of the direct effect of treatment, 41% because of pain reduction, and 43% because of functional improvement. Path analysis also indicated that 51% of improvement in functioning was attributed to pain improvement and 43% to mood improvement. Results demonstrate that improvement in pain and mood contributes to functional improvement, and pain reduction and functional improvement increase the likelihood of remission of depressive symptoms with duloxetine treatment in patients with both MDD and PPS at baseline.

  5. Large-scale pathway-based analysis of bladder cancer genome-wide association data from five studies of European background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idan Menashe

    Full Text Available Pathway analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS offer a unique opportunity to collectively evaluate genetic variants with effects that are too small to be detected individually. We applied a pathway analysis to a bladder cancer GWAS containing data from 3,532 cases and 5,120 controls of European background (n = 5 studies. Thirteen hundred and ninety-nine pathways were drawn from five publicly available resources (Biocarta, Kegg, NCI-PID, HumanCyc, and Reactome, and we constructed 22 additional candidate pathways previously hypothesized to be related to bladder cancer. In total, 1421 pathways, 5647 genes and ∼90,000 SNPs were included in our study. Logistic regression model adjusting for age, sex, study, DNA source, and smoking status was used to assess the marginal trend effect of SNPs on bladder cancer risk. Two complementary pathway-based methods (gene-set enrichment analysis [GSEA], and adapted rank-truncated product [ARTP] were used to assess the enrichment of association signals within each pathway. Eighteen pathways were detected by either GSEA or ARTP at P≤0.01. To minimize false positives, we used the I(2 statistic to identify SNPs displaying heterogeneous effects across the five studies. After removing these SNPs, seven pathways ('Aromatic amine metabolism' [P(GSEA = 0.0100, P(ARTP = 0.0020], 'NAD biosynthesis' [P(GSEA = 0.0018, P(ARTP = 0.0086], 'NAD salvage' [P(ARTP = 0.0068], 'Clathrin derived vesicle budding' [P(ARTP = 0.0018], 'Lysosome vesicle biogenesis' [P(GSEA = 0.0023, P(ARTP<0.00012], 'Retrograde neurotrophin signaling' [P(GSEA = 0.00840], and 'Mitotic metaphase/anaphase transition' [P(GSEA = 0.0040] remained. These pathways seem to belong to three fundamental cellular processes (metabolic detoxification, mitosis, and clathrin-mediated vesicles. Identification of the aromatic amine metabolism pathway provides support for the ability of this approach to identify pathways

  6. Identifying Proper Names Based on Association Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The issue of proper names recognition in Chinese text was discussed. An automatic approach based on association analysis to extract rules from corpus was presented. The method tries to discover rules relevant to external evidence by association analysis, without additional manual effort. These rules can be used to recognize the proper nouns in Chinese texts. The experimental result shows that our method is practical in some applications.Moreover, the method is language independent.

  7. Reducing economic disparities between rural and urban areas through integrated development – Case study: analysis of the turnover of companies in the AIDA Association, Alba County, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Gavrilă-Paven

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a local initiative in Romania, Alba County, which tries to establish general guidelines for the sustainable development of a local community that consists of three towns and eight villages. The analysis conducted in this paper is focused on economic activity. The turnover of the companies located in the eleven localities that compose the Intercommunity Development Association – Alba Iulia have been studied. The authors’ objective is to determine the influences effecting the localities and to establish the core of the economic development of this partnership which is trying to surpass the barriers between rural and urban and to form a community able to valorize its potential according to the principles of sustainable development.

  8. Analysis of Personal and Home Characteristics Associated with the Elemental Composition of PM2.5 in Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air in the RIOPA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick H; Brokamp, Cole; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Rao, M B

    2015-12-01

    each study site and across study sites. Secondly, we performed model-based clustering analysis to group RIOPA participants with similar exposures to mixtures of elements in personal PM2.5. We examined the association between cluster membership and the concentrations of elements in indoor and outdoor PM2.5 samples and personal and home characteristics. Finally, we developed a series of linear regression models and random forest models to examine the association between personal exposure to elements in PM2.5 and (1) outdoor measurements, (2) outdoor and indoor measurements, and (3) outdoor and indoor measurements and home characteristics. As we developed each model, the improvement in prediction of personal exposure when including additional information was assessed. Personal exposures to PM2.5 and to most elements were significantly correlated with both indoor and outdoor concentrations, although concentrations in personal samples frequently exceeded those of indoor and outdoor samples. In general, for most PM2.5 elements indoor concentrations were more highly correlated with personal exposure than were outdoor concentrations. PCA showed that the mixture of elements in indoor, outdoor, and personal PM2.5 varied significantly across sample types within each study site and also across study sites within each sample type. Using model-based clustering, we identified seven clusters of RIOPA participants whose personal PM2.5 samples had similar patterns of elemental composition. Using this approach, subsets of RIOPA participants were identified whose personal exposures to PM2.5 (and its elements) were significantly higher than their indoor and outdoor concentrations (and vice versa). The results of linear and random forest regression models were consistent with our correlation analyses and demonstrated that (1) indoor concentrations were more significantly associated with personal exposure than were outdoor concentrations and (2) participant reports of time spent at their

  9. MCPerm: a Monte Carlo permutation method for accurately correcting the multiple testing in a meta-analysis of genetic association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshuai Jiang

    Full Text Available Traditional permutation (TradPerm tests are usually considered the gold standard for multiple testing corrections. However, they can be difficult to complete for the meta-analyses of genetic association studies based on multiple single nucleotide polymorphism loci as they depend on individual-level genotype and phenotype data to perform random shuffles, which are not easy to obtain. Most meta-analyses have therefore been performed using summary statistics from previously published studies. To carry out a permutation using only genotype counts without changing the size of the TradPerm P-value, we developed a Monte Carlo permutation (MCPerm method. First, for each study included in the meta-analysis, we used a two-step hypergeometric distribution to generate a random number of genotypes in cases and controls. We then carried out a meta-analysis using these random genotype data. Finally, we obtained the corrected permutation P-value of the meta-analysis by repeating the entire process N times. We used five real datasets and five simulation datasets to evaluate the MCPerm method and our results showed the following: (1 MCPerm requires only the summary statistics of the genotype, without the need for individual-level data; (2 Genotype counts generated by our two-step hypergeometric distributions had the same distributions as genotype counts generated by shuffling; (3 MCPerm had almost exactly the same permutation P-values as TradPerm (r = 0.999; P<2.2e-16; (4 The calculation speed of MCPerm is much faster than that of TradPerm. In summary, MCPerm appears to be a viable alternative to TradPerm, and we have developed it as a freely available R package at CRAN: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/MCPerm/index.html.

  10. Association of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 with breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of case-control studies with subgroups of ethnic and menopausal statue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Zhimin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfotransferase (SULT plays an important role in the formation of estrogen which is usually conferred as a risk factor for breast cancer. Polymorphism of the SULT1A1 may be closely associated with breast cancer. However, studies on the association between polymorphism and breast cancer have yielded inconsistent results. We performed a meta-analysis including ethnic subgroup and menopausal statue subgroup to investigate the association of SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphism with breast cancer. Methods PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science databases were searched for the correlative articles up to January 2010 (10362 breast cancer patients and 14250 controls. The risk (odds ratio, OR was used to estimate the association between SULT1A1 polymorphism and breast cancer risk. All of the data from each study use either fixed-effects or random-effects. Results We found that SULT1A1 Arg213His had no exact effect to increase the risk of breast cancer (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.97-1.17, P = 0.164, but it did increase the risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the dominant model (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 1.04-1.58, P = 0.019. No similar effect was found among premenopausal breast cancer women (OR = 1.06, 95%CI: 0.88-1.27, P = 0.537. There was a significant increase in breast cancer risk among Asian women (OR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.00-4.14, P = 0.051 but not Caucasian women in recessive model. There was publication bias among postmenopausal women subgroup (P = 0.002, however by using the trim and fill method, if the publication bias was the only source of the funnel plot asymmetry, it needed two more studies to be symmetrical. The value of Log OR did not change too much after the adjustment and the fail-safe number of missing studies that would bring the P-value changed was 17. Conclusions We concluded that the polymorphism of SULT1A1 Arg213His might be one of the high risk factors for breast cancer in Asian women and in postmenopausal women for all

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Loth (Daan); M.S. Artigas; S.A. Gharib (Sina); L.V. Wain (Louise); N. Franceschini (Nora); B. Koch (Beate); T.D. Pottinger (Tess); G.D. Smith; Q. Duan (Qing); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); M.K. Lee (Mi Kyeong); D.P. Strachan (David); A.L. James (Alan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); V. Vitart (Veronique); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); X.-Q. Wang (Xin-Qun); H. Trochet (Holly); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Flexeder (Claudia); E. Albrecht (Eva); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); B. Thyagarajan (Bharat); A.C. Alves (Alexessander Couto); S. Enroth (Stefan); E. Omenaas (Ernst); P.K. Joshi (Peter); M. Fall (Magnus); A. Viñuela (Ana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L.R. Loehr (Laura); M. Fornage (Myriam); G. Li (Guo); J.B. Wilk (Jemma); W. Tang (Wenbo); A. Manichaikul (Ani); L. Lahousse (Lies); T.B. Harris (Tamara); K.E. North (Kari); A.R. Rudnicka (Alicja); J. Hui (Jennie); X. Gu (Xiangjun); T. Lumley (Thomas); A.F. Wright (Alan); N. Hastie (Nick); S. Campbell (Susan); R. Kumar (Rajesh); I. Pin (Isabelle); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); I. Surakka (Ida); Y. Liu (Yongmei); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); H. Schulz (Holger); J. Heinrich (Joachim); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Pouta (Anneli); A. Johansson (Åsa); S.H. Wild (Sarah); E. Ingelsson (Erik); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Völzke (Henry); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); W. Gao (Wei); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); W.B. White (Wendy); S.S. Rich (Stephen); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Aspelund (Thor); D. Couper (David); L.J. Smith (Lewis); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K. Lohman (Kurt); E.G. Burchard (Esteban); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Garcia (Melissa); B.R. Joubert (Bonnie); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); L. Zgaga (Lina); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Navarro (Pau); I. Rudan (Igor); Y.-M. Oh (Yeon-Mok); S. Redline (Susan); D.L. Jarvis (Deborah); J.H. Zhao (Jing); T. Rantanen (Taina); G.T. O'Connor (George); S. Ripatti (Samuli); R.J. Scott (Rodney); S. Karrasch (Stefan); H. Grallert (Harald); N.C. Gaddis (Nathan); J.M. Starr (John); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); R.L. Minster (Ryan); C.W. Lederer (Carsten); J. Pekkanen (Juha); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); H. Campbell (Harry); A.P. Morris (Andrew); S. Gläser (Sven); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); K.M. Burkart (Kristin); J.P. Beilby (John); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); D.B. Hancock (Dana); O.D. Williams (Dale); O. Polasek (Ozren); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M.F. Petrini (Marcy); K.T. de Jong (Kim); M. Wjst (Matthias); W.H. Kim (Woo); D.J. Porteous (David J.); G. Scotland (Generation); B.H. Smith (Blair); A. Viljanen (Anne); M. Heliovaara (Markku); J. Attia (John); I. Sayers (Ian); R. Hampel (Regina); C. Gieger (Christian); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.M. Boezen (Marike); A.B. Newman (Anne); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Lind (Lars); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Teumer (Alexander); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E. Melén (Erik); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); L.A. Lange (Leslie); R.G. Barr (Graham); K.R. Bracke (Ken); F.M. Verhamme (Fien); J. Sung (Joohon); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.A. Cassano (Patricia); A. Sood (Akshay); C. Hayward (Caroline); J. Dupuis (Josée); I.P. Hall (Ian); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); M.D. Tobin (Martin); S.J. London (Stephanie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractForced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in

  12. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kaonen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Vinuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wik, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Voezke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbe, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Glaeser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gucinason, Vilrnundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Villanen, Anne; Heliovaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, Hendrika; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melen, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josee; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 addit

  13. Insights into the genetic architecture of early stage age-related macular degeneration: a genome-wide association study meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Elizabeth G; Smith, Albert V; Cornes, Belinda K; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Jensen, Richard A; Sim, Xueling; Aspelund, Thor; Aung, Tin; Baird, Paul N; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cheng, Ching Yu; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara; Hewitt, Alex W; Inouye, Michael; Jonasson, Fridbert; Klein, Barbara E K; Launer, Lenore; Li, Xiaohui; Liew, Gerald; Lumley, Thomas; McElduff, Patrick; McKnight, Barbara; Mitchell, Paul; Psaty, Bruce M; Rochtchina, Elena; Rotter, Jerome I; Scott, Rodney J; Tay, Wanting; Taylor, Kent; Teo, Yik Ying; Uitterlinden, André G; Viswanathan, Ananth; Xie, Sophia; Vingerling, Johannes R; Klaver, Caroline C W; Tai, E Shyong; Siscovick, David; Klein, Ronald; Cotch, Mary Frances; Wong, Tien Y; Attia, John; Wang, Jie Jin

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors explain a majority of risk variance for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). While genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for late AMD implicate genes in complement, inflammatory and lipid pathways, the genetic architecture of early AMD has been relatively under studied. We conducted a GWAS meta-analysis of early AMD, including 4,089 individuals with prevalent signs of early AMD (soft drusen and/or retinal pigment epithelial changes) and 20,453 individuals without these signs. For various published late AMD risk loci, we also compared effect sizes between early and late AMD using an additional 484 individuals with prevalent late AMD. GWAS meta-analysis confirmed previously reported association of variants at the complement factor H (CFH) (peak P = 1.5×10(-31)) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) (P = 4.3×10(-24)) loci, and suggested Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) polymorphisms (rs2075650; P = 1.1×10(-6)) associated with early AMD. Other possible loci that did not reach GWAS significance included variants in the zinc finger protein gene GLI3 (rs2049622; P = 8.9×10(-6)) and upstream of GLI2 (rs6721654; P = 6.5×10(-6)), encoding retinal Sonic hedgehog signalling regulators, and in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene (rs621313; P = 3.5×10(-6)), involved in melanin biosynthesis. For a range of published, late AMD risk loci, estimated effect sizes were significantly lower for early than late AMD. This study confirms the involvement of multiple established AMD risk variants in early AMD, but suggests weaker genetic effects on the risk of early AMD relative to late AMD. Several biological processes were suggested to be potentially specific for early AMD, including pathways regulating RPE cell melanin content and signalling pathways potentially involved in retinal regeneration, generating hypotheses for further investigation.

  14. Challenges of Opportunity Cost Analysis in Planning REDD+: A Honduran Case Study of Social and Cultural Values Associated with Indigenous Forest Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer T. Plumb

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The REDD Programme is predicated on the assumption that developed countries will provide sufficient funds to offset opportunity costs associated with avoiding deforestation. The role of non-market values in indigenous land management may challenge the efficacy of compensation schemes targeted at meeting opportunity costs as calculated in traditional opportunity cost analysis (OCA. Furthermore it is unclear how these economic incentives might affect social and cultural values linked to land-use norms, livelihoods, and local governance. This study explores the economic, social and cultural values of forest uses for a Miskito community in the Rio Plátano Biosphere Reserve in Honduras. Data were collected using household surveys, farm visits, and community workshops. OCA indicates potential for successful REDD+ payment schemes; however it is an inadequate method to account for subsistence and cultural opportunity costs associated with avoided deforestation. Compensation to change land-use practices may undermine governance institutions necessary to address deforestation in the region. Our results indicate that small-scale agriculture and other forest-based subsistence activities are important cultural practices for maintaining Miskito identity and forest management institutions. Recommendations are offered for using OCA to develop REDD+ projects that recognize the linkages between social and cultural values and forest management by focusing on approaches that consider a full range of economic, social and cultural opportunity costs.

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Seow, Wei Jie; Shiraishi, Kouya; Hsiung, Chao A; Matsuo, Keitaro; Liu, Jie; Chen, Kexin; Yamji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Chang, I-Shou; Wu, Chen; Hong, Yun-Chul; Burdett, Laurie; Wyatt, Kathleen; Chung, Charles C; Li, Shengchao A; Yeager, Meredith; Hutchinson, Amy; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria T; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Song, Minsun; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ashikawa, Kyota; Momozawa, Yukihide; Daigo, Yataro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Yin, Zhihua; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Guan, Peng; Chang, Jiang; Tan, Wen; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Gee-Chen; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Zheng, Hong; Li, Haixin; Cui, Ping; Guo, Huan; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Sung, Jae Sook; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Young Tae; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Hee Nam; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Young-Chul; Sung, Sook Whan; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Shin, Min-Ho; Seow, Adeline; Chen, Ying; Lim, Wei-Yen; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Maria Pik; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Berndt, Sonja I; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Wang, Junwen; Xu, Jun; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Ho, James C M; Chan, John K C; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Lu, Daru; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Wei, Fusheng; Wu, Guoping; An, She-Juan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Su, Jian; Wu, Yi-Long; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; He, Xingzhou; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Klein, Robert; Pao, William; Lawrence, Charles; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chih-Yi; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Yao-Jen; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Lin, Chien-Chung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Dongxin; Zhou, Baosen; Yu, Jinming; Shen, Hongbing; Kubo, Michiaki; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer in Asian never-smoking women have previously identified six susceptibility loci associated with lung cancer risk. To further discover new susceptibility loci, we imputed data from four GWAS of Asian non-smoking female lung cancer (6877 cases and 6277 controls) using the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1 Release 3) data as the reference and genotyped additional samples (5878 cases and 7046 controls) for possible replication. In our meta-analysis, three new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7741164 at 6p21.1 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; P = 5.8 × 10(-13)), rs72658409 at 9p21.3 (per-allele OR = 0.77; P = 1.41 × 10(-10)) and rs11610143 at 12q13.13 (per-allele OR = 0.89; P = 4.96 × 10(-9)). These findings identified new genetic susceptibility alleles for lung cancer in never-smoking women in Asia and merit follow-up to understand their biological underpinnings.

  16. Genetic correlates of brain aging on MRI and cognitive test measures: a genome-wide association and linkage analysis in the Framingham study

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cognitive tests can identify heritable endophenotypes associated with an increased risk of developing stroke, dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) and linkage analysis exploring the genetic basis of these endophenotypes in a community-based sample. Methods A total of 705 stroke- and dementia-free Framingham participants (age 62 +9 yrs, 50% male) who underwent volumetric brain MRI and ...

  17. Association studies in consanguineous populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpous, F. [Institut National d`Etudes Demographiques, Paris (France)

    1996-04-01

    To study the genetic determinism of multifactorial diseases in large panmictic populations, a strategy consists in looking for an association with markers closely linked to candidate genes. A distribution of marker genotypes different in patients and controls may indicate that the candidate gene is involved in the disease. In panmictic populations, the power to detect the role of a candidate gene depends on the gametic disequilibrium with the marker locus. In consanguineous populations, we show that it depends on the inbreeding coefficient F as well. Inbreeding increases the power to detect the role of a recessive or quasi-recessive disease-susceptibility factor. The gain in power turns out to be greater for small values of the gametic disequilibrium. Moreover, even in the absence of gametic disequilibrium, the presence of inbreeding may allow to detect the role of a recessive factor. Ignoring inbreeding when it exists may lead to reject falsely a recessive model if the mode of inheritance is inferred on the distribution of genotypes among patients. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Infection Route Analysis of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Guo; Jie; Zhang; Jing-yun; Li; Yue; Ma; Sheng-hui; Cui

    2012-01-01

    Objective A prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care center to identify the risk factors of ventilator associated pneumonia(VAP) through phenotypic and molecular biological methods. Methods The patients who were mechanically ventilated in the respiratory intensive care unit(RICU) and the neurological internal intensive care unit(NICU) were enrolled in our study, and samples were collected from the lower respiratory tract, oropharynx and stomach. Other samples, including the environmental air, swabs of nurses’ hands, subglottic secretion and ventilator circuit, were also collected. Microorganisms in the collected samples were recovered and identified at species level by biochemical detection. Genetic relationship of dominant species was further characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis(PFGE). Results Out of 48 enrolled patients, 22 cases developed VAP and bacterial cultures were recovered from the lower respiratory tract samples of 14 cases. The average hospitalization time with VAP was significantly longer than that of patients without VAP(P < 0.05). Among the recovered bacteria cultures, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were dominant. It was more likely that subglottic secretion and gastric juice samples contained the same isolates as recovered in the lower respiratory tract by PFGE analysis. Conclusions Mechanical ventilation in RICU and NICU was a high risk factor for VAP development. Special emphasis of VAP prophylaxis should be paid on subglottic secretion and gastric juice reflux.

  19. Clinical analysis of ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-Qu Deng; Yong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical analysis associated pneumonia in elderly ventilator. Methods:Through January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital 165 cases of ventilator therapy in elderly patients with clinical data were retrospectively analyzed, discussed ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly risk factors, clinical symptoms, and the distribution of pathogens analysis of drug resistance.Results: The patient's age, sex, APACHE score, the incidence of aspiration, sedation and antacids, ventilator time were higher in patients (P<0.05); pathogens of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly by high to low order of Pseudomonas aerations, Acinetobacter sop, etc.; pathogens commonly used in clinical antimicrobial drug resistance is higher.Conclusion:Take the risk factors associated pneumonia ventilator for elderly corresponding measures to reduce the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia, which Gram-negative bacteria as cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly is an important pathogen occurs, the clinical course of treatment should be combined with a reasonable choice of antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

  20. Neuroticism's prospective association with mental disorders halves after adjustment for baseline symptoms and psychiatric history, but the adjusted association hardly decays with time : a meta-analysis on 59 longitudinal/prospective studies with 443 313 participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeronimus, B. F.; Kotov, R.; Riese, H.; Ormel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background This meta-analysis seeks to quantify the prospective association between neuroticism and the common mental disorders (CMDs, including anxiety, depression, and substance abuse) as well as thought disorders (psychosis/schizophrenia) and non-specific mental distress. Data on the degree of co

  1. Climatic Factors and Community — Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections — A Time-Series Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krushna Chandra Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin and soft tissue infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA-SSTIs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have experienced a significant surge all over the world. Changing climatic factors are affecting the global burden of dermatological infections and there is a lack of information on the association between climatic factors and MRSA infections. Therefore, association of temperature and relative humidity (RH with occurrence of SA-SSTIs (n = 387 and also MRSA (n = 251 was monitored for 18 months in the outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital located in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Time-series analysis was used to investigate the potential association of climatic factors (weekly averages of maximum temperature, minimum temperature and RH with weekly incidence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA infections. The analysis showed that a combination of weekly average maximum temperature above 33 °C coinciding with weekly average RH ranging between 55% and 78%, is most favorable for the occurrence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA and within these parameters, each unit increase in occurrence of MRSA was associated with increase in weekly average maximum temperature of 1.7 °C (p = 0.044 and weekly average RH increase of 10% (p = 0.097.

  2. Meta-analysis of the INSIG2 association with obesity including 74,345 individuals: does heterogeneity of estimates relate to study design?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heid, Iris M; Huth, Cornelia; Loos, Ruth J F

    2009-01-01

    with subjects selected for conditions related to a better health status ('healthy population', HP), and obesity studies (OB). We tested five hypotheses to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. The meta-analysis of 27 studies on Caucasian adults (n = 66,213) combining the different study designs did...

  3. Association between class III obesity (BMI of 40-59 kg/m2 and mortality: a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari M Kitahara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of class III obesity (body mass index [BMI]≥40 kg/m2 has increased dramatically in several countries and currently affects 6% of adults in the US, with uncertain impact on the risks of illness and death. Using data from a large pooled study, we evaluated the risk of death, overall and due to a wide range of causes, and years of life expectancy lost associated with class III obesity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia, we estimated sex- and age-adjusted total and cause-specific mortality rates (deaths per 100,000 persons per year and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for adults, aged 19-83 y at baseline, classified as obese class III (BMI 40.0-59.9 kg/m2 compared with those classified as normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Participants reporting ever smoking cigarettes or a history of chronic disease (heart disease, cancer, stroke, or emphysema on baseline questionnaires were excluded. Among 9,564 class III obesity participants, mortality rates were 856.0 in men and 663.0 in women during the study period (1976-2009. Among 304,011 normal-weight participants, rates were 346.7 and 280.5 in men and women, respectively. Deaths from heart disease contributed largely to the excess rates in the class III obesity group (rate differences = 238.9 and 132.8 in men and women, respectively, followed by deaths from cancer (rate differences = 36.7 and 62.3 in men and women, respectively and diabetes (rate differences = 51.2 and 29.2 in men and women, respectively. Within the class III obesity range, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for total deaths and deaths due to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, nephritis/nephrotic syndrome/nephrosis, chronic lower respiratory disease, and influenza/pneumonia increased with increasing BMI. Compared with normal-weight BMI, a BMI of 40-44.9, 45-49.9, 50-54.9, and 55-59.9 kg/m2 was associated with an

  4. How much of the data published in observational studies of the association between diet and prostate or bladder cancer is usable for meta-analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkering, Geertruida E; Harris, Ross J; Thomas, Steve; Mayer, Anne-Marie B; Beynon, Rebecca; Ness, Andrew R; Harbord, Roger M; Bain, Chris; Smith, George Davey; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2008-05-01

    Epidemiologic investigations often report dose-response associations, which may be combined in meta-analyses. The authors examined how often the log odds, risk, or hazard ratio per unit increase in exposure, and its standard error, can be estimated from results reported from observational studies of diet and prostate or bladder cancer so that results are usable in meta-analyses estimating dose-response associations. Eight electronic databases were searched for studies reporting on the association of diet, nutrition, or physical activity with these cancers. A total of 767 papers reported 3,284 results; 1,999 (61%) results, reported in 545 (71%) papers, were usable in dose-response meta-analyses. The most important reason that results were not usable was the absence of sufficient information on exposure levels in the different groups. The proportion of results usable in "high-low" meta-analyses (comparisons of extreme categories) was similar (62%). Results that showed evidence of an association were more likely to be usable than results that found no such evidence. Insufficient detail in reporting of results of observational studies can lead to exclusion of these results from meta-analyses and is an important threat to the validity of systematic reviews of such research. Results providing evidence of associations may be overrepresented in meta-analyses of observational studies.

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Timothy HT; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O’Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica MJ; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W.; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10−9) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10−8), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers. PMID:26621817

  6. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah; Painter, Jodie; O'Mara, Tracy; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Palles, Claire; Jones, Angela; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Giles, Graham G; Pharoah, Paul; Peto, Julian; Cox, Angela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Couch, Fergus; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Lambrechts, Diether; Fasching, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Salvesen, Helga B; Kristensen, Vessela; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Tao; Lindblom, Annika; Hall, Per; de Polanco, Magdalena Echeverry; Sans, Monica; Carracedo, Angel; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aguiar Jnr, Samuel; Teixeira, Manuel R; Dunning, Alison M; Dennis, Joe; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Holliday, Elizabeth; Attia, John; Ashton, Katie; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Werner, Henrica M J; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Tham, Emma; Mints, Miriam; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif; Czene, Kamila; Meindl, Alfons; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Annibali, Daniela; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Al-Tassan, Nada A; Harris, Rebecca; Meyer, Brian F; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J; Kinnersley, Ben; Farrington, Susan M; Timofeeva, Maria; Tenesa, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Haile, Robert W; Hodgson, Shirley; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Easton, Douglas; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Spurdle, Amanda; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-12-01

    High-risk mutations in several genes predispose to both colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). We therefore hypothesised that some lower-risk genetic variants might also predispose to both CRC and EC. Using CRC and EC genome-wide association series, totalling 13,265 cancer cases and 40,245 controls, we found that the protective allele [G] at one previously-identified CRC polymorphism, rs2736100 near TERT, was associated with EC risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.08, P = 0.000167); this polymorphism influences the risk of several other cancers. A further CRC polymorphism near TERC also showed evidence of association with EC (OR = 0.92; P = 0.03). Overall, however, there was no good evidence that the set of CRC polymorphisms was associated with EC risk, and neither of two previously-reported EC polymorphisms was associated with CRC risk. A combined analysis revealed one genome-wide significant polymorphism, rs3184504, on chromosome 12q24 (OR = 1.10, P = 7.23 × 10(-9)) with shared effects on CRC and EC risk. This polymorphism, a missense variant in the gene SH2B3, is also associated with haematological and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that it influences cancer risk through the immune response. Another polymorphism, rs12970291 near gene TSHZ1, was associated with both CRC and EC (OR = 1.26, P = 4.82 × 10(-8)), with the alleles showing opposite effects on the risks of the two cancers.

  7. Association between erectile dysfunction and chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Singh Uppal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: It may be concluded that chronic periodontitis and ED are associated with each other. However, further large scale studies with confounder analysis and longitudinal follow-up are warranted to explore the link between these two diseases.

  8. Associations between unprocessed red and processed meat, poultry, seafood and egg intake and the risk of prostate cancer: A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kana; Spiegelman, Donna; Hou, Tao; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Berndt, Sonja I; van den Brandt, Piet A; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Alexandra Goldbohm, R; Goodman, Gary G; Goodman, Phyllis J; Håkansson, Niclas; Inoue, Manami; Key, Timothy J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Park, Yikyung; Platz, Elizabeth A; Schenk, Jeannette M; Sinha, Rashmi; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Visvanathan, Kala; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wolk, Alicja; Ziegler, Regina G; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A

    2016-05-15

    Reports relating meat intake to prostate cancer risk are inconsistent. Associations between these dietary factors and prostate cancer were examined in a consortium of 15 cohort studies. During follow-up, 52,683 incident prostate cancer cases, including 4,924 advanced cases, were identified among 842,149 men. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate study-specific relative risks (RR) and then pooled using random effects models. Results do not support a substantial effect of total red, unprocessed red and processed meat for all prostate cancer outcomes, except for a modest positive association for tumors identified as advanced stage at diagnosis (advanced(r)). For seafood, no substantial effect was observed for prostate cancer regardless of stage or grade. Poultry intake was inversely associated with risk of advanced and fatal cancers (pooled multivariable RR [MVRR], 95% confidence interval, comparing ≥ 45 vs. <5 g/day: advanced 0.83, 0.70-0.99; trend test p value 0.29), fatal, 0.69, 0.59-0.82, trend test p value 0.16). Participants who ate ≥ 25 versus <5 g/day of eggs (1 egg ∼ 50 g) had a significant 14% increased risk of advanced and fatal cancers (advanced 1.14, 1.01-1.28, trend test p value 0.01; fatal 1.14, 1.00-1.30, trend test p value 0.01). When associations were analyzed separately by geographical region (North America vs. other continents), positive associations between unprocessed red meat and egg intake, and inverse associations between poultry intake and advanced, advanced(r) and fatal cancers were limited to North American studies. However, differences were only statistically significant for eggs. Observed differences in associations by geographical region warrant further investigation.

  9. Direct determination of single nucleotide polymorphism haplotype of NFKBIL1 promoter polymorphism by DNA conformation analysis and its application to association study of chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hiroki; Yasunami, Michio; Obuchi, Nobuhisa; Takahashi, Megumi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Numano, Fujio; Kimura, Akinori

    2006-01-01

    We previously revealed that one of the human leukocyte antigen-linked susceptibility genes for Takayasu's arteritis (TA) was mapped between TNFA and MICB loci and that -63T allele of NFKBIL1, which is between TNFA and MICB loci, was associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Japanese population. We have developed a novel typing method based on reference strand-mediated conformation analysis for the upstream sequence of the NFKBIL1 gene, where -422 (T)8/(T)9, -325 C/G, -263 A/G, and -63 T/A polymorphisms were found. Upon the analysis of the patients with TA (n = 84), those with RA (n = 120), and healthy control subjects (n = 217), five common haplotypes named IKBLp*01 through IKBLp*05 were found in the Japanese population. The frequency of IKBLp*03 was significantly increased in the patient with TA (57.1% vs 35.0%, giving an odds ratio of 2.47). In addition, the frequency of IKBLp*01, but not that of other -63T-bearing alleles, was increased in the patients with RA (73.3% vs 58.1%, giving an odds ratio of 1.99), suggesting that the susceptibility to RA was conferred not by -63T alone but by combination of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the NFKBIL1 promoter. A higher promoter activity associated with IKBLp*03 and a lower activity associated with IKBLp*01 may contribute to the susceptibility to TA and RA, respectively.

  10. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates.

  11. Separate and combined associations of body-mass index and abdominal adiposity with cardiovascular disease : collaborative analysis of 58 prospective studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Wood, Angela M.; Pennells, Lisa; Thompson, Alex; Sarwar, Nadeem; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Ridker, Paul; Salomaa, Veikko; Stevens, June; Woodward, Mark; Sattar, Naveed; Collins, Rory; Thompson, Simon G.; Whitlock, Gary; Danesh, John

    2011-01-01

    Background Guidelines differ about the value of assessment of adiposity measures for cardiovascular disease risk prediction when information is available for other risk factors. We studied the separate and combined associations of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio wi

  12. Separate and combined associations of body-mass index and abdominal adiposity with cardiovascular disease: collaborative analysis of 58 prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines differ about the value of assessment of adiposity measures for cardiovascular disease risk prediction when information is available for other risk factors. We studied the separate and combined associations of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with risk...

  13. On genome-wide association studies for family-based designs: an integrative analysis approach combining ascertained family samples with unselected controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasky-Su, J.; Won, S.; Mick, E.; Anney, R.J.; Franke, B.; Neale, B.; Biederman, J.; Smalley, S.L.; Loo, S.K.; Todorov, A.; Faraone, S.V.; Weiss, S.T.; Lange, C.

    2010-01-01

    Large numbers of control individuals with genome-wide genotype data are now available through various databases. These controls are regularly used in case-control genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to increase the statistical power. Controls are often "unselected" for the disease of interest and

  14. Large scale international replication and meta-analysis study confirms association of the 15q14 locus with myopia. The CREAM consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); V. Vitart (Veronique); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); J. Guggenheim (Jean); M.F. Cotch (Mary Frances); K. Yamashiro (Kenji); P.N. Baird (Paul); D.A. Mackey (David); R. Wojciechowski (Robert); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); A.W. Hewit (Alex); P. Duggal (Priya); S. Janmahasatian (Sarayut); C.C. Khor; Q. Fan (Qiao); X. Zhou (Xinying); T.L. Young (Terri); E.S. Tai (Shyong); L.-K. Goh; Y.J. Li (Yi); T. Aung (Tin); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); W.-T. Tay; X. Sim (Xueling); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.F. Wright (Alan); O. Polasek (Ozren); H. Campbell (Harry); J.F. Wilson (James); B. Fleck (Brian); I. Nakata (Isao); N. Yoshimura; R. Yamada (Ryo); F. Matsuda (Fumihiko); K. Ohno-Matsui (Kyoko); A. Nag (Abhishek); G. Mcmahon (George); B. St Pourcain (Beate); Y. Lu (Yi); J.S. Rahi (Jugnoo); P. Cumberland (Phillippa); S. Bhattacharya (Shoumo); C.L. Simpson (Claire); L.D. Atwood (Larry); X. Li (Xiaohui); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); D. Murgia (Daniela); L. Portas (Laura); D.D.G. Despriet (Dominique); L.M.E. van Koolwijk (Leonieke); C. Wolfram (Christian); K.J. Lackner (Karl); A. Tönjes (Anke); R. Mägi (Reedik); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Esko (Tõnu); A. Metspalu (Andres); T. Rantanen (Taina); O. Pärssinen (Olavi); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); T. Meitinger (Thomas); T.D. Spector (Timothy); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G.D. Smith; P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); A. Hofman (Albert); N. Amin (Najaf); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Döring (Angela); T. Bettecken (Thomas); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); C. Williams (Cathy); T. Zeller (Tanja); R. Castagne (Raphaële); K. Oexle (Konrad); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); R. Höhn (René); A.F.H. Pfeiffer (Andreas); J.E. Bailey-Wilson (Joan); D.E. Stambolian (Dwight); T.Y. Wong (Tien); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMyopia is a complex genetic disorder and a common cause of visual impairment among working age adults. Genome-wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci on chromosomes 15q14 and 15q25 in Caucasian populations of European ancestry. Here, we present a confirmation and met

  15. The genetic aetiology of cannabis use initiation: A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and a SNP-based heritability estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, C.J.H.; Vinkhuyzen, A.A.E.; Benyamin, B.; Lynskey, M.T.; Quaye, L.; Agrawal, A.; Gordon, S.D.; Montgomery, G.W.; Madden, P.A.F.; Heath, A.C.; Spector, T.D.; Martin, N.G.; Medland, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    While initiation of cannabis use is around 40% heritable, not much is known about the underlying genetic aetiology. Here, we meta-analysed two genome-wide association studies of initiation of cannabis use with >10000 individuals. None of the genetic variants reached genome-wide significance. We a

  16. Associations between unprocessed red and processed meat, poultry, seafood and egg intake and the risk of prostate cancer: A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, K.; Spiegelman, D.; Hou, T.; Albanes, D.; Allen, N.E.; Berndt, S.I.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Giles, G.G.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Goodman, G.G.; Goodman, P.J.; Håkansson, N.; Inoue, M.; Key, T.J.; Kolonel, L.N.; Männistö, S.; McCullough, M.L.; Neuhouser, M.L.; Park, Y.; Platz, E.A.; Schenk, J.M.; Sinha, R.; Stampfer, M.J.; Stevens, V.L.; Tsugane, S.; Visvanathan, K.; Wilkens, L.R.; Wolk, A.; Ziegler, R.G.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Reports relating meat intake to prostate cancer risk are inconsistent. Associations between these dietary factors and prostate cancer were examined in a consortium of 15 cohort studies. During follow-up, 52,683 incident prostate cancer cases, including 4,924 advanced cases, were identified among 842

  17. Reporting of financial conflicts of interest in clinical practice guidelines: a case study analysis of guidelines from the Canadian Medical Association Infobase

    OpenAIRE

    Shnier, Adrienne; Lexchin, Joel; Romero, Mirna; Brown, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines are widely distributed by medical associations and relied upon by physicians for the best available clinical evidence. International findings report that financial conflicts of interest (FCOI) with drug companies may influence drug recommendations and are common among guideline authors. There is no comparable study on exclusively Canadian guidelines; therefore, we provide a case study of authors’ FCOI declarations in guidelines from the Canadian Medical...

  18. Association between NSAIDs and Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nitipong Permpalung; Sikarin Upala; Anawin Sanguankeo; Suthanya Sornprom

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Clostridium difficile infection is a leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in developed countries. Studies evaluating the associations of increased risk of community-acquired CDAD and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the odds of NSAID exposure in patients with CDAD versus patients without CDAD in both community-based and healthcare-associated settings. Methods. Re...

  19. Joint analysis of individual participants' data from 17 studies on the association of the IL6 variant -174G >C with circulating glucose levels, interleukin-6 levels, and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huth, Cornelia; Illig, Thomas; Herder, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    Background. Several studies have investigated associations between the -174G >C single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1800795) of the IL6 gene and phenotypes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but presented inconsistent results. Aims. This joint analysis aimed to clarify whether IL6 -174G >C ...

  20. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per;

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  1. The magnitude of association between overweight and obesity and the risk of diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Peeters, Anna; de Courten, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this meta-analysis were to examine the magnitude of the relative risk (RR) of developing type 2 diabetes for overweight and obese populations, compared to those with normal weight, and to determine causes of the variation in RR between various cohort studies. The magnitude...

  2. Network-based analysis of genetic variants associated with hippocampal volume in Alzheimer’s disease: a study of ADNI cohorts

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes dementia. While molecular basis of AD is not fully understood, genetic factors are expected to participate in the development and progression of the disease. Our goal was to uncover novel genetic underpinnings of Alzheimer’s disease with a bioinformatics approach that accounts for tissue specificity. Findings We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for hippocampal volume in two Alzheimer’s Disease Neuro...

  3. Women's risk of repeat abortions is strongly associated with alcohol consumption: a longitudinal analysis of a Russian national panel study, 1994-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Keenan

    Full Text Available Abortion rates in Russia, particularly repeat abortions, are among the highest in the world, and abortion complications make a substantial contribution to the country's high maternal mortality rate. Russia also has a very high rate of hazardous alcohol use. However, the association between alcohol use and abortion in Russia remains unexplored. We investigated the longitudinal predictors of first and repeat abortion, focussing on women's alcohol use as a risk factor. Follow-up data from 2,623 women of reproductive age (16-44 years was extracted from 14 waves of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS, a nationally representative panel study covering the period 1994-2009. We used discrete time hazard models to estimate the probability of having a first and repeat abortion by social, demographic and health characteristics at the preceding study wave. Having a first abortion was associated with demographic factors such as age and parity, whereas repeat abortions were associated with low education and alcohol use. After adjustment for demographic and socioeconomic factors, the risk of having a repeat abortion increased significantly as women's drinking frequency increased (P<0.001, and binge drinking women were significantly more likely to have a repeat abortion than non-drinkers (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.62-3.20. This association was not accounted for by contraceptive use or a higher risk of pregnancy. Therefore the determinants of first and repeat abortion in Russia between 1994-2009 were different. Women who had repeat abortions were distinguished by their heavier and more frequent alcohol use. The mechanism for the association is not well understood but could be explained by unmeasured personality factors, such as risk taking, or social non-conformity increasing the risk of unplanned pregnancy. Heavy or frequent drinkers constitute a particularly high risk group for repeat abortion, who could be targeted in prevention efforts.

  4. Pharmacogenetic analysis of genes implicated in rodent models of antidepressant response: association of TREK1 and treatment resistance in the STAR(*)D study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Roy H; Moorjani, Priya; Fagerness, Jesen; Purcell, Shaun; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A John; Smoller, Jordan W

    2008-11-01

    Recent rodent models of antidepressant response implicate a novel set of genes in mechanisms of antidepressant action. The authors examined variants in four such genes (KCNK2 (TREK1), SLC18A2 (VMAT2), S100A10, and HDAC5) for association with remission in a large effectiveness trial of antidepressant treatments. Subjects were drawn from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR(*)D) study, a multicenter, prospective, effectiveness trial in major depressive disorder (MDD). Outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD were initially treated with citalopram for up to 14 weeks; those who did not remit with citalopram were sequentially randomized to a series of next-step treatments, each for up to 12 weeks. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in four genes were examined for association with remission, defined as a clinician-rated Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C(16)) score < or =5. Of 1554 participants for whom DNA was available, 565 (36%) reached remission with citalopram treatment. No association with any of the four genes was identified. However, among the 751 who entered next-step treatment, variants in KCNK2 were associated with treatment response (Bonferroni-corrected, gene-based empirical p<0.001). In follow-up analyses, KCNK2 was also associated with effects of similar magnitude for third-step treatment among those with unsatisfactory benefit to both citalopram and one next-step pharmacotherapy (n=225). These findings indicate that genetic variation in KCNK2 may identify individuals at risk for treatment resistance. More broadly, they indicate the utility of animal models in identifying genes for pharmacogenetic studies of antidepressant response.

  5. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-27

    Abstract Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  6. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  7. Studying risk factors associated with Human Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is one of the most under diagnosed and underreported disease in both developed and developing countries including India. It is established that environmental conditions and occupational habit of the individuals put them at risk of acquiring disease, which varies from community to community. Various seroprevalence studies across the world have documented emerging situation of this neglected tropical disease, but limited have probed to identify the risk factors, especially in India. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the environmental and occupational risk factors associated with the disease in Udupi District. Materials and Methods: This population-based case-control study was carried out in Udupi, a District in Southern India from April 2012 until August 2012. Udupi is considered to be endemic for Leptospirosis and reported 116 confirmed cases in the year 2011. Seventy of 116 laboratory confirmed cases and 140 sex matched neighborhood healthy controls participated in the study. A predesigned, semi-structured and validated questionnaire was used for data collection through house to house visit and observations were noted about environmental conditions. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis (back ward conditional logistic regression was performed by using STATA version 9.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA to identify potential risk factors. Results: Occupational factors such as outdoor activities (matched odds ratio [OR] of 3.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-13.0, presence of cut or wound at body parts during work (matched OR: 4.88, CI: 1.83-13.02 and environmental factors such as contact with rodents through using the food materials ate by rat (matched OR: 4.29, CI: 1.45-12.73 and contact with soil or water contaminated with urine of rat (matched OR: 4.58, CI: 1.43-14.67 were the risk factors identified to be associated with disease. Conclusion: Leptospirosis is still

  8. A replication study for association of ITPKC and CASP3 two-locus analysis in IVIG unresponsiveness and coronary artery lesion in Kawasaki disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC, rs28493229 and caspase-3 (CASP3, rs113420705 are associated with susceptibility to KD in Japanese and Taiwanese populations. This study was conducted to investigate the involvement of these 2 SNPs in the risk for intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG resistance and coronary artery lesion (CAL in Taiwanese population. A total of 340 KD patients were subjected to assess by the identification of 2-locus genes model. A combinatorial association between ITPKC (rs28493229 and CASP3 (rs113420705 was found in CAL formation (P = 0.0227, OR: 3.06. KD patients with high-risk genotype had a trend of overrepresentation in IVIG resistance compared with individual SNPs. Our findings suggest the existence of genetic factors affecting patients' risk for CAL formation and IVIG responsiveness in a Taiwanese population.

  9. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations ≥40 ng/ml Are Associated with >65% Lower Cancer Risk: Pooled Analysis of Randomized Trial and Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L McDonnell

    Full Text Available Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] concentrations have been associated with a lower risk of multiple cancer types across a range of 25(OHD concentrations.To investigate whether the previously reported inverse association between 25(OHD and cancer risk could be replicated, and if a 25(OHD response region could be identified among women aged 55 years and older across a broad range of 25(OHD concentrations.Data from two cohorts representing different median 25(OHD concentrations were pooled to afford a broader range of 25(OHD concentrations than either cohort alone: the Lappe cohort (N = 1,169, a randomized clinical trial cohort (median 25(OHD = 30 ng/ml and the GrassrootsHealth cohort (N = 1,135, a prospective cohort (median 25(OHD = 48 ng/ml. Cancer incidence over a multi-year period (median: 3.9 years was compared according to 25(OHD concentration. Kaplan-Meier plots were developed and the association between 25(OHD and cancer risk was examined with multivariate Cox regression using multiple 25(OHD measurements and spline functions. The study included all invasive cancers excluding skin cancer.Age-adjusted cancer incidence across the combined cohort (N = 2,304 was 840 cases per 100,000 person-years (1,020 per 100,000 person-years in the Lappe cohort and 722 per 100,000 person-years in the GrassrootsHealth cohort. Incidence was lower at higher concentrations of 25(OHD. Women with 25(OHD concentrations ≥40 ng/ml had a 67% lower risk of cancer than women with concentrations <20 ng/ml (HR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.12-0.90.25(OHD concentrations ≥40 ng/ml were associated with substantial reduction in risk of all invasive cancers combined.

  10. The SNP rs961253 in 20p12.3 is associated with colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study and a meta-analysis of the published literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiawen Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs961253 located in 20p12, was firstly described to be associated with the increased risk of CRC in a genome-wide association study; however, more recent replication studies yielded controversial results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A hospital-based case-control study in a Chinese population was firstly performed, and then a meta-analysis combining the current and previously published studies were conducted to explore the real effect of rs961253 in CRC susceptibility. In the Chinese population including 641 cases and 1037 controls, per-A-allele conferred an OR of 1.60 (95% CI = 1.26-2.02 under additive model. In the meta-analysis including 29859 cases and 29696 controls, per-A-allele have an OR of 1.13 (95% CI = 1.09-1.18 under a random-effects model due to heterogeneity (P = 0.019. Nevertheless, the heterogeneity can be totally explained by ethnicity, with the tau(2 reduced to 0 after including ethnicity in meta-regression model. In stratified analysis by ethnicity, per-A-allele had ORs of 1.34 (95% CI = 1.20-1.50 and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14 for Asian and European, respectively, without heterogeneity. Modest influence of each study was observed on overall estimate in sensitive analysis, and evident tendency to significant association was seen in cumulative analysis over time, together indicating the robust stability of the current results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results from our study and the meta-analysis provided firm evidence that rs961253 significantly contributed to CRC risk in both Asian and European population.

  11. Study on multimers and their structures in molecular association mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Yi; DOU XiaoMing; ZHAO HaiYing; YIN GuangZhong; YAMAGUCHI Yoshinori; OZAKI Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    Self-association system of (R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) solution is studied as a model of molecular association mixture. Analysis methods including FSMWEFA (fixed-size moving window evolving factor analysis) combined with PCA (principal component analysis), SIMPLISMA (simple-to-use interactive self-modeling mixture analysis), and ITTFA (iterative target transformation factor analysis) are adopted to resolve infrared spectra of (R)-1,3-butanediol solution. Association number and equilibrium constant are computed. (R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute inert solution is determined as a monomer-trimer equilibrium system. Theoretical investigation of trimer structures is carried out with DFT (density functional theory), and structural factors are analyzed.

  12. Study on multimers and their structures in molecular association mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAMAGUCHI; Yoshinori; OZAKI; Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    Self-association system of(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)solution is studied as a model of molecular association mixture.Analysis methods including FSMWEFA(fixed-size moving window evolving factor analysis)combined with PCA(principal component analysis),SIMPLISMA (simple-to-use interactive self-modeling mixture analysis),and ITTFA(iterative target transformation factor analysis)are adopted to resolve infrared spectra of(R)-1,3-butanediol solution.Association number and equilibrium constant are computed.(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute inert solution is determined as a monomer-trimer equilibrium system.Theoretical investigation of trimer structures is carried out with DFT(density functional theory),and structural factors are analyzed.

  13. Integrated analysis of gene expression by association rules discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carazo Jose M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is generating huge amounts of data about the expression level of thousands of genes, or even whole genomes, across different experimental conditions. To extract biological knowledge, and to fully understand such datasets, it is essential to include external biological information about genes and gene products to the analysis of expression data. However, most of the current approaches to analyze microarray datasets are mainly focused on the analysis of experimental data, and external biological information is incorporated as a posterior process. Results In this study we present a method for the integrative analysis of microarray data based on the Association Rules Discovery data mining technique. The approach integrates gene annotations and expression data to discover intrinsic associations among both data sources based on co-occurrence patterns. We applied the proposed methodology to the analysis of gene expression datasets in which genes were annotated with metabolic pathways, transcriptional regulators and Gene Ontology categories. Automatically extracted associations revealed significant relationships among these gene attributes and expression patterns, where many of them are clearly supported by recently reported work. Conclusion The integration of external biological information and gene expression data can provide insights about the biological processes associated to gene expression programs. In this paper we show that the proposed methodology is able to integrate multiple gene annotations and expression data in the same analytic framework and extract meaningful associations among heterogeneous sources of data. An implementation of the method is included in the Engene software package.

  14. HIV Infection Is Not Associated with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Brazil: A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the INI/ELSA-Brasil Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinsztejn, Beatriz; da Fonseca, Maria de Jesus M.; Griep, Rosane Härter; Lotufo, Paulo; Bensenor, Isabela; Mill, José G.; Moreira, Rodrigo de C.; Moreira, Ronaldo I.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Chor, Dóra

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) has been used as an early marker of atherosclerotic disease in the general population. Recently its role among HIV-infected patients has been questioned. To date, no Brazilian study has compared cIMT in respect to HIV status. Methods We compared data from 535 patients actively followed in a prospective cohort in Rio de Janeiro (HIV group); 88 HIV-negative individuals who were nominated by patients (friend controls–FCs); and 10,943 participants of the ELSA-Brasil study. Linear regression models were used to study associations of the 3 groups and several covariables with cIMT. Propensity scores weighting (PSW) were also employed to balance data. Results Median thickness in mm (IQR) were 0.54 (0.49,0.62); 0.58 (0.52,0.68); and 0.57 (0.49,0.70), HIV, FCs and ELSA-Brasil groups, respectively (p-value<0.001). The best linear model chosen did not include the group variables, after adjusting for all the variables chosen, showing no difference of cIMT across groups. Similar results were obtained with PSW. Several traditional CVD risk factors were also significantly associated with cIMT: female gender, higher education and higher HDL were negatively associated while risk factors were older age, current/former smoker, AMI/stroke family history, CVD history, hypertension, DM, higher BMI and total cholesterol. Conclusions We show for the first time in a middle-income setting that cIMT, is not different in HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro compared with 2 different groups of non-HIV-infected individuals. Traditional CVD risk factors are associated with this outcome. Our results point out that high standards of care and prevention for CVD risk factors should always be sought both in the HIV-infected and non-infected populations to prevent CVD-related events. PMID:27391355

  15. An 8-year longitudinal sero-epidemiological study of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle in Turkey and analysis of risk factors associated with BLV seropositivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şevik, Murat; Avcı, Oğuzhan; İnce, Ömer Barış

    2015-04-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) which is caused by bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) has an important economic impact on dairy herds due to reduced milk production and restrictions on livestock exports. This study was conducted to determine the BLV infection status in Central Anatolia Region of Turkey, an important milk production centre, and to examine the risk factors such as purchasing cattle, increasing cattle age, cattle breed and herd size associated with transmission of BLV infection. To estimate the rate of BLV infection, a survey for specific antibodies in 28,982 serum samples from animals belonging to 1116 different herds situated in Central Anatolia Region of Turkey were tested from January 2006 to December 2013. A generalized mixed linear model was used to evaluate the risk factors that influenced BLV seroprevalence. Antibodies against BLV were detected in 431 (2.28 %) of 18,822 Holstein and 29 (0.28 %) of 10,160 Brown Swiss cows. Among 1116 herds, 132 herds (11.82 %) had one or more positive animals. Also results of our study show that the prevalence of BLV infection increased from 2006 to 2011, and it tends to reduce with BLV control programme. Furthermore, we found positive associations between percentage of seropositive animal and increasing cattle age, herd size, cattle breed and purchased cattle. Age-specific prevalence showed that BLV prevalence increased with age. These factors should be taken into consideration for control of BLV infection.

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease.

  17. Association of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) rs1050450 Pro198Leu and Pro197Leu polymorphisms with cardiovascular risk:a meta-analysis of ob-servational studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Xia ZHANG; Zhi-Mei WANG; Jun-Jie ZHANG; Lin-Lin ZHU; Xiao-Fei GAO; Shao-Liang CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Objective To clarify the association between rs1050450 polymorphism in Glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) and the risk of cardi-ovascular diseases (CVD) by performing a meta-analysis of published studies. There is growing evidence from different study types for an association of the GPx-1 polymorphism and cardiovascular outcomes, but observational studies have so far shown inconsistent results. Me-thods Relevant publications were searched through PubMed, Embase database databases and the Cochrane Library. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95%confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of association under the best genetic model. Both Q statistic and the I2 were used to check heterogeneity. Meta-regression analysis was performed to explore heterogeneity source. Sensitivity analysis, cumulative me-ta-analysis analysis and publication bias were used to test the reliability of the results. Results Data were available from two cohort studies and 8 case-control studies involving 1,430 cases and 3,767 controls. The pooled ORs for overall CVD risk was 1.36 with 95%CI:1.08-1.70 under a co-dominant model, and that for East Asian subgroup was 1.84 (95%CI:1.39-2.43). Substantial heterogeneity for ORs were de-tected among all the included studies, mainly caused by ethnic differences between East Asian and non-East Asian populations. Although Egger’s regression test suggested no statistical significant publication bias, Begg’s funnel plot exhibited obvious asymmetry. The statistical significance disappeared after adjusting for potential publication bias in the overall studies. However, no substantial publication bias was found in the East Asian subgroup. Conclusions GPx-1 gene Pro198Leu and Pro197Leu polymorphisms considerably increased the risk of CVD in the East Asian population. Large-scale investigations are needed to confirm the results in different ethnicities.

  18. Planning a Regional Energy System in Association with the Creation of Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs, Statistical Analysis and Energy Efficiency Measures: An Italian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Fabbri

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Directive 2002/91/EC EPBD introduced the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC as a tool to guide the real estate market in the creation of products (buildings with improved energy performances. The EPC’s information could be useful in the determination of relevant policies and also in studying the characteristics of the building resources of the territory. This paper presents a case study related to the EPC Database of the Emilia-Romagna Region in mid-northern Italy. The case study shows a way of elaborating the EPC information in statistical analysis evaluations with aggregate data, in order to measure a territory and then direct energy policies toward energy efficiency. A statistical approach was used to define a characteristic statistical indicator index of the EPC database, and compare the energy index with the bottom-up and top-down methods, in order to identify some energy policy scenarios.

  19. Association of cardiopulmonary health effects with source-appointed ambient fine particulate in Beijing, China: a combined analysis from the Healthy Volunteer Natural Relocation (HVNR) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Deng, Furong; Wei, Hongying; Huang, Jing; Wang, Xin; Hao, Yu; Zheng, Chanjuan; Qin, Yu; Lv, Haibo; Shima, Masayuki; Guo, Xinbiao

    2014-03-18

    Previous studies have associated ambient particulate chemical constituents with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects. However, specific pollution sources behind the cardiopulmonary health effects of ambient particles are uncertain. We examined the cardiopulmonary health effects of fine particles (PM2.5) from different pollution sources in Beijing, China, among a panel of 40 healthy university students. Study subjects were repeatedly examined for a series of cardiopulmonary health indicators during three 2-month-long study periods (suburban period, urban period 1, and urban period 2) in 2010-2011 before and after relocating from a suburban campus to an urban campus with changing air pollution levels and contents. Daily ambient PM2.5 mass samples were collected over the study and measured for 29 chemical constituents in the laboratory. Source appointment for ambient PM2.5 was performed using Positive Matrix Factorization, and mixed-effects models were used to estimate the cardiopulmonary effects associated with source-specific PM2.5 concentrations. Seven PM2.5 sources were identified as traffic emissions (12.0%), coal combustion (22.0%), secondary sulfate/nitrate (30.2%), metallurgical emission (0.4%), dust/soil (12.4%), industry (6.9%), and secondary organic aerosol (9.9%). Ambient PM2.5 in the suburban campus had larger contributions from secondary sulfate/nitrate (41.8% vs. 22.9%-26.0%) and metallurgical emission (0.7% vs. 0.3%) as compared to that in the urban campus), whereas PM2.5 in the urban campus had larger contributions from traffic emissions (13.0%-16.3% vs. 5.1%), coal combustion (21.0%-30.7% vs. 10.7%), and secondary organic aerosol (9.7%-12.0% vs. 8.7%) as compared to that in the suburban campus. Potential key sources were identified for PM2.5 effects on inflammatory biomarkers (secondary sulfate/nitrate and dust/soil), blood pressure (coal combustion and metallurgical emission), and pulmonary function (dust/soil and industry). Analyses using another

  20. Early-Stage Hyperoxia Is Associated with Favorable Neurological Outcomes and Survival after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the Brain Hypothermia Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Motoki; Oda, Yasutaka; Yamashita, Susumu; Kaneda, Kotaro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Dohi, Kenji; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kobata, Hitoshi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-19

    The effects of hyperoxia on the neurological outcomes of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are still controversial. We examined whether the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and hyperoxia were associated with neurological outcomes and survival by conducting post-hoc analyses of the Brain Hypothermia (B-HYPO) study, a multi-center randomized controlled trial of mild therapeutic hypothermia for severe TBI. The differences in PaO2 and PaO2/fraction of inspiratory oxygen (P/F) ratio on the 1st day of admission were compared between patients with favorable (n = 64) and unfavorable (n = 65) neurological outcomes and between survivors (n = 90) and deceased patients (n = 39). PaO2 and the P/F ratio were significantly greater in patients with favorable outcomes than in patients with unfavorable neurological outcomes (PaO2: 252 ± 122 vs. 202 ± 87 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.008; P/F ratio: 455 ± 171 vs. 389 ± 155, respectively, p = 0.022) and in survivors than in deceased patients (PaO2: 242 ± 117 vs. 193 ± 75 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.005; P/F ratio: 445 ± 171 vs. 370 ± 141, respectively, p = 0.018). Similar tendencies were observed in subgroup analyses in patients with fever control and therapeutic hypothermia, and in patients with an evacuated mass or other lesions (unevacuated lesions). PaO2 was independently associated with survival (odds ratio 1.008, p = 0.037). These results suggested that early-stage hyperoxia might be associated with favorable neurological outcomes and survival following severe TBI.

  1. Association of 677 C>T (rs1801133 and 1298 A>C (rs1801131 polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene and breast cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis based on 57 individual studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The 677 C>T and 1298 A>C polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene have been widely reported and considered to have a significant effect on breast cancer risk, but the results are inconsistent. A meta-analysis based on 57 eligible studies was carried out to clarify the role of MTHFR gene polymorphisms in breast cancer. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eligible articles were identified by searching databases including PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, CNKI and CBM for the period up to August 2012. Finally, a total of 57 studies were included in this meta-analysis. Crude ORs with 95% CIs were used to assess the association between the MTHFR polymorphisms and breast cancer risk. The pooled ORs were performed with additive model, dominant model and recessive model, respectively. Subgroup analysis was also performed by ethnicity. The statistical heterogeneity across studies was examined with χ2-based Q-test. A meta-analysis was performed using the Stata 12.0 software. Overall, the 677 C allele was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (OR = 0.942, 95%CI = 0.898 to 0.988 when compared with the 677 T allele in the additive model, and the same results were also revealed under other genetic models. Simultaneously, the 1298 A allele was not associated with the breast cancer susceptibility when compared with the 1298 C allele (OR = 0.993, 95%CI = 0.978 to 1.009. Furthermore, analyses under the dominant, recessive and the allele contrast model yielded similar results. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that 677 C>T polymorphism in the MTHFR gene may contribute to breast cancer development. However, the 1298 A>C polymorphism is not significantly associated with increased risks of breast cancer.

  2. Is the Proportion of Carbohydrate Intake Associated with the Incidence of Diabetes Complications?—An Analysis of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study

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    Chika Horikawa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate proportions of macronutritional intake have been controversial in medical nutritional therapy for diabetes, and evidence of the effects of carbohydrate consumption on diabetes complications in prospective settings is sparse. We investigated the relationships between proportions of carbohydrate intake as the % of total energy and diabetes complications in a nationwide cohort of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes aged 40–70 years with hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%. The analysis was of 1516 responders to a baseline dietary survey assessed by the Food Frequency Questionnaire based on food groups. Primary outcomes were times to overt nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and cardiovascular disease (CVD after 8 years. Hazard ratios (HRs for proportions of carbohydrate intake were estimated by Cox regression adjusted for confounders. High carbohydrate intake was significantly related to higher intakes of grain, fruits, and sweets/snacks and lower intakes of soybean and soy products, vegetables, seaweed, meat and processed meat, fish and processed fish, eggs, milk and dairy products, oil, and alcoholic beverages. During the eight-year follow-up, there were 81, 275, and 129 events of overt nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and CVD, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, HRs for complications in patients with carbohydrate intake in the second or third tertiles (51.0%–56.4% and ≥56.5%, respectively compared with carbohydrate intake in the first tertile (<50.9%, referent were analyzed. No significant associations were shown in the second and third tertiles relative to first tertile (overt nephropathy: 1.05 (95% Confidence Interval, 0.54–2.06 and 0.98 (0.40–2.44; diabetic retinopathy: 1.30 (0.90–1.88 and 1.30 (0.78–2.15; and CVD: 0.95 (0.55–1.63 and 1.37 (0.69–2.72. By exploring potentially nonlinear relationships, trends for the incidence of diabetes complications according to proportions of carbohydrate intake were not

  3. Sensitivity analysis on fuel scenario associated magnitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martinez, M.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle scenario analyses are needed as a support for policy makers in terms of sustainability, fuel diversity, security of supply, and social and environmental effects. These analyses are usually aimed to the study of the impact of certain hypotheses on some fuel cycle indicators, without considering the uncertainties on those hypotheses. The expert group of the NEA/OECD on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios, where this work is framed, is devoted to fill this gap, laying the foundations for deep analysis of the sensibilities on fuel cycle indicators. (Author)

  4. Low HDL-C level is associated with the development of intracranial artery stenosis: analysis from the Chinese IntraCranial AtheroSclerosis (CICAS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yining Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS is an important cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. The role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C in the development of ICAS remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the relationship of HDL-C level and the risk of developing ICAS in Chinese patients with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: From October 2007 to June 2009, a total of 1,984 consecutive ischemic stroke patients were evaluated for the presence of symptomatic ICAS by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA. Patients were classified into two groups: intracranial steno-occlusion (ICAS group, n = 888 and non-intracranial stenosis (NICAS group, n = 1096. Serum lipid profiles were analyzed and compared between the ICAS and NICAS group. RESULTS: Significantly more patients in ICAS group had low HDL-C level (51.6% than in the NICAS group (42.9%, P<0.001. The observed association remained significant after adjustment for conventional risk factors [(adjusted OR 1.36; 95%CI (1.13-1.63]. Such predictive value of low level HDL-C persisted even when LDL-C was at very low level(<1.8 mmol/L. Patients in the lowest serum HDL-C quartile (<0.96 mmol/L had the highest risk of developing ICAS [adjusted OR 1.52; 95%CI (1.17-1.98] compared to patients in the highest serum HDL-C quartile (≥ 1.32 mmol/L after adjustments for the covariates. CONCLUSIONS: Low HDL-C level is strongly associated with the development of ICAS. There was an inverse relationship between the level of HDL-C and the risk of developing ICAS.

  5. ZDHHC8 as a candidate gene for schizophrenia: Analysis of a putative functional intronic marker in case-control and family-based association studies

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    Jabs Burkhard

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome 22q11 region is proposed as a major candidate locus for susceptibility genes to schizophrenia. Recently, the gene ZDHHC8 encoding a putative palmitoyltransferase at 22q11 was proposed to increase liability to schizophrenia based on both animal models and human association studies by significant over-transmission of allele rs175174A in female, but not male subjects with schizophrenia. Methods Given the genetic complexity of schizophrenia and the potential genetic heterogeneity in different populations, we examined rs175174 in 204 German proband-parent triads and in an independent case-control study (schizophrenic cases: n = 433; controls: n = 186. Results In the triads heterozygous parents transmitted allele G preferentially to females, and allele A to males (heterogeneity χ2 = 4.43; p = 0.035. The case-control sample provided no further evidence for overall or gender-specific effects regarding allele and genotype frequency distributions. Conclusion The findings on rs175174 at ZDHHC8 are still far from being conclusive, but evidence for sexual dimorphism is moderate, and our data do not support a significant genetic contribution of rs175174 to the aetiopathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  6. Association between the European GWAS-identified susceptibility locus at chromosome 4p16 and the risk of atrial septal defect: a case-control study in Southwest China and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhao

    Full Text Available Atrial septal defect (ASD is the third most frequent type of congenital heart anomaly, featuring shunting of blood between the two atria. Gene-environment interaction remains to be an acknowledged cause for ASD occurrence. A recent European genome-wide association study (GWAS of congenital heart disease (CHD identified 3 susceptibility SNPs at chromosome 4p16 associated with ASD: rs870142, rs16835979 and rs6824295. A Chinese-GWAS of CHD conducted in the corresponding period did not reveal the 3 susceptibility SNPs, but reported 2 different risk SNPs: rs2474937 and rs1531070. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the 3 European GWAS-identified susceptibility SNPs and ASD risk in the Han population in southwest China. Additionally, to increase the robustness of our current analysis, we conducted a meta-analysis combining published studies and our current case-control study. We performed association, linkage disequilibrium, and haplotype analysis among the 3 SNPs in 190 ASD cases and 225 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies among the 3 SNPs showed statistically significant differences between the cases and controls. Our study found that individuals carrying the allele T of rs870142, the allele A of rs16835979, and the allele T of rs6824295 had a respective 50.1% (odds ratio (OR = 1.501, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.122-2.009, PFDR-BH = 0.018, 48.5% (OR = 1.485, 95%CI = 1.109-1.987, PFDR-BH = 0.012, and 38.6% (OR = 1.386, 95%CI = 1.042-1.844, PFDR-BH = 0.025 increased risk to develop ASD than wild-type allele carriers in our study cohort. In the haplotype analysis, we identified a disease-risk haplotype (TAT (OR = 1.540, 95%CI = 1.030-2.380, PFDR-BH = 0.016. Our meta-analysis also showed that the investigated SNP was associated with ASD risk (combined OR (95%CI = 1.35 (1.24-1.46, P < 0.00001. Our study provides compelling evidence to motivate better understanding of the etiology

  7. Emotional experiences and motivating factors associated with fingerprint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, David; Fraser-Mackenzie, Peter A F; Dror, Itiel E

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the emotional and motivational factors involved in fingerprint analysis in day-to-day routine case work and in significant and harrowing criminal investigations. Thematic analysis was performed on interviews with 13 experienced fingerprint examiners from a variety of law enforcement agencies. The data revealed factors relating to job satisfaction and the use of skill. Individual satisfaction related to catching criminals was observed; this was most notable in solving high profile, serious, or long-running cases. There were positive emotional effects associated with matching fingerprints and apparent fear of making errors. Finally, we found evidence for a need of cognitive closure in fingerprint examiner decision-making.

  8. Two new Loci for body-weight regulation identified in a joint analysis of genome-wide association studies for early-onset extreme obesity in French and german study groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Scherag

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses of population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS in adults have recently led to the detection of new genetic loci for obesity. Here we aimed to discover additional obesity loci in extremely obese children and adolescents. We also investigated if these results generalize by estimating the effects of these obesity loci in adults and in population-based samples including both children and adults. We jointly analysed two GWAS of 2,258 individuals and followed-up the best, according to lowest p-values, 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP from 21 genomic regions in 3,141 individuals. After this DISCOVERY step, we explored if the findings derived from the extremely obese children and adolescents (10 SNPs from 5 genomic regions generalized to (i the population level and (ii to adults by genotyping another 31,182 individuals (GENERALIZATION step. Apart from previously identified FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18, we detected two new loci for obesity: one in SDCCAG8 (serologically defined colon cancer antigen 8 gene; p = 1.85x10(-8 in the DISCOVERY step and one between TNKS (tankyrase, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase gene and MSRA (methionine sulfoxide reductase A gene; p = 4.84x10(-7, the latter finding being limited to children and adolescents as demonstrated in the GENERALIZATION step. The odds ratios for early-onset obesity were estimated at approximately 1.10 per risk allele for both loci. Interestingly, the TNKS/MSRA locus has recently been found to be associated with adult waist circumference. In summary, we have completed a meta-analysis of two GWAS which both focus on extremely obese children and adolescents and replicated our findings in a large followed-up data set. We observed that genetic variants in or near FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, SDCCAG8, and TNKS/MSRA were robustly associated with early-onset obesity. We conclude that the currently known major common variants related to obesity overlap to a substantial

  9. Two new Loci for body-weight regulation identified in a joint analysis of genome-wide association studies for early-onset extreme obesity in French and german study groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherag, André; Dina, Christian; Hinney, Anke; Vatin, Vincent; Scherag, Susann; Vogel, Carla I G; Müller, Timo D; Grallert, Harald; Wichmann, H-Erich; Balkau, Beverley; Heude, Barbara; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Levy-Marchal, Claire; Weill, Jacques; Delplanque, Jérôme; Körner, Antje; Kiess, Wieland; Kovacs, Peter; Rayner, Nigel W; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I; Schäfer, Helmut; Jarick, Ivonne; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Reinehr, Thomas; Heinrich, Joachim; Rzehak, Peter; Berdel, Dietrich; Borte, Michael; Biebermann, Heike; Krude, Heiko; Rosskopf, Dieter; Rimmbach, Christian; Rief, Winfried; Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin; Schürmann, Annette; Schulz, Nadja; Nöthen, Markus M; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Boes, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Froguel, Philippe; Hebebrand, Johannes; Meyre, David

    2010-04-22

    Meta-analyses of population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have recently led to the detection of new genetic loci for obesity. Here we aimed to discover additional obesity loci in extremely obese children and adolescents. We also investigated if these results generalize by estimating the effects of these obesity loci in adults and in population-based samples including both children and adults. We jointly analysed two GWAS of 2,258 individuals and followed-up the best, according to lowest p-values, 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from 21 genomic regions in 3,141 individuals. After this DISCOVERY step, we explored if the findings derived from the extremely obese children and adolescents (10 SNPs from 5 genomic regions) generalized to (i) the population level and (ii) to adults by genotyping another 31,182 individuals (GENERALIZATION step). Apart from previously identified FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18, we detected two new loci for obesity: one in SDCCAG8 (serologically defined colon cancer antigen 8 gene; p = 1.85x10(-8) in the DISCOVERY step) and one between TNKS (tankyrase, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase gene) and MSRA (methionine sulfoxide reductase A gene; p = 4.84x10(-7)), the latter finding being limited to children and adolescents as demonstrated in the GENERALIZATION step. The odds ratios for early-onset obesity were estimated at approximately 1.10 per risk allele for both loci. Interestingly, the TNKS/MSRA locus has recently been found to be associated with adult waist circumference. In summary, we have completed a meta-analysis of two GWAS which both focus on extremely obese children and adolescents and replicated our findings in a large followed-up data set. We observed that genetic variants in or near FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, SDCCAG8, and TNKS/MSRA were robustly associated with early-onset obesity. We conclude that the currently known major common variants related to obesity overlap to a substantial degree

  10. Two New Loci for Body-Weight Regulation Identified in a Joint Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Early-Onset Extreme Obesity in French and German Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherag, André; Dina, Christian; Hinney, Anke; Vatin, Vincent; Scherag, Susann; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Müller, Timo D.; Grallert, Harald; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Balkau, Beverley; Heude, Barbara; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Levy-Marchal, Claire; Weill, Jacques; Delplanque, Jérôme; Körner, Antje; Kiess, Wieland; Kovacs, Peter; Rayner, Nigel W.; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I.; Schäfer, Helmut; Jarick, Ivonne; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Reinehr, Thomas; Heinrich, Joachim; Rzehak, Peter; Berdel, Dietrich; Borte, Michael; Biebermann, Heike; Krude, Heiko; Rosskopf, Dieter; Rimmbach, Christian; Rief, Winfried; Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin; Schürmann, Annette; Schulz, Nadja; Nöthen, Markus M.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Boes, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Froguel, Philippe; Hebebrand, Johannes; Meyre, David

    2010-01-01

    Meta-analyses of population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have recently led to the detection of new genetic loci for obesity. Here we aimed to discover additional obesity loci in extremely obese children and adolescents. We also investigated if these results generalize by estimating the effects of these obesity loci in adults and in population-based samples including both children and adults. We jointly analysed two GWAS of 2,258 individuals and followed-up the best, according to lowest p-values, 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from 21 genomic regions in 3,141 individuals. After this DISCOVERY step, we explored if the findings derived from the extremely obese children and adolescents (10 SNPs from 5 genomic regions) generalized to (i) the population level and (ii) to adults by genotyping another 31,182 individuals (GENERALIZATION step). Apart from previously identified FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18, we detected two new loci for obesity: one in SDCCAG8 (serologically defined colon cancer antigen 8 gene; p = 1.85×10−8 in the DISCOVERY step) and one between TNKS (tankyrase, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase gene) and MSRA (methionine sulfoxide reductase A gene; p = 4.84×10−7), the latter finding being limited to children and adolescents as demonstrated in the GENERALIZATION step. The odds ratios for early-onset obesity were estimated at ∼1.10 per risk allele for both loci. Interestingly, the TNKS/MSRA locus has recently been found to be associated with adult waist circumference. In summary, we have completed a meta-analysis of two GWAS which both focus on extremely obese children and adolescents and replicated our findings in a large followed-up data set. We observed that genetic variants in or near FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, SDCCAG8, and TNKS/MSRA were robustly associated with early-onset obesity. We conclude that the currently known major common variants related to obesity overlap to a substantial degree between

  11. Associations between attributes of live poultry trade and HPAI H5N1 outbreaks: a descriptive and network analysis study in northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otte Joachim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of contact between individuals plays an important role in the incursion and spread of contagious diseases in both human and animal populations. In the case of avian influenza, the movement of live birds is a well known risk factor for the geographic dissemination of the virus among poultry flocks. Live bird markets (LBM's contribute to the epidemiology of avian influenza due to their demographic characteristics and the presence of HPAI H5N1 virus lineages. The relationship between poultry producers and live poultry traders (LPT's that operate in LBM's has not been adequately documented in HPAI H5N1-affected SE Asian countries. The aims of this study were to document and study the flow of live poultry in a poultry trade network in northern Vietnam, and explore its potential role in the risk for HPAI H5N1 during 2003 to 2006. Results Our results indicate that LPT's trading for less than a year and operating at retail markets are more likely to source poultry from flocks located in communes with a past history of HPAI H5N1 outbreaks during 2003 to 2006 than LPT's trading longer than a year and operating at wholesale markets. The results of the network analysis indicate that LPT's tend to link communes of similar infection status. Conclusions Our study provides evidence which can be used for informing policies aimed at encouraging more biosecure practices of LPT's operating at authorised LBM's. The results suggest that LPT's play a role in HPAI H5N1 transmission and may contribute to perpetuating HPAI H5N1 virus circulation amongst certain groups of communes. The impact of current disease prevention and control interventions could be enhanced by disseminating information about outbreak risk and the implementation of a formal data recording scheme at LBM's for all incoming and outgoing LPT's.

  12. Association factor analysis between osteoporosis with cerebral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, Bora; Im, Soo Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical association factors between osteoporosis and cerebral artery disease in Korean population. Two hundred nineteen postmenopausal women and men undergoing cerebral computed tomography angiography were enrolled in this study to evaluate the cerebral artery disease by cross-sectional study. Cerebral artery disease was diagnosed if there was narrowing of 50% higher diameter in one or more cerebral vessel artery or presence of vascular calcification. History of osteoporotic fracture was assessed using medical record, and radiographic data such as simple radiography, MRI, and bone scan. Bone mineral density was checked by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. We reviewed clinical characteristics in all patients and also performed subgroup analysis for total or extracranial/ intracranial cerebral artery disease group retrospectively. We performed statistical analysis by means of chi-square test or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test or Wilcoxon's rank sum test for continuous variables. We also used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the factors associated with the prevalence of cerebral artery disease. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. All statistical analyses were performed using R (version 3.1.3; The R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) and SPSS (version 14.0; SPSS, Inc, Chicago, Ill, USA). Of the 219 patients, 142 had cerebral artery disease. All vertebral fracture was observed in 29 (13.24%) patients. There was significant difference in hip fracture according to the presence or absence of cerebral artery disease. In logistic regression analysis, osteoporotic hip fracture was significantly associated with extracranial cerebral artery disease after adjusting for multiple risk factors. Females with osteoporotic hip fracture were associated with total calcified

  13. Associative visual agnosia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnallet, A; Carbonnel, S; David, D; Moreaud, O

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study, an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory.

  14. Associative Visual Agnosia: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    A. Charnallet; S. Carbonnel; David, D.; Moreaud, O.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study [1], an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory [4].

  15. Understanding Salesforce Behavior using Genetic Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. van den Berg (Wouter)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Using genetic association studies, this thesis aims to investigate the drivers of successful customer-salesperson interactions in a context where knowledge development has become crucial to the value creation process. Central to this thesis is the developing role of the

  16. A Comparative Study of Sparse Associative Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripon, Vincent; Heusel, Judith; Löwe, Matthias; Vermet, Franck

    2016-07-01

    We study various models of associative memories with sparse information, i.e. a pattern to be stored is a random string of 0s and 1s with about log N 1s, only. We compare different synaptic weights, architectures and retrieval mechanisms to shed light on the influence of the various parameters on the storage capacity.

  17. Association of the COQ2 V393A variant with risk of multiple system atrophy in East Asians: a case-control study and meta-analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, QuanZhen; Yang, Xinglong; Tian, SiJia; An, Ran; Zheng, JinHua; Xu, Yanming

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies in Japan have associated multiple system atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disease of uncertain etiology, with polymorphism in the COQ2 gene. This led us to explore whether the same polymorphism is associated with MSA in Han Chinese and more broadly in East Asians. We conducted a case-control study with 82 Han Chinese with probable MSA and 484 gender- and age-matched healthy subjects, genotyping them using the ligase detection reaction. The results were meta-analyzed together with data from four previous studies to gain a broader picture of possible disease associations in East Asian populations. The COQ2 variants M78V and R337X were not detected in our Han Chinese patients or controls; only the heterozygous V393A variant (CT genotype) was detected. The frequency of this genotype was significantly higher in patients (7.3%) than in controls (1.86%; OR 4.17, 95% CI 1.44-12.04, p = 0.004). Subgroup analysis among patients showed a significant association of V393A with MSA involving cerebellar signs (MSA-C; OR 4.59, 95% CI 1.36-15.48, p = 0.007), but not with MSA involving parkinsonism (MSA-P). Meta-analysis of our results in Han Chinese with data from case-control studies in Japan, Korea, mainland China and Taiwan showed a significant association of V393A with MSA (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.29-3.25, p = 0.002), which subgroup analysis showed to be significant for MSA-C (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.98-3.84, p < 0.001) but not for MSA-P (OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.64-2.46, p = 0.51). These findings provide evidence that the previously reported association of COQ2 V393A polymorphism with increased risk of MSA in Japanese also applies to Han Chinese, as well as more broadly to other East Asian populations. This association may be particularly strong for MSA-C.

  18. Association Analysis of the Amino Acid Contents in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiguo Zhao; Eun-Jin Park; Jong-Wook Chung; Yong-Jin Park; III-Min Chung; Joung-Kuk Ahn; Gwang-Ho Kim

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to identify simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with the amino acid content of rice (Oryza sativa L.). SSR markers were selected by prescreening for the relationship to amino acid content. Eighty-four rice landrace accessions from Korea were evaluated for 16 kinds of amino acids in brown rice and genotyped with 25 SSR markers. Analysis of population structure revealed four subgroups in the population. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and distributions are of fundamental importance for genome-wide mapping associations. The mean r2 value for all intrachromosomal loci pairs was 0.033. LD between linked markers decreased with distance. Marker-trait associations were investigated using the unified mixed-model approach, considering both population structure (Q) and kinship (K). A total of 42 marker-trait associations with amino acids (P < 0.05) were identified using 15 different SSR markers covering three chromosomes and explaining more than 40% of the total variation. These results suggest that association analysis In rice is a viable alternative to quantitative trait loci mapping and should help rice breeders develop strategies for improving rice quality.

  19. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key points Significantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power capacity in

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R; Kendler, Kenneth S;

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yiel...

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sklar, Pamela; Holmans, Peter A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Duan, Jubao; Ophoff, Roel A.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Scolnick, Edward; Cichon, Sven; Clair, David St.; Corvin, Aiden; Gurling, Hugh; Werge, Thomas; Rujescu, Dan; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Pato, Carlos N.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Purcell, Shaun; Dudbridge, Frank; Neale, Benjamin M.; Rossin, Lizzy; Visscher, Peter M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fanous, Ayman; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Mowry, Bryan J.; Golimbet, Vera; De Hert, Marc; Jonsson, Erik G.; Bitter, Istvan; Pietilainen, Olli P. H.; Collier, David A.; Tosato, Sarah; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amdur, Richard L.; Amin, Farooq; Bass, Nicholas; Bergen, Sarah E.; Black, Donald W.; Borglum, Anders D.; Brown, Matthew A.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Catts, Stanley V.; Choudhury, Khalid; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nicholas; Danoy, Patrick A.; Datta, Susmita; De Haan, Lieuwe; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donnelly, Peter; Donohoe, Gary; Duong, Linh; Dwyer, Sarah; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Glenthoj, Birte; Godard, Stephanie; Hamshere, Marian; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Hougaard, David M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Ingason, Andres; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Jay, Maurice; Juergens, Gesche; Kahn, Renes; Keller, Matthew C.; Kenis, Gunter; Kenny, Elaine; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Konnerth, Heike; Konte, Bettina; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Lasseter, Virginia K.; Laurent, Claudine; Lawrence, Jacob; Lencz, Todd; Lerer, F. Bernard; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Linszen, Don H.; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Maclean, Alan W.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Malloy, Pat; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGrath, John J.; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Duncan E.; McQuillin, Andrew; Melle, Ingrid; Michie, Patricia T.; Milanova, Vihra; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nielsen, Jimmi; Nikolov, Ivan; Nordentoft, Merete; Norton, Nadine; Noethen, Markus M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm T.; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Orntoft, Torben F.; Owen, Michael J.; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George; Pato, Michele T.; Peltonen, Leena; Petursson, Hannes; Pickard, Ben; Pimm, Jonathan; Pulver, Ann E.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby; Quinn, Emma M.; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Rethelyi, Janos M.; Ribble, Robert; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Ruggeri, Mirella; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scott, Rodney J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Kari; Strange, Amy; Strengman, Eric; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Terenius, Lars; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thygesen, Johan H.; Timm, Sally; Toncheva, Draga; van den Oord, Edwin; van Os, Jim; van Winkel, Ruud; Veldink, Jan; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, August G.; Wiersma, Durk; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Hywel J.; Williams, Nigel M.; Wormley, Brandon; Zammit, Stan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Daly, Mark J.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded

  2. Reliability analysis of an associated system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈长杰; 魏一鸣; 蔡嗣经

    2002-01-01

    Based on engineering reliability of large complex system and distinct characteristic of soft system, some new conception and theory on the medium elements and the associated system are created. At the same time, the reliability logic model of associated system is provided. In this paper, through the field investigation of the trial operation, the engineering reliability of the paste fill system in No.2 mine of Jinchuan Non-ferrous Metallic Corporation is analyzed by using the theory of associated system.

  3. Reduction in Healthcare and Societal Resource Utilization Associated with Cladribine Tablets in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Analysis of Economic Data from the CLARITY Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Shehzad; Paracha, Noman; Cook, Stuart;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common, chronic, neurodegenerative condition associated with substantial healthcare and societal economic burden. Disease-modifying MS treatments have the potential to reduce health resource utilization (HRU), thereby reducing the attendant socioeconomic...

  4. Vitamin D deficiency in older adults and its associated factors: a cross-sectional analysis of the Mexican Health and Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Vega, María Fernanda; García-Peña, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin D deficiency was common in older adults from a country with adequate sun exposure. The variables associated with this deficiency provide insight into the next steps needed to characterize older adults with this deficiency and to treat it accordingly.

  5. When, where and how osteoporosis-associated fractures occur: an analysis from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline G Costa

    Full Text Available To examine when, where and how fractures occur in postmenopausal women.We analyzed data from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW, including women aged ≥55 years from the United States of America, Canada, Australia and seven European countries. Women completed questionnaires including fracture data at baseline and years 1, 2 and 3.Among 60,393 postmenopausal women, 4122 incident fractures were reported (86% non-hip, non-vertebral [NHNV], 8% presumably clinical vertebral and 6% hip. Hip fractures were more likely to occur in spring, with little seasonal variation for NHNV or spine fractures. Hip fractures occurred equally inside or outside the home, whereas 65% of NHNV fractures occurred outside and 61% of vertebral fractures occurred inside the home. Falls preceded 68-86% of NHNV and 68-83% of hip fractures among women aged ≤64 to ≥85 years, increasing with age. About 45% of vertebral fractures were associated with falls in all age groups except those ≥85 years, when only 24% occurred after falling.In this multi-national cohort, fractures occurred throughout the year, with only hip fracture having a seasonal variation, with a higher proportion in spring. Hip fractures occurred equally within and outside the home, spine fractures more often in the home, and NHNV fractures outside the home. Falls were a proximate cause of most hip and NHNV fractures. Postmenopausal women at risk for fracture need counseling about reducing potentially modifiable fracture risk factors, particularly falls both inside and outside the home and during all seasons of the year.

  6. Association between cancer and contact allergy: a linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil;

    2011-01-01

    and cancer, few have looked into the association between cancer and contact allergy, a type IV allergy. By linking two clinical databases, the authors investigate the possible association between contact allergy and cancer. Methods Record linkage of two different registers was performed: (1) a tertiary...... by logistic regression analysis. Results An inverse association between contact allergy and non-melanoma skin- and breast cancer, respectively, was identified in both sexes, and an inverse trend for brain cancer was found in women with contact allergy. Additionally, a positive association between contact......Background Contact allergy is a prevalent disorder. It is estimated that about 20% of the general population are allergic to one or more of the chemicals that constitute the European baseline patch test panel. While many studies have investigated associations between type I allergic disorders...

  7. Adverse events associated with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT for smoking cessation. A systematic review and meta-analysis of one hundred and twenty studies involving 177,390 individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockhart Ian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is the most common form of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy and has proven efficacy for the treatment of tobacco dependence. Although expectations of mild adverse effects have been observed to be independent predictors of reduced motivation to use NRT, adverse effects associated with NRT have not been precisely quantified. Objective A systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to identify all randomized clinical trials (RCTs of NRT versus inert controls and all observational studies to determine the magnitude of reported adverse effects with NRT. Methods Searches of 10 electronic databases from inception to November 2009 were conducted. Study selection and data extraction were carried out independently in duplicate. RCTs were pooled using a random effects method with Odds Ratio [OR] as the effect measure, while proportions were pooled from observational studies. A meta-regression analysis was applied to examine whether the nicotine patch is associated with different adverse effects from those common to orally administered NRT. Results Ninety-two RCTs involving 32,185 participants and 28 observational studies involving 145, 205 participants were identified. Pooled RCT evidence of varying NRT formulations found an increased risk of heart palpitations and chest pains (OR 2.06, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.51-2.82, P Conclusion The use of NRT is associated with a variety of side effects. In addition to counseling and medical monitoring, clinicians should inform patients of potential side effects which are associated with the use of NRT for the treatment of tobacco dependence.

  8. Effect modification by population dietary folate on the association between MTHFR genotype, homocysteine, and stroke risk : a meta-analysis of genetic studies and randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Newcombe, Paul; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Sofat, Reecha; Ricketts, Sally L.; Cooper, Jackie; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Bautista, Leonelo E.; Sharma, Pankaj; Whittaker, John C.; Smeeth, Liam; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Algra, Ale; Shmeleva, Veronika; Szolnoki, Zoltan; Roest, Mark; Linnebank, Michael; Zacho, Jeppe; Nalls, Michael A.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hardy, John; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Matarin, Mar; Norman, Paul E.; Flicker, Leon; Almeida, Osvaldo P.; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Shimokata, Hiroshi; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bobak, Martin; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Smith, George Davey; Talmud, Philippa J.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Humphries, Steve E.; Price, Jackie F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Meschia, James F.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The MTHFR 677C -> T polymorphism has been associated with raised homocysteine concentration and increased risk of stroke. A previous overview showed that the effects were greatest in regions with low dietary folate consumption, but differentiation between the effect of folate and small-st

  9. Loneliness is associated with poor prognosis in late-life depression : Longitudinal analysis of the Netherlands study of depression in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Floor; Burger, Huibert; de Waal, Margot M. W.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Comijs, Hannie C.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although depression and loneliness are common among older adults, the role of loneliness on the prognosis of late life depression has not yet been determined. Therefore, we examined the association between loneliness and the course of depression. Methods: We conducted a 2-year follow-up

  10. Associative Visual Agnosia: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Charnallet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study [1], an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive episodic models of memory [4].

  11. The association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with coronary heart disease: findings from the British Women's Heart and Health cohort study and a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiessling Matthew

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been inconsistent results from case-control studies assessing the association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with coronary heart disease (CHD. Most studies have included predominantly men and the association in women is unclear. Since lipid levels vary between the sexes the antioxidant effect of PON1 and any genes associated with it may also vary by sex. We have examined the association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with CHD in a large cohort of British women and combined the results from our cohort study with those from all other published studies. Results The distribution of genotypes was the same among women with CHD and those without disease. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval of having CHD comparing those with either the QR or RR genotype to those with QQ genotype (dominant model of association was 1.03 (0.89, 1.21 and the per allele odds ratio was 0.98 (0.95, 1.01. In a meta-analysis of this and 38 other published studies (10,738 cases and 17,068 controls the pooled odds ratio for the dominant effect was 1.14 (1.08, 1.20 and for the per allele effect was 1.10 (1.06, 1.13. There was evidence of small study bias in the meta-analyses and the dominant effect among those studies with 500 or more cases was 1.05 (0.96, 1.15. Ethnicity and reporting of whether the genotyping was done blind to the participants clinical status also contributed to heterogeneity between studies, but there was no difference in effect between studies with 50% or more women compared to those with fewer women and no difference between studies of healthy populations compared to those at high risk (with diabetes, renal disease of familial hypercholesterolaemia. Conclusion There is no robust evidence that the PON1 Q192R polymorphism is associated with CHD risk in Caucasian women or men.

  12. Prediction of disease and phenotype associations from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome wide association studies (GWAS have proven useful as a method for identifying genetic variations associated with diseases. In this study, we analyzed GWAS data for 61 diseases and phenotypes to elucidate common associations based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. The study was an expansion on a previous study on identifying disease associations via data from a single GWAS on seven diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adjustments to the originally reported study included expansion of the SNP dataset using Linkage Disequilibrium (LD and refinement of the four levels of analysis to encompass SNP, SNP block, gene, and pathway level comparisons. A pair-wise comparison between diseases and phenotypes was performed at each level and the Jaccard similarity index was used to measure the degree of association between two diseases/phenotypes. Disease relatedness networks (DRNs were used to visualize our results. We saw predominant relatedness between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis for the first three levels of analysis. Expected relatedness was also seen between lipid- and blood-related traits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The predominant associations between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis can be validated by clinical studies. The diseases have been proposed to share a systemic inflammation phenotype that can result in progression of additional diseases in patients with one of these three diseases. We also noticed unexpected relationships between metabolic and neurological diseases at the pathway comparison level. The less significant relationships found between diseases require a more detailed literature review to determine validity of the predictions. The results from this study serve as a first step towards a better understanding of seemingly unrelated diseases and phenotypes with similar symptoms or modes of treatment.

  13. The -149C>T polymorphism of DNMT3B is not associated with colorectal cancer risk: Evidence from a meta-analysis based on case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chunyan; Sun, Wenqi; Han, Huirong; Shi, Lihong; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Yan; Tan, Yang

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between the -149C>T polymorphism of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) and colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility. A comprehensive search was conducted to identify all case-control studies of the -149C>T polymorphism of DNMT3B and CRC risk. Statistical analysis was performed with the software program Stata (version 12.0) and Review Manager (version 5.0). A total of seven eligible studies, including 2,666 cases and 4,022 controls, associating the DNMT3B polymorphism of -149C>T with the risk of CRC were identified. These studies suggested no significant associations between the -149C>T polymorphism of the DNMT3B gene and the risk of developing CRC in the recessive, dominant and co-dominant models [for CC vs. TT: odds ratio (OR), 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90-1.25; P=0.37; for the recessive model: OR, 0.54, 95% CI, 0.28-1.04; PT polymorphism in DNMT3B and CRC susceptibility.

  14. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Gregory T; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available genome-wide association...... cardiovascular diseases and related traits suggesting that traditional cardiovascular risk factor management may only have limited value in preventing the progression of aneurysmal disease....

  15. Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53 949)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Davies (Gail); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); J.C. Bis (Joshua); J. Bressler (Jan); V. Chouraki (Vincent); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); E. Hofer; C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); M. Kirin (Mirna); J. Lahti; S. van der Lee (Sven); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); T. Liu; R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); D. Postmus (Douwe); G.D. Smith; J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); R. Thomson (Russell); V. Vitart (Veronique); J. Wang; L. Yu; L. Zgaga (Lina); W. Zhao (Wei); R. Boxall (Ruth); S.E. Harris (Sarah); W.D. Hill (W. David); D.C. Liewald (David C.); M. Luciano (Michelle); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); D. Ames; N. Amin (Najaf); P. Amouyel (Philippe); A.A. Assareh; R. Au; J.T. Becker; A. Beiser; C. Berr (Claudine); L. Bertram (Lars); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); H. Campbell (Harry); J. Corley; P.L. De Jager; C. Dufouil (Carole); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Espeseth (Thomas); J.D. Faul; I. Ford; G. Scotland (Generation); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); M.D. Griswold (Michael); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris; G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Hofman (Albert); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); N.A. Kochan (Nicole A.); D.S. Knopman (David); J.B. Kwok; J.-C. Lambert; T. Lee; G. Li; S.-C. Li; M. Loitfelder (Marisa); O.L. Lopez (Oscar); A.J. Lundervold; A. Lundqvist; R. Mather; S.S. Mirza (Saira S.aeed); L. Nyberg; B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Papenberg; A. Pattie (Alison); K. Petrovic (Katja); O. Polasek (Ozren); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P. Redmond (Paul); S. Reppermund; J.I. Rotter; R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Schuur (Maaike); P.W. Schofield; R.J. Scott; V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); K.D. Taylor (Kent); J. Trollor; S. Trompet (Stella); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G. Weinstein; E. Widen (Elisabeth); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); A. Wright (Alan); M.J. Wright (Margaret); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); H. Amieva (Hélène); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David); H. Brodaty (Henry); A.J. de Craen (Anton); C. Hayward; M.A. Ikram (Arfan); U. Lindenberger; L.-G. Nilsson; D.J. Porteous (David J.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); I. Reinvang (Ivar); I. Rudan (Igor); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt; P. Schofield (Peter); V. Srikanth; J.M. Starr (John); S.T. Turner (Stephen); D.R. Weir (David R.); J.F. Wilson (James F); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia M.); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.L. Fitzpatrick (Annette); S. Seshadri (Sudha); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); I.J. Deary (Ian J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGeneral cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of g

  16. Probiotics in prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhoea: meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Aloysius L; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi; Cooke, Jonathan; Bulpitt, Christopher J

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate efficacy of probiotics in prevention and treatment of diarrhoea associated with the use of antibiotics. Design Meta-analysis; outcome data (proportion of patients not getting diarrhoea) were analysed, pooled, and compared to determine odds ratios in treated and control groups. Identification Studies identified by searching Medline between 1966 and 2000 and the Cochrane Library. Studies reviewed Nine randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trials of probiotics. Results Two of the nine studies investigated the effects of probiotics in children. Four trials used a yeast (Saccharomyces boulardii), four used lactobacilli, and one used a strain of enterococcus that produced lactic acid. Three trials used a combination of probiotic strains of bacteria. In all nine trials, the probiotics were given in combination with antibiotics and the control groups received placebo and antibiotics. The odds ratio in favour of active treatment over placebo in preventing diarrhoea associated with antibiotics was 0.39 (95% confidence interval 0.25 to 0.62; P<0.001) for the yeast and 0.34 (0.19 to 0.61; P<0.01 for lactobacilli. The combined odds ratio was 0.37 (0.26 to 0.53; P<0.001) in favour of active treatment over placebo. Conclusions The meta-analysis suggests that probiotics can be used to prevent antibiotic associated diarrhoea and that S boulardii and lactobacilli have the potential to be used in this situation. The efficacy of probiotics in treating antibiotic associated diarrhoea remains to be proved. A further large trial in which probiotics are used as preventive agents should look at the costs of and need for routine use of these agents. What is already known on this topicProbiotics are well known for their microbiological properties and have been used to treat gastrointestinal and vaginal mucosal infectionsConflicting results have prevented probiotics from being accepted as viable alternatives to conventional treatments for antibiotic associated

  17. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi J Eskola

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in humans. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990-2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. RESULTS: Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat, COL11A1 (rs1676486, GDF5 (rs143383, SKT (rs16924573, THBS2 (rs9406328 and MMP9 (rs17576. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration.

  18. Association between fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO gene polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianli Cai

    Full Text Available AIMS: Many studies have investigated the relationship between FTO gene polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS susceptibility but revealed mixed results. In this study, we aimed to perform a meta-analysis to clarify this association. METHODS: Published literature from PubMed, Embase and CNKI was retrieved. Meta-analysis was performed to calculate pooled odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI using the random- or fix- effects model. RESULTS: A total of 5 studies (4778 cases and 4272 controls were included in our meta-analysis. The results suggested that FTO rs9939609 polymorphism (or its proxy was marginally associated with PCOS risk after adjustment for body mass index (BMI (OR = 1.26; 95%CI: 1.02-1.55. However, the marginal association was not stable after sensitivity analysis. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the association was significant in East Asians (OR = 1.43, 95%CI = 1.30-1.59 but not in Caucasians (OR = 1.04, 95%CI = 0.85-1.29. CONCLUSIONS: Our present meta-analysis indicated that FTO rs9939609 polymorphism (or its proxy might not be associated with risk of PCOS in overall population. However, in East Asians, there might be a direct association between FTO variant and PCOS risk, which is independent of BMI (adiposity.

  19. Gastroschisis and associated defects: an international study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2007-04-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency and type of malformations associated with gastroschisis in a large pool of international data, to identify malformation patterns, and to evaluate the role of maternal age in non-isolated cases. Case-by-case information from 24 registries, all members of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR), were evaluated. After the exclusion of other abdominal wall defects cases were classified as: (a) isolated; (b) recognizable syndrome, chromosomal or not; (c) multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Our results showed that out of 3,322 total cases 469 non-isolated cases were registered (14.1%): 41 chromosomal syndromes, 24 other syndromes, and 404 MCA. Among MCA four groups of anomalies were most frequent: CNS (4.5%), cardio-vascular (2.5%), limb (2.2%), and kidney anomalies (1.9%). No similar patterns emerged except two patterns resembling limb-body wall complex and OEIS. In both of them the gastroschisis could be however misclassified. Chromosomal trisomies and possibly non-syndromic MCA are associated with an older maternal age more than isolated cases. On consideration of our data and the most valid studies published in the literature, the best estimate of the proportion of gastroschisis associated with major unrelated defects is about 10%, with a few cases associated to recognizable syndromes. Recognized syndromes with gastroschisis seem to be so exceptional that the well documented and validated cases are worth being published as interesting case report. An appropriate case definition in etiological studies should include only isolated gastroschisis after an appropriate definition of isolated and non-isolated cases and a thorough case-by-case review.

  20. Early Hepatic Dysfunction Is Associated with a Worse Outcome in Patients Presenting with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the ACURASYS and PROSEVA Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizier, Stéphanie; Forel, Jean-Marie; Ayzac, Louis; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Hraiech, Sami; Lehingue, Samuel; Loundou, Anderson; Roch, Antoine; Guerin, Claude; Papazian, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bilirubin is well-recognized marker of hepatic dysfunction in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Multiple organ failure often complicates acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution and is associated with high mortality. The effect of early hepatic dysfunction on ARDS mortality has been poorly investigated. We evaluated the incidence and the prognostic significance of increased serum bilirubin levels in the initial phase of ARDS. Methods The data of 805 patients with ARDS were retrospectively analysed. This population was extracted from two recent multicenter, prospective and randomised trials. Patients presenting with ARDS with a ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen < 150 mmHg measured with a PEEP ≥ 5 cm of water were included. The total serum bilirubin was measured at inclusion and at days 2, 4, 7 and 14. The primary objective was to analyse the bilirubin at inclusion according to the 90-day mortality rate. Results The 90-day mortality rate was 33.8% (n = 272). The non-survivors were older, had higher Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and were more likely to have a medical diagnosis on admission than the survivors. At inclusion, the SOFA score without the liver score (10.3±2.9 vs. 9.0±3.0, p<0.0001) and the serum bilirubin levels (36.1±57.0 vs. 20.5±31.5 μmol/L, p<0.0001) were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors. Age, the hepatic SOFA score, the coagulation SOFA score, the arterial pH level, and the plateau pressure were independently associated with 90-day mortality in patients with ARDS. Conclusion Bilirubin used as a surrogate marker of hepatic dysfunction and measured early in the course of ARDS was associated with the 90-day mortality rate. PMID:26636318

  1. Recommendations for using standardised phenotypes in genetic association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naylor Melissa G

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic association studies of complex traits often rely on standardised quantitative phenotypes, such as percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume and body mass index to measure an underlying trait of interest (eg lung function, obesity. These phenotypes are appealing because they provide an easy mechanism for comparing subjects, although such standardisations may not be the best way to control for confounders and other covariates. We recommend adjusting raw or standardised phenotypes within the study population via regression. We illustrate through simulation that optimal power in both population- and family-based association tests is attained by using the residuals from within-study adjustment as the complex trait phenotype. An application of family-based association analysis of forced expiratory volume in one second, and obesity in the Childhood Asthma Management Program data, illustrates that power is maintained or increased when adjusted phenotype residuals are used instead of typical standardised quantitative phenotypes.

  2. Semantic Associations in Business English: A Corpus-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the semantic associations of words found in the business lexical environment by using a one-million word corpus of both spoken and written Business English. The key method of analysis is that of semantic prosody or semantic association; the notion that words associate with collocates that are themselves related, often either…

  3. Low blood long chain omega-3 fatty acids in UK children are associated with poor cognitive performance and behavior: a cross-sectional analysis from the DOLAB study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Montgomery

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA, especially DHA (docosahexaenonic acid are essential for brain development and physical health. Low blood Omega-3 LC-PUFA have been reported in children with ADHD and related behavior/learning difficulties, as have benefits from dietary supplementation. Little is known, however, about blood fatty acid status in the general child population. We therefore investigated this in relation to age-standardized measures of behavior and cognition in a representative sample of children from mainstream schools. PARTICIPANTS: 493 schoolchildren aged 7-9 years from mainstream Oxfordshire schools, selected for below average reading performance in national assessments at age seven. METHOD: Whole blood fatty acids were obtained via fingerstick samples. Reading and working memory were assessed using the British Ability Scales (II. Behaviour (ADHD-type symptoms was rated using the revised Conners' rating scales (long parent and teacher versions. Associations were examined and adjusted for relevant demographic variables. RESULTS: DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, accounted for only 1.9% and 0.55% respectively of total blood fatty acids, with DHA showing more individual variation. Controlling for sex and socio-economic status, lower DHA concentrations were associated with poorer reading ability (std. OLS coeff. = 0.09, p = <.042 and working memory performance (0.14, p = <.001. Lower DHA was also associated with higher levels of parent rated oppositional behavior and emotional lability (-0.175, p = <.0001 and -0.178, p = <.0001. CONCLUSIONS: In these healthy UK children with below average reading ability, concentrations of DHA and other Omega-3 LC-PUFA were low relative to adult cardiovascular health recommendations, and directly related to measures of cognition and behavior. These findings require confirmation, but suggest that the benefits from dietary supplementation with

  4. A Study on Associative Neural Memories

    OpenAIRE

    B.D.C.N.Prasad; P. E. S. N. Krishna Prasad; Sagar Yeruva; P Sita Rama Murty

    2011-01-01

    Memory plays a major role in Artificial Neural Networks. Without memory, Neural Network can not be learned itself. One of the primary concepts of memory in neural networks is Associative neural memories. A survey has been made on associative neural memories such as Simple associative memories (SAM), Dynamic associative memories (DAM), Bidirectional Associative memories (BAM), Hopfield memories, Context Sensitive Auto-associative memories (CSAM) and so on. These memories can be applied in vari...

  5. Study of Associated α Particle Imaging Technique for Explosives Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The explosive detecting technique about neutron mainly include the thermal neutron analysis (TNA), the fast neutron analysis (FNA), the pulse fast and thermal neutron analysis (PFTNA) and the associated α particle imaging technique about fast neutron (API).

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study of Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a multifactorial disease with environmental and genetic determinants. The genetic determinants of CAD have previously been explored by the candidate gene approach. Recently, the data from the International HapMap Project and the development of dense genotyping chips have enabled us to perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS on a large number of subjects without bias towards any particular candidate genes. In 2007, three chip-based GWAS simultaneously revealed the significant association between common variants on chromosome 9p21 and CAD. This association was replicated among other ethnic groups and also in a meta-analysis. Further investigations have detected several other candidate loci associated with CAD. The chip-based GWAS approach has identified novel and unbiased genetic determinants of CAD and these insights provide the important direction to better understand the pathogenesis of CAD and to develop new and improved preventive measures and treatments for CAD.

  7. Allelic association studies of genome wide association data can reveal errors in marker position assignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis David

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association (GWA studies provide the opportunity to develop new kinds of analysis. Analysing pairs of markers from separate regions might lead to the detection of allelic association which might indicate an interaction between nearby genes. Methods 396,591 markers typed in 541 subjects were studied. 7.8*1010 pairs of markers were screened and those showing initial evidence for allelic association were subjected to more thorough investigation along with 10 flanking markers on either side. Results No evidence was detected for interaction. However 6 markers appeared to have an incorrect map position according to NCBI Build 35. One of these was corrected in Build 36 and 2 were dropped. The remaining 3 were left with map positions inconsistent with their allelic association relationships. Discussion Although no interaction effects were detected the method was successful in identifying markers with probably incorrect map positions. Conclusion The study of allelic association can supplement other methods for assigning markers to particular map positions. Analyses of this type may usefully be applied to data from future GWA studies.

  8. Association between Waste Management and HBV among Solid Municipal Waste Workers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Romana Natalina Corrao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To conduct a systematic review of this relationship using available published observational studies in the field of solid municipal waste treatment. Methods. The review of the scientific literature was based on Medline and Scopus databases up to December 2012, using the keywords HBV, waste, solid, treatment, workers, disposal, and refuse in different combinations. Results. 160 studies were found and checked. Finally, 5 observational studies were considered suitable, all cross-sectional. The pooled proportion of HBs-Ag considering all the studies was 11% (95% CI: 5–21%, and considering the high quality studies only, this proportion was 14% (95% CI: 6–24%. The pooled proportion of HBs-Ab positivity among waste workers considering all the studies was 14.2% (95% CI: 1.4–37.2%, and considering the high quality studies only, this proportion was 24% (95% CI: 18–30%. The pooled proportion of HBc-Ab positivity among waste workers considering all the studies was 24% (95% CI: 6–49%. The pooled estimation of the risk of HBV positivity (HBsAg among exposed was OR = 2.39 (95% CI: 0.88–6.52. Conclusion. In conclusion, waste workers need to be vaccinated against HBV infection since they are at risk of acquiring this infection through the exposure to potentially infected waste.

  9. Sensitivity studies associated with dosimetry experiment interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourganel, S.; Soldevila, M. [CEA/DANS/DM2S/SERMA, CEA Saclay, 91191, Gif sur Yvette (France); Ferrer, A.; Gregoire, G.; Destouches, C.; Beretz, D. [CEA/DEN-CAD/DER/SPEX, CEA Cadarache, F13108, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: Interpretation of reactor dosimetry experiments with C/E comparison requires precise knowledge of parameters involved in modeling. Some parameters have more weight than others on the calculated values. So, sensitivity studies should be conducted to verify the importance of these parameters. The conclusions of these studies are used to refine the experiment modeling, or to correct uncertainty calculations. The results of these sensitivity studies allow a post-irradiation analysis, which can justify the discarding of some atypical C/M values. Derived uncertainties may be improved by the sensitivity analyses. Beyond classical parameters as geometry or composition, this paper describes some specific sensitivity studies conducted for dosimetry irradiation in reactor, and presents conclusions. These studies are based on dosimeters irradiated in the EOLE reactor facility at Cadarache CEA center. Conclusions drawn from these studies are generic and can be applied to any dosimetry study. Calculations performed for these studies were realized using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  10. Association and linkage analysis of aluminum tolerance genes in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Krill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aluminum (Al toxicity is a major worldwide constraint to crop productivity on acidic soils. Al becomes soluble at low pH, inhibiting root growth and severely reducing yields. Maize is an important staple food and commodity crop in acidic soil regions, especially in South America and Africa where these soils are very common. Al exclusion and intracellular tolerance have been suggested as two important mechanisms for Al tolerance in maize, but little is known about the underlying genetics. METHODOLOGY: An association panel of 282 diverse maize inbred lines and three F2 linkage populations with approximately 200 individuals each were used to study genetic variation in this complex trait. Al tolerance was measured as net root growth in nutrient solution under Al stress, which exhibited a wide range of variation between lines. Comparative and physiological genomics-based approaches were used to select 21 candidate genes for evaluation by association analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Six candidate genes had significant results from association analysis, but only four were confirmed by linkage analysis as putatively contributing to Al tolerance: Zea mays AltSB like (ZmASL, Zea mays aluminum-activated malate transporter2 (ALMT2, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteinase (SAHH, and Malic Enzyme (ME. These four candidate genes are high priority subjects for follow-up biochemical and physiological studies on the mechanisms of Al tolerance in maize. Immediately, elite haplotype-specific molecular markers can be developed for these four genes and used for efficient marker-assisted selection of superior alleles in Al tolerance maize breeding programs.

  11. Susceptibility to chronic mucus hypersecretion, a genome wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkelies E Dijkstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA study of CMH in Caucasian populations. METHODS: GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years. Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. RESULTS: A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10(-6, OR = 1.17, located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1 on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10(-9 in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH.

  12. Susceptibility to Chronic Mucus Hypersecretion, a Genome Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Smolonska, Joanna; van den Berge, Maarten; Wijmenga, Ciska; Zanen, Pieter; Luinge, Marjan A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Lammers, Jan-Willem; Dahlback, Magnus; Tosh, Kerrie; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Spira, Avi; Vestbo, Jorgen; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Benn, Marianne; Nielsen, Sune F.; Dahl, Morten; Verschuren, W. Monique; Picavet, H. Susan J.; Smit, Henriette A.; Owsijewitsch, Michael; Kauczor, Hans U.; de Koning, Harry J.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Eva; Mejza, Filip; Nastalek, Pawel; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, M. A.; Loth, Daan W.; Lahousse, Lies; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Andre; Stricker, Bruno H.; Brusselle, Guy G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Boezen, H. Marike; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA) study of CMH in Caucasian populations. Methods GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years). Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Results A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10−6, OR = 1.17), located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1) on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G) was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10−9) in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. Conclusions Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH. PMID:24714607

  13. Facial dermatosis associated with Demodex: a case-control study*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ya-e; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiang-lan; Wu, Li-ping; Wang, Mei; Yan, Hu-ling; Xiao, Sheng-xiang

    2011-01-01

    Demodex has been considered to be related with multiple skin disorders, but controversy persists. In this case-control study, a survey was conducted with 860 dermatosis patients aged 12 to 84 years in Xi’an, China to identify the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex. Amongst the patients, 539 suffered from facial dermatosis and 321 suffered from non-facial dermatosis. Demodex mites were sampled and examined using the skin pressurization method. Multivariate regression analysis wa...

  14. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schunkert (Heribert); I.R. König (Inke); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); H. Holm (Hilma); M. Preuss (Michael); A.F.R. Stewart (Alexandre); M. Barbalic (maja); C. Gieger (Christian); D. Absher (Devin); Z. Aherrahrou (Zouhair); H. Allayee (Hooman); D. Altshuler (David); S.S. Anand (Sonia); K. Andersen (Karl); J.L. Anderson (Jeffrey); D. Ardissino (Diego); S.G. Ball (Stephen); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); T.A. Barnes (Timothy); D.M. Becker (Diane); K. Berger (Klaus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); E. Boerwinkle (Eric); P.S. Braund (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M.S. Burnett; I. Buysschaert (Ian); J.F. Carlquist (John); L. Chen (Li); S. Cichon (Sven); V. Codd (Veryan); R.W. Davies (Robert); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Demissie (Serkalem); J. Devaney (Joseph); P. Diemert (Patrick); R. Do (Ron); A. Doering (Angela); S. Eifert (Sandra); N.E.E. Mokhtari; S.G. Ellis (Stephen); R. Elosua (Roberto); J.C. Engert (James); S.E. Epstein (Stephen); U. de Faire (Ulf); M. Fischer (Marcus); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); J. Freyer (Jennifer); B. Gigante (Bruna); D. Girelli (Domenico); S. Gretarsdottir (Solveig); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.R. Gulcher (Jeffrey); E. Halperin (Eran); N. Hammond (Naomi); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); A. Hofman (Albert); B.D. Horne (Benjamin); T. Illig (Thomas); C. Iribarren (Carlos); G.T. Jones (Gregory); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M.A. Kaiser (Michael); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); G. Kolovou (Genovefa); A. Kong (Augustine); R. Laaksonen (Reijo); D. Lambrechts (Diether); K. Leander (Karin); G. Lettre (Guillaume); X. Li (Xiaohui); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Loley (Christina); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); P.M. Mannucci (Pier); S. Maouche (Seraya); N. Martinelli (Nicola); P.P. McKeown (Pascal); C. Meisinger (Christa); T. Meitinger (Thomas); O. Melander (Olle); P.A. Merlini; V. Mooser (Vincent); T. Morgan (Thomas); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); J.B. Muhlestein (Joseph); T. Münzel (Thomas); K. Musunuru (Kiran); J. Nahrstaedt (Janja); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); O. Olivieri (Oliviero); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); C.C. Patterson (Chris); A. Peters (Annette); F. Peyvandi (Flora); L. Qu (Liming); A.A. Quyyumi (Arshed); D.J. Rader (Daniel); L.S. Rallidis (Loukianos); C. Rice (Catherine); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); D. Rubin (Diana); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.L. Sampietro (Maria Lourdes); M.S. Sandhu (Manj); E.E. Schadt (Eric); A. Scḧsignfer (Arne); A. Schillert (Arne); S. Schreiber (Stefan); J. Schrezenmeir (Jürgen); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); D.S. Siscovick (David); M. Sivananthan (Mohan); S. Sivapalaratnam (Suthesh); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.D. Snoep (Jaapjan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); J.A. Spertus (John); K. Stark (Klaus); K. Stirrups (Kathy); M. Stoll (Monika); W.H.W. Tang (Wilson); S. Tennstedt (Stephanie); G. Thorgeirsson (Gudmundur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); M. Tomaszewski; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.M. van Rij (Andre); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.A. Wells (George); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); P.S. Wild (Philipp); C. Willenborg (Christina); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.J. Wright (Benjamin); S. Ye (Shu); T. Zeller (Tanja); A. Ziegler; F. Cambien (François); A.H. Goodall (Alison); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); T. Quertermous (Thomas); W. Mäsignrz (Winfried); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); S. Blankenberg (Stefan); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); A.S. Hall (Alistair); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J.R. Thompson (John); K. Stefansson (Kari); R. Roberts (Robert); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); N.J. Samani (Nilesh)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis ide

  15. More female patients and fewer stimuli per session are associated with the short-term antidepressant properties of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS): a meta-analysis of 54 sham-controlled studies published between 1997–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Azorina, Valeriya; Reitz, Sarah Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) appears to have short-term antidepressant properties. The aim of the current study was to update our previous meta-analysis and to investigate factors associated with the antidepressant properties of rTMS. Method Following a systematic literature search conducted in Medline and PsycInfo, N=14 sham-controlled, parallel design studies (published after 2008 to August 2013) that had utilized rTMS of the DLPFC in major depression were included in the current meta-analysis. The sensitivity and moderator analyses also included data from N=40 studies (published in 1997–2008) from our previous meta-analysis. The effect size (Cohen’s d) in each study was the standardized difference in mean depression scores (on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale) from baseline to final (after last session) in rTMS compared to sham groups. Results According to a random-effects model with inverse-variance weights, depression scores were significantly reduced after rTMS compared to sham in studies published from 2008–2013 based on N=659 patients (overall mean weighted d=−0.42, 95% confidence interval: −0.66, −0.18, P=0.001). Combining studies from our past and current meta-analyses (published in 1997–2013; N=54) revealed that depression was significantly reduced after left-fast (>1 Hz), right-slow (≤1 Hz), and bilateral (or sequential) rTMS of DLPFC compared to sham. Significant antidepressant properties of rTMS were observed in studies with patients who were treatment resistant, unipolar (or bipolar), non-psychotic, medication-free (or started on antidepressants concurrently with rTMS). According to univariate meta-regressions, depression scores were significantly lower in studies with more female patients and fewer stimuli per session. There was little evidence that publication bias occurred in the

  16. Socio-Economic Differences in the Association between Self-Reported and Clinically Present Diabetes and Hypertension: Secondary Analysis of a Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Tompkins

    Full Text Available Diabetes and hypertension are key risk factors for coronary heart disease. Prevalence of both conditions is socio-economically patterned. Awareness of presence of the conditions may influence risk behaviour and use of preventative services. Our aim was to examine whether there were socio-economic differences in awareness of hypertension and diabetes in a UK population.Data from the Scottish Health Survey was used to compare self-reported awareness of hypertension and diabetes amongst those found on examination to have these conditions, by socioeconomic position (SEP (measured by occupation, education and income. Odds ratios of self-reported awareness against presence, and the sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of self-reporting as a measure of the presence of the condition, were calculated.Presence and self-reported awareness of both conditions increased as SEP decreased, on most measures. There was only one significant difference in awareness by SEP once other factors had been taken into account. Sensitivity showed that those in the most disadvantaged groups were most likely to self-report awareness of their hypertension, and specificity showed that those in the least disadvantaged groups were most likely to self-report awareness of its absence. There were few differences of note for diabetes.We found no consistent pattern in the associations between SEP and the presence and self-reported awareness of hypertension and diabetes amongst those with these conditions. Without evidence of differences, it is important that universal approaches continue to be applied to the identification and management of those at risk of these and other conditions that underpin cardiovascular disease.

  17. Analysis of associated factors for remission and relapse in proliferative and membranous lupus nephritis patients: a 4-year follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚超君

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the related factors of remission and relapse in lupus nephritis(LN)patients.Methods A retrospective study was conducted for proliferation and membrane LN patients diagnosed from 2003 to 2010.Their clinical,laboratory and pathological parameters were collected.According to the response to treatment,they were divided into 3

  18. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission in households of infected cases : a pooled analysis of primary data from three studies across international settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knox, J; Van Rijen, M; Uhlemann, A-C; Miller, M; Hafer, C; Vavagiakis, P; Shi, Q; Johnson, P D R; Coombs, G; Kluytmans-Van Den Bergh, M; Kluytmans, J; Bennett, C M; Lowy, F D

    2015-01-01

    Diverse strain types of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cause infections in community settings worldwide. To examine heterogeneity of spread within households and to identify common risk factors for household transmission across settings, primary data from studies conducted in New

  19. Analysis of factors associated with excess weight in school children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Renata Paulino; Nunes, Altacílio Aparecido; de Mello, Luane Marques

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in schoolchildren aged 10 to 16 years and its association with dietary and behavioral factors. Methods: Cross-sectional study that evaluated 505 adolescents using a structured questionnaire and anthropometric data. The data was analyzed through the T Test for independent samples and Mann-Whitney Test to compare means and medians, respectively, and Chi2 Test for proportions. Prevalence ratio (RP) and the 95% confidence interval was used to estimate the degree of association between variables. The logistic regression was employed to adjust the estimates to confounding factors. The significance level of 5% was considered for all analysis. Results: Excess weight was observed in 30.9% of the schoolchildren: 18.2% of overweight and 12.7% of obesity. There was no association between weight alterations and dietary/behavioral habits in the bivariate and multivariate analyses. However, associations were observed in relation to gender. Daily consumption of sweets [PR=0.75 (0.64-0.88)] and soft drinks [PR=0.82 (0.70-0.97)] was less frequent among boys; having lunch daily was slightly more often reported by boys [OR=1.11 (1.02-1.22)]. Physical activity practice of (≥3 times/week) was more often mentioned by boys and the association measures disclosed two-fold more physical activity in this group [PR=2.04 (1.56-2.67)] when compared to girls. Approximately 30% of boys and 40% of girls stated they did not perform activities requiring energy expenditure during free periods, with boys being 32% less idle than girls [PR=0.68 (0.60-0.76)]. Conclusions: A high prevalence of both overweight and obesity was observed, as well as unhealthy habits in the study population, regardless of the presence of weight alterations. Health promotion strategies in schools should be encouraged, in order to promote healthy habits and behaviors among all students. PMID:27321919

  20. Higher magnesium intake is associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin, with no evidence of interaction with select genetic loci, in a meta-analysis of 15 charge consortium studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorable associations between magnesium intake and glycemic traits, such as fasting glucose and insulin, are observed in observational and clinical studies, but whether genetic variation affects these associations is largely unknown. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assoc...

  1. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa of the uterine cervix associated with intraabdominal "PEComatosis": A clinicopathological study with comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Linglei

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization recently recognized a family of neoplasms showing at least partial morphological or immunohistochemical evidence of a putative perivascular epithelioid cell (PEC differentiation. These tumors include angiomyolipoma (AML, clear cell "sugar" tumors of the lung (CCST, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM, clear cell myomelanocytic tumors of the falciform ligament and distinctive clear cell tumors at various other anatomic sites. Case presentation & methods A 41-year old gravida-1 para-1 with tuberous sclerosis presented with an incidentally identified 2.2 cm mass. The morphology and immunohistochemical profile was consistent with PEComa. Distinct aggregates of HMB-45 epithelioid cells were present in an occasionally distinctive perivascular distribution in the myometrium, small bowel lamina propria and ovarian hila. These distinctive aggregates, for which we propose the designation "PEComatosis" based on their intraabdominal distribution, did not display cytological atypia, mitotic activity or necrosis. CGH and DNA ploidy analysis showed a balanced chromosomal profile and diploid nuclei, respectively. There was no recurrence or metastases at 35 months' follow-up. Fifty-one previously reported cases of non-AML, LAM and CCST PEComas [perivascular epithelioid cell tumors- not otherwise specified (PEComa-NOS] are reviewed. Conclusions The lesions may be a reflection of tumor multicentricity, in which each may be a potential nidus for the development of future more well-developed tumors. Alternatively, they may be a manifestation of a poorly understood "field effect", in which there is an increased propensity to develop tumors of this type throughout the abdomen. Finally, and least likely in our opinion, they may represent tumor spread from its primary site.

  2. Network analysis of genes and their association with diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontou, Panagiota I; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Dimou, Niki L; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2016-09-15

    A plethora of network-based approaches within the Systems Biology universe have been applied, to date, to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of various human diseases. In the present study, we perform a bipartite, topological and clustering graph analysis in order to gain a better understanding of the relationships between human genetic diseases and the relationships between the genes that are implicated in them. For this purpose, disease-disease and gene-gene networks were constructed from combined gene-disease association networks. The latter, were created by collecting and integrating data from three diverse resources, each one with different content covering from rare monogenic disorders to common complex diseases. This data pluralism enabled us to uncover important associations between diseases with unrelated phenotypic manifestations but with common genetic origin. For our analysis, the topological attributes and the functional implications of the individual networks were taken into account and are shortly discussed. We believe that some observations of this study could advance our understanding regarding the etiology of a disease with distinct pathological manifestations, and simultaneously provide the springboard for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies and its underlying genetic mechanisms.

  3. Genetic variants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cui, Long; Tam, Wing Hung; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) share common genetic polymorphisms. We conducted meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of all available variants and determined the effects of confounding and experimental components on the genetic association of GDM. Any case-controlled or cohort studies with genotype distribution compared GDM cases with controls were included. In total, 28 articles including 8,204 cases and 15,221 controls for 6 polymorphisms were studied. rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1) were significantly associated with the increased GDM risk. The association of rs4402960(IGF2BP2) and rs1800629(TNF-α) was significant only when the studies with control allele frequency deviation and publication bias were excluded. Further subgroup analysis showed the risk alleles of rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significantly associated with the GDM risk only in Asian, but not in Caucasian population. The OGTT test using 100 g, but not 75 g; and genotype detection by other assays, but not Taqman method, were also significantly associated with increased GDM risk in rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2). Overall GDM was associated with rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1), but only rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significant in Asian populations. While rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2) were significantly affected by OGTT protocol and genotyping methods. PMID:27468700

  4. Relationships between Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Statistics and Bibliometric Indicators: A Principal Components Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed 2005-2006 Web of Science bibliometric data from institutions belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and corresponding ARL statistics to find any associations between indicators from the two data sets. Principal components analysis on 36 variables from 103 universities revealed obvious associations between…

  5. Associations between postprandial insulin and blood glucose responses, appetite sensations and energy intake in normal weight and overweight individuals: a meta-analysis of test meal studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flint, Anne; Gregersen, Nikolaj T.; Gluud, Lise L.

    2007-01-01

    ) in normal weight and overweight participants. Data from seven test meal studies were used, including 136 healthy participants (ALL) (92 normal weight (NW) and 44 overweight or obese (OW)). All meals were served as breakfasts after an overnight fast, and appetite sensations and blood samples were obtained......, but the relationship is disrupted in the overweight and obese. We conclude that the postprandial insulin response may be an important satiety signal, and that central nervous system insulin resistance in overweight might explain the blunted effect on appetite....

  6. Evolutionary triangulation: informing genetic association studies with evolutionary evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minjun; Graham, Britney E; Zhang, Ge; Harder, Reed; Kodaman, Nuri; Moore, Jason H; Muglia, Louis; Williams, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of human diseases have identified many variants associated with pathogenesis and severity. However, most studies have used only statistical association to assess putative relationships to disease, and ignored other factors for evaluation. For example, evolution is a factor that has shaped disease risk, changing allele frequencies as human populations migrated into and inhabited new environments. Since many common variants differ among populations in frequency, as does disease prevalence, we hypothesized that patterns of disease and population structure, taken together, will inform association studies. Thus, the population distributions of allelic risk variants should reflect the distributions of their associated diseases. Evolutionary Triangulation (ET) exploits this evolutionary differentiation by comparing population structure among three populations with variable patterns of disease prevalence. By selecting populations based on patterns where two have similar rates of disease that differ substantially from a third, we performed a proof of principle analysis for this method. We examined three disease phenotypes, lactase persistence, melanoma, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We show that for lactase persistence, a phenotype with a simple genetic architecture, ET identifies the key gene, lactase. For melanoma, ET identifies several genes associated with this disease and/or phenotypes related to it, such as skin color genes. ET was less obviously successful for Type 2 diabetes mellitus, perhaps because of the small effect sizes in known risk loci and recent environmental changes that have altered disease risk. Alternatively, ET may have revealed new genes involved in conferring disease risk for diabetes that did not meet nominal GWAS significance thresholds. We also compared ET to another method used to filter for phenotype associated genes, population branch statistic (PBS), and show that ET performs better in identifying genes known to associate with

  7. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are significantly associated with higher cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis from 34 case-control studies.

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    Xi Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIF-1 activates various genes in cancer progression and metastasis. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are reportedly associated with cancer risk; however, the results are inconclusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A meta-analysis of 34 studies that involved 7522 cases and 9847 controls for 1772 C/T and 24 studies that involved 4884 cases and 8154 controls for 1790 G/A was conducted to identify the association of C/T and G/A polymorphisms with cancer risk. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were used to assess the strength of association. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms were associated with higher cancer risk in homozygote comparison (1772C/T: TT vs. CC: OR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.52, 3.96; P heterogeneity = 0.028; 1790G/A: AA vs. GG: OR=4.74, 95% CI: 1.78, 12.6; P heterogeneity < 0.01, dominant model (1772C/T: TT/CT vs. CC: OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.55; P heterogeneity < 0.01, 1790G/A: AA/GA vs. GG: OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.60; P heterogeneity < 0.01, T allele versus C allele (T vs. C: OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.70; P heterogeneity < 0.01, and A allele versus G allele (A vs. G: OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.96; P heterogeneity < 0.01. On a subgroup analysis, the 1772 C/T polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer, whereas the 1790 G/A polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for lung cancer and prostate cancer. A significantly increased cancer risk was found in both Asians and Caucasians for 1772C/T polymorphism, whereas a significantly increased cancer risk was found in Caucasians in the heterozygote comparison and recessive model for 1790G/A polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are significantly associated with higher cancer risk.

  8. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

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    Agnes Mägi, Eve Unt, Ele Prans, Liina Raus, Jaan Eha, Alar Veraksitš, Külli Kingo, Sulev Kõks

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1 to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2 to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females. The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008 in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 (r = 0.475, p = 0.002. No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance.

  9. Rates of influenza vaccination in older adults and factors associated with vaccine use: A secondary analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merry Heather

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza vaccination has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in the older adult population. In Canada, vaccination rates remain suboptimal. We identified factors predictive of influenza vaccination, in order to determine which segments of the older adult population might be targeted to increase coverage in influenza vaccination programs. Methods The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA is a population-based national cohort study of 10263 older adults (≥ 65 conducted in 1991. We used data from the 5007 community-dwelling participants in the CSHA without dementia for whom self-reported influenza vaccination status is known. Results Of 5007 respondents, 2763 (55.2% reported having received an influenza vaccination within the previous 2 years. The largest predictive factors for flu vaccination included: being married (57.4 vs. 52.6%, p = 0.0007, having attained a higher education (11.0 vs. 10.3 years, p While many other differences were statistically significant, most were small (e.g. mean age 75.1 vs. 74.6 years for immunized vs. unimmunized older adults, p = 0.006, higher Modified Mini Mental Status Examination score (89.9 vs. 89.1, p Residents of Ontario were more likely (64.6% to report vaccination (p Conclusions The vaccination rate in this sample, in whom influenza vaccination is indicated, was low (55.2%. Even in a publicly administered health care setting, influenza vaccination did not reach an important proportion of the elderly population. Whether these differences reflect patient preference or access remains to be determined.

  10. Factors associated with reductions in alcohol use between high school and college: an analysis of data from the College Alcohol Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swann CA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Swann,1 Michelle Sheran,1 Diana Phelps2 1Department of Economics, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA; 2RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: The consumption of alcohol by college students is a significant public health concern, and a large amount of literature explores this issue. Much of the focus is on the prevalence and correlates of binge drinking. Relatively few studies explore reductions in drinking, and these generally focus on reductions that occur during college. Aims: We examined the transition between high school and college and sought to understand the characteristics and behaviors of students that are related to reductions in the consumption of alcohol during this transition. Methods: We used data from all four rounds of the Harvard School of Public Health's College Alcohol Survey and logistic regression models to relate the status of reduced alcohol consumption to five groups of variables: demographic and parental variables, other substance use, social environment, student activities, and alcohol policies. Results: A number of characteristics were related to reductions in drinking. Students whose fathers did not attend college were more likely to reduce alcohol consumption (odds ratio [OR] =1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.06–1.55, whereas students who prioritize parties (OR =0.35; CI =0.30–0.43 and who have recently smoked cigarettes (OR =0.52; CI =0.41–0.64 or marijuana (OR =0.52; CI =0.40–0.67 or whose fathers are moderate (OR =0.73; CI =0.55–0.96 or heavy (OR =0.72; CI =0.53–0.96 drinkers were less likely to reduce alcohol consumption. Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of family background and social environment on reductions in drinking. Keywords: binge drinking, College Alcohol Study, college drinking, reductions in alcohol consumption

  11. Genome-wide association study yields variants at 20p12.2 that associate with urinary bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafnar, T.; Sulem, P.; Thorleifsson, G.; Vermeulen, S.; Helgason, H.; Saemundsdottir, J.; Gudjonsson, S.A.; Sigurdsson, A.; Stacey, S.N.; Gudmundsson, J.; Johannsdottir, H.; Alexiusdottir, K.; Petursdottir, V.; Nikulasson, S.; Geirsson, G.; Jonsson, T.; Aben, K.K.H.; Grotenhuis, A.J.; Verhaegh, G.W.C.T.; Dudek, A.M.D.; Witjes, J.A.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Vrieling, A.; Galesloot, T.E.; Juan, A. de; Panadero, A.; Rivera, F.; Hurst, C.; Bishop, D.T.; Sak, S.C.; Choudhury, A.; Teo, M.T.; Arici, C.; Carta, A.; Toninelli, E.; Verdier, P. de; Rudnai, P.; Gurzau, E; Koppova, K.; Keur, K.A. van der; Lurkin, I.; Goossens, M.; Kellen, E.; Guarrera, S.; Russo, A.; Critelli, R.; Sacerdote, C.; Vineis, P.; Krucker, C.; Zeegers, M.P.; Gerullis, H.; Ovsiannikov, D.; Volkert, F.; Hengstler, J.G.; Selinski, S.; Magnusson, O.T.; Masson, G.; Kong, A.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Lindblom, A.; Zwarthoff, E.; Porru, S.; Golka, K.; Buntinx, F.; Matullo, G.; Kumar, R.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Steineck, D.G.; Kiltie, A.E.; Jonsson, E.; Radvanyi, F.; Knowles, M.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kiemeney, B.; Stefansson, K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of urinary bladder cancer (UBC) have yielded common variants at 12 loci that associate with risk of the disease. We report here the results of a GWAS of UBC including 1670 UBC cases and 90 180 controls, followed by replication analysis in additional 5266 UBC ca

  12. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with moderate sample sizes are underpowered, especially when testing SNP alleles with low allele counts, a situation that may lead to high frequency of false-positive results and lack of replication in independent studies. Related individuals, such as twin pairs...... concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases...... and ordinary healthy samples as controls. We examined the power gain of the twin-based design for various scenarios (i.e., cases from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for a disease) and compared the power with the ordinary case-control design with cases collected from the unrelated patient...

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study of Serum Selenium Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Peters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI. We tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p < 1 × 10−5. None of these 41 SNPs reached the significant threshold (p = 0.05/15 regions = 0.003 in the second stage (WHI. Three SNPs had p < 0.05 in the second stage (rs1395479 and rs1506807 in 4q34.3/AGA-NEIL3; and rs891684 in 17q24.3/SLC39A11 and had p between 2.62 × 10−7 and 4.04 × 10−7 in the combined analysis (PLCO + WHI. Additional studies are needed to replicate these findings. Identification of genetic variation that impacts selenium concentrations may contribute to a better understanding of which genes regulate circulating selenium concentrations.

  14. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS.

  15. Association between Periodontal Disease and Stroke: A Meta-analysis of Case-control Studies%牙周病与卒中相关性的病例-对照研究的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李薇; 毛敏; 任昌菊; 刘彩云; 严艳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between periodontal disease and stroke by performing a meta-analysis. Methods Two authors independently searched the PubMed, Embase, CNKI, CBM, Wanfang, and VIP databases to collect the relevant case-control studies up to April 4th, 2012. After quality assessment of included studies and data extraction, a meta-analysis was performed by using the Comprehensive Meta Analysis V2 software, and the level of evidence was evaluated by using the GRADE system. Results Five engb'sh studies met the criterion. Meta-analysis showed that exposure to periodontal disease could obviously increase 3.93 times risk of incident stroke (OR = 3. 94,95 % CI = 2. 64 - 5. 88, P < 0. 001) , the level of evidence was " morderate quality" . Conclusion Current evidences show that periodontal disease is an independent and significant risk fator for stroke. Further studies according to the degrees of periodontal disease and the clinical subtypes of stroke are needed.%目的:采用Meta分析的方法评价牙周病与卒中的相关性.方法:由两名评价者独立检索PubMed、Embase、中国知网、中国生物医学文献数据库、万方数据库、维普数据库中公开发表的探讨牙周病与卒中相关性的病例-对照研究,对符合纳入标准的文献采用NOS标准进行质量评价及数据提取后,采用Comprehensive Meta Analysis V2软件进行Meta分析,并采用GRADE系统进行证据评级.结果:共纳入病例对照研究5个,均为英文.Meta分析结果显示暴露于牙周病可以显著提高卒中发生率3.93倍(OR =3.94,95% CI =2.64 -5.88,P<0.001),证据等级为“中级”.结论:牙周病是卒中的一个独立的、有意义的危险因子.建议未来的研究能够按照牙周病临床程度分级和卒中临床亚型分型.

  16. 'Smoking genes': a genetic association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Verde

    Full Text Available Some controversy exists on the specific genetic variants that are associated with nicotine dependence and smoking-related phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association of smoking status and smoking-related phenotypes (included nicotine dependence with 17 candidate genetic variants: CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A6*2 (1799T>A [rs1801272], CYP2A6*9 (-48T>G [rs28399433], CYP2A6*12, CYP2A13*2 (3375C>T [rs8192789], CYP2A13*3 (7520C>G, CYP2A13*4 (579G>A, CYP2A13*7 (578C>T [rs72552266], CYP2B6*4 (785A>G, CYP2B6*9 (516G>T, CHRNA3 546C>T [rs578776], CHRNA5 1192G>A [rs16969968], CNR1 3764C>G [rs6928499], DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A [rs1800497], 5HTT LPR, HTR2A -1438A>G [rs6311] and OPRM1 118A>G [rs1799971]. We studied the genotypes of the aforementioned polymorphisms in a cohort of Spanish smokers (cases, N = 126 and ethnically matched never smokers (controls, N = 80. The results showed significant between-group differences for CYP2A6*2 and CYP2A6*12 (both PA (Taq1A polymorphisms was 3.60 (95%CI: 1.75, 7.44 and 2.63 (95%CI: 1.41, 4.89 respectively. Compared with the wild-type genotype, the OR for being a non-smoker in carriers of the minor CYP2A6*2 allele was 1.80 (95%CI: 1.24, 2.65. We found a significant genotype effect (all P≤0.017 for the following smoking-related phenotypes: (i cigarettes smoked per day and CYP2A13*3; (ii pack years smoked and CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A13*7, CYP2B6*4 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A; (iii nicotine dependence (assessed with the Fagestrom test and CYP2A6*9. Overall, our results suggest that genetic variants potentially involved in nicotine metabolization (mainly, CYP2A6 polymorphisms are those showing the strongest association with smoking-related phenotypes, as opposed to genetic variants influencing the brain effects of nicotine, e.g., through nicotinic acetylcholine (CHRNA5, serotoninergic (HTR2A, opioid (OPRM1 or cannabinoid receptors (CNR1.

  17. Identification of novel autism candidate regions through analysis of reported cytogenetic abnormalities associated with autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorstman, JAS; Staal, WG; van Daalen, E; van Engeland, H; Hochstenbach, PFR; Franke, L

    2006-01-01

    The identification of the candidate genes for autism through linkage and association studies has proven to be a difficult enterprise. An alternative approach is the analysis of cytogenetic abnormalities associated with autism. We present a review of all studies to date that relate patients with cyto

  18. An Object Extraction Model Using Association Rules and Dependence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Extracting objects from legacy systems is a basic step insystem's obje ct-orientation to improve the maintainability and understandability of the syst e ms. A new object extraction model using association rules an d dependence analysis is proposed. In this model data are classified by associat ion rules and the corresponding operations are partitioned by dependence analysis.

  19. A study of type-1 diabetes associated autoantibodies in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallford, Philomena; Clair, David St; Halley, Lorna; Mustard, Colette; Wei, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies revealed an association between type-1 diabetes (T1D) and schizophrenia but the findings reported to date have been controversial. To clarify the inconsistency across studies, T1D-associated autoantibodies were examined in plasma samples collected from 272 patients with schizophrenia and 276 control subjects. An in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using three linear peptide antigens, one of which was derived from glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two were derived from insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA2). Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant decrease in the levels of plasma IgG against the IA2b antigen in schizophrenia patients as compared to control subjects (Z=-3.54, p=0.0007), while no significant difference was found between these two groups either in anti-IA2a IgG levels (Z=-1.62, p=0.105) or in anti-GAD IgG levels (Z=-1.63, p=0.104). Linear regression analysis indicated no association of antipsychotic medication with the levels of plasma IgG against IA2a, IA2b or GAD, while the levels of plasma IgG for these 3 peptide antigens were significantly correlated with each other. Binary logistic regression showed that neither the DQ2.5 variant nor the DQ8 variant was associated with circulating levels of 3 T1D-associated autoantibodies in both the patient group and the control group. The coefficient of variation was 10.7% for anti-IA2a IgG assay, 10.1% for anti-IA2b IgG assay and 10.7% for anti-GAD IgG assay. The present work suggests that T1D-associated antibodies are unlikely to confer risk of schizophrenia and that the in-house ELISA developed with linear peptide antigens is highly reproducible.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study of Down Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Dhanya; Zeng, Zhen; Locke, Adam E; Mulle, Jennifer G; Bean, Lora J H; Rosser, Tracie C; Dooley, Kenneth J; Cua, Clifford L; Capone, George T; Reeves, Roger H; Maslen, Cheryl L; Cutler, David J; Feingold, Eleanor; Sherman, Stephanie L; Zwick, Michael E

    2015-07-20

    The goal of this study was to identify the contribution of common genetic variants to Down syndrome-associated atrioventricular septal defect, a severe heart abnormality. Compared with the euploid population, infants with Down syndrome, or trisomy 21, have a 2000-fold increased risk of presenting with atrioventricular septal defects. The cause of this increased risk remains elusive. Here we present data from the largest heart study conducted to date on a trisomic background by using a carefully characterized collection of individuals from extreme ends of the phenotypic spectrum. We performed a genome-wide association study using logistic regression analysis on 452 individuals with Down syndrome, consisting of 210 cases with complete atrioventricular septal defects and 242 controls with structurally normal hearts. No individual variant achieved genome-wide significance. We identified four disomic regions (1p36.3, 5p15.31, 8q22.3, and 17q22) and two trisomic regions on chromosome 21 (around PDXK and KCNJ6 genes) that merit further investigation in large replication studies. Our data show that a few common genetic variants of large effect size (odds ratio >2.0) do not account for the elevated risk of Down syndrome-associated atrioventricular septal defects. Instead, multiple variants of low-to-moderate effect sizes may contribute to this elevated risk, highlighting the complex genetic architecture of atrioventricular septal defects even in the highly susceptible Down syndrome population.

  1. Tissue Non-Specific Genes and Pathways Associated with Diabetes: An Expression Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hao; Li, Lianna; Liu, Shijian; Jiang, Fan; Griswold, Michael; Mosley, Thomas

    2017-01-21

    We performed expression studies to identify tissue non-specific genes and pathways of diabetes by meta-analysis. We searched curated datasets of the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and identified 13 and five expression studies of diabetes and insulin responses at various tissues, respectively. We tested differential gene expression by empirical Bayes-based linear method and investigated gene set expression association by knowledge-based enrichment analysis. Meta-analysis by different methods was applied to identify tissue non-specific genes and gene sets. We also proposed pathway mapping analysis to infer functions of the identified gene sets, and correlation and independent analysis to evaluate expression association profile of genes and gene sets between studies and tissues. Our analysis showed that PGRMC1 and HADH genes were significant over diabetes studies, while IRS1 and MPST genes were significant over insulin response studies, and joint analysis showed that HADH and MPST genes were significant over all combined data sets. The pathway analysis identified six significant gene sets over all studies. The KEGG pathway mapping indicated that the significant gene sets are related to diabetes pathogenesis. The results also presented that 12.8% and 59.0% pairwise studies had significantly correlated expression association for genes and gene sets, respectively; moreover, 12.8% pairwise studies had independent expression association for genes, but no studies were observed significantly different for expression association of gene sets. Our analysis indicated that there are both tissue specific and non-specific genes and pathways associated with diabetes pathogenesis. Compared to the gene expression, pathway association tends to be tissue non-specific, and a common pathway influencing diabetes development is activated through different genes at different tissues.

  2. Association Analysis of Alumni Giving: A Formal Concept Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Ray R.; Le Blanc, Louis A.; Bahar, Mahmood; Traywick, Bryan

    A large sample (initially 33,000 cases representing a ten percent trial) of university alumni giving records for a large public university in the southwestern United States are analyzed by Formal Concept Analysis (FCA). This likely represents the initially attempt to perform analysis of such data by means of a machine learing technique. The variables employed include the gift amount to the university foundation (UF) as well as traditional demographic variables such as year of graduation, gender, ethnicity, marital status, etc. The UF serves as one of the institution's non-profit, fund-raising organizations. It pursues substantial gifts that are designated for the educational or leadership programs of the giver's choice. Although they process gifts of all sizes, the UF focus is on major gifts and endowments.

  3. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with bladder cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Siddiq, Afshan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark; Jacobs, Eric J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Tang, Wei; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth; Tjønneland, Anne; Brenan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M.; Lerner, Seth P.; Barton Grossman, H.; Lin, Jie; Gu, Jian; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Armenti, Karla R.; Hosain, G.M.; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Ryan Diver, W.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Chris A.; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Silverman, Debra T.; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6911 cases and 11 814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising single nucleotide polymorphisms with P < 1 × 10−5 was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P = 4.53 × 10−9) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P = 4.11 × 10−8). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P = 7.13 × 10−7) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P = 6.98 × 10−7); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24163127

  5. Ventilator associated pneumonia and transfusion, is there really an association? (the NAVTRA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Marco

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemic syndrome is a frequent problem in intensive care units. The most probable etiology is the suppression of the erythropoietin response due to the direct effects of cytokines, as well as frequent blood sampling. Transfusions are not free of complications, therefore transfusion reactions are estimated to occur in 2% of the total packed red blood cells (pRBCs transfused. In the past several years, several trials had tried to compare the restrictive with the more liberal use of transfusions, and they were found to be equally effective. Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common nosocomial infection in intensive care units; the prevalence is 47% with an attributive mortality of 33%. There are multiple risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia. Colonization of the upper airways is the most important pathophysiological factor but there are other factors implicated like, sedation techniques, inappropriate use of antibiotics and recumbent positioning. A secondary analysis of the CRIT study describes transfusion therapy and its practices in the United States. They found that transfusion practice is an independent risk factor for the development of nosocomial pneumonia. Methods This is a multicenter, prospective cohort study in different intensive care units in Colombia. A total of 474 patients were selected who had more than 48 hours of mechanical ventilation. The primary objective is to try to demonstrate the hypothetical relationship between the use of transfusions and nosocomial pneumonia. Secondly, we will try to determine which other factors are implicated in the development of pneumonia in intensive care units and describe the incidence of pneumonia and transfusion practices. Discussion Ventilator associated pneumonia is a primary problem in the intensive care unit, multiple factors have been associated with its presence in this study we try to explore the possible association between pneumonia and transfusion

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies genetic loci associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E McLaren

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism in man, rodents and other vertebrates suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. To identify new genomic locations associated with iron deficiency, a genome-wide association study (GWAS was performed using DNA collected from white men aged≥25 y and women≥50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study with serum ferritin (SF≤12 µg/L (cases and iron replete controls (SF>100 µg/L in men, SF>50 µg/L in women. Regression analysis was used to examine the association between case-control status (336 cases, 343 controls and quantitative serum iron measures and 331,060 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes, with replication analyses performed in a sample of 71 cases and 161 controls from a population of white male and female veterans screened at a US Veterans Affairs (VA medical center. Five SNPs identified in the GWAS met genome-wide statistical significance for association with at least one iron measure, rs2698530 on chr. 2p14; rs3811647 on chr. 3q22, a known SNP in the transferrin (TF gene region; rs1800562 on chr. 6p22, the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene; rs7787204 on chr. 7p21; and rs987710 on chr. 22q11 (GWAS observed P<1.51×10(-7 for all. An association between total iron binding capacity and SNP rs3811647 in the TF gene (GWAS observed P=7.0×10(-9, corrected P=0.012 was replicated within the VA samples (observed P=0.012. Associations with the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene also were replicated. The joint analysis of the HEIRS and VA samples revealed strong associations between rs2698530 on chr. 2p14 and iron status outcomes. These results confirm a previously-described TF polymorphism and implicate one potential new locus as a target for gene identification.

  7. Analysis of factors associated with excess weight in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Paulino Pinto

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in schoolchildren aged 10 to 16 years and its association with dietary and behavioral factors. Methods: Cross-sectional study that evaluated 505 adolescents using a structured questionnaire and anthropometric data. The data was analyzed through the T Test for independent samples and Mann-Whitney Test to compare means and medians, respectively, and Chi2 Test for proportions. Prevalence ratio (RP and the 95% confidence interval was used to estimate the degree of association between variables. The logistic regression was employed to adjust the estimates to confounding factors. The significance level of 5% was considered for all analysis. Results: Excess weight was observed in 30.9% of the schoolchildren: 18.2% of overweight and 12.7% of obesity. There was no association between weight alterations and dietary/behavioral habits in the bivariate and multivariate analyses. However, associations were observed in relation to gender. Daily consumption of sweets [PR=0.75 (0.64-0.88] and soft drinks [PR=0.82 (0.70-0.97] was less frequent among boys; having lunch daily was slightly more often reported by boys [OR=1.11 (1.02-1.22]. Physical activity practice of (≥3 times/week was more often mentioned by boys and the association measures disclosed two-fold more physical activity in this group [PR=2.04 (1.56-2.67] when compared to girls. Approximately 30% of boys and 40% of girls stated they did not perform activities requiring energy expenditure during free periods, with boys being 32% less idle than girls [PR=0.68 (0.60-0.76]. Conclusions: A high prevalence of both overweight and obesity was observed, as well as unhealthy habits in the study population, regardless of the presence of weight alterations. Health promotion strategies in schools should be encouraged, in order to promote healthy habits and behaviors among all students.

  8. Analysis of pharmacogenomic variants associated with population differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Yeon

    Full Text Available In the present study, we systematically investigated population differentiation of drug-related (DR genes in order to identify common genetic features underlying population-specific responses to drugs. To do so, we used the International HapMap project release 27 Data and Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (PharmGKB database. First, we compared four measures for assessing population differentiation: the chi-square test, the analysis of variance (ANOVA F-test, Fst, and Nearest Shrunken Centroid Method (NSCM. Fst showed high sensitivity with stable specificity among varying sample sizes; thus, we selected Fst for determining population differentiation. Second, we divided DR genes from PharmGKB into two groups based on the degree of population differentiation as assessed by Fst: genes with a high level of differentiation (HD gene group and genes with a low level of differentiation (LD gene group. Last, we conducted a gene ontology (GO analysis and pathway analysis. Using all genes in the human genome as the background, the GO analysis and pathway analysis of the HD genes identified terms related to cell communication. "Cell communication" and "cell-cell signaling" had the lowest Benjamini-Hochberg's q-values (0.0002 and 0.0006, respectively, and "drug binding" was highly enriched (16.51 despite its relatively high q-value (0.0142. Among the 17 genes related to cell communication identified in the HD gene group, five genes (STX4, PPARD, DCK, GRIK4, and DRD3 contained single nucleotide polymorphisms with Fst values greater than 0.5. Specifically, the Fst values for rs10871454, rs6922548, rs3775289, rs1954787, and rs167771 were 0.682, 0.620, 0.573, 0.531, and 0.510, respectively. In the analysis using DR genes as the background, the HD gene group contained six significant terms. Five were related to reproduction, and one was "Wnt signaling pathway," which has been implicated in cancer. Our analysis suggests that the HD gene group from PharmGKB is

  9. Vitamin D3 receptor ( VDR gene rs2228570 (Fok1 and rs731236 (Taq1 variants are not associated with the risk for multiple sclerosis: results of a new study and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena García-Martín

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some epidemiological, genetic, and experimental data suggest a possible role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Data on the possible contribution of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene to the risk for MS are controversial. Several studies suggested an interaction between some SNPs in the VDR gene and HLADRB1*1501 in the risk for MS. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate a possible influence of the SNPs rs2228570 and rs731236 in the VDR gene in the risk for MS. A secondary objective was to address the possible interactions between VDR genes and HLADRB1*1501. METHODS: We analyzed the allelic and genotype frequency of VDR rs2228570, rs731236, and HLADRB1*1501 (rs3135388 in 303 patients with MS and 310 healthy controls, using TaqMan Assays. We also conducted a meta-analysis, that was carried out by using the software Meta-Disc 1.1.1 (http://www.hrc.es/investigacion/metadisc.html; Unit of Clinical Statistics, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. Heterogeneity between studies in terms of degree of association was tested using the Q-statistic. RESULTS: VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 allelic and genotype frequencies did not differ significantly between MS patients and controls, and were unrelated with the age of onset of MS, gender, and course of MS. HLADRB1*1501 showed a high association with the risk of developing MS 4.76(95% C.I.  = 3.14-7.27; p<0.0001. The meta-analysis, after excluding data of one study that was responsible of heterogeneity for rs731236 polymorphism, showed lack of relation of both SNPs with the risk for MS. HLADRB1*1501 showed lack of interaction with VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 in increasing MS risk. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 polymorphisms are not related with the risk for MS, and did not confirm interaction between these VDR SNPs and HLADRB1

  10. Association studies in common endocrine diseases (review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrami SM

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the pathogenesis of endocrine disorders increase rapidly by genetic studies at the molecular level. Common endocrine disorders such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, osteoporosis, dyslipidemia and cancer follow the multifactorial model in the genetic aspect. This review tries to clarify the approach in molecular studies of such diseases for clinicians in different specialties. How to evaluate a possible association between a single nucleotide polymorphism and an endocrinopathy or its complication is the main concern of this review. Two approaches for gene mapping will be discussed as well as main challenges regarding each approach. All such genetic studies ideally include some test of the association between genome sequence variation and the phenotype of interest such as the trait itself, the presence of a given complication, or measures of some endocrinopathy-related intermediate trait. Despite different advances in this analysis, there are major concerns regarding the overall performance and robustness of genetic association studies. By using powerful new high-throughput methods, further insights to molecular basis of such endocrine disorders can be expected. Close correlation between geneticists and clinicians can effectively bridge between basic sciences and clinical investigations.

  11. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Baron-Cohen

    Full Text Available Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419 versus low (n = 183 mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5, 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6. In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859 showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115 were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4. Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64. The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  12. Evaluating variations of genotype calling: a potential source of spurious associations in genome-wide association studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xuixiao Hong; Zhenqiang Su; Weigong Ge; Leming Shi; Roger Perkins; Hong Fang; Donna Mendrick; Weida Tong

    2010-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) examine the entire human genome with the goal of identifying genetic variants (usually single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) that are associated with phenotypic traits such as disease status and drug response. The discordance of significantly associated SNPs for the same disease identified from different GWAS indicates that false associations exist in such results. In addition to the possible sources of spurious associations that have been investigated and discussed intensively, such as sample size and population stratification, an accurate and reproducible genotype calling algorithm is required for concordant GWAS results from different studies. However, variations of genotype calling of an algorithm and their effects on significantly associated SNPs identified in downstream association analyses have not been systematically investigated. In this paper, the variations of genotype calling using the Bayesian Robust Linear Model with Mahalanobis distance classifier (BRLMM) algorithm and the resulting influence on the lists of significantly associated SNPs were evaluated using the raw data of 270 HapMap samples analysed with the Affymetrix Human Mapping 500K Array Set (Affy500K) by changing algorithmic parameters. Modified were the Dynamic Model (DM) call confidence threshold (threshold) and the number of randomly selected SNPs (size). Comparative analysis of the calling results and the corresponding lists of significantly associated SNPs identified through association analysis revealed that algorithmic parameters used in BRLMM affected the genotype calls and the significantly associated SNPs. Both the threshold and the size affected the called genotypes and the lists of significantly associated SNPs in association analysis. The effect of the threshold was much larger than the effect of the size. Moreover, the heterozygous calls had lower consistency compared to the homozygous calls.

  13. Genome-wide association and functional studies identify a role for IGFBP3 in hip osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S. Evans (Daniel); F. Cailotto (Frederic); N. Parimi (Neeta); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); Y. Liu (Youfang); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); A. Teumer (Alexander); G.J. Tranah (Gregory); M.C. Nevitt (Michael); S. Cummings; E.S. Orwoll (Eric); E. Barrett-Connor (Elizabeth); J.B. Renner (Jordan); J.M. Jordan (Joanne); M. Doherty (Michael); S. Doherty (Sally); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); T.D. Spector (Timothy); R.J. Lories (Rik); N.E. Lane

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To identify genetic associations with hip osteoarthritis (HOA), we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of HOA. Methods The GWAS meta-analysis included approximately 2.5 million imputed HapMap single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). HOA cases and

  14. Genome-wide association study of kidney function decline in individuals of European descent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorski, Mathias; Tin, Adrienne; Garnaas, Maija; McMahon, Gearoid M.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chalmers, John; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; Woodward, Marc; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Smith, Albert V.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Li, Man; Freudenberger, Paul; Hofer, Edith; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; de Boer, Ian H.; Li, Guo; Siscovick, David S.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Corre, Tanguy; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Olden, Matthias; Yang, Qiong; de Andrade, Mariza; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Turner, Stephen T.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Barlassina, Cristina; Cusi, Daniele; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Grallert, Harald; Meisinger, Christa; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Kraemer, Bernhard K.; Kramer, Holly; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Snieder, Harold; Del Greco, M. Fabiola; Franke, Andre; Noethlings, Ute; Lieb, Wolfgang; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Coassin, Stefan; Haun, Margot; Kollerits, Barbara; Kronenberg, Florian; Paulweber, Bernhard; Aumann, Nicole; Endlich, Karlhans; Pietzner, Mike; Voelker, Uwe; Rettig, Rainer; Chouraki, Vincent; Helmer, Catherine; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Metzger, Marie; Stengel, Benedicte; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Raitakari, Olli; Johnson, Andrew; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Kottgen, Anna; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.; Boeger, Carsten A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple loci associated with cross-sectional eGFR, but a systematic genetic analysis of kidney function decline over time is missing. Here we conducted a GWAS meta-analysis among 63,558 participants of European descent, initially from 16 cohor

  15. Genome-wide association study of kidney function decline in individuals of European descent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gorski (Mathias); A. Tin (Adrienne); M. Garnaas (Maija); G.M. McMahon (Gearoid M.); A.Y. Chu (Audrey Y.); B. Tayo (Bamidele); C. Pattaro (Cristian); A. Teumer (Alexander); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); J. Chalmers (John); P. Hamet (Pavel); J. Tremblay (Johanne); M. Woodward (Mark); T. Aspelund (Thor); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.V. Smith (Albert V.); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); J.R. O´Connell; A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Coresh (Josef); M. Li (Man); P. Freudenberger (Paul); E. Hofer (Edith); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); I.H. de Boer (Ian); G. Li (Guo); D.S. Siscovick (David); Z. Kutalik; T. Corre (Tanguy); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); J. Gupta (Jayanta); P.P. Kanetsky (Peter P.); S.J. Hwang; M. Olden (Matthias); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); M. de Andrade (Mariza); E.J. Atkinson (Elizabeth J.); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); S.T. Turner (Stephen); J.M. Stafford (Jeanette M.); J. Ding (Jinhui); Y. Liu; C. Barlassina (Christina); D. Cusi (Daniele); E. Salvi (Erika); J.A. Staessen (Jan); P.M. Ridker (Paul); H. Grallert (Harald); C. Meisinger (Christa); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); B.K. Krämer (Bernhard K.); H. Kramer (Holly); S.E. Rosas (Sylvia E.); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); H. Snieder (Harold); M. Fabiola Del Greco; A. Franke (Andre); U. Nöthlings (Ute); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan J L); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); P. Van Der Harst (Pim); A. Dehghan (Abbas); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sedaghat (Sanaz); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Coassin (Stefan); M. Haun (Margot); B. Kollerits (Barbara); F. Kronenberg (Florian); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); N. Aumann (Nicole); K. Endlich (Karlhans); M. Pietzner (Mike); U. Völker (Uwe); R. Rettig (Rainer); V. Chouraki (Vincent); C. Helmer (Catherine); J.-C. Lambert (Jean-Charles); M. Metzger (Marie); B. Stengel (Benedicte); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); O. Raitakari (Olli); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); A. Parsa (Afshin); M. Bochud (Murielle); I.M. Heid (Iris); W. Goessling (Wolfram); A. K̈ttgen (Anna); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); C.S. Fox (Caroline S.); C.A. Böger (Carsten)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple loci associated with cross-sectional eGFR, but a systematic genetic analysis of kidney function decline over time is missing. Here we conducted a GWAS meta-analysis among 63,558 participants of European descent, initially f

  16. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  17. Efficient Analysis of Pattern and Association Rule Mining Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabet Slimani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The process of data mining produces various patterns from a given data source. The most recognized data mining tasks are the process of discovering frequent itemsets, frequent sequential patterns, frequent sequential rules and frequent association rules. Numerous efficient algorithms have been proposed to do the above processes. Frequent pattern mining has been a focused topic in data mining research with a good number of references in literature and for that reason an important progress has been made, varying from performant algorithms for frequent itemset mining in transaction databases to complex algorithms, such as sequential pattern mining, structured pattern mining, correlation mining. Association Rule mining (ARM is one of the utmost current data mining techniques designed to group objects together from large databases aiming to extract the interesting correlation and relation among huge amount of data. In this article, we provide a brief review and analysis of the current status of frequent pattern mining and discuss some promising research directions. Additionally, this paper includes a comparative study between the performance of the described approaches.

  18. Association study of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrera, Noa; Arrojo, Manuel; Sanjuán, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies using several hundred thousand anonymous markers present limited statistical power. Alternatively, association studies restricted to common nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) have the advantage of strongly reducing the multiple testing problem, ...

  19. The Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments.......A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments....

  20. Study on acute burn injury survivors and the associated issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan Bayuo; Pius Agbenorku; Richcane Amankwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the phenomenon of surviving burn injury and its associated issues and concerns. Methods: A cross sectional survey approach was utilized to obtain data from one hundred burn survivors who were purposely selected. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze data. Results: Findings from the study indicate that burns from flames stood out as a major cause of burns. Physical discomfort/pain, anxiety, needing assistance in meeting self-care needs, financial and social limitations were identified as the major impact of the injury. Furthermore, participants perceived the existence of societal stigma. In addition, hope in God or a spiritual being as well as family support were the two key resources participants relied on to cope effectively. Conclusions: Surviving burn injury is associated with varied physical, social and psy-chological factors and survivors may need professional assistance to fully adjust after discharge.

  1. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Susan Martins; de Araújo, Gleide Santos; Santos, Carlos Antônio de Souza Teles; de Oliveira, Maeli Gomes; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. METHODS It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial), and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2) years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3) years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61%) were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04–5.42), which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12–7.94). CONCLUSIONS The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies. PMID:28099656

  2. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Martins Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. METHODS It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial, and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2 years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3 years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61% were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04–5.42, which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12–7.94. CONCLUSIONS The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies.

  3. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  4. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10−8). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  5. Tomographic Study of Ionospheric Effects Associated with a Solar Eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuXiong-bin; XuJi-sheng; MaShu-ying; TianMao

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the ionospheric effects associated with the solar eclipse of October 24th, 1995 by means of Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT). Since the reconstructed profiles from experimental CIT are sporadically located in time, a time domain interpolation method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique is proposed and applied to extract the ionospheric effects. The effects can be extracted by comparison analysis between the interpolated CIT profiles of the eclipse days and that of the reference day that are time-aligned. A series of figs have been obtained showing the attenuation of photonization effect at low altitudes and the weakening of plasma's transportation process at high altitudes, etc. The photonization effect recovered to normal level soon after the last contact. The maximum electron density diminishing is observed about 2 h after the eclipse maximum and the effects seem vanished in the hours followed. Analysis on vertical TEC's latitudinal-temporal variation gives similar conclusions.

  6. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire;

    2016-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We...

  7. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Felix (Janine); J.P. Bradfield (Jonathan); C. Monnereau; R.J.P. van der Valk (Ralf); E. Stergiakouli (Evie); A. Chesi (Alessandra); R. Gaillard (Romy); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); E. Thiering (Elisabeth); E. Kreiner-Møller (Eskil); A. Mahajan (Anubha); Niina Pitkänen; R. Joro (Raimo); A. Cavadino (Alana); V. Huikari (Ville); S. Franks (Steve); M. Groen-Blokhuis (Maria); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); J.A. Marsh (Julie); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J.A. Curtin (John); J. Vioque (Jesus); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); R. Myhre (Ronny); T.S. Price (Thomas); Natalia Vilor-Tejedor; L. Yengo (Loic); N. Grarup (Niels); I. Ntalla (Ioanna); W.Q. Ang (Wei); M. Atalay (Mustafa); H. Bisgaard (Hans); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); L. Carstensen (Lisbeth); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); C. Flexeder (Claudia); L. Franke (Lude); F. Geller (Frank); M. Geserick (Mandy); A.L. Hartikainen; C.M.A. Haworth (Claire M.); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel N.); A. Hofman (Albert); J.-C. Holm (Jens-Christian); M. Horikoshi (Momoko); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J. Huang (Jian); H.N. Kadarmideen (Haja N.); M. Kähönen (Mika); W. Kiess (Wieland); T.A. Lakka (Timo); T.A. Lakka (Timo); A. Lewin (Alex); L. Liang (Liming); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); B. Ma (Baoshan); P. Magnus (Per); S.E. McCormack (Shana E.); G. Mcmahon (George); F.D. Mentch (Frank); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); C.S. Murray (Clare S.); K. Pahkala (Katja); T.H. Pers (Tune); R. Pfäffle (Roland); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C. Power (Christine); A. Simpson (Angela); V. Sengpiel (Verena); C. Tiesler (Carla); M. Torrent (Maties); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); R. Vinding (Rebecca); J. Waage (Johannes); J. Wardle (Jane); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); B.S. Zemel (Babette S.); G.V. Dedoussis (George); O. Pedersen (Oluf); P. Froguel (Philippe); J. Sunyer (Jordi); R. Plomin (Robert); B. Jacobsson (Bo); T. Hansen (Torben); J.R. Gonzalez (Juan R.); A. Custovic; O.T. Raitakari (Olli T.); C.E. Pennell (Craig); Elisabeth Widén; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); S. Sebert (Sylvain); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); E. Hypponen (Elina); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); V. Lindi (Virpi); N. Harri (Niinikoski); A. Körner (Antje); K. Bønnelykke (Klaus); J. Heinrich (Joachim); M. Melbye (Mads); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); S.M. Ring (Susan); G.D. Smith; T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild I.A.); N. Timpson (Nicholas); S.F. Grant; V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent W. V.); H.J. Kalkwarf (Heidi J.); J.M. Lappe (Joan M.); V. Gilsanz (Vicente); S.E. Oberfield (Sharon E.); J.A. Shepherd (John A.); A. Kelly (Andrea)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown.We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation sc

  8. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Cousminer, Diana L; Marsh, Julie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M A; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A; Lewin, Alexandra M; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D; Middeldorp, Christel M; Murray, Clare S; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M T; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G; van Meurs, Joyce B; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S; Dedoussis, George V; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T; Pennell, Craig E; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2015-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We in

  9. Meta-analysis for Discovering Rare-Variant Associations: Statistical Methods and Software Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2015-07-02

    There is heightened interest in using next-generation sequencing technologies to identify rare variants that influence complex human diseases and traits. Meta-analysis is essential to this endeavor because large sample sizes are required for detecting associations with rare variants. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of statistical methods for meta-analysis of sequencing studies for discovering rare-variant associations. Specifically, we discuss the calculation of relevant summary statistics from participating studies, the construction of gene-level association tests, the choice of transformation for quantitative traits, the use of fixed-effects versus random-effects models, and the removal of shadow association signals through conditional analysis. We also show that meta-analysis based on properly calculated summary statistics is as powerful as joint analysis of individual-participant data. In addition, we demonstrate the performance of different meta-analysis methods by using both simulated and empirical data. We then compare four major software packages for meta-analysis of rare-variant associations-MASS, RAREMETAL, MetaSKAT, and seqMeta-in terms of the underlying statistical methodology, analysis pipeline, and software interface. Finally, we present PreMeta, a software interface that integrates the four meta-analysis packages and allows a consortium to combine otherwise incompatible summary statistics.

  10. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Yuan

    Full Text Available Egg number (EN, egg laying rate (LR and age at first egg (AFE are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens.

  11. Fatores associados à rosácea em amostras populacionais do Sul do Brasil: análise de estudos casos-controles Factors associated with rosacea in population samples of Southern Brazil: analysis of case-control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Rangel Bonamigo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A rosácea é dermatose que apresenta uma série de va