WorldWideScience

Sample records for association study analysis

  1. Joint Analysis of Multiple Traits in Rare Variant Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenchuan; Wang, Xuexia; Sha, Qiuying; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2016-05-01

    The joint analysis of multiple traits has recently become popular since it can increase statistical power to detect genetic variants and there is increasing evidence showing that pleiotropy is a widespread phenomenon in complex diseases. Currently, the majority of existing methods for the joint analysis of multiple traits test association between one common variant and multiple traits. However, the variant-by-variant methods for common variant association studies may not be optimal for rare variant association studies due to the allelic heterogeneity as well as the extreme rarity of individual variants. Current statistical methods for rare variant association studies are for one single trait only. In this paper, we propose an adaptive weighting reverse regression (AWRR) method to test association between multiple traits and rare variants in a genomic region. AWRR is robust to the directions of effects of causal variants and is also robust to the directions of association of traits. Using extensive simulation studies, we compare the performance of AWRR with canonical correlation analysis (CCA), Single-TOW, and the weighted sum reverse regression (WSRR). Our results show that, in all of the simulation scenarios, AWRR is consistently more powerful than CCA. In most scenarios, AWRR is more powerful than Single-TOW and WSRR. PMID:26990300

  2. A strategy analysis for genetic association studies with known inbreeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Giacco Stefano

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association studies consist in identifying the genetic variants which are related to a specific disease through the use of statistical multiple hypothesis testing or segregation analysis in pedigrees. This type of studies has been very successful in the case of Mendelian monogenic disorders while it has been less successful in identifying genetic variants related to complex diseases where the insurgence depends on the interactions between different genes and the environment. The current technology allows to genotype more than a million of markers and this number has been rapidly increasing in the last years with the imputation based on templates sets and whole genome sequencing. This type of data introduces a great amount of noise in the statistical analysis and usually requires a great number of samples. Current methods seldom take into account gene-gene and gene-environment interactions which are fundamental especially in complex diseases. In this paper we propose to use a non-parametric additive model to detect the genetic variants related to diseases which accounts for interactions of unknown order. Although this is not new to the current literature, we show that in an isolated population, where the most related subjects share also most of their genetic code, the use of additive models may be improved if the available genealogical tree is taken into account. Specifically, we form a sample of cases and controls with the highest inbreeding by means of the Hungarian method, and estimate the set of genes/environmental variables, associated with the disease, by means of Random Forest. Results We have evidence, from statistical theory, simulations and two applications, that we build a suitable procedure to eliminate stratification between cases and controls and that it also has enough precision in identifying genetic variants responsible for a disease. This procedure has been successfully used for the beta-thalassemia, which is

  3. Power analysis of principal components regression in genetic association studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-feng SHEN; Jun ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Association analysis provides an opportunity to find genetic variants underlying complex traits. A principal com-ponents regression (PCR)-based approach was shown to outperform some competing approaches. However, a limitation of this method is that the principal components (PCs) selected from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be unrelated to the phenotype. In this article, we investigate the theoretical properties of such a method in more detail. We first derive the exact power function of the test based on PCR, and hence clarify the relationship between the test power and the degrees of freedom (DF). Next, we extend the PCR test to a general weighted PCs test, which provides a unified framework for understanding the properties of some related statistics. We then compare the performance of these tests. We also introduce several data-driven adaptive alterna-tives to overcome difficulties in the PCR approach. Finally, we illustrate our results using simulations based on real genotype data. Simulation study shows the risk of using the unsupervised rule to determine the number of PCs, and demonstrates that there is no single uniformly powerful method for detecting genetic variants.

  4. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke J; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur;

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects....

  5. Imputation Aware Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitlen, Noah; Eskin, Eleazar

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have recently identified many new loci associated with human complex diseases. These newly discovered variants typically have weak effects requiring studies with large numbers of individuals to achieve the statistical power necessary to identify them. Likely, there exist even more associated variants, which remain to be found if even larger association studies can be assembled. Meta-analysis provides a straightforward means of increasing study sample sizes with...

  6. Multivariate Meta-Analysis of Genetic Association Studies: A Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Neupane

    Full Text Available In a meta-analysis with multiple end points of interests that are correlated between or within studies, multivariate approach to meta-analysis has a potential to produce more precise estimates of effects by exploiting the correlation structure between end points. However, under random-effects assumption the multivariate estimation is more complex (as it involves estimation of more parameters simultaneously than univariate estimation, and sometimes can produce unrealistic parameter estimates. Usefulness of multivariate approach to meta-analysis of the effects of a genetic variant on two or more correlated traits is not well understood in the area of genetic association studies. In such studies, genetic variants are expected to roughly maintain Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium within studies, and also their effects on complex traits are generally very small to modest and could be heterogeneous across studies for genuine reasons. We carried out extensive simulation to explore the comparative performance of multivariate approach with most commonly used univariate inverse-variance weighted approach under random-effects assumption in various realistic meta-analytic scenarios of genetic association studies of correlated end points. We evaluated the performance with respect to relative mean bias percentage, and root mean square error (RMSE of the estimate and coverage probability of corresponding 95% confidence interval of the effect for each end point. Our simulation results suggest that multivariate approach performs similarly or better than univariate method when correlations between end points within or between studies are at least moderate and between-study variation is similar or larger than average within-study variation for meta-analyses of 10 or more genetic studies. Multivariate approach produces estimates with smaller bias and RMSE especially for the end point that has randomly or informatively missing summary data in some individual studies, when

  7. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke J.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Bos, Steffan D.; Esko, Tonu; Evans, Daniel S.; Metrustry, Sarah; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Ramos, Yolande F M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; ,; Arden, Nigel; Aslam, Nadim

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects. Methods We performed a two-stage meta-analysis on more than 78 000 participants. In stage 1, we synthesised data from eight GWAS whereas data from 10 centres were used for ‘in silico’ or ‘de novo’ replication. Besides the main analysis, a stratified by sex a...

  8. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel variants associated with osteoarthritis of the hip.

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Kerkhof, Hanneke; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Ntzani, Evangelia; Bos, Steffan; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, Daniel; Metrustry, Sarah; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Ramos, Yolande; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tsilidis, Konstantinos; Arden, Nigel; Aslam, Nadim; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis with a clear genetic component. To identify novel loci associated with hip OA we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on European subjects. Methods We performed a two-stage meta-analysis on more than 78 000 participants. In stage 1, we synthesised data from eight GWAS whereas data from 10 centres were used for 'in silico' or 'de novo' replication. Besides the main analysis, a str...

  9. Incidence of Cancer in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Weifeng; Ning, Yong; Xu, Xiu; Li, Menglan; Guo, Shuiming; Han, Min; Zeng, Rui; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to examine cancer incidence in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AASV) derived from population-based cohort studies by means of meta-analysis. Methods Relevant electronic databases were searched for studies characterizing the associated risk of overall malignancy in patients with AASV. Standardized incidence rates (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of association. We tested for publication bias and heter...

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study and Linkage Analysis of the Healthy Aging Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minster, Ryan L; Sanders, Jason L; Singh, Jatinder;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Healthy Aging Index (HAI) is a tool for measuring the extent of health and disease across multiple systems. METHODS: We conducted a genome-wide association study and a genome-wide linkage analysis to map quantitative trait loci associated with the HAI and a modified HAI weighted for......: There were no genome-wide significant findings from the genome-wide association study; however, several single-nucleotide polymorphisms near ZNF704 on chromosome 8q21.13 were suggestively associated with the HAI in the Long Life Family Study (p < 10(-) (6)) and nominally replicated in the Cardiovascular...

  11. Association between Herpesviruses and Chronic Periodontitis: A Meta-Analysis Based on Case-Control Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, May. Chun. Mei; Feng, Xi-Ping; Lu, Hai-Xia; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective Numerous studies have investigated the associations between herpesviruses and chronic periodontitis; however, the results remain controversial. To derive a more precise estimation, a meta-analysis on all available studies was performed to identify the association between herpesviruses and chronic periodontitis. Methods A computerized literature search was conducted in December 2014 to identify eligible case-control studies from the PUBMED and EMBASE databases according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to assess the association between herpesviruses and risk of chronic periodontitis. A fixed or random effects model was determined based on a heterogeneity test. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate stability and reliability. Publication bias was investigated using the Begg rank correlation test and Egger's funnel plot. Results Ten eligible studies were included to investigate the association between Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and chronic periodontitis. The results showed that EBV has a significant association with chronic periodontitis compared with periodontally healthy group (OR = 5.74, 95% CI = 2.53–13.00, Pherpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and chronic periodontitis risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.21–4.86). Conclusion The findings of this meta-analysis suggest that two members of the herpesvirus family, EBV and HCMV, are significantly associated with chronic periodontitis. There is insufficient evidence to support associations between HSV, HHV-7 and chronic periodontitis. PMID:26666412

  12. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  13. METASEQ: PRIVACY PRESERVING META-ANALYSIS OF SEQUENCING-BASED ASSOCIATION STUDIES*

    OpenAIRE

    SINGH, ANGAD PAL; ZAFER, SAMREEN; Pe’er, Itsik

    2013-01-01

    Human genetics recently transitioned from GWAS to studies based on NGS data. For GWAS, small effects dictated large sample sizes, typically made possible through meta-analysis by exchanging summary statistics across consortia. NGS studies groupwise-test for association of multiple potentially-causal alleles along each gene. They are subject to similar power constraints and therefore likely to resort to meta-analysis as well. The problem arises when considering privacy of the genetic informati...

  14. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; Maloney, Cliona M.; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; de Boer, Anthonius; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goe, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshal, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondah, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Christie, Jason D.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Maerz, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Watkins, Hugh; Grant, Struan F. A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Kumari, Meena; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and

  15. Multiple SNP-sets Analysis for Genome-wide Association Studies through Bayesian Latent Variable Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhaohua; Zhu, Hongtu; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Stephanie, Williams N.; Zou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for mapping complex traits with single SNP analysis may be undermined by modest SNP effect sizes, unobserved causal SNPs, correlation among adjacent SNPs, and SNP-SNP interactions. Alternative approaches for testing the association between a single SNP-set and individual phenotypes have been shown to be promising for improving the power of GWAS. We propose a Bayesian latent variable selection (BLVS) method to simultaneously model the joint a...

  16. Association between seminal plasma zinc level and asthenozoospermia: a meta-analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taravati, A; Tohidi, F

    2016-08-01

    Zinc is proposed to have an important role in the morphology, viability and motility of spermatozoa. There are inconsistent reports on the association between seminal plasma zinc concentration and male infertility. For this purpose, papers reporting the level of seminal zinc among asthenozoospermic groups were selected and used for further analysis. This meta-analysis of previous published studies was performed to obtain more precise information on the association between seminal plasma zinc and asthenozoospermia. Relevant studies for inclusion were identified after preliminary investigation of research papers published on electronic databases up to February 2015. Eight reports and 475 subjects were finally included in the meta-analysis. In the overall analysis, a statistically significant reduction in seminal plasma zinc concentrations was observed in asthenozoospermic infertile men. Random-effects method was used to evaluate the summary effect size due to the presence of significant heterogeneity. The effect of zinc on asthenozoospermia was significant (Hedge's G effect size = -0.506, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -0.998 to -0.014, P = 0.044). Taken together, despite of significant statistical heterogeneity between studies, our findings were indicative of significant association between zinc concentration and asthenozoospermia. In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that seminal plasma zinc concentration is negatively associated with male infertility. PMID:26541500

  17. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schaefer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; STEINHAUSEN, HANS-CHRISTOPH; Freitag, Christine,; Reif, Andreas; Tobias J Renner

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to boost statistical power. Method: We used data from four projects: a) the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP); b) phase I of ...

  18. Association between sleep duration and cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep duration has been shown to play an important role in the development of cancer. However, the results have been inconsistent. A meta-analysis with prospective cohort studies was performed to clarify the association between short or long sleep duration and cancer risk. METHODS: PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible publications. Pooled relative risk (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI was calculated using random- or fixed- model. RESULTS: A total of 10 prospective studies (8392 incident cases and 555678 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Neither short nor long sleep duration was statistically associated with increased risk of cancer (short sleep duration: RR=1.05, 95%CI=0.90-1.24, p=0.523; long sleep duration: RR=0.92, 95%CI=0.76-1.12, p=0.415. In the subgroup by cancer type, long sleep duration was positively associated with colorectal cancer (RR=1.29, 95%CI=1.09-1.52, p=0.003. CONCLUSION: The present meta-analysis suggested that neither short nor long sleep duration was significantly associated with risk of cancer, although long sleep duration increased risk of with colorectal cancer. Large-scale well-design prospective studies are required to be conducted to further investigate the observed association.

  19. Statistical Analysis of Genetic Data in Twin Studies and Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Setiawan, A.

    2007-01-01

    In studies in human genetics we want to answer questions such as: how important are genetic effects on a phenotype; what kind of action and interaction exists between gene products in the pathways between genotypes and phenotype; are the genetic effects on a phenotype consistent across sexes; do some genes have particularly outstanding effects when compared to others; what are the locations of the genes involved in the phenotype of interest ? Twin studies and association studies as described ...

  20. Higher Caffeinated Coffee Intake Is Associated with Reduced Malignant Melanoma Risk: A Meta-Analysis Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Liu

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies have determined the associations between coffee intake level and skin cancer risk; however, the results were not yet conclusive. Herein, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the cohort and case-control studies for the association between coffee intake level and malignant melanoma (MM risk.Studies were identified through searching the PubMed and MEDLINE databases (to November, 2015. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled under the random-effects model.Two case-control studies (846 MM patients and 843 controls and five cohort studies (including 844,246 participants and 5,737 MM cases were identified. For caffeinated coffee, the pooled relative risk (RR of MM was 0.81 [95% confidential interval (95% CI = 0.68-0.97; P-value for Q-test = 0.003; I2 = 63.5%] for those with highest versus lowest quantity of intake. In the dose-response analysis, the RR of MM was 0.955 (95% CI = 0.912-0.999 for per 1 cup/day increment of caffeinated coffee consumption and linearity dose-response association was found (P-value for nonlinearity = 0.326. Strikingly, no significant association was found between the decaffeinated coffee intake level and MM risk (pooled RR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.81-1.05; P-value for Q-test = 0.967; I2 = 0%; highest versus lowest quantity of intake.This meta-analysis suggested that caffeinated coffee might have chemo-preventive effects against MM but not decaffeinated coffee. However, larger prospective studies and the intervention studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  1. Higher Caffeinated Coffee Intake Is Associated with Reduced Malignant Melanoma Risk: A Meta-Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jibin; Shen, Biao; Shi, Minxin; Cai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Several epidemiological studies have determined the associations between coffee intake level and skin cancer risk; however, the results were not yet conclusive. Herein, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the cohort and case-control studies for the association between coffee intake level and malignant melanoma (MM) risk. Methods Studies were identified through searching the PubMed and MEDLINE databases (to November, 2015). Study-specific risk estimates were pooled under the random-effects model. Results Two case-control studies (846 MM patients and 843 controls) and five cohort studies (including 844,246 participants and 5,737 MM cases) were identified. For caffeinated coffee, the pooled relative risk (RR) of MM was 0.81 [95% confidential interval (95% CI) = 0.68–0.97; P-value for Q-test = 0.003; I2 = 63.5%] for those with highest versus lowest quantity of intake. In the dose-response analysis, the RR of MM was 0.955 (95% CI = 0.912–0.999) for per 1 cup/day increment of caffeinated coffee consumption and linearity dose-response association was found (P-value for nonlinearity = 0.326). Strikingly, no significant association was found between the decaffeinated coffee intake level and MM risk (pooled RR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.81–1.05; P-value for Q-test = 0.967; I2 = 0%; highest versus lowest quantity of intake). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggested that caffeinated coffee might have chemo-preventive effects against MM but not decaffeinated coffee. However, larger prospective studies and the intervention studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:26816289

  2. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J.L.; Langely, Kate; O’Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although twin and family studies have shown Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association scans (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to boost statistical power. Method We used data from four projects: a) the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), b) phase I of the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics project (IMAGE), c) phase II of IMAGE (IMAGE II), and d) the Pfizer funded study from the University of California, Los Angeles, Washington University and the Massachusetts General Hospital (PUWMa). The final sample size consisted of 2,064 trios, 896 cases and 2,455 controls. For each study, we imputed HapMap SNPs, computed association test statistics and transformed them to Z-scores, and then combined weighted Z-scores in a meta-analysis. Results No genome-wide significant associations were found, although an analysis of candidate genes suggests they may be involved in the disorder. Conclusions Given that ADHD is a highly heritable disorder, our negative results suggest that the effects of common ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small or that other types of variants, e.g. rare ones, account for much of the disorder’s heritability. PMID:20732625

  3. Multinomial logistic regression approach to haplotype association analysis in population-based case-control studies

    OpenAIRE

    Kao Jau-Tsuen; Chen Yi-Hau

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The genetic association analysis using haplotypes as basic genetic units is anticipated to be a powerful strategy towards the discovery of genes predisposing human complex diseases. In particular, the increasing availability of high-resolution genetic markers such as the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has made haplotype-based association analysis an attractive alternative to single marker analysis. Results We consider haplotype association analysis under the popula...

  4. Association between Sleep Duration and Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Lu; Nong Tian; Jie Yin; Yuhua Shi; Zhenping Huang

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep duration has been shown to play an important role in the development of cancer. However, the results have been inconsistent. A meta-analysis with prospective cohort studies was performed to clarify the association between short or long sleep duration and cancer risk. METHODS: PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible publications. Pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using random- or fixed- model. RESULTS: A total of 10 pros...

  5. XWAS: A Software Toolset for Genetic Data Analysis and Association Studies of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Chang, Diana; Biddanda, Arjun; Ma, Li; Guo, Yingjie; Zhou, Zilu; Keinan, Alon

    2015-01-01

    XWAS is a new software suite for the analysis of the X chromosome in association studies and similar genetic studies. The X chromosome plays an important role in human disease and traits of many species, especially those with sexually dimorphic characteristics. Special attention needs to be given to its analysis due to the unique inheritance pattern, which leads to analytical complications that have resulted in the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) either not considering X or mishandling it with toolsets that had been designed for non-sex chromosomes. We hence developed XWAS to fill the need for tools that are specially designed for analysis of X. Following extensive, stringent, and X-specific quality control, XWAS offers an array of statistical tests of association, including: 1) the standard test between a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) and disease risk, including after first stratifying individuals by sex, 2) a test for a differential effect of a SNP on disease between males and females, 3) motivated by X-inactivation, a test for higher variance of a trait in heterozygous females as compared with homozygous females, and 4) for all tests, a version that allows for combining evidence from all SNPs across a gene. We applied the toolset analysis pipeline to 16 GWAS datasets of immune-related disorders and 7 risk factors of coronary artery disease, and discovered several new X-linked genetic associations. XWAS will provide the tools and incentive for others to incorporate the X chromosome into GWAS and similar studies in any species with an XX/XY system, hence enabling discoveries of novel loci implicated in many diseases and in their sexual dimorphism. PMID:26268243

  6. Association between dietary patterns and coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Lina; LI Fei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ou, Zejin; Xu, Dingli; Tan, Wanlong; Dai, Meng

    2015-01-01

    The associations of dietary patterns with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk remain unclear. Thereby, a meta-analysis was conducted to examine potential relations between dietary patterns and CHD. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched up to March 2014 for eligible prospective cohort studies regarding the relationships between common dietary patterns and CHD. Random-effects models were applied to calculate the summary relative risk estimates (SRRE) for the highest versus the lowest category...

  7. ESPRESSO: taking into account assessment errors on outcome and exposures in power analysis for association studies

    OpenAIRE

    Gaye, Amadou; Burton, Thomas W. Y.; Burton, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Very large studies are required to provide sufficiently big sample sizes for adequately powered association analyses. This can be an expensive undertaking and it is important that an accurate sample size is identified. For more realistic sample size calculation and power analysis, the impact of unmeasured aetiological determinants and the quality of measurement of both outcome and explanatory variables should be taken into account. Conventional methods to analyse power use closed-...

  8. Factors associated with syphilis infection: a comprehensive analysis based on a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y; Li, S-L; Lin, H-L; Lin, Z-F; Zhu, X-Z; Fan, J-Y; Gao, K; Zhang, H-L; Lin, L-R; Liu, L-L; Tong, M-L; Niu, J-J; Yang, T-C

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate factors that influence the likelihood of syphilis infection from risk-taking behaviours and medical conditions. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by enrolling 664 syphilis inpatients (excluding 11 congenital syphilis patients) and 800 sex- and age-matched controls. Medical histories, clinical data and patient interview data were collected and subjected to logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of syphilis in the study population was 3·9% (675/17 304). By univariate analysis, syphilis infection was associated with migration between cities, marital status, smoking, reproductive history, hypertension, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (P syphilis-HBV co-infection was observed in HIV-negative patients and further research revealed an association between syphilis and specific HBV serological reactivity. Syphilis was also associated with the frequency, duration and status of tobacco use. Multivariate analysis indicated that syphilis infection was independently associated with migration between cities [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·368, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·048-1·785], current smoking (aOR 1·607, 95% CI 1·177-2·195), elevated BUN (aOR 1·782, 95% CI 1·188-2·673) and some serological patterns of HBV infection. To prevent the spread of infectious diseases, inpatients and blood donors should be tested for HIV, syphilis, HBV and HCV simultaneously. PMID:26467944

  9. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L;

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  10. Gene ontology analysis of pairwise genetic associations in two genome-wide studies of sporadic ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nora

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly clear that common human diseases have a complex genetic architecture characterized by both additive and nonadditive genetic effects. The goal of the present study was to determine whether patterns of both additive and nonadditive genetic associations aggregate in specific functional groups as defined by the Gene Ontology (GO. Results We first estimated all pairwise additive and nonadditive genetic effects using the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method that makes few assumptions about the underlying genetic model. Statistical significance was evaluated using permutation testing in two genome-wide association studies of ALS. The detection data consisted of 276 subjects with ALS and 271 healthy controls while the replication data consisted of 221 subjects with ALS and 211 healthy controls. Both studies included genotypes from approximately 550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Each SNP was mapped to a gene if it was within 500 kb of the start or end. Each SNP was assigned a p-value based on its strongest joint effect with the other SNPs. We then used the Exploratory Visual Analysis (EVA method and software to assign a p-value to each gene based on the overabundance of significant SNPs at the α = 0.05 level in the gene. We also used EVA to assign p-values to each GO group based on the overabundance of significant genes at the α = 0.05 level. A GO category was determined to replicate if that category was significant at the α = 0.05 level in both studies. We found two GO categories that replicated in both studies. The first, ‘Regulation of Cellular Component Organization and Biogenesis’, a GO Biological Process, had p-values of 0.010 and 0.014 in the detection and replication studies, respectively. The second, ‘Actin Cytoskeleton’, a GO Cellular Component, had p-values of 0.040 and 0.046 in the detection and replication studies, respectively. Conclusions Pathway

  11. Capturing the spectrum of interaction effects in genetic association studies by simulated evaporative cooling network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A McKinney

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human genetic studies of several disorders suggests that interactions between alleles at multiple genes play an important role in influencing phenotypic expression. Analytical methods for identifying Mendelian disease genes are not appropriate when applied to common multigenic diseases, because such methods investigate association with the phenotype only one genetic locus at a time. New strategies are needed that can capture the spectrum of genetic effects, from Mendelian to multifactorial epistasis. Random Forests (RF and Relief-F are two powerful machine-learning methods that have been studied as filters for genetic case-control data due to their ability to account for the context of alleles at multiple genes when scoring the relevance of individual genetic variants to the phenotype. However, when variants interact strongly, the independence assumption of RF in the tree node-splitting criterion leads to diminished importance scores for relevant variants. Relief-F, on the other hand, was designed to detect strong interactions but is sensitive to large backgrounds of variants that are irrelevant to classification of the phenotype, which is an acute problem in genome-wide association studies. To overcome the weaknesses of these data mining approaches, we develop Evaporative Cooling (EC feature selection, a flexible machine learning method that can integrate multiple importance scores while removing irrelevant genetic variants. To characterize detailed interactions, we construct a genetic-association interaction network (GAIN, whose edges quantify the synergy between variants with respect to the phenotype. We use simulation analysis to show that EC is able to identify a wide range of interaction effects in genetic association data. We apply the EC filter to a smallpox vaccine cohort study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and infer a GAIN for a collection of SNPs associated with adverse events. Our results suggest an important

  12. Remote sensing and spatial analysis based study for detecting deforestation and the associated drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Abbas, Mustafa M.; Csaplovics, Elmar; Deafalla, Taisser H.

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays, remote-sensing technologies are becoming increasingly interlinked to the issue of deforestation. They offer a systematized and objective strategy to document, understand and simulate the deforestation process and its associated causes. In this context, the main goal of this study, conducted in the Blue Nile region of Sudan, in which most of the natural habitats were dramatically destroyed, was to develop spatial methodologies to assess the deforestation dynamics and its associated factors. To achieve that, optical multispectral satellite scenes (i.e., ASTER and LANDSAT) integrated with field survey in addition to multiple data sources were used for the analyses. Spatiotemporal Object Based Image Analysis (STOBIA) was applied to assess the change dynamics within the period of study. Broadly, the above mentioned analyses include; Object Based (OB) classifications, post-classification change detection, data fusion, information extraction and spatial analysis. Hierarchical multi-scale segmentation thresholds were applied and each class was delimited with semantic meanings by a set of rules associated with membership functions. Consequently, the fused multi-temporal data were introduced to create detailed objects of change classes from the input LU/LC classes. The dynamic changes were quantified and spatially located as well as the spatial and contextual relations from adjacent areas were analyzed. The main finding of the present study is that, the forest areas were drastically decreased, while the agrarian structure in conversion of forest into agricultural fields and grassland was the main force of deforestation. In contrast, the capability of the area to recover was clearly observed. The study concludes with a brief assessment of an 'oriented' framework, focused on the alarming areas where serious dynamics are located and where urgent plans and interventions are most critical, guided with potential solutions based on the identified driving forces.

  13. Rare Variants Association Analysis in Large-Scale Sequencing Studies at the Single Locus Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenbin; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Genetic association analyses of rare variants in next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies are fundamentally challenging due to the presence of a very large number of candidate variants at extremely low minor allele frequencies. Recent developments often focus on pooling multiple variants to provide association analysis at the gene instead of the locus level. Nonetheless, pinpointing individual variants is a critical goal for genomic researches as such information can facilitate the precise delineation of molecular mechanisms and functions of genetic factors on diseases. Due to the extreme rarity of mutations and high-dimensionality, significances of causal variants cannot easily stand out from those of noncausal ones. Consequently, standard false-positive control procedures, such as the Bonferroni and false discovery rate (FDR), are often impractical to apply, as a majority of the causal variants can only be identified along with a few but unknown number of noncausal variants. To provide informative analysis of individual variants in large-scale sequencing studies, we propose the Adaptive False-Negative Control (AFNC) procedure that can include a large proportion of causal variants with high confidence by introducing a novel statistical inquiry to determine those variants that can be confidently dispatched as noncausal. The AFNC provides a general framework that can accommodate for a variety of models and significance tests. The procedure is computationally efficient and can adapt to the underlying proportion of causal variants and quality of significance rankings. Extensive simulation studies across a plethora of scenarios demonstrate that the AFNC is advantageous for identifying individual rare variants, whereas the Bonferroni and FDR are exceedingly over-conservative for rare variants association studies. In the analyses of the CoLaus dataset, AFNC has identified individual variants most responsible for gene-level significances. Moreover, single-variant results

  14. Association between anxiety and hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yu Pan,1,2,* Wenpeng Cai,1,* Qi Cheng,3,* Wei Dong,1 Ting An,4 Jin Yan1 1Department of Psychology and Mental Health, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 2Department of Psychology, Peoples Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, 3Department of Child and Adolescent Behavioral Medicine, The 102 Hospital of PLA, Changzhou, 4Department of Internal Medicine, The PLA Second Artillery Force General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Epidemiological studies have repeatedly investigated the association between anxiety and hypertension. However, the results have been inconsistent. This study aimed to summarize the current evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies that evaluated this association. Methods: Seven common databases were searched for articles published up to November 2014. Cross-sectional and prospective studies that reported an association between the two conditions in adults were included. Data on prevalence, incidence, unadjusted or adjusted odds ratios or hazard ratios, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were extracted or calculated by the authors. The pooled odds ratio was calculated separately for cross-sectional and prospective studies using random-effects models. The Q test and I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. A funnel plot and modified Egger linear regression test were used to estimate publication bias. Results: The search yielded 13 cross-sectional studies (n=151,389, and the final pooled odds ratio was 1.18 (95% CI 1.02–1.37; PQ<0.001; I2=84.9%. Eight prospective studies with a total sample size of 80,146 and 2,394 hypertension case subjects, and the pooled adjusted hazard ratio was 1.55 (95% CI 1.24–1.94; PQ<0.001; I2=84.6%. The meta-regression showed that location, diagnostic criteria for anxiety, age, sex, sample size, year of publication, quality, and years of follow-up (for prospective study were not

  15. Associative Analysis in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Muntean

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the interest in technologies such as in-memory analytics and associative search has increased. This paper explores how you can use in-memory analytics and an associative model in statistics. The word “associative” puts the emphasis on understanding how datasets relate to one another. The paper presents the main characteristics of “associative” data model. Also, the paper presents how to design an associative model for labor market indicators analysis. The source is the EU Labor Force Survey. Also, this paper presents how to make associative analysis.

  16. Incidence of Cancer in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Weifeng; Ning, Yong; Xu, Xiu; Li, Menglan; Guo, Shuiming; Han, Min; Zeng, Rui; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to examine cancer incidence in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AASV) derived from population-based cohort studies by means of meta-analysis. Methods Relevant electronic databases were searched for studies characterizing the associated risk of overall malignancy in patients with AASV. Standardized incidence rates (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of association. We tested for publication bias and heterogeneity and stratified for site-specific cancers. Results Six studies (n = 2,578) were eventually identified, of which six provided the SIR for overall malignancy, five reported the SIR for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), four for leukemia, five for bladder cancer, three for lymphoma, three for liver cancer, four for lung cancer, three for kidney cancer, four for prostate cancer, four for colon cancer and four for breast cancer. Overall, the pooled SIR of cancer in AASV patients was 1.74 (95%CI = 1.37–2.21), with moderate heterogeneity among these studies (I2 = 65.8%, P = 0.012). In sub-analyses for site-specific cancers, NMSC, leukemia and bladder cancer were more frequently observed in patients with AASV with SIR of 5.18 (95%CI = 3.47–7.73), 4.89 (95%CI = 2.93–8.16) and 3.84 (95%CI = 2.72–5.42) respectively. There was no significant increase in the risk of kidney cancer (SIR = 2.12, 95%CI = 0.66–6.85), prostate cancer (SIR = 1.45, 95%CI = 0.87–2.42), colon cancer (SIR = 1.26, 95%CI = 0.70–2.27), and breast cancer (SIR = 0.95, 95%CI = 0.50–1.79). Among these site-specific cancers, only NMSC showed moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 55.8%, P = 0.06). No publication bias was found by using the Begg’s test and Egger's test. Conclusions This meta-analysis shows that AASV patients treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYC) are at increased risk of late-occurring malignancies, particularly of the NMSC, leukemia and bladder cancer. However, there is no significant

  17. Quantitative analysis of torrential rainfall associated with typhoon landfall: A case study of typhoon Haitang (2005)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caijun Yue

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of torrential rainfall associated with typhoon Haitang (2005) is carried out using a modified moist ageostrophic Q vector and data from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulation.Four major factors determining the ascending motion associated with torrential rainfall have been studied:large-scale and convective condensational heating,topographic lifting and friction.The results show that the convective condensational heating plays a major role in the torrential rainfall process,and the large-scale condensational heating is secondary before the landfall of typhoon Haitang,and vice versa after the landfall.The topographic lifting affects the formation of rainfall,whereas the topographic friction has important impacts on torrential rainfall after the landfall.The rainfall amounts forced by the topographic friction and lifting have similar horizontal distributions,but the magnitudes of the former are 2-3 times larger than those of the latter.The rainfall amounts forced by topography (lifting and friction) and modified moist ageostrophic Q vector have different horizontal distributions,and the magnitudes of the former are 2-5 times larger than those of the latter.Synthetic analysis shows that the typhoon rainfall may be motivated by modified moist ageostrophic Q vector and enhanced further by the topographic effects.

  18. Analysis of Case-Control Association Studies: SNPs, Imputation and Haplotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2009-11-01

    Although prospective logistic regression is the standard method of analysis for case-control data, it has been recently noted that in genetic epidemiologic studies one can use the "retrospective" likelihood to gain major power by incorporating various population genetics model assumptions such as Hardy-Weinberg-Equilibrium (HWE), gene-gene and gene-environment independence. In this article we review these modern methods and contrast them with the more classical approaches through two types of applications (i) association tests for typed and untyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (ii) estimation of haplotype effects and haplotype-environment interactions in the presence of haplotype-phase ambiguity. We provide novel insights to existing methods by construction of various score-tests and pseudo-likelihoods. In addition, we describe a novel two-stage method for analysis of untyped SNPs that can use any flexible external algorithm for genotype imputation followed by a powerful association test based on the retrospective likelihood. We illustrate applications of the methods using simulated and real data. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2009.

  19. Perinatal morbidity and mortality associated with chlamydial infection: a meta-analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Penna Maisonnette de Attayde Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of Chlamydia trachomatis infection during pregnancy on perinatal morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Systematic review and meta-analysis in an electronic database and manual, combining high sensitivity specific descriptors seeking to answer the research objective. The articles considered to be of high methodological quality (score above 6 on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale were assessed by meta-analysis. RESULTS: Summary estimates of 12 studies were calculated by means of Mantel-Haenszel test with 95% confidence interval. It was observed that Chlamydia infection during pregnancy increased risk of preterm labor (relative risk (RR = 1.35 [1.11, 1.63], low birth weight (RR = 1.52 [1.24, 1.87] and perinatal mortality (RR = 1.84 [1.15, 2.94]. No evidence of increased risk was associated with Chlamydia infection in regard to premature rupture of membranes (RR = 1.13 [0.95, 1.34], abortion and postpartum endometritis (RR = 1.20 [0.65, 2.20] and 0.89 [0.49, 1.61] respectively. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis and treatment of Chlamydia cervicitis during pregnancy can reduce perinatal morbidity and mortality associated with this infection. However, clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  20. Association of clusterin (CLU) variants and exfoliation syndrome: An analysis in two Caucasian studies and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bao J; Pasquale, Louis R; Kang, Jae H; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Haines, Jonathan L; Wiggs, Janey L

    2015-10-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an important risk factor for glaucoma (XFG) worldwide. LOXL1 variants are highly associated with XFS in most populations; however, the high frequency of risk alleles in normal individuals and the reversal of risk alleles in different ethnic populations suggest that other factors contribute to XFS pathogenesis. Clusterin (CLU) is an extracellular matrix chaperone that prevents protein aggregation and is highly expressed in ocular tissues affected by XFS. Studies examining common CLU variants for association with XFS have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CLU variants for association with XFS in two independent datasets from the United States (222 cases and 344 controls) and Israel (92 cases and 102 controls). Seven tag SNPs that captured >95% of alleles at r(2) greater than 0.8 across the CLU genomic region were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Genotypes for an additional SNP, rs2279590, were imputed using phased haplotypes of HapMap reference CEU samples. Of the 8 CLU SNPs selected for the study, none were significantly associated with XFS in either case-control group (age and sex adjusted P > 0.14 and 0.36, respectively, in the US and Israeli datasets), or when they were meta-analyzed together (age and sex adjusted P > 0.13). Haplotype analysis using all 8 SNPs or only the promoter region SNPs also did not show significant associations of CLU with XFS in the combined US and Israeli dataset (P > 0.28). Meta-analysis of the data from this study and previous studies in Caucasian populations (1184 cases and 978 controls) resulted in statistically significant association of rs2279590 with XFS (summary OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03-1.33, P = 0.01). Significant association between rs2279590 and XFS was also found in Indian populations (summary OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.61-0.96; P = 0.02); however, significant heterogeneity between the Caucasian and Indian populations possibly due to reversal of the risk allele

  1. Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Donghui; Duell, Eric J.; Yu, Kai; Risch, Harvey A.; Olson, Sara H.; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M.; Jiao, Li; Dong, Xiaoqun; Wheeler, Bill; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H Bas; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron

    2012-01-01

    Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic...

  2. Smokeless tobacco-associated cancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis of Indian studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dhirendra N; Abdulkader, Rizwan Suliankatchi; Gupta, Prakash C

    2016-03-15

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that there is sufficient evidence in humans for the carcinogenicity of smokeless tobacco (SLT) for mouth, oesophagus and pancreas, based largely on Western studies. We wanted to confirm this by conducting a systematic review using Indian studies because India faces the biggest brunt of SLT-attributable health effects. A systematic search was conducted for published and unpublished studies. Two authors independently reviewed the studies and extracted data. Summary odds ratio (OR) for each cancer type was calculated using fixed and random effects model. The population attributable fraction (PAF) method was used to calculate the attributable burden of incident cases. A significant association was found for oral-5.55 (5.07, 6.07), pharyngeal-2.69 (2.28, 3.17), laryngeal-2.84 (2.18, 3.70), oesophageal-3.17 (2.76, 3.63) and stomach-1.26 (1.00, 1.60) cancers. But in random effects model, laryngeal-1.79 (0.70, 4.54) and stomach-1.31 (0.92, 1.87) cancers became non-significantly associated. Gender-wise analysis revealed that women had a higher risk (OR = 12.0 vs. 5.16) of oral but a lower risk (1.9 vs. 4.5) of oesophageal cancer compared with men. For oral cancer, studies that adjusted for smoking, alcohol and other factors reported a significantly lower OR compared with studies that adjusted for smoking only or smoking and alcohol only (3.9 vs. 8.4). The annual number of attributable cases was calculated as 49,192 (PAF = 60%) for mouth, 14,747 (51%) for pharynx, 11,825 (40%) for larynx, 14,780 (35%) for oesophagus and 3,101 (8%) for stomach. PMID:26443187

  3. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R;

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS inc...

  4. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes : A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Heikkilae, Paeivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; Van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O'Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M. S.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Doerk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menendez Rodriguez, Primitiva; Zamora, Pilar; Bentez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Bruening, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yang, Show-Lin; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collee, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkaes, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paeivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Orsted, David Dynnes; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P. E. A.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients f

  5. SNP-based pathway enrichment analysis for genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkin Steven G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently we have witnessed a surge of interest in using genome-wide association studies (GWAS to discover the genetic basis of complex diseases. Many genetic variations, mostly in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, have been identified in a wide spectrum of diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and psychiatric diseases. A common theme arising from these studies is that the genetic variations discovered by GWAS can only explain a small fraction of the genetic risks associated with the complex diseases. New strategies and statistical approaches are needed to address this lack of explanation. One such approach is the pathway analysis, which considers the genetic variations underlying a biological pathway, rather than separately as in the traditional GWAS studies. A critical challenge in the pathway analysis is how to combine evidences of association over multiple SNPs within a gene and multiple genes within a pathway. Most current methods choose the most significant SNP from each gene as a representative, ignoring the joint action of multiple SNPs within a gene. This approach leads to preferential identification of genes with a greater number of SNPs. Results We describe a SNP-based pathway enrichment method for GWAS studies. The method consists of the following two main steps: 1 for a given pathway, using an adaptive truncated product statistic to identify all representative (potentially more than one SNPs of each gene, calculating the average number of representative SNPs for the genes, then re-selecting the representative SNPs of genes in the pathway based on this number; and 2 ranking all selected SNPs by the significance of their statistical association with a trait of interest, and testing if the set of SNPs from a particular pathway is significantly enriched with high ranks using a weighted Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We applied our method to two large genetically distinct GWAS data sets of schizophrenia, one

  6. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The epilepsies are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. Despite strong evidence for heritability, genome-wide association studies have had little success in identification of risk loci associated with epilepsy, probably because of relatively small sample sizes and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilep...

  7. Joint Analysis of Functional Genomic Data and Genome-wide Association Studies of 18 Human Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Pickrell, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    Annotations of gene structures and regulatory elements can inform genome-wide association studies (GWASs). However, choosing the relevant annotations for interpreting an association study of a given trait remains challenging. I describe a statistical model that uses association statistics computed across the genome to identify classes of genomic elements that are enriched with or depleted of loci influencing a trait. The model naturally incorporates multiple types of annotations. I applied th...

  8. Powerful SNP-Set Analysis for Case-Control Genome-wide Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Michael C.; Kraft, Peter; Epstein, Michael P.; Deanne M Taylor; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Lin, Xihong

    2010-01-01

    GWAS have emerged as popular tools for identifying genetic variants that are associated with disease risk. Standard analysis of a case-control GWAS involves assessing the association between each individual genotyped SNP and disease risk. However, this approach suffers from limited reproducibility and difficulties in detecting multi-SNP and epistatic effects. As an alternative analytical strategy, we propose grouping SNPs together into SNP sets on the basis of proximity to genomic features su...

  9. A mega-analysis of genome-wide association studies for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripke, Stephan; Wray, Naomi R; Lewis, Cathryn M; Hamilton, Steven P; Weissman, Myrna M; Breen, Gerome; Byrne, Enda M; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cichon, Sven; Heath, Andrew C; Holsboer, Florian; Lucae, Susanne; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; McGuffin, Peter; Muglia, Pierandrea; Noethen, Markus M; Penninx, Brenda P; Pergadia, Michele L; Potash, James B; Rietschel, Marcella; Lin, Danyu; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Shi, Jianxin; Steinberg, Stacy; Grabe, Hans J; Lichtenstein, Paul; Magnusson, Patrik; Perlis, Roy H; Preisig, Martin; Smoller, Jordan W; Stefansson, Kari; Uher, Rudolf; Kutalik, Zoltan; Tansey, Katherine E; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Barnes, Michael R; Bettecken, Thomas; Binder, Elisabeth B; Breuer, René; Castro, Victor M; Churchill, Susanne E; Coryell, William H; Craddock, Nick; Craig, Ian W; Czamara, Darina; De Geus, Eco J; Degenhardt, Franziska; Farmer, Anne E; Fava, Maurizio; Frank, Josef; Gainer, Vivian S; Gallagher, Patience J; Gordon, Scott D; Goryachev, Sergey; Gross, Magdalena; Guipponi, Michel; Henders, Anjali K; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B; Hoefels, Susanne; Hoogendijk, Witte; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Iosifescu, Dan V; Ising, Marcus; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Jung-Ying, Tzeng; Knowles, James A; Kohane, Isaac S; Kohli, Martin A; Korszun, Ania; Landen, Mikael; Lawson, William B; Lewis, Glyn; Macintyre, Donald; Maier, Wolfgang; Mattheisen, Manuel; McGrath, Patrick J; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Alan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Middleton, Lefkos; Montgomery, Grant M; Murphy, Shawn N; Nauck, Matthias; Nolen, Willem A; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donovan, Michael; Oskarsson, Högni; Pedersen, Nancy; Scheftner, William A; Schulz, Andrea; Schulze, Thomas G; Shyn, Stanley I; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Slager, Susan L; Smit, Johannes H; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steffens, Michael; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Völzke, Henry; Weilburg, Jeffrey B; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zitman, Frans G; Neale, Benjamin; Daly, Mark; Levinson, Douglas F; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2013-04-01

    Prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of major depressive disorder (MDD) have met with limited success. We sought to increase statistical power to detect disease loci by conducting a GWAS mega-analysis for MDD. In the MDD discovery phase, we analyzed more than 1.2 million autosomal and X chromosome single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 759 independent and unrelated subjects of recent European ancestry (9240 MDD cases and 9519 controls). In the MDD replication phase, we evaluated 554 SNPs in independent samples (6783 MDD cases and 50 695 controls). We also conducted a cross-disorder meta-analysis using 819 autosomal SNPs with Pgenetic effects typical for complex traits. Therefore, we were unable to identify robust and replicable findings. We discuss what this means for genetic research for MDD. The 3p21.1 MDD-BIP finding should be interpreted with caution as the most significant SNP did not replicate in MDD samples, and genotyping in independent samples will be needed to resolve its status. PMID:22472876

  10. Associative Analysis in Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Muntean

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, the interest in technologies such as in-memory analytics and associative search has increased. This paper explores how you can use in-memory analytics and an associative model in statistics. The word “associative” puts the emphasis on understanding how datasets relate to one another. The paper presents the main characteristics of “associative” data model. Also, the paper presents how to design an associative model for labor market indicators analysis. The source is the EU L...

  11. Retrospective analysis of main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human complex traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    paper introduces a retrospective polytomous logistic regression model to measure both the main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human discrete and continuous complex traits. In this model, combinations of genotypes at two interacting loci or of environmental exposure and...... logistic regression model can be used as a convenient tool for assessing both main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human multifactorial diseases involving genetic and non-genetic factors as well as categorical or continuous traits....

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for personality

    OpenAIRE

    Moor, M.H.M.; Costa, P. T.; Terracciano, A; Krueger, R.F.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Toshiko, T.; Penninx, B W J H; Esko, T.; Madden, P.A.F.; Derringer, J; Amin, N; Willemsen, G.; Hottenga, J-J; Distel, M A; Uda, M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Personality can be thought of as a set of characteristics that influence people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviour across a variety of settings. Variation in personality is predictive of many outcomes in life, including mental health. Here we report on a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data for personality in ten discovery samples (17 375 adults) and five in-silico replication samples (3 294 adults). All participants were of European ancestry. Personality s...

  13. Simultaneous analysis of all SNPs in genome-wide and re-sequencing association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive J Hoggart

    Full Text Available Testing one SNP at a time does not fully realise the potential of genome-wide association studies to identify multiple causal variants, which is a plausible scenario for many complex diseases. We show that simultaneous analysis of the entire set of SNPs from a genome-wide study to identify the subset that best predicts disease outcome is now feasible, thanks to developments in stochastic search methods. We used a Bayesian-inspired penalised maximum likelihood approach in which every SNP can be considered for additive, dominant, and recessive contributions to disease risk. Posterior mode estimates were obtained for regression coefficients that were each assigned a prior with a sharp mode at zero. A non-zero coefficient estimate was interpreted as corresponding to a significant SNP. We investigated two prior distributions and show that the normal-exponential-gamma prior leads to improved SNP selection in comparison with single-SNP tests. We also derived an explicit approximation for type-I error that avoids the need to use permutation procedures. As well as genome-wide analyses, our method is well-suited to fine mapping with very dense SNP sets obtained from re-sequencing and/or imputation. It can accommodate quantitative as well as case-control phenotypes, covariate adjustment, and can be extended to search for interactions. Here, we demonstrate the power and empirical type-I error of our approach using simulated case-control data sets of up to 500 K SNPs, a real genome-wide data set of 300 K SNPs, and a sequence-based dataset, each of which can be analysed in a few hours on a desktop workstation.

  14. An Empirical Study on User-oriented Association Analysis of Library Classification Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Tieh Pu

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Library classification schemes are mostly organized based on disciplines with a hierarchical structure. From the user point of view, some highly related yet non-hierarchical classes may not be easy to perceive in these schemes. This paper is to discover hidden associations between classes by analyzing users’ usage of library collections. The proposed approach employs collaborative filtering techniques to discover associated classes based on the circulation patterns of similar users. Many associated classes scattered across different subject hierarchies could be discovered from the circulation patterns of similar users. The obtained association norms between classes were found to be useful in understanding users' subject preferences for a given class. Classification schemes can, therefore, be made more adaptable to changes of users and the uses of different library collections. There are implications for applications in information organization and retrieval as well. For example, catalogers could refer to the ranked associated classes when they perform multi-classification, and users could also browse the associated classes for related subjects in an enhanced OPAC system. In future research, more empirical studies will be needed to validate the findings, and methods for obtaining user-oriented associations can still be improved.[Article content in Chinese

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies ten loci influencing allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Matheson, Melanie C; Pers, Tune Hannes;

    2013-01-01

    top SNP at each of 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association with allergic sensitization from three to ten, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2...... and HLA-B. All the top SNPs were associated with allergic symptoms in an independent study. Risk-associated variants at these ten loci were estimated to account for at least 25% of allergic sensitization and allergic rhinitis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations may...

  16. On the analysis of genome-wide association studies in family-based designs: a universal, robust analysis approach and an application to four genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Won

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For genome-wide association studies in family-based designs, we propose a new, universally applicable approach. The new test statistic exploits all available information about the association, while, by virtue of its design, it maintains the same robustness against population admixture as traditional family-based approaches that are based exclusively on the within-family information. The approach is suitable for the analysis of almost any trait type, e.g. binary, continuous, time-to-onset, multivariate, etc., and combinations of those. We use simulation studies to verify all theoretically derived properties of the approach, estimate its power, and compare it with other standard approaches. We illustrate the practical implications of the new analysis method by an application to a lung-function phenotype, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 in 4 genome-wide association studies.

  17. The association between maternal dietary micronutrient intake and neonatal anthropometry - secondary analysis from the ROLO study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horan, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are necessary for fetal growth. However increasingly pregnant women are nutritionally replete and little is known about the effect of maternal micronutrient intakes on fetal adiposity in mothers with increased BMI. The aim of this study was to examine the association of maternal dietary micronutrient intake with neonatal size and adiposity in a cohort at risk of macrosomia.

  18. Genome-wide association study of swine farrowing traits. Part II: Bayesian analysis of marker data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reproductive efficiency has a great impact on the economic success of pork production. Number born alive (NBA) and average piglet birth weight (ABW) contribute greatly to reproductive efficiency. To better understand the underlying genetics of birth traits, a genome wide association study (GWAS) w...

  19. Association of CD247 polymorphisms with rheumatoid arthritis: a replication study and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teruel

    Full Text Available Given the role of CD247 in the response of the T cells, its entailment in autoimmune diseases and in order to better clarify the role of this gene in RA susceptibility, we aimed to analyze CD247 gene variants previously associated with other autoimmune diseases (rs1052237, rs2056626 and rs864537 in a large independent European Caucasian population. However, no evidence of association was found for the analyzed CD247 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with RA and with the presence/absence of anti-cyclic citrullinated polypeptide. We performed a meta-analysis including previously published GWAS data from the rs864537 variant, revealing an overall genome-wide significant association between this CD247 SNP and RA with anti-CCP (OR = 0.90, CI 95% = 0.87-0.93, Poverall = 2.1×10(-10. Our results show for first time a GWAS-level association between this CD247 polymorphism and RA risk.

  20. Evidence of association of APOE with age-related macular degeneration: a pooled analysis of 15 studies.

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Gareth J; Patterson, Chris C; Chakravarthy, Usha; Dasari, Shilpa; Klaver, Caroline C.; Vingerling, Johannes R; Ho, Lintje; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Young, Ian S.; Seland, Johan H.; Rahu, Mati; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of incurable visual impairment in high-income countries. Previous studies report inconsistent associations between AMD and apolipoprotein E (APOE), a lipid transport protein involved in low-density cholesterol modulation. Potential interaction between APOE and sex, and smoking status has been reported. We present a pooled analysis (n = 21,160) demonstrating associations between late AMD and APOε4 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.72 per haplo...

  1. Genome-wide association study and biological pathway analysis for response to Eimeria maxima in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamzic, Edin; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Hérault, Frédéric;

    2015-01-01

    costs for development of efficient vaccines, respectively. Therefore, the present control programs must be expanded with complementary approaches such as the use of genetics for improvement of the host’s response to Eimeria infections. Recently, we have performed a large-scale challenge study on Cobb500...... broilers using E. maxima where we investigated variability among animals in response to the challenge. Taking advantage of size and structure of the large-scale challenge study, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with the aim to identify genomic regions underlying variability of the...

  2. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 10 loci influencing allergic sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A; Warrington, Nicole M; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H; Tiesler, Carla M T; Duffy, David L; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy L; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Husemoen, Lise L; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE (allergic sensitization) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the top SNP from 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association to allergic sensitization from three to 10, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2 and HLA-B. All the top-SNPs were associated with allergic symptoms in an independent study. Risk variants at these 10 loci were estimated to account for at least 25% of allergic sensitization and allergic rhinitis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations may provide novel insight into the etiology of allergic disease. PMID:23817571

  3. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springelkamp, Henriet; Hoehn, Rene; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Bailey, Jessica N. Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E.; Montgomery, GrantW.; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Iglesias, Adriana I.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hauser, Michael A.; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G.; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H.; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J.; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M. E.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Spector, Timothy D.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Lemij, Hans G.; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Jonas, Jost B.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Young, Terri L.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R.; Hewitt, Alex W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important dise

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Springelkamp (Henriët); R. Höhn (René); A. Mishra (Aniket); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); C.C. Khor; S.J. Loomis (Stephanie J.); J.N.C. Bailey (Jessica N. Cooke); J. Gibson (Jane); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); X. Luo (Xiaoyan); W.D. Ramdas (Wishal); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); M.E. Nongpiur (Monisha E.); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); L. Xu (Liang); J.E. Mountain (Jenny E.); P. Gharahkhani (Puya); Y. Lu (Yi); N. Amin (Najaf); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); K.S. Sim; E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); O. Iglesias (Oriol); V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); M.A. Hauser (Michael); S.-C. Loon (Seng-Chee); D.D.G. Despriet (Dominique); A. Nag (Abhishek); C. Venturini (Cristina); P.G. Sanfilippo (Paul G.); A. Schillert (Arne); J.H. Kang (Jae H.); J. Landers (John); F. Jonasson (Fridbert); A.J. Cree (Angela); L.M.E. van Koolwijk (Leonieke); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); V. Jonsson (Vesteinn); G. Menon (Geeta); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); E. Rochtchina (Elena); J. Attia (John); R. Scott (Rodney); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); P.N. Baird (Paul); J. Xie (Jing); M. Inouye (Michael); A.C. Viswanathan (Ananth); X. Sim (Xueling); R.N. Weinreb (Robert N.); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Ennis (Sarah); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); K.P. Burdon (Kathryn); R.R. Allingham (R Rand); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); D.L. Budenz (Donald L.); W.G. Christen (William G.); J. Fingert (John); D.S. Friedman (David); D. Gaasterland (Douglas); T. Gaasterland (Terry); J.L. Haines (Jonathan); J.H. Kang; P. Kraft (Peter); R.K. Lee (Richard K.); P.A. Lichter (Paul A.); Y. Liu (Yutao); S.E. Moroi (Sayoko); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); A. Realini (Anthony); J.E. Richards (Julia); J.S. Schuman (Joel S.); W.K. Scott (William); K. Singh (Kuldev); A.J. Sit (Arthur J.); D. Vollrath (Douglas); G. Wollstein (Gadi); D.J. Zack (Donald); K. Zhang (Kang); I. Barroso (Inês); K.L. Blackwell (Kimberly); E. Bramon (Elvira); M.A. Brown (Matthew); J.P. Casas (Juan); A. Corvin (Aiden); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Duncanson (Audrey); J.A. Jankowski (Janusz Antoni); H.S. Markus (Hugh); J. Mathew (Joseph); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); R. Plomin (Robert); A. Rautanen (Anna); S.J. Sawcer (Stephen); R.C. Trembath (Richard); A.C. Viswanathan (Ananth C.); N.W. Wood (Nicholas); C.C.A. Spencer (Chris C.); G. Band (Gavin); C. Bellenguez (Céline); C. Freeman (Colin); F.A. Hellenthal; E. Giannoulatou (Eleni); M. Pirinen (Matti); R. Pearson (Richard); A. Strange (Amy); Z. Su (Zhan); D. Vukcevic (Damjan); P. Donnelly (Peter); C. Langford (Cordelia); S.E. Hunt (Sarah); T. Edkins (Ted); R. Gwilliam (Rhian); H. Blackburn (Hannah); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S. Dronov (Serge); M. Gillman (Matthew); E. Gray (Emma); N. Hammond (Naomi); A. Jayakumar (Alagurevathi); O.T. McCann (Owen); J. Liddle (Jennifer); S.C. Potter (Simon); R. Ravindrarajah (Radhi); M. Ricketts (Michelle); P. Waller (Patrick); P. Weston (Paul); S. Widaa (Sara); P. Whittaker (Pamela); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); R.C.W. Wolfs (Roger); H.G. Lemij (Hans); E.S. Tai (Shyong); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); J.B. Jonas (Jost B.); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); T. Aung (Tin); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); J.E. Craig (Jamie); S. MacGregor (Stuart); D.A. Mackey (David); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); T.L. Young (Terri); J.L. Wiggs (Janey); A.F.H. Pfeiffer (Andreas); T.Y. Wong (Tien); L.R. Pasquale (Louis); A.W. Hewit (Alex); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); S.F. Janssen (Sarah)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractGlaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an im

  5. PERSPECTIVES OF FACTORIAL ANALYSIS IN STUDYING ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN IMMUNE SYSTEM PARAMETERS AND CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS IN GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Solovyeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  When studying functional features of immune system, a lot of quantitative and functional parameters are determined. A multifactorial analysis allows of detecting interdependent immunological parameters and defining them as significant factors. In present study, four factors are revealed, which are associated with certain clinical characteristics of gastric cancer (tumor invasion depth, lymph node status and distant metastases, tumor stage, histological type. The data obtained are of interest, with regard of systemic approach to functional studies of immune functions.

  6. Genome Wide Association Study and Follow-Up Analysis of Adiposity Traits in Hispanic-Americans: the IRAS Family Study

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Jill M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Talbert, Matthew E.; Wing, Maria R; Haritunians, Talin; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Hanley, Anthony J. G.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Taylor, Kent D.; Haffner, Steven M.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Donald W Bowden; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated candidate genomic regions associated with computed tomography (CT)-derived measures of adiposity in Hispanic from the IRAS Family Study. In 1190 Hispanic individuals from 92 families from the San Luis Valley, CO and San Antonio, TX, we measured CT-derived visceral adipose tissue (VAT); subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT); and visceral: subcutaneous ratio (VSR). A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was completed using the Illumina HumanHap 300 BeadChip (~317K single nucleotide ...

  7. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Berndt, Sonja I.; Benlloch, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Thun, Michael J.; Gaziano, Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Siddiq, Afshan; Travis, Ruth C.; Cox, David G.; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J.; Andriole, Gerald; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B.; Schleutker, Johanna; Auvinen, Anssi; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Weischer, Maren; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Sorensen, Karina D.; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Gardiner, Robert A.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Dörk, Thilo; Brenner, Hermann; Habuchi, Tomonori; Ingles, Sue; John, Esther M.; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Kaneva, Radka; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Park, Jong Y.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Saunders, Edward; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Guy, Michelle; Govindasami, Koveela; O'Brien, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Hall, Amanda L.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morrison, Jonathan; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Dudderidge, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S.; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas; Virtamo, Jarmo; Le Marchand, Loic; Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lindstrom, Sara; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan; Yeager, Meredith; Cox, Angela; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; Aly, Markus; Isaacs, William; Adolfsson, Jan; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Wahlfors, Tiina; Taari, Kimmo; Kujala, Paula; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Røder, M. Andreas; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Bojesen, Stig E.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika M.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Rinckleb, Antje; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Meyer, Andreas; Serth, Jürgen; Marthick, James R.; Patterson, Briony; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Spurdle, Amanda; Lose, Felicity; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Joshi, Amit D.; Shahabi, Ahva; Pinto, Pedro; Santos, Joana; Ray, Ana; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Stephenson, Robert A.; Teerlink, Craig; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Cao, Guang-Wen; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Chanock, Stephen; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS including 5953 cases of aggressive PrCa and 11 463 controls (men without PrCa). We computed association tests for approximately 2.6 million SNPs and followed up the most significant SNPs by genotyping 49 121 samples in 29 studies through the international PRACTICAL and BPC3 consortia. We not only confirmed the association of a PrCa susceptibility locus, rs11672691 on chromosome 19, but also showed an association with aggressive PrCa [odds ratio = 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.21), P = 1.4 × 10−8]. This report describes a genetic variant which is associated with aggressive PrCa, which is a type of PrCa associated with a poorer prognosis. PMID:23065704

  8. THE COMPLEX ANALYSIS METHOD OF SEMANTIC ASSOCIATIONS IN STUDYING THE STUDENTS’ CREATIVE ETHOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Starikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates the sociological research findings concerning the students’ ideas of creativity based on the questionnaires and testing of the students of the natural science, humanities and technical profiles at Siberian Federal University over the period of 2007-2011.The author suggests a new method of semantic association analysis in order to identify the latent groups of notions related to the concept of creativity. The range of students’ common opinions demonstrate the obvious trend for humanizing the idea of creativity, considering  it as the perfect mode of human existence, which coincide with the ideas of K. Rogers, A. Maslow and other scholars. Today’s students associate creativity primarily with pleasure, self-development, self-expression, inspiration, improvisation, spontaneity; and the resulting semantic complex incorporates such characteristics of creative work as goodness, abundance of energy, integrity, health, freedom and independence, self-development and spirituality.The obtained data prove the importance of the inspiration experience in creative pedagogy; the research outcomes along with the continuing monitoring of students attitude to creativity development can optimize the learning process. The author emphasizes the necessity of introducing some special courses, based on the integral approach (including social, philosophical, psychological, psycho-social and technical aspects, and aimed at developing students’ creative competence. 

  9. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 39 studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The associations between vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk were comprehensively investigated to clarify issues that remain controversial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An electronic search was conducted of several databases, including PubMed, the Cochrane library, Web of Science, EMBASE, CBM and CNKI, for papers that describe the association between Fok1, poly-A repeat, Bsm1, Taq1 or Apa1 polymorphisms of the VDR gene and breast cancer risk. Summary odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated based on a fixed-effect model (FEM or random-effect model (REM, depending on the absence or presence of significant heterogeneity. A total of 39 studies met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of high-quality studies showed that the Fok1 polymorphism of the VDR gene was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (ff vs. Ff+FF, OR: 1.09, 95%CI: 1.02 to 1.16, p = 0.007. No significant associations were observed between the other polymorphisms and breast cancer risk. No positive results were detected by pooling the results of all relevant studies. CONCLUSION: A meta-analysis of high-quality studies demonstrated that the Fok1 polymorphism of the VDR gene was closely associated with breast cancer risk.

  10. Kernel Machine SNP-set Analysis for Censored Survival Outcomes in Genome-wide Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xinyi; Cai, Tianxi; Wu, Michael C.; ZHOU, Qian; Liu, Geoffrey; Christiani, David C.; Lin, Xihong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a powerful test for identifying SNP-sets that are predictive of survival with data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We first group typed SNPs into SNP-sets based on genomic features and then apply a score test to assess the overall effect of each SNP-set on the survival outcome through a kernel machine Cox regression framework. This approach uses genetic information from all SNPs in the SNP-set simultaneously and accounts for linkage disequilibrium (LD), ...

  11. Genome-wide association study of swine farrowing traits. Part II: Bayesian analysis of marker data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J F; Rempel, L A; Snelling, W M; Wiedmann, R T; Nonneman, D J; Rohrer, G A

    2012-10-01

    Reproductive efficiency has a great impact on the economic success of pork (sus scrofa) production. Number born alive (NBA) and average piglet birth weight (ABW) contribute greatly to reproductive efficiency. To better understand the underlying genetics of birth traits, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was undertaken. Samples of DNA were collected and tested using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip from 1,152 first parity gilts. Traits included total number born (TNB), NBA, number born dead (NBD), number stillborn (NSB), number of mummies (MUM), total litter birth weight (LBW), and ABW. A total of 41,151 SNP were tested using a Bayesian approach. Beginning with the first 5 SNP on SSC1 and ending with the last 5 SNP on the SSCX, SNP were assigned to groups of 5 consecutive SNP by chromosome-position order and analyzed again using a Bayesian approach. From that analysis, 5-SNP groups were selected having no overlap with another 5-SNP groups and no overlap across chromosomes. These selected 5-SNP non-overlapping groups were defined as QTL. Of the available 8,814 QTL, 124 were found to be statistically significant (P false positives. Eleven QTL were found for TNB, 3 on SSC1, 3 on SSC4, 1 on SSC13, 1 on SSC14, 2 on SSC15, and 1 on SSC17. Statistical testing for NBA identified 14 QTL, 4 on SSC1, 1 on SSC4, 1 on SSC6, 1 on SSC10, 1on SSC13, 3 on SSC15, and 3 on SSC17. A single NBD QTL was found on SSC11. No QTL were identified for NSB or MUM. Thirty-three QTL were found for LBW, 3 on SSC1, 1 on SSC2, 1 on SSC3, 5 on SSC4, 2 on SSC5, 5 on SSC6, 3 on SSC7, 2 on SSC9, 1 on SSC10, 2 on SSC14, 6 on SSC15, and 2 on SSC17. A total of 65 QTL were found for ABW, 9 on SSC1, 3 on SSC2, 9 on SSC5, 5 on SSC6, 1 on SSC7, 2 on SSC8, 2 on SSC9, 3 on SSC10, 1 on SSC11, 3 on SSC12, 2 on SSC13, 8 on SSC14, 8 on SSC15, 1 on SSC17, and 8 on SSC18. Several candidate genes have been identified that overlap QTL locations among TNB, NBA, NBD, and ABW. These QTL when combined with

  12. Dental arch changes associated with rapid maxillary expansion: A retrospective model analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor M D′Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transverse deficiency of the maxilla is a common clinical problem in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Transverse maxillary deficiency, isolated or associated with other dentofacial deformities, results in esthetic and functional impairment giving rise to several clinical manifestations such as asymmetrical facial growth, positional and functional mandibular deviations, altered dentofacial esthetics, adverse periodontal responses, unstable dental tipping, and other functional problems. Orthopedic maxillary expansion is the preferred treatment approach to increase the maxillary transverse dimension in young patients by splitting of the mid palatal suture. This orthopedic procedure has lately been subject of renewed interest in orthodontic treatment mechanics because of its potential for increasing arch perimeter to alleviate crowding in the maxillary arch without adversely affecting facial profile. Hence, the present investigation was conducted to establish a correlation between transverse expansion and changes in the arch perimeter, arch width and arch length. Methods: For this purpose, 10 subjects (five males, five females were selected who had been treated by rapid maxillary expansion (RME using hyrax rapid palatal expander followed by fixed mechanotherapy (PEA. Pretreatment (T1, postexpansion (T2, and posttreatment (T3 dental models were compared for dental changes brought about by RME treatment and its stability at the end of fixed mechanotherapy. After model measurements were made, the changes between T1-T2, T2-T3 and T1-T3 were determined for each patient. The mean difference between T1-T2, T2-T3 and T1-T3 were compared to assess the effects of RME on dental arch measurements. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation and are compared by repeated measures analysis of variance followed by a post-hoc test. Arch perimeter changes are correlated with changes in arch widths at the canine, premolar and molar

  13. Elevated alanine aminotransferase is strongly associated with incident metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS is rapidly increasing worldwide and associated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity. However, the impact of ALT activity on MetS incidence is inconsistent in published literature. We therefore estimated the association between elevated ALT activity and incident MetS through a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All published prospective cohort studies on the association between elevated ALT activity and incident MetS were retrieved from Pubmed, Embase, and the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI. In all, seven prospective cohort studies, with 31545 participants and 2873 cases of incident MetS were recruited. If there was insignificant heterogeneity (P-value>0.05 and I(2<50%, the fixed-effect model was used to calculate the pooled relative risks (RRs of incident MetS induced by raised ALT. Otherwise, the random-effect model was used. The calculated RR was 1.81 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-2.14 when the incidence of MetS was compared between the highest versus the lowest classification of ALT activities. The pooled RR was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.11-1.16 in dose-response analysis with 5 units per liter (U/l of ALT increment. Subgroup analysis suggested that gender disparity might be the main origin of heterogeneity in overall analysis (P = 0.007 between RRs of gender-specific subgroups evaluated with 5 U/l increments of ALT. Women had a higher dose-response risk of MetS incidence (1.38, 95% CI: 1.20-1.55 than men. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis confirmed the stability of results. No publication bias was found in our meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Current evidence from prospective studies supports the association between ALT elevation and increasing MetS incidence. This association is closer and more consistent in female population. Further studies are needed to confirm this association and to investigate the potential mechanism of

  14. Red and processed meat intake is associated with higher gastric cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcheng Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Red and processed meat was concluded as a limited-suggestive risk factor of gastric cancer by the World Cancer Research Fund. However, recent epidemiological studies have yielded inconclusive results. METHODS: We searched Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to April 2013 for both cohort and case-control studies which assessed the association between red and/or processed meat intake and gastric cancer risk. Study-specific relative risk estimates were polled by random-effect or fixed-effect models. RESULTS: Twelve cohort and thirty case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Significant associations were found between both red (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.22-1.73 and processed (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.26-1.65 meat intake and gastric cancer risk generally. Positive findings were also existed in the items of beef (RR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.57, bacon (RR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.17-1.61, ham (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.00-2.06, and sausage (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.16-1.52. When conducted by study design, the association was significant in case-control studies (RR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.33-1.99 but not in cohort studies (RR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.90-1.17 for red meat. Increased relative risks were seen in high-quality, adenocarcinoma, cardia and European-population studies for red meat. And most subgroup analysis confirmed the significant association between processed meat intake and gastric cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that consumption of red and/or processed meat contributes to increased gastric cancer risk. However, further investigation is needed to confirm the association, especially for red meat.

  15. Goldsurfer2 (Gs2: A comprehensive tool for the analysis and visualization of genome wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Michael R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association (GWA studies are now being widely undertaken aiming to find the link between genetic variations and common diseases. Ideally, a well-powered GWA study will involve the measurement of hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in thousands of individuals. The sheer volume of data generated by these experiments creates very high analytical demands. There are a number of important steps during the analysis of such data, many of which may present severe bottlenecks. The data need to be imported and reviewed to perform initial quality control (QC before proceeding to association testing. Evaluation of results may involve further statistical analysis, such as permutation testing, or further QC of associated markers, for example, reviewing raw genotyping intensities. Finally significant associations need to be prioritised using functional and biological interpretation methods, browsing available biological annotation, pathway information and patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD. Results We have developed an interactive and user-friendly graphical application to be used in all steps in GWA projects from initial data QC and analysis to biological evaluation and validation of results. The program is implemented in Java and can be used on all platforms. Conclusion Very large data sets (e.g. 500 k markers and 5000 samples can be quality assessed, rapidly analysed and integrated with genomic sequence information. Candidate SNPs can be selected and functionally evaluated.

  16. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick;

    2010-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarc...

  17. A meta-analysis and genome-wide association study of platelet count and mean platelet volume in african americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Qayyum

    Full Text Available Several genetic variants associated with platelet count and mean platelet volume (MPV were recently reported in people of European ancestry. In this meta-analysis of 7 genome-wide association studies (GWAS enrolling African Americans, our aim was to identify novel genetic variants associated with platelet count and MPV. For all cohorts, GWAS analysis was performed using additive models after adjusting for age, sex, and population stratification. For both platelet phenotypes, meta-analyses were conducted using inverse-variance weighted fixed-effect models. Platelet aggregation assays in whole blood were performed in the participants of the GeneSTAR cohort. Genetic variants in ten independent regions were associated with platelet count (N = 16,388 with p<5×10(-8 of which 5 have not been associated with platelet count in previous GWAS. The novel genetic variants associated with platelet count were in the following regions (the most significant SNP, closest gene, and p-value: 6p22 (rs12526480, LRRC16A, p = 9.1×10(-9, 7q11 (rs13236689, CD36, p = 2.8×10(-9, 10q21 (rs7896518, JMJD1C, p = 2.3×10(-12, 11q13 (rs477895, BAD, p = 4.9×10(-8, and 20q13 (rs151361, SLMO2, p = 9.4×10(-9. Three of these loci (10q21, 11q13, and 20q13 were replicated in European Americans (N = 14,909 and one (11q13 in Hispanic Americans (N = 3,462. For MPV (N = 4,531, genetic variants in 3 regions were significant at p<5×10(-8, two of which were also associated with platelet count. Previously reported regions that were also significant in this study were 6p21, 6q23, 7q22, 12q24, and 19p13 for platelet count and 7q22, 17q11, and 19p13 for MPV. The most significant SNP in 1 region was also associated with ADP-induced maximal platelet aggregation in whole blood (12q24. Thus through a meta-analysis of GWAS enrolling African Americans, we have identified 5 novel regions associated with platelet count of which 3 were replicated in other ethnic

  18. Research guidelines in the era of large-scale collaborations: an analysis of Genome-wide Association Study Consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Melissa A; Hair, Marilyn S; Fullerton, Stephanie M

    2012-05-01

    Scientific research has shifted from studies conducted by single investigators to the creation of large consortia. Genetic epidemiologists, for example, now collaborate extensively for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The effect has been a stream of confirmed disease-gene associations. However, effects on human subjects oversight, data-sharing, publication and authorship practices, research organization and productivity, and intellectual property remain to be examined. The aim of this analysis was to identify all research consortia that had published the results of a GWAS analysis since 2005, characterize them, determine which have publicly accessible guidelines for research practices, and summarize the policies in these guidelines. A review of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies identified 55 GWAS consortia as of April 1, 2011. These consortia were comprised of individual investigators, research centers, studies, or other consortia and studied 48 different diseases or traits. Only 14 (25%) were found to have publicly accessible research guidelines on consortia websites. The available guidelines provide information on organization, governance, and research protocols; half address institutional review board approval. Details of publication, authorship, data-sharing, and intellectual property vary considerably. Wider access to consortia guidelines is needed to establish appropriate research standards with broad applicability to emerging forms of large-scale collaboration. PMID:22491085

  19. Evaluation of a Two-Stage Approach in Trans-Ethnic Meta-Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jaeyoung; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Dupuis, Josée; Liu, Ching-Ti

    2016-05-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has achieved great success in detecting loci underlying human diseases. Incorporating GWAS results from diverse ethnic populations for meta-analysis, however, remains challenging because of the possible heterogeneity across studies. Conventional fixed-effects (FE) or random-effects (RE) methods may not be most suitable to aggregate multiethnic GWAS results because of violation of the homogeneous effect assumption across studies (FE) or low power to detect signals (RE). Three recently proposed methods, modified RE (RE-HE) model, binary-effects (BE) model and a Bayesian approach (Meta-analysis of Transethnic Association [MANTRA]), show increased power over FE and RE methods while incorporating heterogeneity of effects when meta-analyzing trans-ethnic GWAS results. We propose a two-stage approach to account for heterogeneity in trans-ethnic meta-analysis in which we clustered studies with cohort-specific ancestry information prior to meta-analysis. We compare this to a no-prior-clustering (crude) approach, evaluating type I error and power of these two strategies, in an extensive simulation study to investigate whether the two-stage approach offers any improvements over the crude approach. We find that the two-stage approach and the crude approach for all five methods (FE, RE, RE-HE, BE, MANTRA) provide well-controlled type I error. However, the two-stage approach shows increased power for BE and RE-HE, and similar power for MANTRA and FE compared to their corresponding crude approach, especially when there is heterogeneity across the multiethnic GWAS results. These results suggest that prior clustering in the two-stage approach can be an effective and efficient intermediate step in meta-analysis to account for the multiethnic heterogeneity. PMID:27061095

  20. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies with Correlated Individuals: Application to the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Tamar; Shaffer, John R; Graff, Mariaelisa; Qi, Qibin; Stilp, Adrienne M; Gogarten, Stephanie M; North, Kari E; Isasi, Carmen R; Laurie, Cathy C; Szpiro, Adam A

    2016-09-01

    Investigators often meta-analyze multiple genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to increase the power to detect associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a trait. Meta-analysis is also performed within a single cohort that is stratified by, e.g., sex or ancestry group. Having correlated individuals among the strata may complicate meta-analyses, limit power, and inflate Type 1 error. For example, in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), sources of correlation include genetic relatedness, shared household, and shared community. We propose a novel mixed-effect model for meta-analysis, "MetaCor," which accounts for correlation between stratum-specific effect estimates. Simulations show that MetaCor controls inflation better than alternatives such as ignoring the correlation between the strata or analyzing all strata together in a "pooled" GWAS, especially with different minor allele frequencies (MAFs) between strata. We illustrate the benefits of MetaCor on two GWASs in the HCHS/SOL. Analysis of dental caries (tooth decay) stratified by ancestry group detected a genome-wide significant SNP (rs7791001, P-value = 3.66×10-8, compared to 4.67×10-7 in pooled), with different MAFs between strata. Stratified analysis of body mass index (BMI) by ancestry group and sex reduced overall inflation from λGC=1.050 (pooled) to λGC=1.028 (MetaCor). Furthermore, even after removing close relatives to obtain nearly uncorrelated strata, a naïve stratified analysis resulted in λGC=1.058 compared to λGC=1.027 for MetaCor. PMID:27256683

  1. The Associations between VEGF Gene Polymorphisms and Diabetic Retinopathy Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis of 11 Case-Control Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Published data on the associations of VEGF polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR susceptibility are inconclusive. A systematic meta-analysis was undertaken to clarify this topic. Methods. Data were collected from the following electronic databases: PubMed, Embase, OVID, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE, and Cochrane Library with the last report up to January 10, 2014. ORs and 95% CIs were calculated for VEGF–2578C/A (rs699947, –1154G/A (rs1570360, –460T/C (rs833061, −634G>C (rs2010963, and +936C/T (rs3025039 in at least two published studies. Meta-analysis was performed in a fixed/random effect model by using the software STATA 12.0. Results. A total of 11 studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. A significant relationship between VEGF+936C/T (rs3025039 polymorphism and DR was found in a recessive model (OR = 3.19, 95% CI = 1.20–8.41, and P(z=0.01 in Asian and overall populations, while a significant association was also found between –460T/C (rs833061 polymorphism and DR risk under a recessive model (OR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.12–4.01, and P(z=0.02. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that +936C/T (rs3025039 is likely to be associated with susceptibility to DR in Asian populations, and the recessive model of –460T/C (rs833061 is associated with elevated DR susceptibility.

  2. Genome-wide association study knowledge-driven pathway analysis of alcohol dependence implicates the calcium signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Danni; Li Jinming; Guo Yanfang

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence (AD) is a serious and common public health problem.The identification of genes that contribute to the AD variation will improve our understanding of the genetic mechanism underlying this complex disease.Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene genetic association studies identified individual genes as candidates for alcohol phenotypes,but efforts to generate an integrated view of accumulative genetic variants and pathways under alcohol drinking are lacking.Methods We applied enrichment gene set analysis to existing genetic association results to identify pertinent pathways to AD in this study.A total of 1 438 SNPs (P <1.0×10-3) associated to alcohol drinking related traits have been collected from 31 studies (10 candidate gene association studies,19 GWAS of SNPs,and 2 GWAS of copy number variants).Results Among all of the KEGG pathways,the calcium signaling pathway (hsa04020) showed the most significant enrichment of associations (21 genes) to alcohol consumption phenotypes (P=5.4×10-5).Furthermore,the calcium signaling pathway is the only pathway that turned out to be significant after multiple test adjustments,achieving Bonferroni P value of 0.8×10-3 and FDR value of 0.6×10-2,respectively.Interestingly,the calcium signaling pathway was previously found to be essential to regulate brain function,and genes in this pathway link to a depressive effect of alcohol consumption on the body.Conclusions Our findings,together with previous biological evidence,suggest the importance of gene polymorphisms of calcium signaling pathway to AD susceptibility.Still,further investigations are warranted to uncover the role of this pathway in AD and related traits.

  3. Association studies of ERCC1 polymorphisms with lung cancer susceptibility: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excision repair cross-complimentary group 1 (ERCC1 is an essential component of the nucleotide excision repair system that is responsible for repairing damaged DNA. Functional genetic variations in the ERCC1 gene may alter DNA repair capacity and modulate cancer risk. The putative roles of ERCC1 gene polymorphisms in lung cancer susceptibility have been widely investigated. However, the results remain controversial. OBJECTIVES: An updated meta-analysis was conducted to explore whether lung cancer risk could be attributed to the following ERCC1 polymorphisms: rs11615 (T>C, rs3212986 (C>A, rs3212961 (A>C, rs3212948 (G>C, rs2298881 (C>A. METHODS: Several major databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus and the Chinese Biomedical database were searched for eligible studies. Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to measure the strength of associations. RESULTS: Sixteen studies with 10,106 cases and 13,238 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled ORs from 11 eligible studies (8,215 cases vs. 11,402 controls suggested a significant association of ERCC1 rs11615 with increased risk for lung cancer (homozygous: CC versus TT, OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.04-1.48, P = 0.02. However, such an association was disproportionately driven by a single study. Removal of that study led to null association. Moreover, initial analyses suggested that ERCC1 rs11615 exerts a more profound effect on the susceptibility of non-smokers to lung cancer than that of smokers. Moreover, no statistically significant association was found between remaining ERCC1 polymorphisms of interest and lung cancer risk, except for rs3212948 variation (heterozygous: CG vs.GG, OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.67-0.90, P = 0.001; dominant: CG/CC vs.GG, OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.69-0.91, P = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Overall, this meta-analysis suggests that ERCC1 rs3212948 G>C, but not others, is a lung cancer risk-associated polymorphism. Carefully

  4. Heritability and genome-wide association analysis of renal sinus fat accumulation in the Framingham Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Meredith C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ectopic fat accumulation in the renal sinus is associated with chronic kidney disease and hypertension. The genetic contributions to renal sinus fat accumulation in humans have not been well characterized. Methods The present analysis consists of participants from the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation who underwent computed tomography; renal sinus fat and visceral adipose tissue (VAT were quantified. Renal sinus fat was natural log transformed and sex- and cohort-specific residuals were created, adjusted for (1 age, (2 age and body mass index (BMI, and (3 age and VAT. Residuals were pooled and used to calculate heritability using variance-components analysis in SOLAR. A genome-wide association study (GWAS for renal sinus fat was performed using an additive model with approximately 2.5 million imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Finally, we identified the associations of renal sinus fat in our GWAS results with validated SNPs for renal function (n = 16, BMI (n = 32, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, n = 14, and applied a multi-SNP genetic risk score method to determine if the SNPs for each renal and obesity trait were in aggregate associated with renal sinus fat. Results The heritability of renal sinus fat was 39% (p Conclusions Renal sinus fat is a heritable trait, even after accounting for generalized and abdominal adiposity. This provides support for further research into the genetic determinants of renal sinus fat. While our study was underpowered to detect genome-wide significant loci, our candidate gene BMI risk score results suggest that variability in renal sinus fat may be associated with SNPs previously known to be associated with generalized adiposity.

  5. Evaluation of the association between acne and smoking: systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mannocci

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Acne vulgaris is one of the most common skin diseases with a multifactorial pathogenesis. Examination of the literature regarding the contribution of smoking to acne shows contradictory results. The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis about the association between acne and smoking.

    Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis, when possible were performed. The literature review was based on Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar searches using the keywords “(smoking OR tobacco OR nicotine OR cigarettes AND acne”. Only cross-sectional studies were included. Meta-analyses were performed using the RevMan software version 5 for Windows. Four different meta-analyses were carried out: one evaluating the association between smoking habit and acne, one including data stratified by gender, one for studies with a quality score > 6, and one relating to acne classification.

    Results: Six studies were selected. The first meta-analysis, including all studies, showed a non significant role of smoke in the development of acne: OR 1.05 (95% CI: 0.66–1.67 with random effect estimate. The second meta-analyses, including data stratified by gender, showed a OR=0.99 (95% CI: 0.57–1.73 for males and a OR of 1.45 (95% CI: 0.08–24.64 for females, using random effect for the heterogeneity in both cases. The third meta-analysis, included studies with a quality score >6 resulted in an estimated OR= 0.69 (95% CI: 0.55–0.85: in this case it was possible to use the fixed effect estimate. The last meta-analysis, concerning the severity grading, showed a non-significant result: OR=1.09 (95% CI: 0.61–1.95 using the random effect approach.

    Conclusions: The first two meta-analyses found no signification association between smoking and

  6. Fuzzy association rules for biological data analysis: a case study on yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Cano Carlos; Garcia Fernando; Blanco Armando; Lopez Francisco J; Marin Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Last years' mapping of diverse genomes has generated huge amounts of biological data which are currently dispersed through many databases. Integration of the information available in the various databases is required to unveil possible associations relating already known data. Biological data are often imprecise and noisy. Fuzzy set theory is specially suitable to model imprecise data while association rules are very appropriate to integrate heterogeneous data. Results In ...

  7. Fuzzy association rules for biological data analysis: A case study on yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Carlos

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Last years' mapping of diverse genomes has generated huge amounts of biological data which are currently dispersed through many databases. Integration of the information available in the various databases is required to unveil possible associations relating already known data. Biological data are often imprecise and noisy. Fuzzy set theory is specially suitable to model imprecise data while association rules are very appropriate to integrate heterogeneous data. Results In this work we propose a novel fuzzy methodology based on a fuzzy association rule mining method for biological knowledge extraction. We apply this methodology over a yeast genome dataset containing heterogeneous information regarding structural and functional genome features. A number of association rules have been found, many of them agreeing with previous research in the area. In addition, a comparison between crisp and fuzzy results proves the fuzzy associations to be more reliable than crisp ones. Conclusion An integrative approach as the one carried out in this work can unveil significant knowledge which is currently hidden and dispersed through the existing biological databases. It is shown that fuzzy association rules can model this knowledge in an intuitive way by using linguistic labels and few easy-understandable parameters.

  8. Genome-wide association study of major depressive disorder: new results, meta-analysis, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, N R; Pergadia, M L; Blackwood, D H R; Penninx, B W J H; Gordon, S D; Nyholt, D R; Ripke, S; MacIntyre, D J; McGhee, K A; Maclean, A W; Smit, J H; Hottenga, J J; Willemsen, G; Middeldorp, C M; de Geus, E J C; Lewis, C M; McGuffin, P; Hickie, I B; van den Oord, E J C G; Liu, J Z; Macgregor, S; McEvoy, B P; Byrne, E M; Medland, S E; Statham, D J; Henders, A K; Heath, A C; Montgomery, G W; Martin, N G; Boomsma, D I; Madden, P A F; Sullivan, P F

    2012-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common complex disorder with a partly genetic etiology. We conducted a genome-wide association study of the MDD2000+ sample (2431 cases, 3673 screened controls and >1 M imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)). No SNPs achieved genome-wide significance either in the MDD2000+ study, or in meta-analysis with two other studies totaling 5763 cases and 6901 controls. These results imply that common variants of intermediate or large effect do not have main effects in the genetic architecture of MDD. Suggestive but notable results were (a) gene-based tests suggesting roles for adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3, 2p23.3) and galanin (GAL, 11q13.3); published functional evidence relates both of these to MDD and serotonergic signaling; (b) support for the bipolar disorder risk variant SNP rs1006737 in CACNA1C (P=0.020, odds ratio=1.10); and (c) lack of support for rs2251219, a SNP identified in a meta-analysis of affective disorder studies (P=0.51). We estimate that sample sizes 1.8- to 2.4-fold greater are needed for association studies of MDD compared with those for schizophrenia to detect variants that explain the same proportion of total variance in liability. Larger study cohorts characterized for genetic and environmental risk factors accumulated prospectively are likely to be needed to dissect more fully the etiology of MDD. PMID:21042317

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Susceptibility Genes in Chinese Population: A Field Synopsis and Meta-Analysis of Genetic Association Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxian Sun

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies to date have evaluated the association between genetic variants and the susceptibility to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. However, the results of these studies have been inconclusive. In this current study we performed meta-analysis of genetic association studies (GAS to pool OSA-susceptible genes in Chinese population, to perform a more precise evaluation of the association.Various databases (i.e., PubMed, EMBASE, HuGE Navigator, Wanfang and CNKI were searched to identify all eligible GAS-related variants associated with susceptibility to OSA. The generalized odds ratio metric (ORG and the odds ratio (OR of the allele contrast were used to quantify the impact of genetic variants on the risk of OSA. Cumulative and recursive cumulative meta-analyses (CMA were also performed to investigate the trend and stability of effect sizes as evidence was accumulated.Thirty-two GAS evaluating 13 polymorphisms in 10 genes were included in our meta-analysis. Significant associations were derived for four polymorphisms either for the allele contrast or for the ORG. The variants TNF-α-308G/A, 5-HTTLPR, 5-HTTVNTR, and APOE showed marginal significance for ORG (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.01(1.31-3.07; 1.31(1.09-1.58; 1.85(1.16-2.95; 1.79(1.10-2.92; and 1.79(1.10-2.92 respectively. In addition, the TNF-α-308G/A, 5-HTTLPR, and 5-HTTVNTR variants showed significance for the allele contrast: 2.15(1.39-3.31; 2.26(1.58-3.24; 1.32(1.12-1.55; and 1.86(1.12-3.08 respectively. CMA showed a trend towards an association, and recursive CMA indicated that more evidence was needed to determine whether this was significant.TNF-α, 5-HTT, and APOE genes can all be proposed as OSA-susceptibility genes in Chinese population. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are therefore urgently needed to confirm our findings within a larger sample of OSA patients in China.

  10. Extended Analysis of a Genome-Wide Association Study in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Detects Multiple Novel Risk Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folseraas, Trine; Melum, Espen; Rausch, Philipp; Juran, Brian D.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Shiryaev, Alexey; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Ellinghaus, David; Schramm, Christoph; Weismüller, Tobias J.; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Clausen, Ole Petter; Weersma, Rinse K.; Janse, Marcel; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Björnsson, Einar; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Cleynen, Isabelle; Rosenstiel, Philip; Holm, Kristian; Teufel, Andreas; Rust, Christian; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Bergquist, Annika; Ryu, Euijung; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Runz, Heiko; Sterneck, Martina; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Wijmenga, Cisca; Schrumpf, Erik; Manns, Michael P.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Schreiber, Stefan; Baines, John F.; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims A limited number of genetic risk factors have been reported in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). To discover further genetic susceptibility factors for PSC, we followed up on a second tier of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods We analyzed 45 SNPs in 1221 PSC cases and 3508 controls. The association results from the replication analysis and the original GWAS (715 PSC cases and 2962 controls) were combined in a meta-analysis comprising 1936 PSC cases and 6470 controls. We performed an analysis of bile microbial community composition in 39 PSC patients by 16S rRNA sequencing. Results Seventeen SNPs representing 12 distinct genetic loci achieved nominal significance (Preplication<0.05) in the replication. The most robust novel association was detected at chromosome 1p36 (rs3748816; Pcombined=2.1×10−8) where the MMEL1 and TNFRSF14 genes represent potential disease genes. Eight additional novel loci showed suggestive evidence of association (Prepl<0.05). FUT2 at chromosome 19q13 (rs602662; Pcomb=1.9×10−6, rs281377; Pcomb = 2.1×10−6 and rs601338; Pcomb=2.7×10−6) is notable due to its implication in altered susceptibility to infectious agents. We found that FUT2 secretor status and genotype defined by rs601338 significantly influences biliary microbial community composition in PSC patients. Conclusions We identify multiple new PSC risk loci by extended analysis of a PSC GWAS. FUT2 genotype needs to be taken into account when assessing the influence from microbiota on biliary pathology in PSC. PMID:22521342

  11. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis find that over 40 loci affect risk of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrett, Jeffrey C; Clayton, David G; Concannon, Patrick;

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common autoimmune disorder that arises from the action of multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. We report the findings of a genome-wide association study of T1D, combined in a meta-analysis with two previously published studies. The total sample set included 7......,514 cases and 9,045 reference samples. Forty-one distinct genomic locations provided evidence for association with T1D in the meta-analysis (P < 10(-6)). After excluding previously reported associations, we further tested 27 regions in an independent set of 4,267 cases, 4,463 controls and 2,319 affected sib......-pair (ASP) families. Of these, 18 regions were replicated (P < 0.01; overall P < 5 x 10(-8)) and 4 additional regions provided nominal evidence of replication (P < 0.05). The many new candidate genes suggested by these results include IL10, IL19, IL20, GLIS3, CD69 and IL27....

  12. Association of sarcopenic obesity with the risk of all-cause mortality: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Simiao; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Many prospective studies have investigated the relationship between sarcopenic obesity (SO) and risk of mortality. However, the results have been controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between SO and all-cause mortality in adults by a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. A systematic literature search was carried out through electronic databases up to September 2014. A total of nine articles with 12 prospective cohort studies, including 35 287 participants and 14 306 deaths, were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with healthy subjects, subjects with SO had a significant increased risk of all-cause mortality (pooled HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.12-1.37, P < 0.001), with significant heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  = 53.18%, P = 0.0188), but no indication for publication bias (P = 0.7373). Heterogeneity became low and no longer significant in the subgroup analyses by three SO definitions. More importantly, SO, defined by mid-arm muscle circumference and muscle strength criteria, significantly increased the risk of mortality (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.23-1.73 and 1.23, 1.09-1.38, respectively). The risk of all-cause mortality did not appreciably change considering the geography (USA cohorts and non-USA cohorts) or the duration of follow up (≥10 years and <10 years). However, the risk estimate was only significant in men (HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.08-1.41, P = 0.0017), not in women (HR 1.16, P = 0.1332). The results of the present study show that subjects with SO are associated with a 24% increase risk of all-cause mortality, compared with those without SO, in particular in men; the significant association was found independent of geographical location and duration of follow up. PMID:26271226

  13. Rule based classifier for the analysis of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in genetic association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehr Thorsten

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been presented for the analysis of complex interactions between genetic polymorphisms and/or environmental factors. Despite the available methods, there is still a need for alternative methods, because no single method will perform well in all scenarios. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of three selected rule based classifier algorithms, RIPPER, RIDOR and PART, for the analysis of genetic association studies. Methods Overall, 42 datasets were simulated with three different case-control models, a varying number of subjects (300, 600, SNPs (500, 1500, 3000 and noise (5%, 10%, 20%. The algorithms were applied to each of the datasets with a set of algorithm-specific settings. Results were further investigated with respect to a the Model, b the Rules, and c the Attribute level. Data analysis was performed using WEKA, SAS and PERL. Results The RIPPER algorithm discovered the true case-control model at least once in >33% of the datasets. The RIDOR and PART algorithm performed poorly for model detection. The RIPPER, RIDOR and PART algorithm discovered the true case-control rules in more than 83%, 83% and 44% of the datasets, respectively. All three algorithms were able to detect the attributes utilized in the respective case-control models in most datasets. Conclusions The current analyses substantiate the utility of rule based classifiers such as RIPPER, RIDOR and PART for the detection of gene-gene/gene-environment interactions in genetic association studies. These classifiers could provide a valuable new method, complementing existing approaches, in the analysis of genetic association studies. The methods provide an advantage in being able to handle both categorical and continuous variable types. Further, because the outputs of the analyses are easy to interpret, the rule based classifier approach could quickly generate testable hypotheses for additional evaluation. Since the algorithms are

  14. Pathway-based analysis using genome-wide association data from a Korean non-small cell lung cancer study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon Lee

    Full Text Available Pathway-based analysis, used in conjunction with genome-wide association study (GWAS techniques, is a powerful tool to detect subtle but systematic patterns in genome that can help elucidate complex diseases, like cancers. Here, we stepped back from genetic polymorphisms at a single locus and examined how multiple association signals can be orchestrated to find pathways related to lung cancer susceptibility. We used single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array data from 869 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases from a previous GWAS at the National Cancer Center and 1,533 controls from the Korean Association Resource project for the pathway-based analysis. After mapping single-nucleotide polymorphisms to genes, considering their coding region and regulatory elements (±20 kbp, multivariate logistic regression of additive and dominant genetic models were fitted against disease status, with adjustments for age, gender, and smoking status. Pathway statistics were evaluated using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA and Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP methods. Among 880 pathways, 11 showed relatively significant statistics compared to our positive controls (PGSEA≤0.025, false discovery rate≤0.25. Candidate pathways were validated using the ARTP method and similarities between pathways were computed against each other. The top-ranked pathways were ABC Transporters (PGSEA<0.001, PARTP = 0.001, VEGF Signaling Pathway (PGSEA<0.001, PARTP = 0.008, G1/S Check Point (PGSEA = 0.004, PARTP = 0.013, and NRAGE Signals Death through JNK (PGSEA = 0.006, PARTP = 0.001. Our results demonstrate that pathway analysis can shed light on post-GWAS research and help identify potential targets for cancer susceptibility.

  15. Integrative pathway analysis of a genome-wide association study of V̇o2max response to exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivar, Juan C.; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Sung, Yun Ju; Timmons, James A.; Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the findings from a genome-wide association study of the response of maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max) to an exercise program. Here we follow up on these results to generate hypotheses on genes, pathways, and systems involved in the ability to respond to exercise training. A systems biology approach can help us better establish a comprehensive physiological description of what underlies V̇o2maxtrainability. The primary material for this exploration was the individual single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), SNP-gene mapping, and statistical significance levels. We aimed to generate novel hypotheses through analyses that go beyond statistical association of single-locus markers. This was accomplished through three complementary approaches: 1) building de novo evidence of gene candidacy through informatics-driven literature mining; 2) aggregating evidence from statistical associations to link variant enrichment in biological pathways to V̇o2max trainability; and 3) predicting possible consequences of variants residing in the pathways of interest. We started with candidate gene prioritization followed by pathway analysis focused on overrepresentation analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. Subsequently, leads were followed using in silico analysis of predicted SNP functions. Pathways related to cellular energetics (pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis; PPAR signaling) and immune functions (complement and coagulation cascades) had the highest levels of SNP burden. In particular, long-chain fatty acid transport and fatty acid oxidation genes and sequence variants were found to influence differences in V̇o2max trainability. Together, these methods allow for the hypothesis-driven ranking and prioritization of genes and pathways for future experimental testing and validation. PMID:23990238

  16. Uncertainty associated with regional landslide risk analysis - a case study in Buzau County, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumpano, Veronica; Ciurean, Roxana; Micu, Mihai; Balteanu, Dan; Glade, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    When analyzing the risk for a region where landslides constitute a threat for the society and the environment, a fully quantitative approach often becomes impracticable. The magnitude, frequency and location of landslides and a reasonably complete inventory of historical events is commonly not available. Likewise, a thorough investigation of the damaged assets and quantification of losses is rarely possible. Nevertheless, an alternative approach can be engaged in areas where information regarding the environmental conditions leading to the occurrence of landslides including their relative location, and the characteristics and distribution of elements at risk are known. This contribution proposes a methodology for a landslide risk analysis applicable at regional scale taking into account the spatial probability and consequences of past damaging events. Since the temporal information used to calculate the detailed hazard probability is missing, a susceptibility analysis is performed by using a data-driven Bayesian method (Weights of Evidence modeling technique) which analyzes the relation between a training set (past landslide events) and multiple predisposing factors (lithology, landuse, slope, aspect, internal relief, altitude), in order to predict areas that are less-to-more susceptible to landslide initiation. The consequence analysis is based on a generalized assessment of vulnerability, exposure and value of the elements at risk (i.e. buildings and roads) using cadastral and statistical data. For both components of the risk analysis (susceptibility analysis and consequence analysis) an estimation of uncertainty is performed by defining a central value (which represents the statistical mean) and a measure of value range (minimum and maximum) of the input parameters. As the procedure operates at a spatial level, the distribution of risk and the annual probability of expected losses are expressed numerically as well as spatially with the use of GIS. The developed

  17. Pathway Analysis Using Genome-Wide Association Study Data for Coronary Restenosis – A Potential Role for the PARVB Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Jeffrey J. W.; Trompet, Stella; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Koch, Werner; Kastrati, Adnan; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Quax, Paul H. A.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) still remains a significant limitation of the procedure. The causative mechanisms of restenosis have not yet been fully identified. The goal of the current study was to perform gene-set analysis of biological pathways related to inflammation, proliferation, vascular function and transcriptional regulation on coronary restenosis to identify novel genes and pathways related to this condition. Methods The GENetic DEterminants of Restenosis (GENDER) databank contains genotypic data of 556,099SNPs of 295 cases with restenosis and 571 matched controls. Fifty-four pathways, related to known restenosis-related processes, were selected. Gene-set analysis was performed using PLINK, GRASS and ALIGATOR software. Pathways with a p<0.01 were fine-mapped and significantly associated SNPs were analyzed in an independent replication cohort. Results Six pathways (cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions pathway, IL2 signaling pathway, IL6 signaling pathway, platelet derived growth factor pathway, vitamin D receptor pathway and the mitochondria pathway) were significantly associated in one or two of the software packages. Two SNPs in the cell-ECM interactions pathway were replicated in an independent restenosis cohort. No replication was obtained for the other pathways. Conclusion With these results we demonstrate a potential role of the cell-ECM interactions pathway in the development of coronary restenosis. These findings contribute to the increasing knowledge of the genetic etiology of restenosis formation and could serve as a hypothesis-generating effort for further functional studies. PMID:23950981

  18. Long-term study of water masers associated with Young Stellar Objects. II: Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, J; Comoretto, G; Felli, M; Palagi, F; Palla, Fabrizio; Valdettaro, R

    2003-01-01

    (Abridged) H2O masers in 14 SFRs have been monitored once every 2-3 months for up to 13 years. We investigate the dependence of the overall spectral morphology of the maser emission and its variability on the luminosity of the YSO, and look for bursts and gradients in individual components. We find that higher-luminosity sources tend to be associated with stronger and more stable masers.Higher-luminosity YSOs can excite more emission components over a larger range in velocity, yet the emission that dominates the spectra is at a velocity very near that of the molecular cloud in which the objects are embedded. For Lfir > 3E+04 Lo the maser emission becomes increasingly structured and more extended in velocity with increasing Lfir. Below this limit the maser emission shows the same variety of morphologies, but without a clear dependence on Lfir and with a smaller velocity extent. Also, for sources with Lfir above this limit, the water maser is always present above the 5sigma-level; below it, the typical 5sigma d...

  19. GENIE: a software package for gene-gene interaction analysis in genetic association studies using multiple GPU or CPU cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-gene interaction in genetic association studies is computationally intensive when a large number of SNPs are involved. Most of the latest Central Processing Units (CPUs have multiple cores, whereas Graphics Processing Units (GPUs also have hundreds of cores and have been recently used to implement faster scientific software. However, currently there are no genetic analysis software packages that allow users to fully utilize the computing power of these multi-core devices for genetic interaction analysis for binary traits. Findings Here we present a novel software package GENIE, which utilizes the power of multiple GPU or CPU processor cores to parallelize the interaction analysis. GENIE reads an entire genetic association study dataset into memory and partitions the dataset into fragments with non-overlapping sets of SNPs. For each fragment, GENIE analyzes: 1 the interaction of SNPs within it in parallel, and 2 the interaction between the SNPs of the current fragment and other fragments in parallel. We tested GENIE on a large-scale candidate gene study on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 graphics card, the GPU mode of GENIE achieves a speedup of 27 times over its single-core CPU mode run. Conclusions GENIE is open-source, economical, user-friendly, and scalable. Since the computing power and memory capacity of graphics cards are increasing rapidly while their cost is going down, we anticipate that GENIE will achieve greater speedups with faster GPU cards. Documentation, source code, and precompiled binaries can be downloaded from http://www.cceb.upenn.edu/~mli/software/GENIE/.

  20. GENIE: a software package for gene-gene interaction analysis in genetic association studies using multiple GPU or CPU cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene-gene interaction in genetic association studies is computationally intensive when a large number of SNPs are involved. Most of the latest Central Processing Units (CPUs) have multiple cores, whereas Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) also have hundreds of cores and have been recently used to implement faster scientific software. However, currently there are no genetic analysis software packages that allow users to fully utilize the computing power of these multi-core devices for genetic interaction analysis for binary traits. Findings Here we present a novel software package GENIE, which utilizes the power of multiple GPU or CPU processor cores to parallelize the interaction analysis. GENIE reads an entire genetic association study dataset into memory and partitions the dataset into fragments with non-overlapping sets of SNPs. For each fragment, GENIE analyzes: 1) the interaction of SNPs within it in parallel, and 2) the interaction between the SNPs of the current fragment and other fragments in parallel. We tested GENIE on a large-scale candidate gene study on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 graphics card, the GPU mode of GENIE achieves a speedup of 27 times over its single-core CPU mode run. Conclusions GENIE is open-source, economical, user-friendly, and scalable. Since the computing power and memory capacity of graphics cards are increasing rapidly while their cost is going down, we anticipate that GENIE will achieve greater speedups with faster GPU cards. Documentation, source code, and precompiled binaries can be downloaded from http://www.cceb.upenn.edu/~mli/software/GENIE/. PMID:21615923

  1. Study on traffic noise level of Sylhet by multiple regression analysis associated with health hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Alam, M. Jobair Bin Alam, M. M. Rahman, A. K. Dikshit, S. K. Khan

    Full Text Available The study reports the level of traffic-induced noise pollution in Sylhet City. For this purpose noise levels have been measured at thirty-seven major locations of the city from 7 am to 11 pm during the working days. It was observed that at all the locations the level of noise remains far above the acceptable limit for all the time. The noise level on the main road near residential area, hospital area and educational area were above the recommended level (65dBA. It was found that the predictive equations are in 60-70% correlated with the measured noise level. The study suggests that vulnerable institutions like school and hospital should be located about 60m away from the roadside unless any special arrangement to alleviate sound is used.

  2. Genetic Control of Canine Leishmaniasis: Genome-Wide Association Study and Genomic Selection Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Quilez, Javier; Martínez, Verónica; Woolliams, John A.; Sanchez, Armand; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Kennedy, Lorna J.; Quinnell, Rupert J.; William E. R. Ollier; Roura, Xavier; Ferrer, Lluís; Altet, Laura; Francino, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Background: the current disease model for leishmaniasis suggests that only a proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease, while others are asymptomatically infected due to immune control of infection. The factors that determine whether individuals progress to clinical disease following Leishmania infection are unclear, although previous studies suggest a role for host genetics. Our hypothesis was that canine leishmaniasis is a complex disease with multiple loci responsible for...

  3. Genetic control of canine leishmaniasis: genome-wide association study and genomic selection analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Quilez; Verónica Martínez; Woolliams, John A.; Armand Sanchez; Ricardo Pong-Wong; Kennedy, Lorna J.; Quinnell, Rupert J; Ollier, William E.R.; Xavier Roura; Lluís Ferrer; Laura Altet; Olga Francino

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current disease model for leishmaniasis suggests that only a proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease, while others are asymptomatically infected due to immune control of infection. The factors that determine whether individuals progress to clinical disease following Leishmania infection are unclear, although previous studies suggest a role for host genetics. Our hypothesis was that canine leishmaniasis is a complex disease with multiple loci responsible for...

  4. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Six New Loci for Serum Calcium Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. O'Seaghdha (Conall); H. Wu (Hongsheng); Q. Yang (Qiong); K. Kapur (Karen); I. Guessous (Idris); P. Zuber (Patrick); A. Köttgen (Anna); C. Stoudmann (Candice); A. Teumer (Alexander); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); M. Mangino (Massimo); A. Dehghan (Abbas); W. Zhang (Weihua); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); G. Li (Guo); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); L. Portas (Laura); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); C. Hayward (Caroline); K. Lohman (Kurt); K. Matsuda (Koichi); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); D. Firsov (Dmitri); R. Sorice; S. Ulivi (Shelia); A.C. Brockhaus (A. Catharina); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); A. Mahajan (Anubha); F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A. Mace (Aurelien); E. Boerwinckle (Eric); D.E. Arking (Dan); C. Tanikawa (Chizu); Y. Nakamura (Yusuke); M.J. Brown (Morris); J.-M. Gaspoz (Jean-Michel); J.-M. Theler (Jean-Marc); D.S. Siscovick (David); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); P. Vollenweider (Peter); V. Vitart (Veronique); A.F. Wright (Alan); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); M. Boban (Mladen); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Navarro (Pau); E.M. Brown (Edward); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); J. Ding (Jinhui); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Singleton (Andrew); S. Girotto; D. Ruggiero; A.P. d' Adamo (Adamo Pio); A. Robino (Antonietta); T. Meitinger (Thomas); C. Meisinger (Christa); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Starr (John); J.C. Chambers (John); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); B. Winkelmann; J. Huang (Jian); D. Murgia (Daniela); S.H. Wild (Sarah); H. Campbell (Harry); A.D. Morris (Andrew); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); U. Vol̈ker (Uwe); M. Hannemann (Mario); R. Biffar (Reiner); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); S.-Y. Shin; P. Lescuyer (Pierre); H. Henry (Hughes); C. Schurmann (Claudia); P. Munroe (Patricia); P. Gasparini (Paolo); N. Pirastu (Nicola); M. Ciullo; C. Gieger (Christian); W. März (Winfried); L. Lind (Lars); T.D. Spector (Timothy); G.D. Smith; I. Rudan (Igor); J.F. Wilson (James); O. Polasek (Ozren); I.J. Deary (Ian); M. Pirastu (Mario); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); Y. Liu (Yongmei); B. Kestenbaum (Bryan); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); M. Nauck (Matthias); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); O. Bonny (Olivier); C. Fox (Craig); M. Bochud (Murielle)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCalcium is vital to the normal functioning of multiple organ systems and its serum concentration is tightly regulated. Apart from CASR, the genes associated with serum calcium are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 39,400 individuals from 17 populati

  5. Replication Study in a Japanese Population of Six Susceptibility Loci for Type 2 Diabetes Originally Identified by a Transethnic Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Ren; Imamura, Minako; Tanaka, Yasushi; Iwata, Minoru; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Watada, Hirotaka; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Maeda, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Aim We performed a replication study in a Japanese population to evaluate the association between type 2 diabetes and six susceptibility loci (TMEM154, SSR1, FAF1, POU5F1, ARL15, and MPHOSPH9) originally identified by a transethnic meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 2014. Methods We genotyped 7,620 Japanese participants (5,817 type 2 diabetes patients and 1,803 controls) for each of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction invader assay. The association of each SNP locus with the disease was evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Of the six SNPs examined in this study, four (rs6813195 near TMEM154, rs17106184 in FAF1, rs3130501 in POU5F1 and rs4275659 near MPHOSPH9) had the same direction of effect as in the original reports, but two (rs9505118 in SSR1 and rs702634 in ARL15) had the opposite direction of effect. Among these loci, rs3130501 and rs4275659 were nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (rs3130501; p = 0.017, odds ratio [OR] = 1.113, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.019–1.215, rs4275659; p = 0.012, OR = 1.127, 95% CI 1.026–1.238, adjusted for sex, age and body mass index), but we did not observe a significant association with type 2 diabetes for any of the six evaluated SNP loci in our Japanese population. Conclusions Our results indicate that effects of the six SNP loci identified in the transethnic GWAS meta-analysis are not major among the Japanese, although SNPs in POU5F1 and MPHOSPH9 loci may have some effect on susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in this population. PMID:27115357

  6. Quantitative expression analysis and prognostic significance of the BCL2-associated X gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a highly metastatic epithelial malignancy showing high prevalence in Southeast Asia and North Africa. The BCL2-associated X (BAX) gene encodes the most important pro-apoptotic member of the BCL2 family. We have recently shown that BCL2 and BCL2L12, two other members of the same apoptosis-related family, possess significant prognostic value in NPC. The objective of the current study was to analyze BAX mRNA expression in nasopharyngeal biopsies of NPC patients, and to assess its prognostic potential in this disease. Total RNA was isolated from 88 malignant and 9 hyperplastic nasopharyngeal biopsies, resected from Tunisian patients. After cDNA synthesis by reverse transcription of polyadenylated RNA, BAX mRNA expression was analyzed using a highly sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) method. Lower BAX mRNA levels were detected in NPC biopsies than in hyperplastic nasopharyngeal samples. BAX mRNA expression status was associated with low tumor extent, negative regional lymph node status, and absence of distant metastases. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that patients with BAX mRNA-positive NPC have significantly longer disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). In accordance with these findings, Cox regression analysis revealed that BAX mRNA expression can be considered as a favorable prognostic indicator of DFS and OS in NPC, independent of their gender, age, tumor histology, tumor extent, and nodal status. Furthermore, NPC patients without distant metastases are less likely to relapse when their primary tumor is BAX mRNA-positive, compared to metastasis-free patients with a BAX-negative nasopharyngeal malignancy. This is the first study examining the potential clinical utility of BAX as a prognostic tumor biomarker in NPC. We provide evidence that BAX mRNA expression can be considered as an independent favorable prognostic indicator of DFS and OS in NPC

  7. SNP Set Association Analysis for Familial Data

    OpenAIRE

    Schifano, Elizabeth D.; Epstein, Michael P.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Jhun, Min A; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Peyser, Patricia A; Lin, Xihong

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a popular approach for identifying common genetic variants and epistatic effects associated with a disease phenotype. The traditional statistical analysis of such GWAS attempts to assess the association between each individual Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and the observed phenotype. Recently, kernel machine-based tests for association between a SNP set (e.g., SNPs in a gene) and the disease phenotype have been proposed as a useful alternative...

  8. Association of Body Mass Index with Depression, Anxiety and Suicide—An Instrumental Variable Analysis of the HUNT Study

    OpenAIRE

    Johan Håkon Bjørngaard; David Carslake; Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen; Linthorst, Astrid C E; George Davey Smith; David Gunnell; Pål Richard Romundstad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: While high body mass index is associated with an increased risk of depression and anxiety, cumulative evidence indicates that it is a protective factor for suicide. The associations from conventional observational studies of body mass index with mental health outcomes are likely to be influenced by reverse causality or confounding by ill-health. In the present study, we investigated the associations between offspring body mass index and parental anxiety, depression and suicide ...

  9. GRASP: analysis of genotype–phenotype results from 1390 genome-wide association studies and corresponding open access database

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, Richard; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: We created a deeply extracted and annotated database of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) results. GRASP v1.0 contains >6.2 million SNP-phenotype association from among 1390 GWAS studies. We re-annotated GWAS results with 16 annotation sources including some rarely compared to GWAS results (e.g. RNAediting sites, lincRNAs, PTMs).

  10. Novel loci for major depression identified by genome-wide association study of Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression and meta-analysis of three studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyn, S I; Shi, J; Kraft, J B; Potash, J B; Knowles, J A; Weissman, M M; Garriock, H A; Yokoyama, J S; McGrath, P J; Peters, E J; Scheftner, W A; Coryell, W; Lawson, W B; Jancic, D; Gejman, P V; Sanders, A R; Holmans, P; Slager, S L; Levinson, D F; Hamilton, S P

    2011-02-01

    We report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of major depressive disorder (MDD) in 1221 cases from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study and 1636 screened controls. No genome-wide evidence for association was detected. We also carried out a meta-analysis of three European-ancestry MDD GWAS data sets: STAR*D, Genetics of Recurrent Early-onset Depression and the publicly available Genetic Association Information Network-MDD data set. These data sets, totaling 3957 cases and 3428 controls, were genotyped using four different platforms (Affymetrix 6.0, 5.0 and 500 K, and Perlegen). For each of 2.4 million HapMap II single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), using genotyped data where available and imputed data otherwise, single-SNP association tests were carried out in each sample with correction for ancestry-informative principal components. The strongest evidence for association in the meta-analysis was observed for intronic SNPs in ATP6V1B2 (P=6.78 x 10⁻⁷), SP4 (P=7.68 x 10⁻⁷) and GRM7 (P=1.11 x 10⁻⁶). Additional exploratory analyses were carried out for a narrower phenotype (recurrent MDD with onset before age 31, N=2191 cases), and separately for males and females. Several of the best findings were supported primarily by evidence from narrow cases or from either males or females. On the basis of previous biological evidence, we consider GRM7 a strong MDD candidate gene. Larger samples will be required to determine whether any common SNPs are significantly associated with MDD. PMID:20038947

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei;

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16......(-8)). We also replicated association with the FLG locus and with two recently identified association signals at 11q13.5 (rs7927894; P = 0.008) and 20q13.33 (rs6010620; P = 0.002). Our results underline the importance of both epidermal barrier function and immune dysregulation in atopic dermatitis...

  12. Association of smoking and drinking with socioeconomic factors: A comparative study based on bivariate probit model analysis

    OpenAIRE

    OSHIO, Takashi; Kobayashi, Miki

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the differences between smoking and drinking in regard to their associations with socioeconomic factors among about 7,000 Japanese workers. Using microdata from nationwide surveys in Japan, we estimated bivariate probit models to jointly explore how smoking and drinking are related to a wide variety of socioeconomic factors. We found that only educational attainment is consistently and negatively associated with both smoking and drinking for both genders. The associ...

  13. Validation of type 2 diabetes risk variants identified by genome-wide association studies in Han Chinese population: a replication study and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS involving European populations have successfully identified risk genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, the effects conferred by these variants in Han Chinese population have not yet been fully elucidated. METHODS: We analyzed the effects of 24 risk genetic variants with reported associations from European GWAS in 3,040 Han Chinese subjects in Taiwan (including 1,520 T2DM cases and 1,520 controls. The discriminative power of the prediction models with and without genotype scores was compared. We further meta-analyzed the association of these variants with T2DM by pooling all candidate-gene association studies conducted in Han Chinese. RESULTS: Five risk variants in IGF2BP2 (rs4402960, rs1470579, CDKAL1 (rs10946398, SLC30A8 (rs13266634, and HHEX (rs1111875 genes were nominally associated with T2DM in our samples. The odds ratio was 2.22 (95% confidence interval, 1.81-2.73, P34 as compared with subjects with the lowest quartile (score<29. The incoporation of genotype score into the predictive model increased the C-statistics from 0.627 to 0.657 (P<0.0001. These estimates are very close to those observed in European populations. Gene-environment interaction analysis showed a significant interaction between rs13266634 in SLC30A8 gene and age on T2DM risk (P<0.0001. Further meta-analysis pooling 20 studies in Han Chinese confirmed the association of 10 genetic variants in IGF2BP2, CDKAL1, JAZF1, SCL30A8, HHEX, TCF7L2, EXT2, and FTO genes with T2DM. The effect sizes conferred by these risk variants in Han Chinese were similar to those observed in Europeans but the allele frequencies differ substantially between two populations. CONCLUSION: We confirmed the association of 10 variants identified by European GWAS with T2DM in Han Chinese population. The incorporation of genotype scores into the prediction model led to a small but significant improvement in T2DM

  14. Gene-based meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies implicates new loci involved in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägg, Sara; Ganna, Andrea; Van Der Laan, Sander W; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H; Locke, Adam E; Berndt, Sonja I; Justice, Anne E; Kahali, Bratati; Siemelink, Marten A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Strachan, David P; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Loos, Ruth J F; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Pawitan, Yudi; Ingelsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium. Each cohort was tested for association between ∼2.4 million (Stage 1) or ∼200 000 (Stage 2) imputed or genotyped single variants and BMI, and summary statistics were subsequently meta-analyzed in 17 941 genes. We used the 'VErsatile Gene-based Association Study' (VEGAS...

  15. Association of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 with breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of case-control studies with subgroups of ethnic and menopausal statue

    OpenAIRE

    Shao Zhimin; Shen Zhenzhou; Yan Tingting; Zhou Liheng; Jiang Yiwei; Lu Jinsong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Sulfotransferase (SULT) plays an important role in the formation of estrogen which is usually conferred as a risk factor for breast cancer. Polymorphism of the SULT1A1 may be closely associated with breast cancer. However, studies on the association between polymorphism and breast cancer have yielded inconsistent results. We performed a meta-analysis including ethnic subgroup and menopausal statue subgroup to investigate the association of SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphism wi...

  16. Large scale international replication and meta-analysis study confirms association of the 15q14 locus with myopia. The CREAM consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vitart, Veronique; Mirshahi, Alireza; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Yamashiro, Kenji; Baird, Paul N.; Mackey, David A.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Ikram, M. Kamran; Hewitt, Alex W.; Duggal, Priya; Janmahasatian, Sarayut

    2012-01-01

    Myopia is a complex genetic disorder and a common cause of visual impairment among working age adults. Genome-wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci on chromosomes 15q14 and 15q25 in Caucasian populations of European ancestry. Here, we present a confirmation and meta-analysis study in which we assessed whether these two loci are also associated with myopia in other populations. The study population comprised 31 cohorts from the Consortium of Refractive Error and Myopia (...

  17. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: The DAMAGE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; van 't Riet, Esther;

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes...... for correct mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis: aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, translation initiation factors, tRNA modifying enzymes and mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. SNPs showing evidence for association with T2DM were measured in second stage genotyping (n=10164......-wide association studies, this SNP was also not associated with T2DM (P=0.72). In conclusion, we did not find evidence for association of common variants in 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins with T2DM.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 11 February 2009; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2009.4....

  18. A risk factor analysis of healthcare-associated fungal infections in an intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Su-Pen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of fungal healthcare-associated infection (HAI has increased in a major teaching hospital in the northern part of Taiwan over the past decade, especially in the intensive care units (ICUs. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that were responsible for the outbreak and trend in the ICU. Methods Surveillance fungal cultures were obtained from “sterile” objects, antiseptic solutions, environment of infected patients and hands of medical personnel. Risk factors for comparison included age, gender, admission service, and total length of stay in the ICU, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores at admission to the ICU, main diagnosis on ICU admission, use of invasive devices, receipt of hemodialysis, total parenteral nutrition (TPN use, history of antibiotic therapy before HAI or during ICU stay in no HAI group, and ICU discharge status (ie, dead or alive. Univariable analysis followed by multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors for ICU fungal HAIs and ICU mortality. Results There was a significant trend in ICU fungal HAIs from 1998 to 2009 (P Candida albicans (27.3%, Candida tropicalis (6.6%, Candida glabrata (6.6%, Candida parapsilosis (1.9%, Candida species (0.8%, and other fungi (1.9%. Candida albicans accounted for 63% of all Candida species. Yeasts were found in the environment of more heavily infected patients. The independent risk factors (P P  Conclusions There was a secular trend of an increasing number of fungal HAIs in our ICU over the past decade. Patients with ICU fungal HAIs had a significantly higher mortality rate than did patients without ICU HAIs. Total parenteral nutrition was a significant risk factor for all types of ICU fungal HAIs, and its use should be monitored closely.

  19. Meta-analysis of association studies between five candidate genes and type 2 diabetes in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chen; Xueyao, Han; Linong, Ji

    2012-10-01

    The multiple small-scale association studies of candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Chinese Han population have shown inconsistent results. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the contribution of five candidate genes to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in the Chinese Han population. We searched for relevant published papers and used STATA v.11.0 to perform a meta-analysis on six single-nucleotide polymorphisms in five genes-ADIPOQ-rs2241766 (SNP45) and -rs1501299 (SNP276), ADRB3-rs4994 (Trp64Arg), CAPN10-rs3792267 (SNP43), ENPP1-rs1044498 (K121Q), and PPARGC1A-rs8192678 (Gly482Ser)-in the Chinese Han population under an additive genetic model. The pooled odds ratios (95% confidence intervals and P-values) were 0.71 (0.60-0.83; P ADRB3-rs4994, 0.79 (0.57-1.10; P = 0.163) for CAPN10-rs3792267, 1.41 (1.13-1.76; P = 0.003) for ENPP1-rs1044498, and 1.54 (1.34-1.81; P ADRB3-rs4994, ENPP1-rs1044498, and PPARGC1A-rs8192678 (I² = 0.0, 43.4, and 23.3%, respectively). Under an additive genetic model, the C allele of ADRB3-rs4994, the C allele of ENPP1-rs1044498, and the A allele of PPARGC1A-rs8192678 increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in the Chinese Han population. PMID:22391941

  20. Opposite Associations between Individual KIAA0319 Polymorphisms and Developmental Dyslexia Risk across Populations: A Stratified Meta-Analysis by the Study Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shanshan; Niu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kong, Rui; Wang, Jia; Liu, Lingfei; Luo, Xiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Song, Ranran

    2016-01-01

    KIAA0319 at the DYX2 locus is one of the most extensively studied candidate genes for developmental dyslexia (DD) owing to its important role in neuronal migration. Previous research on associations between KIAA0319 genetic variations and DD has yielded inconsistent results. It is important to establish a more precise estimate of the DD risk associated with these genetic variations. We carried out a meta-analysis of association studies involving KIAA0319 polymorphisms and DD risk. The results of pooled analysis indicated that none of the six investigated markers in or near the KIAA0319 gene are associated with DD. However, a stratified analysis by the study population revealed opposite associations involving KIAA0319 rs4504469 in European and Asian subgroups. The stratified analysis also showed that the KIAA0319 rs9461045 minor allele (T allele) has a protective effect in Asians. This meta-analysis has allowed us to establish the effects of specific KIAA0319 polymorphisms on DD risk with greater precision, as they vary across populations; analyzing one single nucleotide polymorphism at a time could not fully explain the genetic association for DD. PMID:27464509

  1. CCRaVAT and QuTie - enabling analysis of rare variants in large-scale case control and quantitative trait association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Katherine S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies have been successful in finding common variants influencing common traits. However, these associations only account for a fraction of trait heritability. There has been a shift in the field towards studying low frequency and rare variants, which are now widely recognised as putative complex trait determinants. Despite this increasing focus on examining the role of low frequency and rare variants in complex disease susceptibility, there is a lack of user-friendly analytical packages implementing powerful association tests for the analysis of rare variants. Results We have developed two software tools, CCRaVAT (Case-Control Rare Variant Analysis Tool and QuTie (Quantitative Trait, which enable efficient large-scale analysis of low frequency and rare variants. Both programs implement a collapsing method examining the accumulation of low frequency and rare variants across a locus of interest that has more power than single variant analysis. CCRaVAT carries out case-control analyses whereas QuTie has been developed for continuous trait analysis. Conclusions CCRaVAT and QuTie are easy to use software tools that allow users to perform genome-wide association analysis on low frequency and rare variants for both binary and quantitative traits. The software is freely available and provides the genetics community with a resource to perform association analysis on rarer genetic variants.

  2. An Optimal Bahadur-Efficient Method in Detection of Sparse Signals with Applications to Pathway Analysis in Sequencing Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guodong; Wu, Michael; Zhi, Degui

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing data pose a severe curse of dimensionality, complicating traditional "single marker—single trait" analysis. We propose a two-stage combined p-value method for pathway analysis. The first stage is at the gene level, where we integrate effects within a gene using the Sequence Kernel Association Test (SKAT). The second stage is at the pathway level, where we perform a correlated Lancaster procedure to detect joint effects from multiple genes within a pathway. We show that the Lancaster procedure is optimal in Bahadur efficiency among all combined p-value methods. The Bahadur efficiency,limε→0N(2)/N(1)=ϕ12(θ), compares sample sizes among different statistical tests when signals become sparse in sequencing data, i.e. ε →0. The optimal Bahadur efficiency ensures that the Lancaster procedure asymptotically requires a minimal sample size to detect sparse signals (PN(i)<ε→0). The Lancaster procedure can also be applied to meta-analysis. Extensive empirical assessments of exome sequencing data show that the proposed method outperforms Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). We applied the competitive Lancaster procedure to meta-analysis data generated by the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium to identify pathways significantly associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. PMID:27380176

  3. Association between Soy Isoflavone Intake and Breast Cancer Risk for Pre- and Post-Menopausal Women: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Meinan Chen; Yanhua Rao; Yi Zheng; Shiqing Wei; Ye Li; Tong Guo; Ping Yin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conclusions drawn from meta-analyses on the association between soy isoflavone intake and breast cancer risk for pre- and post-menopausal women are not fully consistent. These meta-analyses did not explore the influence of different study designs on the pooled results on the basis of distinguishing between pre- and post-menopausal women. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis of 35 studies which reported results of association between soy isoflavone intak...

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies six new Loci for serum calcium concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conall M O'Seaghdha

    Full Text Available Calcium is vital to the normal functioning of multiple organ systems and its serum concentration is tightly regulated. Apart from CASR, the genes associated with serum calcium are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 39,400 individuals from 17 population-based cohorts and investigated the 14 most strongly associated loci in ≤ 21,679 additional individuals. Seven loci (six new regions in association with serum calcium were identified and replicated. Rs1570669 near CYP24A1 (P = 9.1E-12, rs10491003 upstream of GATA3 (P = 4.8E-09 and rs7481584 in CARS (P = 1.2E-10 implicate regions involved in Mendelian calcemic disorders: Rs1550532 in DGKD (P = 8.2E-11, also associated with bone density, and rs7336933 near DGKH/KIAA0564 (P = 9.1E-10 are near genes that encode distinct isoforms of diacylglycerol kinase. Rs780094 is in GCKR. We characterized the expression of these genes in gut, kidney, and bone, and demonstrate modulation of gene expression in bone in response to dietary calcium in mice. Our results shed new light on the genetics of calcium homeostasis.

  5. Red and Processed Meat Intake Is Associated with Higher Gastric Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiological Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Zhang, Chi; Zhu, Chen; Tao, Guangzhou; ZHAO, LIANJUN; Tang, Shaowen; Shu, Zheng; Cai, Jing; Dai, Shengbin; Qin, Qin; Xu, Liping; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2013-01-01

    Background Red and processed meat was concluded as a limited-suggestive risk factor of gastric cancer by the World Cancer Research Fund. However, recent epidemiological studies have yielded inconclusive results. Methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to April 2013 for both cohort and case-control studies which assessed the association between red and/or processed meat intake and gastric cancer risk. Study-specific relative risk estimates were polled...

  6. Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals no gain in power for association studies of common variants in the Finnish Saami

    OpenAIRE

    Huyghe, Jeroen R; Fransen, Erik; Hannula, Samuli; Van Laer, Lut; Van Eyken, Els; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana; Aikio, Pekka; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2009-01-01

    The Saami from Fennoscandia are believed to represent an ancient, genetically isolated population with no evidence of population expansion. Theoretical work has indicated that under this demographic scenario, extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) is generated by genetic drift. Therefore, it has been suggested that the Saami would be particularly suited for genetic association studies, offering a substantial power advantage and allowing more economic study designs. However, no study has yet as...

  7. Positive Association between APOA5 rs662799 Polymorphism and Coronary Heart Disease: A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huadan Ye

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5 is associated with plasma triglyceride (TG levels, a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD. This study explored the association between CHD and the APOA5 rs662799 polymorphism.We collected 1,521 samples (783 CHD patients and 738 controls for this case-control study. Meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager Software and Stata Software.Significant differences were observed between CHD cases and controls at the level of both genotype (χ2 = 8.964, df = 2, P = 0.011 and allele (χ2 = 9.180, df = 1, P = 0.002, OR = 1.275, 95% CI = 1.089-1.492. A breakdown analysis by gender showed a significant association of APOA5 rs662799 with CHD in males (χ2 = 7.770, df = 1, P = 0.005; OR = 1.331, 95% CI = 1.088-1.628. An additional meta-analysis using 21378 cases and 28428 controls established that rs662799 is significantly associated with CHD (P < 0.00001.Both our case-control study and meta-analysis confirm a significant association between APOA5 rs662799 and CHD. In addition, our results suggest a male-specific association between the APOA5 rs662799 polymorphism and CHD.

  8. Associations between postprandial insulin and blood glucose responses, appetite sensations and energy intake in normal weight and overweight individuals: a meta-analysis of test meal studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flint, Anne; Gregersen, Nikolaj T.; Gluud, Lise L.;

    2007-01-01

    is unclear whether postprandial blood glucose or insulin exerts a regulatory function in short-term appetite regulation in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate, by use of meta-analysis, the role of blood glucose and insulin in short-term appetite sensation and energy intake (EI) in...... frequently in the postprandial period. Finally, an ad libitum lunch was served. Data were analysed by fixed effects study level (SL) meta-regression analysis and individual participant data (IPD) regression analysis, using STATA software. In SL analysis, postprandial insulin response was associated with...... decreased hunger in ALL, NW and OW (P<0 center dot 0 19), and with increased satiety in NW (P= 0.004) and lower subsequent El in OW (P=0 center dot 022). Multivariate IPD analysis showed similar associations, but only in NW for hunger, satiety and El (P <0.028), and in ALL for El (P=0 center dot 016). The...

  9. Time-to-Event Analysis of Individual Variables Associated with Nursing Students' Academic Failure: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, Angelo; Fabris, Stefano; Palese, Alvisa

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies and conceptual frameworks presented in the extant literature offer a static imagining of academic failure. Time-to-event analysis, which captures the dynamism of individual factors, as when they determine the failure to properly tailor timely strategies, impose longitudinal studies which are still lacking within the field. The…

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei;

    2011-01-01

    population-based cohorts and then examined the ten most strongly associated new susceptibility loci in an additional 5,419 affected individuals and 19,833 controls from 14 studies. Three SNPs reached genome-wide significance in the discovery and replication cohorts combined, including rs479844 upstream of...

  11. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus : the DAMAGE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; van't Riet, Esther; van Haeften, Timon W.; Arp, Pascal A.; Hansen, Torben; Kremer, Dennis; Groenewoud, Marlous J.; van Hove, Els C.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Jan W. A.; Nijpels, Giel; Heine, Robert J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Pedersen, Oluf; Slagboom, P. Eline; Maassen, Johannes A.; Hofker, Marten H.; 't Hart, Leen M.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes me

  12. The Association Studies of Intelligence Analysis Thinking%情报分析思维的关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱明; 杨雁莹

    2015-01-01

    通过对CNKI中以情报分析和思维为主题的文献进行关键词频次和关联等的分析,发现《情报杂志》是此类文献的核心收录期刊和心理学与情报分析思维关联的内容。通过对文献和案例梳理,探讨了情报分析思维的类型和特点,将情报分析思维的基本结构归结为认知、突破、元认知、逻辑假设和评估。%Based on literature keywords frequency and correlation analysis of intelligence analysis and thinking themes in CNKI, Journal of Intelligence is found to be the core periodicals of this kind of literature, and has the associated contents of psychology and intelligence anal-ysis thinking. Through reviewing the literature and cases related, the types and characteristics of intelligence analysis thinking are dis-cussed;the basic structure of intelligence analysis thinking is summarized as cognition, breakthrough, metacognition, logical assumptions and evaluation.

  13. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: the DAMAGE study

    OpenAIRE

    Reiling, Erwin; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; van't Riet, Esther; van Haeften, Timon W; Arp, Pascal A; Hansen, Torben; Kremer, Dennis; Groenewoud, Marlous J.; van Hove, Els C.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Jan W. A.; Nijpels, Giel; Heine, Robert J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Pedersen, Oluf

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using a two-stage design. In the first stage, we analyzed 62 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Hoorn study (n=999 participants) covering all common variation in 13...

  14. Analysis of Associations Between Contemporaneous Job Corps Performance Measures and Impact Estimates from the National Job Corps Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Fortson; Peter Z. Schochet

    2011-01-01

    Conducted in 1993, the National Job Corps Study (NJCS) found Job Corps improved education and training outcomes, reduced criminal activity, and improved earnings and employment outcomes. However, impacts on key outcomes were not associated with overall center performance measures. This study analyzed the relationship between unadjusted and regression-adjusted Job Corps performance measures and center-level impact estimates from the NJCS and found the adjusted performance ratings were uncorrel...

  15. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes identified by the transethnic meta-analysis study: assessment in American Indians and evidence for a new signal in LPP

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Anup K; Muller, Yunhua Li; McLean, Nellie A.; Abdussamad, Maryam; Piaggi, Paolo; Kobes, Sayuko; Weil, E. Jennifer; Jeffrey M Curtis; Nelson, Robert G.; Knowler, William C.; Hanson, Robert L.; Baier, Leslie J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim/hypothesis A recent genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis identified seven new loci associated with type 2 diabetes. We assessed the replication of the seven lead single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and evaluated these loci for additional signals in American Indians. Methods Seven SNPs were genotyped in 7,710 individuals from a longitudinally studied American Indian population, and associations with type 2 diabetes, BMI and related phenotypes were assessed. Previous genome-wide asso...

  16. Vitamin D receptor rs2228570 polymorphism and invasive ovarian carcinoma risk: pooled analysis in five studies within the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J; Carney, Michael E; Palmieri, Rachel T; Pharoah, Paul D P; Song, Honglin; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; DiCioccio, Richard A; McGuire, Valerie; Whittemore, Alice S; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Goodman, Marc T

    2011-01-01

    The association of invasive ovarian carcinoma risk with the functional polymorphism rs2228570 (aka rs10735810; FokI polymorphism) in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene was examined in 1820 white non-Hispanic cases and 3479 controls in a pooled analysis of five population-based case-control studies...... analysis provides further evidence that the VDR rs2228570 polymorphism might influence ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  17. Spatial Point Pattern Analysis of Human Settlements and Geographical Associations in Eastern Coastal China — A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhonghao Zhang; Rui Xiao; Ashton Shortridge; Jiaping Wu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial point pattern of human settlements and their geographical associations are important for understanding the drivers of land use and land cover change and the relationship between environmental and ecological processes on one hand and cultures and lifestyles on the other. In this study, a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach, Ripley’s K function and Monte Carlo simulation were used to investigate human settlement point patterns. Remotely sensed tools and regres...

  18. Association of Adiponectin SNP+45 and SNP+276 with Type 2 Diabetes in Han Chinese Populations: A Meta-Analysis of 26 Case-Control Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yiping Li; Xianli Li; Li Shi; Man Yang; Ying Yang; Wenyu Tao; Lei Shi; Yuxin Xiong; Ying Zhang; Yufeng Yao

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many studies have reported that the SNP+45(T>G) and SNP+276(G>T) polymorphisms in the adiponectin gene are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the Chinese Han population. However, the previous studies yielded many conflicting results. Thus, a meta-analysis of the association of the adiponectin gene with T2DM in the Chinese Han population is required. In the current study, we first determined the distribution of the adiponectin SNP+276 polymorphism in T2DM and nondiabetes (NDM)...

  19. Risk factors associated with hantavirosis fatality: a regional analysis from a case-control study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Antunes Willemann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Brazil, hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS has a high lethality rate that varies by region. This study aimed to identify the risk factors associated with fatal hantavirosis. Methods: This study was a case-control study that included all laboratory confirmed cases of hantavirosis. The cases were stratified by the different Brazilian regions using data from the Notifiable Diseases Information System. “Cases” were patients who progressed to death, whereas “controls” were patients who were cured. The odds ratio (OR and the adjusted OR were calculated. Results: Overall, 158 cases and 281 controls were included in this study. In the Midwest region, the cases were 60% less likely to present with flank pain, and the time between the beginning of symptoms and death was shorter than the time between the beginning of symptoms and a cure. In the Southeast region, the cases were 60% less likely to present with thrombocytopenia or reside in rural areas compared to those who progressed to a cure. Additionally, the cases sought medical assistance, notification and investigation more quickly than the controls. In the Southern region, the cases that died were 70% less likely to be male compared to the controls. Conclusions: HCPS manifests with nonspecific symptoms, and there are few published studies related to the condition, so determining a patient's therapeutic strategy is difficult. This study presents findings from different Brazilian regions and highlights the need for further investigations to improve comprehension about regional risk factors associated with hantavirosis and to reduce morbimortality.

  20. Association between LGALS2 3279C>T and coronary artery disease: A case-control study and a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIAN, JIANGFANG; FANG, PEILIANG; DAI, DONGJUN; BA, YANNA; YANG, XI; HUANG, XIAOYAN; LI, JUNXIN; CHEN, XIAOLIANG; GUO, JIAN; GUAN, FENG; PENG, PING; ZHAO, RUOCHI; ZHANG, SHANGSHI; GAO, FANG; TANG, LINLIN; ZHANG, CHENG; JI, HUIHUI; HONG, QINGXIAO; YE, HUADAN; XU, LIMIN; ZHONG, QILONG; LIU, PANPAN; ZHOU, JIANQING; DUAN, SHIWEI

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become the main cause of mortality worldwide. Lectin galactoside-binding soluble-2 (LGALS2) is involved in the cytokine lymphotoxin-α (LTA) cascade that may influence the progress of CAD. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the LGALS2 3279C>T (rs7291467) polymorphism and CAD. A total of 562 cases and 572 controls were recruited to examine the association. A systematic meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the contribution of LGALS2 3279C>T polymorphism to the risk of CAD among 12,093 cases and 11,020 controls. There was no significant association found in the present case-control study. However, the meta-analysis showed that LGALS2 3279C>T played a protective role in CAD [P=0.008, odds ratio (OR), 0.90; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.82–0.97] and particularly in the Asian population (P=0.006; OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71–0.94). The present case-control study did not find a significant association between LGALS2 3279C>T and CAD in the Eastern Han Chinese population. However, the meta-analysis indicated that LGALS2 3279C>T played a protective role in CAD, suggesting an ethnic difference in the association of the locus with CAD. PMID:25279163

  1. ERAP1 variants are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in East Asian population: a new Chinese case-control study and meta-analysis of published series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Zhang, X

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) has been confirmed to be associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Caucasian. However, whether they are associated with AS in East Asian population remains unidentified. We investigated this relationship by a new Chinese case-control study and a meta-analysis of published series. 368 cases and 460 controls were recruited in the Chinese case-control study. Genotyping was completed using the chip-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Allelic associations were analysed using contingency tables. In the meta-analysis, up to 2748 cases and 2774 controls from seven different studies and the new Chinese study were combined using Review Manager software version 5.1.1. Mantel-Haenszel or Inverse Variance test was used to calculate fixed or random-effects pooled ORs. In the new Chinese study, strong association with AS was observed for marker rs10050860, rs27434 and rs1065407 at P value of ERAP1 variants are associated with AS in East Asian population, indicating a common pathogenic mechanism for AS in East Asians and Caucasians. PMID:25817437

  2. Association between IGF2BP2 Polymorphisms and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case–Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ping; Wang, Hao; Fang, Honghong; Gao, Qing; Zhang, Jie; Song, Manshu; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Youxin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) found that IGF2BP2 rs4402960 and rs1470579 polymorphisms were associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk. Many studies have replicated this association, but yielded inconsistent results. Materials and Methods: A case-control study consisting of 461 T2DM patients and 434 health controls was conducted to detect the genetic susceptibility of IGF2BP2 in a northern Han Chinese population. A meta-analysis was to evaluate the association more precisely in Asians. Results: In the case-control study, the carriers of TT genotype at rs4402960 had a higher T2DM risk than the G carriers (TG + GG) (adjusted odd ratio (AOR) = 1.962, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.065–3.612, p = 0.031]; CC carriers at rs1470579 were more susceptible to T2DM than A carriers (CA + AA) (AOR = 2.014, 95% CI = 1.114–3.642, p = 0.021). The meta-analysis containing 36 studies demonstrated that the two polymorphisms were associated with T2DM under the allele comparison, genetic models of dominant and recessive in Asians (p Asian populations. PMID:27294943

  3. The filaggrin null genotypes R501X and 2282del4 seem not to be associated with psoriasis: results from general population study and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Carlsen, Berit Christina;

    2012-01-01

    status by using cross-sectional general population questionnaire data. Also, to perform a meta-analysis including published studies that investigated the relation between filaggrin gene mutations R501X and 2282del4, respectively, and psoriasis vulgaris. Methods Between June 2006 and May 2008, a cross...... with the R501X and 2282del4 filaggrin null genotypes in a general population study and in a meta-analysis on published studies....... uninvolved skin. So far five relatively small patient-based case-control studies have rejected a possible association between psoriasis and the two most prevalent filaggrin null mutations, 2282del4 and R501X. Objectives To reinvestigate a possible association between psoriasis and filaggrin null mutation...

  4. Pathway Analysis Using Genome-Wide Association Study Data for Coronary Restenosis - A Potential Role for the PARVB Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Verschuren, Jeffrey J.W.; Trompet, Stella; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Koch, Werner; Kastrati, Adnan; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Slagboom, P Eline; Quax, Paul H. A.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) still remains a significant limitation of the procedure. The causative mechanisms of restenosis have not yet been fully identified. The goal of the current study was to perform gene-set analysis of biological pathways related to inflammation, proliferation, vascular function and transcriptional regulation on coronary restenosis to identify novel genes and pathways related to this condition. Methods The GENetic DEter...

  5. Reduced Serum Level of Interleukin-10 is Associated with Cerebral Infarction: A Case-Control and Meta-Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifei; Yang, Haiqing; Diao, Zengyan; Li, Yi; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    IL-10 expression limits inflammation and restricts the size of CNS damage from stroke. In this study, we examined the correlation between cerebral infarction (CI) and serum levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) using a combination of case-control study and meta-analysis of published data, with an aim of understanding the relevance of serum IL-10 levels to CI development. This study enrolled a total of 169 CI patients admitted to the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University between May 2011 and November 2014. During the same period, a group of 145 individuals were recruited at the same hospital as healthy controls after thorough physical examination. Serum IL-10 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SPSS 19.0 (IBM, 2010, Chicago, IL, USA) and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 2.0 (CMA 2.0) software were used for data analysis. Serum levels of IL-10 (pg/mL) were significantly lower in CI patients when compared to healthy controls (15.36 ± 3.21 vs. 21.64 ± 5.17, t = 13.12, P  0.05). Logistic regression analysis indicated that, with the exception of triglyceride (TG) and uric acid (UA) levels (both P > 0.05), the other seven parameters, including fasting blood glucose (FPG), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), creatinine (Cr), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), strongly correlated with CI development (all P relationship in Asians (SMD = 2.522, 95 % CI 0.468~4.576, P = 0.016) but not in Caucasians (P > 0.05). Our study provided convincing evidence that the patients with CI exhibit consistently reduced serum levels of IL-10, and IL-10 may be a major player in the development and progression of CI. PMID:26253723

  6. Meta-analysis of the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer based on case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliu Peng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 is an inducible enzyme converting arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and playing important roles in inflammatory diseases as well as tumor development. Previous studies investigating the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer (CRC risk reported conflicting results. We performed a meta-analysis of all available studies to explore this association. METHODS: All studies published up to October 2013 on the association between COX-2 polymorphisms and CRC risk were identified by searching electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library. The association between COX-2 polymorphisms and CRC risk was assessed by odds ratios (ORs together with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: Ten studies with 6,774 cases and 9,772 controls were included for -1195A>G polymorphism, 13 studies including 6,807 cases and 10,052 controls were available for -765G>C polymorphism, and 8 studies containing 5,121 cases and 7,487 controls were included for 8473T>C polymorphism. With respect to -765G>C polymorphism, we did not find a significant association with CRC risk when all eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. However, in subgroup analyses by ethnicity and cancer location, with a Bonferroni corrected alpha of 0.05/2, statistical significant increased CRC risk was found in the Asian populations (dominant model CC+CG vs. GG: OR = 1.399, 95%CI: 1.113-1.760, P = 0.004 and rectum cancer patients (CC vs. GG: OR = 2.270, 95%CI: 1.295-3.980, P = 0.004; Recessive model CC vs. CG+GG: OR = 2.269, 95%CI: 1.297-3.970, P = 0.004. In subgroup analysis according to source of control, no significant association was detected. With respect to -1195A>G and 8473T>C polymorphisms, no significant association with CRC risk was demonstrated in the overall and subgroup analyses. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis suggests that the COX-2 -765G>C polymorphism may be a risk factor for

  7. Combined analysis of genome-wide association studies for Crohn disease and psoriasis identifies seven shared susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Nair, Rajan P; Stuart, Philip E; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Debrus, Sophie; Raelson, John V; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Belouchi, Majid; West, Sarah L; Barker, Jonathan N; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Balschun, Tobias; Palmieri, Orazio; Annese, Vito; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H Erich; Kabesch, Michael; Trembath, Richard C; Mathew, Christopher G; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Weidinger, Stephan; Nikolaus, Susanna; Schreiber, Stefan; Elder, James T; Weichenthal, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Franke, Andre

    2012-04-01

    Psoriasis (PS) and Crohn disease (CD) have been shown to be epidemiologically, pathologically, and therapeutically connected, but little is known about their shared genetic causes. We performed meta-analyses of five published genome-wide association studies on PS (2,529 cases and 4,955 controls) and CD (2,142 cases and 5,505 controls), followed up 20 loci that showed strongest evidence for shared disease association and, furthermore, tested cross-disease associations for previously reported PS and CD risk alleles in additional 6,115 PS cases, 4,073 CD cases, and 10,100 controls. We identified seven susceptibility loci outside the human leukocyte antigen region (9p24 near JAK2, 10q22 at ZMIZ1, 11q13 near PRDX5, 16p13 near SOCS1, 17q21 at STAT3, 19p13 near FUT2, and 22q11 at YDJC) shared between PS and CD with genome-wide significance (p diseases and enlarge the map of shared genetic risk loci. PMID:22482804

  8. Associations of Suboptimal Growth with All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in Children under Five Years: A Pooled Analysis of Ten Prospective Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ibironke Olofin; Christine M McDonald; Majid Ezzati; Seth Flaxman; Black, Robert E; Wafaie W Fawzi; Caulfield, Laura E.; Goodarz Danaei

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Child undernutrition affects millions of children globally. We investigated associations between suboptimal growth and mortality by pooling large studies. METHODS: Pooled analysis involving children 1 week to 59 months old in 10 prospective studies in Africa, Asia and South America. Utilizing most recent measurements, we calculated weight-for-age, height/length-for-age and weight-for-height/length Z scores, applying 2006 WHO Standards and the 1977 NCHS/WHO Reference. We estimated ...

  9. Association of Vitamin E Intake with Reduced Risk of Kidney Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Chongxing; Huang, Ying; Yi, Shanhong; Fang, Zhenqiang; Li, Longkun

    2015-01-01

    Background Several observational studies suggested that vitamin E intake is related to the risk of kidney cancer; however, the results of published studies are inconsistent. Material/Methods A meta-analysis was performed to assess the relationship between vitamin E intake and the risk of kidney cancer by searching PubMed and Medline through August 2015. We computed pooled relative risks (RR) and 95%CI of kidney cancer for the highest versus lowest level of vitamin E intake. Results A total of...

  10. Association between mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 20 case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs profiles can be used as diagnostic markers for human cancers. The associations between mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1 SNPs rs889312 A>C, rs16886165 T>G and breast cancer risk have been widely evaluated, but the results were inconsistent. To derive a conclusive assessment of the associations, we performed a meta-analysis by combining data from all eligible case-control studies up to date. METHODS: By searching PubMed, ISI web of knowledge, Embase and Cochrane databases, we identified all eligible studies published before September 2013. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to assess the strength of associations in fixed-effect or random-effect model. False-positive report probability (FPRP was calculated to confirm the significance of the results. RESULTS: A total of 59670 cases in 20 case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for SNPs rs889312 and rs16886165 polymorphisms with a per-allele OR of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.09-1.13 and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.09-1.20 respectively. For rs889312, in subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significant associations were identified in Europeans and Asians, but not in Africans. When stratified by estrogen receptor (ER expression status, rs889312 was associated with both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. Results from the FPRP analyses were consistent with and supportive to the above results. CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis suggests that rs889312-C allele and rs16886165-G allele might be risk factors for breast cancer, especially in Europeans and Asians.

  11. Double genomic control is not effective to correct for population stratification in meta-analysis for genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shudong; Chen, Wenan; Chen, Xiangning; Hu, Fengjiao; Archer, Kellie J; Liu, Hb Nianjun; Sun, Shumei; Gao, Guimin

    2012-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become a useful tool to identify genetic variants that are associated with complex human diseases. To control spurious associations between genetic variants and disease that are caused by population stratification, double genomic control (GC) correction for population stratification in meta-analysis for GWAS has been implemented in the software METAL and GWAMA and is widely used by investigators. In this research, we conducted extensive simulation studies to evaluate the double GC correction method in meta-analysis and compared the performance of the double GC correction with that of a principal components analysis (PCA) correction method in meta-analysis. Results show that when the data consist of population stratification, using double GC correction method can have inflated type I error rates at a marker with significant allele frequency differentiation in the subpopulations (such as caused by recent strong selection). On the other hand, the PCA correction method can control type I error rates well and has much higher power in meta-analysis compared to the double GC correction method, even though in the situation that the casual marker does not have significant allele frequency difference between the subpopulations. We applied the double GC correction and PCA correction to meta-analysis of GWAS for two real datasets from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) project and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) project. The results also suggest that PCA correction is more effective than the double GC correction in meta-analysis. PMID:23269928

  12. Strong association of 677 C>T substitution in the MTHFR gene with male infertility--a study on an indian population and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishi Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is an important enzyme of folate and methionine metabolism, making it crucial for DNA synthesis and methylation. The objective of this study was to analyze MTHFR gene 677C>T polymorphism in infertile male individuals from North India, followed by a meta-analysis on our data and published studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook genotyping on a total of 837 individuals including well characterized infertile (N = 522 and confirmed fertile (N = 315 individuals. The SNP was typed by direct DNA sequencing. Chi square test was done for statistical analysis. Published studies were searched using appropriate keywords. Source of data collection for meta-analysis included 'Pubmed', 'Ovid' and 'Google Scholar'. Those studies analyzing 677C>T polymorphism in male infertility and presenting all relevant data were included in meta-analysis. The genotype data for infertile subjects and fertile controls was extracted from each study. Chi square test was done to obtain odds ratio (OR and p-value. Meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis software (Version 2. The frequency of mutant (T allele (p = 0.0025 and genotypes (CT+TT (p = 0.0187 was significantly higher in infertile individuals in comparison to fertile controls in our case-control study. The overall summary estimate (OR for allele and genotype meta-analysis were 1.304 (p = 0.000, 1.310 (p = 0.000, respectively, establishing significant association of 677C>T polymorphism with male infertility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: 677C>T substitution associated strongly with male infertility in Indian population. Allele and genotype meta-analysis also supported its strong correlation with male infertility, thus establishing it as a risk factor.

  13. The association between the ring finger protein 213 (RNF213) polymorphisms and moyamoya disease susceptibility: a meta-analysis based on case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun-Sha; Wen, Jun; Li, Jiao-Xing; Lai, Rong; Wang, Yu-Fang; Liu, Hui-Jiao; Sheng, Wen-Li

    2016-06-01

    A number of studies assessed the association of ring finger protein 213 (RNF213) gene polymorphisms with moyamoya disease (MMD), but the results were not entirely consistent. This meta-analysis was performed to explore the relationship between RNF213 polymorphisms and moyamoya disease in Asian population. A systematic search from the PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI web of science, CNKI, China CBM and WANFANG DATA databases was conducted to retrieve published studies until March 2015. Statistical analyses were performed using the STATA12.0 software. Fixed or random effects model, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and publication bias were used to improve the comprehensive analysis. Eight papers including 904 MMD patients and 2258 controls were recruited in the meta-analysis. rs112735431 was closely associated with the risk of MMD among Asian population in all genetic models (dominant model: OR 103.39, 95 % CI 52.25-204.55, P = 1.69e-40; recessive model: OR 16.45, 95 % CI 6.00-45.10, P = 5.33e-08; additive model: OR 61.49, 95 % CI 22.07-171.33, P = 3.32e-15), especially in the Japanese population. Subgroup analysis revealed highly statistically significant higher risk in the patients with family histories. Although another polymorphism rs148731719 showed no significant association with the MMD, rs138130613 was found to be related to the higher risk in Chinese population (dominant model: OR 8.34, 95 % CI 1.72-40.47, P = 0.008). Our meta-analysis strengthens RNF213 rs112735431 is closely associated with the increased risk of MMD in Japanese, and the screening combined with rs112735431 and rs138130613may improve the detection rate for MMD in China. PMID:26847828

  14. Association between CD14 SNP -159 C/T and gastric cancer: an independent case–control study and an updated meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ai-Min; Li, Xin-Yuan; Xie, Yi-Qiang; Jia, Zhan-Dong; Li, Yuan-Xin; Zou, Yong-Yan; Xu, Chang-Qing; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between CD14 -159C/T polymorphism and the susceptibility to gastric cancer (GC) has been reported. However, the results were inconclusive. In the present study, a case–control study and a meta-analysis were performed to assess the possible association between -159C/T in the CD14 gene and GC risk. Patients and methods Relevant studies were searched in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, and Wanfang database (last search was performed on December 30, 2015). In addition, a case–control study involving 164 GC cases and 169 controls was also performed in the analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by the software Revman5.3. Results A total of ten published studies and the present case–control study involving 2,844 GC and 3,983 controls were included for the meta-analysis. The analysis result indicated that the T allele of CD14 -159C/T polymorphism did not confer risk for GC (in our study: [P=0.93]; in the meta-analysis: T vs 2N odds ratio =1.28 and 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.95–1.24, [P=0.24]). However, we found a significant association in the recessive model (in our study: TT vs TC+CC [P=0.04]; in the meta-analysis: TT vs TC+CC odds ratio =1.12 and 95% CI =1.01–1.26, [P=0.04]). Furthermore, a subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed that TT genotype was significantly associated with GC in Asian (odds ratio =1.17 and 95% CI =1.02–1.34, [P=0.02]) but not in Caucasian. Conclusion Our results highlight the TT genotype of CD14 -159C/T as a genetic susceptibility factor for gastric cancer, particularly, in Asians and population-based controls. PMID:27486336

  15. Meta-analysis of the INSIG2 association with obesity including 74,345 individuals: does heterogeneity of estimates relate to study design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris M Heid

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism was identified for obesity (BMI> or =30 kg/m(2 in one of the first genome-wide association studies, but replications were inconsistent. We collected statistics from 34 studies (n = 74,345, including general population (GP studies, population-based studies with subjects selected for conditions related to a better health status ('healthy population', HP, and obesity studies (OB. We tested five hypotheses to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. The meta-analysis of 27 studies on Caucasian adults (n = 66,213 combining the different study designs did not support overall association of the CC-genotype with obesity, yielding an odds ratio (OR of 1.05 (p-value = 0.27. The I(2 measure of 41% (p-value = 0.015 indicated between-study heterogeneity. Restricting to GP studies resulted in a declined I(2 measure of 11% (p-value = 0.33 and an OR of 1.10 (p-value = 0.015. Regarding the five hypotheses, our data showed (a some difference between GP and HP studies (p-value = 0.012 and (b an association in extreme comparisons (BMI> or =32.5, 35.0, 37.5, 40.0 kg/m(2 versus BMI<25 kg/m(2 yielding ORs of 1.16, 1.18, 1.22, or 1.27 (p-values 0.001 to 0.003, which was also underscored by significantly increased CC-genotype frequencies across BMI categories (10.4% to 12.5%, p-value for trend = 0.0002. We did not find evidence for differential ORs (c among studies with higher than average obesity prevalence compared to lower, (d among studies with BMI assessment after the year 2000 compared to those before, or (e among studies from older populations compared to younger. Analysis of non-Caucasian adults (n = 4889 or children (n = 3243 yielded ORs of 1.01 (p-value = 0.94 or 1.15 (p-value = 0.22, respectively. There was no evidence for overall association of the rs7566605 polymorphism with obesity. Our data suggested an association with extreme degrees of obesity, and consequently heterogeneous effects from different study designs may

  16. Association between endothelial nitric oxide synthase 894G>T polymorphism and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of literature studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cheng; Yan, Weiqian; Zu, Xiongbing; Chen, Minfeng; Liu, Longfei; Zhao, Shushan; Liu, Hong; Hu, Xia; Luo, Renna; Xia, Yang; Qi, Lin

    2014-12-01

    To date, several studies have been conducted to assess the association between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene 894G > T polymorphism and prostate cancer (PCa) risk, but the results are conflicting. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship between 894G > T polymorphism and PCa risk, the present meta-analysis was performed. A total of eight case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI) was calculated to evaluate the associations. Our results suggested that 894G > T polymorphism is associated with PCa risk under codominant (GT vs. GG) (OR = 1.11, 95 % CI = 1.01-1.22, P = 0.04) and overdominant (GT vs. GG + TT) (OR = 1.12, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.23, P = 0.02) models in the overall population, while there are no associations observed under dominant (GT + TT vs. GG), recessive (TT vs. GG + GT), and allelic (T vs. G) models. Moreover, when the eligible studies were stratified according to sources of control, significant association between 894G > T polymorphism and susceptibility of PCa was also identified under codominant (OR = 1.12, 95 % CI = 1.01-1.24, P = 0.03) and overdominant (OR = 1.13, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.25, P = 0.02) models when using healthy individuals as control. However, there are no significant associations found under any genetic models when using BPH patients as control group. In conclusion, the present meta-analysis suggested that the eNOS gene 894G > T polymorphism might be a risk factor in the onset of PCa. PMID:25374059

  17. Association of neighborhood context with offspring risk of preterm birth and low birthweight: A systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Collette N; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Albert, Steven M; Herrick, Amy L; Burke, Jessica G

    2016-03-01

    Findings from studies investigating associations of residential environment with poor birth outcomes have been inconsistent. In a systematic review and meta-analysis, we examined associations of neighborhood disadvantage with preterm birth (PTB) and low birthweight (LBW), and explored differences in relationships among racial groups. Two reviewers searched English language articles in electronic databases of published literature. We used random effects logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) relating neighborhood disadvantage with PTB and LBW. Neighborhood disadvantage, most disadvantaged versus least disadvantaged neighborhoods, was defined by researchers of included studies, and comprised of poverty, deprivation, racial residential segregation or racial composition, and crime. We identified 1314 citations in the systematic review. The meta-analyses included 7 PTB and 14 LBW cross-sectional studies conducted in the United States (U.S.). Overall, we found 27% [95%CI: 1.16, 1.39] and 11% [95%CI: 1.07, 1.14] higher risk for PTB and LBW among the most disadvantaged compared with least disadvantaged neighborhoods. No statistically significant association was found in meta-analyses of studies that adjusted for race. In race-stratified meta-analyses models, we found 48% [95%CI: 1.25, 1.75] and 61% [95%CI: 1.30, 2.00] higher odds of PTB and LBW among non-Hispanic white mothers living in most disadvantaged neighborhoods compared with those living in least disadvantaged neighborhoods. Similar, but less strong, associations were observed for PTB (15% [95%CI: 1.09, 1.21]) and LBW (17% [95%CI: 1.10, 1.25]) among non-Hispanic black mothers. Neighborhood disadvantage is associated with PTB and LBW, however, associations may differ by race. Future studies evaluating causal mechanisms underlying the associations, and racial/ethnic differences in associations, are warranted. PMID:26900890

  18. Association Between XRCC3 Thr241Met Polymorphism and Risk of Breast Cancer: Meta-Analysis of 23 Case-Control Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan; Li CHEN; Zhang, Fan; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that gene and environmental factors, such as BRCA1/2 mutations, ionized radiation, and chemical carcinogens, are related with breast cancer. X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) is involved in homologous repair of double DNA breaks. It was reported that Thr241Met single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in XRCC3 is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. However, the finding remains controversial. The current meta-analysis aims to determine wheth...

  19. Association between variants of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR and overweight: a systematic review and an analysis of the CoLaus study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bender

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (Q223R, K109R and K656N of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR have been tested for association with obesity-related outcomes in multiple studies, showing inconclusive results. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association of the three LEPR variants with BMI. In addition, we analysed 15 SNPs within the LEPR gene in the CoLaus study, assessing the interaction of the variants with sex. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched electronic databases, including population-based studies that investigated the association between LEPR variants Q223R, K109R and K656N and obesity- related phenotypes in healthy, unrelated subjects. We furthermore performed meta-analyses of the genotype and allele frequencies in case-control studies. Results were stratified by SNP and by potential effect modifiers. CoLaus data were analysed by logistic and linear regressions and tested for interaction with sex. The meta-analysis of published data did not show an overall association between any of the tested LEPR variants and overweight. However, the choice of a BMI cut-off value to distinguish cases from controls was crucial to explain heterogeneity in Q223R. Differences in allele frequencies across ethnic groups are compatible with natural selection of derived alleles in Q223R and K109R and of the ancient allele in K656N in Asians. In CoLaus, the rs10128072, rs3790438 and rs3790437 variants showed interaction with sex for their association with overweight, waist circumference and fat mass in linear regressions. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review and analysis of primary data from the CoLaus study did not show an overall association between LEPR SNPs and overweight. Most studies were underpowered to detect small effect sizes. A potential effect modification by sex, population stratification, as well as the role of natural selection should be addressed in future genetic association studies.

  20. Association of MHTFR Ala222Val (rs1801133 polymorphism and breast cancer susceptibility: An update meta-analysis based on 51 research studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liwa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between MHTFR Ala222Val polymorphism and breast cancer (BC risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted through researching MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases before August 2012. Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to estimate the strength of the association. Results A total of 51 studies including 20,907 cases and 23,905 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, significant associations were found between MTHFR Ala222Val polymorphism and BC risk when all studies pooled into the meta-analysis (Ala/Ala vs Val/Val: OR=0.870, 95%CI=0.789–0.958,P=0.005; Ala/Val vs Val/Val: OR=0.895, 95%CI=0.821–0.976, P=0.012; dominant model: OR=0.882, 95%CI=0.808–0.963, P=0.005; and recessive model: OR = 0.944, 95%CI=0.898–0.993, P=0.026; Ala allele vs Val allele: OR = 0.935, 95%CI=0.887–0.986, P=0.013. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the same results were found in Asian populations, while no significant associations were found for all comparison models in other Ethnicity populations. Conclusion In conclusion, our meta-analysis provides the evidence that MTHFR Ala222Val gene polymorphisms contributed to the breast cancer development. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1966146911851976

  1. Genotypic variants at 2q33 and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in China: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    OpenAIRE

    Abnet, Christian C.; Wang, Zhaoming; SONG, XIN; Hu, Nan; Zhou, Fu-You; Freedman, Neal D.; Li, Xue-Min; Yu, Kai; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zheng, Wei; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Liao, Linda M.; Lee, Maxwell P.; DING, Ti

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We conducted a meta-analysis of all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that showed nominally significant P-values in two previously published genome-wide scans that included a total of 2961 ESCC cases and 3400 controls. The meta-analysis revealed five SNPs at 2q33 with P< 5 × 10−8, and the strongest signal was rs13016963, with a combined odds ratio (95% confidence interval) o...

  2. Reporting and evaluating genetic association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Stephen P

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic association studies have become an important part of our scientific landscape. This commentary discusses some basic scientific issues which should be considered when reporting and evaluating such studies including SNP Discovery, Genotyping and Haplotype Analysis; Population Size, Matching of Cases and Controls, and Population Stratification; Phenotype Definition and Multiple Related Phenotypes; Multiple Testing; Replication; Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS; and the Role of Functional Studies. All of these elements are important in evaluating such studies and should be carefully considered when these studies are conceived and carried out.

  3. Spatial Point Pattern Analysis of Human Settlements and Geographical Associations in Eastern Coastal China — A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghao Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatial point pattern of human settlements and their geographical associations are important for understanding the drivers of land use and land cover change and the relationship between environmental and ecological processes on one hand and cultures and lifestyles on the other. In this study, a Geographic Information System (GIS approach, Ripley’s K function and Monte Carlo simulation were used to investigate human settlement point patterns. Remotely sensed tools and regression models were employed to identify the effects of geographical determinants on settlement locations in the Wen-Tai region of eastern coastal China. Results indicated that human settlements displayed regular-random-cluster patterns from small to big scale. Most settlements located on the coastal plain presented either regular or random patterns, while those in hilly areas exhibited a clustered pattern. Moreover, clustered settlements were preferentially located at higher elevations with steeper slopes and south facing aspects than random or regular settlements. Regression showed that influences of topographic factors (elevation, slope and aspect on settlement locations were stronger across hilly regions. This study demonstrated a new approach to analyzing the spatial patterns of human settlements from a wide geographical prospective. We argue that the spatial point patterns of settlements, in addition to the characteristics of human settlements, such as area, density and shape, should be taken into consideration in the future, and land planners and decision makers should pay more attention to city planning and management. Conceptual and methodological bridges linking settlement patterns to regional and site-specific geographical characteristics will be a key to human settlement studies and planning.

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Shriner, Daniel; Chen, Brian H; Li, Jiang; Chen, Wei-Min; Guo, Xiuqing; Liu, Jiankang; Bielinski, Suzette J; Yanek, Lisa R; Nalls, Michael A; Comeau, Mary E; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Jensen, Richard A; Evans, Daniel S; Sun, Yan V; An, Ping; Patel, Sanjay R; Lu, Yingchang; Long, Jirong; Armstrong, Loren L; Wagenknecht, Lynne; Yang, Lingyao; Snively, Beverly M; Palmer, Nicholette D; Mudgal, Poorva; Langefeld, Carl D; Keene, Keith L; Freedman, Barry I; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Nayak, Uma; Raffel, Leslie J; Goodarzi, Mark O; Chen, Y-D Ida; Taylor, Herman A; Correa, Adolfo; Sims, Mario; Couper, David; Pankow, James S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Doumatey, Ayo; Chen, Guanjie; Mathias, Rasika A; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Singleton, Andrew B; Zonderman, Alan B; Igo, Robert P; Sedor, John R; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Siscovick, David S; McKnight, Barbara; Rice, Kenneth; Liu, Yongmei; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Zhao, Wei; Bielak, Lawrence F; Kraja, Aldi; Province, Michael A; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William J; Lowe, William L; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Crawford, Dana C; Grundberg, Elin; Rich, Stephen S; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Loos, Ruth J F; Borecki, Ingrid B; Peyser, Patricia A; Cummings, Steven R; Psaty, Bruce M; Fornage, Myriam; Iyengar, Sudha K; Evans, Michele K; Becker, Diane M; Kao, W H Linda; Wilson, James G; Rotter, Jerome I; Sale, Michèle M; Liu, Simin; Rotimi, Charles N; Bowden, Donald W

    2014-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA) Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) association analysis was conducted in each study under the additive model after adjustment for age, sex, study site, and principal components. Meta-analysis of approximately 2.6 million genotyped and imputed SNPs in all studies was conducted using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effect model. Replications were performed to follow up 21 loci in up to 6,061 cases and 5,483 controls in African Americans, and 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls of European ancestry. We identified three known loci (TCF7L2, HMGA2 and KCNQ1) and two novel loci (HLA-B and INS-IGF2) at genome-wide significance (4.15 × 10(-94)liability scale in African Americans. Overall, this study identified two novel susceptibility loci for T2D in African Americans. A substantial number of previously reported loci are transferable to African Americans after accounting for linkage disequilibrium, enabling fine mapping of causal variants in trans-ethnic meta-analysis studies. PMID:25102180

  5. Associations of supermarket characteristics with weight status and body fat: a multilevel analysis of individuals within supermarkets (RECORD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basile Chaix

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous research on the influence of the food environment on weight status has often used impersonal measures of the food environment defined for residential neighborhoods, which ignore whether people actually use the food outlets near their residence. To assess whether supermarkets are relevant contexts for interventions, the present study explored between-residential neighborhood and between-supermarket variations in body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC, and investigated associations between brands and characteristics of supermarkets and BMI or WC, after adjustment for individual and residential neighborhood characteristics. METHODS: Participants in the RECORD Cohort Study (Paris Region, France, 2007-2008 were surveyed on the supermarket (brand and exact location where they conducted their food shopping. Overall, 7 131 participants shopped in 1 097 different supermarkets. Cross-classified multilevel linear models were estimated for BMI and WC. RESULTS: Just 11.4% of participants shopped for food primarily within their residential neighborhood. After accounting for participants' residential neighborhood, people shopping in the same supermarket had a more comparable BMI and WC than participants shopping in different supermarkets. After adjustment for individual and residential neighborhood characteristics, participants shopping in specific supermarket brands, in hard discount supermarkets (especially if they had a low education, and in supermarkets whose catchment area comprised low educated residents had a higher BMI/WC. CONCLUSION: A public health strategy to reduce excess weight may be to intervene on specific supermarkets to change food purchasing behavior, as supermarkets are where dietary preferences are materialized into definite purchased foods.

  6. Safety-critical event risk associated with cell phone tasks as measured in naturalistic driving studies: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sarah M; Hicks, Anne; Caird, Jeff K

    2016-02-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis of naturalistic driving studies involving estimates of safety-critical event risk associated with handheld device use while driving is described. Fifty-seven studies identified from targeted databases, journals and websites were reviewed in depth, and six were ultimately included. These six studies, published between 2006 and 2014, encompass seven sets of naturalistic driver data and describe original research that utilized naturalistic methods to assess the effects of distracting behaviors. Four studies involved non-commercial drivers of light vehicles and two studies involved commercial drivers of trucks and buses. Odds ratios quantifying safety-critical event (SCE) risk associated with talking, dialing, locating or answering, and texting or browsing were extracted. Stratified meta-analysis of pooled odds ratios was used to estimate SCE risk by distraction type; meta-regression was used to test for sources of heterogeneity. The results indicate that tasks that require drivers to take their eyes off the road, such as dialing, locating a phone and texting, increase SCE risk to a greater extent than tasks that do not require eyes off the road such as talking. Although talking on a handheld device did not increase SCE risk, further research is required to determine whether it indirectly influences SCE risk (e.g., by encouraging other cell phone activities). In addition, a number of study biases and quality issues of naturalistic driving studies are discussed. PMID:26724505

  7. Association between EHBP1 rs721048(A>G polymorphism and prostate cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 17 studies involving 150,678 subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao X

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiang Ao,1,* Ying Liu,1,* Xiao-Yan Bai,1 Xinjian Qu,2 Zhaowei Xu,1 Gaolei Hu,1 Min Chen,1 Huijian Wu1,21Laboratory of Molecular Medicine & Pharmacy, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 2Laboratory of Molecular Medicine & Pharmacy, School of Life Science and Medicine, Dalian University of Technology, Panjin, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China*These authors have contributed equally to this workBackground: EHBP1 rs721048(A was first identified as a prostate cancer (PCa risk in Caucasians by genome-wide association study, but subsequent replication studies involving Caucasian and other ethnicities did not produce consistent results. The aim of this study was to obtain a more definite association between rs721048(A and PCa risk.Methods: We comprehensively searched several databases updated to September 2014, including PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Google Scholar. Two authors independently screened and reviewed the eligibility of each study. The quality of the included studies was assessed by the Newcastle–Ottawa scale. The association of rs721048(A and PCa risk was assessed by pooling odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs.Results: A total of 17 studies, including 48,135 cases and 102,543 controls, published between 2008 and 2014 were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the pooled analysis demonstrated that rs721048(A was significantly associated with the risk of PCa under the allele model (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.11–1.17, P=0.000. Subgroup analysis based on ethnicity revealed a ­significant association between rs721048(A and PCa in Caucasian (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.11–1.16, P=0.000, African descent (OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.01–1.23, P=0.025, and Asian (OR=1.35, 95% CI=1.12–1.64, P=0.002.Conclusion: Our results provided strong evidence that rs721048(A could be a risk factor for PCa.Keywords: EHBP1, rs721048, meta-analysis, prostate cancer

  8. MI-GWAS: a SAS platform for the analysis of inherited and maternal genetic effects in genome-wide association studies using log-linear models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Laura E

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several platforms for the analysis of genome-wide association data are available. However, these platforms focus on the evaluation of the genotype inherited by affected (i.e. case individuals, whereas for some conditions (e.g. birth defects the genotype of the mothers of affected individuals may also contribute to risk. For such conditions, it is critical to evaluate associations with both the maternal and the inherited (i.e. case genotype. When genotype data are available for case-parent triads, a likelihood-based approach using log-linear modeling can be used to assess both the maternal and inherited genotypes. However, available software packages for log-linear analyses are not well suited to the analysis of typical genome-wide association data (e.g. including missing data. Results An integrated platform, Maternal and Inherited Analyses for Genome-wide Association Studies (MI-GWAS for log-linear analyses of maternal and inherited genetic effects in large, genome-wide datasets, is described. MI-GWAS uses SAS and LEM software in combination to appropriately format data, perform the log-linear analyses and summarize the results. This platform was evaluated using existing genome-wide data and was shown to perform accurately and relatively efficiently. Conclusions The MI-GWAS platform provides a valuable tool for the analysis of association of a phenotype or condition with maternal and inherited genotypes using genome-wide data from case-parent triads. The source code for this platform is freely available at http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/sbrr/mi-gwas.htm.

  9. Meta-analysis of the INSIG2 association with obesity including 74,345 individuals: does heterogeneity of estimates relate to study design?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heid, Iris M; Huth, Cornelia; Loos, Ruth J F;

    2009-01-01

    The INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism was identified for obesity (BMI> or =30 kg/m(2)) in one of the first genome-wide association studies, but replications were inconsistent. We collected statistics from 34 studies (n = 74,345), including general population (GP) studies, population-based studies with...... subjects selected for conditions related to a better health status ('healthy population', HP), and obesity studies (OB). We tested five hypotheses to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. The meta-analysis of 27 studies on Caucasian adults (n = 66,213) combining the different study designs did not...... support overall association of the CC-genotype with obesity, yielding an odds ratio (OR) of 1.05 (p-value = 0.27). The I(2) measure of 41% (p-value = 0.015) indicated between-study heterogeneity. Restricting to GP studies resulted in a declined I(2) measure of 11% (p-value = 0.33) and an OR of 1.10 (p...

  10. Post hoc Analysis for Detecting Individual Rare Variant Risk Associations Using Probit Regression Bayesian Variable Selection Methods in Case-Control Sequencing Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nicholas B; McDonnell, Shannon; Albright, Lisa Cannon; Teerlink, Craig; Stanford, Janet; Ostrander, Elaine A; Isaacs, William B; Xu, Jianfeng; Cooney, Kathleen A; Lange, Ethan; Schleutker, Johanna; Carpten, John D; Powell, Isaac; Bailey-Wilson, Joan; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Giles, Graham; MacInnis, Robert; Maier, Christiane; Whittemore, Alice S; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Wiklund, Fredrik; Catolona, William J; Foulkes, William; Mandal, Diptasri; Eeles, Rosalind; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ackerman, Michael J; Olson, Timothy M; Klein, Christopher J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Rare variants (RVs) have been shown to be significant contributors to complex disease risk. By definition, these variants have very low minor allele frequencies and traditional single-marker methods for statistical analysis are underpowered for typical sequencing study sample sizes. Multimarker burden-type approaches attempt to identify aggregation of RVs across case-control status by analyzing relatively small partitions of the genome, such as genes. However, it is generally the case that the aggregative measure would be a mixture of causal and neutral variants, and these omnibus tests do not directly provide any indication of which RVs may be driving a given association. Recently, Bayesian variable selection approaches have been proposed to identify RV associations from a large set of RVs under consideration. Although these approaches have been shown to be powerful at detecting associations at the RV level, there are often computational limitations on the total quantity of RVs under consideration and compromises are necessary for large-scale application. Here, we propose a computationally efficient alternative formulation of this method using a probit regression approach specifically capable of simultaneously analyzing hundreds to thousands of RVs. We evaluate our approach to detect causal variation on simulated data and examine sensitivity and specificity in instances of high RV dimensionality as well as apply it to pathway-level RV analysis results from a prostate cancer (PC) risk case-control sequencing study. Finally, we discuss potential extensions and future directions of this work. PMID:27312771

  11. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in African Americans Provides Insights into the Genetic Architecture of Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Brian H.; Li, Jiang; Chen, Wei-Min; Guo, Xiuqing; Liu, Jiankang; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Comeau, Mary E.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Jensen, Richard A.; Evans, Daniel S.; Sun, Yan V.; An, Ping; Patel, Sanjay R.; Lu, Yingchang; Long, Jirong; Armstrong, Loren L.; Wagenknecht, Lynne; Yang, Lingyao; Snively, Beverly M.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Mudgal, Poorva; Langefeld, Carl D.; Keene, Keith L.; Freedman, Barry I.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nayak, Uma; Raffel, Leslie J.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Chen, Y-D Ida; Taylor, Herman A.; Correa, Adolfo; Sims, Mario; Couper, David; Pankow, James S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Doumatey, Ayo; Chen, Guanjie; Mathias, Rasika A.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Singleton, Andrew B.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Igo, Robert P.; Sedor, John R.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Siscovick, David S.; McKnight, Barbara; Rice, Kenneth; Liu, Yongmei; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Zhao, Wei; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Kraja, Aldi; Province, Michael A.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Gottesman, Omri; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William J.; Lowe, William L.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Grundberg, Elin; Rich, Stephen S.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Fornage, Myriam; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Evans, Michele K.; Becker, Diane M.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Wilson, James G.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sale, Michèle M.; Liu, Simin; Rotimi, Charles N.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA) Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) association analysis was conducted in each study under the additive model after adjustment for age, sex, study site, and principal components. Meta-analysis of approximately 2.6 million genotyped and imputed SNPs in all studies was conducted using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effect model. Replications were performed to follow up 21 loci in up to 6,061 cases and 5,483 controls in African Americans, and 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls of European ancestry. We identified three known loci (TCF7L2, HMGA2 and KCNQ1) and two novel loci (HLA-B and INS-IGF2) at genome-wide significance (4.15×10−94association (2.2×10−23 < locus-wide P<0.05). These novel and previously identified loci yielded a sibling relative risk of 1.19, explaining 17.5% of the phenotypic variance of T2D on the liability scale in African Americans. Overall, this study identified two novel susceptibility loci for T2D in African Americans. A substantial number of previously reported loci are transferable to African Americans after accounting for linkage disequilibrium, enabling fine mapping of causal variants in trans-ethnic meta-analysis studies. PMID:25102180

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie C Y Ng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS in individuals of European ancestry. In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs association analysis was conducted in each study under the additive model after adjustment for age, sex, study site, and principal components. Meta-analysis of approximately 2.6 million genotyped and imputed SNPs in all studies was conducted using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effect model. Replications were performed to follow up 21 loci in up to 6,061 cases and 5,483 controls in African Americans, and 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls of European ancestry. We identified three known loci (TCF7L2, HMGA2 and KCNQ1 and two novel loci (HLA-B and INS-IGF2 at genome-wide significance (4.15 × 10(-94association (2.2 × 10(-23 < locus-wide P<0.05. These novel and previously identified loci yielded a sibling relative risk of 1.19, explaining 17.5% of the phenotypic variance of T2D on the liability scale in African Americans. Overall, this study identified two novel susceptibility loci for T2D in African Americans. A substantial number of previously reported loci are transferable to African Americans after accounting for linkage disequilibrium, enabling fine mapping of causal variants in trans-ethnic meta-analysis studies.

  13. Association Between RFC1 G80A Polymorphism and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: a Review and Meta-Analysis of 10 Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forat-Yazdi, M; Hosseini-Biouki, F; Salehi, J; Neamatzadeh, H; Masoumi Dehshiri, R; Sadri, Z; Ghanizadeh, F; Sheikhpour, R; Zare-Zardini, H

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates RFC1 G80A polymorphism as a risk factor for a number of cancers. Increasing studies have been conducted on the association of RFC1 G80A polymorphism with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) risk. However, the results were controversial. The aim of the present study was to derive a more precise estimation of the relationship. Materials and Method PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane database, and Google Scholar were searched to get the genetic association studies between RFC1 G80A polymorphism and ALL. All eligible studies for the period up to February 2016 were identified. Subgroup analyses regarding ethnicity were also implemented. All statistical analyses were done with CMA 2.0. Results A total of ten studies comprising of 2,168 ALL cases and 2,693 healthy controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was detected for allelic model (OR = 1.029, 95 % CI 0.754- 1.405, P=0.000), Dominant model (OR = 1.619, 95 % CI 0.847-3.094, P=0.145), recessive model (OR = 1.169, 95 % CI 10.764-1.790, P=0.429), and homozygote model (OR = 1.288, 95 % CI 0.928-1.788, P=0.130). However, there was an obvious association under the heterozygote model (OR = 1.368, 95 % CI 1.056- 1.772, P=0.018). Also, in the stratified analysis by ethnicity, no significant association of this polymorphism with risk of OC was found in the Asian and Caucasian populations. However, there was not significant heterogeneity between heterozygote genetic model (P = 0.15, I2 = 33%) in Caucasian. Therefore, we utilized the fixed-effect model to merge OR value. Conclusion Based on the available evidence, no association between RFC1 G80A Polymorphism and ALL risk was observed, even in the subanalysis by ethnicity. The direction of further research should focus not only on the simple relationship of RFC1 G80A Polymorphism and ALL risk, but also on gene–gene and gene-environment interaction. PMID:27222703

  14. Association between 17q25.3-rs6465657 polymorphism and prostate cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis based on 19 studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang X

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Jiang,1,2 Mei Zhang,3 Xiao-Yan Bai,1 Shujing Li,1 Huijian Wu1 1Laboratory of Molecular Medicine & Pharmacy, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Gastroenterology, Dalian Municipal Central Hospital Affiliated of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Haerbin, People’s Republic of China Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified rs6465657 polymorphism at chromosome 17q25.3 as a new prostate cancer (PCa susceptibility locus in people of European descent. However, subsequent replication studies have yielded inconsistent results among different ethnicities. In this study, a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the relationship between rs6465657 polymorphism and PCa risk.Methods: All the articles involved were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, EBSCO databases, and Google Scholar before December 2015. The odds ratios (ORs with corresponding 95% confidence internals (95% CIs were pooled under the allele model. Fourteen eligible articles with 19 studies were finally included.Results: In the overall population, the 17q25.3-rs6465657C allele was found to be significantly associated with increased risk of PCa compared to the T allele (OR =1.097; 95% CI: 1.061–1.134; P<0.001. In the subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity, significantly increased risk was found in the Caucasian population (OR =1.120; 95% CI: 1.078–1.162; P<0.001, while the difference of OR did not reach the statistical significance in the Asian or African-American population. The analyses of sensitivity indicated the robust stability of the results, and the Begg’s and Egger’s test indicated that no publication bias existed.Conclusion: The current meta-analysis suggested that the 17q25.3-rs6465657

  15. The quest for sensible data analysis in clinical routine: Study case on the new Octavius1500 array and its associated phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the dosimetric characteristics of the new Octavius1500 array and its associated phantoms (Oct2D and Oct4D) and compared it to the previous systems. In line with the rising amount of publications advocating the retirement of the widely used but overly lenient 3%, 3mm (global dose) gamma analysis criteria, we have also focused on deriving appropriate evaluation criteria to be used with the new measurement systems in clinical routine. Using the Octavius1500 study as an example, we advocate the use of more selective, equipment specific gamma criteria, all starting from the same, very strict acceptance criteria but adding measurement uncertainty to these

  16. Prediabetes Is Associated with HNF-4α P2 Promoter Polymorphism rs1884613: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Population and an Updated Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changyi; Chen, Sihan; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Zhongwei; Liu, Shengyuan; Peng, Xiaolin; Ma, Jianping; Zhong, Xiaohong; Yan, Yanqiong; Tang, Linlin; Mai, Yifeng; Han, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Controversy remains for the association between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α) P2 promoter polymorphism rs1884613 and type 2 diabetes (T2D). There was no association test of this polymorphism with prediabetes and T2D in the Chinese population. Moreover, an updated meta-analysis in various ethnic groups is needed to establish the contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Methods. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform approach, we genotyped rs1884613 of HNF-4α in the P2 promoter region among 490 T2D patients, 471 individuals with prediabetes, and 575 healthy controls. All the individuals were recruited from 16 community health service centers in Nanshan district in Shenzhen province. Using STATA 11.0 software, meta-analysis was performed to summarize the overall contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Results. Polymorphism rs1884613 was associated with genetic susceptibility to prediabetes in the whole samples (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.16–1.68, P = 0.0001) and the female subgrouped samples (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.14–1.92, P = 0.003) after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). In contrast, there was no association of rs1884613 with T2D in the whole samples and male in our case-control study and meta-analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggest that rs1884613 contributes to susceptibility to prediabetes, whereas this polymorphism may not play an important role in the development of T2D. PMID:25400315

  17. Prediabetes Is Associated with HNF-4α P2 Promoter Polymorphism rs1884613: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Population and an Updated Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Controversy remains for the association between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α P2 promoter polymorphism rs1884613 and type 2 diabetes (T2D. There was no association test of this polymorphism with prediabetes and T2D in the Chinese population. Moreover, an updated meta-analysis in various ethnic groups is needed to establish the contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Methods. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform approach, we genotyped rs1884613 of HNF-4α in the P2 promoter region among 490 T2D patients, 471 individuals with prediabetes, and 575 healthy controls. All the individuals were recruited from 16 community health service centers in Nanshan district in Shenzhen province. Using STATA 11.0 software, meta-analysis was performed to summarize the overall contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Results. Polymorphism rs1884613 was associated with genetic susceptibility to prediabetes in the whole samples (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.16–1.68, P=0.0001 and the female subgrouped samples (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.14–1.92, P=0.003 after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI. In contrast, there was no association of rs1884613 with T2D in the whole samples and male in our case-control study and meta-analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggest that rs1884613 contributes to susceptibility to prediabetes, whereas this polymorphism may not play an important role in the development of T2D.

  18. Employers' Demands for Personal Transferable Skills in Graduates: A Content Analysis of 1000 Job Advertisements and an Associated Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Content analysis of 1,000 job ads in marketing, management, finance, and human resource management showed that ads were significantly more likely to ask for specific personal skills relevant to the job category. A survey of 170 companies that placed the ads indicated their motives for stipulating personal skills; two-thirds conducted formal job…

  19. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  20. Genetic association between NFKB1 −94 ins/del ATTG Promoter Polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 42 case-control studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duan; Xie, Tianhang; Xu, Jin; Wang, Haoyang; Zeng, Weinan; Rao, Shuquan; Zhou, Kai; Pei, Fuxing; Zhou, Zongke

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have indicated that the functional -94 ins/del ATTG polymorphism in the promoter region of human nuclear factor-kappa B1 (NFKB1) gene may be associated with cancer risk. However, some studies yielded conflicting results. To clarify precise association, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of 42 case-control studies involving 43,000 subjects (18,222 cases and 24,778 controls). The overall results suggested that the -94 ins/del ATTG polymorphism had a decreased risk for cancer, reaching significant levels in five genetic models (dominant model: OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.79–0.95, P = 0.002; recessive model: OR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.74–0.94, P = 0.003; homozygous model: OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66–0.90, P = 0.001; heterozygous model: OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.83–0.98, P = 0.011; allelic model: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.83–0.96, P = 0.002). Furthermore, the -94 ins/del ATTG polymorphism could confer a decreased or increased risk for cancer development among Asians and Caucasians, respectively. Additionally, the stratification analysis revealed a significant association between the variant and decreased risk of oral, ovarian, and nasopharyngeal cancer in Asians. After we adjusted p values using the Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate method to account for multiple comparisons, these associations remained. PMID:27443693

  1. Visual analysis of the radiation effects associated to modified atmosphere on the tahiti lemon storage - preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruits of selected lime in the stage of complete maturation, dark green skin, smooth thickness and free of mechanical damages, had been take to the Laboratorio de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia, CENA/USP, with objective to evaluate the effect of the radiation gamma on the external appearance when associate with packing in polystyrene bag, with and without air. The packing process was done before and also after irradiation. A cobalt-60 source was used to treated the fruits with doses of 0,0.5 and 0.75 kGy. The storage was held in BOD chamber with constant temperature of 27 deg C during 3 and 6 days. The association of the radiation with polystyrene bag, with or without application of vacuum, did not prevent the effect of the radiation doses, causing occurrence of dark spots in the skin. The vacuum application in the package resulted in lesser damage in the skin. Polystyrene bag, with and without vacuum application, kept the green coloration and the brightness of the skin during all period of storage, with loss of weight varying from 0.22 to 0.66% of the original weight. (author)

  2. COMT Val(158) Met genotype is associated with reward learning: a replication study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Frías, N S; Pizzagalli, D A; Carré, J M; Michalski, L J; Nikolova, Y S; Perlis, R H; Fagerness, J; Lee, M R; Conley, E Drabant; Lancaster, T M; Haddad, S; Wolf, A; Smoller, J W; Hariri, A R; Bogdan, R

    2016-06-01

    Identifying mechanisms through which individual differences in reward learning emerge offers an opportunity to understand both a fundamental form of adaptive responding as well as etiological pathways through which aberrant reward learning may contribute to maladaptive behaviors and psychopathology. One candidate mechanism through which individual differences in reward learning may emerge is variability in dopaminergic reinforcement signaling. A common functional polymorphism within the catechol-O-methyl transferase gene (COMT; rs4680, Val(158) Met) has been linked to reward learning, where homozygosity for the Met allele (linked to heightened prefrontal dopamine function and decreased dopamine synthesis in the midbrain) has been associated with relatively increased reward learning. Here, we used a probabilistic reward learning task to asses response bias, a behavioral form of reward learning, across three separate samples that were combined for analyses (age: 21.80 ± 3.95; n = 392; 268 female; European-American: n = 208). We replicate prior reports that COMT rs4680 Met allele homozygosity is associated with increased reward learning in European-American participants (β = 0.20, t = 2.75, P COMT rs4680 genotype and reward learning (95% CI -0.11 to -0.03; z = 3.2; P COMT rs4680 influences individual differences in reward which may potentially contribute to psychopathology characterized by reward dysfunction. PMID:27138112

  3. A genome-wide association study and biological pathway analysis of epilepsy prognosis in a prospective cohort of newly treated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Doug; Hoggart, Clive; Petrovski, Slave; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Coffey, Alison; Jorgensen, Andrea; Eleftherohorinou, Hariklia; De Iorio, Maria; Todaro, Marian; De, Tisham; Smith, David; Smith, Philip E; Jackson, Margaret; Cooper, Paul; Kellett, Mark; Howell, Stephen; Newton, Mark; Yerra, Raju; Tan, Meng; French, Chris; Reuber, Markus; Sills, Graeme E; Chadwick, David; Pirmohamed, Munir; Bentley, David; Scheffer, Ingrid; Berkovic, Samuel; Balding, David; Palotie, Aarno; Marson, Anthony; O'Brien, Terence J; Johnson, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We present the analysis of a prospective multicentre study to investigate genetic effects on the prognosis of newly treated epilepsy. Patients with a new clinical diagnosis of epilepsy requiring medication were recruited and followed up prospectively. The clinical outcome was defined as freedom from seizures for a minimum of 12 months in accordance with the consensus statement from the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Genetic effects on remission of seizures after starting treatment were analysed with and without adjustment for significant clinical prognostic factors, and the results from each cohort were combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis. After quality control (QC), we analysed 889 newly treated epilepsy patients using 472 450 genotyped and 6.9 × 10(6) imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Suggestive evidence for association (defined as Pmeta 4.4% of the variation in the outcome of newly treated epilepsy. PMID:23962720

  4. Hierarchical Parallelization of Gene Differential Association Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwarkadas Sandhya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray gene differential expression analysis is a widely used technique that deals with high dimensional data and is computationally intensive for permutation-based procedures. Microarray gene differential association analysis is even more computationally demanding and must take advantage of multicore computing technology, which is the driving force behind increasing compute power in recent years. In this paper, we present a two-layer hierarchical parallel implementation of gene differential association analysis. It takes advantage of both fine- and coarse-grain (with granularity defined by the frequency of communication parallelism in order to effectively leverage the non-uniform nature of parallel processing available in the cutting-edge systems of today. Results Our results show that this hierarchical strategy matches data sharing behavior to the properties of the underlying hardware, thereby reducing the memory and bandwidth needs of the application. The resulting improved efficiency reduces computation time and allows the gene differential association analysis code to scale its execution with the number of processors. The code and biological data used in this study are downloadable from http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/biostat/people/faculty/hu.cfm. Conclusions The performance sweet spot occurs when using a number of threads per MPI process that allows the working sets of the corresponding MPI processes running on the multicore to fit within the machine cache. Hence, we suggest that practitioners follow this principle in selecting the appropriate number of MPI processes and threads within each MPI process for their cluster configurations. We believe that the principles of this hierarchical approach to parallelization can be utilized in the parallelization of other computationally demanding kernels.

  5. Analysis of an alternative method for the study of bromeliad-associated fauna in plants with different foliar organization

    OpenAIRE

    Gerson A. Müller; Fernando T. Name; Frederico C.L. Pacheco; Carlos B. Marcondes

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of an alternative method of collection (by suction of water) for the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae (Diptera), Scirtidae (Coleoptera) and Coenagrionidae (Odonata) in bromeliads with different foliar architecture in a restinga at Florianópolis, SC, Brazil, was studied. The alternative method was less efficient to collect Culicidae and Chironomidae (Wilcoxon test p 0.05) from Aechmea lindenii. ...

  6. Genome-wide association study and gene expression analysis identifies CD84 as a predictor of response to etanercept therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF biologic therapy is a widely used treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. It is unknown why some RA patients fail to respond adequately to anti-TNF therapy, which limits the development of clinical biomarkers to predict response or new drugs to target refractory cases. To understand the biological basis of response to anti-TNF therapy, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analysis of more than 2 million common variants in 2,706 RA patients from 13 different collections. Patients were treated with one of three anti-TNF medications: etanercept (n = 733, infliximab (n = 894, or adalimumab (n = 1,071. We identified a SNP (rs6427528 at the 1q23 locus that was associated with change in disease activity score (ΔDAS in the etanercept subset of patients (P = 8 × 10(-8, but not in the infliximab or adalimumab subsets (P>0.05. The SNP is predicted to disrupt transcription factor binding site motifs in the 3' UTR of an immune-related gene, CD84, and the allele associated with better response to etanercept was associated with higher CD84 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (P = 1 × 10(-11 in 228 non-RA patients and P = 0.004 in 132 RA patients. Consistent with the genetic findings, higher CD84 gene expression correlated with lower cross-sectional DAS (P = 0.02, n = 210 and showed a non-significant trend for better ΔDAS in a subset of RA patients with gene expression data (n = 31, etanercept-treated. A small, multi-ethnic replication showed a non-significant trend towards an association among etanercept-treated RA patients of Portuguese ancestry (n = 139, P = 0.4, but no association among patients of Japanese ancestry (n = 151, P = 0.8. Our study demonstrates that an allele associated with response to etanercept therapy is also associated with CD84 gene expression, and further that CD84 expression correlates with disease activity. These findings support a model in which CD84

  7. Studies of the Association of Arg72Pro of Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 with Type 2 Diabetes in a Combined Analysis of 55,521 Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten; Grarup, Niels; Justesen, JM; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Jørgensen, Torben; Sandbæk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Madsbad, Sten; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf

    2011-01-01

    Aims: A study of 222 candidate genes in type 2 diabetes reported association of variants in RAPGEF1, ENPP1, TP53, NRF1, SLC2A2, SLC2A4 and FOXC2 with type 2 diabetes in 4,805 Finnish individuals. We aimed to replicate these associations in a Danish case-control study and to substantiate any...... 2 diabetes in the Danish samples. However, for all nine variants the estimate of increase in type 2 diabetes risk was observed for the same allele as previously reported. In a meta-analysis of published and online data including 55,521 Europeans the G-allele of rs1042522 in TP53 showed significant...... replicated associations in meta-analyses. Furthermore, we evaluated the impact on diabetes-related intermediate traits in a population-based sample of middle-aged Danes. Methods: We genotyped nine lead variants in the seven genes in 4,973 glucose-tolerant and 3,612 type 2 diabetes Danish individuals. In meta...

  8. A study of model parameters associated with the urban climate using HCMM data. [analysis of St. Louis, Missouri infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the study of the intensity of the urban heat island is reported. The intensity of the heat island is commonly defined as the temperature difference between the center of the city and the surrounding suburban and rural regions. The intensity is considered as a function of changes in the season and changes in meteorological conditions in order to derive various parameters which may be used in numerical models for urban climate. Twelve case studies were selected and CCT's were ordered. In situ data was obtained from sixteen stations scattered about the city of St. Louis. Upper-air meteorological data were obtained and the water vapor and the temperature data were processed. Atmospheric transmissivities were computed for each of the case studies.

  9. Assessing the Association between Natural Food Folate Intake and Blood Folate Concentrations: A Systematic Review and Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Trials and Observational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Marchetta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Folate is found naturally in foods or as synthetic folic acid in dietary supplements and fortified foods. Adequate periconceptional folic acid intake can prevent neural tube defects. Folate intake impacts blood folate concentration; however, the dose-response between natural food folate and blood folate concentrations has not been well described. We estimated this association among healthy females. A systematic literature review identified studies (1 1992–3 2014 with both natural food folate intake alone and blood folate concentration among females aged 12–49 years. Bayesian methods were used to estimate regression model parameters describing the association between natural food folate intake and subsequent blood folate concentration. Seven controlled trials and 29 observational studies met the inclusion criteria. For the six studies using microbiologic assay (MA included in the meta-analysis, we estimate that a 6% (95% Credible Interval (CrI: 4%, 9% increase in red blood cell (RBC folate concentration and a 7% (95% CrI: 1%, 12% increase in serum/plasma folate concentration can occur for every 10% increase in natural food folate intake. Using modeled results, we estimate that a natural food folate intake of ≥450 μg dietary folate equivalents (DFE/day could achieve the lower bound of an RBC folate concentration (~1050 nmol/L associated with the lowest risk of a neural tube defect. Natural food folate intake affects blood folate concentration and adequate intakes could help women achieve a RBC folate concentration associated with a risk of 6 neural tube defects/10,000 live births.

  10. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for Thirteen Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Wheeler, William A; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Figueroa, Jonine D; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Taylor, Philip R; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A; Purdue, Mark P; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Birmann, Brenda M; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K C; Chang, Ellen T; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Diver, W Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M; Haiman, Christopher A; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hosain, G M Monawar; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R; Kelly, Rachel S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert J; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Link, Brian K; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S; Michaud, Dominique S; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E; Novak, Anne J; Oberg, Ann L; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M; Sanjose, Silvia de; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K; Shanafelt, Tait D; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A; Tinker, Lesley F; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Villano, Danylo J; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M; Cerhan, James R; Ferri, Giovanni M; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M; Smedby, Karin E; Teras, Lauren R; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T; Slager, Susan L; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. METHO

  11. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for Thirteen Cancer Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Wheeler, William A; Yeager, Meredith;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. ME...

  12. Genomic Characterisation and Polymorphism Analysis of Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits and Association Studies in Three Cattle Breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Seefried, Franz Reinhold

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, various mapping experiments resulted in the detection of several markers affecting milk production traits on bovine chromosome 6. The aim of this study was to identify causative polymorphisms of milk traits using a multiple breed approach. Six selected candidate genes on chromosome 6 in cattle were characterised and screened for polymorphisms. Following this, 50 polymorphisms were genotyped in sires of German Brown, Fleckvieh and German Holstein for investigation in assoc...

  13. Analysis of an alternative method for the study of bromeliad-associated fauna in plants with different foliar organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerson A; Name, Fernando T; Pacheco, Frederico C L; Marcondes, Carlos B

    2010-12-01

    The efficiency of an alternative method of collection (by suction of water) for the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae (Diptera), Scirtidae (Coleoptera) and Coenagrionidae (Odonata) in bromeliads with different foliar architecture in a restinga at Florianópolis, SC, Brazil, was studied. The alternative method was less efficient to collect Culicidae and Chironomidae (Wilcoxon test p 0.05) from Aechmea lindenii. This method was less efficient to collect insects of all groups from Vriesea friburgensis (Wilcoxon test p < 0.05). The alternative method was efficient to estimate the diversity of these insects in both species of bromeliads. The higher mobility of immature forms of beetles and dragonflies, and the availability of only one tank in Aechea lindenii, contrasting to several tanks in Vriesea friburgensis that help the suction of these immature, probably influenced the results, which indicated that the suction method should not replace the dismantling in the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae. This method can be useful to get immature forms of Scirtidae and Coenagrionidae in one-tank bromeliads. PMID:21152764

  14. Microarray Study of Pathway Analysis Expression Profile Associated with MicroRNA-29a with Regard to Murine Cholestatic Liver Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chou Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence demonstrates that microRNA-29 (miR-29 expression is prominently decreased in patients with hepatic fibrosis, which consequently stimulates hepatic stellate cells’ (HSCs activation. We used a cDNA microarray study to gain a more comprehensive understanding of genome-wide gene expressions by adjusting miR-29a expression in a bile duct-ligation (BDL animal model. Methods: Using miR-29a transgenic mice and wild-type littermates and applying the BDL mouse model, we characterized the function of miR-29a with regard to cholestatic liver fibrosis. Pathway enrichment analysis and/or specific validation were performed for differentially expressed genes found within the comparisons. Results: Analysis of the microarray data identified a number of differentially expressed genes due to the miR-29a transgene, BDL, or both. Additional pathway enrichment analysis revealed that TGF-β signaling had a significantly differential activated pathway depending on the occurrence of miR-29a overexpression or the lack thereof. Furthermore, overexpression was found to elicit changes in Wnt/β-catenin after BDL. Conclusion: This study verified that an elevated miR-29a level could alleviate liver fibrosis caused by cholestasis. Furthermore, the protective effects of miR-29a correlate with the downregulation of TGF-β and associated with Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway following BDL.

  15. Lack of association between the tagging SNP A+930-->G of SOCS3 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of four independent study populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Fischer-Rosinsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3 provides a link between cytokine action and their negative consequences on insulin signalling. Thus SOCS3 is a potential candidate gene for type 2 diabetes (T2DM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on HapMap we identified the polymorphism A+930-->G (rs4969168 as a haplotype tagging SNP (htSNP sufficiently covering the genetic variation of the whole gene. We therefore examined the association between rs4969168 within SOCS3 and T2DM in three independent study populations; one prospective case-cohort study and two cross-sectional study populations. Due to the low frequency of individuals being homozygous for the polymorphism a dominant model of inheritance was assumed. The case-cohort study with 2,957 individuals (764 of them with incident T2DM showed no effect of the polymorphism on diabetes risk (hazard ratio (95%CI: 0.86 (0.66-1.13; p = 0.3. Within the MeSyBePo-study population 325 subjects had T2DM from a total of 1,897 individuals, while the second cross-sectional cohort included 851 cases of T2DM within a total of 1653 subjects. According to the results in the prospective study, no association with T2DM was found (odds ratio (95%CI: 0.78 (0.54-1.12 for MesyBepo and 1.13 (0.90-1.42 for the Leipzig study population. There was also no association with metabolic subtraits such as insulin sensitivity (p = 0.7, insulin secretion (p = 0.8 or the hyperbolic relation of both, the disposition index (p = 0.7. In addition, no evidence for interaction with BMI or sex was found. We subsequently performed a meta-analysis, additionally including the publicly available data from the T2DM-subcohort of the WTCCC (n = 4,855. The overall odds ratio within that meta-analysis was 0.96 (0.88-1.06. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is no strong effect of the common genetic variation within the SOCS3 gene on the development of T2DM.

  16. GWAMA: software for genome-wide association meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mägi Reedik

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the recent success of genome-wide association studies in identifying novel loci contributing effects to complex human traits, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity, much of the genetic component of variation in these phenotypes remains unexplained. One way to improving power to detect further novel loci is through meta-analysis of studies from the same population, increasing the sample size over any individual study. Although statistical software analysis packages incorporate routines for meta-analysis, they are ill equipped to meet the challenges of the scale and complexity of data generated in genome-wide association studies. Results We have developed flexible, open-source software for the meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies. The software incorporates a variety of error trapping facilities, and provides a range of meta-analysis summary statistics. The software is distributed with scripts that allow simple formatting of files containing the results of each association study and generate graphical summaries of genome-wide meta-analysis results. Conclusions The GWAMA (Genome-Wide Association Meta-Analysis software has been developed to perform meta-analysis of summary statistics generated from genome-wide association studies of dichotomous phenotypes or quantitative traits. Software with source files, documentation and example data files are freely available online at http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/GWAMA.

  17. TNF-α -308 G > A (rs1800629) Polymorphism is Associated with Celiac Disease: A Meta-analysis of 11 Case-Control Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saif; Mandal, Raju K; Jawed, Arshad; Dar, Sajad A; Wahid, Mohd; Panda, Aditya K; Areeshi, Mohammed Y; Ahmed Khan, Md Ekhlaque; Haque, Shafiul

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) remains one of the most significant autoimmune diseases worldwide. The pathogenesis of CD is not clearly understood and is probably attributed to genomic variations and host genetic make-up. Case-control and cohort studies of the association between the TNF-α -308 G > A (rs1800629) polymorphism and CD susceptibility have yielded inconsistent results. In this study, PubMed, EMBASE, and Google Scholar web-databases were searched for pertinent reports showing association of TNF-α -308 G > A gene with CD risk. A total of eleven reports involving 1774 controls and 1147 CD cases were included. Significant associations in four genetic models, viz. variant allele (A vs. G: p = 0.001; OR = 2.051, 95% CI = 1.452-2.895), variant homozygous (AA vs. GG: p = 0.001; OR = 6.626, 95% CI = 3.569-12.300), recessive (AA vs. GG + AG: p = 0.001; OR = 4.766, 95% CI = 3.177-7.152) and dominant (AA + AG vs. GG: p = 0.008; OR = 1.910, 95% CI = 1.181-3.088) were found in comparison with wild type homozygous GG genotype. However, heterozygous genetic model did not show any association. Sensitivity analysis revealed stable and statistically robust results. Our results suggest that TNF-α -308 G > A gene polymorphism significantly contributes to CD susceptibility. PMID:27597177

  18. Literature-Informed Analysis of a Genome-Wide Association Study of Gestational Age in Norwegian Women and Children Suggests Involvement of Inflammatory Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacelis, Jonas; Juodakis, Julius; Sengpiel, Verena; Zhang, Ge; Myhre, Ronny; Muglia, Louis J.; Nilsson, Staffan; Jacobsson, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Five-to-eighteen percent of pregnancies worldwide end in preterm birth, which is the major cause of neonatal death and morbidity. Approximately 30% of the variation in gestational age at birth can be attributed to genetic factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not shown robust evidence of association with genomic loci yet. Methods We separately investigated 1921 Norwegian mothers and 1199 children from pregnancies with spontaneous onset of delivery. Individuals were further divided based on the onset of delivery: initiated by labor or prelabor rupture of membranes. Genetic association with ultrasound-dated gestational age was evaluated using three genetic models and adaptive permutations. The top-ranked loci were tested for enrichment in 12 candidate gene-sets generated by text-mining PubMed abstracts containing pregnancy-related keywords. Results The six GWAS did not reveal significant associations, with the most extreme empirical p = 5.1 × 10−7. The top loci from maternal GWAS with deliveries initiated by labor showed significant enrichment in 10 PubMed gene-sets, e.g., p = 0.001 and 0.005 for keywords "uterus" and "preterm" respectively. Enrichment signals were mainly caused by infection/inflammation-related genes TLR4, NFKB1, ABCA1, MMP9. Literature-informed analysis of top loci revealed further immunity genes: IL1A, IL1B, CAMP, TREM1, TFRC, NFKBIA, MEFV, IRF8, WNT5A. Conclusion Our analyses support the role of inflammatory pathways in determining pregnancy duration and provide a list of 32 candidate genes for a follow-up work. We observed that the top regions from GWAS in mothers with labor-initiated deliveries significantly more often overlap with pregnancy-related genes than would be expected by chance, suggesting that increased sample size would benefit similar studies. PMID:27490719

  19. Analysis of an alternative method for the study of bromeliad-associated fauna in plants with different foliar organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson A. Müller

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of an alternative method of collection (by suction of water for the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae (Diptera, Scirtidae (Coleoptera and Coenagrionidae (Odonata in bromeliads with different foliar architecture in a restinga at Florianópolis, SC, Brazil, was studied. The alternative method was less efficient to collect Culicidae and Chironomidae (Wilcoxon test p 0.05 from Aechmea lindenii. This method was less efficient to collect insects of all groups from Vriesea friburgensis (Wilcoxon test p A eficiência do método alternativo de coleta (por sucção da água para o estudo de Culicidae e Chironomidae (Diptera, Scirtidae (Coleoptera e Coenagrionidae (Odonata em bromélias com diferentes estruturas foliares de restinga em Florianópolis, SC, Brasil, foi estudada. O método alternativo foi menos eficiente para coletar Culicidae e Chironomidae (teste de Wilcoxon p 0, 05 a partir de Aechmea lindenii. Esse foi menos eficiente para coletar insetos de todos os grupos a partir de Vriesea friburgensis (teste de Wilcoxon p < 0,05. O método alternativo se mostrou eficiente em estimar a diversidade desses insetos nas duas espécies de bromélias. A alta mobilidade das formas imaturas dos coleópteros e libélulas e a disponibilidade de apenas um tanque em Aechea lindenii, em contraste com as várias axilas e Vriesea friburgensis, facilitando a sucção destas formas imaturas provavelmente influenciaram os resultados. Os resultados indicam que o método de sucção não deve substituir o desmanche no estudo de Culicidae e Chironomidae; ele pode ser útil para a obtenção de formas imaturas de Scirtidae e Coenagrionidae em bromélias de um só tanque.

  20. Association between prenatal exposure to antiretroviral therapy and birth defects: an analysis of the French perinatal cohort study (ANRS CO1/CO11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Sibiude

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has major benefits during pregnancy, both for maternal health and to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Safety issues, including teratogenic risk, need to be evaluated. We estimated the prevalence of birth defects in children born to HIV-infected women receiving ART during pregnancy, and assessed the independent association of birth defects with each antiretroviral (ARV drug used. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The French Perinatal Cohort prospectively enrolls HIV-infected women delivering in 90 centers throughout France. Children are followed by pediatricians until 2 y of age according to national guidelines. We included 13,124 live births between 1994 and 2010, among which, 42% (n = 5,388 were exposed to ART in the first trimester of pregnancy. Birth defects were studied using both European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT and Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP classifications; associations with ART were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. Correction for multiple comparisons was not performed because the analyses were based on hypotheses emanating from previous findings in the literature and the robustness of the findings of the current study. The prevalence of birth defects was 4.4% (95% CI 4.0%-4.7%, according to the EUROCAT classification. In multivariate analysis adjusting for other ARV drugs, maternal age, geographical origin, intravenous drug use, and type of maternity center, a significant association was found between exposure to zidovudine in the first trimester and congenital heart defects: 2.3% (74/3,267, adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 2.2 (95% CI 1.3-3.7, p = 0.003, absolute risk difference attributed to zidovudine +1.2% (95% CI +0.5; +1.9%. Didanosine and indinavir were associated with head and neck defects, respectively: 0.5%, AOR = 3.4 (95% CI 1.1-10.4, p = 0.04; 0.9%, AOR = 3.8 (95% CI 1.1-13.8, p = 0

  1. Associations of Suboptimal Growth with All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in Children under Five Years: A Pooled Analysis of Ten Prospective Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofin, Ibironke; McDonald, Christine M.; Ezzati, Majid; Flaxman, Seth; Black, Robert E.; Fawzi, Wafaie W.; Caulfield, Laura E.; Danaei, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Child undernutrition affects millions of children globally. We investigated associations between suboptimal growth and mortality by pooling large studies. Methods Pooled analysis involving children 1 week to 59 months old in 10 prospective studies in Africa, Asia and South America. Utilizing most recent measurements, we calculated weight-for-age, height/length-for-age and weight-for-height/length Z scores, applying 2006 WHO Standards and the 1977 NCHS/WHO Reference. We estimated all-cause and cause-specific mortality hazard ratios (HR) using proportional hazards models comparing children with mild (−2≤Z<−1), moderate (−3≤Z<−2), or severe (Z<−3) anthropometric deficits with the reference category (Z≥−1). Results 53 809 children were eligible for this re-analysis and contributed a total of 55 359 person-years, during which 1315 deaths were observed. All degrees of underweight, stunting and wasting were associated with significantly higher mortality. The strength of association increased monotonically as Z scores decreased. Pooled mortality HR was 1.52 (95% Confidence Interval 1.28, 1.81) for mild underweight; 2.63 (2.20, 3.14) for moderate underweight; and 9.40 (8.02, 11.03) for severe underweight. Wasting was a stronger determinant of mortality than stunting or underweight. Mortality HR for severe wasting was 11.63 (9.84, 13.76) compared with 5.48 (4.62, 6.50) for severe stunting. Using older NCHS standards resulted in larger HRs compared with WHO standards. In cause-specific analyses, all degrees of anthropometric deficits increased the hazards of dying from respiratory tract infections and diarrheal diseases. The study had insufficient power to precisely estimate effects of undernutrition on malaria mortality. Conclusions All degrees of anthropometric deficits are associated with increased risk of under-five mortality using the 2006 WHO Standards. Even mild deficits substantially increase mortality, especially from infectious diseases

  2. Associations of suboptimal growth with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in children under five years: a pooled analysis of ten prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibironke Olofin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Child undernutrition affects millions of children globally. We investigated associations between suboptimal growth and mortality by pooling large studies. METHODS: Pooled analysis involving children 1 week to 59 months old in 10 prospective studies in Africa, Asia and South America. Utilizing most recent measurements, we calculated weight-for-age, height/length-for-age and weight-for-height/length Z scores, applying 2006 WHO Standards and the 1977 NCHS/WHO Reference. We estimated all-cause and cause-specific mortality hazard ratios (HR using proportional hazards models comparing children with mild (-2≤Z<-1, moderate (-3≤Z<-2, or severe (Z<-3 anthropometric deficits with the reference category (Z≥-1. RESULTS: 53 809 children were eligible for this re-analysis and contributed a total of 55 359 person-years, during which 1315 deaths were observed. All degrees of underweight, stunting and wasting were associated with significantly higher mortality. The strength of association increased monotonically as Z scores decreased. Pooled mortality HR was 1.52 (95% Confidence Interval 1.28, 1.81 for mild underweight; 2.63 (2.20, 3.14 for moderate underweight; and 9.40 (8.02, 11.03 for severe underweight. Wasting was a stronger determinant of mortality than stunting or underweight. Mortality HR for severe wasting was 11.63 (9.84, 13.76 compared with 5.48 (4.62, 6.50 for severe stunting. Using older NCHS standards resulted in larger HRs compared with WHO standards. In cause-specific analyses, all degrees of anthropometric deficits increased the hazards of dying from respiratory tract infections and diarrheal diseases. The study had insufficient power to precisely estimate effects of undernutrition on malaria mortality. CONCLUSIONS: All degrees of anthropometric deficits are associated with increased risk of under-five mortality using the 2006 WHO Standards. Even mild deficits substantially increase mortality, especially from infectious

  3. Association of p53 codon72 Arg>Pro polymorphism with susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma: evidence from a case-control study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, S K; Chakrabarti, S; Roy, S D; Baishya, N; Reddy, R R; Suklabaidya, S; Kumar, A; Mohanty, S; Maji, S; Suryanwanshi, A; Rajasubramaniam, S; Asthana, M; Panda, A K; Singh, S P; Ganguly, S; Shaw, O P; Bichhwalia, A K; Sahoo, P K; Chattopadhyay, N R; Chatterjee, K; Kundu, C N; Das, A K; Kannan, R; Zorenpuii; Zomawia, E; Sema, S A; Singh, Y I; Ghosh, S K; Sharma, K; Das, B S; Choudhuri, T

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is a critical player in the fight against cancer as it controls the cell cycle check point, apoptotic pathways and genomic stability. It is known to be the most frequently mutated gene in a wide variety of human cancers. Single-nucleotide polymorphism of p53 at codon72 leading to substitution of proline (Pro) in place of arginine (Arg) has been identified as a risk factor for development of many cancers, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the association of this polymorphism with NPC across the published literature has shown conflicting results. We aimed to conduct a case-control study for a possible relation of p53 codon72 Arg>Pro polymorphism with NPC risk in underdeveloped states of India, combine the result with previously available records from different databases and perform a meta-analysis to draw a more definitive conclusion. A total of 70 NPC patients and 70 healthy controls were enrolled from different hospitals of north-eastern India. The p53 codon72 Arg>Pro polymorphism was typed by polymerase chain reaction, which showed an association with NPC risk. In the meta-analysis consisting of 1842 cases and 2330 controls, it was found that individuals carrying the Pro allele and the ProPro genotype were at a significantly higher risk for NPC as compared with those with the Arg allele and the ArgArg genotype, respectively. Individuals with a ProPro genotype and a combined Pro genotype (ProPro+ArgPro) also showed a significantly higher risk for NPC over a wild homozygote ArgArg genotype. Additionally, the strength of each study was tested by power analysis and genotype distribution by Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The outcome of the study indicated that both allele frequency and genotype distribution of p53 codon72 Arg>Pro polymorphism were significantly associated with NPC risk. Stratified analyses based on ethnicity and source of samples supported the above result. PMID:27159678

  4. Mining association rules using formal concept analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquier, Nicolas

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we give an overview of the use of Formal Concept Analysis in the framework of association rule extraction. Using frequent closed itemsets and their generators, that are defined using the Galois closure operator, we address two major problems: response times of association rule extraction and the relevance and usefulness of discovered association rules. We quickly review the Close and the A-Close algorithms for extracting frequent closed itemsets using their generators that redu...

  5. Genetic associations in diabetic nephropathy: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mooyaart, A. L.; Valk, E. J. J.; L. A. van Es; Bruijn, J. A.; de Heer, E.; Freedman, B.I.; Dekkers, O. M.; Baelde, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis This meta-analysis assessed the pooled effect of each genetic variant reproducibly associated with diabetic nephropathy. Methods PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for articles assessing the association between genes and diabetic nephropathy. All genetic variants statistically associated with diabetic nephropathy in an initial study, then independently reproduced in at least one additional study, were selected. Subsequently, all studies assessing these variants we...

  6. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Loth (Daan); M.S. Artigas; S.A. Gharib (Sina); L.V. Wain (Louise); N. Franceschini (Nora); B. Koch (Beate); T.D. Pottinger (Tess); G.D. Smith; Q. Duan (Qing); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); M.K. Lee (Mi Kyeong); D.P. Strachan (David); A.L. James (Alan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); V. Vitart (Veronique); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); X.-Q. Wang (Xin-Qun); H. Trochet (Holly); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Flexeder (Claudia); E. Albrecht (Eva); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); B. Thyagarajan (Bharat); A.C. Alves (Alexessander Couto); S. Enroth (Stefan); E. Omenaas (Ernst); P.K. Joshi (Peter); M. Fall (Magnus); A. Viñuela (Ana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L.R. Loehr (Laura); M. Fornage (Myriam); G. Li (Guo); J.B. Wilk (Jemma); W. Tang (Wenbo); A. Manichaikul (Ani); L. Lahousse (Lies); T.B. Harris (Tamara); K.E. North (Kari); A.R. Rudnicka (Alicja); J. Hui (Jennie); X. Gu (Xiangjun); T. Lumley (Thomas); A.F. Wright (Alan); N. Hastie (Nick); S. Campbell (Susan); R. Kumar (Rajesh); I. Pin (Isabelle); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); I. Surakka (Ida); Y. Liu (Yongmei); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); H. Schulz (Holger); J. Heinrich (Joachim); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Pouta (Anneli); A. Johansson (Åsa); S.H. Wild (Sarah); E. Ingelsson (Erik); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Völzke (Henry); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); W. Gao (Wei); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); W.B. White (Wendy); S.S. Rich (Stephen); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Aspelund (Thor); D. Couper (David); L.J. Smith (Lewis); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K. Lohman (Kurt); E.G. Burchard (Esteban); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Garcia (Melissa); B.R. Joubert (Bonnie); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); L. Zgaga (Lina); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Navarro (Pau); I. Rudan (Igor); Y.-M. Oh (Yeon-Mok); S. Redline (Susan); D.L. Jarvis (Deborah); J.H. Zhao (Jing); T. Rantanen (Taina); G.T. O'Connor (George); S. Ripatti (Samuli); R.J. Scott (Rodney); S. Karrasch (Stefan); H. Grallert (Harald); N.C. Gaddis (Nathan); J.M. Starr (John); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); R.L. Minster (Ryan); C.W. Lederer (Carsten); J. Pekkanen (Juha); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); H. Campbell (Harry); A.P. Morris (Andrew); S. Gläser (Sven); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); K.M. Burkart (Kristin); J.P. Beilby (John); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); D.B. Hancock (Dana); O.D. Williams (Dale); O. Polasek (Ozren); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M.F. Petrini (Marcy); K.T. de Jong (Kim); M. Wjst (Matthias); W.H. Kim (Woo); D.J. Porteous (David J.); G. Scotland (Generation); B.H. Smith (Blair); A. Viljanen (Anne); M. Heliovaara (Markku); J. Attia (John); I. Sayers (Ian); R. Hampel (Regina); C. Gieger (Christian); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.M. Boezen (H. Marike); A.B. Newman (Anne); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Lind (Lars); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Teumer (Alexander); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E. Melén (Erik); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); L.A. Lange (Leslie); R.G. Barr (Graham); K.R. Bracke (Ken); F.M. Verhamme (Fien); J. Sung (Joohon); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.A. Cassano (Patricia); A. Sood (Akshay); C. Hayward (Caroline); J. Dupuis (Josée); I.P. Hall (Ian); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); M.D. Tobin (Martin); S.J. London (Stephanie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractForced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in

  7. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kaonen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Vinuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wik, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Voezke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbe, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Glaeser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gucinason, Vilrnundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Villanen, Anne; Heliovaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, Hendrika; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melen, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josee; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 addit

  8. Association of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 with breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of case-control studies with subgroups of ethnic and menopausal statue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Zhimin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfotransferase (SULT plays an important role in the formation of estrogen which is usually conferred as a risk factor for breast cancer. Polymorphism of the SULT1A1 may be closely associated with breast cancer. However, studies on the association between polymorphism and breast cancer have yielded inconsistent results. We performed a meta-analysis including ethnic subgroup and menopausal statue subgroup to investigate the association of SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphism with breast cancer. Methods PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science databases were searched for the correlative articles up to January 2010 (10362 breast cancer patients and 14250 controls. The risk (odds ratio, OR was used to estimate the association between SULT1A1 polymorphism and breast cancer risk. All of the data from each study use either fixed-effects or random-effects. Results We found that SULT1A1 Arg213His had no exact effect to increase the risk of breast cancer (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.97-1.17, P = 0.164, but it did increase the risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the dominant model (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 1.04-1.58, P = 0.019. No similar effect was found among premenopausal breast cancer women (OR = 1.06, 95%CI: 0.88-1.27, P = 0.537. There was a significant increase in breast cancer risk among Asian women (OR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.00-4.14, P = 0.051 but not Caucasian women in recessive model. There was publication bias among postmenopausal women subgroup (P = 0.002, however by using the trim and fill method, if the publication bias was the only source of the funnel plot asymmetry, it needed two more studies to be symmetrical. The value of Log OR did not change too much after the adjustment and the fail-safe number of missing studies that would bring the P-value changed was 17. Conclusions We concluded that the polymorphism of SULT1A1 Arg213His might be one of the high risk factors for breast cancer in Asian women and in postmenopausal women for all

  9. A Pooling Genome-Wide Association Study Combining a Pathway Analysis for Typical Sporadic Parkinson's Disease in the Han Population of Chinese Mainland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yakun; Deng, Libing; Zhang, Jie; Fang, Xin; Mei, Puming; Cao, Xuebing; Lin, Jiari; Wei, Yi; Zhang, Xiong; Xu, Renshi

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) are mainly conducted in European and American populations at present, and the Han populations of Chinese mainland (HPCM) almost have not been studied yet. Here, we conducted a pooling GWAS combining a pathway analysis with 862,198 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms of IlluminaHumanOmniZhongHua-8 in 250 sPD and 250 controls from HPCM precluded toxicant exposure, age, and heavy coffee drinking habit interference. We revealed that among the 22 potential loci implicated, PRDM2/KIAA1026 (kgp8090149), TSG1/MANEA (kgp154172), PDE10A (kgp8130520), MDGA2 (rs9323124), ATPBD4/LOC100288892 (kgp11333367), ZFP64/TSHZ2 (kgp4156164), PAQR3/ARD1B (kgp9482779), FLJ23172/FNDC3B (kgp760898), C18orf1 (kgp348599), FLJ43860/NCRNA00051 (kgp4105983), CYP1B1/C2orf58 (kgp11353523), WNT9A/LOC728728 (rs849898), ANXA1/LOC100130911 (rs10746953), FLJ35379/LOC100132423 (kgp9550589), PLEKHN1 (kgp7172368), DMRT2/SMARCA2 (kgp10769919), ZNF396/INO80C (rs1362858), C3orf67/LOC339902 (rs6783485), LOC285194/IGSF11 (rs1879553), FGF10/MRPS30 (rs13153459), BARX1/PTPDC1 (kgp6542803), and COL5 A2 (rs11186), the peak significance was at the kgp4105983 of FLJ43860 gene in chromosome 8, the first top strongest associated locus with sPD was PRDM2 (kgp8090149) in chromosome 1, and the 24 pathways including 100 significantly associated genes were strongly associated with sPD from HPCM. The 40 genes were shared by at least two pathways. The most possible associated pathways with sPD were axon guidance, ECM-receptor interaction, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, tight junction, focal adhesion, gap junction, long-term depression, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, adherens junction, endocytosis, and protein digestion and absorption. Our results indicated that these loci, pathways, and their related genes might be involved in the pathogenesis of sPD from HPCM and provided some novel evidences for further searching the genetic

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Seow, Wei Jie; Shiraishi, Kouya; Hsiung, Chao A; Matsuo, Keitaro; Liu, Jie; Chen, Kexin; Yamji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Chang, I-Shou; Wu, Chen; Hong, Yun-Chul; Burdett, Laurie; Wyatt, Kathleen; Chung, Charles C; Li, Shengchao A; Yeager, Meredith; Hutchinson, Amy; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria T; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Song, Minsun; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ashikawa, Kyota; Momozawa, Yukihide; Daigo, Yataro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Yin, Zhihua; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Guan, Peng; Chang, Jiang; Tan, Wen; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Gee-Chen; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Zheng, Hong; Li, Haixin; Cui, Ping; Guo, Huan; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Sung, Jae Sook; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Young Tae; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Hee Nam; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Young-Chul; Sung, Sook Whan; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Shin, Min-Ho; Seow, Adeline; Chen, Ying; Lim, Wei-Yen; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Maria Pik; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Berndt, Sonja I; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Wang, Junwen; Xu, Jun; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Ho, James C M; Chan, John K C; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Lu, Daru; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Wei, Fusheng; Wu, Guoping; An, She-Juan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Su, Jian; Wu, Yi-Long; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; He, Xingzhou; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Klein, Robert; Pao, William; Lawrence, Charles; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chih-Yi; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Yao-Jen; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Lin, Chien-Chung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Dongxin; Zhou, Baosen; Yu, Jinming; Shen, Hongbing; Kubo, Michiaki; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer in Asian never-smoking women have previously identified six susceptibility loci associated with lung cancer risk. To further discover new susceptibility loci, we imputed data from four GWAS of Asian non-smoking female lung cancer (6877 cases and 6277 controls) using the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1 Release 3) data as the reference and genotyped additional samples (5878 cases and 7046 controls) for possible replication. In our meta-analysis, three new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7741164 at 6p21.1 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; P = 5.8 × 10(-13)), rs72658409 at 9p21.3 (per-allele OR = 0.77; P = 1.41 × 10(-10)) and rs11610143 at 12q13.13 (per-allele OR = 0.89; P = 4.96 × 10(-9)). These findings identified new genetic susceptibility alleles for lung cancer in never-smoking women in Asia and merit follow-up to understand their biological underpinnings. PMID:26732429

  11. Challenges of Opportunity Cost Analysis in Planning REDD+: A Honduran Case Study of Social and Cultural Values Associated with Indigenous Forest Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer T. Plumb

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The REDD Programme is predicated on the assumption that developed countries will provide sufficient funds to offset opportunity costs associated with avoiding deforestation. The role of non-market values in indigenous land management may challenge the efficacy of compensation schemes targeted at meeting opportunity costs as calculated in traditional opportunity cost analysis (OCA. Furthermore it is unclear how these economic incentives might affect social and cultural values linked to land-use norms, livelihoods, and local governance. This study explores the economic, social and cultural values of forest uses for a Miskito community in the Rio Plátano Biosphere Reserve in Honduras. Data were collected using household surveys, farm visits, and community workshops. OCA indicates potential for successful REDD+ payment schemes; however it is an inadequate method to account for subsistence and cultural opportunity costs associated with avoided deforestation. Compensation to change land-use practices may undermine governance institutions necessary to address deforestation in the region. Our results indicate that small-scale agriculture and other forest-based subsistence activities are important cultural practices for maintaining Miskito identity and forest management institutions. Recommendations are offered for using OCA to develop REDD+ projects that recognize the linkages between social and cultural values and forest management by focusing on approaches that consider a full range of economic, social and cultural opportunity costs.

  12. Association analysis of genetic variant of rs13331 in PSD95 gene with autism spectrum disorders: A case-control study in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Li, Li; Shao, Shan-Shan; He, Zhen; Chen, Yan-Lin; Kong, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Gong, Jian-Hua; Song, Ran-Ran

    2016-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by high heritability. Recently, autism, the most profound form of ASD, has been increasingly attributed to synaptic abnormalities. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95), encoding PSD protein-95, was found essential for synaptic formation, maturation and plasticity at a PSD of excitatory synapse. It is possibly a crucial candidate gene for the pathogenesis of ASD. To identify the relationship between the rs13331 of PSD95 gene and ASD, we performed a case-control study in 212 patients and 636 controls in a Chinese population by using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP) assay. The results showed that in genetic analysis of the heterozygous model, an association between the T allele of the rs13331 and ASD was found in the dominant model (OR=1.709, 95% CI 1.227-2.382, P=0.002) and the additive model (OR=1.409, 95% CI=1.104-1.800, P=0.006). Our data indicate that the genetic mutation C>T at the rs13331 in the PSD95 gene is strikingly associated with an increased risk of ASD. PMID:27072977

  13. Analysis of the energy metabolism of urban socioeconomic sectors and the associated carbon footprints: Model development and a case study for Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cities consume 80% of the world's energy; therefore, analyzing urban energy metabolism and the resulting carbon footprint provides basic data for formulating target carbon emission reductions. While energy metabolism includes both direct and indirect consumptions among sectors, few researchers have studied indirect consumption due to a lack of data. In this study, we used input–output analysis to calculate the energy flows among directly linked sectors. Building on this, we used ecological network analysis to develop a model of urban energy flows and also account for energy consumption embodied by the flows among indirectly linked sectors (represented numerically as paths with a length of 2 or more). To illustrate the model, monetary input–output tables for Beijing from 2000 to 2010 were analyzed to determine the embodied energy consumption and associated carbon footprints of these sectors. This analysis reveals the environmental pressure based on the source (energy consumption) and sink (carbon footprint) values. Indirect consumption was Beijing's primary form, and the carbon footprint therefore resulted mainly from indirect consumption (both accounting for ca. 60% of the total, though with considerable variation among sectors). To reduce emissions, the utilization efficiency of indirect consumption must improve. - Highlights: • We quantified the embodied energy transfers among Beijing's socioeconomic sectors. • We calculated the sectors' intensity of energy consumption and carbon footprint. • The indirect energy consumption was higher than the direct for all sectors. • The high-indirect-consumption sectors are at the end of industrial supply chains. • High-indirect-consumption sectors can improve upstream products energy efficiency

  14. Complex association between alanine aminotransferase activity and mortality in general population: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtao Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Controversy exists in using alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity for predicting long-term survival. Therefore, this research study investigated the association between ALT activity and mortality through a systematic review and meta-analysis of previous prospective studies. METHODS: Electronic literature databases, including PubMed, Embase, and the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI, were searched for relevant prospective observational studies (published before Dec 30, 2013 on the association between baseline ALT activity and ensuing all-cause/disease-specific mortality. Information on nationality, sample size, participant characteristics, follow-up duration, comparison, outcome assessment, hazard ratios (HRs and adjusted covariates was extracted. Pooled HRs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were separately calculated for categorical risk estimates (highest vs. lowest ALT categories and continuous risk estimates (per 5 U/l of ALT increment in subgroups separated by age (<70/≥ 70 years. RESULTS: A total of twelve prospective cohort studies, totaling 206,678 participants and 16,249 deaths, were identified and analyzed. In the younger age group, the pooled HR for mortality related to liver-disease was about 1.24 (95% CI: 1.23-1.25 per 5 U/l of ALT increment. The dose-response HRs of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV disease-related mortality, and cancer-related mortality were 0.91 (0.88-0.94, 0.91 (0.85-0.96, 0.92 (0.86-0.98 respectively per 5 U/l of ALT elevation, with insignificant heterogeneity in the older population. There was an approximate decrease of 4‰ observed on HRs of all-cause, CV-related, and cancer-related mortality followed with one year's increment through meta-regression (all P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The ALT-mortality association was inconsistent and seems particularly susceptible to age after synthesizing the previous prospective studies. In terms of the age, ALT activity was more valuable

  15. Physical Activity Volumes during Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies Assessing the Association with Infant's Birth Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Michèle; Lavoie-Guénette, Joëlle; Tremblay, Angelo; Marc, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to examine the association between different maternal physical activity exposures during pregnancy and infant's birth weight, body composition, and risk of inadequate weight. Methods Two reviewers (M.B. and J.L.G.) identified observational studies reporting total or leisure time activity during pregnancy and birth weight outcomes. Pooled analyses were performed to summarize the risk associated with high or moderate volumes of physical activity on birth weight. Results A total of 54 studies among 4,080 reported the association between physical activity and birth weight (37 studies) or risks of small or large birth weight. The association between physical activity and birth weight was evaluated by physical activity levels (low, moderate, or high). Despite heterogeneity, pooled results (23 studies) suggested that moderate levels of activity are associated with an increased birth weight (mean difference: 61.5 g, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 16.6, 106.5, 15 studies), while high levels were associated with lower birth weight (mean difference: −69.9 g, 95% CI: −114.8, −25.0, 15 studies). Data were insufficient to provide robust estimates for other outcomes. Conclusions The results of observational studies suggest an inverted u-shaped association between physical activity and birth weight, despite methodological variability. These results could help refining physical activity guidelines for pregnancy and provide guidance for future research. PMID:27127718

  16. Association studies in consanguineous populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpous, F. [Institut National d`Etudes Demographiques, Paris (France)

    1996-04-01

    To study the genetic determinism of multifactorial diseases in large panmictic populations, a strategy consists in looking for an association with markers closely linked to candidate genes. A distribution of marker genotypes different in patients and controls may indicate that the candidate gene is involved in the disease. In panmictic populations, the power to detect the role of a candidate gene depends on the gametic disequilibrium with the marker locus. In consanguineous populations, we show that it depends on the inbreeding coefficient F as well. Inbreeding increases the power to detect the role of a recessive or quasi-recessive disease-susceptibility factor. The gain in power turns out to be greater for small values of the gametic disequilibrium. Moreover, even in the absence of gametic disequilibrium, the presence of inbreeding may allow to detect the role of a recessive factor. Ignoring inbreeding when it exists may lead to reject falsely a recessive model if the mode of inheritance is inferred on the distribution of genotypes among patients. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Identification of genes associated with multiple cancers via integrative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jian

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advancement in gene profiling techniques makes it possible to measure expressions of thousands of genes and identify genes associated with development and progression of cancer. The identified cancer-associated genes can be used for diagnosis, prognosis prediction, and treatment selection. Most existing cancer microarray studies have been focusing on the identification of genes associated with a specific type of cancer. Recent biomedical studies suggest that different cancers may share common susceptibility genes. A comprehensive description of the associations between genes and cancers requires identification of not only multiple genes associated with a specific type of cancer but also genes associated with multiple cancers. Results In this article, we propose the Mc.TGD (Multi-cancer Threshold Gradient Descent, an integrative analysis approach capable of analyzing multiple microarray studies on different cancers. The Mc.TGD is the first regularized approach to conduct "two-dimensional" selection of genes with joint effects on cancer development. Simulation studies show that the Mc.TGD can more accurately identify genes associated with multiple cancers than meta analysis based on "one-dimensional" methods. As a byproduct, identification accuracy of genes associated with only one type of cancer may also be improved. We use the Mc.TGD to analyze seven microarray studies investigating development of seven different types of cancers. We identify one gene associated with six types of cancers and four genes associated with five types of cancers. In addition, we also identify 11, 9, 18, and 17 genes associated with 4 to 1 types of cancers, respectively. We evaluate prediction performance using a Leave-One-Out cross validation approach and find that only 4 (out of 570 subjects cannot be properly predicted. Conclusion The Mc.TGD can identify a short list of genes associated with one or multiple types of cancers. The identified genes

  18. Breath analysis for in vivo detection of pathogens related to ventilator-associated pneumonia in intensive care patients: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Wojciech; Beer, Ronny; Sponring, Andreas; Filipiak, Anna; Ager, Clemens; Schiefecker, Alois; Lanthaler, Simon; Helbok, Raimund; Nagl, Markus; Troppmair, Jakob; Amann, Anton

    2015-03-01

    Existing methods for the early detection of infections in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients at intensive care units (ICUs) are unsatisfactory. Here we present an exploratory study assessing the feasibility of breath VOC analyses for the non-invasive detection of pathogens in the lower respiratory tract of ventilated patients. An open uncontrolled clinical pilot study was performed by enrolling 28 mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with severe intracranial disease, being at risk for the development of or already with confirmed ventilation-associated pneumonia (VAP). The recently developed sampling technique enabled the collection of breath gas with a maximized contribution of alveolar air directly from the respiratory circuit under continuous capnography control, adsorptive preconcentration and final analysis by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).VAP was confirmed in 22/28 preselected patients (78%). The most common microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus (5/22 VAP patients), Escherichia coli (5/22 VAP patients) and Candida spp. (5/22 VAP patients). 12/32 metabolites released by S. aureus in our previous in vitro studies were also detected in the end-tidal air of VAP patients infected with this pathogen. A similar overlap was seen in Candida albicans infections (8/29 VOCs). Moreover, the concentration profile of selected compounds correlated with the course of the infection.This prospective pilot study provides proof of the concept that the appearance and the concentration profile of pathogen-derived metabolites (elucidated from in vitro experiments) in the breath of ventilated patients during clinically confirmed VAP correlates with the presence of a particular pathogen. PMID:25557917

  19. Infection Route Analysis of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Guo; Jie; Zhang; Jing-yun; Li; Yue; Ma; Sheng-hui; Cui

    2012-01-01

    Objective A prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care center to identify the risk factors of ventilator associated pneumonia(VAP) through phenotypic and molecular biological methods. Methods The patients who were mechanically ventilated in the respiratory intensive care unit(RICU) and the neurological internal intensive care unit(NICU) were enrolled in our study, and samples were collected from the lower respiratory tract, oropharynx and stomach. Other samples, including the environmental air, swabs of nurses’ hands, subglottic secretion and ventilator circuit, were also collected. Microorganisms in the collected samples were recovered and identified at species level by biochemical detection. Genetic relationship of dominant species was further characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis(PFGE). Results Out of 48 enrolled patients, 22 cases developed VAP and bacterial cultures were recovered from the lower respiratory tract samples of 14 cases. The average hospitalization time with VAP was significantly longer than that of patients without VAP(P < 0.05). Among the recovered bacteria cultures, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were dominant. It was more likely that subglottic secretion and gastric juice samples contained the same isolates as recovered in the lower respiratory tract by PFGE analysis. Conclusions Mechanical ventilation in RICU and NICU was a high risk factor for VAP development. Special emphasis of VAP prophylaxis should be paid on subglottic secretion and gastric juice reflux.

  20. Clinical analysis of ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-Qu Deng; Yong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical analysis associated pneumonia in elderly ventilator. Methods:Through January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital 165 cases of ventilator therapy in elderly patients with clinical data were retrospectively analyzed, discussed ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly risk factors, clinical symptoms, and the distribution of pathogens analysis of drug resistance.Results: The patient's age, sex, APACHE score, the incidence of aspiration, sedation and antacids, ventilator time were higher in patients (P<0.05); pathogens of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly by high to low order of Pseudomonas aerations, Acinetobacter sop, etc.; pathogens commonly used in clinical antimicrobial drug resistance is higher.Conclusion:Take the risk factors associated pneumonia ventilator for elderly corresponding measures to reduce the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia, which Gram-negative bacteria as cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the elderly is an important pathogen occurs, the clinical course of treatment should be combined with a reasonable choice of antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

  1. The use of neutron activation analysis for the study of environmental risks associated with the fly ash from burning Polish coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work oriented towards assessment of environmental risk associated with the emission of fly-ash into atmosphere and its storage on solid waste depositories included: 1. Elaboration of the INAA procedure for the determination of 20-24 elements in the fly-ashes. This method was next used for the analysis of fly-ashes from three different Polish power stations working on hard coal. 2. Studies on leaching of trace elements from neutron irradiated fly-ash by water and H2SO4 solution (pH=2.5) simulating acid rain. The results were compared with analogous experiments in which elements leached from non-irradiated fly-ash were determined by AAS and spectrophotometry. 3. Preparation and certification on the basis of an international intercomparison of the new Polish CRM - fine fly-ash (CTA-FFA-1). Although the certification is still not completed it is almost certain that it will be possible to establish ''recommended values'' for at least 34 elements and ''information values'' for another 10 to 16 ones. (author). 11 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  2. Prediabetes Is Associated with HNF-4α P2 Promoter Polymorphism rs1884613: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Population and an Updated Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Changyi Wang; Sihan Chen; Tao Zhang; Zhongwei Chen; Shengyuan Liu; Xiaolin Peng; Jianping Ma; Xiaohong Zhong; Yanqiong Yan; Linlin Tang; Yifeng Mai; Liyuan Han; Shiwei Duan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Controversy remains for the association between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α) P2 promoter polymorphism rs1884613 and type 2 diabetes (T2D). There was no association test of this polymorphism with prediabetes and T2D in the Chinese population. Moreover, an updated meta-analysis in various ethnic groups is needed to establish the contribution of rs1884613 to T2D risk. Methods. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform approach, we genotyped rs1884613 of HNF-4α in the P2 promoter...

  3. GWAMA: software for genome-wide association meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mägi Reedik; Morris Andrew P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the recent success of genome-wide association studies in identifying novel loci contributing effects to complex human traits, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity, much of the genetic component of variation in these phenotypes remains unexplained. One way to improving power to detect further novel loci is through meta-analysis of studies from the same population, increasing the sample size over any individual study. Although statistical software analysis packages in...

  4. Higher alcohol intake may modify the association between mammographic density and breast cancer: An analysis of three case-control studies

    OpenAIRE

    Conroy, Shannon M; Koga, Karin; Woolcott, Christy G.; Dahl, Timothy; Byrne, Celia; Nagata, Chisato; Ursin, Giske; Yaffe, Martin J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and mammographic density are established risk factors for breast cancer. This study examined whether the association of mammographic density with breast cancer varies by alcohol intake. Mammographic density was assessed in digitized images for 1,207 cases and 1,663 controls from three populations (Japan, Hawaii, California) using a computer-assisted method. Associations were estimated by logistic regression. When comparing ever to never drinking, mean density was similar a...

  5. Replication Study and Meta-Analysis in European Samples Supports Association of the 3p21.1 Locus with Bipolar Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassos, Evangelos; Steinberg, Stacy; Cichon, Sven; Breen, Gerome; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Andreassen, Ole A; Djurovic, Srdjan; Morken, Gunnar; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Diaconu, Carmen C; Czerski, Piotr M; Hauser, Joanna; Babadjanova, Gulja; Abramova, Lilia I; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; McGuffin, Peter; Clair, David St; Gustafsson, Omar; Melle, Ingrid; Pietiläinen, Olli P H; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah; Werge, Thomas; Ophoff, Roel A; Rujescu, Dan; Børglum, Anders D; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B; Demontis, Ditte; Hollegaard, Mads V; van Winkel, Ruud; Kenis, Gunter; De Hert, Marc; Réthelyi, János M; Bitter, István; Rubino, I Alex; Golimbet, Vera; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van den Berg, Leonard H; Franke, Barbara; Jönsson, Erik G; Farmer, Anne; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Collier, David A

    2012-01-01

    Common genetic polymorphisms at chromosome 3p21.1, including rs2251219 in polybromo 1 (PBRM1), have been implicated in susceptibility to bipolar affective disorder (BP) through genome-wide association studies. Subsequent studies have suggested that this is also a risk locus for other psychiatric ...... phenotypes, including major depression and schizophrenia....

  6. Climatic Factors and Community — Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections — A Time-Series Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krushna Chandra Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin and soft tissue infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA-SSTIs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have experienced a significant surge all over the world. Changing climatic factors are affecting the global burden of dermatological infections and there is a lack of information on the association between climatic factors and MRSA infections. Therefore, association of temperature and relative humidity (RH with occurrence of SA-SSTIs (n = 387 and also MRSA (n = 251 was monitored for 18 months in the outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital located in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Time-series analysis was used to investigate the potential association of climatic factors (weekly averages of maximum temperature, minimum temperature and RH with weekly incidence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA infections. The analysis showed that a combination of weekly average maximum temperature above 33 °C coinciding with weekly average RH ranging between 55% and 78%, is most favorable for the occurrence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA and within these parameters, each unit increase in occurrence of MRSA was associated with increase in weekly average maximum temperature of 1.7 °C (p = 0.044 and weekly average RH increase of 10% (p = 0.097.

  7. Association between class III obesity (BMI of 40-59 kg/m2 and mortality: a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari M Kitahara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of class III obesity (body mass index [BMI]≥40 kg/m2 has increased dramatically in several countries and currently affects 6% of adults in the US, with uncertain impact on the risks of illness and death. Using data from a large pooled study, we evaluated the risk of death, overall and due to a wide range of causes, and years of life expectancy lost associated with class III obesity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia, we estimated sex- and age-adjusted total and cause-specific mortality rates (deaths per 100,000 persons per year and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for adults, aged 19-83 y at baseline, classified as obese class III (BMI 40.0-59.9 kg/m2 compared with those classified as normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Participants reporting ever smoking cigarettes or a history of chronic disease (heart disease, cancer, stroke, or emphysema on baseline questionnaires were excluded. Among 9,564 class III obesity participants, mortality rates were 856.0 in men and 663.0 in women during the study period (1976-2009. Among 304,011 normal-weight participants, rates were 346.7 and 280.5 in men and women, respectively. Deaths from heart disease contributed largely to the excess rates in the class III obesity group (rate differences = 238.9 and 132.8 in men and women, respectively, followed by deaths from cancer (rate differences = 36.7 and 62.3 in men and women, respectively and diabetes (rate differences = 51.2 and 29.2 in men and women, respectively. Within the class III obesity range, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for total deaths and deaths due to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, nephritis/nephrotic syndrome/nephrosis, chronic lower respiratory disease, and influenza/pneumonia increased with increasing BMI. Compared with normal-weight BMI, a BMI of 40-44.9, 45-49.9, 50-54.9, and 55-59.9 kg/m2 was associated with an

  8. Associations between unprocessed red and processed meat, poultry, seafood and egg intake and the risk of prostate cancer: A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kana; Spiegelman, Donna; Hou, Tao; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Berndt, Sonja I; van den Brandt, Piet A; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Alexandra Goldbohm, R; Goodman, Gary G; Goodman, Phyllis J; Håkansson, Niclas; Inoue, Manami; Key, Timothy J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Park, Yikyung; Platz, Elizabeth A; Schenk, Jeannette M; Sinha, Rashmi; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Visvanathan, Kala; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wolk, Alicja; Ziegler, Regina G; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A

    2016-05-15

    Reports relating meat intake to prostate cancer risk are inconsistent. Associations between these dietary factors and prostate cancer were examined in a consortium of 15 cohort studies. During follow-up, 52,683 incident prostate cancer cases, including 4,924 advanced cases, were identified among 842,149 men. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate study-specific relative risks (RR) and then pooled using random effects models. Results do not support a substantial effect of total red, unprocessed red and processed meat for all prostate cancer outcomes, except for a modest positive association for tumors identified as advanced stage at diagnosis (advanced(r)). For seafood, no substantial effect was observed for prostate cancer regardless of stage or grade. Poultry intake was inversely associated with risk of advanced and fatal cancers (pooled multivariable RR [MVRR], 95% confidence interval, comparing ≥45 vs. red meat and egg intake, and inverse associations between poultry intake and advanced, advanced(r) and fatal cancers were limited to North American studies. However, differences were only statistically significant for eggs. Observed differences in associations by geographical region warrant further investigation. PMID:26685908

  9. Associations between unprocessed red and processed meat, poultry, seafood and egg intake and the risk of prostate cancer: A pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kana; Spiegelman, Donna; Hou, Tao; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Berndt, Sonja I.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Goldbohm, R. Alexandra; Goodman, Gary G.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Håkansson, Niclas; Inoue, Manami; Key, Timothy J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Park, Yikyung; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Sinha, Rashmi; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Visvanathan, Kala; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wolk, Alicja; Ziegler, Regina G.; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Reports relating meat intake to prostate cancer risk are inconsistent. Associations between these dietary factors and prostate cancer were examined in a consortium of 15 cohort studies. During follow-up, 52, 683 incident prostate cancer cases, including 4,924 advanced cases, were identified among 842, 149 men. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate study-specific relative risks (RR) and then pooled using random effects models. Results do not support a substantial effect of total red, unprocessed red and processed meat for all prostate cancer outcomes, except for a modest positive association for tumors identified as advanced stage at diagnosis (advanced(r)). For seafood, no substantial effect was observed for prostate cancer regardless of stage or grade. Poultry intake was inversely associated with risk of advanced and fatal cancers (pooled multivariable RR [MVRR], 95% confidence interval, comparing ≥45 vs. meat and egg intake, and inverse associations between poultry intake and advanced, advanced(r) and fatal cancers were limited to North American studies. However, differences were only statistically significant for eggs. Observed differences in associations by geographical region warrant further investigation. PMID:26685908

  10. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates. PMID:27027517

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in five cohorts reveals common variants in RBFOX1, a regulator of tissue-specific splicing, associated with refractive error

    OpenAIRE

    Stambolian, Dwight; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Li, Xiaohui; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily Y.; Klein, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Y.; Simpson, Claire L.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Visual refractive errors (REs) are complex genetic traits with a largely unknown etiology. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of moderate size have identified several novel risk markers for RE, measured here as mean spherical equivalent (MSE). We performed a GWAS using a total of 7280 samples from five cohorts: the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS); the KORA study (‘Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg’); the Framingham Eye Study (FES); the Ogliastra Genetic...

  12. Associations of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A level with essential hypertension and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in Chinese population: a meta-analysis of 20 research studies involving 3332 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Gaojun; Zhang, Bifeng; Weng, Weijin; Yang, Liping; Shi, Ganwei; Xue, Sheliang; Fu, Xingli

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the associations between serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) level, and essential hypertension (EH) and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) in Chinese population. Methods Pertinent studies were independently searched in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), Wanfang databases and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). The standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% CIs was used to estimate the size of the effec...

  13. Separate and combined associations of body-mass index and abdominal adiposity with cardiovascular disease: collaborative analysis of 58 prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Wood, Angela M; Pennells, Lisa; Thompson, Alex; Sarwar, Nadeem; Kizer, Jorge R; Lawlor, Debbie A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Ridker, Paul; Salomaa, Veikko; Stevens, June; Woodward, Mark; Sattar, Naveed; Collins, Rory; Thompson, Simon G; Whitlock, Gary; Danesh, John; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines differ about the value of assessment of adiposity measures for cardiovascular disease risk prediction when information is available for other risk factors. We studied the separate and combined associations of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with risk of...

  14. Separate and combined associations of body-mass index and abdominal adiposity with cardiovascular disease: collaborative analysis of 58 prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele;

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines differ about the value of assessment of adiposity measures for cardiovascular disease risk prediction when information is available for other risk factors. We studied the separate and combined associations of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with risk ...

  15. A meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies to identify novel loci for maximum number of alcoholic drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Manav; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Wetherill, Leah; Le, Nhung; Bertelsen, Sarah; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Budde, John; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen; Dick, Danielle; Harari, Oscar; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Rice, John,

    2013-01-01

    Maximum number of alcoholic drinks consumed in a 24-h period (maxdrinks) is a heritable (> 50%) trait and is strongly correlated with vulnerability to excessive alcohol consumption and subsequent alcohol dependence (AD). Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have studied alcohol dependence, but few have concentrated on excessive alcohol consumption. We performed two GWAS using maxdrinks as an excessive alcohol consumption phenotype: one in 118 extended families (N=2322) selected from...

  16. Assessing the Association between Natural Food Folate Intake and Blood Folate Concentrations: A Systematic Review and Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Trials and Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Claire M. Marchetta; Devine, Owen J.; Krista S Crider; Tsang, Becky L.; Amy M. Cordero; Yan Ping Qi; Jing Guo; Berry, Robert J; Jorge Rosenthal; Joseph Mulinare; Patricia Mersereau; Hamner, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    Folate is found naturally in foods or as synthetic folic acid in dietary supplements and fortified foods. Adequate periconceptional folic acid intake can prevent neural tube defects. Folate intake impacts blood folate concentration; however, the dose-response between natural food folate and blood folate concentrations has not been well described. We estimated this association among healthy females. A systematic literature review identified studies (1 1992–3 2014) with both natural food folat...

  17. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjær, Per;

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  18. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  19. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-27

    Abstract Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  20. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  1. Graph Analysis of the Associative-Semantic Network

    OpenAIRE

    WANG Yu

    2015-01-01

    Explicit associative-semantic processing of words and pictures activates a distributed set of brain areas that has been replicated across a wide range of studies. In our lab we have already a long tradition to study these regions in normal subjects as well as in different patient populations. Until recently, these studies were mainly focusing at the regional level, less is known about how information is integrated and transfered between regions. Brain network analysis is a promising tool to i...

  2. Reduction in Healthcare and Societal Resource Utilization Associated with Cladribine Tablets in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Analysis of Economic Data from the CLARITY Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Shehzad; Paracha, Noman; Cook, Stuart;

    2012-01-01

    home visits during each study period. Societal resource use and productivity outcomes included mean number of hours and days of paid assistance, mean patient and carer work days missed, and self-reported productivity. Results: The mean number of hospital days per patient over 96 weeks was lower in the......Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common, chronic, neurodegenerative condition associated with substantial healthcare and societal economic burden. Disease-modifying MS treatments have the potential to reduce health resource utilization (HRU), thereby reducing the attendant socioeconomic...... burden. Objective: This study aimed to compare health and societal resource use and productivity in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) receiving cladribine tablets versus placebo over 96 weeks in the CLARITY study. Methods: The CLARITY study was a 96-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo...

  3. A replication study for association of ITPKC and CASP3 two-locus analysis in IVIG unresponsiveness and coronary artery lesion in Kawasaki disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC, rs28493229 and caspase-3 (CASP3, rs113420705 are associated with susceptibility to KD in Japanese and Taiwanese populations. This study was conducted to investigate the involvement of these 2 SNPs in the risk for intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG resistance and coronary artery lesion (CAL in Taiwanese population. A total of 340 KD patients were subjected to assess by the identification of 2-locus genes model. A combinatorial association between ITPKC (rs28493229 and CASP3 (rs113420705 was found in CAL formation (P = 0.0227, OR: 3.06. KD patients with high-risk genotype had a trend of overrepresentation in IVIG resistance compared with individual SNPs. Our findings suggest the existence of genetic factors affecting patients' risk for CAL formation and IVIG responsiveness in a Taiwanese population.

  4. Studying risk factors associated with Human Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is one of the most under diagnosed and underreported disease in both developed and developing countries including India. It is established that environmental conditions and occupational habit of the individuals put them at risk of acquiring disease, which varies from community to community. Various seroprevalence studies across the world have documented emerging situation of this neglected tropical disease, but limited have probed to identify the risk factors, especially in India. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the environmental and occupational risk factors associated with the disease in Udupi District. Materials and Methods: This population-based case-control study was carried out in Udupi, a District in Southern India from April 2012 until August 2012. Udupi is considered to be endemic for Leptospirosis and reported 116 confirmed cases in the year 2011. Seventy of 116 laboratory confirmed cases and 140 sex matched neighborhood healthy controls participated in the study. A predesigned, semi-structured and validated questionnaire was used for data collection through house to house visit and observations were noted about environmental conditions. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis (back ward conditional logistic regression was performed by using STATA version 9.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA to identify potential risk factors. Results: Occupational factors such as outdoor activities (matched odds ratio [OR] of 3.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-13.0, presence of cut or wound at body parts during work (matched OR: 4.88, CI: 1.83-13.02 and environmental factors such as contact with rodents through using the food materials ate by rat (matched OR: 4.29, CI: 1.45-12.73 and contact with soil or water contaminated with urine of rat (matched OR: 4.58, CI: 1.43-14.67 were the risk factors identified to be associated with disease. Conclusion: Leptospirosis is still

  5. Community-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission among Households of Infected Cases: a Pooled Analysis of Primary Data from Three Studies across International Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J.; Van Rijen, M.; Uhlemann, A.-C.; Miller, M.; Hafer, C.; Vavagiakis, P.; Shi, Q.; Johnson, P. D. R.; Coombs, G.; Van Den Bergh, M. Kluytmans; Kluytmans, J.; Bennett, C. M.; Lowy, F. D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Diverse strain types of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cause infections in community settings worldwide. To examine heterogeneity of spread within households and to identify common risk factors for household transmission across settings, primary data from studies conducted in New York, US, Breda, NL, and Melbourne, AU were pooled. Following MRSA infection of the index patient, household members completed questionnaires and provided nasal swabs. Swabs positive for S. aureus were genotyped by spa-sequencing. Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to estimate prevalence odds ratios for transmission of the clinical isolate to non-index household members. Great diversity of strain types existed across studies. Despite differences between studies, the index patient being colonized with the clinical isolate at the home visit (p<.01) and the percent of household members <18 years (p<.01) were independently associated with transmission. Targeted decolonization strategies could be used across geographic settings to limit household MRSA transmission. PMID:24763185

  6. Hardy-Weinberg analysis of a large set of published association studies reveals genotyping error and a deficit of heterozygotes across multiple loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Srijan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In genetic association studies, deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWD can be due to recent admixture or selection at a locus, but is most commonly due to genotyping errors. In addition to its utility for identifying potential genotyping errors in individual studies, here we report that HWD can be useful in detecting the presence, magnitude and direction of genotyping error across multiple studies. If there is a consistent genotyping error at a given locus, larger studies, in general, will show more evidence for HWD than small studies. As a result, for loci prone to genotyping errors, there will be a correlation between HWD and the study sample size. By contrast, in the absence of consistent genotyping errors, there will be a chance distribution of p-values among studies without correlation with sample size. We calculated the evidence for HWD at 17 separate polymorphic loci investigated in 325 published genetic association studies. In the full set of studies, there was a significant correlation between HWD and locus-standardised sample size (p = 0.001. For 14/17 of the individual loci, there was a positive correlation between extent of HWD and sample size, with the evidence for two loci (5-HTTLPR and CTSD rising to the level of statistical significance. Among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, 15/23 studies that deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE did so because of a deficit of hetero-zygotes. The inbreeding coefficient (F(is is a measure of the degree and direction of deviation from HWE. Among studies investigating SNPs, there was a significant correlation between F(is and HWD (R = 0.191; p = 0.002, indicating that the greater the deviation from HWE, the greater the deficit of heterozygotes. By contrast, for repeat variants, only one in five studies that deviated significantly from HWE showed a deficit of heterozygotes and there was no significant correlation between F(is and HWD. These results

  7. Chemotherapy-associated thromboembolic risk in cancer outpatients and effect of nadroparin thromboprophylaxis: results of a retrospective analysis of the PROTECHT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrelli Fausto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy are at increased risk of thrombosis. Nadroparin has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of venous and arterial thrombotic events (TEs by about 50% in cancer outpatients receiving chemotherapy. The aims of this retrospective analysis were to evaluate the thromboembolic risk and the benefit of thromboprophylaxis according to type of chemotherapy. Methods Cancer outpatients were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections of nadroparin or placebo. The incidence of symptomatic TEs was assessed according to the type of chemotherapy. Results were reported as risk ratios with associated 95% CI and two-tailed probability values. Results 769 and 381 patients have been evaluated in the nadroparin and placebo group, respectively. In the absence of thromboprophylaxis, the highest rate of TEs was found in patients receiving gemcitabine- (8.1% or cisplatin-based chemotherapy (7.0%. The combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin or carboplatin increased the risk to 10.2%. Thromboprophylaxis reduced TE risk by 68% in patients receiving gemcitabine; with a further decrease to 78% in those receiving a combination of gemcitabine and platinum. Conclusions This retrospective analysis confirms that patients undergoing chemotherapy including gemcitabine, platinum analogues or their combination are at higher risk of TEs. Our results also suggest that outpatients receiving chemotherapy regimens including these agents might achieve an increased benefit from thromboprophylaxis with nadroparin. Clinical Trial registration number: NCT 00951574

  8. Safety analysis report for the North Tank Farm, Tank W-11, and the Gunite and Associated Tanks -- Treatability Study, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The North Tank Farm (NTF) tanks consist of eight underground storage tanks which have been removed from service because of age and changes in liquid waste system needs and requirements. Tank W-11, which was constructed in 1943, has been removed from service, and contains several hundred gallons of liquid low-level waste (LLLW). The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Treatability Study involves the demonstration of sludge removal techniques and equipment for use in other waste storage tanks throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The hazards associated with the NTF, Tank W-11, and the Treatability Study are identified in hazard identification table in Appendixes A, B, and C. The hazards identified for the NTF, Tank W-11, and the Treatability Study were analyzed in the preliminary hazards analyses (PHA) included as Appendices D and E. The PHA identifies potential accident scenarios and qualitatively estimates the consequences. Because of the limited quantities of materials present in the tanks and the types of energy sources that may result in release of the materials, none of the accidents identified are anticipated to result in significant adverse health effects to on-site or off-site personnel

  9. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations ≥40 ng/ml Are Associated with >65% Lower Cancer Risk: Pooled Analysis of Randomized Trial and Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L McDonnell

    Full Text Available Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] concentrations have been associated with a lower risk of multiple cancer types across a range of 25(OHD concentrations.To investigate whether the previously reported inverse association between 25(OHD and cancer risk could be replicated, and if a 25(OHD response region could be identified among women aged 55 years and older across a broad range of 25(OHD concentrations.Data from two cohorts representing different median 25(OHD concentrations were pooled to afford a broader range of 25(OHD concentrations than either cohort alone: the Lappe cohort (N = 1,169, a randomized clinical trial cohort (median 25(OHD = 30 ng/ml and the GrassrootsHealth cohort (N = 1,135, a prospective cohort (median 25(OHD = 48 ng/ml. Cancer incidence over a multi-year period (median: 3.9 years was compared according to 25(OHD concentration. Kaplan-Meier plots were developed and the association between 25(OHD and cancer risk was examined with multivariate Cox regression using multiple 25(OHD measurements and spline functions. The study included all invasive cancers excluding skin cancer.Age-adjusted cancer incidence across the combined cohort (N = 2,304 was 840 cases per 100,000 person-years (1,020 per 100,000 person-years in the Lappe cohort and 722 per 100,000 person-years in the GrassrootsHealth cohort. Incidence was lower at higher concentrations of 25(OHD. Women with 25(OHD concentrations ≥40 ng/ml had a 67% lower risk of cancer than women with concentrations <20 ng/ml (HR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.12-0.90.25(OHD concentrations ≥40 ng/ml were associated with substantial reduction in risk of all invasive cancers combined.

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  11. An 8-year longitudinal sero-epidemiological study of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle in Turkey and analysis of risk factors associated with BLV seropositivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şevik, Murat; Avcı, Oğuzhan; İnce, Ömer Barış

    2015-04-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) which is caused by bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) has an important economic impact on dairy herds due to reduced milk production and restrictions on livestock exports. This study was conducted to determine the BLV infection status in Central Anatolia Region of Turkey, an important milk production centre, and to examine the risk factors such as purchasing cattle, increasing cattle age, cattle breed and herd size associated with transmission of BLV infection. To estimate the rate of BLV infection, a survey for specific antibodies in 28,982 serum samples from animals belonging to 1116 different herds situated in Central Anatolia Region of Turkey were tested from January 2006 to December 2013. A generalized mixed linear model was used to evaluate the risk factors that influenced BLV seroprevalence. Antibodies against BLV were detected in 431 (2.28 %) of 18,822 Holstein and 29 (0.28 %) of 10,160 Brown Swiss cows. Among 1116 herds, 132 herds (11.82 %) had one or more positive animals. Also results of our study show that the prevalence of BLV infection increased from 2006 to 2011, and it tends to reduce with BLV control programme. Furthermore, we found positive associations between percentage of seropositive animal and increasing cattle age, herd size, cattle breed and purchased cattle. Age-specific prevalence showed that BLV prevalence increased with age. These factors should be taken into consideration for control of BLV infection. PMID:25708566

  12. Non-surgical treatment for localized gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Interium analysis of a multicenter prospective study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori and radiation therapy (RT) have curative potential for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, no prospective study has yet been reported. This prospective study evaluated the efficacy and safety of this non-surgical treatment for localized gastric MALT lymphoma. Among the 115 eligible patients, 89 (77.3%) achieved remission with eradication therapy. Twenty five (21.7%) patients received RT as additional treatment for residual tumor and 22 (88%) achieved complete remission. No serious adverse events, such as hemorrhage or perforation of the stomach, were observed. This organ-preserving treatment for localized gastric MALT lymphoma is safe and effective and has the potential to become the standard treatment for this disease, although long-term follow up is necessary. (author)

  13. Association of the COQ2 V393A variant with risk of multiple system atrophy in East Asians: a case-control study and meta-analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, QuanZhen; Yang, Xinglong; Tian, SiJia; An, Ran; Zheng, JinHua; Xu, Yanming

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies in Japan have associated multiple system atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disease of uncertain etiology, with polymorphism in the COQ2 gene. This led us to explore whether the same polymorphism is associated with MSA in Han Chinese and more broadly in East Asians. We conducted a case-control study with 82 Han Chinese with probable MSA and 484 gender- and age-matched healthy subjects, genotyping them using the ligase detection reaction. The results were meta-analyzed together with data from four previous studies to gain a broader picture of possible disease associations in East Asian populations. The COQ2 variants M78V and R337X were not detected in our Han Chinese patients or controls; only the heterozygous V393A variant (CT genotype) was detected. The frequency of this genotype was significantly higher in patients (7.3 %) than in controls (1.86 %; OR 4.17, 95 % CI 1.44-12.04, p = 0.004). Subgroup analysis among patients showed a significant association of V393A with MSA involving cerebellar signs (MSA-C; OR 4.59, 95 % CI 1.36-15.48, p = 0.007), but not with MSA involving parkinsonism (MSA-P). Meta-analysis of our results in Han Chinese with data from case-control studies in Japan, Korea, mainland China and Taiwan showed a significant association of V393A with MSA (OR 2.05, 95 % CI 1.29-3.25, p = 0.002), which subgroup analysis showed to be significant for MSA-C (OR 2.75, 95 % CI 1.98-3.84, p Japanese also applies to Han Chinese, as well as more broadly to other East Asian populations. This association may be particularly strong for MSA-C. PMID:26590992

  14. Planning a Regional Energy System in Association with the Creation of Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs, Statistical Analysis and Energy Efficiency Measures: An Italian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Fabbri

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Directive 2002/91/EC EPBD introduced the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC as a tool to guide the real estate market in the creation of products (buildings with improved energy performances. The EPC’s information could be useful in the determination of relevant policies and also in studying the characteristics of the building resources of the territory. This paper presents a case study related to the EPC Database of the Emilia-Romagna Region in mid-northern Italy. The case study shows a way of elaborating the EPC information in statistical analysis evaluations with aggregate data, in order to measure a territory and then direct energy policies toward energy efficiency. A statistical approach was used to define a characteristic statistical indicator index of the EPC database, and compare the energy index with the bottom-up and top-down methods, in order to identify some energy policy scenarios.

  15. Study on multimers and their structures in molecular association mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAMAGUCHI; Yoshinori; OZAKI; Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    Self-association system of(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)solution is studied as a model of molecular association mixture.Analysis methods including FSMWEFA(fixed-size moving window evolving factor analysis)combined with PCA(principal component analysis),SIMPLISMA (simple-to-use interactive self-modeling mixture analysis),and ITTFA(iterative target transformation factor analysis)are adopted to resolve infrared spectra of(R)-1,3-butanediol solution.Association number and equilibrium constant are computed.(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute inert solution is determined as a monomer-trimer equilibrium system.Theoretical investigation of trimer structures is carried out with DFT(density functional theory),and structural factors are analyzed.

  16. Anthropometric markers and their association with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: which marker is best for prediction? Pooled analysis of four German population-based cohort studies and comparison with a nationwide cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Saskia; Kluttig, Alexander; Tiller, Daniel; Fricke, Julia; Müller, Grit; Schipf, Sabine; Völzke, Henry; Schunk, Michaela; Meisinger, Christa; Schienkiewitz, Anja; Heidemann, Christin; Moebus, Susanne; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Werdan, Karl; Kuss, Oliver; Tamayo, Teresa; Haerting, Johannes; Greiser, Karin Halina

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the association between different anthropometric measurements and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to assess their predictive ability in different regions of Germany. Methods Data of 10 258 participants from 4 prospective population-based cohorts were pooled to assess the association of body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR) and waist-to-height-ratio (WHtR) with incident T2DM by calculating HRs of the crude, adjusted and standardised markers, as well as providing receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Differences between HRs and ROCs for the different anthropometric markers were calculated to compare their predictive ability. In addition, data of 3105 participants from the nationwide survey were analysed separately using the same methods to provide a nationally representative comparison. Results Strong associations were found for each anthropometric marker and incidence of T2DM. Among the standardised anthropometric measures, we found the strongest effect on incident T2DM for WC and WHtR in the pooled sample (HR for 1 SD difference in WC 1.97, 95% CI 1.75 to 2.22, HR for WHtR 1.93, 95% CI 1.71 to 2.17 in women) and in female DEGS participants (HR for WC 2.24, 95% CI 1.91 to 2.63, HR for WHtR 2.10, 95% CI 1.81 to 2.44), whereas the strongest association in men was found for WHR among DEGS participants (HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.89 to 2.78). ROC analysis showed WHtR to be the strongest predictor for incident T2DM. Differences in HR and ROCs between the different markers confirmed WC and WHtR to be the best predictors of incident T2DM. Findings were consistent across study regions and age groups (<65 vs ≥65 years). Conclusions We found stronger associations between anthropometric markers that reflect abdominal obesity (ie, WC and WHtR) and incident T2DM than for BMI and weight. The use of these measurements in risk prediction should be encouraged. PMID:26792214

  17. Cloning, functional organization, transcript studies, and phylogenetic analysis of the complete nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) and associated genes in the archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri 227.

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Y T; Zinder, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) from Methanosarcina barkeri 227 was completed in this study by cloning and sequencing a 2.7-kb BamHI fragment containing the 3' end of nifK2 and 1,390 bp of the nifE2-homologous genes. Open reading frame nifK2 is 1,371 bp long including the stop codon TAA and encodes a polypeptide of 456 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the nifK2 and nifE2 gene products from M. barke...

  18. The magnitude of association between overweight and obesity and the risk of diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Peeters, Anna; de Courten, Maximilian;

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this meta-analysis were to examine the magnitude of the relative risk (RR) of developing type 2 diabetes for overweight and obese populations, compared to those with normal weight, and to determine causes of the variation in RR between various cohort studies. The magnitude of the...... diabetes (>median), adjusted by at least three main confounding variables (age, family history of type 2 diabetes, physical activity), measured BMI, and diabetes determined by clinical diagnosis, the RR was 7.28, 95% CI: 6.47, 8.28 for obesity and 2.92, 95% CI: 2.57, 3.32 for overweight....

  19. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations ≥40 ng/ml Are Associated with >65% Lower Cancer Risk: Pooled Analysis of Randomized Trial and Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Sharon L.; Baggerly, Carole; French, Christine B.; Baggerly, Leo L.; Garland, Cedric F.; Gorham, Edward D.; Lappe, Joan M.; Heaney, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations have been associated with a lower risk of multiple cancer types across a range of 25(OH)D concentrations. Objectives To investigate whether the previously reported inverse association between 25(OH)D and cancer risk could be replicated, and if a 25(OH)D response region could be identified among women aged 55 years and older across a broad range of 25(OH)D concentrations. Methods Data from two cohorts representing different median 25(OH)D concentrations were pooled to afford a broader range of 25(OH)D concentrations than either cohort alone: the Lappe cohort (N = 1,169), a randomized clinical trial cohort (median 25(OH)D = 30 ng/ml) and the GrassrootsHealth cohort (N = 1,135), a prospective cohort (median 25(OH)D = 48 ng/ml). Cancer incidence over a multi-year period (median: 3.9 years) was compared according to 25(OH)D concentration. Kaplan-Meier plots were developed and the association between 25(OH)D and cancer risk was examined with multivariate Cox regression using multiple 25(OH)D measurements and spline functions. The study included all invasive cancers excluding skin cancer. Results Age-adjusted cancer incidence across the combined cohort (N = 2,304) was 840 cases per 100,000 person-years (1,020 per 100,000 person-years in the Lappe cohort and 722 per 100,000 person-years in the GrassrootsHealth cohort). Incidence was lower at higher concentrations of 25(OH)D. Women with 25(OH)D concentrations ≥40 ng/ml had a 67% lower risk of cancer than women with concentrations <20 ng/ml (HR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.12–0.90). Conclusions 25(OH)D concentrations ≥40 ng/ml were associated with substantial reduction in risk of all invasive cancers combined. PMID:27049526

  20. Association Analysis for Visual Exploration of Multivariate Scientific Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaotong; Shen, Han-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneity and complexity of multivariate characteristics poses a unique challenge to visual exploration of multivariate scientific data sets, as it requires investigating the usually hidden associations between different variables and specific scalar values to understand the data's multi-faceted properties. In this paper, we present a novel association analysis method that guides visual exploration of scalar-level associations in the multivariate context. We model the directional interactions between scalars of different variables as information flows based on association rules. We introduce the concepts of informativeness and uniqueness to describe how information flows between scalars of different variables and how they are associated with each other in the multivariate domain. Based on scalar-level associations represented by a probabilistic association graph, we propose the Multi-Scalar Informativeness-Uniqueness (MSIU) algorithm to evaluate the informativeness and uniqueness of scalars. We present an exploration framework with multiple interactive views to explore the scalars of interest with confident associations in the multivariate spatial domain, and provide guidelines for visual exploration using our framework. We demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of our approach through case studies using three representative multivariate scientific data sets. PMID:26529739

  1. Longitudinal Analysis of the Association Between Vasomotor Symptoms and Race/Ethnicity Across the Menopausal Transition: Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ellen B.; Colvin, Alicia; Avis, Nancy; Bromberger, Joyce; Greendale, Gail A.; Powell, Lynda; Sternfeld, Barbara; Matthews, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether vasomotor symptom reporting or patterns of change in symptom reporting over the perimenopausal transition among women enrolled in a national study differed according to race/ethnicity. We also sought to determine whether racial/ethnic differences were explained by sociodemographic, health, or lifestyle factors. Methods. We followed 3198 women enrolled in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation during 1996 through 2002. We analyzed frequency of vasomotor symptom reporting using longitudinal multiple logistic regressions. Results. Rates of vasomotor symptom reporting were highest among African Americans (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.21, 2.20). The transition to late perimenopause exhibited the strongest association with vasomotor symptoms (adjusted OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 4.80, 9.20). Other risk factors were age (adjusted OR=1.17; 95% CI=1.13, 1.21), having less than a college education (adjusted OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.40, 2.61), increasing body mass index (adjusted OR=1.03 per unit of increase; 95% CI=1.01, 1.04), smoking (adjusted OR=1.63; 95% CI=1.25, 2.12), and anxiety symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR=3.10; 95% CI=2.33, 4.12). Conclusions. Among the risk factors assessed, vasomotor symptoms were most strongly associated with menopausal status. After adjustment for covariates, symptoms were reported most often in all racial/ethnic groups in late perimenopause and nearly as often in postmenopause. PMID:16735636

  2. Parental factors associated with walking to school and participation in organised activities at age 5: Analysis of the Millennium Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodgers Sarah E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is associated with better health. Two sources of activity for children are walking to school and taking part in organised sports and activities. This study uses a large national cohort to examine factors associated with participation in these activities. Methods The Millennium Cohort study contains 5 year follow-up of 17,561 singleton children recruited between 2000-2002 in the UK. All participants were interviewed in their own homes at 9 months, 3 years and 5 years follow-up and all measures were self reports. Logistic regression and likelihood ratio tests were used. Results Children are less likely to walk to school as income and parental education increase [Adjusted odds: 0.7 (95%CI: 0.6-0.8 for higher income/education compared to low income/no qualifications]. However, if the parent plays with the child in high income families the child is more likely to walk to school [Adjusted odds: 1.67 (95%CI: 1.3-2.1]. Children taking part in organised activities are from higher income, higher education families, with a car, in a "good" area with non-working mothers. However, in low socio-economic families where the parent plays with the child the child is more likely to take part in organised activities [Adjusted odds: 2.0 (95% CI: 1.5-2.7]. Conclusions Income is an important determinant of the type of activity available to children. Families that report good health behaviours (non-smoking, low TV viewing and play with their children show higher levels of physical activity. Thus, parenting practice appears to have a strong impact on their child's physical activity.

  3. SNPTrack™ : an integrated bioinformatics system for genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Joshua; Kelly, Reagan; Zhou, Guangxu; Turner, Steven A; Ding, Don; Harris, Stephen C; Hong, Huixiao; Fang, Hong; Tong, Weida

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association study is a complicated process that involves collecting phenotypic data, generating genotypic data, analyzing associations between genotypic and phenotypic data, and interpreting genetic biomarkers identified. SNPTrack is an integrated bioinformatics system developed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to support the review and analysis of pharmacogenetics data resulting from FDA research or submitted by sponsors. The system integrates data management, analysis, and interpretation in a single platform for genetic association studies. Specifically, it stores genotyping data and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) annotations along with study design data in an Oracle database. It also integrates popular genetic analysis tools, such as PLINK and Haploview. SNPTrack provides genetic analysis capabilities and captures analysis results in its database as SNP lists that can be cross-linked for biological interpretation to gene/protein annotations, Gene Ontology, and pathway analysis data. With SNPTrack, users can do the entire stream of bioinformatics jobs for genetic association studies. SNPTrack is freely available to the public at http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/BioinformaticsTools/SNPTrack/default.htm. PMID:23245293

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in five cohorts reveals common variants in RBFOX1, a regulator of tissue-specific splicing, associated with refractive error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, Dwight; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Li, Xiaohui; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily Y.; Klein, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Y.; Simpson, Claire L.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Baird, Paul N.; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Mitchell, Paul; Saw, Seang Mei; Fossarello, Maurizio; Kazmierkiewicz, Krista; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Schache, Maria; Richardson, Andrea; Xie, Jing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Hosseini, S.M.; Döring, Angela; Bettecken, Thomas; Vatavuk, Zoran; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Foster, Paul J.; Topouzis, Fotis; McGuffin, Peter; Sim, Xueling; Inouye, Michael; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Meitinger, Thomas; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Visual refractive errors (REs) are complex genetic traits with a largely unknown etiology. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of moderate size have identified several novel risk markers for RE, measured here as mean spherical equivalent (MSE). We performed a GWAS using a total of 7280 samples from five cohorts: the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS); the KORA study (‘Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg’); the Framingham Eye Study (FES); the Ogliastra Genetic Park-Talana (OGP-Talana) Study and the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Genotyping was performed on Illumina and Affymetrix platforms with additional markers imputed to the HapMap II reference panel. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 16 (rs10500355, P = 3.9 × 10−9) in a combined discovery and replication set (26 953 samples). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is located within the RBFOX1 gene which is a neuron-specific splicing factor regulating a wide range of alternative splicing events implicated in neuronal development and maturation, including transcription factors, other splicing factors and synaptic proteins. PMID:23474815

  5. Association between NSAIDs and Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permpalung, Nitipong; Upala, Sikarin; Sanguankeo, Anawin; Sornprom, Suthanya

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Clostridium difficile infection is a leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in developed countries. Studies evaluating the associations of increased risk of community-acquired CDAD and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have yielded inconclusive results. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the odds of NSAID exposure in patients with CDAD versus patients without CDAD in both community-based and healthcare-associated settings. Methods. Relevant observational studies indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE up to February 2015 were analyzed and data were extracted from nine studies. Of these, eight studies were included in the meta-analysis. Results. A search of the databases resulted in 987 articles. The nine studies from which data were extracted involved over 39,000 subjects. The pooled odds ratio for history of NSAID use in participants with CDAD compared with controls was 1.41 (95% CI 1.06–1.87; p < 0.01), indicating a significant increased odds of CDAD among patients exposed to NSAIDs. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of its nature to demonstrate the association between the use of NSAIDs and increased risk of CDAD. Further studies to evaluate if any specific types of NSAIDs can increase the risk of CDAD are warranted.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α -308G/A (rs1800629) polymorphism distribution in North India and its association with pemphigus: Case-control study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Sajad Ahmad; Akhter, Naseem; Haque, Shafiul; Singh, Taru; Mandal, Raju Kumar; Ramachandran, Vishnampettai Ganapathysubramanian; Bhattacharya, Sambit Nath; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Das, Shukla

    2016-05-01

    Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disorder of skin and/or mucosal surfaces characterized by intraepithelial lesions and immunoglobulin-G autoantibodies against desmogleins (proteins critical in cell-to-cell adhesion). Genetic, immunological, hormonal, and environmental factors are known to contribute to its etiology. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) which plays a key role in pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory diseases has been found in high levels in lesional skin and sera of pemphigus patients. However, studies on association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in promoter region of TNF-α at position -308 affecting G to A transition with pemphigus has been scarce. This study was conducted to evaluate the TNF-α -308G/A SNP distribution in North Indian cohort, and to define the association between the TNF-α -308G/A SNP distribution and pemphigus, globally, by means of meta-analysis. TNF-α -308G/A SNP in pemphigus patients was investigated by cytokine genotyping using genomic DNA by PCR with sequence-specific primers. Meta-analysis of the data, including four previously published studies from other populations, was performed to generate a meaningful relationship. The results of our case-control study indicate non-significant differences between patients and controls in TNF-α -308G/A SNP. The meta-analysis also revealed that TNF-α -308G/A SNP is not associated with pemphigus risk in population at large; however, it may be contributing towards autoimmune phenomenon in pemphigus by being a part of its multi-factorial etiology. This study provides evidence that the TNF-α -308G/A polymorphism is not associated with overall pemphigus susceptibility. Nevertheless, further studies on specific ethnicity and pemphigus variants are necessary to validate the findings. PMID:26761187

  7. Association between Air Pollutants and Asthma Emergency Room Visits and Hospital Admissions in Time Series Studies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-yan Zheng

    Full Text Available Air pollution constitutes a significant stimulus of asthma exacerbations; however, the impacts of exposure to major air pollutants on asthma-related hospital admissions and emergency room visits (ERVs have not been fully determined.We sought to quantify the associations between short-term exposure to air pollutants [ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, sulfur dioxide (SO2, and particulate matter ≤10 μm (PM10 and PM2.5] and the asthma-related emergency room visits (ERV and hospitalizations.Systematic computerized searches without language limitation were performed. Pooled relative risks (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs were estimated using the random-effect models. Sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses were also performed.After screening of 246 studies, 87 were included in our analyses. Air pollutants were associated with significantly increased risks of asthma ERVs and hospitalizations [O3: RR(95%CI, 1.009 (1.006, 1.011; I2 = 87.8%, population-attributable fraction (PAF (95%CI: 0.8 (0.6, 1.1; CO: RR(95%CI, 1.045 (1.029, 1.061; I2 = 85.7%, PAF (95%CI: 4.3 (2.8, 5.7; NO2: RR(95%CI, 1.018 (1.014, 1.022; I2 = 87.6%, PAF (95%CI: 1.8 (1.4, 2.2; SO2: RR(95%CI, 1.011 (1.007, 1.015; I2 = 77.1%, PAF (95%CI: 1.1 (0.7, 1.5; PM10: RR(95%CI, 1.010 (1.008, 1.013; I2 = 69.1%, PAF (95%CI: 1.1 (0.8, 1.3; PM2.5: RR(95%CI, 1.023 (1.015, 1.031; I2 = 82.8%, PAF (95%CI: 2.3 (1.5, 3.1]. Sensitivity analyses yielded compatible findings as compared with the overall analyses without publication bias. Stronger associations were found in hospitalized males, children and elderly patients in warm seasons with lag of 2 days or greater.Short-term exposures to air pollutants account for increased risks of asthma-related ERVs and hospitalizations that constitute a considerable healthcare utilization and socioeconomic burden.

  8. ZDHHC8 as a candidate gene for schizophrenia: Analysis of a putative functional intronic marker in case-control and family-based association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabs Burkhard

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome 22q11 region is proposed as a major candidate locus for susceptibility genes to schizophrenia. Recently, the gene ZDHHC8 encoding a putative palmitoyltransferase at 22q11 was proposed to increase liability to schizophrenia based on both animal models and human association studies by significant over-transmission of allele rs175174A in female, but not male subjects with schizophrenia. Methods Given the genetic complexity of schizophrenia and the potential genetic heterogeneity in different populations, we examined rs175174 in 204 German proband-parent triads and in an independent case-control study (schizophrenic cases: n = 433; controls: n = 186. Results In the triads heterozygous parents transmitted allele G preferentially to females, and allele A to males (heterogeneity χ2 = 4.43; p = 0.035. The case-control sample provided no further evidence for overall or gender-specific effects regarding allele and genotype frequency distributions. Conclusion The findings on rs175174 at ZDHHC8 are still far from being conclusive, but evidence for sexual dimorphism is moderate, and our data do not support a significant genetic contribution of rs175174 to the aetiopathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  9. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis with infertility and clinical manifestations: a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Hossein; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-07-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the sexually transmitted pathogens causing reproductive health-threatening diseases worldwide. However, its role in infertility, particularly in asymptomatic individuals, is not yet definitely determined. Methods For the study, electronic databases were searched using the following keywords; 'Chlamydia trachomatis', 'prevalence', 'frequency', 'fertile', 'infertile', 'case', 'control', 'symptomatic' and 'asymptomatic'. Finally, after some exclusions, 34 studies (19 fertile-infertile and 15 symptomatic-asymptomatic) from different countries were included in the study and meta-analysis was performed on the data collected. Results Odds ratios (ORs) for urogenital C. trachomatis prevalence in males in the fertile-infertile group, for infertile and fertile individuals, ranged from 1.3-3.7 and in females from 1.04-4.8, and the overall OR for both genders was 2.2 (95% CI). In the symptomatic-asymptomatic group, the overall OR in males and females was 4.9 (95% CI = 1.1-21.7) and 3.3 (95% CI = 1.7-6.3), respectively. In all of the analyses, there were high levels of heterogeneity (I(2) >50%, p-value national programmes for adequate diagnosis, screening and treatment of infected individuals, particularly asymptomatic ones, seem to be necessary. PMID:27064452

  10. Association between the European GWAS-Identified Susceptibility Locus at Chromosome 4p16 and the Risk of Atrial Septal Defect: A Case-Control Study in Southwest China and a Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dian, Ke; Ying, Binwu; Lu, Xiaojun; Hu, Xuejiao; An, Qi; Chen, Chunxia; Huang, Chunyan; Tan, Bin; Qin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is the third most frequent type of congenital heart anomaly, featuring shunting of blood between the two atria. Gene-environment interaction remains to be an acknowledged cause for ASD occurrence. A recent European genome-wide association study (GWAS) of congenital heart disease (CHD) identified 3 susceptibility SNPs at chromosome 4p16 associated with ASD: rs870142, rs16835979 and rs6824295. A Chinese-GWAS of CHD conducted in the corresponding period did not reveal the 3 susceptibility SNPs, but reported 2 different risk SNPs: rs2474937 and rs1531070. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the 3 European GWAS-identified susceptibility SNPs and ASD risk in the Han population in southwest China. Additionally, to increase the robustness of our current analysis, we conducted a meta-analysis combining published studies and our current case-control study. We performed association, linkage disequilibrium, and haplotype analysis among the 3 SNPs in 190 ASD cases and 225 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies among the 3 SNPs showed statistically significant differences between the cases and controls. Our study found that individuals carrying the allele T of rs870142, the allele A of rs16835979, and the allele T of rs6824295 had a respective 50.1% (odds ratio (OR) = 1.501, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.122-2.009, PFDR-BH = 0.018), 48.5% (OR = 1.485, 95%CI = 1.109-1.987, PFDR-BH = 0.012), and 38.6% (OR = 1.386, 95%CI = 1.042-1.844, PFDR-BH = 0.025) increased risk to develop ASD than wild-type allele carriers in our study cohort. In the haplotype analysis, we identified a disease-risk haplotype (TAT) (OR = 1.540, 95%CI = 1.030-2.380, PFDR-BH = 0.016). Our meta-analysis also showed that the investigated SNP was associated with ASD risk (combined OR (95%CI) = 1.35 (1.24-1.46), P < 0.00001). Our study provides compelling evidence to motivate better understanding of the etiology of ASD

  11. Association between the European GWAS-identified susceptibility locus at chromosome 4p16 and the risk of atrial septal defect: a case-control study in Southwest China and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhao

    Full Text Available Atrial septal defect (ASD is the third most frequent type of congenital heart anomaly, featuring shunting of blood between the two atria. Gene-environment interaction remains to be an acknowledged cause for ASD occurrence. A recent European genome-wide association study (GWAS of congenital heart disease (CHD identified 3 susceptibility SNPs at chromosome 4p16 associated with ASD: rs870142, rs16835979 and rs6824295. A Chinese-GWAS of CHD conducted in the corresponding period did not reveal the 3 susceptibility SNPs, but reported 2 different risk SNPs: rs2474937 and rs1531070. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the 3 European GWAS-identified susceptibility SNPs and ASD risk in the Han population in southwest China. Additionally, to increase the robustness of our current analysis, we conducted a meta-analysis combining published studies and our current case-control study. We performed association, linkage disequilibrium, and haplotype analysis among the 3 SNPs in 190 ASD cases and 225 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies among the 3 SNPs showed statistically significant differences between the cases and controls. Our study found that individuals carrying the allele T of rs870142, the allele A of rs16835979, and the allele T of rs6824295 had a respective 50.1% (odds ratio (OR = 1.501, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.122-2.009, PFDR-BH = 0.018, 48.5% (OR = 1.485, 95%CI = 1.109-1.987, PFDR-BH = 0.012, and 38.6% (OR = 1.386, 95%CI = 1.042-1.844, PFDR-BH = 0.025 increased risk to develop ASD than wild-type allele carriers in our study cohort. In the haplotype analysis, we identified a disease-risk haplotype (TAT (OR = 1.540, 95%CI = 1.030-2.380, PFDR-BH = 0.016. Our meta-analysis also showed that the investigated SNP was associated with ASD risk (combined OR (95%CI = 1.35 (1.24-1.46, P < 0.00001. Our study provides compelling evidence to motivate better understanding of the etiology

  12. Association between the European GWAS-identified susceptibility locus at chromosome 4p16 and the risk of atrial septal defect: a case-control study in Southwest China and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Li, Bei; Dian, Ke; Ying, Binwu; Lu, Xiaojun; Hu, Xuejiao; An, Qi; Chen, Chunxia; Huang, Chunyan; Tan, Bin; Qin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is the third most frequent type of congenital heart anomaly, featuring shunting of blood between the two atria. Gene-environment interaction remains to be an acknowledged cause for ASD occurrence. A recent European genome-wide association study (GWAS) of congenital heart disease (CHD) identified 3 susceptibility SNPs at chromosome 4p16 associated with ASD: rs870142, rs16835979 and rs6824295. A Chinese-GWAS of CHD conducted in the corresponding period did not reveal the 3 susceptibility SNPs, but reported 2 different risk SNPs: rs2474937 and rs1531070. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the associations between the 3 European GWAS-identified susceptibility SNPs and ASD risk in the Han population in southwest China. Additionally, to increase the robustness of our current analysis, we conducted a meta-analysis combining published studies and our current case-control study. We performed association, linkage disequilibrium, and haplotype analysis among the 3 SNPs in 190 ASD cases and 225 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies among the 3 SNPs showed statistically significant differences between the cases and controls. Our study found that individuals carrying the allele T of rs870142, the allele A of rs16835979, and the allele T of rs6824295 had a respective 50.1% (odds ratio (OR) = 1.501, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.122-2.009, PFDR-BH = 0.018), 48.5% (OR = 1.485, 95%CI = 1.109-1.987, PFDR-BH = 0.012), and 38.6% (OR = 1.386, 95%CI = 1.042-1.844, PFDR-BH = 0.025) increased risk to develop ASD than wild-type allele carriers in our study cohort. In the haplotype analysis, we identified a disease-risk haplotype (TAT) (OR = 1.540, 95%CI = 1.030-2.380, PFDR-BH = 0.016). Our meta-analysis also showed that the investigated SNP was associated with ASD risk (combined OR (95%CI) = 1.35 (1.24-1.46), P < 0.00001). Our study provides compelling evidence to motivate better understanding of the etiology of ASD

  13. Combining genetic association study designs: a GWAS case study

    OpenAIRE

    Estus, Janice L.; ,; Fardo, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) explore the relationship between genome variability and disease susceptibility with either population- or family-based data. Here, we have evaluated the utility of combining population- and family-based statistical association tests and have proposed a method for reducing the burden of multiple testing. Unrelated singleton and parent-offspring trio cases and controls from the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study were analyzed for genetic associ...

  14. Genetic association analysis of complex diseases incorporating intermediate phenotype information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafang Li

    Full Text Available Genetic researchers often collect disease related quantitative traits in addition to disease status because they are interested in understanding the pathophysiology of disease processes. In genome-wide association (GWA studies, these quantitative phenotypes may be relevant to disease development and serve as intermediate phenotypes or they could be behavioral or other risk factors that predict disease risk. Statistical tests combining both disease status and quantitative risk factors should be more powerful than case-control studies, as the former incorporates more information about the disease. In this paper, we proposed a modified inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis method to combine disease status and quantitative intermediate phenotype information. The simulation results showed that when an intermediate phenotype was available, the inverse-variance weighted method had more power than did a case-control study of complex diseases, especially in identifying susceptibility loci having minor effects. We further applied this modified meta-analysis to a study of imputed lung cancer genotypes with smoking data in 1154 cases and 1137 matched controls. The most significant SNPs came from the CHRNA3-CHRNA5-CHRNB4 region on chromosome 15q24-25.1, which has been replicated in many other studies. Our results confirm that this CHRNA region is associated with both lung cancer development and smoking behavior. We also detected three significant SNPs--rs1800469, rs1982072, and rs2241714--in the promoter region of the TGFB1 gene on chromosome 19 (p = 1.46×10(-5, 1.18×10(-5, and 6.57×10(-6, respectively. The SNP rs1800469 is reported to be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in cigarette smokers. The present study is the first GWA study to replicate this result. Signals in the 3q26 region were also identified in the meta-analysis. We demonstrate the intermediate phenotype can potentially enhance the power of complex

  15. Large Scale Association Analysis for Drug Addiction: Results from SNP to Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhifa; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Heping

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic association studies used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) data to identify genetic variants for complex diseases. Although SNP-based associations are most common in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), gene-based association analysis has received increasing attention in understanding genetic etiologies for complex diseases. While both methods have been used to analyze the same data, few genome-wide association studies compare the results or observe the connection between...

  16. Association Analysis of the Amino Acid Contents in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiguo Zhao; Eun-Jin Park; Jong-Wook Chung; Yong-Jin Park; III-Min Chung; Joung-Kuk Ahn; Gwang-Ho Kim

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to identify simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with the amino acid content of rice (Oryza sativa L.). SSR markers were selected by prescreening for the relationship to amino acid content. Eighty-four rice landrace accessions from Korea were evaluated for 16 kinds of amino acids in brown rice and genotyped with 25 SSR markers. Analysis of population structure revealed four subgroups in the population. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and distributions are of fundamental importance for genome-wide mapping associations. The mean r2 value for all intrachromosomal loci pairs was 0.033. LD between linked markers decreased with distance. Marker-trait associations were investigated using the unified mixed-model approach, considering both population structure (Q) and kinship (K). A total of 42 marker-trait associations with amino acids (P < 0.05) were identified using 15 different SSR markers covering three chromosomes and explaining more than 40% of the total variation. These results suggest that association analysis In rice is a viable alternative to quantitative trait loci mapping and should help rice breeders develop strategies for improving rice quality.

  17. Reliability analysis of an associated system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈长杰; 魏一鸣; 蔡嗣经

    2002-01-01

    Based on engineering reliability of large complex system and distinct characteristic of soft system, some new conception and theory on the medium elements and the associated system are created. At the same time, the reliability logic model of associated system is provided. In this paper, through the field investigation of the trial operation, the engineering reliability of the paste fill system in No.2 mine of Jinchuan Non-ferrous Metallic Corporation is analyzed by using the theory of associated system.

  18. Two new Loci for body-weight regulation identified in a joint analysis of genome-wide association studies for early-onset extreme obesity in French and german study groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Scherag

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses of population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS in adults have recently led to the detection of new genetic loci for obesity. Here we aimed to discover additional obesity loci in extremely obese children and adolescents. We also investigated if these results generalize by estimating the effects of these obesity loci in adults and in population-based samples including both children and adults. We jointly analysed two GWAS of 2,258 individuals and followed-up the best, according to lowest p-values, 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP from 21 genomic regions in 3,141 individuals. After this DISCOVERY step, we explored if the findings derived from the extremely obese children and adolescents (10 SNPs from 5 genomic regions generalized to (i the population level and (ii to adults by genotyping another 31,182 individuals (GENERALIZATION step. Apart from previously identified FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18, we detected two new loci for obesity: one in SDCCAG8 (serologically defined colon cancer antigen 8 gene; p = 1.85x10(-8 in the DISCOVERY step and one between TNKS (tankyrase, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase gene and MSRA (methionine sulfoxide reductase A gene; p = 4.84x10(-7, the latter finding being limited to children and adolescents as demonstrated in the GENERALIZATION step. The odds ratios for early-onset obesity were estimated at approximately 1.10 per risk allele for both loci. Interestingly, the TNKS/MSRA locus has recently been found to be associated with adult waist circumference. In summary, we have completed a meta-analysis of two GWAS which both focus on extremely obese children and adolescents and replicated our findings in a large followed-up data set. We observed that genetic variants in or near FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, SDCCAG8, and TNKS/MSRA were robustly associated with early-onset obesity. We conclude that the currently known major common variants related to obesity overlap to a substantial

  19. Risk Characterization uncertainties associated description, sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power point presentation is about risks to the estimated levels of exposure, uncertainty and variability in the analysis, sensitivity analysis, risks from exposure to multiple substances, formulation of guidelines for carcinogenic and genotoxic compounds and risk subpopulations

  20. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-06-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key pointsSignificantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power

  1. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key points Significantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power capacity in

  2. A Comparative Study of Sparse Associative Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripon, Vincent; Heusel, Judith; Löwe, Matthias; Vermet, Franck

    2016-07-01

    We study various models of associative memories with sparse information, i.e. a pattern to be stored is a random string of 0s and 1s with about log N 1s, only. We compare different synaptic weights, architectures and retrieval mechanisms to shed light on the influence of the various parameters on the storage capacity.

  3. Associative Visual Agnosia: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    A. Charnallet; S. Carbonnel; David, D; O. Moreaud

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study [1], an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory [4].

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R; Kendler, Kenneth S;

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis...

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R; Kendler, Kenneth S;

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yiel...

  6. Cloning, functional organization, transcript studies, and phylogenetic analysis of the complete nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) and associated genes in the archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri 227.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Y T; Zinder, S H

    1996-01-01

    Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK2) from Methanosarcina barkeri 227 was completed in this study by cloning and sequencing a 2.7-kb BamHI fragment containing the 3' end of nifK2 and 1,390 bp of the nifE2-homologous genes. Open reading frame nifK2 is 1,371 bp long including the stop codon TAA and encodes a polypeptide of 456 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the nifK2 and nifE2 gene products from M. barkeri showed that both genes cluster most closely with the corresponding nif-1 gene products from Clostridium pasteurianum, consistent with our previous analyses of nifH2 and nifD2. The nifE gene product is known to be homologous to that of nifD, and our analysis shows that the branching pattern for the nifE proteins resembles that for the nifD product (with the exception of vnfE from Azotobacter vinelandii), suggesting that a gene duplication occurred before the divergence of nitrogenases. Primer extension showed that nifH2 had a single transcription start site located 34 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translation start site for nifH2, and a sequence resembling the archaeal consensus promoter sequence [TTTA(A/T)ATA] was found 32 nucleotides upstream from that transcription start site. A tract of four T's, previously identified as a transcription termination site in archaea, was found immediately downstream of the nifK2 gene, and a potential promoter was located upstream of the nifE2 gene. Hybridization with nifH2 and nifDK2 probes with M. barkeri RNA revealed a 4.6-kb transcript from N2-grown cells, large enough to harbor nifHDK genes and their internal open reading frames, while no transcript was detected from NH4(+)-grown cells. These results support a model in which the nitrogenase structural genes in M. barkeri are cotranscribed in a single NH4(+)-repressed operon. PMID:8550408

  7. Effect modification by population dietary folate on the association between MTHFR genotype, homocysteine, and stroke risk : a meta-analysis of genetic studies and randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Newcombe, Paul; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Sofat, Reecha; Ricketts, Sally L.; Cooper, Jackie; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Bautista, Leonelo E.; Sharma, Pankaj; Whittaker, John C.; Smeeth, Liam; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Algra, Ale; Shmeleva, Veronika; Szolnoki, Zoltan; Roest, Mark; Linnebank, Michael; Zacho, Jeppe; Nalls, Michael A.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hardy, John; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Matarin, Mar; Norman, Paul E.; Flicker, Leon; Almeida, Osvaldo P.; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Shimokata, Hiroshi; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bobak, Martin; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Smith, George Davey; Talmud, Philippa J.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Humphries, Steve E.; Price, Jackie F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Meschia, James F.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The MTHFR 677C -> T polymorphism has been associated with raised homocysteine concentration and increased risk of stroke. A previous overview showed that the effects were greatest in regions with low dietary folate consumption, but differentiation between the effect of folate and small-st

  8. Loneliness is associated with poor prognosis in late-life depression : Longitudinal analysis of the Netherlands study of depression in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Floor; Burger, Huibert; de Waal, Margot M. W.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Comijs, Hannie C.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although depression and loneliness are common among older adults, the role of loneliness on the prognosis of late life depression has not yet been determined. Therefore, we examined the association between loneliness and the course of depression. Methods: We conducted a 2-year follow-up

  9. A large replication study and meta-analysis in European samples provides further support for association of AHI1 markers with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingason, Andrés; Giegling, Ina; Cichon, Sven; Hansen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Nielsen, Jimmi; Jürgens, Gesche; Muglia, Pierandrea; Hartmann, Annette M; Strengman, Eric; Vasilescu, Catalina; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Lerer, Bernard; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Francks, Clyde; Pietiläinen, Olli P H; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Walshe, Muriel; Vassos, Evangelos; Di Forti, Marta; Murray, Robin; Bonetto, Chiara; Tosato, Sarah; Cantor, Rita M; Rietschel, Marcella; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Peltonen, Leena; Andreassen, Ole A; Nöthen, Markus M; St Clair, David; Ophoff, Roel A; O'Donovan, Michael C; Collier, David A; Werge, Thomas; Rujescu, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The Abelson helper integration site 1 (AHI1) gene locus on chromosome 6q23 is among a group of candidate loci for schizophrenia susceptibility that were initially identified by linkage followed by linkage disequilibrium mapping, and subsequent replication of the association in an independent samp...

  10. Prediction of disease and phenotype associations from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome wide association studies (GWAS have proven useful as a method for identifying genetic variations associated with diseases. In this study, we analyzed GWAS data for 61 diseases and phenotypes to elucidate common associations based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. The study was an expansion on a previous study on identifying disease associations via data from a single GWAS on seven diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adjustments to the originally reported study included expansion of the SNP dataset using Linkage Disequilibrium (LD and refinement of the four levels of analysis to encompass SNP, SNP block, gene, and pathway level comparisons. A pair-wise comparison between diseases and phenotypes was performed at each level and the Jaccard similarity index was used to measure the degree of association between two diseases/phenotypes. Disease relatedness networks (DRNs were used to visualize our results. We saw predominant relatedness between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis for the first three levels of analysis. Expected relatedness was also seen between lipid- and blood-related traits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The predominant associations between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis can be validated by clinical studies. The diseases have been proposed to share a systemic inflammation phenotype that can result in progression of additional diseases in patients with one of these three diseases. We also noticed unexpected relationships between metabolic and neurological diseases at the pathway comparison level. The less significant relationships found between diseases require a more detailed literature review to determine validity of the predictions. The results from this study serve as a first step towards a better understanding of seemingly unrelated diseases and phenotypes with similar symptoms or modes of treatment.

  11. Whole-genome association analysis to identify markers associated with recombination rates using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Liang; Liu Nianjun; Wang Shuang; Huang Song; Oh Cheongeun; Zhao Hongyu

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Recombination during meiosis is one of the most important biological processes, and the level of recombination rates for a given individual is under genetic control. In this study, we conducted genome-wide association studies to identify chromosomal regions associated with recombination rates. We analyzed genotype data collected on the pedigrees in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics on Alcoholism data provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 14. A total of 315 microsatellites and 1...

  12. Association between fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO gene polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianli Cai

    Full Text Available AIMS: Many studies have investigated the relationship between FTO gene polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS susceptibility but revealed mixed results. In this study, we aimed to perform a meta-analysis to clarify this association. METHODS: Published literature from PubMed, Embase and CNKI was retrieved. Meta-analysis was performed to calculate pooled odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI using the random- or fix- effects model. RESULTS: A total of 5 studies (4778 cases and 4272 controls were included in our meta-analysis. The results suggested that FTO rs9939609 polymorphism (or its proxy was marginally associated with PCOS risk after adjustment for body mass index (BMI (OR = 1.26; 95%CI: 1.02-1.55. However, the marginal association was not stable after sensitivity analysis. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the association was significant in East Asians (OR = 1.43, 95%CI = 1.30-1.59 but not in Caucasians (OR = 1.04, 95%CI = 0.85-1.29. CONCLUSIONS: Our present meta-analysis indicated that FTO rs9939609 polymorphism (or its proxy might not be associated with risk of PCOS in overall population. However, in East Asians, there might be a direct association between FTO variant and PCOS risk, which is independent of BMI (adiposity.

  13. Cardiovascular outcomes associated with use of clarithromycin: population based study

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, AY; Root, A.; Douglas, IJ; Chui, CS; Chan, EW; Ghebremichael-Weldeselassie, Y.; Siu, CW; Smeeth, L; Wong, IC

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION:  What is the association between clarithromycin use and cardiovascular outcomes? METHODS:  In this population based study the authors compared cardiovascular outcomes in adults aged 18 or more receiving oral clarithromycin or amoxicillin during 2005-09 in Hong Kong. Based on age within five years, sex, and calendar year at use, each clarithromycin user was matched to one or two amoxicillin users. The cohort analysis included patients who received clarithromycin (n=108 988) or ...

  14. Semantic Associations in Business English: A Corpus-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the semantic associations of words found in the business lexical environment by using a one-million word corpus of both spoken and written Business English. The key method of analysis is that of semantic prosody or semantic association; the notion that words associate with collocates that are themselves related, often either…

  15. Do Self-efficacy Expectation and Spirituality Provide a Buffer Against Stress-Associated Impairment of Health? A Comprehensive Analysis of the German Pastoral Ministry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Eckhard; Büssing, Arndt; Baumann, Klaus; Weig, Wolfgang; Jacobs, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to analyse stress perception, psychosomatic health and life satisfaction in pastoral professionals, paying particular attention to their individual and shared resources. Enrolling 8574 German pastoral professionals (48 % priests, 22 % parish expert workers, 18 % pastoral assistants, 12 % deacons), we found that pastoral professionals' stress perception is associated with psychosomatic health impairment. General self-efficacy was a beneficial resource to protect against stress perceptions, while perception of the transcendent had a further yet weakly positive influence for stress-related impairment of health. External stressors (i.e. team size, duration of work per week and size of pastoral unit) were only of marginal independent relevance. PMID:25812491

  16. Chemotherapy-associated thromboembolic risk in cancer outpatients and effect of nadroparin thromboprophylaxis: results of a retrospective analysis of the PROTECHT study

    OpenAIRE

    Petrelli Fausto; Brighenti Matteo; Mandalà Mario; Verso Melina; Bonizzoni Erminio; Agnelli Giancarlo; Labianca Roberto; Barni Sandro; Bianchini Carlo; Perrone Tania; Gasparini Giampietro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy are at increased risk of thrombosis. Nadroparin has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of venous and arterial thrombotic events (TEs) by about 50% in cancer outpatients receiving chemotherapy. The aims of this retrospective analysis were to evaluate the thromboembolic risk and the benefit of thromboprophylaxis according to type of chemotherapy. Methods Cancer outpatients were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections...

  17. A case-control association study and family-based expression analysis of the bipolar disorder candidate gene PI4K2B

    OpenAIRE

    Houlihan, Lorna; Christoforou, A.; Arbuckle, M I; Torrance, H. S.; Anderson, S. M.; Muir, Walter,; Porteous, D. J.; Blackwood, D H; Evans, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and recurrent major depression are complex psychiatric illnesses with a substantial, yet unknown genetic component. Linkage of bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression with markers on chromosome 4p15–p16 has been identified in a large Scottish family and three smaller families. Analysis of haplotypes in the four chromosome 4p-linked families, identified two regions, each shared by three of the four families, which are also supported by a case-control ass...

  18. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi J Eskola

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in humans. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990-2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. RESULTS: Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat, COL11A1 (rs1676486, GDF5 (rs143383, SKT (rs16924573, THBS2 (rs9406328 and MMP9 (rs17576. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration.

  19. Gastroschisis and associated defects: an international study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2007-04-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency and type of malformations associated with gastroschisis in a large pool of international data, to identify malformation patterns, and to evaluate the role of maternal age in non-isolated cases. Case-by-case information from 24 registries, all members of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR), were evaluated. After the exclusion of other abdominal wall defects cases were classified as: (a) isolated; (b) recognizable syndrome, chromosomal or not; (c) multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Our results showed that out of 3,322 total cases 469 non-isolated cases were registered (14.1%): 41 chromosomal syndromes, 24 other syndromes, and 404 MCA. Among MCA four groups of anomalies were most frequent: CNS (4.5%), cardio-vascular (2.5%), limb (2.2%), and kidney anomalies (1.9%). No similar patterns emerged except two patterns resembling limb-body wall complex and OEIS. In both of them the gastroschisis could be however misclassified. Chromosomal trisomies and possibly non-syndromic MCA are associated with an older maternal age more than isolated cases. On consideration of our data and the most valid studies published in the literature, the best estimate of the proportion of gastroschisis associated with major unrelated defects is about 10%, with a few cases associated to recognizable syndromes. Recognized syndromes with gastroschisis seem to be so exceptional that the well documented and validated cases are worth being published as interesting case report. An appropriate case definition in etiological studies should include only isolated gastroschisis after an appropriate definition of isolated and non-isolated cases and a thorough case-by-case review.

  20. Low blood long chain omega-3 fatty acids in UK children are associated with poor cognitive performance and behavior: a cross-sectional analysis from the DOLAB study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Montgomery

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA, especially DHA (docosahexaenonic acid are essential for brain development and physical health. Low blood Omega-3 LC-PUFA have been reported in children with ADHD and related behavior/learning difficulties, as have benefits from dietary supplementation. Little is known, however, about blood fatty acid status in the general child population. We therefore investigated this in relation to age-standardized measures of behavior and cognition in a representative sample of children from mainstream schools. PARTICIPANTS: 493 schoolchildren aged 7-9 years from mainstream Oxfordshire schools, selected for below average reading performance in national assessments at age seven. METHOD: Whole blood fatty acids were obtained via fingerstick samples. Reading and working memory were assessed using the British Ability Scales (II. Behaviour (ADHD-type symptoms was rated using the revised Conners' rating scales (long parent and teacher versions. Associations were examined and adjusted for relevant demographic variables. RESULTS: DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, accounted for only 1.9% and 0.55% respectively of total blood fatty acids, with DHA showing more individual variation. Controlling for sex and socio-economic status, lower DHA concentrations were associated with poorer reading ability (std. OLS coeff. = 0.09, p = <.042 and working memory performance (0.14, p = <.001. Lower DHA was also associated with higher levels of parent rated oppositional behavior and emotional lability (-0.175, p = <.0001 and -0.178, p = <.0001. CONCLUSIONS: In these healthy UK children with below average reading ability, concentrations of DHA and other Omega-3 LC-PUFA were low relative to adult cardiovascular health recommendations, and directly related to measures of cognition and behavior. These findings require confirmation, but suggest that the benefits from dietary supplementation with

  1. Association between Waste Management and HBV among Solid Municipal Waste Workers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Carmela Romana Natalina Corrao; Angela Del Cimmuto; Carolina Marzuillo; Emanuele Paparo; Giuseppe La Torre

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To conduct a systematic review of this relationship using available published observational studies in the field of solid municipal waste treatment. Methods. The review of the scientific literature was based on Medline and Scopus databases up to December 2012, using the keywords HBV, waste, solid, treatment, workers, disposal, and refuse in different combinations. Results. 160 studies were found and checked. Finally, 5 observational studies were considered suitable, all cross-sectional. ...

  2. Association between Waste Management and HBV among Solid Municipal Waste Workers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Romana Natalina Corrao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To conduct a systematic review of this relationship using available published observational studies in the field of solid municipal waste treatment. Methods. The review of the scientific literature was based on Medline and Scopus databases up to December 2012, using the keywords HBV, waste, solid, treatment, workers, disposal, and refuse in different combinations. Results. 160 studies were found and checked. Finally, 5 observational studies were considered suitable, all cross-sectional. The pooled proportion of HBs-Ag considering all the studies was 11% (95% CI: 5–21%, and considering the high quality studies only, this proportion was 14% (95% CI: 6–24%. The pooled proportion of HBs-Ab positivity among waste workers considering all the studies was 14.2% (95% CI: 1.4–37.2%, and considering the high quality studies only, this proportion was 24% (95% CI: 18–30%. The pooled proportion of HBc-Ab positivity among waste workers considering all the studies was 24% (95% CI: 6–49%. The pooled estimation of the risk of HBV positivity (HBsAg among exposed was OR = 2.39 (95% CI: 0.88–6.52. Conclusion. In conclusion, waste workers need to be vaccinated against HBV infection since they are at risk of acquiring this infection through the exposure to potentially infected waste.

  3. Functional linear models for association analysis of quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Mills, James L; Wilson, Alexander F; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Xiong, Momiao

    2013-11-01

    Functional linear models are developed in this paper for testing associations between quantitative traits and genetic variants, which can be rare variants or common variants or the combination of the two. By treating multiple genetic variants of an individual in a human population as a realization of a stochastic process, the genome of an individual in a chromosome region is a continuum of sequence data rather than discrete observations. The genome of an individual is viewed as a stochastic function that contains both linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) information of the genetic markers. By using techniques of functional data analysis, both fixed and mixed effect functional linear models are built to test the association between quantitative traits and genetic variants adjusting for covariates. After extensive simulation analysis, it is shown that the F-distributed tests of the proposed fixed effect functional linear models have higher power than that of sequence kernel association test (SKAT) and its optimal unified test (SKAT-O) for three scenarios in most cases: (1) the causal variants are all rare, (2) the causal variants are both rare and common, and (3) the causal variants are common. The superior performance of the fixed effect functional linear models is most likely due to its optimal utilization of both genetic linkage and LD information of multiple genetic variants in a genome and similarity among different individuals, while SKAT and SKAT-O only model the similarities and pairwise LD but do not model linkage and higher order LD information sufficiently. In addition, the proposed fixed effect models generate accurate type I error rates in simulation studies. We also show that the functional kernel score tests of the proposed mixed effect functional linear models are preferable in candidate gene analysis and small sample problems. The methods are applied to analyze three biochemical traits in data from the Trinity Students Study. PMID:24130119

  4. Large Scale Association Analysis for Drug Addiction: Results from SNP to Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many genetic association studies used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs data to identify genetic variants for complex diseases. Although SNP-based associations are most common in genome-wide association studies (GWAS, gene-based association analysis has received increasing attention in understanding genetic etiologies for complex diseases. While both methods have been used to analyze the same data, few genome-wide association studies compare the results or observe the connection between them. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the data from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE and compared the results from the SNP-based and gene-based analyses. Our results suggest that the gene-based method complements the individual SNP-based analysis, and conceptually they are closely related. In terms of gene findings, our results validate many genes that were either reported from the analysis of the same dataset or based on animal studies for substance dependence.

  5. Longitudinal Analysis of the Association Between Vasomotor Symptoms and Race/Ethnicity Across the Menopausal Transition: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Ellen B.; Colvin, Alicia; Avis, Nancy; Bromberger, Joyce; Greendale, Gail A.; Powell, Lynda; Sternfeld, Barbara; Matthews, Karen A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether vasomotor symptom reporting or patterns of change in symptom reporting over the perimenopausal transition among women enrolled in a national study differed according to race/ethnicity. We also sought to determine whether racial/ethnic differences were explained by sociodemographic, health, or lifestyle factors. METHODS: We followed 3198 women enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation during 1996 through 2002. We analyzed frequency of vasomo...

  6. Study of Associated α Particle Imaging Technique for Explosives Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The explosive detecting technique about neutron mainly include the thermal neutron analysis (TNA), the fast neutron analysis (FNA), the pulse fast and thermal neutron analysis (PFTNA) and the associated α particle imaging technique about fast neutron (API).

  7. Associations between Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms, Stimulant Use, and Treatment Outcomes: A Secondary Analysis of NIDA’s Women and Trauma Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Hien, Denise A.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Campbell, Aimee N. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives To examine the associations between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, stimulant use, and treatment outcomes among dually-diagnosed women. Methods Participants were 141 women who participated in a multisite clinical trial of group treatments for PTSD and addictions. Results Generalized linear models indicated Seeking Safety (SS; a cognitive-behavioral intervention) was significantly more effective than Women’s Health Education (WHE; a control group intervention) in reducing stimulant use at follow-up among women who were heavy stimulant users at pre-treatment and who showed improvements in PTSD symptoms. There were no significant differences between the interventions among women who were light stimulant users at treatment entry. Conclusions and Scientific Significance These findings suggest that integrated treatment of co-occurring PTSD and addictions may be more effective than general health education approaches for heavy stimulant users. Assessment of frequency of stimulant use among individuals with PTSD symptoms may inform treatment selection for this population. PMID:24313246

  8. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schunkert (Heribert); I.R. König (Inke); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); H. Holm (Hilma); M. Preuss (Michael); A.F.R. Stewart (Alexandre); M. Barbalic (maja); C. Gieger (Christian); D. Absher (Devin); Z. Aherrahrou (Zouhair); H. Allayee (Hooman); D. Altshuler (David); S.S. Anand (Sonia); K. Andersen (Karl); J.L. Anderson (Jeffrey); D. Ardissino (Diego); S.G. Ball (Stephen); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); T.A. Barnes (Timothy); D.M. Becker (Diane); K. Berger (Klaus); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); E. Boerwinkle (Eric); P.S. Braund (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M.S. Burnett; I. Buysschaert (Ian); J.F. Carlquist (John); L. Chen (Li); S. Cichon (Sven); V. Codd (Veryan); R.W. Davies (Robert); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Demissie (Serkalem); J. Devaney (Joseph); P. Diemert (Patrick); R. Do (Ron); A. Doering (Angela); S. Eifert (Sandra); N.E.E. Mokhtari; S.G. Ellis (Stephen); R. Elosua (Roberto); J.C. Engert (James); S.E. Epstein (Stephen); U. de Faire (Ulf); M. Fischer (Marcus); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); J. Freyer (Jennifer); B. Gigante (Bruna); D. Girelli (Domenico); S. Gretarsdottir (Solveig); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.R. Gulcher (Jeffrey); E. Halperin (Eran); N. Hammond (Naomi); S.L. Hazen (Stanley); A. Hofman (Albert); B.D. Horne (Benjamin); T. Illig (Thomas); C. Iribarren (Carlos); G.T. Jones (Gregory); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M.A. Kaiser (Michael); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); J.W. Knowles (Joshua); G. Kolovou (Genovefa); A. Kong (Augustine); R. Laaksonen (Reijo); D. Lambrechts (Diether); K. Leander (Karin); G. Lettre (Guillaume); X. Li (Xiaohui); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Loley (Christina); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); P.M. Mannucci (Pier); S. Maouche (Seraya); N. Martinelli (Nicola); P.P. McKeown (Pascal); C. Meisinger (Christa); T. Meitinger (Thomas); O. Melander (Olle); P.A. Merlini; V. Mooser (Vincent); T. Morgan (Thomas); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); J.B. Muhlestein (Joseph); T. Münzel (Thomas); K. Musunuru (Kiran); J. Nahrstaedt (Janja); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); O. Olivieri (Oliviero); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); C.C. Patterson (Chris); A. Peters (Annette); F. Peyvandi (Flora); L. Qu (Liming); A.A. Quyyumi (Arshed); D.J. Rader (Daniel); L.S. Rallidis (Loukianos); C. Rice (Catherine); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); D. Rubin (Diana); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.L. Sampietro (Maria Lourdes); M.S. Sandhu (Manj); E.E. Schadt (Eric); A. Scḧsignfer (Arne); A. Schillert (Arne); S. Schreiber (Stefan); J. Schrezenmeir (Jürgen); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); D.S. Siscovick (David); M. Sivananthan (Mohan); S. Sivapalaratnam (Suthesh); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.D. Snoep (Jaapjan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); J.A. Spertus (John); K. Stark (Klaus); K. Stirrups (Kathy); M. Stoll (Monika); W.H.W. Tang (Wilson); S. Tennstedt (Stephanie); G. Thorgeirsson (Gudmundur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); M. Tomaszewski; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A.M. van Rij (Andre); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); N.J. Wareham (Nick); G.A. Wells (George); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); P.S. Wild (Philipp); C. Willenborg (Christina); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.J. Wright (Benjamin); S. Ye (Shu); T. Zeller (Tanja); A. Ziegler; F. Cambien (François); A.H. Goodall (Alison); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); T. Quertermous (Thomas); W. Mäsignrz (Winfried); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); S. Blankenberg (Stefan); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); A.S. Hall (Alistair); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J.R. Thompson (John); K. Stefansson (Kari); R. Roberts (Robert); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); N.J. Samani (Nilesh)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis ide

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    OpenAIRE

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sklar, Pamela; Holmans, Peter A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Duan, Jubao; Ophoff, Roel A.; Andreassen, Ole A; Scolnick, Edward; Cichon, Sven; St. Clair, David; Corvin, Aiden; Gurling, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated ...

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci.

    OpenAIRE

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sklar, Pamela; Holmans, Peter A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Duan, Jubao; Ophoff, Roel A.; Andreassen, Ole A; Scolnick, Edward; Cichon, Sven; St. Clair, David; Corvin, Aiden; Gurling, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated ...

  11. Genetic variants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cui, Long; Tam, Wing Hung; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) share common genetic polymorphisms. We conducted meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of all available variants and determined the effects of confounding and experimental components on the genetic association of GDM. Any case-controlled or cohort studies with genotype distribution compared GDM cases with controls were included. In total, 28 articles including 8,204 cases and 15,221 controls for 6 polymorphisms were studied. rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1) were significantly associated with the increased GDM risk. The association of rs4402960(IGF2BP2) and rs1800629(TNF-α) was significant only when the studies with control allele frequency deviation and publication bias were excluded. Further subgroup analysis showed the risk alleles of rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significantly associated with the GDM risk only in Asian, but not in Caucasian population. The OGTT test using 100 g, but not 75 g; and genotype detection by other assays, but not Taqman method, were also significantly associated with increased GDM risk in rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2). Overall GDM was associated with rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1), but only rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significant in Asian populations. While rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2) were significantly affected by OGTT protocol and genotyping methods. PMID:27468700

  12. Analysis of associated factors for remission and relapse in proliferative and membranous lupus nephritis patients: a 4-year follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚超君

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the related factors of remission and relapse in lupus nephritis(LN)patients.Methods A retrospective study was conducted for proliferation and membrane LN patients diagnosed from 2003 to 2010.Their clinical,laboratory and pathological parameters were collected.According to the response to treatment,they were divided into 3

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Shriner, Daniel; Chen, Brian H;

    2014-01-01

    of 1.19, explaining 17.5% of the phenotypic variance of T2D on the liability scale in African Americans. Overall, this study identified two novel susceptibility loci for T2D in African Americans. A substantial number of previously reported loci are transferable to African Americans after accounting...

  14. Methods for association analysis and meta-analysis of rare variants in families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuang; Pistis, Giorgio; Zhang, He; Zawistowski, Matthew; Mulas, Antonella; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Busonero, Fabio; Sanna, Serena; Hveem, Kristian; Willer, Cristen; Cucca, Francesco; Liu, Dajiang J; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2015-05-01

    Advances in exome sequencing and the development of exome genotyping arrays are enabling explorations of association between rare coding variants and complex traits. To ensure power for these rare variant analyses, a variety of association tests that group variants by gene or functional unit have been proposed. Here, we extend these tests to family-based studies. We develop family-based burden tests, variable frequency threshold tests and sequence kernel association tests. Through simulations, we compare the performance of different tests. We describe situations where family-based studies provide greater power than studies of unrelated individuals to detect rare variants associated with moderate to large changes in trait values. Broadly speaking, we find that when sample sizes are limited and only a modest fraction of all trait-associated variants can be identified, family samples are more powerful. Finally, we illustrate our approach by analyzing the relationship between coding variants and levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in 11,556 individuals from the HUNT and SardiNIA studies, demonstrating association for coding variants in the APOC3, CETP, LIPC, LIPG, and LPL genes and illustrating the value of family samples, meta-analysis, and gene-level tests. Our methods are implemented in freely available C++ code. PMID:25740221

  15. Relationships between Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Statistics and Bibliometric Indicators: A Principal Components Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed 2005-2006 Web of Science bibliometric data from institutions belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and corresponding ARL statistics to find any associations between indicators from the two data sets. Principal components analysis on 36 variables from 103 universities revealed obvious associations between…

  16. Higher magnesium intake is associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin, with no evidence of interaction with select genetic loci, in a meta-analysis of 15 charge consortium studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorable associations between magnesium intake and glycemic traits, such as fasting glucose and insulin, are observed in observational and clinical studies, but whether genetic variation affects these associations is largely unknown. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assoc...

  17. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa of the uterine cervix associated with intraabdominal "PEComatosis": A clinicopathological study with comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Linglei

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization recently recognized a family of neoplasms showing at least partial morphological or immunohistochemical evidence of a putative perivascular epithelioid cell (PEC differentiation. These tumors include angiomyolipoma (AML, clear cell "sugar" tumors of the lung (CCST, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM, clear cell myomelanocytic tumors of the falciform ligament and distinctive clear cell tumors at various other anatomic sites. Case presentation & methods A 41-year old gravida-1 para-1 with tuberous sclerosis presented with an incidentally identified 2.2 cm mass. The morphology and immunohistochemical profile was consistent with PEComa. Distinct aggregates of HMB-45 epithelioid cells were present in an occasionally distinctive perivascular distribution in the myometrium, small bowel lamina propria and ovarian hila. These distinctive aggregates, for which we propose the designation "PEComatosis" based on their intraabdominal distribution, did not display cytological atypia, mitotic activity or necrosis. CGH and DNA ploidy analysis showed a balanced chromosomal profile and diploid nuclei, respectively. There was no recurrence or metastases at 35 months' follow-up. Fifty-one previously reported cases of non-AML, LAM and CCST PEComas [perivascular epithelioid cell tumors- not otherwise specified (PEComa-NOS] are reviewed. Conclusions The lesions may be a reflection of tumor multicentricity, in which each may be a potential nidus for the development of future more well-developed tumors. Alternatively, they may be a manifestation of a poorly understood "field effect", in which there is an increased propensity to develop tumors of this type throughout the abdomen. Finally, and least likely in our opinion, they may represent tumor spread from its primary site.

  18. Facial dermatosis associated with Demodex: a case-control study*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ya-e; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiang-lan; Wu, Li-ping; Wang, Mei; Yan, Hu-ling; XIAO, SHENG-XIANG

    2011-01-01

    Demodex has been considered to be related with multiple skin disorders, but controversy persists. In this case-control study, a survey was conducted with 860 dermatosis patients aged 12 to 84 years in Xi’an, China to identify the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex. Amongst the patients, 539 suffered from facial dermatosis and 321 suffered from non-facial dermatosis. Demodex mites were sampled and examined using the skin pressurization method. Multivariate regression analysis wa...

  19. Genetic associations with neuroendocrine tumor risk: results from a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yeting; Ter-Minassian, Monica; Brais, Lauren; Brooks, Nichole; Waldron, Amanda; Chan, Jennifer A; Lin, Xihong; Kraft, Peter; Christiani, David C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2016-08-01

    The etiology of neuroendocrine tumors remains poorly defined. Although neuroendocrine tumors are in some cases associated with inherited genetic syndromes, such syndromes are rare. The majority of neuroendocrine tumors are thought to be sporadic. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify potential genetic risk factors for sporadic neuroendocrine tumors. Using germline DNA from blood specimens, we genotyped 909,622 SNPs using the Affymetrix 6.0 GeneChip, in a cohort comprising 832 neuroendocrine tumor cases from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital and 4542 controls from the Harvard School of Public Health. An additional 241 controls from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute were used for quality control. We assessed risk associations in the overall cohort, and in neuroendocrine tumor subgroups. We identified no potential risk associations in the cohort overall. In the small intestine neuroendocrine tumor subgroup, comprising 293 cases, we identified risk associations with three SNPs on chromosome 12, all in strong LD. The three SNPs are located upstream of ELK3, a transcription factor implicated in angiogenesis. We did not identify clear risk associations in the bronchial or pancreatic neuroendocrine subgroups. This large-scale study provides initial evidence that presumed sporadic small intestine neuroendocrine tumors may have a genetic etiology. Our results provide a basis for further exploring the role of genes implicated in this analysis, and for replication studies to confirm the observed associations. Additional studies to evaluate potential genetic risk factors for sporadic pancreatic and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors are warranted. PMID:27492634

  20. Association between class III obesity (BMI of 40-59 kg/m2) and mortality: a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Cari M Kitahara; Flint, Alan J.; Amy Berrington de Gonzalez; Leslie Bernstein; Michelle Brotzman; MacInnis, Robert J.; Moore, Steven C.; Kim Robien; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Singh, Pramil N; Elisabete Weiderpass; Hans Olov Adami; Hoda Anton-Culver; Rachel Ballard-Barbash; Buring, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background The number of obese people (individuals with an excessive amount of body fat) is increasing rapidly in many countries. Worldwide, according to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013, more than a third of all adults are now overweight or obese. Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI, an indicator of body fat calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by their height in meters squared) of more than 30 kg/m2 (a 183-cm [6-ft] tall man who weigh...

  1. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes Mägi, Eve Unt, Ele Prans, Liina Raus, Jaan Eha, Alar Veraksitš, Külli Kingo, Sulev Kõks

    2016-01-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed ...

  2. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Mägi, Eve Unt, Ele Prans, Liina Raus, Jaan Eha, Alar Veraksitš, Külli Kingo, Sulev Kõks

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1 to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2 to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females. The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008 in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 (r = 0.475, p = 0.002. No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance.

  3. Rates of influenza vaccination in older adults and factors associated with vaccine use: A secondary analysis of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merry Heather

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza vaccination has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in the older adult population. In Canada, vaccination rates remain suboptimal. We identified factors predictive of influenza vaccination, in order to determine which segments of the older adult population might be targeted to increase coverage in influenza vaccination programs. Methods The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA is a population-based national cohort study of 10263 older adults (≥ 65 conducted in 1991. We used data from the 5007 community-dwelling participants in the CSHA without dementia for whom self-reported influenza vaccination status is known. Results Of 5007 respondents, 2763 (55.2% reported having received an influenza vaccination within the previous 2 years. The largest predictive factors for flu vaccination included: being married (57.4 vs. 52.6%, p = 0.0007, having attained a higher education (11.0 vs. 10.3 years, p While many other differences were statistically significant, most were small (e.g. mean age 75.1 vs. 74.6 years for immunized vs. unimmunized older adults, p = 0.006, higher Modified Mini Mental Status Examination score (89.9 vs. 89.1, p Residents of Ontario were more likely (64.6% to report vaccination (p Conclusions The vaccination rate in this sample, in whom influenza vaccination is indicated, was low (55.2%. Even in a publicly administered health care setting, influenza vaccination did not reach an important proportion of the elderly population. Whether these differences reflect patient preference or access remains to be determined.

  4. Factors associated with reductions in alcohol use between high school and college: an analysis of data from the College Alcohol Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swann CA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Swann,1 Michelle Sheran,1 Diana Phelps2 1Department of Economics, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA; 2RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: The consumption of alcohol by college students is a significant public health concern, and a large amount of literature explores this issue. Much of the focus is on the prevalence and correlates of binge drinking. Relatively few studies explore reductions in drinking, and these generally focus on reductions that occur during college. Aims: We examined the transition between high school and college and sought to understand the characteristics and behaviors of students that are related to reductions in the consumption of alcohol during this transition. Methods: We used data from all four rounds of the Harvard School of Public Health's College Alcohol Survey and logistic regression models to relate the status of reduced alcohol consumption to five groups of variables: demographic and parental variables, other substance use, social environment, student activities, and alcohol policies. Results: A number of characteristics were related to reductions in drinking. Students whose fathers did not attend college were more likely to reduce alcohol consumption (odds ratio [OR] =1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.06–1.55, whereas students who prioritize parties (OR =0.35; CI =0.30–0.43 and who have recently smoked cigarettes (OR =0.52; CI =0.41–0.64 or marijuana (OR =0.52; CI =0.40–0.67 or whose fathers are moderate (OR =0.73; CI =0.55–0.96 or heavy (OR =0.72; CI =0.53–0.96 drinkers were less likely to reduce alcohol consumption. Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of family background and social environment on reductions in drinking. Keywords: binge drinking, College Alcohol Study, college drinking, reductions in alcohol consumption

  5. Harmonic Analysis Associated with the Generalized q-Bessel Operator

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Abouelaz; Radouan Daher; El Mehdi Loualid

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we give a new harmonic analysis associated with the generalized q-Bessel operator. We introduce the generalized $q$-Bessel transform, the generalized q-Bessel translation and the generalized $q$-Bessel convolution product.

  6. Study of the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory and analysis of the associated hadronic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR), i.e. E ≥ 1 EeV, raise many questions about their origin and constitute a challenge to modern physics. These cosmic rays entering the atmosphere dissipate their huge energy by generating a shower of secondary particles whose development is significantly different depending on the nature of the primaries. The study of the composition of UHECR is therefore a major interest both in understanding the hadronic processes which govern the evolution of showers and in identifying the sources of this radiation. Given its hybrid structure and the size of its unmatched network of ground detectors, the Pierre Auger Observatory can provide clear answers to the issues raised by UHECR. In this thesis, we are particularly interested in the muon component of air showers. First, we show how the hadronic parameters define the production of muons. Then we present an original method to extract this muon component and deduce the implications on the composition of UHECR. The results of this approach suggest a transition from a heavy composition to a light one when the energy increases. Finally, we address the measurement of cosmic-air cross section and present the first results derived from the Pierre Auger Observatory data. (author)

  7. Joint association analysis of bivariate quantitative and qualitative traits

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Univariate genome-wide association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits has been investigated extensively in the literature. In the presence of correlated phenotypes, it is more intuitive to analyze all phenotypes simultaneously. We describe an efficient likelihood-based approach for the joint association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits in unrelated individuals. We assume a probit model for the qualitative trait, under which an unobserved latent variable and a presp...

  8. Genome wide association study on early puberty in Bos indicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, A V; Matos, M C; Seno, L O; Romero, A R S; Garcia, J F; Grisolia, A B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fertility traits (early puberty) in Nellore cattle (Bos indicus). Fifty-five Nellore cows were selected from a herd monitored for early puberty onset (positive pregnancy at 18 months of age). Extremes of this phenotype were selected; 30 and 25 individuals were pregnant and non-pregnant, respectively, at that age. DNA samples were genotyped using a high-density SNP chip (>777.000 SNP). GWAS using a case-control strategy highlighted a number of significant markers based on their proximity with the Bonferroni correction line. Results indicated that chromosomes 5, 6, 9, 10, and 22 were associated with the traits of interest. The most significant SNPs on these chromosomes were rs133039577, rs110013280, rs134702839, rs109551605, and rs41639155. Candidate genes, as well as quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously reported in the Ensembl and Cattle QTLdb databases, were further investigated. Analysis of the regions close to the SNP on chromosomes 9 and 10 revealed that four QTL had been previously classified under the reproduction category. In conclusion, we have identified SNPs in close proximity to genes associated with reproductive traits. Moreover, U6 spliceosomal RNA was present on three different chromosomes, which is possibly associated with age at first calving, suggesting that it might be a strong candidate for future studies. PMID:26909970

  9. Genome-wide association study of parity in Bangladeshi women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P pregnancies at P pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis. PMID:25742292

  10. Joint analysis of individual participants' data from 17 studies on the association of the IL6 variant -174G>C with circulating glucose levels, interleukin-6 levels, and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huth, Cornelia; Illig, Thomas; Herder, Christian; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Vollmert, Caren; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Hamid, Yasmin H; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Thorand, Barbara; Meisinger, Christa; Doring, Angela; Klopp, Norman; Gohlke, Henning; Lieb, Wolfgang; Hengstenberg, Christian; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Groop, Leif; Ireland, Helen; Stephens, Jeffrey W; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Jansson, John-Olov; Boeing, Heiner; Mohlig, Matthias; Stringham, Heather M; Boehnke, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Fernandez-Real, Jose-Manuel; Lopez-Bermejo, Abel; Gallart, Luis; Vendrell, Joan; Humphries, Steve E; Kronenberg, Florian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Heid, Iris M

    2009-01-01

    associated with glucose and circulating interleukin-6 concentrations as well as body mass index (BMI). METHODS: Individual-level data from all studies of the IL6-T2DM consortium on Caucasian subjects with available BMI were collected. As study-specific estimates did not show heterogeneity (P>0.1), they were...... combined by using the inverse-variance fixed-effect model. RESULTS: The main analysis included 9440, 7398, 24,117, or 5659 non-diabetic and manifest T2DM subjects for fasting glucose, 2-hour glucose, BMI, or circulating interleukin-6 levels, respectively. IL6 -174 C-allele carriers had significantly lower...... fasting glucose (-0.091 mmol/L, P=0.014). There was no evidence for association between IL6 -174G>C and BMI or interleukin-6 levels, except in some subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that C-allele carriers of the IL6 -174G>C polymorphism have lower fasting glucose levels on average, which...

  11. Study on activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High purity aluminum has been analyzed by neutron activation analysis. The determination of copper contents is aluminum has been used to evaluate its purity level. A new sensitive method has been developed by using graphite thermal column to reduce or eliminate the interference of 24Na which is generated from 27Al (n,α) 24Na reaction by fast neutron. Influence for activity of 24Na due to above reaction is found to be between 2.3 - 2.8 %. Copper contents in the high purity aluminum come out 0.542±0.084 ppm. In addition, contents of 23 other impurity elements (<0.1 - 0.01 ppm) are measured using general method after detection limit and optimum conditions are established. (author)

  12. Applications of the kernel principal component analysis-based logistic regression model on nonlinear association study%核主成分logistic回归模型在非线性关联分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高青松; 薛付忠

    2011-01-01

    目的 将核主成分分析(KPCA)与logistic回归模型相结合,提出一种核主成分logistic(KPCA-based logis-tic)回归模型,用于复杂疾病基因定位的非线性关联分析.方法 针对病例对照研究设计的关联分析,对候选基因区域内的单核苷酸多肽性(SNPs)进行核主成分分析,以核主成分为自变量构建logistic回归模型,并对GAW16类风湿关节炎数据中PTPN22和RNF186两个基因区域进行分析,以验证KPCA-based logistic回归模型的有效性和实用性.结果 对PTPN22和RNF186两个基因区域的分析结果显示,KPCA-based logistic回归模型既能够检测出单点检验所能发现的区域(PTPN22),也能检测出单点检验所不能发现的区域(RNF186).结论 KPCA-based 1ogistic回归模型是一种有效的非线性关联分析方法,能够发现更多的易感区域.%Objective To combine the kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and the logistic regression model to propose a KPCA-based logistic regression model for nonlinear association analysis of complex disease gene mapping.Methods For association study of case-control research design, the kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) was performed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of a candidate region to construct the logistic regression model with kernel principal components as independent variables, and then the PTPN22 and RNF186 gene regions of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) data from GAW16 were analyzed to illustrate the effectiveness and practicability of the KPCA-based logistic regression model.Results Application to the PTPN22 and RNF186 gene regions indicated that the KPCAbased logistic regression model could detect regions which could be detected by a single-locus test (PTPN22), and identify significant regions which could not be identified by a single-locus test (RNF186).Conclusion As an effective nonlinear association study method, the KPCA-based logistic regression model can identify more susceptible regions.

  13. An Object Extraction Model Using Association Rules and Dependence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Extracting objects from legacy systems is a basic step insystem's obje ct-orientation to improve the maintainability and understandability of the syst e ms. A new object extraction model using association rules an d dependence analysis is proposed. In this model data are classified by associat ion rules and the corresponding operations are partitioned by dependence analysis.

  14. HLA associations and HLA sharing in recurrent miscarriage : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Tess; Lashley, Lisa E L O; Dekkers, Olaf M.; van Lith, Jan M M; Claas, Frans H J; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M

    2015-01-01

    Problem: The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate whether specific maternal HLA alleles and HLA sharing of couples are associated with the occurrence of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Method of study: A systematic literature search was performed for studies that evaluated the association between H

  15. Performance analysis of modified algorithm for finding multilevel association rules

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Arpna; Jain, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Multilevel association rules explore the concept hierarchy at multiple levels which provides more specific information. Apriori algorithm explores the single level association rules. Many implementations are available of Apriori algorithm. Fast Apriori implementation is modified to develop new algorithm for finding multilevel association rules. In this study the performance of this new algorithm is analyzed in terms of running time in seconds.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study of Serum Selenium Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Peters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI. We tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p < 1 × 10−5. None of these 41 SNPs reached the significant threshold (p = 0.05/15 regions = 0.003 in the second stage (WHI. Three SNPs had p < 0.05 in the second stage (rs1395479 and rs1506807 in 4q34.3/AGA-NEIL3; and rs891684 in 17q24.3/SLC39A11 and had p between 2.62 × 10−7 and 4.04 × 10−7 in the combined analysis (PLCO + WHI. Additional studies are needed to replicate these findings. Identification of genetic variation that impacts selenium concentrations may contribute to a better understanding of which genes regulate circulating selenium concentrations.

  17. Whole-genome association analysis to identify markers associated with recombination rates using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Nianjun; Chen, Liang; Oh, Cheongeun; Zhao, Hongyu

    2005-01-01

    Recombination during meiosis is one of the most important biological processes, and the level of recombination rates for a given individual is under genetic control. In this study, we conducted genome-wide association studies to identify chromosomal regions associated with recombination rates. We analyzed genotype data collected on the pedigrees in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics on Alcoholism data provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 14. A total of 315 microsatellites and 10,081 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from Affymetrix on 22 autosomal chromosomes were used in our association analysis. Genome-wide gender-specific recombination counts for family founders were inferred first and association analysis was performed using multiple linear regressions. We used the positive false discovery rate (pFDR) to account for multiple comparisons in the two genome-wide scans. Eight regions showed some evidence of association with recombination counts based on the single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis after adjusting for multiple comparisons. However, no region was found to be significant using microsatellites. PMID:16451663

  18. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS. PMID:27013625

  19. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating phospho- and sphingolipid concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirkan, Ayşe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ugocsai, Peter; Isaacs, Aaron; Pramstaller, Peter P; Liebisch, Gerhard; Wilson, James F; Johansson, Åsa; Rudan, Igor; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Kirichenko, Anatoly V; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Jansen, Ritsert C; Gnewuch, Carsten; Domingues, Francisco S; Pattaro, Cristian; Wild, Sarah H; Jonasson, Inger; Polasek, Ozren; Zorkoltseva, Irina V; Hofman, Albert; Karssen, Lennart C; Struchalin, Maksim; Floyd, James; Igl, Wilmar; Biloglav, Zrinka; Broer, Linda; Pfeufer, Arne; Pichler, Irene; Campbell, Susan; Zaboli, Ghazal; Kolcic, Ivana; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Huffman, Jennifer; Hastie, Nicholas D; Uitterlinden, Andre; Franke, Lude; Franklin, Christopher S; Vitart, Veronique; Nelson, Christopher P; Preuss, Michael; Bis, Joshua C; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Franceschini, Nora; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Axenovich, Tatiana; Oostra, Ben A; Meitinger, Thomas; Hicks, Andrew A; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Schmitz, Gerd; Jørgensen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Phospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric......, and metabolic consequences. A large number of phospholipid and sphingolipid species can be detected and measured in human plasma. We conducted a meta-analysis of five European family-based genome-wide association studies (N = 4034) on plasma levels of 24 sphingomyelins (SPM), 9 ceramides (CER), 57...

  1. Analysis of pharmacogenomic variants associated with population differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Yeon

    Full Text Available In the present study, we systematically investigated population differentiation of drug-related (DR genes in order to identify common genetic features underlying population-specific responses to drugs. To do so, we used the International HapMap project release 27 Data and Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (PharmGKB database. First, we compared four measures for assessing population differentiation: the chi-square test, the analysis of variance (ANOVA F-test, Fst, and Nearest Shrunken Centroid Method (NSCM. Fst showed high sensitivity with stable specificity among varying sample sizes; thus, we selected Fst for determining population differentiation. Second, we divided DR genes from PharmGKB into two groups based on the degree of population differentiation as assessed by Fst: genes with a high level of differentiation (HD gene group and genes with a low level of differentiation (LD gene group. Last, we conducted a gene ontology (GO analysis and pathway analysis. Using all genes in the human genome as the background, the GO analysis and pathway analysis of the HD genes identified terms related to cell communication. "Cell communication" and "cell-cell signaling" had the lowest Benjamini-Hochberg's q-values (0.0002 and 0.0006, respectively, and "drug binding" was highly enriched (16.51 despite its relatively high q-value (0.0142. Among the 17 genes related to cell communication identified in the HD gene group, five genes (STX4, PPARD, DCK, GRIK4, and DRD3 contained single nucleotide polymorphisms with Fst values greater than 0.5. Specifically, the Fst values for rs10871454, rs6922548, rs3775289, rs1954787, and rs167771 were 0.682, 0.620, 0.573, 0.531, and 0.510, respectively. In the analysis using DR genes as the background, the HD gene group contained six significant terms. Five were related to reproduction, and one was "Wnt signaling pathway," which has been implicated in cancer. Our analysis suggests that the HD gene group from PharmGKB is

  2. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ‘work’ for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held – appropriately – at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics. PMID:20235786

  3. CYP450 genotype and pharmacogenetic association studies: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rashmi R; Gaedigk, Andrea; LLerena, Adrián; Eichelbaum, Michel; Stingl, Julia; Smith, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    Despite strong pharmacological support, association studies using genotype-predicted phenotype as a variable have yielded conflicting or inconclusive evidence to promote personalized pharmacotherapy. Unless the patient is a genotypic poor metabolizer, imputation of patient's metabolic capacity (or metabolic phenotype), a major factor in drug exposure-related clinical response, is a complex and highly challenging task because of limited number of alleles interrogated, population-specific differences in allele frequencies, allele-specific substrate-selectivity and importantly, phenoconversion mediated by co-medications and inflammatory co-morbidities that modulate the functional activity of drug metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, metabolic phenotype and clinical outcomes are not binary functions; there is large intragenotypic and intraindividual variability. Therefore, the ability of association studies to identify relationships between genotype and clinical outcomes can be greatly enhanced by determining phenotype measures of study participants and/or by therapeutic drug monitoring to correlate drug concentrations with genotype and actual metabolic phenotype. To facilitate improved analysis and reporting of association studies, we propose acronyms with the prefixes 'g' (genotype-predicted phenotype) and 'm' (measured metabolic phenotype) to better describe this important variable of the study subjects. Inclusion of actually measured metabolic phenotype, and when appropriate therapeutic drug monitoring, promises to reveal relationships that may not be detected by using genotype alone as the variable. PMID:26780308

  4. Association of interferon regulatory factor 4 gene polymorphisms rs12203592 and rs872071 with skin cancer and haematological malignancies susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 19 case–control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research has indicated that the rs12203592 and rs872071 interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) gene polymorphisms correlate with the risk of cancer, especially skin cancer and haematological malignancies, but the results remain controversial. To understand better the effects of these two polymorphisms on skin cancer and haematological malignancies susceptibility, a cumulative meta-analysis was performed. We conducted a search using the PubMed and Web of Science databases for relevant case-control studies published before April 2014. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed- or random-effects models where appropriate. Heterogeneity test, publication bias test, and sensitivity analysis were also performed. In total, 11 articles comprised of 19 case–control studies were identified; five focused on the rs12203592 polymorphism with 7,992 cases and 8,849 controls, and six were on the rs872071 polymorphism with 3108 cases and 8300 controls. As for rs12203592, a significant correlation with overall skin cancer and haematological malignancies risk was found with the homozygote comparison model (OR = 1.566, 95% CI 1.087-2.256) and recessive model (OR = 1.526, 95% CI 1.107-2.104). For rs872071, a significantly elevated haematological malignancies risk was observed in all genetic models (homozygote comparison: OR = 1.805, 95% CI 1.402-2.323; heterozygote comparison: OR = 1.427, 95% CI 1.203-1.692; dominant: OR = 1.556, 95% CI 1.281-1.891; recessive: OR = 1.432, 95% CI 1.293-1.587; additive: OR = 1.349, 95% CI 1.201-1.515). Similarly, increased skin cancer and haematological malignancies risk was also identified after stratification of the SNP data by cancer type, ethnicity and source of controls for both polymorphisms. Our meta-analysis indicated that the rs12203592 and rs872071 IRF4 gene polymorphisms are associated with individual susceptibility to skin cancer and haematological malignancies. Moreover, the effect

  5. Ventilator associated pneumonia and transfusion, is there really an association? (the NAVTRA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Marco

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemic syndrome is a frequent problem in intensive care units. The most probable etiology is the suppression of the erythropoietin response due to the direct effects of cytokines, as well as frequent blood sampling. Transfusions are not free of complications, therefore transfusion reactions are estimated to occur in 2% of the total packed red blood cells (pRBCs transfused. In the past several years, several trials had tried to compare the restrictive with the more liberal use of transfusions, and they were found to be equally effective. Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common nosocomial infection in intensive care units; the prevalence is 47% with an attributive mortality of 33%. There are multiple risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia. Colonization of the upper airways is the most important pathophysiological factor but there are other factors implicated like, sedation techniques, inappropriate use of antibiotics and recumbent positioning. A secondary analysis of the CRIT study describes transfusion therapy and its practices in the United States. They found that transfusion practice is an independent risk factor for the development of nosocomial pneumonia. Methods This is a multicenter, prospective cohort study in different intensive care units in Colombia. A total of 474 patients were selected who had more than 48 hours of mechanical ventilation. The primary objective is to try to demonstrate the hypothetical relationship between the use of transfusions and nosocomial pneumonia. Secondly, we will try to determine which other factors are implicated in the development of pneumonia in intensive care units and describe the incidence of pneumonia and transfusion practices. Discussion Ventilator associated pneumonia is a primary problem in the intensive care unit, multiple factors have been associated with its presence in this study we try to explore the possible association between pneumonia and transfusion

  6. Risk analysis associated with petroleum hydrocarbons: is everything running smoothly?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum products represent one of the main sources of environmental contamination, and these products are complex, composed of several hundred individual hydrocarbons. The evaluation of the risks associated with petroleum products is often limited by certain specific parameters such as benzene. The petroleum hydrocarbons running from C(10) to C(50) are not often integrated in an analysis of the toxological risks since the toxological characterization of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons is difficult to carry out. There exist in the United States two approaches that were developed recently that allow the integration of various hydrocarbons comprising a mixture. In this presentation, two of these approaches are described and compared. An overview of these approaches related to Canadian regulatory bodies is included, and a case study completes the account. The two approaches that are most well known in this area are: 1) that of the Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection, and 2) that of the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group. The integration of petroleum hydrocarbons in a quantitative evaluation of their toxological risk is possible by present methods. This integration allows a reduction in the uncertainty associated with the use of an integrating parameter in the case of these petroleum hydrocarbons in the C(10) to the C(50) range

  7. Vitamin D3 receptor ( VDR gene rs2228570 (Fok1 and rs731236 (Taq1 variants are not associated with the risk for multiple sclerosis: results of a new study and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena García-Martín

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some epidemiological, genetic, and experimental data suggest a possible role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Data on the possible contribution of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene to the risk for MS are controversial. Several studies suggested an interaction between some SNPs in the VDR gene and HLADRB1*1501 in the risk for MS. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate a possible influence of the SNPs rs2228570 and rs731236 in the VDR gene in the risk for MS. A secondary objective was to address the possible interactions between VDR genes and HLADRB1*1501. METHODS: We analyzed the allelic and genotype frequency of VDR rs2228570, rs731236, and HLADRB1*1501 (rs3135388 in 303 patients with MS and 310 healthy controls, using TaqMan Assays. We also conducted a meta-analysis, that was carried out by using the software Meta-Disc 1.1.1 (http://www.hrc.es/investigacion/metadisc.html; Unit of Clinical Statistics, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. Heterogeneity between studies in terms of degree of association was tested using the Q-statistic. RESULTS: VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 allelic and genotype frequencies did not differ significantly between MS patients and controls, and were unrelated with the age of onset of MS, gender, and course of MS. HLADRB1*1501 showed a high association with the risk of developing MS 4.76(95% C.I.  = 3.14-7.27; p<0.0001. The meta-analysis, after excluding data of one study that was responsible of heterogeneity for rs731236 polymorphism, showed lack of relation of both SNPs with the risk for MS. HLADRB1*1501 showed lack of interaction with VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 in increasing MS risk. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that VDR rs2228570 and rs731236 polymorphisms are not related with the risk for MS, and did not confirm interaction between these VDR SNPs and HLADRB1

  8. Performance Analysis of Genetic Algorithm for Mining Association Rules

    OpenAIRE

    Indira, K.; Kanmani, S.

    2012-01-01

    Association rule (AR) mining is a data mining task that attempts to discover interesting patterns or relationships between data in large databases. Genetic algorithm (GA) based on evolution principles has found its strong base in mining ARs. This paper analyzes the performance of GA in Mining ARs effectively based on the variations and modification in GA parameters. The recent works in the past seven years for mining association rules using genetic algorithm is considered for the analysis. Ge...

  9. Evaluating variations of genotype calling: a potential source of spurious associations in genome-wide association studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xuixiao Hong; Zhenqiang Su; Weigong Ge; Leming Shi; Roger Perkins; Hong Fang; Donna Mendrick; Weida Tong

    2010-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) examine the entire human genome with the goal of identifying genetic variants (usually single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) that are associated with phenotypic traits such as disease status and drug response. The discordance of significantly associated SNPs for the same disease identified from different GWAS indicates that false associations exist in such results. In addition to the possible sources of spurious associations that have been investigated and discussed intensively, such as sample size and population stratification, an accurate and reproducible genotype calling algorithm is required for concordant GWAS results from different studies. However, variations of genotype calling of an algorithm and their effects on significantly associated SNPs identified in downstream association analyses have not been systematically investigated. In this paper, the variations of genotype calling using the Bayesian Robust Linear Model with Mahalanobis distance classifier (BRLMM) algorithm and the resulting influence on the lists of significantly associated SNPs were evaluated using the raw data of 270 HapMap samples analysed with the Affymetrix Human Mapping 500K Array Set (Affy500K) by changing algorithmic parameters. Modified were the Dynamic Model (DM) call confidence threshold (threshold) and the number of randomly selected SNPs (size). Comparative analysis of the calling results and the corresponding lists of significantly associated SNPs identified through association analysis revealed that algorithmic parameters used in BRLMM affected the genotype calls and the significantly associated SNPs. Both the threshold and the size affected the called genotypes and the lists of significantly associated SNPs in association analysis. The effect of the threshold was much larger than the effect of the size. Moreover, the heterozygous calls had lower consistency compared to the homozygous calls.

  10. Association studies in common endocrine diseases (review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrami SM

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the pathogenesis of endocrine disorders increase rapidly by genetic studies at the molecular level. Common endocrine disorders such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, osteoporosis, dyslipidemia and cancer follow the multifactorial model in the genetic aspect. This review tries to clarify the approach in molecular studies of such diseases for clinicians in different specialties. How to evaluate a possible association between a single nucleotide polymorphism and an endocrinopathy or its complication is the main concern of this review. Two approaches for gene mapping will be discussed as well as main challenges regarding each approach. All such genetic studies ideally include some test of the association between genome sequence variation and the phenotype of interest such as the trait itself, the presence of a given complication, or measures of some endocrinopathy-related intermediate trait. Despite different advances in this analysis, there are major concerns regarding the overall performance and robustness of genetic association studies. By using powerful new high-throughput methods, further insights to molecular basis of such endocrine disorders can be expected. Close correlation between geneticists and clinicians can effectively bridge between basic sciences and clinical investigations.

  11. A genome-wide linkage and association study using COGA data

    OpenAIRE

    Cao Guichan; Kan Donghui; Cooper Richard; Zhu Xiaofeng; Wu Xiaodong

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome-wide association will soon be available to use as an adjunct to traditional linkage analysis. We studied alcoholism in 119 families collected by the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism and made available in Genetic Analysis Workshop 14, using genome-wide linkage and association analyses. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis was first performed using microsatellite markers and a region with the strongest linkage evidence was further analyzed using singl...

  12. A genome-wide linkage and association study using COGA data

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Cooper, Richard; Kan, Donghui; Cao, Guichan; Wu, Xiaodong

    2005-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association will soon be available to use as an adjunct to traditional linkage analysis. We studied alcoholism in 119 families collected by the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism and made available in Genetic Analysis Workshop 14, using genome-wide linkage and association analyses. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis was first performed using microsatellite markers and a region with the strongest linkage evidence was further analyzed using single-nucleot...

  13. Association study of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrera, Noa; Arrojo, Manuel; Sanjuán, Julio;

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies using several hundred thousand anonymous markers present limited statistical power. Alternatively, association studies restricted to common nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) have the advantage of strongly reducing the multiple testing problem...

  14. The Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments.......A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments....

  15. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire;

    2016-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We...

  17. Study on acute burn injury survivors and the associated issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan Bayuo; Pius Agbenorku; Richcane Amankwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the phenomenon of surviving burn injury and its associated issues and concerns. Methods: A cross sectional survey approach was utilized to obtain data from one hundred burn survivors who were purposely selected. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze data. Results: Findings from the study indicate that burns from flames stood out as a major cause of burns. Physical discomfort/pain, anxiety, needing assistance in meeting self-care needs, financial and social limitations were identified as the major impact of the injury. Furthermore, participants perceived the existence of societal stigma. In addition, hope in God or a spiritual being as well as family support were the two key resources participants relied on to cope effectively. Conclusions: Surviving burn injury is associated with varied physical, social and psy-chological factors and survivors may need professional assistance to fully adjust after discharge.

  18. CHARACTER ASSOCIATION AND PATH ANALYSIS FOR YIELD AND YIELD ATTRIBUTES IN SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.)

    OpenAIRE

    V.Venkanna; D.Lokanadha Reddy; V.Thirumala Rao; B. Sathish Chandra; N.Lingaiah

    2014-01-01

    Character association and path analysis between yield and its contributing traits were studied in 71 genotypes (15 parents, 54 hybrids and two checks) of sunflower. Analysis of variance revealed that existence of significant differences among genotypes for all the characters studied. Seed yield was significant positively correlated with number of filled seeds per head, head diameter, hundredseed weight, seed filling per cent and plant height. Path coefficient analysis indicated that highest d...

  19. Meta-analysis for Discovering Rare-Variant Associations: Statistical Methods and Software Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    There is heightened interest in using next-generation sequencing technologies to identify rare variants that influence complex human diseases and traits. Meta-analysis is essential to this endeavor because large sample sizes are required for detecting associations with rare variants. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of statistical methods for meta-analysis of sequencing studies for discovering rare-variant associations. Specifically, we discuss the calculation of relevant ...

  20. Fatores associados à rosácea em amostras populacionais do Sul do Brasil: análise de estudos casos-controles Factors associated with rosacea in population samples of Southern Brazil: analysis of case-control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Rangel Bonamigo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A rosácea é dermatose que apresenta uma série de variáveis associadas a seu surgimento. A maioria dos estudos é proveniente dos Estados Unidos da América e de países europeus, sendo escasso o conhecimento produzido e publicado acerca da doença no Hemisfério Sul, particularmente no Brasil. OBJETIVOS: Descrever os principais fatores clínicos e histopatológicos associados à rosácea em amostras populacionais do sul do Brasil. MÉTODOS: Dois estudos casos-controles realizados em seqüência, com análise univariada e bivariada, utilizando-se p BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a dermatosis that has many factors associated with its onset. Most studies on this condition come from the United States and European countries, with little information produced and published about the disease in the Southern hemisphere, particularly in Brazil. OBJECTIVES: To describe the main clinical and histopathological factors associated with rosacea in population samples from southern Brazil. METHODS: Two case-control studies performed sequentially, with univariate and bivariate analysis, using p<0.05 for statistical significance (Chi-square test and Mantel-Haenzel, for stratifications RESULTS: Rosacea is most frequent among women and in the age range of 40-50 years. Almost all cases have phototypes II and III. The inflammatory forms of rosacea are more often diagnosed than the vascular form and there is an association with serological positivity to Helicobacter pylori and with histopathological presence of Demodex folliculorum (p<0.05. Emotional and climatic changes, exposure to the sun and intake of alcoholic beverages were the main factors described as provoking or worsening the disease. CONCLUSIONS: We have obtained an overview of rosacea in a sample of the southern population of Brazil. While some data are similar to those already described internationally, other aspects, such as economic issues and the factors described as provoking or worsening the

  1. Tomographic Study of Ionospheric Effects Associated with a Solar Eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuXiong-bin; XuJi-sheng; MaShu-ying; TianMao

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the ionospheric effects associated with the solar eclipse of October 24th, 1995 by means of Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT). Since the reconstructed profiles from experimental CIT are sporadically located in time, a time domain interpolation method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique is proposed and applied to extract the ionospheric effects. The effects can be extracted by comparison analysis between the interpolated CIT profiles of the eclipse days and that of the reference day that are time-aligned. A series of figs have been obtained showing the attenuation of photonization effect at low altitudes and the weakening of plasma's transportation process at high altitudes, etc. The photonization effect recovered to normal level soon after the last contact. The maximum electron density diminishing is observed about 2 h after the eclipse maximum and the effects seem vanished in the hours followed. Analysis on vertical TEC's latitudinal-temporal variation gives similar conclusions.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Analysis in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre; Melum, Espen; Kaser, Arthur; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Balschun, Tobias; Lie, Benedicte A.; Bergquist, Annika; Schramm, Christoph; Weismueller, Tobias J.; Gotthardt, Daniel; Rust, Christian; Philipp, Eva E. R.; Fritz, Teresa; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Weersma, Rinse K.; Stokkers, Pieter; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sterneck, Martina; Nothnagel, Michael; Hampe, Jochen; Teufel, Andreas; Runz, Heiko; Rosenstiel, Philip; Stiehl, Adolf; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Manns, Michael P.; Schrumpf, Erik; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We aimed to characterize the genetic susceptibility to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) by means of a genome-wide association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. METHODS: A total of 443,816 SNPs on the Affymetrix SNP Array 5.0 (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA

  3. Harmonic Analysis Associated with the Generalized q-Bessel Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abouelaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we give a new harmonic analysis associated with the generalized q-Bessel operator. We introduce the generalized $q$-Bessel transform, the generalized q-Bessel translation and the generalized $q$-Bessel convolution product.

  4. Exceptional longevity and muscle and fitness related genotypes: a functional in vitro analysis and case-control association replication study with SNPs THRH rs7832552, IL6 rs1800795 and ACSL1 rs6552828

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki eFuku

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There are several gene variants that are candidates to influence functional capacity in long-lived individuals. As such, their potential association with exceptional longevity (EL, i.e., reaching 100+ years deserves analysis. Among them are rs7832552 in the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR gene, rs1800795 in the interleukin-6 (IL6 gene and rs6552828 in the coenzyme A synthetase long-chain 1 (ACSL1 gene. To gain insight into their functionality (which is yet unknown, here we determined for the first time luciferase gene reporter activity at the muscle tissue level in rs7832552 and rs6552828. We then compared allele/genotype frequencies of the 3 abovementioned variants among centenarians [n=138, age range 100-111 years (114 women] and healthy controls [n=334, 20-50 years (141 women] of the same ethnic and geographic origin (Spain. We also studied healthy centenarians [n=79, 100-104 years (40 women] and controls [n=316, 27-81 years (156 women] from Italy, and centenarians [n=742, 100-116 years (623 women] and healthy controls [n=499, 23-59 years (356 women] from Japan. The THRH rs7832552 T-allele and ACSL1 rs6552828 A-allele up-regulated luciferase activity compared to the C and G-allele, respectively (P≤0.001. Yet we found no significant association of EL with rs7832552, rs1800795 or rs6552828 in any of the 3 cohorts. Further research is needed with larger cohorts of centenarians of different origin as well as with younger old people.

  5. Structural studies of CRISPR-associated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Reeks, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) act to prevent viral infection and horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes. The genomic CRISPR array contains short sequences (“spacers”) that are derived from foreign genetic elements. The CRISPR array is transcribed and processed into CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) used in the sequence-specific degradation of foreign nucleic acids. This process is called interference and is mediated by CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. This thes...

  6. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Yuan

    Full Text Available Egg number (EN, egg laying rate (LR and age at first egg (AFE are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens.

  7. Genome-wide association studies suggest sex-specific loci associated with abdominal and visceral fat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yun Ju; Pérusse, Louis; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Fornage, Myriam; Sidney, Steve; Sternfeld, Barbara; Rice, Treva; Terry, Gregg; Jacobs, David R.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Curran, Joanne E; Carr, John Jeffrey; Blangero, John; Ghosh, Sujoy; Després, Jean-Pierre; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D.C.; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify loci associated with abdominal fat and replicate prior findings, we performed genome-wide association (GWA) studies of abdominal fat traits: subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total adipose tissue (TAT) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VSR). Subjects and Methods Sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses were performed on each trait with (TRAIT-BMI) or without (TRAIT) adjustment for BMI, and cohort-specific results were combined via a fixed effects meta-analysis. A total of 2,513 subjects of European descent were available for the discovery phase. For replication, 2,171 European Americans and 772 African Americans were available. Results A total of 52 SNPs encompassing 7 loci showed suggestive evidence of association (p < 1.0 × 10−6) with abdominal fat in the sex-combined analyses. The strongest evidence was found on chromosome 7p14.3 between a SNP near BBS9 gene and VAT (rs12374818; p= 1.10 × 10−7), an association that was replicated (p = 0.02). For the BMI-adjusted trait, the strongest evidence of association was found between a SNP near CYCSP30 and VAT-BMI (rs10506943; p= 2.42 × 10−7). Our sex-specific analyses identified one genome-wide significant (p < 5.0 × 10−8) locus for SAT in women with 11 SNPs encompassing the MLLT10, DNAJC1 and EBLN1 genes on chromosome 10p12.31 (p = 3.97 × 10−8 to 1.13 × 10−8). The THNSL2 gene previously associated with VAT in women was also replicated (p= 0.006). The six gene/loci showing the strongest evidence of association with VAT or VAT-BMI were interrogated for their functional links with obesity and inflammation using the Biograph knowledge-mining software. Genes showing the closest functional links with obesity and inflammation were ADCY8 and KCNK9, respectively. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for new loci influencing abdominal visceral (BBS9, ADCY8, KCNK9) and subcutaneous (MLLT10/DNAJC1/EBLN1) fat, and confirmed a locus (THNSL2

  8. Epigenome-Wide Association Studies for common human diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rakyan, Vardhman K; Down, Thomas A; Balding, David J.; Beck, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in identifying loci associated with common diseases, a significant proportion of the causality remains unexplained. Recent advances in genomic technologies have placed us in a position to initiate large-scale studies of human disease-associated epigenetic variation, specifically variation in DNA methylation (DNAm). Such Epigenome-Wide Association Studies (EWAS) present novel opportunities but also create new challenges that are not...

  9. Genome-wide association analysis identifies variants associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that have distinct effects on metabolic traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth K Speliotes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA analysis of computed tomography (CT measured hepatic steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (∼26%-27% in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n = 880 to 3,070. By carrying out a fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA results between CT hepatic steatosis and ∼2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome-wide significant levels (p<5×10(-8 in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, and PPP1R3B. We genotype these and 42 other top CT hepatic steatosis-associated SNPs in 592 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD from the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN. In comparisons with 1,405 healthy controls from the Myocardial Genetics Consortium (MIGen, we observe significant associations with histologic NAFLD at variants in or near NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and PNPLA3, but not PPP1R3B. Variants at these five loci exhibit distinct patterns of association with serum lipids, as well as glycemic and anthropometric traits. We identify common genetic variants influencing CT-assessed steatosis and risk of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis associated variants are not uniformly associated with NASH/fibrosis or result in abnormalities in serum lipids or glycemic and anthropometric traits, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in the pathways influencing these traits.

  10. Searching joint association signals in CATIE schizophrenia genome-wide association studies through a refined integrative network approach

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated a wealth of valuable genotyping data for complex diseases/traits. A large proportion of these data are embedded with many weakly associated markers that have been missed in traditional single marker analyses, but they may provide valuable insights in dissecting the genetic components of diseases. Gene set analysis (GSA) augmented by protein-protein interaction network data provides a promising way to examine GWAS data by analyzi...

  11. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Risk Factors: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal POOROLAJAL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hamadan Province is one of the high-risk regions in Iran for Multiple sclerosis (MS. A majority of the epidemiological studies conducted in Iran addressing MS are descriptive. This study was conducted to assess MS and its associated risk factors in Hamadan Province, the west of Iran.Methods: This case-control study compared 100 patients with MS (case group and 100 patients with acute infectious diseases (control group from September 2013 to March 2014. A checklist was used to assess the demographic, medical, and family history of the patients. The Friedman-Rosenman questionnaire was also used to assess personality type. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression model with Stata 11 software program.Results: The adjusted odds ratio (OR estimate of MS was 4.37 (95% CI: 2.33, 8.20 for females compared to males; 0.15 (95% CI: 0.06, 0.43 for people aged above 50 years compared to aged 14 to 29 years; 0.44 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.91 for overweight or obese people compared to normal weights. Crude OR indicated a significant association between the occurrence of MS and exclusive breast feeding, season of birth, and smoking. However, the association was not statistically significant after adjustment for other covariates.Conclusion: The risk of MS is significantly lower in male gender, obese/overweight, and old people. Furthermore, non-smoking, non-exclusive breast-feeding, and born in autumn may increase the risk of MS but need further investigation. However, long-term large prospective cohort studies are needed to investigate the true effect of the potential risk factors on MS. Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, Risk factors, Case-control study, Iran

  12. Genome-wide association study of multiplex schizophrenia pedigrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinson, Douglas F; Shi, Jianxin; Wang, Kai;

    2012-01-01

    The authors used a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of multiply affected families to investigate the association of schizophrenia to common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and rare copy number variants (CNVs)....

  13. Joint association analysis of bivariate quantitative and qualitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mengdie; Diao, Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    Univariate genome-wide association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits has been investigated extensively in the literature. In the presence of correlated phenotypes, it is more intuitive to analyze all phenotypes simultaneously. We describe an efficient likelihood-based approach for the joint association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits in unrelated individuals. We assume a probit model for the qualitative trait, under which an unobserved latent variable and a prespecified threshold determine the value of the qualitative trait. To jointly model the quantitative and qualitative traits, we assume that the quantitative trait and the latent variable follow a bivariate normal distribution. The latent variable is allowed to be correlated with the quantitative phenotype. Simultaneous modeling of the quantitative and qualitative traits allows us to make more precise inference on the pleiotropic genetic effects. We derive likelihood ratio tests for the testing of genetic effects. An application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data is provided. The new method yields reasonable power and meaningful results for the joint association analysis of the quantitative trait Q1 and the qualitative trait disease status at SNPs with not too small MAF. PMID:22373162

  14. Molecular characterization and association analysis of porcine PANE1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang; Deng, Hong; Yang, Yiling;

    2010-01-01

    PANE1, allele frequencies determination in different pig breeds and association analysis were performed on this SNP BssHII by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Allele frequencies varied greatly among different pig breeds, and the association results indicated that piglet individuals......-polymerase chain reaction revealed that porcine PANE1 gene was differently expressed in seven diverse tissues, showed highest expression level in lymph node, but lowest in kidney. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (C>A) which can be digested by restriction enzyme BssHII was identified in intron 1 of porcine...

  15. Association between the European GWAS-Identified Susceptibility Locus at Chromosome 4p16 and the Risk of Atrial Septal Defect: A Case-Control Study in Southwest China and a Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Li; Li, Bei; Dian, Ke; Ying, Binwu; Lu, Xiaojun; Hu, Xuejiao; An, Qi; CHEN, CHUNXIA; Huang, Chunyan; Tan, Bin; Qin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is the third most frequent type of congenital heart anomaly, featuring shunting of blood between the two atria. Gene-environment interaction remains to be an acknowledged cause for ASD occurrence. A recent European genome-wide association study (GWAS) of congenital heart disease (CHD) identified 3 susceptibility SNPs at chromosome 4p16 associated with ASD: rs870142, rs16835979 and rs6824295. A Chinese-GWAS of CHD conducted in the corresponding period did not reveal ...

  16. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matullo, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Betti, Marta; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ferrante, Daniela; Voglino, Floriana; Cadby, Gemma; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosa, Fabio; Russo, Alessia; Hirvonen, Ari; Casalone, Elisabetta; Tunesi, Sara; Padoan, Marina; Giordano, Mara; Aspesi, Anna; Casadio, Caterina; Ardissone, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Libener, Roberta; Guaschino, Roberto; Piccolini, Ezio; Neri, Monica; Musk, Arthur W B; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; James, Alan L; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce W; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle J; Mirabelli, Dario; Ugolini, Donatella; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs) in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes), causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14). Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28). These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:23626673

  17. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Matullo

    Full Text Available Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM, a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes, causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14. Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28. These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos.

  18. Meat subtypes and their association with colorectal cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Prudence R; Walter, Viola; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael

    2016-01-15

    Associations between specific red meat subtypes and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been investigated in a number of epidemiological studies. However, no publication to date has summarised the overall epidemiological evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies (cohort, nested case-control or case-cohort studies), which reported relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between intake of meat subtypes with colorectal, colon or rectal cancer or colorectal adenoma risk. PubMed and ISI Web of Science were searched up until August 1, 2014. Nineteen studies examined meat subtypes (5 beef, 5 pork, 2 lamb, 1 veal and 19 poultry) and associations with colorectal, colon or rectal cancer risk and 4 studies examined associations with adenoma risk (1 beef and 4 poultry). Comparing highest versus lowest intake, beef consumption was associated with an increased risk of CRC (RR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.22) and colon cancer (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.44), but no association was found with rectal cancer (RR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.78 to 1.16). Higher consumption of lamb was also associated with increased risk of CRC (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.44). No association was observed for pork (RR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.27), but some between study heterogeneity was observed. No association was observed for poultry consumption and risk of colorectal adenomas or cancer. This meta-analysis suggests that red meat subtypes differ in their association with CRC and its sub sites. Further analysis of data from prospective cohort studies is warranted, especially regarding the role of pork. PMID:25583132

  19. Tomographic Study of Ionospheric Effects Associated with a Solar Eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiong-bin; Xu Ji-sheng; Ma Shu-ying; Tian Mao

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the ionospheric effects associ-ated with the solar eclipse of October 24th, 1995 by means of Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT). Since the re-constructed profiles from experimental CIT are sporadically located in time, a time domain interpolation method based onSingular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique is proposed and applied to extract the ionospheric effects. The effects canbe extracted by comparison analysis between the interpolated CIT profiles of the eclipse days and that of the reference day that are time-aligned. A series of figs have been obtained showing the attenuation of photonization effect at low alti-tudes and the weakening of plasma's transportation process athigh altitudes, etc. The photonization effect recovered to nor-mal level soon after the last contact. The maximum electron density diminishing is observed about 2 h after the eclipse maximum and the effects seem vanished in the hours fol-lowed. Analysis on vertical TEC's latitudinal temporal variation gives similar conclusions.

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ripke, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10(-11)) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10(-9)), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10(-8)) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).

  1. Exploring spatial variations and factors associated with childhood stunting in Ethiopia: spatial and multilevel analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Demewoz; Azage, Muluken; Mola, Tegegn; Rainey, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Stunting reflects a failure to receive adequate nutrition over a long period of time. Stunting is associated with adverse functional consequences including poor cognition, low educational performance, low adult wages, and poor reproductive outcomes. The objective of the study was to investigate spatial variations and factors associated with childhood stunting in Ethiopia. Methods This study is a secondary data analysis of the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS). A t...

  2. The association of hypertriglyceridemia with cardiovascular events and pancreatitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Murad M Hassan; Hazem Ahmad; Coto-Yglesias Fernando; Dzyubak Svitlana; Gupta Shabnum; Bancos Irina; Lane Melanie A; Erwin Patricia J; Berglund Lars; Elraiyah Tarig; Montori Victor M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hypertriglyceridemia may be associated with important complications. The aim of this study is to estimate the magnitude of association and quality of supporting evidence linking hypertriglyceridemia to cardiovascular events and pancreatitis. Methods We conducted a systematic review of multiple electronic bibliographic databases and subsequent meta-analysis using a random effects model. Studies eligible for this review followed patients longitudinally and evaluated quantita...

  3. Detecting rare variants in case-parents association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Fu Cheng

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs in detecting common variants (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 many suggested that rare variants also contribute to the genetic architecture of diseases. Recently, researchers demonstrated that rare variants can show a strong stratification which may not be corrected by using existing methods. In this paper, we focus on a case-parents study and consider methods for testing group-wise association between multiple rare (and common variants in a gene region and a disease. All tests depend on the numbers of transmitted mutant alleles from parents to their diseased children across variants and hence they are robust to the effect of population stratification. We use extensive simulation studies to compare the performance of four competing tests: the largest single-variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT, multivariable test, combined TDT, and a likelihood ratio test based on a random-effects model. We find that the likelihood ratio test is most powerful in a wide range of settings and there is no negative impact to its power performance when common variants are also included in the analysis. If deleterious and protective variants are simultaneously analyzed, the likelihood ratio test was generally insensitive to the effect directionality, unless the effects are extremely inconsistent in one direction.

  4. Genetic association analysis of LARS2 with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, E; Jafar-Mohammadi, B; van 't Riet, E;

    2010-01-01

    to establish the true contribution of this variant and common variants in LARS2 (MAF > 5%) to type 2 diabetes risk. METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data (n = 10,128) from the DIAGRAM consortium with independent data derived from a tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach in...... Dutch individuals (n = 999) and took forward two SNPs of interest to replication in up to 11,163 Dutch participants (rs17637703 and rs952621). In addition, because inspection of genome-wide association study data identified a cluster of low-frequency variants with evidence of type 2 diabetes association......, we attempted replication of rs9825041 (a proxy for this group) and the previously identified H324Q variant in up to 35,715 participants of European descent. RESULTS: No association between the common SNPs in LARS2 and type 2 diabetes was found. Our replication studies for the two low...

  5. Asymmetric measures of association, closed data, and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, M. Ed; Nuhfer, E.B.

    1980-01-01

    The association between constant-sum variables Xiand Xjexpressed as percentages can be calculated as a product-moment correlation between Xiand Xj/(100 - Xi) and a correlation between Xjand Xi/(100 - Xj). An asymmetric, square matrix may be formed from these coefficients, and multivariate analysis performed by two methods: singular value decomposition and canonical decomposition. Either analysis avoids problems in the interpretation of correlation coefficients determined from closed arrays, and provides information about dependencies among the variables beyond that obtained from the usual correlation coefficient between Xiand Xj. Two examples show the canonical decomposition to have the greater usefulness. ?? 1980 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  6. Analysis of late toxicity associated with external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer with uniform setting of classical 4-field 70 Gy in 35 fractions: a survey study by the Osaka Urological Tumor Radiotherapy Study Group

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Suzuki, Osamu; Nishimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Hitoshi; Hara, Tsuneo; Yoshida, Ken; Imai, Atsushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to analyse late toxicity associated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer using uniform dose-fractionation and beam arrangement, with the focus on the effect of 3D (CT) simulation and portal field size. We collected data concerning patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma who had been treated with EBRT at five institutions in Osaka, Japan, between 1998 and 2006. All had been treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions, using the classical 4-field technique wit...

  7. Systems-Level Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as the method of choice for identifying common variants affecting complex disease. In a GWAS, particular attention is placed, for obvious reasons, on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that exceed stringent genome-wide significance thresholds. However, it is expected that many SNPs with only nominal evidence of association (e.g., P < 0.05) truly influence disease. Efforts to extract additional biological information from entire GWAS data...

  8. Association of OPN rs11730582 polymorphism with cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He LL

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lanlan He,1,* Yong Wang2,* 1Emergency Department, Zhenjiang First People’s Hospital, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Interventional Radiology and Vascular Surgery, Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *Both authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Several molecular epidemiological studies have investigated the association between OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism and cancer risk, but the results are inconsistent. Hence, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine the association of this polymorphism with cancer risk. Materials and methods: The related articles were searched in PubMed, Embase, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate the strength of the associations. A random-effects model or fixed-effects model was employed depending on the heterogeneity. Results: A total of ten case-control studies involving 2,749 cancer cases and 3,398 controls were included in the meta-analysis. In overall analysis, OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism was not associated with cancer risk. In a stratified analysis by cancer type, no significant association was found between OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism and the risk of glioma, gastric cancer, and other cancers. Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that OPN rs11730582 C>T polymorphism is not associated with cancer susceptibility. Keywords: osteopontin, polymorphism, cancer, risk 

  9. Association between arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M-L. van Popele (Nicole); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); M.L. Bots (Michiel); R. Asmar (Roland); J. Topouchian; R.S. Reneman; A.P.G. Hoeks; D.A. van der Kuip (Deirdre); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Studies of the association between arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis are contradictory. We studied stiffness of the aorta and the common carotid artery in relation to several indicators of atherosclerosis. METHODS: This study was conducted w

  10. Comparison study of microarray meta-analysis methods

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Yee; Campain Anna

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Meta-analysis methods exist for combining multiple microarray datasets. However, there are a wide range of issues associated with microarray meta-analysis and a limited ability to compare the performance of different meta-analysis methods. Results We compare eight meta-analysis methods, five existing methods, two naive methods and a novel approach (mDEDS). Comparisons are performed using simulated data and two biological case studies with varying degrees of meta-analysis c...

  11. Toll-like receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with allergic rhinitis: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson Daniel; Andiappan Anand; Halldén Christer; Yun Wang; Säll Torbjörn; Tim Chew; Cardell Lars-Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Toll-like receptor proteins are important in host defense and initiation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. A number of studies have identified associations between genetic variation in the Toll-like receptor genes and allergic disorders such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. The present study aim to search for genetic variation associated with allergic rhinitis in the Toll-like receptor genes. Methods A first association analysis genotyped 73 SNPs in 182 case...

  12. CCNA Cisco Certified Network Associate Study Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lammle, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Learn from the Best - Cisco Networking Authority Todd LammleWritten by Cisco networking authority Todd Lammle, this comprehensive guide has been completely updated to reflect the latest CCNA 640-802 exam. Todd's straightforward style provides lively examples, hands on and written labs, easy-to-understand analogies, and real-world scenarios that will not only help you prepare for the exam, but also give you a solid foundation as a Cisco networking professional.This Study Guide teaches you how toDescribe how a network worksConfigure, verify and troubleshoot a switch with VLANs and interswitch co

  13. An evolutionary framework for association testing in resequencing studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ryan King

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing technologies are becoming cheap enough to apply to large numbers of study participants and promise to provide new insights into human phenotypes by bringing to light rare and previously unknown genetic variants. We develop a new framework for the analysis of sequence data that incorporates all of the major features of previously proposed approaches, including those focused on allele counts and allele burden, but is both more general and more powerful. We harness population genetic theory to provide prior information on effect sizes and to create a pooling strategy for information from rare variants. Our method, EMMPAT (Evolutionary Mixed Model for Pooled Association Testing, generates a single test per gene (substantially reducing multiple testing concerns, facilitates graphical summaries, and improves the interpretation of results by allowing calculation of attributable variance. Simulations show that, relative to previously used approaches, our method increases the power to detect genes that affect phenotype when natural selection has kept alleles with large effect sizes rare. We demonstrate our approach on a population-based re-sequencing study of association between serum triglycerides and variation in ANGPTL4.

  14. Association between cancer and contact allergy: a linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2011-01-01

    logistic regression analysis. Results An inverse association between contact allergy and non-melanoma skin- and breast cancer, respectively, was identified in both sexes, and an inverse trend for brain cancer was found in women with contact allergy. Additionally, a positive association between contact...... cancer, few have looked into the association between cancer and contact allergy, a type IV allergy. By linking two clinical databases, the authors investigate the possible association between contact allergy and cancer. Methods Record linkage of two different registers was performed: (1) a tertiary...... hospital register of dermatitis patients patch tested for contact allergy and (2) a nationwide cancer register (the Danish Cancer Register). After linking the two registers, only cancer subtypes with 40 or more patients registered were included in the analysis. The final associations were evaluated by...

  15. Association between cancer and contact allergy: a linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2011-01-01

    logistic regression analysis. Results An inverse association between contact allergy and non-melanoma skin- and breast cancer, respectively, was identified in both sexes, and an inverse trend for brain cancer was found in women with contact allergy. Additionally, a positive association between contact...... metabolites in the bladder. The authors' findings add to the limited knowledge about contact allergy and the risk of cancer....... cancer, few have looked into the association between cancer and contact allergy, a type IV allergy. By linking two clinical databases, the authors investigate the possible association between contact allergy and cancer. Methods Record linkage of two different registers was performed: (1) a tertiary...

  16. Is hepatitis C associated with atherosclerotic burden? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Increasing evidence demonstrates that hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is associated with atherosclerosis. However, there are contrasting findings in several studies that the atherosclerotic burden is not associated with HCV infections. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to clarify if HCV infection is associated with atherosclerosis compared to non-infected people. METHODS: Standard guidelines for performance of meta-analysis were followed. RESULTS: A thorough database search performed by two independent investigators identified 14 eligible studies for analysis. The data from 11 studies were synthesized to report unadjusted odds ratios (ORs for carotid atherosclerosis; the pooled unadjusted OR (95% confidence interval (CI was 1.65 (1.21, 2.09. By synthesizing the data from 8 studies to report adjusted ORs for carotid atherosclerosis the pooled multi-confounder adjusted OR (95% CI was 1.76 (1.20, 2.32. However, the numbers of studies on coronary or femoral atherosclerosis were limited and not enough for analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis indicates that HCV infection is associated with carotid atherosclerosis independent of classical risk factors. Therefore, we would recommend for HCV infected patients to be counseled on their risk for carotid atherosclerosis.

  17. Genome-wide association study of plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids in the InCHIANTI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA have a role in many physiological processes, including energy production, modulation of inflammation, and maintenance of cell membrane integrity. High plasma PUFA concentrations have been shown to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease and mortality. To identify genetic contributors of plasma PUFA concentrations, we conducted a genome-wide association study of plasma levels of six omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in 1,075 participants in the InCHIANTI study on aging. The strongest evidence for association was observed in a region of chromosome 11 that encodes three fatty acid desaturases (FADS1, FADS2, FADS3. The SNP with the most significant association was rs174537 near FADS1 in the analysis of arachidonic acid (AA; p = 5.95 x 10(-46. Minor allele homozygotes had lower AA compared to the major allele homozygotes and rs174537 accounted for 18.6% of the additive variance in AA concentrations. This SNP was also associated with levels of eicosadienoic acid (EDA; p = 6.78 x 10(-9 and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA; p = 1.07 x 10(-14. Participants carrying the allele associated with higher AA, EDA, and EPA also had higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C and total cholesterol levels. Outside the FADS gene cluster, the strongest region of association mapped to chromosome 6 in the region encoding an elongase of very long fatty acids 2 (ELOVL2. In this region, association was observed with EPA (rs953413; p = 1.1 x 10(-6. The effects of rs174537 were confirmed in an independent sample of 1,076 subjects participating in the GOLDN study. The ELOVL2 SNP was associated with docosapentanoic and DHA but not with EPA in GOLDN. These findings show that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes in the metabolism of PUFA contribute to plasma concentrations of fatty acids.

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating phospho- and sphingolipid concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Demirkan

    Full Text Available Phospho- and sphingolipids are crucial cellular and intracellular compounds. These lipids are required for active transport, a number of enzymatic processes, membrane formation, and cell signalling. Disruption of their metabolism leads to several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. A large number of phospholipid and sphingolipid species can be detected and measured in human plasma. We conducted a meta-analysis of five European family-based genome-wide association studies (N = 4034 on plasma levels of 24 sphingomyelins (SPM, 9 ceramides (CER, 57 phosphatidylcholines (PC, 20 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC, 27 phosphatidylethanolamines (PE, and 16 PE-based plasmalogens (PLPE, as well as their proportions in each major class. This effort yielded 25 genome-wide significant loci for phospholipids (smallest P-value = 9.88×10(-204 and 10 loci for sphingolipids (smallest P-value = 3.10×10(-57. After a correction for multiple comparisons (P-value<2.2×10(-9, we observed four novel loci significantly associated with phospholipids (PAQR9, AGPAT1, PKD2L1, PDXDC1 and two with sphingolipids (PLD2 and APOE explaining up to 3.1% of the variance. Further analysis of the top findings with respect to within class molar proportions uncovered three additional loci for phospholipids (PNLIPRP2, PCDH20, and ABDH3 suggesting their involvement in either fatty acid elongation/saturation processes or fatty acid specific turnover mechanisms. Among those, 14 loci (KCNH7, AGPAT1, PNLIPRP2, SYT9, FADS1-2-3, DLG2, APOA1, ELOVL2, CDK17, LIPC, PDXDC1, PLD2, LASS4, and APOE mapped into the glycerophospholipid and 12 loci (ILKAP, ITGA9, AGPAT1, FADS1-2-3, APOA1, PCDH20, LIPC, PDXDC1, SGPP1, APOE, LASS4, and PLD2 to the sphingolipid pathways. In large meta-analyses, associations between FADS1-2-3 and carotid intima media thickness, AGPAT1 and type 2 diabetes, and APOA1 and coronary artery disease were observed. In conclusion, our

  19. An approach to incorporate linkage disequilibrium structure into genomic association analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengyu Zhang; Diane Wagener

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we propose to use the principal component analysis (PCA) and regression model to incorporate linkage disequilibrium (LD) in genomic association data analysis. To accommodate LD in genomic data and reduce multiple testing, we suggest performing PCA and extracting the PCA score to capture the variation of genomic data, after which regression analysis is used to assess the association of the disease with the principal component score. An empirical analysis result shows that both genotype-basod correlation matrix and haplotype-based LD matrix can produce similar results for PCA. Principal component score seems to be more powerful in detecting genetic association because the principal component score is quantitatively measured and may be able to capture the effect of multiple loci.

  20. Confounded by sequencing depth in association studies of rare alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Chad

    2011-05-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are facilitating large-scale association studies of rare genetic variants. The depth of the sequence read coverage is an important experimental variable in the next-generation technologies and it is a major determinant of the quality of genotype calls generated from sequence data. When case and control samples are sequenced separately or in different proportions across batches, they are unlikely to be matched on sequencing read depth and a differential misclassification of genotypes can result, causing confounding and an increased false-positive rate. Data from Pilot Study 3 of the 1000 Genomes project was used to demonstrate that a difference between the mean sequencing read depth of case and control samples can result in false-positive association for rare and uncommon variants, even when the mean coverage depth exceeds 30× in both groups. The degree of the confounding and inflation in the false-positive rate depended on the extent to which the mean depth was different in the case and control groups. A logistic regression model was used to test for association between case-control status and the cumulative number of alleles in a collapsed set of rare and uncommon variants. Including each individual's mean sequence read depth across the variant sites in the logistic regression model nearly eliminated the confounding effect and the inflated false-positive rate. Furthermore, accounting for the potential error by modeling the probability of the heterozygote genotype calls in the regression analysis had a relatively minor but beneficial effect on the statistical results. PMID:21328616

  1. Association between Asthma and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zheng

    Full Text Available We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from epidemiological studies of the association between asthma and autism spectrum disorder (ASD.A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library for studies published before February 2nd, 2016. Observational studies investigating the association between asthma and ASD were included. A random effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates for the outcome. Subgroup analysis was used to explore potential sources of heterogeneity and publication bias was estimated using Begg's and Egger's tests.Ten studies encompassing 175,406 participants and 8,809 cases of ASD were included in this meta-analysis. In the cross-sectional studies, the prevalence of asthma in ASD was 20.4%, while the prevalence of asthma in controls was 15.4% (P < 0.001. The pooled odds ratio (OR for the prevalence of asthma in ASD in the cross-sectional studies was 1.26 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.98-1.61 (P = 0.07, with moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 65.0%, P = 0.02 across studies. In the case-control studies, the pooled OR for the prevalence of asthma in ASD was 0.98 (95% CI: 0.68-1.43 (P = 0.94, and there was no evidence of an association between asthma and ASD. No evidence of significant publication bias on the association between asthma and ASD was found.In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis do not suggest an association between asthma and ASD. Further prospective studies ascertaining the association between asthma and ASD are warranted.

  2. Genetic association analysis of LARS2 with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiling, E.; Jafar-Mohammadi, B.; van't Riet, E.; Weedon, M. N.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J. V.; Hansen, T.; Saxena, R.; van Haeften, T. W.; Arp, P. A.; Das, S.; Nijpels, G.; Groenewoud, M. J.; van Hove, E. C.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Smit, J. W. A.; Morris, A. D.; Doney, A. S. F.; Palmer, C. N. A.; Guiducci, C.; Hattersley, A. T.; Frayling, T. M.; Pedersen, O.; Slagboom, P. E.; Altshuler, D. M.; Groop, L.; Romijn, J. A.; Maassen, J. A.; Hofker, M. H.; Dekker, J. M.; McCarthy, M. I.; 't Hart, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    LARS2 has been previously identified as a potential type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene through the low-frequency H324Q (rs71645922) variant (minor allele frequency [MAF] 3.0%). However, this association did not achieve genome-wide levels of significance. The aim of this study was to establish the t

  3. Family-Based Rare Variant Association Analysis: A Fast and Efficient Method of Multivariate Phenotype Association Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longfei; Lee, Sungyoung; Gim, Jungsoo; Qiao, Dandi; Cho, Michael; Elston, Robert C; Silverman, Edwin K; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Family-based designs have been repeatedly shown to be powerful in detecting the significant rare variants associated with human diseases. Furthermore, human diseases are often defined by the outcomes of multiple phenotypes, and thus we expect multivariate family-based analyses may be very efficient in detecting associations with rare variants. However, few statistical methods implementing this strategy have been developed for family-based designs. In this report, we describe one such implementation: the multivariate family-based rare variant association tool (mFARVAT). mFARVAT is a quasi-likelihood-based score test for rare variant association analysis with multiple phenotypes, and tests both homogeneous and heterogeneous effects of each variant on multiple phenotypes. Simulation results show that the proposed method is generally robust and efficient for various disease models, and we identify some promising candidate genes associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The software of mFARVAT is freely available at http://healthstat.snu.ac.kr/software/mfarvat/, implemented in C++ and supported on Linux and MS Windows. PMID:27312886

  4. Analysis of the Error Associated With the Domenico Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V.; Clement, T.; Lee, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Domenico solution is one of the widely used analytical solutions used in screening-level ground water contaminant transport models; e.g., BIOCHLOR and BIOSCREEN. This approximate solution describes the transport of a decaying contaminant subjected to advection in one dimension and dispersion in all three dimensions. However, the development of this solution as presented by the original authors involves approximations that are more heuristic than rigorous. This makes it difficult to predict the nature of the error associated with these approximations. Hence, several ground water modelers have expressed skepticism regarding the validity of this solution. To address the issues stated above, it is necessary to perform a rigorous mathematical analysis on the Domenico solution. In this work a rigorous mathematical approach to derive the Domenico solution is presented. Furthermore, the limits of this approximation are explored to provide a qualitative assessment of the error associated with the Domenico solution. The analysis indicates that the Domenico solution is an exact analytical solution when the value of the longitudinal dispersivity is zero. For all non-zero longitudinal dispersivity values, the Domenico solution will have a finite error. The results of our analysis also indicate that this error is highly sensitive to the value of the longitudinal dispersivity and the position of the advective front. Based on these inferences some general guidelines for the appropriate use of this solution are suggested.

  5. Risk of congenital anomalies associated with antithyroid treatment during pregnancy: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Gui-Yang; Ma, Jian-Li; Zhou, Liang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the association of either propylthiouracil or methimazole treatment for hyperthyroidism during pregnancy with congenital malformations, relevant studies were identified by searching Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE. We intended to include randomized controlled trials, but no such trials were identified. Thus, we included cohort studies and case-control studies in this meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies were included in the meta-analyses. The results revealed an in...

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study of Intelligence: Additive Effects of Novel Brain Expressed Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Sandra K.; Shtir, Corina; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; McGough, James J.; McCracken, James; Biederman, Joseph; Smalley, Susan L.; Cantor, Rita M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with human intelligence or general cognitive ability. Method: We performed a genome-wide association analysis with a dense set of 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative intelligence scores within an ancestrally…

  7. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Species Associated with Childhood Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Mitzi R.; Paster, Bruce J.; Leys, Eugene J.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Kenyon, Sarah G.; Galvin, Jamie L.; Boches, Susan K.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Griffen, Ann L.

    2002-01-01

    Although substantial epidemiologic evidence links Streptococcus mutans to caries, the pathobiology of caries may involve more complex communities of bacterial species. Molecular methods for bacterial identification and enumeration now make it possible to more precisely study the microbiota associated with dental caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the bacteria found in early childhood caries (ECC) to those found in caries-free children by using molecular identification methods. C...

  8. Functional analysis of mutations in TGIF associated with holoprosencephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaick, Kenia B.; Powers, Shannon E.; Bartholin, Laurent; Myers, Kenneth R.; Hahn, Jin; Orioli, Ieda M.; Ouspenskaia, Maia; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Roessler, Erich; Wotton, David; Muenke, Maximilian

    2007-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common structural malformation of the forebrain and face in humans. Our current understanding of the pathogenesis of HPE attempts to integrate genetic susceptibility, evidenced by mutations in the known HPE genes, with the epigenetic influence of environmental factors. Mutations or deletions of the human TGIF gene have been associated with HPE in multiple population cohorts. Here we examine the functional effects of all previously reported mutations, and describe four additional variants. Of the eleven sequence variations in TGIF, all but four can be demonstrated to be functionally abnormal. In contrast, no potentially pathogenic sequence alterations were detected in the related gene TGIF2. These results provide further evidence of a role for TGIF in HPE and demonstrate the importance of functional analysis of putative disease-associated alleles. PMID:16962354

  9. Disagreement between symptom-reflux association analysis parameters in pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel C Lüthold, Mascha K Rochat, Peter Bähler

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess the agreement within 3 commonly used symptom-reflux association analysis (SAA) parameters investigating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants.METHODS: Twenty three infants with suspected GERD were included in this study. Symptom index (SI), Symptom sensitivity index (SSI) and symptom association probability (SAP) related to cough and irritability were calculated after 24 h combined pH/multiple intraluminal impedance (MII) monitoring. Through defined cut-off values, ...

  10. Association between diabetes or antidiabetic therapy and lung cancer: A meta‐analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhida; Bao, Cuiping; Su, Cheng; Xu, Weili; Luo, Hongbin; Chen, Liming; Qi, Xiuying

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction Diabetes can increase the risk of cancers at several sites, but the association between diabetes and lung cancer remains unclear. We aimed to provide the quantitative estimates for the association between diabetes or antidiabetic treatment and lung cancer risk in the present meta‐analysis. Materials and Methods Cohort studies were identified by searching the PubMed database (January 1960 through October 2012) and manually assessing the cited references in the retrie...

  11. Socioeconomic Associations with ADHD: Findings from a Mediation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Emma Russell

    Full Text Available Children from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds are at greater risk of a range of negative outcomes throughout their life course than their peers; however the specific mechanisms by which socioeconomic status relates to different health outcomes in childhood are as yet unclear.The current study investigates the relationship between socioeconomic disadvantage in childhood and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, and investigates putative mediators of this association in a longitudinal population-based birth cohort in the UK.Data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children was used (n = 8,132 to explore the relationship between different measures of socioeconomic status at birth-3 years and their association with a diagnosis of ADHD at age 7. A multiple mediation model was utilised to examine factors occurring between these ages that may mediate the association.Financial difficulties, housing tenure, maternal age at birth of child and marital status were significantly associated with an outcome of ADHD, such that families either living in financial difficulty, living in council housing, with younger or single mothers' were more likely to have a child with a research diagnosis of ADHD at age 7. Financial difficulties was the strongest predictor of ADHD (OR 2.23 95% CI 1.57-3.16. In the multiple mediation model, involvement in parenting at age 6 and presence of adversity at age 2-4 mediated 27.8% of the association.Socioeconomic disadvantage, conceptualised as reported difficulty in affording basic necessities (e.g. heating, food has both direct and indirect impacts on a child's risk of ADHD. Lower levels of parent involvement mediates this association, as does presence of adversity; with children exposed to adversity and those with less involved parents being at an increased risk of having ADHD. This study highlights the importance of home and environmental factors as small but important contributors toward the

  12. Genetic association analysis of LARS2 with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Reiling, E.; Jafar-Mohammadi, B.; van ’t Riet, E.; Weedon, M.N.; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Hansen, T; R. Saxena; van Haeften, T W; Arp, P.A.; Das, S.; Nijpels, G; Groenewoud, M. J.; van Hove, E. C.; Uitterlinden, A G; Smit, J. W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis LARS2 has been previously identified as a potential type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene through the low-frequency H324Q (rs71645922) variant (minor allele frequency [MAF] 3.0%). However, this association did not achieve genome-wide levels of significance. The aim of this study was to establish the true contribution of this variant and common variants in LARS2 (MAF > 5%) to type 2 diabetes risk. Methods We combined genome-wide association data (n = 10,128) from the DIAGRAM cons...

  13. A study of association between dental health status and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavana Gupta; Attiuddin Siddique

    2013-01-01

    Background: To study the association between dental health status and pregnancy in rural India. Methods: The cohort study was carried out in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Integral Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Lucknow from March 2012 to April 2013, for the period of 1year. The dental health statuses of 600 antenatal cases were studied. The prevalence of gingivitis, dental caries and periodontal disease were studied. The association between poor oral hygiene, ...

  14. Character association and path analysis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    H.C.Sowmya, Y.G.Shadakshari, K.J. Pranesh, Arpita Srivastava and B. Nandini

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken during Summer 2009 at ZARS, GKVK, Bangalore. The material used in this study wasprovided by All India Co-ordinated Research Project on Sunflower, Bengaluru. The base material comprised of thirty eightsterility maintainer lines (‘B’ lines) and thirty eight fertility restorer lines (‘R’ lines). The studies on correlation and pathcoefficient analysis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) showed that days to 50% flowering, days to maturity, plant height, headdiamete...

  15. A Developed Algorithm of Apriori Based on Association Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pingxiang; CHEN Jiangping; BIAN Fuling

    2004-01-01

    A method for mining frequent itemsets by evaluating their probability of supports based on association analysis is presented. This paper obtains the probability of every 1-itemset by scanning the database, then evaluates the probability of every 2-itemset, every 3-itemset, every k-itemset from the frequent 1-itemsets and gains all the candidate frequent itemsets. This paper also scans the database for verifying the support of the candidate frequent itemsets. Last, the frequent itemsets are mined. The method reduces a lot of time of scanning database and shortens the computation time of the algorithm.

  16. Design considerations for genetic linkage and association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsengimana, Jérémie; Bishop, D Timothy

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the main issues that genetic epidemiologists usually consider in the design of linkage and association studies. For linkage, we briefly consider the situation of rare, highly penetrant alleles showing a disease pattern consistent with Mendelian inheritance investigated through parametric methods in large pedigrees or with autozygosity mapping in inbred families, and we then turn our focus to the most common design, affected sibling pairs, of more relevance for common, complex diseases. Theoretical and more practical power and sample size calculations are provided as a function of the strength of the genetic effect being investigated. We also discuss the impact of other determinants of statistical power such as disease heterogeneity, pedigree, and genotyping errors, as well as the effect of the type and density of genetic markers. Linkage studies should be as large as possible to have sufficient power in relation to the expected genetic effect size. Segregation analysis, a formal statistical technique to describe the underlying genetic susceptibility, may assist in the estimation of the relevant parameters to apply, for instance. However, segregation analyses estimate the total genetic component rather than a single-locus effect. Locus heterogeneity should be considered when power is estimated and at the analysis stage, i.e. assuming smaller locus effect than the total the genetic component from segregation studies. Disease heterogeneity should be minimised by considering subtypes if they are well defined or by otherwise collecting known sources of heterogeneity and adjusting for them as covariates; the power will depend upon the relationship between the disease subtype and the underlying genotypes. Ultimately, identifying susceptibility alleles of modest effects (e.g. RR≤1.5) requires a number of families that seem unfeasible in a single study. Meta-analysis and data pooling between different research groups can provide a sizeable study

  17. Whole-genome association studies of alcoholism with loci linked to schizophrenia susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Youngchul; Namkung Junghyun; Park Taesung

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Alcoholism is a complex disease. There have been many reports on significant comorbidity between alcoholism and schizophrenia. For the genetic study of complex diseases, association analysis has been recommended because of its higher power than that of the linkage analysis for detecting genes with modest effects on disease. Results To identify alcoholism susceptibility loci, we performed genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) association tests, which yielded 489...

  18. Spatial-temporal analysis and projection of extreme particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) levels using association rules: A case study of the Jing-Jin-Ji region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shanshan; Liu, Feng; Wang, Chen; Song, Yiliao; Qu, Jiansheng

    2015-11-01

    The Jing-Jin-Ji region of Northern China has experienced serious extreme PM concentrations, which could exert considerable negative impacts on human health. However, only small studies have focused on extreme PM concentrations. Therefore, joint regional PM research and air pollution control has become an urgent issue in this region. To characterize PM pollution, PM10 and PM2.5 hourly samples were collected from 13 cities in Jing-Jin-Ji region for one year. This study initially analyzed extreme PM data using the Apriori algorithm to mine quantitative association rules in PM spatial and temporal variations and intercity influences. The results indicate that 1) the association rules of intercity PM are distinctive, and do not completely rely on their spatial distributions; 2) extreme PM concentrations frequently occur in southern cities, presenting stronger spatial and temporal associations than in northern cities; 3) the strength of the spatial and temporal associations of intercity PM2.5 are more substantial than those of intercity PM10.

  19. Association of traumatic brain injury with subsequent neurological and psychiatric disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David C; Sturm, Virginia E; Peterson, Matthew J; Pieper, Carl F; Bullock, Thomas; Boeve, Bradley F; Miller, Bruce L; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Berger, Mitchel S; Kramer, Joel H; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and other illnesses. This study's objective was to determine the association of prior mild TBI with the subsequent diagnosis (that is, at least 1 year postinjury) of neurological or psychiatric disease. METHODS All studies from January 1995 to February 2012 reporting TBI as a risk factor for diagnoses of interest were identified by searching PubMed, study references, and review articles. Reviewers abstracted the data and assessed study designs and characteristics. RESULTS Fifty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. A random effects meta-analysis revealed a significant association of prior TBI with subsequent neurological and psychiatric diagnoses. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the development of any illness subsequent to prior TBI was 1.67 (95% CI 1.44-1.93, p depression, mixed affective disorders, and bipolar disorder in individuals with previous TBI as compared to those without TBI. This association was present when examining only studies of mild TBI and when considering the influence of study design and characteristics. Analysis of a subset of studies demonstrated no evidence that multiple TBIs were associated with higher odds of disease than a single TBI. CONCLUSIONS History of TBI, including mild TBI, is associated with the development of neurological and psychiatric illness. This finding indicates that either TBI is a risk factor for heterogeneous pathological processes or that TBI may contribute to a common pathological mechanism. PMID:26315003

  20. Interspecific associations and community structure: A local survey and analysis in a grass community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Interspecific associations in the plant community may help to understand the self-organizing assembly and succession of the community. In present study, Pearson correlation, net correlation, Spearman rank correlation, and point correlation were used to detect the interspecific (inter-family associations of grass species (families using the sampling data collected in a grass community of Zhuhai, China. We found that most associations between grass species (families were positive associations. The competition/interference/niche separation between grass species (families was not significant. A lot of pairs of grass species and families with statistically significant interspecific (inter-family associations based on four correlation measures were discovered. Cluster trees for grass species/families were obtained by using cluster analysis. Relationship among positive/negative associations, interspecific relationship and community succession/stability/robustness was discussed. I held that species with significant positive or negative associations are generally keystone species in the community. Although both negative and positive associations occur in the community succession, the adaptation and selection will finally result in the successful coexistence of the species with significant positive associations in the climax community. As the advance of community succession, the significant positive associations increase and maximize in climax community, and the significant negative associations increase to a maximum and then decline into climax community. Dominance of significant positive associations in the climax community means the relative stablility and equilibrium of the community. No significant associations usually account for the majority of possible interspecific associations at each phase of community succession. They guarantee the robustness of community. They are candidates of keystone species. Lose of some existing keystone species might be

  1. Re-mining item associations: methodology and a case study in apparel retailing

    OpenAIRE

    Demiriz, Ayhan; Ertek, Gürdal; Ertek, Gurdal; Atan, Tankut; Kula, Ufuk

    2011-01-01

    Association mining is the conventional data mining technique for analyzing market basket data and it reveals the positive and negative associations between items. While being an integral part of transaction data, pricing and time information have not been integrated into market basket analysis in earlier studies. This paper proposes a new approach to mine price, time and domain related attributes through re-mining of association mining results. The underlying factors behind positive and negat...

  2. Association analysis identifies ZNF750 regulatory variants in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birnbaum Ramon Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the ZNF750 promoter and coding regions have been previously associated with Mendelian forms of psoriasis and psoriasiform dermatitis. ZNF750 encodes a putative zinc finger transcription factor that is highly expressed in keratinocytes and represents a candidate psoriasis gene. Methods We examined whether ZNF750 variants were associated with psoriasis in a large case-control population. We sequenced the promoter and exon regions of ZNF750 in 716 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 397 Caucasian controls. Results We identified a total of 47 variants, including 38 rare variants of which 35 were novel. Association testing identified two ZNF750 haplotypes associated with psoriasis (p ZNF750 promoter and 5' UTR variants displayed a 35-55% reduction of ZNF750 promoter activity, consistent with the promoter activity reduction seen in a Mendelian psoriasis family with a ZNF750 promoter variant. However, the rare promoter and 5' UTR variants identified in this study did not strictly segregate with the psoriasis phenotype within families. Conclusions Two haplotypes of ZNF750 and rare 5' regulatory variants of ZNF750 were found to be associated with psoriasis. These rare 5' regulatory variants, though not causal, might serve as a genetic modifier of psoriasis.

  3. A meta-analysis identifies new loci associated with body mass index in individuals of African ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monda, Keri L.; Chen, Gary K.; Taylor, Kira C.; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Chen, Guanjie; Graff, Mariaelisa; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Rhie, Suhn K.; Li, Guo; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Youfang; Lu, Yingchang; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ademola, Adeyinka; Amos, Christopher I.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Britton, Angela; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cai, Quiyin; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carlson, Chris S.; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chen, Wei-Min; Chen, Fang; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Demerath, Ellen; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L.; Driver, Ryan W.; Dubbert, Patricia; Feitosa, Mary F.; Feng, Ye; Freedman, Barry I.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Xiuqing; Haritunians, Talin; Harris, Tamara; Harris, Curtis C.; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Hernandez, Dena G.; McNeill, Lorna H.; Howard, Timothy D.; Howard, Barbara V.; Howard, Virginia J.; Johnson, Karen C.; Kang, Sun J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kuller, Lewis H.; Kutlar, Abdullah; Langefeld, Carl D.; Lettre, Guillaume; Lohman, Kurt; Lotay, Vaneet; Lyon, Helen; Manson, Joann E.; Maixner, William; Meng, Yan A.; Monroe, Kristine R.; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Murphy, Adam B.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Nayak, Uma; N'Diaye, Amidou; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M. Cristina; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Neuhouser, Marian; Nyante, Sarah; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ogundiran, Temidayo O.; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Palmer, Julie R.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Press, Michael F.; Rampersaud, Evandine; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Salako, Babatunde; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shriner, Daniel A.; Siscovick, David; Smith, Shad B.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Sucheston, Lara; Taylor, Herman; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Edwards, Digna R. Velez; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Witte, John S.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, James J.; Levin, Albert M.; Young, Taylor R.; Zakai, Neil A.; Cushman, Mary; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Yonglan; Zhou, Jie; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Hunt, Kelly J.; Spruill, Ida J.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ambs, Stefan; Arnett, Donna K.; Atwood, Larry; Becker, Diane M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bowden, Donald W.; Burke, Gregory; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cooper, Richard S.; Ding, Jingzhong; Duggan, David; Evans, Michele K.; Fox, Caroline; Garvey, W. Timothy; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hsing, Ann; Chu, Lisa; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huo, Dezheng; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kittles, Rick A.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liu, Simin; McKnight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert C.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Williams, L. Keoki; Patel, Sanjay R.; Peters, Ulrike; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Redline, Susan; Rotimi, Charles N.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Sale, Michele M.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Stanford, Janet L.; Strom, Sara S.; Thun, Michael J.; Vitolins, Mara; Zheng, Wei; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.; Ketkar, Shamika; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zonderman, Alan B.; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; North, Kari E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry and followed up t

  4. A genome-wide association study of body mass index across early life and childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole M Warrington; Howe, Laura D; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kaakinen, Marika; Herrala, Sauli; Huikari, Ville; Wu, Yan Yan; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Pourcain, Beate St; Davey Smith, George; Tilling, Kate; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have investigated the effect of known adult body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on BMI in childhood. There has been no genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BMI trajectories over childhood. Methods: We conducted a GWAS meta-analysis of BMI trajectories from 1 to 17 years of age in 9377 children (77 967 measurements) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Ra...

  5. A genome-wide association study of body mass index across early life and childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Warrington, N.; Howe, L; Paternoster, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Herrala, S. (Sauli); Huikari, V.; Wu, Y.; Kemp, J.; Timpson, N.; St Pourcain, B.; Smith, G.; Tilling, K; Jarvelin, M; Pennell, C; Evans, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have investigated the effect of known adult body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on BMI in childhood. There has been no genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BMI trajectories over childhood. Methods: We conducted a GWAS meta-analysis of BMI trajectories from 1 to 17 years of age in 9377 children (77 967 measurements) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Ra...

  6. Tooth loss is associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis with dose-response analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Qi-Lin Chen; Xian-Tao Zeng; Zhi-Xiao Luo; Xiao-Li Duan; Jie Qin; Wei-Dong Leng

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed the association between tooth loss and the risk of esophageal cancer (EC); however, consistent results were not obtained from different single studies. Therefore, we conducted the present meta-analysis to evaluate the association between tooth loss and EC. We conducted electronic searches of PubMed until to February 10, 2015 to identify relevant observational studies that examined the association between tooth loss and the risk of EC. Study selection and ...

  7. The study of slip line field and upper bound method based on associated flow and non-associated flow rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Yingren; Deng Chujian; Wang Jinglin

    2010-01-01

    At present,associated flow rule of traditional plastic theory is adopted in the slip line field theory and upper bound method of geotechnical materials.So the stress characteristic line conforms to the velocity line.It is proved that geotechnical materials do not abide by the associated flow rule.It is impossible for the stress characteristic line to conform to the velocity line.Generalized plastic mechanics theoretically proved that plastic potential surface intersects the Mohr-Coulomb yield surface with an angle,so that the velocity line must be studied by non-associated flow rule.According to limit analysis theory,the theory of slip line field is put forward in this paper,and then the ultimate boating capacity of strip footing is obtained based on the associated flow rule and the non-associated flow rule individually.These two results are identical since the ultimate bearing capacity is independent of flow rule.On the contrary,the velocity fields of associated and non-associated flow rules are different which shows the velocity field based on the associated flow rule is incorrect.

  8. CHARACTER ASSOCIATION AND PATH ANALYSIS FOR YIELD AND YIELD ATTRIBUTES IN SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Venkanna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Character association and path analysis between yield and its contributing traits were studied in 71 genotypes (15 parents, 54 hybrids and two checks of sunflower. Analysis of variance revealed that existence of significant differences among genotypes for all the characters studied. Seed yield was significant positively correlated with number of filled seeds per head, head diameter, hundredseed weight, seed filling per cent and plant height. Path coefficient analysis indicated that highest direct effects on seed yield were observed in the traits, number of filled seeds per head and hundred seed weight and hence emphasis can belaid out on these traits during selection for further improvement in seed yield in sunflower.

  9. Study of a human immunodeficiency virus-associated multiple-tissue dysfunction syndrome in one boy: Analysis of multiple tissues using X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Xichao Xia; Qingfu Hu; Shifeng Zhang; Juan Cui; Bingqin Shi; Hongwen Li; Hongjun Li; Xizhong Jia; Lei Jiang; Rongzhi Liu

    2016-01-01

    In the previous study, reports of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated multiple tissue dysfunction syndromes are limit. Now, multiple tissue lesions of one boy with AIDS were analyzed using X-ray, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results showed that obvious brain atrophy and several focus were detected by CT and MRI. Lung lymphoid inflammation and pulmonary lymphoplasia were observed by CT. A swelling with a slight low density in hepatic anterior region ...

  10. Small Sample Kernel Association Tests for Human Genetic and Microbiome Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Wenan; Zhao, Ni; Wu, Michael C; Schaid, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Kernel machine based association tests (KAT) have been increasingly used in testing the association between an outcome and a set of biological measurements due to its power to combine multiple weak signals of complex relationship with the outcome through the specification of a relevant kernel. Human genetic and microbiome association studies are two important applications of KAT. However, the classic KAT framework relies on large sample theory, and conservativeness has been observed for small sample studies, especially for microbiome association studies. The common approach for addressing the small sample problem relies on computationally intensive resampling methods. Here, we derive an exact test for KAT with continuous traits, which resolve the small sample conservatism of KAT without the need for resampling. The exact test has significantly improved power to detect association for microbiome studies. For binary traits, we propose a similar approximate test, and we show that the approximate test is very powerful for a wide range of kernels including common variant- and microbiome-based kernels, and the approximate test controls the type I error well for these kernels. In contrast, the sequence kernel association tests have slightly inflated genomic inflation factors after small sample adjustment. Extensive simulations and application to a real microbiome association study are used to demonstrate the utility of our method. PMID:26643881

  11. FIRMS' FINANCIAL AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATION WITH EARNING MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A META-ANALYSIS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima Abdul Hamid; Chaabane Oussama Hou ssem Eddine; Abdullah Mohamed Ayedh; Abdelghani Echchabi

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the association between firm’s corporate governance and financial attributes (namely, board of directors’ size, board of directors’ independence, chief executive officer (CEO) duality, ownership structure , audit type, firm’s size, firm’s return and leverage) with earnings management practices. The study applies a comprehensive meta - analysis of the findings of 25 journal articles published between 2003 and 2013. The analysis permits this research to accu...

  12. Activation analysis in forensic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of neutron activation analysis in forensics are grouped into 3 categories: firearms-discharge applications, elemental analysis of other nonbiological evidence materials (paint, other), and elemental analysis of biological evidence materials (multielemental analysis of hair, analysis of hair for As and Hg). 18 refs

  13. Cross-sectional association of dietary patterns with insulin resistance phenotypes among adults without diabets in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several studies have linked dietary patterns which derived by cluster analysis with metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are key metabolic abnormalities which drive the metabolic syndrome. However, whether dietary patterns identified by cluster analysis are also associated wi...

  14. FIRMS' FINANCIAL AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATION WITH EARNING MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A META-ANALYSIS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Abdul Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the association between firm’s corporate governance and financial attributes (namely, board of directors’ size, board of directors’ independence, chief executive officer (CEO duality, ownership structure , audit type, firm’s size, firm’s return and leverage with earnings management practices. The study applies a comprehensive meta - analysis of the findings of 25 journal articles published between 2003 and 2013. The analysis permits this research to accumulate and assimilate the results of previous literature, and their generalization to a wider range of settings. The results showed that all corporate governance and financial characteristics variables have a significant association with earnings management practices.

  15. Association between cancer and contact allergy: a linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Engkilde, Kaare; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Contact allergy is a prevalent disorder. It is estimated that about 20% of the general population are allergic to one or more of the chemicals that constitute the European baseline patch test panel. While many studies have investigated associations between type I allergic disorders and cancer, few have looked into the association between cancer and contact allergy, a type IV allergy. By linking two clinical databases, the authors investigate the possible association between contact...

  16. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); J.C. Randall (Joshua); C. Lamina (Claudia); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); L. Qi (Lu); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); C.J. Willer (Cristen); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Lim (Noha); P. Scheet (Paul); N. Soranzo (Nicole); N. Amin (Najaf); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.C. Chambers (John); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Luan; H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sanna (Serena); N. Timpson (Nicholas); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); H.Z. Jing; P. Almgren (Peter); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Cherkas (Lynn); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); C. Cooper (Charles); G. Crawford (Gabe); A. Doering (Angela); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); P. Elliott (Paul); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G. Fischer (Guido); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); C. Guiducci (Candace); D. Hadley (David); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); J.W. Holloway (John); T. Illig (Thomas); B. Isomaa (Bo); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); K. Jameson (Karen); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Nordström (Anna); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); F. Payne (Felicity); J. Peden (John); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Renström (Frida); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Song (Kijoung); X. Yuan (Xin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zhang (Cuilin); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G.D. Smith; I.N.M. Day (Ian); P.W. Franks (Paul); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.R. Jarvelin; A. Kong (Augustine); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); M. Laakso (Markku); E. Lakatta (Edward); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Waterworth (Dawn); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); D.J. Hunter (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); D. Schlessinger (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); I. Barroso (Inês); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evid

  17. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue disease: meta-analysis of clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwana, Masataka; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Nobushige; Sugiyama, Naonobu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Few studies have focused on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with connective tissue diseases (CTDs). The optimal treatment for CTD-PAH has yet to be established. Design Meta-analysis of the data from evaluations of treatment for PAH generally (19 studies) and CTD-PAH specifically (nine studies) to compare the effects of pulmonary vasodilative PAH agents. MEDLINE, EMBASE and BIOSIS were searched. English-language full-text articles published between January 1990 and ...

  18. Association Between rs1344706 of ZNF804A and Schizophrenia:A Meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiyan Zhu; Tongyang Liu; Jihong Zhang; Shuting Jia; Wenru Tang; Ying Luo

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most serious mental diseases found in humans. Previous studies indicated that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1344706 in the gene ZNF804A encoding zinc finger protein 804A was associated with schizophrenia in Caucasian population but not in Chinese Han population. However, current results are conflicting in Asian population. In the present study, a meta-analysis was performed to revisit the association between rs1344706 and the risk of schizophrenia in Asian, Caucasian and other populations. Electronic search of PubMed database identified 25 case–control studies with available genotype frequencies of rs1344706 for the meta-analysis, involving a total of 15,788 cases and 22,654 controls. A pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to assess the association. The current meta-analysis showed an association between rs1344706 and schizophrenia in Caucasian populations (P= 0.028, OR= 1.138, 95% CI: 1.014–1.278; P = 0.004 for heterogeneity) and Asian populations (P = 0.008, OR = 1.092, 95% CI: 1.023–1.165; P = 0.001 for heterogeneity), but not in other populations (P= 0.286, OR= 1.209, 95% CI: 0.853–1.714, P = 0.120 for heterogeneity). Egger’s test (P > 0.05) and Begg’s test (P>0.05) are both suggestive of the lack of publication bias for the included studies. Thus, the absence of association in other populations suggests a genetic heterogeneity in the susceptibility of schizophrenia and demonstrates the difficulties in replicating genome-wide association study findings regarding schizophrenia across different ethnic populations. To validate the association between rs1344706 and schizophrenia, further studies with larger participant populations worldwide are needed.

  19. Positive associations primacy in the IAT: a many-facet rasch measurement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Pasquale; Vianello, Michelangelo; Robusto, Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Two studies investigated the different contribution of positive and negative associations to the size of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) effect. A Many-Facet Rasch Measurement analysis was applied for the purpose. Across different IATs (Race and Weight) and different groups of respondents (White, Normal weight, and Obese people) we observed that positive words increase the IAT effect whereas negative words tend to decrease it. Results suggest that the IAT is influenced by a positive associations primacy effect. As a consequence, we argue that researchers should be careful when interpreting IAT effects as a measure of implicit prejudice. PMID:21592938

  20. NAT2 polymorphisms combining with smoking associated with breast cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Qiu, Li-Xin; Wang, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Jia-Lei; He, Shuang-Shuang; Hu, Xi-Chun

    2010-10-01

    To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship between the slow or rapid acetylation resulting from N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) polymorphisms and breast cancer risk, a meta-analysis was performed. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Web of Science were searched. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess strength of association. The pooled ORs were performed for slow versus rapid acetylation genotypes. A total of 26 studies including 9,215 cases and 10,443 controls were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, no significantly elevated breast cancer risk was associated with NAT2 slow genotypes when all studies were pooled into the meta-analysis (OR = 1.026, 95% CI = 0.968-1.087). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, increased risks were not found for either Caucasians (OR = 1.001, 95% CI = 0.938-1.068) or Asians (OR = 1.155, 95% CI = 0.886-1.506). When stratified by study design, statistically significantly elevated risk associated with NAT2 slow genotypes was only found among hospital-based studies (OR = 1.178, 95% CI = 1.037-1.339). In the subgroup analysis by menopausal status, no statistically significantly increased risk was found in either premenopausal (OR = 1.053, 95% CI = 0.886-1.252) or postmenopausal women (OR = 0.965, 95% CI = 0.844-1.104). When stratified by cumulative smoking exposure, in the subgroup of smokers with high pack-years, NAT2 slow genotypes were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR = 1.400, 95% CI = 1.099-1.784). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that there is overall lack of association between NAT2 genotypes and breast cancer risk, however, NAT2 polymorphisms when combining with heavy smoking history may contribute to breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:20180012

  1. Comparative analysis of fungal protein kinases and associated domains

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund Yael; Kosti Idit; Horwitz Benjamin A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein phosphorylation is responsible for a large portion of the regulatory functions of eukaryotic cells. Although the list of sequenced genomes of filamentous fungi has grown rapidly, the kinomes of recently sequenced species have not yet been studied in detail. The objective of this study is to apply a comparative analysis of the kinase distribution in different fungal phyla, and to explore its relevance to understanding the evolution of fungi and their taxonomic class...

  2. Comparative analysis of fungal protein kinases and associated domains

    OpenAIRE

    Kosti, Idit; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael; Glaser, Fabian; Horwitz, Benjamin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation is responsible for a large portion of the regulatory functions of eukaryotic cells. Although the list of sequenced genomes of filamentous fungi has grown rapidly, the kinomes of recently sequenced species have not yet been studied in detail. The objective of this study is to apply a comparative analysis of the kinase distribution in different fungal phyla, and to explore its relevance to understanding the evolution of fungi and their taxonomic classification...

  3. Genetic Association Analysis of Complex Diseases Incorporating Intermediate Phenotype Information

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yafang; Huang, Jian; Amos, Christopher I.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic researchers often collect disease related quantitative traits in addition to disease status because they are interested in understanding the pathophysiology of disease processes. In genome-wide association (GWA) studies, these quantitative phenotypes may be relevant to disease development and serve as intermediate phenotypes or they could be behavioral or other risk factors that predict disease risk. Statistical tests combining both disease status and quantitative risk factors should ...

  4. Multi-element analysis of emeralds and associated rocks by k(o) neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya; Mondal; Burte; Nair; Reddy; Reddy; Reddy; Manohar

    2000-12-01

    Multi-element analysis was carried out in natural emeralds, their associated rocks and one sample of beryl obtained from Rajasthan, India. The concentrations of 21 elements were assayed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using the k0 method (k0 INAA method) and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The data reveal the segregation of some elements from associated (trapped and host) rocks to the mineral beryl forming the gemstones. A reference rock standard of the US Geological Survey (USGS BCR-1) was also analysed as a control of the method. PMID:11077961

  5. Pathway-Based Genome-wide Association Studies Reveal That the Rac1 Pathway Is Associated with Plasma Adiponectin Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Dong Li; Hongxiao Jiao; Kai Wang; Fuhua Yang; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hakon Hakonarson; Rexford Ahima; R. Arlen Price

    2015-01-01

    Pathway-based analysis as an alternative and effective approach to identify disease-related genes or loci has been verified. To decipher the genetic background of plasma adiponectin levels, we performed genome wide pathway-based association studies in extremely obese individuals and normal-weight controls. The modified Gene Set Enrichment Algorithm (GSEA) was used to perform the pathway-based analyses (the GenGen Program) in 746 European American females, which were collected from our previou...

  6. Study of a human immunodeficiency virus-associated multiple-tissue dysfunction syndrome in one boy: Analysis of multiple tissues using X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xichao Xia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the previous study, reports of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated multiple tissue dysfunction syndromes are limit. Now, multiple tissue lesions of one boy with AIDS were analyzed using X-ray, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Results showed that obvious brain atrophy and several focus were detected by CT and MRI. Lung lymphoid inflammation and pulmonary lymphoplasia were observed by CT. A swelling with a slight low density in hepatic anterior region of right lobe and a large soft tissue neoplasm in right abdomen were obtained by CT. An obvious damage of intestinal duct and intestinal lymphomas were respectively observed by molybdenum contrast image and CT. X-ray showed a low density of thoracic bone and iliac bone, and irregular shapes of bone joint and epiphysis. Characterizations of HIV-associated multiple organ dysfunction syndromes in the case are benefit to understand features of children with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies novel locus for neuroticism and shows polygenic association with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Marleen H.M.; van den Berg, Stéphanie M.; Verweij, Karin J.H.; Krueger, Robert F.; Luciano, Michelle; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Matteson, Lindsay K.; Derringer, Jaime; Esko, Tõnu; Amin, Najaf; Gordon, Scott D.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hart, Amy B.; Seppälä, Ilkka; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Konte, Bettina; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Minyoung; Miller, Mike; Nutile, Teresa; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Wedenoja, Juho; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Agrawal, Arpana; Allik, Jüri; Appel, Katja; Bigdeli, Timothy B.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Costa, Paul T.; Smith, George Davey; Davies, Gail; de Wit, Harriet; Ding, Jun; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franke, Barbara; Giegling, Ina; Grucza, Richard; Hartmann, Annette M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heinonen, Kati; Henders, Anjali K.; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Janzing, Joost; Jokela, Markus; Karlsson, Robert; Kemp, John P.; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Latvala, Antti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Magri, Chiara; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Marten, Jonathan; Maschio, Andrea; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milaneschi, Yuri; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nauck, Matthias; Ouwens, Klaasjan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Pettersson, Erik; Polasek, Ozren; Qian, Yong; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Raitakari, Olli T.; Realo, Anu; Rose, Richard J.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Sorice, Rossella; Starr, John M.; Pourcain, Beate St; Sutin, Angelina R.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Trochet, Holly; Vermeulen, Sita; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Widen, Elisabeth; Wouda, Jasper; Wright, Margaret J.; Zgaga, Lina; Scotland, Generation; Porteous, David; Minelli, Alessandra; Palmer, Abraham A.; Rujescu, Dan; Ciullo, Marina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Metspalu, Andres; Kaprio, Jaakko; Deary, Ian J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Wilson, James F.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Bierut, Laura J.; Hettema, John M.; Grabe, Hans J.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Evans, David M.; Schlessinger, David; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Terracciano, Antonio; McGue, Matt; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Neuroticism is a personality trait that is briefly defined by emotional instability. It is a robust genetic risk factor for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Hence, neuroticism is an important phenotype for psychiatric genetics. The Genetics of Personality Consortium (GPC) has created a resource for genome-wide association analyses of personality traits in over 63,000 participants (including MDD cases). Objective To identify genetic variants associated with neuroticism by performing a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results based on 1000Genomes imputation, to evaluate if common genetic variants as assessed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) explain variation in neuroticism by estimating SNP-based heritability, and to examine whether SNPs that predict neuroticism also predict MDD. Setting 30 cohorts with genome-wide genotype, personality and MDD data from the GPC. Participants The study included 63,661 participants from 29 discovery cohorts and 9,786 participants from a replication cohort. Participants came from Europe, the United States or Australia. Main outcome measure(s) Neuroticism scores harmonized across all cohorts by Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis, and clinically assessed MDD case-control status. Results A genome-wide significant SNP was found in the MAGI1 gene (rs35855737; P=9.26 × 10−9 in the discovery meta-analysis, and P=2.38 × 10−8 in the meta-analysis of all 30 cohorts). Common genetic variants explain 15% of the variance in neuroticism. Polygenic scores based on the meta-analysis of neuroticism in 27 of the discovery cohorts significantly predicted neuroticism in 2 independent cohorts. Importantly, polygenic scores also predicted MDD in these cohorts. Conclusions and relevance This study identifies a novel locus for neuroticism. The variant is located in a known gene that has been associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in previous studies. In addition, the study

  8. Association of COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xue

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is one of the most important enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism and its functional genetic polymorphisms may be associated with breast cancer (BC risk. Many epidemiological studies have been conducted to explore the association between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk. However, the results remain inconclusive. In order to derive a more precise estimation of this relationship, a large meta-analysis was performed in this study. Methods Systematic searches of the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were performed. Crude odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to estimate the strength of the association. Results A total of 56 studies including 34,358 breast cancer cases and 45,429 controls were included. Overall, no significant associations between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and breast cancer risk were found for LL versus HH, HL versus HH, LL versus HL, recessive model LL versus HL+HH, and dominant model LL+HL versus HH. In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, source of controls, and menopausal status, there was still no significant association detected in any of the genetic models. Conclusion Our meta-analysis results suggest that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism may not contribute to breast cancer susceptibility. Virtual slides The virtual slides(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs4806123577708417

  9. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  10. Current approaches of genome-wide association studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Xu

    2008-01-01

    @@ With rapid advances in high-throughput genotyping technology and the great increase in information available on SNPs throughout the genuine, genuine-wide association(GWA) studies have now become feasible.

  11. Optophysiological analysis of associational circuits in the olfactory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akari eHagiwara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary olfactory cortical areas receive direct input from the olfactory bulb, but also have extensive associational connections that have been mainly studied with classical anatomical methods. Here, we shed light on the functional properties of associational connections in the anterior and posterior piriform cortex (aPC and pPC using optophysiological methods. We found that the aPC receives dense functional connections from the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON, a major hub in olfactory cortical circuits. The local recurrent connectivity within the aPC, long invoked in cortical autoassociative models, is sparse and weak. By contrast, the pPC receives negligible input from the AON, but has dense connections from the aPC as well as more local recurrent connections than the aPC. Finally, there are negligible functional connections from the pPC to aPC. Our study provides a circuit basis for a more sensory role for the aPC in odor processing and an associative role for the pPC.

  12. French experience in seismic risk analysis and associated research works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This communication reviews the basic principles of the seismic risk analysis for nuclear installations in France practiced by the IPSN of the CEA. The presentation of each stage of the analysis includes an account of the methods used, the difficulties met, and a comparison with the recommendations of the AIEA-SG-S1. First, this paper deals with the sismotectonic analysis and with the definition of two reference earthquakes. Then, the calculation of the ground motion corresponding to the reference earthquakes is presented. A particular attention is paid to the problems of calculation of ground motion in the case of important earthquakes near active faults and to the effect of the soil on these movements. Finally, some criticisms, a description of studies undertaken at the moment and some recommendations are presented

  13. A Genomewide Association Study of DSM-IV Cannabis Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.; Hinrichs, Anthony; Grucza, Richard; Saccone, Scott F; Krueger, Robert; Neuman, Rosalind; Howells, William; Fisher, Sherri; Fox, Louis; Cloninger, Robert,; Dick, Danielle M; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Goate, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite twin studies showing that 50–70% of variation in DSM-IV cannabis dependence is attributable to heritable influences, little is known of specific genotypes that influence vulnerability to cannabis dependence. We conducted a genomewide association study of DSM-IV cannabis dependence. Association analyses of 708 DSM-IV cannabis dependent cases with 2,346 cannabis exposed nondependent controls was conducted using logistic regression in PLINK. None of the 948,142 SNPs met genomewide signif...

  14. Families or Unrelated: The Evolving Debate in Genetic Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Fardo, David W.; Charnigo, Richard; Epstein, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    To help uncover the genetic determinants of complex disease, a scientist often designs an association study using either unrelated subjects or family members within pedigrees. But which of these two subject recruitment paradigms is preferable? This editorial addresses the debate over the relative merits of family- and population-based genetic association studies. We begin by briefly recounting the evolution of genetic epidemiology and the rich crossroads of statistics and genetics. We then de...

  15. Genome-wide association study of clinical dimensions of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanous, Ayman H; Zhou, Baiyu; Aggen, Steven H;

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sources of evidence suggest that genetic factors influence variation in clinical features of schizophrenia. The authors present the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of dimensional symptom scores among individuals with schizophrenia.......Multiple sources of evidence suggest that genetic factors influence variation in clinical features of schizophrenia. The authors present the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of dimensional symptom scores among individuals with schizophrenia....

  16. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were...

  17. Genome-wide Association Study of Periodontal Pathogen Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Divaris, K.; Monda, K.L.; North, K. E.; Olshan, A F; Lange, E.M.; K. Moss; Barros, S.P.; Beck, J.D.; Offenbacher, S.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological shifts of the human microbiome are characteristic of many diseases, including chronic periodontitis. To date, there is limited evidence on host genetic risk loci associated with periodontal pathogen colonization. We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) study among 1,020 white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy to severe chronic periodontitis, and for whom “checkerboard” DNA-DNA hybridization quantifi...

  18. An efficient weighted tag SNP-set analytical method in genome-wide association studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Bin; Wang, Shudong; Jia, Huaqian; Liu, Xing; Wang, Xinzeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-set analysis in Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has emerged as a research hotspot for identifying genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility. But most existing methods of SNP-set analysis are affected by the quality of SNP-set, and poor quality of SNP-set can lead to low power in GWAS. Results In this research, we propose an efficient weighted tag-SNP-set analytical method to detect the disease associations. In our method, we...

  19. THE CONCEPT OF “UNDERSTATEMENT”: COGNITIVE-ASSOCIATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova V. G.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “Understatement| is considered in the article from the angle of an associative approach. The author analyses the associative connections of the word “Understatement”, which allows figuring out a specific inner structure of the meaning, a deep system of interconnections, underlying native speakers’ cognitive picture of the world. The ethno-cultural peculiarities of the concept of “Understatement” in the English language are emphasized by means of mapping the corresponding lexical groups, comparing value judgments and set expressions, based on behavioral stereotypes. While analyzing the concept sphere of “Understatement” the author underlines the representativeness and relevance of the studied concept, which reveals the most important characteristics of the Anglo Saxon society, as well as its connection with some mental and language categories

  20. Is in vitro fertilization associated with preeclampsia? A propensity score matched study

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Noriyoshi; Fujiwara, Takeo; Suzuki, Tomo; Jwa, Seung Chik; Taniguchi, Kosuke; Yamanobe, Yuji; Kozuka, Kazuto; Sago, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Although an increased risk of preeclampsia in pregnancies conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) has been reported, it remains unknown whether IVF is associated with preeclampsia. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether IVF is associated with preeclampsia in pregnant women using propensity score matching analysis. Methods This study included 3,084 pregnant women who visited the National Center for Child Health and Development before 20 weeks of gestation without h...

  1. Association between Diet and Lifestyle Habits and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yu-Bin; Zhuang, Kang-Min; Kuang, Lei; Zhan, Qiang; Wang, Xian-fei; Liu, Si-De

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Recent papers have highlighted the role of diet and lifestyle habits in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but very few population-based studies have evaluated this association in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between diet and lifestyle habits and IBS. Methods A food frequency and lifestyle habits questionnaire was used to record the diet and lifestyle habits of 78 IBS subjects and 79 healthy subjects. Cross-tabulation analysis and lo...

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies variants in the ABO locus associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amundadottir, Laufey; Kraft, Peter; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Fuchs, Charles S; Petersen, Gloria M.; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Eric J.; LaCroix, Andrea; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Bamlet, William; Berg, Christine D

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of pancreatic cancer, a cancer with one of the poorest survival rates worldwide. Initially, we genotyped 558,542 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,896 incident cases and 1,939 controls drawn from twelve prospective cohorts plus one hospital-based case-control study. In a combined analysis adjusted for study, sex, ancestry and five principal components that included an additional 2,457 cases and 2,654 controls from eight case-con...

  3. Computing fuzzy associations for the analysis of biological literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Keer, Harindar S; Bork, Peer; Andrade, Miguel A

    2002-06-01

    The increase of information in biology makes it difficult for researchers in any field to keep current with the literature. The MEDLINE database of scientific abstracts can be quickly scanned using electronic mechanisms. Potentially interesting abstracts can be selected by matching words joined by Boolean operators. However this means of selecting documents is not optimal. Nonspecific queries have to be effected, resulting in large numbers of irrelevant abstracts that have to be manually scanned To facilitate this analysis, we have developed a system that compiles a summary of subjects and related documents on the results of a MEDLINE query. For this, we have applied a fuzzy binary relation formalism that deduces relations between words present in a set of abstracts preprocessed with a standard grammatical tagger. Those relations are used to derive ensembles of related words and their associated subsets of abstracts. The algorithm can be used publicly at http:// www.bork.embl-heidelberg.de/xplormed/. PMID:12074170

  4. Novel loci associated with usual sleep duration: the CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, D J; Hek, K; Chen, T-H; Watson, N F; Eiriksdottir, G; Byrne, E M; Cornelis, M; Warby, S C; Bandinelli, S; Cherkas, L; Evans, D S; Grabe, H J; Lahti, J; Li, M; Lehtimäki, T; Lumley, T; Marciante, K D; Pérusse, L; Psaty, B M; Robbins, J; Tranah, G J; Vink, J M; Wilk, J B; Stafford, J M; Bellis, C; Biffar, R; Bouchard, C; Cade, B; Curhan, G C; Eriksson, J G; Ewert, R; Ferrucci, L; Fülöp, T; Gehrman, P R; Goodloe, R; Harris, T B; Heath, A C; Hernandez, D; Hofman, A; Hottenga, J-J; Hunter, D J; Jensen, M K; Johnson, A D; Kähönen, M; Kao, L; Kraft, P; Larkin, E K; Lauderdale, D S; Luik, A I; Medici, M; Montgomery, G W; Palotie, A; Patel, S R; Pistis, G; Porcu, E; Quaye, L; Raitakari, O; Redline, S; Rimm, E B; Rotter, J I; Smith, A V; Spector, T D; Teumer, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Vohl, M-C; Widen, E; Willemsen, G; Young, T; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Blangero, J; Boomsma, D I; Gudnason, V; Hu, F; Mangino, M; Martin, N G; O'Connor, G T; Stone, K L; Tanaka, T; Viikari, J; Gharib, S A; Punjabi, N M; Räikkönen, K; Völzke, H; Mignot, E; Tiemeier, H

    2015-10-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based cohorts totaling 47 180 individuals of European ancestry. Genome-wide significant association was identified at two loci. The strongest is located on chromosome 2, in an intergenic region 35- to 80-kb upstream from the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 (lowest P=1.1 × 10(-9)). This finding was replicated in an African-American sample of 4771 individuals (lowest P=9.3 × 10(-4)). The strongest combined association was at rs1823125 (P=1.5 × 10(-10), minor allele frequency 0.26 in the discovery sample, 0.12 in the replication sample), with each copy of the minor allele associated with a sleep duration 3.1 min longer per night. The alleles associated with longer sleep duration were associated in previous GWAS with a more favorable metabolic profile and a lower risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these associations may help elucidate biological mechanisms influencing sleep duration and its association with psychiatric, metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25469926

  5. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara;

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748...

  6. Increased mortality for pregnancy-associated melanoma: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrom, L; Olsen, C; Knight, L; Khosrotehrani, K; Green, A C

    2015-08-01

    Among women, pregnancy-associated melanomas may have a poorer prognosis than other melanomas, but evidence is inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect on melanoma outcome of a coinciding pregnancy. The objective of the study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of risk of death from, or recurrence of, pregnancy-associated melanomas compared with other melanomas in women of reproductive age. Cochrane (1996-2013), MEDLINE (1950-2013), EMBASE (1966-2013), CINAHL (1982-2013), and PUBMED (1951-2013) databases were searched for studies assessing the risk of death and recurrence in pregnancy-associated melanomas. Eligible studies investigated melanoma outcomes in women with pregnancy-associated melanomas (diagnosed during pregnancy or in 12 months following pregnancy), included a comparison group and reported measures of risk of melanoma death or disease-free survival. Eligible study designs were cohort studies of women of childbearing age with confirmed diagnoses of cutaneous melanoma. Individual study effect estimates were pooled using the weighted average method. Studies that did not report a quantitative estimate were summarized narratively. Of 304 citations identified, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, with assessed outcomes being melanoma death (7), recurrence (3), or both (4). Pooled estimates of mortality risk from four studies showed increased risk of melanoma death after adjustment for patient age and stage of melanoma (pHR 1.56, 95% CI 1.23-1.99) for pregnancy-associated melanoma compared with other melanomas. Based on limited quantitative evidence, pregnancy-associated melanomas appear to have poorer outcomes than other melanomas. PMID:25690106

  7. Meta-analysis of the association between selenium and gastric cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, He-Yi; He, Jin-Guang; Li, Bao-Sheng

    2016-03-29

    To clarify the effects of selenium level on the risk of gastric cancer (GC) and GC mortality, a meta-analysis was performed. Related studies were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM). Pooled ORs and 95% CIs were used to assess the strengthof the associations. A total of 8 studies including 17834 subjects were involved in this meta-analysis. High selenium level was associated with GC risk in case-control study (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.44-0.89, P = 0.009; I2 = 52%) and cohort study (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.97, P = 0.01; I2 = 25%). In addition, high selenium level was associated with GC mortality risk (OR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.97, P = 0.006, I2 = 49%). In summary, this meta-analysis suggested that selenium might inversely associated with GC risk and GC mortality. PMID:26862854

  8. Genome-wide association study of serum selenium concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Jian; Hsu, Li; Harrison, Tabitha;

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this...... hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We...... tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO) 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p < 1 × 10−5. None of these 41 SNPs reached the significant threshold (p = 0.05/15 regions = 0...

  9. Statistical methods for genetic association analysis involving complex longitudinal data

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Rany Mansour

    2009-01-01

    Most, if not all, human phenotypes exhibit a temporal, dosage-dependent, or age effect. In this work, I explore and showcase the use different analytical methods for assessing the genetic contribution to traits with temporal trends, or what I refer to as 'dynamic complex traits' (DCTs). The study of DCTs could offer insights into disease pathogenesis that are not achievable in other research settings. I describe the development and application of a method of DCT analysis termed ̀Curve- Based ...

  10. A critical review and meta-analysis of the association between overt hyperthyroidism and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Green, Anders; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Brix, Thomas H

    2011-01-01

    Overt hyperthyroidism has been associated with cardiac arrhythmias, hypercoagulopathy, stroke, and pulmonary embolism, all of which may increase mortality. Some, but not all, studies show an increased mortality in patients with hyperthyroidism. This inconsistency may be due to differences in study...... design, characteristics of participants, or confounders. In order to test whether hyperthyroidism influences mortality, we performed a critical review and statistical meta-analysis....

  11. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Assimes, Themistocles L; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barnes, Timothy A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S; Brown, Morris J; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, John F; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M; Diemert, Patrick; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; Mokhtari, Nour Eddine El; Ellis, Stephen G; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C; Epstein, Stephen E; de Faire, Ulf; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A; Kaplan, Lee M; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J; Mannucci, Pier M; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Muhlestein, Joseph B; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P; Nöthen, Markus M; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S; Patterson, Chris C; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Rader, Daniel J; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B; Snoep, Jaapjan D; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W H Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Rij, Andre M; Voight, Benjamin F; Wareham, Nick J; Wells, George A; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Philipp S; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Wright, Benjamin J; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H; Cupples, L Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H; Hall, Alistair S; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O'Donnell, Christopher J; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J

    2011-04-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis identified 13 loci newly associated with CAD at P < 5 × 10⁻⁸ and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 new loci showed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6% to 17% increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the new loci showed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors and the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the new CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  12. SNPTrackTM : an integrated bioinformatics system for genetic association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Joshua

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A genetic association study is a complicated process that involves collecting phenotypic data, generating genotypic data, analyzing associations between genotypic and phenotypic data, and interpreting genetic biomarkers identified. SNPTrack is an integrated bioinformatics system developed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA to support the review and analysis of pharmacogenetics data resulting from FDA research or submitted by sponsors. The system integrates data management, analysis, and interpretation in a single platform for genetic association studies. Specifically, it stores genotyping data and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP annotations along with study design data in an Oracle database. It also integrates popular genetic analysis tools, such as PLINK and Haploview. SNPTrack provides genetic analysis capabilities and captures analysis results in its database as SNP lists that can be cross-linked for biological interpretation to gene/protein annotations, Gene Ontology, and pathway analysis data. With SNPTrack, users can do the entire stream of bioinformatics jobs for genetic association studies. SNPTrack is freely available to the public at http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/BioinformaticsTools/SNPTrack/default.htm.

  13. Breast cancer risk associated with different HRT formulations: a register-based case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Thai Do; Möhner Sabine; Heinemann Lothar AJ; Dinger Juergen C; Assmann Anita

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous epidemiological studies have inconsistently shown a modestly increased breast cancer risk associated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Limited information is available about different formulations – particularly concerning different progestins. Methods A case-control study was performed within Germany in collaboration with regional cancer registries and tumor centers. Up to 5 controls were matched breast cancer cases. Conditional logistic regression analysis...

  14. A genomic background based method for association analysis in related individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najaf Amin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Feasibility of genotyping of hundreds and thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in thousands of study subjects have triggered the need for fast, powerful, and reliable methods for genome-wide association analysis. Here we consider a situation when study participants are genetically related (e.g. due to systematic sampling of families or because a study was performed in a genetically isolated population. Of the available methods that account for relatedness, the Measured Genotype (MG approach is considered the 'gold standard'. However, MG is not efficient with respect to time taken for the analysis of genome-wide data. In this context we proposed a fast two-step method called Genome-wide Association using Mixed Model and Regression (GRAMMAR for the analysis of pedigree-based quantitative traits. This method certainly overcomes the drawback of time limitation of the measured genotype (MG approach, but pays in power. One of the major drawbacks of both MG and GRAMMAR, is that they crucially depend on the availability of complete and correct pedigree data, which is rarely available. METHODOLOGY: In this study we first explore type 1 error and relative power of MG, GRAMMAR, and Genomic Control (GC approaches for genetic association analysis. Secondly, we propose an extension to GRAMMAR i.e. GRAMMAR-GC. Finally, we propose application of GRAMMAR-GC using the kinship matrix estimated through genomic marker data, instead of (possibly missing and/or incorrect genealogy. CONCLUSION: Through simulations we show that MG approach maintains high power across a range of heritabilities and possible pedigree structures, and always outperforms other contemporary methods. We also show that the power of our proposed GRAMMAR-GC approaches to that of the 'gold standard' MG for all models and pedigrees studied. We show that this method is both feasible and powerful and has correct type 1 error in the context of genome-wide association analysis

  15. Sialolithiasis is associated with nephrolithiasis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan-Chang; Hung, Shih-Han; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions This study demonstrates an association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis. The results call for more awareness of this association among physicians and patients with nephrolithiasis. Objective Very few empirical studies have been conducted to explore the potential association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis. As such, the association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis still remains unclear. This study aimed to explore the possible association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis using a population-based dataset. Methods Using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005, this case-control study identified 966 patients with sialolithiasis as cases and 2898 sex- and age-matched subjects without sialolithiasis as controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to examine the association of sialolithiasis with previously diagnosed nephrolithiasis. Results Out of 3864 sampled patients, 165 (4.27%) had prior nephrolithiasis. Using Chi-square test, it was found that there was a significant difference in the prevalence of prior nephrolithiasis between the cases and controls (10.25% vs 2.28%, p nephrolithiasis for cases was 4.74 (95% CI = 3.41-6.58, p < 0.001) when compared to controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic location, urbanization level of residence, diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, chronic renal disease, and tobacco use. PMID:26808906

  16. An ecophysiological study of the Azolla filiculoides- Anabaena azollae association

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kempen, Monique; Smolders, Fons; Speelman, Eveline; Reichart, Gert Jan; Barke, Judith; Brinkhuis, Henk; Lotter, Andy; Roelofs, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The long term effects of salinity stress on the growth, nutrient content and amino acid composition of the Azolla filiculoides - Anabaena azollae association was studied in a laboratory experiment. It was demonstrated that the symbiosis could tolerate salt stress up to 90 mM NaCl, even after a 100 day period of preconditioning at salt concentrations that were 30 mM NaCl lower. In the 120 mM NaCl treatment the Azolla filiculoides survived, but hardly any new biomass was produced. It was shown th