WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessment model version

  1. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shott, G. J.

    2012-04-15

    Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

  2. An Assessment of MJO and Tropical Waves Simulated by Different Versions of the GAMIL Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jiang-Yu; LI Li-Juan

    2012-01-01

    Simulated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) outputs by two versions of the grid-point atmospheric general circulation model (GAMIL) were analyzed to assess the influences of improvements in cloud microphysics and convective parameterization schemes on the simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and other tropical waves. The wavenumber-frequency spectral analysis was applied to isolate dominant modes of convectively coupled equatorial waves, including the M30, Kelvin, equatorial Rossby (ER), mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG), and inertio-gravity (1G) waves. The performances of different versions of the GAMIL modelversion 1.0 (GAMIL1.0) and version 2.0 (GAMIL2.0)) were evalu- ated by comparing the power spectrum distributions of these waves among GAMIL 1.0, GAMIL2.0, and observational data. GAMIL1.0 shows a weak MJO signal, with the maximum variability occurring separately at wavenumbers 1 and 4 rather than being concentrated on wavenumbers 1-3, suggesting that GAMILI.0 could not effectively capture the intraseasonal variability. However, GAMIL2.0 is able to effectively reproduce both the symmetric and anti-symmetric waves, and the significant spectra of the MJO, Kelvin, and MRG waves are in agreement with observational data, indicating that the ability of GAMIL2.0 to simulate the MJO and other tropical waves is enhanced by improving the cloud microphysics and convective parameterization schemes and implying that such improvements are crucial to further improving this model's performance.

  3. A Prototypicality Validation of the Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathic Personality (CAPP) Model Spanish Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Gerardo; Casas, Alfonso; Kreis, Mette K F; Forti, Leonello; Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández, Juan; Conde, Manuel; Vázquez-Noguerol, Raúl; Blanco, Tania; Hoff, Helge A; Cooke, David J

    2015-10-01

    The Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathic Personality (CAPP) is a newly developed, lexically based, conceptual model of psychopathy. The content validity of the Spanish language CAPP model was evaluated using prototypicality analysis. Prototypicality ratings were collected from 187 mental health experts and from samples of 143 health professionals and 282 community residents. Across the samples the majority of CAPP items were rated as highly prototypical of psychopathy. The Self, Dominance, and Attachment domains were evaluated as being more prototypical than the Behavioral and Cognitive domains. These findings are consistent with findings from similar studies in other languages and provide further support for the content validation of the CAPP model across languages and the lexical approach.

  4. Global assessment of Vegetation Index and Phenology Lab (VIP and Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS version 3 products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marshall

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth observation based long-term global vegetation index products are used by scientists from a wide range of disciplines concerned with global change. Inter-comparison studies are commonly performed to keep the user community informed on the consistency and accuracy of such records as they evolve. In this study, we compared two new records: (1 Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Version 3 (NDVI3g and (2 Vegetation Index and Phenology Lab (VIP Version 3 NDVI (NDVI3v and Enhanced Vegetation Index 2 (EVI3v. We evaluated the two records via three experiments that addressed the primary use of such records in global change research: (1 prediction of the Leaf Area Index (LAI used in light-use efficiency modeling, (2 estimation of vegetation climatology in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer models, and (3 trend analysis of the magnitude and phenology of vegetation productivity. Experiment one, unlike previous inter-comparison studies, was performed with a unique Landsat 30 m spatial resolution and in situ LAI database for major crop types on five continents. Overall, the two records showed a high level of agreement both in direction and magnitude on a monthly basis, though VIP values were higher and more variable and showed lower correlations and higher error with in situ LAI. The records were most consistent at northern latitudes during the primary growing season and southern latitudes and the tropics throughout much of the year, while the records were less consistent at northern latitudes during green-up and senescence and in the great deserts of the world throughout much of the year. The two records were also highly consistent in terms of trend direction/magnitude, showing a 30+ year increase (decrease in NDVI over much of the globe (tropical rainforests. The two records were less consistent in terms of timing due to the poor correlation of the records during start and end of growing season.

  5. Validation of the Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment using classical test theory and the Rasch model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Lambert, Heather C; Faber, Jens

    2012-01-01

    consistency (Chronbach's alpha). External construct validity (convergent and known-groups validity) was evaluated against theoretical constructs assessing the complex concept of ingestive skills. Internal construct validity was tested using Rasch analysis. Results: High internal consistency reliability......Purpose: The study aimed to validate the Danish version of the Canadian the "McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment" (MISA-DK) for measuring dysphagia in frail elders. Method: One-hundred and ten consecutive older medical patients were recruited to the study. Reliability was assessed by internal...... with Chronbach's alpha of 0.77-0.95 was evident. External construct validity was supported by expected high correlations with most of the constructs related to ingestive skills (r(s)¿=¿0.53 to r(s)¿=¿0.66). The MISA-DK discriminated significantly between known-groups. Fit to the Rasch model (x(2) (df)¿=¿12 (12...

  6. Modeling report of DYMOND code (DUPIC version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo Hwan [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yacout, Abdellatif M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Ilinois (United States)

    2003-04-01

    The DYMOND code employs the ITHINK dynamic modeling platform to assess the 100-year dynamic evolution scenarios for postulated global nuclear energy parks. Firstly, DYMOND code has been developed by ANL(Argonne National Laboratory) to perform the fuel cycle analysis of LWR once-through and LWR-FBR mixed plant. Since the extensive application of DYMOND code has been requested, the first version of DYMOND has been modified to adapt the DUPIC, MSR and RTF fuel cycle. DYMOND code is composed of three parts; the source language platform, input supply and output. But those platforms are not clearly distinguished. This report described all the equations which were modeled in the modified DYMOND code (which is called as DYMOND-DUPIC version). It divided into five parts;Part A deals model in reactor history which is included amount of the requested fuels and spent fuels. Part B aims to describe model of fuel cycle about fuel flow from the beginning to the end of fuel cycle. Part C is for model in re-processing which is included recovery of burned uranium, plutonium, minor actinide and fission product as well as the amount of spent fuels in storage and disposal. Part D is for model in other fuel cycle which is considered the thorium fuel cycle for MSR and RTF reactor. Part E is for model in economics. This part gives all the information of cost such as uranium mining cost, reactor operating cost, fuel cost etc.

  7. Inspection of the Math Model Tools for On-Orbit Assessment of Impact Damage Report. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Piascik, Robert S.; Kramer White, Julie; Labbe, Steve G.; Rotter, Hank A.

    2005-01-01

    In Spring of 2005, the NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) was engaged by the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to peer review the suite of analytical tools being developed to support the determination of impact and damage tolerance of the Orbiter Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The NESC formed an independent review team with the core disciplines of materials, flight sciences, structures, mechanical analysis and thermal analysis. The Math Model Tools reviewed included damage prediction and stress analysis, aeroheating analysis, and thermal analysis tools. Some tools are physics-based and other tools are empirically-derived. Each tool was created for a specific use and timeframe, including certification, real-time pre-launch assessments, and real-time on-orbit assessments. The tools are used together in an integrated strategy for assessing the ramifications of impact damage to tile and RCC. The NESC teams conducted a peer review of the engineering data package for each Math Model Tool. This report contains the summary of the team observations and recommendations from these reviews.

  8. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Version 2.0 theory and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1992). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. In Version 2.0, GWSCREEN has incorporated an additional source model to calculate the impacts to groundwater resulting from the release to percolation ponds. In addition, transport of radioactive progeny has also been incorporated. GWSCREEN has shown comparable results when compared against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool

  9. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Version 2.0 theory and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1993-06-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1992). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. In Version 2.0, GWSCREEN has incorporated an additional source model to calculate the impacts to groundwater resulting from the release to percolation ponds. In addition, transport of radioactive progeny has also been incorporated. GWSCREEN has shown comparable results when compared against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.

  10. GWSCREEN: A Semi-analytical Model for Assessment of the Groundwater Pathway from Surface or Buried Contamination, Theory and User's Manual, Version 2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, Arthur South

    1998-08-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non-radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The code calculates 1) the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded, 2) peak aquifer concentration and associated human health impacts, and 3) aquifer concentrations and associated human health impacts as a function of time and space. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, vertical contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and 2D or 3D contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. In Version 2.5, transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow or dispersive solution model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Three source models are included; leaching from a surface or buried source, infiltration pond, or user-defined arbitrary release. Dispersion in the aquifer may be described by fixed dispersivity values or three, spatial-variable dispersivity functions. Version 2.5 also includes a Monte Carlo sampling routine for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis and a preprocessor to allow multiple input files and multiple contaminants to be run in a single simulation. GWSCREEN has been validated against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. The code was originally designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data are limited. It was intended to simulate relatively simple

  11. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination. Theory and user's manual, Version 2.0: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimedia exposure assessment of hazardous chemicals and radionuclides requires that all pathways of exposure be investigated. The GWSCREEN model was designed to perform initial screening calculations for groundwater pathway impacts resulting from the leaching of surficial and buried contamination at CERCLA sites identified as low probability hazard at the INEL. In Version 2.0, an additional model was added to calculate impacts to groundwater from the operation of a percolation pond. The model was designed to make best use of the data that would potentially be available. These data include the area and depth of contamination, sorptive properties and solubility limit of the contaminant, depth to aquifer, and the physical properties of the aquifer (porosity, velocity, and dispersivity). For the pond model, data on effluent flow rates and operation time are required. Model output includes the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. Also, groundwater concentration as a function of time may be calculated. The model considers only drinking water consumption and does not include the transfer of contamination to food products due to irrigation with contaminated water. Radiological dose, carcinogenic risk, and the hazard quotient are calculated for the peak time using the user-defined input mass (or activity). Appendices contain sample problems and the source code listing

  12. An integrated assessment modelling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, E.; Scott, J. R.; Sokolov, A. P.; Forest, C. E.; Schlosser, C. A.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes an integrated assessment modelling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an earth system model of intermediate complexity to a human activity model, is linked to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). Since the MIT IGSM-CAM framework (version 1.0) incorporates a human activity model, it is possible to analyse uncertainties in emissions resulting from both uncertainties in the economic model parameters and uncertainty in future climate policies. Another major feature is the flexibility to vary key climate parameters controlling the climate system response: climate sensitivity, net aerosol forcing and ocean heat uptake rate. Thus, the IGSM-CAM is a computationally efficient framework to explore the uncertainty in future global and regional climate change associated with uncertainty in the climate response and projected emissions. This study presents 21st century simulations based on two emissions scenarios (unconstrained scenario and stabilization scenario at 660 ppm CO2-equivalent) and three sets of climate parameters. The chosen climate parameters provide a good approximation for the median, and the 5th and 95th percentiles of the probability distribution of 21st century global climate change. As such, this study presents new estimates of the 90% probability interval of regional climate change for different emissions scenarios. These results underscore the large uncertainty in regional climate change resulting from uncertainty in climate parameters and emissions, especially when it comes to changes in precipitation.

  13. An integrated assessment modelling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Monier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an integrated assessment modelling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM, an integrated assessment model that couples an earth system model of intermediate complexity to a human activity model, is linked to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM. Since the MIT IGSM-CAM framework (version 1.0 incorporates a human activity model, it is possible to analyse uncertainties in emissions resulting from both uncertainties in the economic model parameters and uncertainty in future climate policies. Another major feature is the flexibility to vary key climate parameters controlling the climate system response: climate sensitivity, net aerosol forcing and ocean heat uptake rate. Thus, the IGSM-CAM is a computationally efficient framework to explore the uncertainty in future global and regional climate change associated with uncertainty in the climate response and projected emissions. This study presents 21st century simulations based on two emissions scenarios (unconstrained scenario and stabilization scenario at 660 ppm CO2-equivalent and three sets of climate parameters. The chosen climate parameters provide a good approximation for the median, and the 5th and 95th percentiles of the probability distribution of 21st century global climate change. As such, this study presents new estimates of the 90% probability interval of regional climate change for different emissions scenarios. These results underscore the large uncertainty in regional climate change resulting from uncertainty in climate parameters and emissions, especially when it comes to changes in precipitation.

  14. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  15. Forsmark - site descriptive model version 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 2002, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is starting investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian basement of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Forsmark, which lies in the municipality of Oesthammar, on the east coast of Sweden, about 150 kilometres north of Stockholm. The site description should present all collected data and interpreted parameters of importance for the overall scientific understanding of the site, for the technical design and environmental impact assessment of the deep repository, and for the assessment of long-term safety. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. The site descriptive models are devised and stepwise updated as the site investigations proceed. The point of departure for this process is the regional site descriptive model, version 0, which is the subject of the present report. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. This information, with the exception of data from tunnels and drill holes at the sites of the Forsmark nuclear reactors and the underground low-middle active radioactive waste storage facility, SFR, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. For this reason, the Forsmark site descriptive model, version 0, as detailed in the present report, has been developed at a regional scale. It covers a rectangular area, 15 km in a southwest-northeast and 11 km in a northwest-southeast direction, around the

  16. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, E.; Scott, J. R.; Sokolov, A. P.; Forest, C. E.; Schlosser, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to a human activity model, is linked to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). Since the MIT IGSM-CAM framework (version 1.0) incorporates a human activity model, it is possible to analyze uncertainties in emissions resulting from both uncertainties in the underlying socio-economic characteristics of the economic model and in the choice of climate-related policies. Another major feature is the flexibility to vary key climate parameters controlling the climate system response to changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols concentrations, e.g., climate sensitivity, ocean heat uptake rate, and strength of the aerosol forcing. The IGSM-CAM is not only able to realistically simulate the present-day mean climate and the observed trends at the global and continental scale, but it also simulates ENSO variability with realistic time scales, seasonality and patterns of SST anomalies, albeit with stronger magnitudes than observed. The IGSM-CAM shares the same general strengths and limitations as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3) models in simulating present-day annual mean surface temperature and precipitation. Over land, the IGSM-CAM shows similar biases to the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) version 3, which shares the same atmospheric model. This study also presents 21st century simulations based on two emissions scenarios (unconstrained scenario and stabilization scenario at 660 ppm CO2-equivalent) similar to, respectively, the Representative Concentration Pathways RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 scenarios, and three sets of climate parameters. Results of the simulations with the chosen

  17. ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES DATABASES IN CAP88 MAINFRAME VERSION 1.0 AND WINDOWS-BASED VERSION 3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Lee, P.; Jannik, T.; Donnelly, E.

    2008-09-16

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as Version 1.0 on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based Version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, thirty-five radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, one hundred and twenty-two radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  18. Forsmark - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    During 2002, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is starting investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian basement of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Forsmark, which lies in the municipality of Oesthammar, on the east coast of Sweden, about 150 kilometres north of Stockholm. The site description should present all collected data and interpreted parameters of importance for the overall scientific understanding of the site, for the technical design and environmental impact assessment of the deep repository, and for the assessment of long-term safety. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. The site descriptive models are devised and stepwise updated as the site investigations proceed. The point of departure for this process is the regional site descriptive model, version 0, which is the subject of the present report. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. This information, with the exception of data from tunnels and drill holes at the sites of the Forsmark nuclear reactors and the underground low-middle active radioactive waste storage facility, SFR, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. For this reason, the Forsmark site descriptive model, version 0, as detailed in the present report, has been developed at a regional scale. It covers a rectangular area, 15 km in a southwest-northeast and 11 km in a northwest-southeast direction, around the

  19. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  20. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  1. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model. Version 2

    OpenAIRE

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model. In second version of...

  2. A Functional Version of the ARCH Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hormann, Siegfried; Reeder, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in data acquisition and processing techniques have lead to an almost continuous flow of information for financial data. High resolution tick data are available and can be quite conveniently described by a continuous time process. It is therefore natural to ask for possible extensions of financial time series models to a functional setup. In this paper we propose a functional version of the popular ARCH model. We will establish conditions for the existence of a strictly stationary solution, derive weak dependence and moment conditions, show consistency of the estimators and perform a small empirical study demonstrating how our model matches with real data.

  3. A version management model of PDM system and its realization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shi-sheng; LI Tao

    2008-01-01

    Based on the key function of version management in PDM system, this paper discusses the function and the realization of version management and the transitions of version states with a workflow. A directed acy-clic graph is used to describe a version model. Three storage modes of the directed acyclic graph version model in the database, the bumping block and the PDM working memory are presented and the conversion principle of these three modes is given. The study indicates that building a dynamic product structure configuration model based on versions is the key to resolve the problem. Thus a version model of single product object is built. Then the version management model in product structure configuration is built and the apphcation of version manage-ment of PDM syste' is presented as a case.

  4. Development of the short version of the informal caregiver burden assessment questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE to create a reduced version of the QASCI, which is structurally equivalent to the long one and meets the criteria of reliability and validity. METHOD Through secondary data from previous studies, the participants were divided into two samples, one for the development of reduced version and the second for study of the factorial validity. Participants responded to QASCI, the SF 36, the ADHS and demographic questions. RESULTS A reduced version of 14 items showed adequate psychometric properties of validity and internal consistency, adapted to a heptadimensional structure that assesses positive and negative aspects of care. CONCLUSION Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a good fit with the advocated theoretical model.

  5. The FAMOUS climate model (versions XFXWB and XFHCC: description update to version XDBUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Smith

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, based on version 4.5 of the UK MetOffice Unified Model. Here we update the model description to account for changes in the model as it is used in the CMIP5 EMIC model intercomparison project (EMICmip and a number of other studies. Most of these changes correct errors found in the code. The EMICmip version of the model (XFXWB has a better-conserved water budget and additional cooling in some high latitude areas, but otherwise has a similar climatology to previous versions of FAMOUS. A variant of XFXWB is also described, with changes to the dynamics at the top of the model which improve the model climatology (XFHCC.

  6. The FAMOUS climate model (versions XFXWB and XFHCC): description update to version XDBUA

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R S

    2012-01-01

    FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, based on version 4.5 of the UK MetOffice Unified Model. Here we update the model description to account for changes in the model as it is used in the CMIP5 EMIC model intercomparison project (EMICmip) and a number of other studies. Most of these changes correct errors found in the code. The EMICmip version of the model (XFXWB) has a better-conserved water budget and additional c...

  7. The FAMOUS climate model (versions XFXWB and XFHCC): description update to version XDBUA

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R S

    2011-01-01

    FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, based on version 4.5 of the UK MetOffice Unified Model. Here we update the model description to account for changes in the model as it is used in the CMIP5 EMIC model intercomparison project (EMICmip) and a number of other studies. Most of these changes correct errors found in the code. The EMICmip version of the model (XFXWB) has a better-conserved water budget and additional cooling in some high latitude areas,...

  8. Comparison of two software versions for assessment of body-composition analysis by DXA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, B; Wang, J; Weyer, C;

    2001-01-01

    To compare two software versions provided by Lunar CO: for assessment of body composition analysis by DXA.......To compare two software versions provided by Lunar CO: for assessment of body composition analysis by DXA....

  9. A SERVICE VERSIONING MODEL FOR PERSONALIZED E- LEARNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PALANIVEL,

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Service Versioning is a hot topic that has generated a broad range of guidance from a variety of sources. Several Web services standardization efforts are underway but none of them address the problem of service versioning. Service versioning with metadata in e-learning system makes easy search, retrieval, import and evaluate. In Elearning systems, learning objects with metadata allow the learners to use quality educational contents filling their characteristic and teacher may use quality educational contents to structure their courses. A service versioning model in e-learning objects system with metadata satisfies the requirements for learningenvironment. In personalized e-learning systems, when more numbers of learner searching data the retrieval time is being delayed when the data volume is increasing continuously. This problem can be solved bydesigning and applying a proper service versioning model to ersonalized e-learning systems. Hence, it is proposed to design a service version model with metadata for personalized e-learning system. This proposed service versioning model satisfies some of the requirements like accessibility, interoperability, adaptability,durability and reusability in learning environment. Support multiple versions of a service isolate more expensive business behavior calls to specific versions so as to reduce impact to all of the other learners.

  10. A computationally tractable version of the collective model

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, D J

    2003-01-01

    A computationally tractable version of the Bohr-Mottelson collective model is presented which makes it possible to diagonalize realistic collective models and obtain convergent results in relatively small appropriately chosen subspaces of the collective model Hilbert space. Special features of the proposed model is that it makes use of the beta wave functions given analytically by the softened-beta version of the Wilets-Jean model, proposed by Elliott et al., and a simple algorithm for comput...

  11. Guide for Regional Integrated Assessments: Handbook of Methods and Procedures, Version 5.1. Appendix 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Jones, James W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Antle, John; Ruane, Alex; Boote, Ken; Thorburn, Peter; Valdivia, Roberto; Porter, Cheryl; Janssen, Sander; Mutter, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to describe recommended methods for a trans-disciplinary, systems-based approach for regional-scale (local to national scale) integrated assessment of agricultural systems under future climate, bio-physical and socio-economic conditions. An earlier version of this Handbook was developed and used by several AgMIP Regional Research Teams (RRTs) in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and South Asia (SA)(AgMIP handbook version 4.2, www.agmip.org/regional-integrated-assessments-handbook/). In contrast to the earlier version, which was written specifically to guide a consistent set of integrated assessments across SSA and SA, this version is intended to be more generic such that the methods can be applied to any region globally. These assessments are the regional manifestation of research activities described by AgMIP in its online protocols document (available at www.agmip.org). AgMIP Protocols were created to guide climate, crop modeling, economics, and information technology components of its projects.

  12. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination. Theory and user`s manual, Version 2.0: Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1994-06-01

    Multimedia exposure assessment of hazardous chemicals and radionuclides requires that all pathways of exposure be investigated. The GWSCREEN model was designed to perform initial screening calculations for groundwater pathway impacts resulting from the leaching of surficial and buried contamination at CERCLA sites identified as low probability hazard at the INEL. In Version 2.0, an additional model was added to calculate impacts to groundwater from the operation of a percolation pond. The model was designed to make best use of the data that would potentially be available. These data include the area and depth of contamination, sorptive properties and solubility limit of the contaminant, depth to aquifer, and the physical properties of the aquifer (porosity, velocity, and dispersivity). For the pond model, data on effluent flow rates and operation time are required. Model output includes the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. Also, groundwater concentration as a function of time may be calculated. The model considers only drinking water consumption and does not include the transfer of contamination to food products due to irrigation with contaminated water. Radiological dose, carcinogenic risk, and the hazard quotient are calculated for the peak time using the user-defined input mass (or activity). Appendices contain sample problems and the source code listing.

  13. GCFM Users Guide Revision for Model Version 5.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keimig, Mark A.; Blake, Coleman

    1981-08-10

    This paper documents alterations made to the MITRE/DOE Geothermal Cash Flow Model (GCFM) in the period of September 1980 through September 1981. Version 4.0 of GCFM was installed on the computer at the DOE San Francisco Operations Office in August 1980. This Version has also been distributed to about a dozen geothermal industry firms, for examination and potential use. During late 1980 and 1981, a few errors detected in the Version 4.0 code were corrected, resulting in Version 4.1. If you are currently using GCFM Version 4.0, it is suggested that you make the changes to your code that are described in Section 2.0. User's manual changes listed in Section 3.0 and Section 4.0 should then also be made.

  14. Solar Advisor Model User Guide for Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Janzou, S.; Cameron, C.

    2008-08-01

    The Solar Advisor Model (SAM) provides a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, from photovoltaic systems for residential and commercial markets to concentrating solar power and large photovoltaic systems for utility markets. This manual describes Version 2.0 of the software, which can model photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies for electric applications for several markets. The current version of the Solar Advisor Model does not model solar heating and lighting technologies.

  15. The integrated Earth System Model Version 1: formulation and functionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, William D.; Craig, Anthony P.; Truesdale, John E.; Di Vittorio, Alan; Jones, Andrew D.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.; Thomson, Allison M.; Patel, Pralit L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Chini, Louise M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-07-23

    The integrated Earth System Model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for pro- jecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) and an Earth System Model (ESM) into a common modeling in- frastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the human–Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species, land use and land cover change, and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. The iESM project integrates the economic and human dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a sin- gle simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore- omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific under- standing of the human–Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper de- scribes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.

  16. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling, Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, Patrick W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  17. Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, Richard; Hong, Makiko

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazards pose significant threats to the public safety and economic health of many communities throughout the world. Community leaders and decision-makers continually face the challenges of planning and allocating limited resources to invest in protecting their communities against catastrophic losses from natural-hazard events. Public efforts to assess community vulnerability and encourage loss-reduction measures through mitigation often focused on either aggregating site-specific estimates or adopting standards based upon broad assumptions about regional risks. The site-specific method usually provided the most accurate estimates, but was prohibitively expensive, whereas regional risk assessments were often too general to be of practical use. Policy makers lacked a systematic and quantitative method for conducting a regional-scale risk assessment of natural hazards. In response, Bernknopf and others developed the portfolio model, an intermediate-scale approach to assessing natural-hazard risks and mitigation policy alternatives. The basis for the portfolio-model approach was inspired by financial portfolio theory, which prescribes a method of optimizing return on investment while reducing risk by diversifying investments in different security types. In this context, a security type represents a unique combination of features and hazard-risk level, while financial return is defined as the reduction in losses resulting from an investment in mitigation of chosen securities. Features are selected for mitigation and are modeled like investment portfolios. Earth-science and economic data for the features are combined and processed in order to analyze each of the portfolios, which are then used to evaluate the benefits of mitigating the risk in selected locations. Ultimately, the decision maker seeks to choose a portfolio representing a mitigation policy that maximizes the expected return-on-investment, while minimizing the uncertainty associated with that return

  18. Groundwater flow and transport modelling during the temperate period for the SR-Can assessment. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Hoch, Andrew; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steve; McCarthy, Rachel; Rodwell, William; Swift, Ben [Serco Assurance, Harwell (United Kingdom); Marsic, Niko [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    The focus of the study described in this report has been to perform numerical simulations of the geosphere from post-closure and throughout the temperate period up until the beginning of the next permafrost period around 9,000 AD. Together with providing quantitative results for the immediate temperate period following post-closure, these results are also intended to give a qualitative indication of the evolution of the groundwater system during future temperate periods within an ongoing cycle of glacial/inter-glacial events. Additional calculations were performed to assess the impact of the effects of gas and heat generation in the repository on groundwater flow.

  19. Groundwater flow and transport modelling during the temperate period for the SR-Can assessment. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of the study described in this report has been to perform numerical simulations of the geosphere from post-closure and throughout the temperate period up until the beginning of the next permafrost period around 9,000 AD. Together with providing quantitative results for the immediate temperate period following post-closure, these results are also intended to give a qualitative indication of the evolution of the groundwater system during future temperate periods within an ongoing cycle of glacial/inter-glacial events. Additional calculations were performed to assess the impact of the effects of gas and heat generation in the repository on groundwater flow

  20. An Open Platform for Processing IFC Model Versions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Nour; Karl Beucke

    2008-01-01

    The IFC initiative from the International Alliance of Interoperability has been developing since the mid-nineties through several versions.This paper addresses the problem of binding the growing number of IFC versions and their EXPRESS definitions to programming environments (Java and.NET).The solution developed in this paper automates the process of generating early binding classes,whenever a new version of the IFC model is released.Furthermore, a runtime instantiation of the generated eady binding classes takes place by importing IFC-STEP ISO 10303-P21 models.The user can navigate the IFC STEP model with relevance to the defining EXPRESS-schema,modify,deletem,and create new instances.These func-tionalities are considered to be a basis for any IFC based implementation.It enables researchers to experi-ment the IFC model independently from any software application.

  1. Assessment and Consequences of the Delayed Breakup of the Antarctic Polar Vortex in Two Versions of the GEOS Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, M.M.; Newman, P.A.; Li, F.

    2008-01-01

    In mid-winter, winds circle the globe at speeds greater than 200 km/hr (approximately 130mph) in the middle atmosphere. This strong jet bounds the region known as the polar vortex. The presence of the Antarctic polar vortex is a key ingredient in the formation of the 'ozone hole', because the air inside the vortex is cold and isolated from lower latitudes, creating ideal conditions for large-scale chemical ozone depletion. Many atmospheric models are not able to reproduce observed winds in the middle atmosphere. Specifically, the polar vortices tend to break down too late and peak wind speeds are higher than observed. Hurwitz et al. find that the delayed break-up of the Antarctic polar vortex is due to weaker-than-observed wave driving from the lower atmosphere during the October-November period. The delayed break-up of the Antarctic polar vortex changes the temperature structure of the middle atmosphere, which biases the amount of chemical ozone depletion that can occur in late winter and spring. Also, the extended lifetime of the polar vortex strengthens the 'overturning' circulation cell in the middle atmosphere, changing the amount of ozone, methane and other chemical species that is transported from low to high latitudes. As greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise, the atmospheric temperature structure and resulting wind structure are expected to change. Clearly, if models cannot duplicate the observed late 20th century high-latitude winds, their ability to simulate the polar vortices in future must be poor. Understanding model weaknesses and improving the modeled polar vortices will be necessary for accurate predictions of ozone recovery in the coming century.

  2. METAPHOR (version 1): Users guide. [performability modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furchtgott, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    General information concerning METAPHOR, an interactive software package to facilitate performability modeling and evaluation, is presented. Example systems are studied and their performabilities are calculated. Each available METAPHOR command and array generator is described. Complete METAPHOR sessions are included.

  3. Modified version of the combined model of photonucleon reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A refined version of the combined photonucleon-reaction model is described. This version makes it possible to take into account the effect of structural features of the doorway dipole state on photonucleon reactions in the energy range of Eγ ≤ 30 MeV. In relation to the previous version of the model, the treatment of isospin effects at the preequilibrium and evaporation reaction stages is refined; in addition, the description of the semidirect effect caused by nucleon emission from the doorway dipole state is improved. The model in question is used to study photonucleon reactions on the isotopes 35-56Ca and 102-134Sn in the energy range indicated above

  4. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  5. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, James Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carr, Dorthe B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 SNL IDC Reengineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris V1.1 2/2015 SNL IDC Reengineering Project Team Iteration I2 Review Comments M. Harris

  6. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Dorthe B.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model Survey. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  7. Development of ECOREA-2 VBA version for the assessment of radionuclides' behavior through foodchain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities following an accident into air results in human exposures by intakes of plant products such as rice, vegetables and/or animal products including meat, milk and eggs from contaminated soil. In order to evaluate such exposures from radioactive substances, it is essential to mathematically predict the behavior of these substances in the environments. The ECOREA-II EXCEL VBA version was developed to simulate the behavior of several important radionuclides on foodstuffs and agricutural soil for Korean environment. At first, the code was developed based on currently available model associated with translocation, weathering mechanism and further included a couple of new model such as a growth dilution in a vegetation part and a translocation based on growth of a plant. The primary purpose of the code was to provide a more user-friendly environment such as GUI(Grpahic User Interface). In constrast to the conventional FORTRAN version, this version has a user-friendly interface and is designed for application on personal computers. This is achieved by using the famous spreedsheet program Microsoft Excel for input and output of data. Hence, all model parameters are kept in a single Excel workbook. Detailed calculational procedures for the various model used in the code was developed based on Excel VBA(Visual Basic for Applications) combined with Excel spreadsheets. It is also developed to perform an uncertainty analysis which can estimate the uncertainty of the model results due to parameter uncertainty. The results from the code will be finally transfered to the GIS(Geographical Information System) which displays the predicted results of terrestrial contamination on a digital map. The ECOREA-II Excel VBA version, when more fully developed, is expected to increase the understanding of environmental safety assessment of nuclear facilities following an accident and provide a reasonable regulatory guideline with respect to

  8. Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Song; NIU Hui-xia; ZHAO Lu; GAO Yuan; LU Jia-meng; SHI Chang-he; Chandra Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Background The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was shown to be a reliable and valid measurement for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA).The Brazilian version and the Japanese version of SARAwere favorable for good reliability and validity.This study aimed to translate SARA into Chinese and test its reliability and validity in measurement of cerebellar ataxia.Methods SARA was translated into Chinese.A total 39 patients with degeneration cerebellar ataxia were evaluated independently by two neurologists with the Chinese version of SARA.Then the patients were evaluated by one of above neurologists with International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS).The statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows.Results The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA was 0.78,which represents a good internal consistence.The correlation coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA scores between the two evaluators was 0.86,illustrating that the inter-rater reliability of Chinese version of SARA was good.The correlation coefficient between the Chinese version of SARA and ICARS was 0.91,illustrating that the criterion validity of Chinese version of SARA was not bad.Conclusions The Chinese version of SARA is reliable and effective for the assessment of degeneration cerebellar ataxia.Compared with ICARS,the evaluation of Chinese version of SARA is more objective,the assessment time is shortened,and the maneuverability is better.

  9. COPAT - towards a recommended model version of COSMO-CLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Ivonne; Brienen, Susanne; Eduardo, Bucchignani; Ferrone, Andrew; Geyer, Beate; Keuler, Klaus; Lüthi, Daniel; Mertens, Mariano; Panitz, Hans-Jürgen; Saeed, Sajjad; Schulz, Jan-Peter; Wouters, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    The regional climate model COSMO-CLM is a community model (www.clm-community.com). In close collaboration with the COSMO-consortium the model is further developed by the community members for climate applications. One of the tasks of the community is to give a recommendation on the model version and to evaluate the models performance. The COPAT (Coordinated Parameter Testing) is a voluntary community effort to allow different institutions to carry out model simulations systematically by different institutions in order to test new model options and to find a satisfactory model setup for hydrostatic climate simulations over Europe. We will present the COPAT method used to achieve the latest recommended model version of COSMO-CLM (COSMO5.0_clm6). The simulations cover the EURO-CORDEX domain at two spatial resolutions 0.44° and 0.11°. They used ERAinterim forcing data for the time period of 1979-2000. Interpolated forcing data has been prepared once to ensure that all participating groups used identical forcing. The evaluation of each individual run has been performed for the time period 1981-2000 by using ETOOL and ETOOL-VIS. These tools have been developed within the community to evaluate standard COSMO-CLM output in comparison to observations provided by EOBS and CRU. COPAT was structured in three phases. In Phase 1 all participating institutions performed a reference run on their individual computing platforms and tested the influence of single model options on the results afterwards. Derived from the results of Phase 1 the most promising options were used in combinations in the second phase (Phase 2). These first two phases of COPAT consist of more than 100 simulations with a spatial resolution of 0.44°. Based on the best setup identified in Phase 2 a calibration of eight tuning parameters has been carried out following Bellbrat et al. (2012) in Phase 3. A final simulation with the calibrated parameters has been set up at a higher resolution of 0.11°. The

  10. Fiscal impacts model documentation. Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fiscal Impacts (FI) Model, Version 1.0 was developed under Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program to aid in development of the MRS Reference Site Environmental Document (PNL 5476). It computes estimates of 182 fiscal items for state and local government jurisdictions, using input data from the US Census Bureau's 1981 Survey of Governments and local population forecasts. The model can be adapted for any county or group of counties in the United States

  11. The Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Version of the EB Process Assessment Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Siv; Åhsberg, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study examines whether the psychometric properties of the short version of the Evidence-Based Practice Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS) remain satisfactory when translated and transferred to the context of Swedish welfare services. Method: The Swedish version of EBPPAS was tested on a sample of community-based professionals in…

  12. Exactly separable version of X(5) and related models

    OpenAIRE

    Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; McCutchan, E. A.; Petrellis, D.; Yigitoglu, I.

    2006-01-01

    One-parameter exactly separable versions of the X(5) and X(5)-beta^2 models, labelled as ES-X(5) and ES-X(5)-beta^2 respectively, are derived by using in the Bohr Hamiltonian potentials of the form u(beta)+u(gamma)/beta^2. Unlike X(5), in these models the beta_1 and gamma_1 bands are treated on equal footing. Spacings within the gamma_1 band are well reproduced by both models, while spacings within the beta_1 band are well reproduced only by ES-X(5)-beta^2, for which several nuclei with R_{4/...

  13. Model Versions and Fast Algorithms for Network Epidemiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petter Holme

    2014-01-01

    Network epidemiology has become a core framework for investigating the role of human contact patterns in the spreading of infectious diseases. In network epidemiology, one represents the contact structure as a network of nodes (individuals) connected by links (sometimes as a temporal network where the links are not continuously active) and the disease as a compartmental model (where individuals are assigned states with respect to the disease and follow certain transition rules between the states). In this paper, we discuss fast algorithms for such simulations and also compare two commonly used versions,one where there is a constant recovery rate (the number of individuals that stop being infectious per time is proportional to the number of such people);the other where the duration of the disease is constant. The results show that, for most practical purposes, these versions are qualitatively the same.

  14. Brazilian Version of the Functional Assessment Measure: Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Reliability Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco Jorge, Liliana; Garcia Marchi, Flavia Helena; Portela Hara, Ana Clara; Battistella, Linamara R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Functional Assessment Measure (FAM) into Brazilian Portuguese, and to assess the test-retest reliability. The instrument was translated, back-translated, pretested, and reviewed by a committee. The Brazilian version was assessed in 61 brain-injury patients.…

  15. Assessing doctors' competencies using multisource feedback: validating a Japanese version of the Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool (SPRAT).

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Hatoko; Archer, Julian; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Mori, Rintaro; Nishida, Toshihiko; Kusuda, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    [Objective] To assess the validity and reliability of the Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool (SPRAT) Japanese version for evaluating doctors’ competencies using multisource feedback. [Methods] SPRAT, originally developed in the UK, was translated and validated in three phases: (1) an existing Japanese version of SPRAT was back-translated into English; (2) two expert panel meetings were held to develop and assure content validity in a Japanese setting; (3) the newly devised Japanese SPRAT i...

  16. Assessing doctors’ competencies using multisource feedback: validating a Japanese version of the Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool (SPRAT)

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Hatoko; Archer, Julian; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Mori, Rintaro; Nishida, Toshihiko; Kusuda, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity and reliability of the Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool (SPRAT) Japanese version for evaluating doctors’ competencies using multisource feedback. Methods SPRAT, originally developed in the UK, was translated and validated in three phases: (1) an existing Japanese version of SPRAT was back-translated into English; (2) two expert panel meetings were held to develop and assure content validity in a Japanese setting; (3) the newly devised Japanese SPRAT instr...

  17. Interacting vector boson model and other versions of IBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dyson mapping of interacting vector boson model (IVBM) on the standard IBM with dynamical symmetry U(21) is obtained. This version of IBM contains the S(T=1), D(T=1) and P(T=0) bosons, where T is isospin of bosons. From group theory view point it corresponds to the realization of the Sp(12,R) generators in terms of generators of HW(21)xU(6) group. The problem of elimination of spurious states and Hermitization of this boson representation is discussed. The image of the IVBM Hamiltonian in the space of above mentioned S, D, P-bosons is found. 22 refs

  18. Stochastic hyperfine interactions modeling library-Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacate, Matthew O.; Evenson, William E.

    2016-02-01

    The stochastic hyperfine interactions modeling library (SHIML) provides a set of routines to assist in the development and application of stochastic models of hyperfine interactions. The library provides routines written in the C programming language that (1) read a text description of a model for fluctuating hyperfine fields, (2) set up the Blume matrix, upon which the evolution operator of the system depends, and (3) find the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Blume matrix so that theoretical spectra of experimental techniques that measure hyperfine interactions can be calculated. The optimized vector and matrix operations of the BLAS and LAPACK libraries are utilized. The original version of SHIML constructed and solved Blume matrices for methods that measure hyperfine interactions of nuclear probes in a single spin state. Version 2 provides additional support for methods that measure interactions on two different spin states such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation. Example codes are provided to illustrate the use of SHIML to (1) generate perturbed angular correlation spectra for the special case of polycrystalline samples when anisotropy terms of higher order than A22 can be neglected and (2) generate Mössbauer spectra for polycrystalline samples for pure dipole or pure quadrupole transitions.

  19. a Version-Similarity Based Trust Degree Computation Model for Crowdsourcing Geographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Yijiang

    2016-06-01

    Quality evaluation and control has become the main concern of VGI. In this paper, trust is used as a proxy of VGI quality, a version-similarity based trust degree computation model for crowdsourcing geographic data is presented. This model is based on the assumption that the quality of VGI objects mainly determined by the professional skill and integrity (called reputation in this paper), and the reputation of the contributor is movable. The contributor's reputation is calculated using the similarity degree among the multi-versions for the same entity state. The trust degree of VGI object is determined by the trust degree of its previous version, the reputation of the last contributor and the modification proportion. In order to verify this presented model, a prototype system for computing the trust degree of VGI objects is developed by programming with Visual C# 2010. The historical data of Berlin of OpenStreetMap (OSM) are employed for experiments. The experimental results demonstrate that the quality of crowdsourcing geographic data is highly positive correlation with its trustworthiness. As the evaluation is based on version-similarity, not based on the direct subjective evaluation among users, the evaluation result is objective. Furthermore, as the movability property of the contributors' reputation is used in this presented method, our method has a higher assessment coverage than the existing methods.

  20. Matrix model version of AGT conjecture and generalized Selberg integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Mironov, A; Morozov, And

    2010-01-01

    Operator product expansion (OPE) of two operators in two-dimensional conformal field theory includes a sum over Virasoro descendants of other operator with universal coefficients, dictated exclusively by properties of the Virasoro algebra and independent of choice of the particular conformal model. In the free field model, these coefficients arise only with a special "conservation" relation imposed on the three dimensions of the operators involved in OPE. We demonstrate that the coefficients for the three unconstrained dimensions arise in the free field formalism when additional Dotsenko-Fateev integrals are inserted between the positions of the two original operators in the product. If such coefficients are combined to form an $n$-point conformal block on Riemann sphere, one reproduces the earlier conjectured $\\beta$-ensemble representation of conformal blocks, thus proving this (matrix model) version of the celebrated AGT relation. The statement can also be regarded as a relation between the $3j$-symbols of...

  1. Software Engineering Designs for Super-Modeling Different Versions of CESM Models using DART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluzek, Erik; Duane, Gregory; Tribbia, Joe; Vertenstein, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    The super-modeling approach connects different models together at run time in order to provide run time feedbacks between the models and thus synchronize the models. This method reduces model bias further than after-the-fact averaging of model outputs. We explore different designs to connect different configurations and versions of an IPCC class climate model - the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We build on the Data Assimilation Research Test-bed (DART) software to provide data assimilation from truth as well as to provide a software framework to link different model configurations together. We show a system building on DART that uses a Python script to do simple nudging between three versions of the atmosphere model in CESM (the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) versions three, four and five).

  2. GLEAM version 3: Global Land Evaporation Datasets and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, B.; Miralles, D. G.; Lievens, H.; van der Schalie, R.; de Jeu, R.; Fernandez-Prieto, D.; Verhoest, N.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial evaporation links energy, water and carbon cycles over land and is therefore a key variable of the climate system. However, the global-scale magnitude and variability of the flux, and the sensitivity of the underlying physical process to changes in environmental factors, are still poorly understood due to limitations in in situ measurements. As a result, several methods have risen to estimate global patterns of land evaporation from satellite observations. However, these algorithms generally differ in their approach to model evaporation, resulting in large differences in their estimates. One of these methods is GLEAM, the Global Land Evaporation: the Amsterdam Methodology. GLEAM estimates terrestrial evaporation based on daily satellite observations of meteorological variables, vegetation characteristics and soil moisture. Since the publication of the first version of the algorithm (2011), the model has been widely applied to analyse trends in the water cycle and land-atmospheric feedbacks during extreme hydrometeorological events. A third version of the GLEAM global datasets is foreseen by the end of 2015. Given the relevance of having a continuous and reliable record of global-scale evaporation estimates for climate and hydrological research, the establishment of an online data portal to host these data to the public is also foreseen. In this new release of the GLEAM datasets, different components of the model have been updated, with the most significant change being the revision of the data assimilation algorithm. In this presentation, we will highlight the most important changes of the methodology and present three new GLEAM datasets and their validation against in situ observations and an alternative dataset of terrestrial evaporation (ERA-Land). Results of the validation exercise indicate that the magnitude and the spatiotemporal variability of the modelled evaporation agree reasonably well with the estimates of ERA-Land and the in situ

  3. The Global Mental Health Assessment Tool - Primary Care Version (GMHAT/PC). Development, reliability and validity

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Vimal K; Lepping, Peter; Cummins, Anthony GP; Copeland, John RM; Parhee, Rashmi; Mottram, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The Global Mental Health Assessment Tool – Primary Care Version (GMHAT/PC) is a computerised clinical assessment tool developed to assess and identify a wide range of mental health problems in primary care. It generates a computer diagnosis, a symptom rating, a self-harm risk assessment, and a referral letter. Patients from primary care and community psychiatric outpatient clinics and a small sample of inpatients were interviewed for a period of two months using the GMHAT/PC...

  4. 19-vertex version of the fully frustrated XY model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Yolanda M. M.; Nienhuis, Bernard; Knops, Hubert J. F.; Blöte, Henk W. J.

    1994-07-01

    We investigate a 19-vertex version of the two-dimensional fully frustrated XY (FFXY) model. We construct Yang-Baxter equations for this model and show that there is no solution. Therefore we have chosen a numerical approach based on the transfer matrix. The results show that a coupled XY Ising model is in the same universality class as the FFXY model. We find that the phase coupling over an Ising wall is irrelevant at criticality. This leads to a correction of earlier determinations of the dimension x*h,Is of the Ising disorder operator. We find x*h,Is=0.123(5) and a conformal anomaly c=1.55(5). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the FFXY model behaves as a superposition of an Ising model and an XY model. However, the dimensions associated with the energy, xt=0.77(3), and with the XY magnetization xh,XY~=0.17, refute this hypothesis.

  5. Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the brief version of Kutcher Adolescent Depression Scale – assessment of depression among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Helena Mojs

    2015-02-01

    Validation of Polish version of KADS in a group of students aged 18-24 years has shown its high reliability and content validity. Further studies should be focused on the assessment of the questionnaire criterion validity.

  6. Vendor assessment and software plans: Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preckshot, G.G.; Scott, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    Several previous studies performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have focused on characteristics of software development processes that are important for the development of high-integrity software. These include software reliability (NUREG/CR-6101, Lawrence) and software design factors (NUREG/CR-6294, Lawrence and Preckshot and Ploof and Preckshot). Ploof and Preckshot has been included as Appendix B of this report. In addition, recent analyses of standards important to the development of software for the safety systems of nuclear power plants have indicated the importance of the understanding and use of a complete framework of standards in the development of such software (Scott et. al.). Finally, Preckshot (Appendix A) addressed the assessment of software development processes used by software vendors. The latter work defined a set of steps to be followed in conducting vendor assessments. This report relates, in detail, the vendor assessment steps to the planning audits proposed in NUREG/CR-6101. The correspondence of the vendor assessment steps to the design factor categories of NUREG/CR-6294 is also discussed.

  7. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_SM Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf Helmut; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Chen, Fan; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John; Koster, Randal D.; Smith, E. Brent

    2016-01-01

    close to unity, which would suggest that the magnitude of the modeled errors approximately reflects that of the actual errors. The assessment report also notes several limitations of the "Version 2" L4_SM data product and science algorithm calibration that will be addressed in future releases. Regionally, the time series standard deviation of the normalized O-F residuals deviates considerably from unity, which indicates that the L4_SM assimilation algorithm either over- or under-estimates the actual errors that are present in the system. Planned improvements include revised land model parameters, revised error parameters for the land model and the assimilated SMAP observations, and revised surface meteorological forcing data for the operational period and underlying climatological data. Moreover, a refined analysis of the impact of SMAP observations will be facilitated by the construction of additional variants of the model-only reference data. Nevertheless, the “Version 2” validated release of the L4_SM product is sufficiently mature and of adequate quality for distribution to and use by the larger science and application communities.

  8. Urban Air Quality Assessment Model UAQAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pul WAJ van; Zantvoort EDG van; Leeuw FAAM de; Sluyter RJCF; LLO

    1996-01-01

    The Urban Air Quality Assessment Model (UAQAM) calculates the city concentration caused by city emissions themselves, the so-called city background concentration. Three versions of the model for describing the dispersion were studied: Box, Gifford Hanna (GH) and a combined form of these two (the Box

  9. A Constrained and Versioned Data Model for TEAM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelman, S.; Baru, C.; Chandra, S.; Fegraus, E.; Lin, K.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network (www.teamnetwork.org) is "To generate real time data for monitoring long-term trends in tropical biodiversity through a global network of TEAM sites (i.e. field stations in tropical forests), providing an early warning system on the status of biodiversity to effectively guide conservation action". To achieve this, the TEAM Network operates by collecting data via standardized protocols at TEAM Sites. The standardized TEAM protocols include the Climate, Vegetation and Terrestrial Vertebrate Protocols. Some sites also implement additional protocols. There are currently 7 TEAM Sites with plans to grow the network to 15 by June 30, 2009 and 50 TEAM Sites by the end of 2010. At each TEAM Site, data is gathered as defined by the protocols and according to a predefined sampling schedule. The TEAM data is organized and stored in a database based on the TEAM spatio-temporal data model. This data model is at the core of the TEAM Information System - it consumes and executes spatio-temporal queries, and analytical functions that are performed on TEAM data, and defines the object data types, relationships and operations that maintain database integrity. The TEAM data model contains object types including types for observation objects (e.g. bird, butterfly and trees), sampling unit, person, role, protocol, site and the relationship of these object types. Each observation data record is a set of attribute values of an observation object and is always associated with a sampling unit, an observation timestamp or time interval, a versioned protocol and data collectors. The operations on the TEAM data model can be classified as read operations, insert operations and update operations. Following are some typical operations: The operation get(site, protocol, [sampling unit block, sampling unit,] start time, end time) returns all data records using the specified protocol and collected at the specified site, block

  10. Incremental testing of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Foley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the scientific and structural updates to the latest release of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7 (v4.7 and points the reader to additional resources for further details. The model updates were evaluated relative to observations and results from previous model versions in a series of simulations conducted to incrementally assess the effect of each change. The focus of this paper is on five major scientific upgrades: (a updates to the heterogeneous N2O5 parameterization, (b improvement in the treatment of secondary organic aerosol (SOA, (c inclusion of dynamic mass transfer for coarse-mode aerosol, (d revisions to the cloud model, and (e new options for the calculation of photolysis rates. Incremental test simulations over the eastern United States during January and August 2006 are evaluated to assess the model response to each scientific improvement, providing explanations of differences in results between v4.7 and previously released CMAQ model versions. Particulate sulfate predictions are improved across all monitoring networks during both seasons due to cloud module updates. Numerous updates to the SOA module improve the simulation of seasonal variability and decrease the bias in organic carbon predictions at urban sites in the winter. Bias in the total mass of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 is dominated by overpredictions of unspeciated PM2.5 (PMother in the winter and by underpredictions of carbon in the summer. The CMAQv4.7 model results show slightly worse performance for ozone predictions. However, changes to the meteorological inputs are found to have a much greater impact on ozone predictions compared to changes to the CMAQ modules described here. Model updates had little effect on existing biases in wet deposition predictions.

  11. Incremental testing of the community multiscale air quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Foley

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the scientific and structural updates to the latest release of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7 (v4.7 and points the reader to additional resources for further details. The model updates were evaluated relative to observations and results from previous model versions in a series of simulations conducted to incrementally assess the effect of each change. The focus of this paper is on five major scientific upgrades: (a updates to the heterogeneous N2O5 parameterization, (b improvement in the treatment of secondary organic aerosol (SOA, (c inclusion of dynamic mass transfer for coarse-mode aerosol, (d revisions to the cloud model, and (e new options for the calculation of photolysis rates. Incremental test simulations over the eastern United States during January and August 2006 are evaluated to assess the model response to each scientific improvement, providing explanations of differences in results between v4.7 and previously released CMAQ model versions. Particulate sulfate predictions are improved across all monitoring networks during both seasons due to cloud module updates. Numerous updates to the SOA module improve the simulation of seasonal variability and decrease the bias in organic carbon predictions at urban sites in the winter. Bias in the total mass of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 is dominated by overpredictions of unspeciated PM2.5 (PMother in the winter and by underpredictions of carbon in the summer. The CMAQ v4.7 model results show slightly worse performance for ozone predictions. However, changes to the meteorological inputs are found to have a much greater impact on ozone predictions compared to changes to the CMAQ modules described here. Model updates had little effect on existing biases in wet deposition predictions.

  12. Developmental assessment of the Fort St. Vrain version of the composite HTGR analysis program (CHAP-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP) consists of a model-independent systems analysis mainframe named LASAN and model-dependent linked code modules, each representing a component, subsystem, or phenomenon of an HTGR plant. The Fort St. Vrain version (CHAP-2) includes 21 coded modules that model the neutron kinetics and thermal response of the core; the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor primary coolant system, secondary steam supply system, and balance-of-plant; the actions of the control system and plant protection system; the response of the reactor building; and the relative hazard resulting from fuel particle failure. FSV steady-state and transient plant data are being used to partially verify the component modeling and dynamic simulation techniques used to predict plant response to postulated accident sequences. Results of these preliminary validation efforts are presented showing good agreement between code output and plant data for the portions of the code that have been tested. Plans for further development and assessment as well as application of the validated code are discussed. (author)

  13. Development of environmental dose assessment system (EDAS) code of PC version

    CERN Document Server

    Taki, M; Kobayashi, H; Yamaguchi, T

    2003-01-01

    A computer code (EDAS) was developed to assess the public dose for the safety assessment to get the license of nuclear reactor operation. This code system is used for the safety analysis of public around the nuclear reactor in normal operation and severe accident. This code was revised and composed for personal computer user according to the Nuclear Safety Guidelines reflected the ICRP1990 recommendation. These guidelines are revised by Nuclear Safety Commission on March, 2001, which are 'Weather analysis guideline for the safety assessment of nuclear power reactor', 'Public dose around the facility assessment guideline corresponding to the objective value for nuclear power light water reactor' and 'Public dose assessment guideline for safety review of nuclear power light water reactor'. This code has been already opened for public user by JAERI, and English version code and user manual are also prepared. This English version code is helpful for international cooperation concerning the nuclear safety assessme...

  14. Translation and validation of Hindi version of Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Jain, Veena; Pillai, Rajath;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to translate and validate the oral health-related quality of life assessment tool named Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) into Hindi language for use in the Indian population. METHODOLOGY: The 12-item GOHAI questionnaire was translated into Hindi...... edentulous participants. Age group was also found to be a significant factor for GOHAI scores. CONCLUSION: The Hindi version of GOHAI exhibits acceptable validity and reliability and can be used in the elderly Indian population as a measure of oral health-related quality of life......., back-translated and compared with the original English version. After pilot testing and appropriate changes, the Hindi version was administered to a group of 500 patients visiting the geriatric medicine clinic in All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The questionnaire was re...

  15. Incorporation of detailed eye model into polygon-mesh versions of ICRP-110 reference phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose coefficients for the eye lens reported in ICRP 2010 Publication 116 were calculated using both a stylized model and the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, according to the type of radiation, energy, and irradiation geometry. To maintain consistency of lens dose assessment, in the present study we incorporated the ICRP-116 detailed eye model into the converted polygon-mesh (PM) version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms. After the incorporation, the dose coefficients for the eye lens were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP-116 data. The results showed generally a good agreement between the newly calculated lens dose coefficients and the values of ICRP 2010 Publication 116. Significant differences were found for some irradiation cases due mainly to the use of different types of phantoms. Considering that the PM version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms preserve the original topology of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, it is believed that the PM version phantoms, along with the detailed eye model, provide more reliable and consistent dose coefficients for the eye lens. (paper)

  16. Portuguese-language version of the COPD Assessment Test: validation for use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Pinheiro Ferreira da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To validate a Portuguese-language version of the COPD assessment test (CAT for use in Brazil and to assess the reproducibility of this version. METHODS: This was multicenter study involving patients with stable COPD at two teaching hospitals in the city of Fortaleza, Brazil. Two independent observers (twice in one day administered the Portuguese-language version of the CAT to 50 patients with COPD. One of those observers again administered the scale to the same patients one week later. At baseline, the patients were submitted to pulmonary function testing and the six-minute walk test (6MWT, as well as completing the previously validated Portuguese-language versions of the Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, modified Medical Research Council (MMRC dyspnea scale, and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS. RESULTS: Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.93-0.97; p < 0.001; and ICC = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96-0.98; p < 0.001, respectively. Bland Altman plots showed good test-retest reliability. The CAT total score correlated significantly with spirometry results, 6MWT distance, SGRQ scores, MMRC dyspnea scale scores, and HADS-depression scores. CONCLUSIONS: The Portuguese-language version of the CAT is a valid, reproducible, and reliable instrument for evaluating patients with COPD in Brazil.

  17. Development of the Final Version of the Classification and Assessment of Occupational Dysfunction Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Mutsumi Teraoka; Makoto Kyougoku

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy is involved in disability prevention and health enhancement through the prevention of occupational dysfunction. Although many occupational dysfunction scales exist, no standard method is available for the assessment and classification of occupational dysfunction, which may include occupational imbalance, occupational deprivation, occupational alienation, and occupational marginalization. The purpose of this study was to develop the final version of Classification and Asse...

  18. The validity and reliability study of Turkish version of the multiple intelligences developmental assessment scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten İflazoğlu Saban

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to adapt Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS to Turkish. After examining and confirming equivalency between English and Turkish versions the scale was administered to a sample (1466 participant including undergraduate, graduate students at the Cukurova University and adult in Adana, Turkey. In addition, test-retest reliability was assessed using a sample of undergraduate, graduate and adults in Adana,Turkey (N=100. In order to examine the validity and reliability properties of the scale, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Cronbach Alpha correlation coefficients, corrected item-total correlations and t-tests between items’ means of upper 27%-lower 27% points were used. The final analysis accounted for 41.93 % of the variance under 93 items and 7 factors. The internal consistency coefficient (α = .87 was within ideal ranges. Also results of confirmatory factor analysis show that the model fitness indicator indexes meet the statistical standards [χ2=16558.65 (sd=4164, p<.001, (χ2/sd=3.98, NNFI= 0.95, NFI=0.93, CFI=0.95, IFI= 0.95, RMSEA=0.052, and SRMR= 0.062].

  19. The Chinese version of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale (MIDAS): Mokken scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Watson Roger; Wang Wenru; Ski Chantal F; Thompson David R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hierarchical scales are very useful in clinical practice due to their ability to discriminate precisely between individuals, and the original English version of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale has been shown to contain a hierarchy of items. The purpose of this study was to analyse a Mandarin Chinese translation of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale for a hierarchy of items according to the criteria of Mokken scaling. Data from 180...

  20. Site investigation SFR. Hydrogeological modelling of SFR. Model version 0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations for a planned extension of the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR). A hydrogeological model is developed in three model versions, which will be used for safety assessment and design analyses. This report presents a data analysis of the currently available hydrogeological data from the ongoing Site Investigation SFR (KFR27, KFR101, KFR102A, KFR102B, KFR103, KFR104, and KFR105). The purpose of this work is to develop a preliminary hydrogeological Discrete Fracture Network model (hydro-DFN) parameterisation that can be applied in regional-scale modelling. During this work, the Geologic model had not yet been updated for the new data set. Therefore, all analyses were made to the rock mass outside Possible Deformation Zones, according to Single Hole Interpretation. Owing to this circumstance, it was decided not to perform a complete hydro-DFN calibration at this stage. Instead focus was re-directed to preparatory test cases and conceptual questions with the aim to provide a sound strategy for developing the hydrogeological model SFR v. 1.0. The presented preliminary hydro-DFN consists of five fracture sets and three depth domains. A statistical/geometrical approach (connectivity analysis /Follin et al. 2005/) was performed to estimate the size (i.e. fracture radius) distribution of fractures that are interpreted as Open in geologic mapping of core data. Transmissivity relations were established based on an assumption of a correlation between the size and evaluated specific capacity of geologic features coupled to inflows measured by the Posiva Flow Log device (PFL-f data). The preliminary hydro-DFN was applied in flow simulations in order to test its performance and to explore the role of PFL-f data. Several insights were gained and a few model technical issues were raised. These are summarised in Table 5-1

  1. NETPATH-WIN: an interactive user version of the mass-balance model, NETPATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kadi, A. I.; Plummer, L.N.; Aggarwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    NETPATH-WIN is an interactive user version of NETPATH, an inverse geochemical modeling code used to find mass-balance reaction models that are consistent with the observed chemical and isotopic composition of waters from aquatic systems. NETPATH-WIN was constructed to migrate NETPATH applications into the Microsoft WINDOWS® environment. The new version facilitates model utilization by eliminating difficulties in data preparation and results analysis of the DOS version of NETPATH, while preserving all of the capabilities of the original version. Through example applications, the note describes some of the features of NETPATH-WIN as applied to adjustment of radiocarbon data for geochemical reactions in groundwater systems.

  2. Integrating Cloud Processes in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2014-09-15

    This paper provides a description on the parameterizations of global cloud system in CAM5. Compared to the previous versions, CAM5 cloud parameterization has the following unique characteristics: (1) a transparent cloud macrophysical structure that has horizontally non-overlapped deep cumulus, shallow cumulus and stratus in each grid layer, each of which has own cloud fraction, mass and number concentrations of cloud liquid droplets and ice crystals, (2) stratus-radiation-turbulence interaction that allows CAM5 to simulate marine stratocumulus solely from grid-mean RH without relying on the stability-based empirical empty stratus, (3) prognostic treatment of the number concentrations of stratus liquid droplets and ice crystals with activated aerosols and detrained in-cumulus condensates as the main sources and evaporation-sedimentation-precipitation of stratus condensate as the main sinks, and (4) radiatively active cumulus. By imposing consistency between diagnosed stratus fraction and prognosed stratus condensate, CAM5 is free from empty or highly-dense stratus at the end of stratus macrophysics. CAM5 also prognoses mass and number concentrations of various aerosol species. Thanks to the aerosol activation and the parameterizations of the radiation and stratiform precipitation production as a function of the droplet size, CAM5 simulates various aerosol indirect effects associated with stratus as well as direct effects, i.e., aerosol controls both the radiative and hydrological budgets. Detailed analysis of various simulations revealed that CAM5 is much better than CAM3/4 in the global performance as well as the physical formulation. However, several problems were also identifed, which can be attributed to inappropriate regional tuning, inconsistency between various physics parameterizations, and incomplete model physics. Continuous efforts are going on to further improve CAM5.

  3. Assessment of PTSD in Older Veterans: The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist: Military Version (PCL-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Yarvis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD Checklist: Military Version (PCL-M is a 17-item, self-report measure of PTSD symptomatology in military veterans and provides one total score and four subscale scores for older veterans’ PTSD (re-experiencing, avoiding, numbing, and hyperarousal symptoms. Study subjects are 456 male veterans over 55-years old with deployed experiences selected from a larger survey data by Veterans’ Affairs Canada (VAC. This study found that overall scale reliability was excellent with alpha of .93 and subscale alphas ranging from .81 to .90. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA confirmed the best fit of four first-order factor models. Criterion validity was confirmed through significant associations of the PCL-M scores with well-established measures of depression, substance abuse, and general health indices. The PCL-M is recommended as a reliable and valid tool for the clinical and empirical assessment of screening PTSD symptomatology, specifically related to older veterans military experiences.

  4. A Metric Encoding for Bounded Model Checking (extended version)

    CERN Document Server

    Pradella, Matteo; Pietro, Pierluigi San

    2009-01-01

    In Bounded Model Checking both the system model and the checked property are translated into a Boolean formula to be analyzed by a SAT-solver. We introduce a new encoding technique which is particularly optimized for managing quantitative future and past metric temporal operators, typically found in properties of hard real time systems. The encoding is simple and intuitive in principle, but it is made more complex by the presence, typical of the Bounded Model Checking technique, of backward and forward loops used to represent an ultimately periodic infinite domain by a finite structure. We report and comment on the new encoding technique and on an extensive set of experiments carried out to assess its feasibility and effectiveness.

  5. Structured assessment approach version 1. License submittal document content and format for material control and accounting assessment. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, I.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the second volume, the License Submittal Document Content and Format for Material Control and Accounting Assessment, of a four-volume document. It presents the content and format of the LSD necessary for Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) assessment with the SAA Version 1. The LSD is designed to provide the necessary data input to perform all four stages of analyses associated with the SAA. A full-size but Hypothetical Fuel Cycle Facility (HFCF) is used as an example to illustrate the required input data content and data format and to illustrate the procedure for generating the LSD. Generation of the LSD is the responsibility of the nuclear facility licensee applicant.

  6. The New York PTSD Risk Score for Assessment of Psychological Trauma: Male and Female Versions

    OpenAIRE

    Boscarino, Joseph A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Hoffman, Stuart N; Sartorius, Jennifer; Adams, Richard E.; Figley, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed a new posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) screening instrument – the New York PTSD Risk Score (NYPRS). Since research suggests different PTSD risk factors and outcomes for men and women, in the current study we assessed the suitability of male and female versions of this screening instrument among 3,298 adults exposed to traumatic events. Using diagnostic test methods, including receiver operating curve (ROC) and bootstrap techniques, we examined different prediction ...

  7. Structured assessment approach: Version I. Applied demonstration of output results. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, 1.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility (HFCF) and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the third volume, Applied Demonstration of Output Results, of a four-volume document. It presents the outputs for each of the four levels of the SAA Version 1 computational package. Two types of outputs are discussed: detailed output findings and summary output tables. The summary output tables are used to aggregate the detailed output findings in a condensed form for NRC analyst consumption. Specific output results are presented for an HFCF, which is described in Volume II.

  8. Description of Multimedia Environment Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) version 3.2 modification for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a software tool developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to allow DOE to conduct human health risk analyses nation-wide. This report describes modifications to the MEPAS to meet the requirements of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff in their analyses of Site Decommissioning Management Plan sites. In general, these modifications provide the MEPAS, Version 3.2, with the capability of calculating and reporting annual dose/risk information. Modifications were made to the exposure pathway and health impact modules and the water and atmospheric transport modules. Several example cases used to test the MEPAS, Version 3.2, are also presented. The MEPAS, Version 3.2, also contains a new source-term release component that includes models for estimating contaminant loss from three different types of source zones (contaminated aquifer, contaminated pond/surface impoundment, and contaminated vadose zone) due to decay/degradation, leaching, wind suspension, water erosion, overland flow, and/or volatilization. When multiple loss routes are assumed to occur simultaneously, the models account for their interaction and calculate an appropriate pollutant mass budget to each loss route over time

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Brazilian version of the Eating Assessment Tool - EAT-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maria Inês Rebelo; Remaili, Carla Bogossian; Behlau, Mara

    2013-12-16

    The Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) was conceptually developed in the United States from data collected from 482 patients, for use as a self-administered survey regarding risk identification of dysphagia and symptoms related to clinical response to treatment. The purpose of this study is to present the cultural equivalence of the Brazilian version of the EAT-10. The process followed the Scientific Advisory Committee of Medical Outcome Trust (SACMOT). The questionnaire was translated by two Brazilian bilingual speech-language pathologists, aware of the purpose of this study. A back translation was performed by a third Brazilian speech-language pathologist, bilingual and English teacher that had not participated in the previous stage. After comparing both translations, a final version of the questionnaire was produced and called Instrumento de Autoavaliação da Alimentação (EAT-10). It was administered to 107 adult inpatients of the Hospital São Paulo, cwith request for bedside clinical evaluation of swallow. During the process of translation and cultural adaptation, no item was modified and/or suppressed. The EAT-10 maintained the same structure as the original American English version with ten questions, of which three of functional domain, three of emotional domain and four of physical symptoms domain. The cultural equivalence of the Brazilian version of the EAT-10 was demonstrated, being a score of three points or above it the cutoff for dysphagia risk, also for the Brazilian population.

  10. Development of environmental dose assessment system (EDAS) code of PC version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taki, Mitsumasa; Kikuchi, Masamitsu; Kobayashi, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Takenori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    A computer code (EDAS) was developed to assess the public dose for the safety assessment to get the license of nuclear reactor operation. This code system is used for the safety analysis of public around the nuclear reactor in normal operation and severe accident. This code was revised and composed for personal computer user according to the Nuclear Safety Guidelines reflected the ICRP1990 recommendation. These guidelines are revised by Nuclear Safety Commission on March, 2001, which are 'Weather analysis guideline for the safety assessment of nuclear power reactor', 'Public dose around the facility assessment guideline corresponding to the objective value for nuclear power light water reactor' and 'Public dose assessment guideline for safety review of nuclear power light water reactor'. This code has been already opened for public user by JAERI, and English version code and user manual are also prepared. This English version code is helpful for international cooperation concerning the nuclear safety assessment with JAERI. (author)

  11. Models and Results Database (MAR-D), Version 4. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branham-Haar, K.A.; Dinneen, R.A.; Russell, K.D.; Skinner, N.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (NRC-RES) is presently funding the development of the Models and Results Database (MAR-D) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. MAR-D's primary function is to create a data repository for NUREG-1150 and other permanent data by providing input, conversion, and output capabilities for data used by IRRAS, SARA, SETS, and FRANTIC personal computer (PC) codes. As probabilistic risk assessments and individual plant examinations are submitted to the NRC for review, MAR-D can be used to convert the models and results from the study for use with IRRAS and SARA. Then, these data can be easily accessed by future studies and will be in a form that will enhance the analysis process. This reference manual provides an overview of the function available within MAR-D and step-by-step operating instructions.

  12. The NDFF-EcoGRID logical data model, version 3. - Document version 1.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Arp; G. van Reenen; R. van Seeters; M. Tentij; L.E. Veen; D. Zoetebier

    2011-01-01

    The National Authority for Data concerning Nature has been appointed by the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, and has been assigned the task of making available nature data and of promoting its use. The logical data model described here is intended for everyone in The Netherlands (an

  13. The development and psychometric assessment of the Turkish version of the Nottingham Health Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kücükdeveci, A A; McKenna, S P; Kutlay, S; Gürsel, Y; Whalley, D; Arasil, T

    2000-03-01

    The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) is a widely used measure of perceived health status. The aim of the present study was to adapt the NHP for use in Turkey and to test its psychometric properties. Following translation and testing for its face and content validity, 50 patients with osteoarthritis were interviewed on two occasions. Each interview included administration of the NHP and the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), a measure of functional disability. Test-retest reliability of the new version was satisfactory and comparable with other available language versions. As predicted, high correlations were found between the HAQ and the physical mobility, pain and energy level sections of the NHP and low correlations between the HAQ and emotional reactions, social isolation and sleep, confirming the construct validity of the NHP. It is concluded that the adaptation of the NHP into Turkish was successful but that additional studies are required to assess its suitability for use with other patient populations and its equivalence to other language versions of the measure. PMID:10826123

  14. Validation of the Aster Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 Over the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesch, D.; Oimoen, M.; Danielson, J.; Meyer, D.

    2016-06-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 (GDEM v3) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009 and GDEM Version 2 (v2) in 2011. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v3 was calculated by comparison with more than 23,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the U.S. National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v3 is 8.52 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 8.68 meters for GDEM v2. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v3 mean error of -1.20 meters reflects an overall negative bias in GDEM v3. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover type to provide insight into how GDEM v3 performs in various land surface conditions. While the RMSE varies little across cover types (6.92 to 9.25 meters), the mean error (bias) does appear to be affected by land cover type, ranging from -2.99 to +4.16 meters across 14 land cover classes. These results indicate that in areas where built or natural aboveground features are present, GDEM v3 is measuring elevations above the ground level, a condition noted in assessments of previous GDEM versions (v1 and v2) and an expected condition given the type of stereo-optical image data collected by ASTER. GDEM v3 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v3 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM. The overall validation effort also included an evaluation of the GDEM v3 water mask. In general, the number of distinct water polygons in GDEM v3 is much lower than the number in a reference land cover dataset, but the total areas compare much more closely.

  15. Validation of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model version 3 over the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Meyer, David

    2016-01-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 (GDEM v3) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009 and GDEM Version 2 (v2) in 2011. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v3 was calculated by comparison with more than 23,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the U.S. National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v3 is 8.52 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 8.68 meters for GDEM v2. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v3 mean error of −1.20 meters reflects an overall negative bias in GDEM v3. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover type to provide insight into how GDEM v3 performs in various land surface conditions. While the RMSE varies little across cover types (6.92 to 9.25 meters), the mean error (bias) does appear to be affected by land cover type, ranging from −2.99 to +4.16 meters across 14 land cover classes. These results indicate that in areas where built or natural aboveground features are present, GDEM v3 is measuring elevations above the ground level, a condition noted in assessments of previous GDEM versions (v1 and v2) and an expected condition given the type of stereo-optical image data collected by ASTER. GDEM v3 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v3 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM. The overall validation effort also included an evaluation of the GDEM v3 water mask. In general, the number of distinct water polygons in GDEM v3 is much lower than the number in a reference land cover dataset, but the total areas compare much more closely.

  16. Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Optimization Version 4.0 Functional Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, John; Young, M.; Boley, L.; Garcia, Y.; Saile, L.; Walton, M.; Kerstman, E.; Reyes, D.; Goodenow, D. A.; Myers, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The IMMs ability to assess mission outcome risk levels relative to available resources provides a unique capability to provide guidance on optimal operational medical kit and vehicle resources. Post-processing optimization allows IMM to optimize essential resources to improve a specific model outcome such as maximization of the Crew Health Index (CHI), or minimization of the probability of evacuation (EVAC) or the loss of crew life (LOCL). Mass and or volume constrain the optimized resource set. The IMMs probabilistic simulation uses input data on one hundred medical conditions to simulate medical events that may occur in spaceflight, the resources required to treat those events, and the resulting impact to the mission based on specific crew and mission characteristics. Because IMM version 4.0 provides for partial treatment for medical events, IMM Optimization 4.0 scores resources at the individual resource unit increment level as opposed to the full condition-specific treatment set level, as done in version 3.0. This allows the inclusion of as many resources as possible in the event that an entire set of resources called out for treatment cannot satisfy the constraints. IMM Optimization version 4.0 adds capabilities that increase efficiency by creating multiple resource sets based on differing constraints and priorities, CHI, EVAC, or LOCL. It also provides sets of resources that improve mission-related IMM v4.0 outputs with improved performance compared to the prior optimization. The new optimization represents much improved fidelity that will improve the utility of the IMM 4.0 for decision support.

  17. Estimating Parameters for the PVsyst Version 6 Photovoltaic Module Performance Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Clifford [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We present an algorithm to determine parameters for the photovoltaic module perf ormance model encoded in the software package PVsyst(TM) version 6. Our method operates on current - voltage (I - V) measured over a range of irradiance and temperature conditions. We describe the method and illustrate its steps using data for a 36 cell crystalli ne silicon module. We qualitatively compare our method with one other technique for estimating parameters for the PVsyst(TM) version 6 model .

  18. Evaluation of Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG Version 2 (GAMIL2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lijuan; WANG Bin; DONG Li; LIU Li; SHEN Si; HU Ning; SUN Wenqi

    2013-01-01

    The Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG version 2 (GAMIL2) has been developed through upgrading the deep convection parameterization,cumulus cloud fraction and two-moment cloud microphysical scheme,as well as changing some of the large uncertain parameters.In this paper,its performance is evaluated,and the results suggest that there are some significant improvements in GAMIL2 compared to the previous version GAMIL1,for example,the components of the energy budget at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface; the geographic distribution of shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF); the ratio of stratiform versus total rainfall; the response of atmospheric circulation to the tropical ocean; and the eastward propagation and spatiotemporal structures of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO).Furthermore,the indirect aerosols effect (IAE) is-0.94 W m-2,within the range of 0 to-2 W m-2 given by the IPCC 4th Assessment Report (2007).The influence of uncertain parameters on the MJO and radiation fluxes is also discussed.

  19. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). Version 3.5, Quick Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.

    1992-10-01

    This Reference Guide contains instructions on how to install and use Version 3.5 of the NRC-sponsored Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The NUCLARR data management system is contained in compressed files on the floppy diskettes that accompany this Reference Guide. NUCLARR is comprised of hardware component failure data (HCFD) and human error probability (HEP) data, both of which are available via a user-friendly, menu driven retrieval system. The data may be saved to a file in a format compatible with IRRAS 3.0 and commercially available statistical packages, or used to formulate log-plots and reports of data retrieval and aggregation findings.

  20. Development and assessment of a modified version of RELAP5/MOD3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Analytis, G.T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    A summary of a number of modifications introduced in RELAP/MOD3 is presented. These include implementation of different heat transfer packages for different processes, modification of the low mass-flux Groeneveld CHF look-up table and of the dispersed flow interfacial area (and shear) as well as of the criterion for transition into and out from this regime, elimination of the under-relaxation schemes of the interfacial closure coefficients etc. The modified code is assessed against a number of separate-effect and integral test experiments and in contrast to the frozen version, is shown to result in physically sound predictions which are close to the measurements.

  1. An abbreviated version of the brief assessment of cognition in schizophrenia (BACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD Yasuhiro Kaneda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A short version of the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS was derived. Methods: We calculated the corrected item-total correlation (CITC for each test score relative to the composite score, and then computed the proportion of variance that each test shares with the global score excluding that test (Rt² = CITCt² and the variance explained per minute of administration time for each test (Rt²/mint. Results and Conclusions: The 3 tests with the highest Rt²/mint, Symbol Coding, Digit Sequencing, and Token Motor, were selected for the Abbreviated BACS.

  2. Assessing doctors’ competencies using multisource feedback: validating a Japanese version of the Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool (SPRAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hatoko; Archer, Julian; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Mori, Rintaro; Nishida, Toshihiko; Kusuda, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity and reliability of the Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool (SPRAT) Japanese version for evaluating doctors’ competencies using multisource feedback. Methods SPRAT, originally developed in the UK, was translated and validated in three phases: (1) an existing Japanese version of SPRAT was back-translated into English; (2) two expert panel meetings were held to develop and assure content validity in a Japanese setting; (3) the newly devised Japanese SPRAT instrument was tested by a multisource feedback survey, validity was tested using principal component factor analysis, and reliability was assessed using generalisability and decision studies based on generalisability theory. Results 86 doctors who had been practising for between 2 and 33 years participated as assessees and were evaluated with the SPRAT tool. First, the doctors identified 1019 potential assessors who were each sent SPRAT forms (response rate, 81%). The mean number of assessors per doctor was 9.7 (SD=2.5). The decision study showed that 95% CIs of ±0.5 were achieved with only 5 assessors. 85 of the 86 doctors achieved scores that could be placed with 95% CI above the 4 expected standard. Doctors received lower scores from more senior assessors (pAssessor selection remains a primary concern, as the assessment scores are affected by the seniority of the assessor, the length of the assessor–assessee working relationship, and the assessor's job role. Users of the SPRAT tool need to be aware of these limitations when administering the instrument. PMID:26078310

  3. Diagram Predicate Framework meets Model Versioning and Deep Metamodelling

    OpenAIRE

    Rossini, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Model-driven engineering (MDE) is a branch of software engineering which aims at improving the productivity, quality and cost-effectiveness of software by shifting the paradigm from code-centric to model-centric. MDE promotes models and modelling languages as the main artefacts of the development process and model transformation as the primary technique to generate (parts of) software systems out of models. Models enable developers to reason at a higher level of abstraction, while model trans...

  4. Implementing an HL7 version 3 modeling tool from an Ecore model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánfai, Balázs; Ulrich, Brandon; Török, Zsolt; Natarajan, Ravi; Ireland, Tim

    2009-01-01

    One of the main challenges of achieving interoperability using the HL7 V3 healthcare standard is the lack of clear definition and supporting tools for modeling, testing, and conformance checking. Currently, the knowledge defining the modeling is scattered around in MIF schemas, tools and specifications or simply with the domain experts. Modeling core HL7 concepts, constraints, and semantic relationships in Ecore/EMF encapsulates the domain-specific knowledge in a transparent way while unifying Java, XML, and UML in an abstract, high-level representation. Moreover, persisting and versioning the core HL7 concepts as a single Ecore context allows modelers and implementers to create, edit and validate message models against a single modeling context. The solution discussed in this paper is implemented in the new HL7 Static Model Designer as an extensible toolset integrated as a standalone Eclipse RCP application.

  5. Implementing an HL7 version 3 modeling tool from an Ecore model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánfai, Balázs; Ulrich, Brandon; Török, Zsolt; Natarajan, Ravi; Ireland, Tim

    2009-01-01

    One of the main challenges of achieving interoperability using the HL7 V3 healthcare standard is the lack of clear definition and supporting tools for modeling, testing, and conformance checking. Currently, the knowledge defining the modeling is scattered around in MIF schemas, tools and specifications or simply with the domain experts. Modeling core HL7 concepts, constraints, and semantic relationships in Ecore/EMF encapsulates the domain-specific knowledge in a transparent way while unifying Java, XML, and UML in an abstract, high-level representation. Moreover, persisting and versioning the core HL7 concepts as a single Ecore context allows modelers and implementers to create, edit and validate message models against a single modeling context. The solution discussed in this paper is implemented in the new HL7 Static Model Designer as an extensible toolset integrated as a standalone Eclipse RCP application. PMID:19745289

  6. The Latvian version of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) and the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I; Ruperto, N; Bikis, E; Remberga, S; Saulite, I; Plotkina, N; Viksna, A; Krauca, M; Breca, I; Vikmanis, U

    2001-01-01

    We report herein the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation into the Latvian language of the parent's version of two health related quality of life instruments. The Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) is a disease specific health instrument that measures functional ability in daily living activities in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) is a generic health instrument designed to capture the physical and psychosocial well-being of children independently from the underlying disease. The Latvian CHAQ CHQ were fully validated with 1 forward and 1 backward translations. A total of 141 subjects were enrolled: 80 patients with JIA (16% systemic onset, 32.5% polyarticular onset, 19% extended oligoarticular subtype, and 32.5% persistent oligoarticular subtype) and 61 healthy children. The CHAQ clinically discriminated between healthy subjects and JIA patients, with the systemic, polyarticular and extended oligoarticular subtypes having a higher degree of disability, pain, and a lower overall well-being when compared to their healthy peers. Also the CHQ clinically discriminated between healthy subjects and JIA patients, with the systemic onset, polyarticular onset and extended oligoarticular subtypes having a lower physical and psychosocial well-being when compared to their healthy peers. In conclusion the Latvian version of the CHAQ-CHQ is a reliable, and valid tool for the functional, physical and psychosocial assessment of children with JIA.

  7. A Dynamic Probabilistic Version of the Aoki-Yoshikawa Sectoral Productivity Model

    OpenAIRE

    Scalas, Enrico; Garibaldi, Ubaldo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the authors explore a dynamical version of the Aoki and Yoshikawa model (AYM) for an economy driven by demand. They show that when an appropriate Markovian dynamics is taken into account, the AYM has different equilibrium distributions depending on the form of transition probabilities. In the version of the dynamic AYM presented here, transition probabilities depend on a parameter c tuning the choice of a new sector for workers leaving their sector. The solution of Aoki and Yos...

  8. Assessment of the Greek worry-related metacognitions: the Greek version of the Metacognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typaldou, G M; Konstantakopoulos, G; Roxanis, I; Nidos, A; Vaidakis, N; Papadimitriou, G N; Wells, A

    2014-01-01

    The Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30), developed by Wells and Cartwright-Hatton (2004), represents a multidimensional measure of metacognitive factors considered to be important in the metacognitive model of psychological disorders. The primary aim of the present study was to examine internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity and the factor structure of the Greek version of the MCQ-30. Moreover, we investigated the associations of the extracted factors with trait anxiety in a Greek sample. The study sample consisted of 547 non-clinical participants (213 males and 334 females). All participants completed the Greek version of the MCQ-30. A subsample of 157 participants also completed the Trait Anxiety subscale of the State -Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Meta-worry subscale of the Anxious Thought Inventory. Thirty participants were retested with the MCQ-30 over a retest interval ranging from three to five weeks. The results confirmed the dimensionality of the MCQ-30 and five factors were extracted consistent with the original English version: (1) positive beliefs about worry, (2) negative beliefs about worry concerning uncontrollability and danger, (3) cognitive confidence, (4) beliefs about the need to control thoughts and the negative consequences of not controlling them, and (5) cognitive selfconsciousness. The MCQ-30 showed high levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The correlation between MCQ-30 total score and AnTI-MW was strong, indicating high level of convergent validity. Moreover, all correlations between MCQ-30 total and subscale scores and STAI-T were significant apart from the correlation between 'cognitive confidence' and trait anxiety. The Greek sample scored higher in the MCQ-30 and its subscales than the English sample in the original study. Women scored significantly higher than men in the overall MCQ-30 and the "uncontrollability and danger" and "need to control thoughts" subscales, whereas no

  9. Developmental assessment of the Fort St. Vrain version of the Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP) consists of a model-independent systems analysis mainframe named LASAN and model-dependent linked code modules, each representing a component, subsystem, or phenomenon of an HTGR plant. The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) version (CHAP-2) includes 21 coded modules that model the neutron kinetics and thermal response of the core; the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor primary coolant system, secondary steam supply system, and balance-of-plant; the actions of the control system and plant protection system; the response of the reactor building; and the relative hazard resulting from fuel particle failure. FSV steady-state and transient plant data are being used to partially verify the component modeling and dynamic smulation techniques used to predict plant response to postulated accident sequences

  10. The suicide assessment scale: Psychometric properties of a Norwegian language version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koldsland Bjørn

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rating scales are valuable tools in suicide research and can also be useful supplements to the clinical interview in suicide risk assessments. This study describes the psychometric properties of a Norwegian language version of the Suicide Assessment Scale Self-report version (SUAS-S. Methods Participants were fifty-two patients (mean age = 39.3 years, SD = 10.7 with major depression (53.8%, bipolar disorder (25.0% and/or a personality disorder (63.5% referred to a psychiatric outpatient clinic. The SUAS-S, the screening section of the Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS-5, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck’s Hopelessness Scale (BHS, the Symptom Check-List-90 R (SCL-90R and the Clinical Global Impression for Severity of Suicidality (CGI-SS were administered. One week later, the patients completed the SUAS-S a second time. Results Cronbach’s alpha for SUAS-S was 0.88 and the test–retest reliability was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93– 0.97. SUAS-S was positively correlated with the BSS-5 (r = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.47–0.85 for the study sample as a whole and for the suicidal (r = 0.52 and non-suicidal groups (r = 0.50 respectively. There was no difference between the SUAS-S and the BSS-5 in the ability to identify suicidality. This ability was more pronounced when the suicide risk was high. There was a substantial intercorrelation between the score on the SUAS-S and the BDI (0.81 and the BHS (0.76. The sensitivity and specificity of the SUAS-S was explored and an appropriate clinical cut-off value was assessed. Conclusions The study revealed good internal consistency, test–retest reliability and concurrent validity for the Suicide Assessment Scale Self-report version. The discriminatory ability for suicidality was comparable to that of the BSS-5.

  11. The MiniBIOS model (version 1A4) at the RIVM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijt de Haag PAM; Laheij GMH

    1993-01-01

    This report is the user's guide of the MiniBIOS model, version 1A4. The model is operational at the Laboratory of Radiation Research of the RIVM. MiniBIOS is a simulation model for calculating the transport of radionuclides in the biosphere and the consequential radiation dose to humans. The transp

  12. The MiniBIOS model (version 1A4) at the RIVM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijt de Haag PAM; Laheij GMH

    1993-01-01

    This report is the user's guide of the MiniBIOS model, version 1A4. The model is operational at the Laboratory of Radiation Research of the RIVM. MiniBIOS is a simulation model for calculating the transport of radionuclides in the biosphere and the consequential radiation dose to humans. The

  13. Validation of the Danish version of the Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions questionnaire (PACIC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Vedsted, Peter

    18 or more with type1 or type2 diabetes sampled in a national register of people with diabetes. They were sent a Danish version of the PACIC. Main outcome measures: Data quality (mean, median, item response, missing, floor and ceiling effects), internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha and average...... interitem correlation), item-rest correlations. Model fit from confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results: We present the psychometric properties of the questionnaire and the first results evaluating chronic care in Danish people with diabetes. Conclusions: The complexity of validation is greater when...

  14. Modelling and analysis of Markov reward automata (extended version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guck, Dennis; Timmer, Mark; Hatefi, Hassan; Ruijters, Enno; Stoelinga, Mariëlle

    2014-01-01

    Costs and rewards are important ingredients for cyberphysical systems, modelling critical aspects like energy consumption, task completion, repair costs, and memory usage. This paper introduces Markov reward automata, an extension of Markov automata that allows the modelling of systems incorporating

  15. Diminishing balance model for Islamic home finance: Final version

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Zubair

    2011-01-01

    This brief note supplements the argument of an earlier paper Islamic Home Financing: Current Models and a Proposal from Social Perspective”; it explains that the Diminishing Balance Model for Islamic home financing is operable in a Shari’ah compliant way even without the Islamic Banking laws accommodating the notion of constructive ownership as envisaged earlier. It further clarifies how the new model scores over the models currently being used for the purpose.

  16. Factorial Validity and Invariance Assessment of a Short Version of the Recalled Childhood Gender Identity/Role Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Jaimie F

    2016-04-01

    Recalled childhood gender role/identity is a construct that is related to sexual orientation, abuse, and psychological health. The purpose of this study was to assess the factorial validity of a short version of Zucker et al.'s (2006) "Recalled Childhood Gender Identity/Gender Role Questionnaire" using confirmatory factor analysis and to test the stability of the factor structure across groups (measurement invariance). Six items of the questionnaire were completed online by 1929 participants from a variety of gender identity and sexual orientation groups. Models of the six items loading onto one factor had poor fit for the data. Items were removed for having a large proportion of error variance. Among birth-assigned females, a five-item model had good fit for the data, but there was evidence for differences in scale's factor structure across gender identity, age, level of education, and country groups. Among birth-assigned males, the resulting four-item model did not account for all of the relationship between variables, and modeling for this resulted in a model that was almost saturated. This model also had evidence of measurement variance across gender identity and sexual orientation groups. The models had good reliability and factor score determinacy. These findings suggest that results of previous studies that have assessed recalled childhood gender role/identity may have been susceptible to construct bias due to measurement variance across these groups. Future studies should assess measurement invariance between groups they are comparing, and if it is not found the issue can be addressed by removing variant indicators and/or applying a partial invariance model.

  17. On Application of House's Translation Quality Assessment Model in Chinese-English Translation—A Case Study of Zhang Peiji' English Version of Dreamlike Childhood%从豪斯的翻译质量评估模式看汉英翻译——以《梦》的英译本为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲茹茹

    2015-01-01

    该文以张培基的英译本《梦》(原作者:冰心)为例,旨在从语场、语旨、语式和体裁四个方面验证豪斯的翻译质量评估模式在汉英翻译中的效度和信度.首先,该文对豪斯的模式进行了阐释,然后在此基础上,对原文和译文做了对比分析,最后在分析结果的基础上肯定了该模式的成就但同时也指出了一些不足.%The paper aims to testify the feasibility and validity of Juliane House's translation quality assessment model in Chi-nese-English translation from the aspects of field,tenor,mode,and genre,taking Zhang Peiji's English version of Dreamlike Childhood as an example.It firstly elucidates House's TQA model and then evaluates the translation quality.At last,it points out some defects of this model without denying its achievements.

  18. SSM - SOLID SURFACE MODELER, VERSION 6.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goza, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Surface Modeler (SSM) is an interactive graphics software application for solid-shaded and wireframe three- dimensional geometric modeling. It enables the user to construct models of real-world objects as simple as boxes or as complex as Space Station Freedom. The program has a versatile user interface that, in many cases, allows mouse input for intuitive operation or keyboard input when accuracy is critical. SSM can be used as a stand-alone model generation and display program and offers high-fidelity still image rendering. Models created in SSM can also be loaded into other software for animation or engineering simulation. (See the information below for the availability of SSM with the Object Orientation Manipulator program, OOM, a graphics software application for three-dimensional rendering and animation.) Models are constructed within SSM using functions of the Create Menu to create, combine, and manipulate basic geometric building blocks called primitives. Among the simpler primitives are boxes, spheres, ellipsoids, cylinders, and plates; among the more complex primitives are tubes, skinned-surface models and surfaces of revolution. SSM also provides several methods for duplicating models. Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) is one of the most powerful model manipulation tools provided by SSM. The CSG operations implemented in SSM are union, subtraction and intersection. SSM allows the user to transform primitives with respect to each axis, transform the camera (the user's viewpoint) about its origin, apply texture maps and bump maps to model surfaces, and define color properties; to select and combine surface-fill attributes, including wireframe, constant, and smooth; and to specify models' points of origin (the positions about which they rotate). SSM uses Euler angle transformations for calculating the results of translation and rotation operations. The user has complete control over the modeling environment from within the system. A variety of file

  19. Adaptation and psychometric assessment of the Hebrew version of the Recovery Promoting Relationships Scale (RPRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Galia S; Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Garber-Epstein, Paula; Roe, David

    2014-03-01

    Recovery is supported by relationships that are characterized by human centeredness, empowerment and a hopeful approach. The Recovery Promoting Relationships Scale (RPRS; Russinova, Rogers, & Ellison, 2006) assesses consumer-provider relationships from the consumer perspective. Here we present the adaptation and psychometric assessment of a Hebrew version of the RPRS. The RPRS was translated to Hebrew (RPRS-Heb) using multiple strategies to assure conceptual soundness. Then 216 mental health consumers were administered the RPRS-Heb as part of a larger project initiative implementing illness management and recovery intervention (IMR) in community settings. Psychometric testing included assessment of the factor structure, reliability, and validity using the Hope Scale, the Working Alliance Inventory, and the Recovery Assessment Scale. The RPRS-Heb factor structure replicated the two factor structures found in the original scale with minor exceptions. Reliability estimates were good: Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.94. An estimate of 0.93 for the Recovery-Promoting Strategies factor, and 0.86 for the Core Relationship. Concurrent validity was confirmed using the Working Alliance Scale (rp = .51, p relationships with Hebrew speaking population.

  20. UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MJ Fayer

    2000-06-12

    The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

  1. SALT 2010 Bilingual S/E Version: A Tool for Assessing the Language Production of Bilingual (Spanish/English) Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon F.; Iglesias, Aquiles; Rojas, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the language development of bilingual children can be a challenge--too often, children in the complex process of learning both Spanish and English are under- or over-diagnosed with language disorders. SLPs can change that with "SALT 2010 Bilingual S/E Version" for grades K-3, the first tool to comprehensively assess children's language…

  2. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the hospital-level consumer assessment of health plans survey (R) instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Arah; A.H.A. ten Asbroek; D.M.J. Delnoij; J.S. de Koning; P.J.A. Stam; A.H. Poll; B. Vriens; P.F. Schmidt; N.S. Klazinga

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the reliability and validity of a translated version of the American Hospital-level Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (R) (H-CAHPS) instrument for use in Dutch health care. Data Sources/Study Setting. Primary survey data from adults aged 18 years or more who were recen

  3. Validation Study of the Scale for "Assessment of the Teaching-Learning Process", Student Version (ATLP-S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Jesus; Sander, Paul; Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, M. Carmen; Garcia-Berben, Ana B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The main goal of this study is to evaluate the psychometric and assessment features of the Scale for the "Assessment of the Teaching-Learning Process, Student Version" (ATLP-S), for both practical and theoretical reasons. From an applied point of view, this self-report measurement instrument has been designed to encourage student…

  4. Flipped version of the supersymmetric strongly coupled preon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajfer, S.; Mileković, M.; Tadić, D.

    1989-12-01

    In the supersymmetric SU(5) [SUSY SU(5)] composite model (which was described in an earlier paper) the fermion mass terms can be easily constructed. The SUSY SU(5)⊗U(1), i.e., flipped, composite model possesses a completely analogous composite-particle spectrum. However, in that model one cannot construct a renormalizable superpotential which would generate fermion mass terms. This contrasts with the standard noncomposite grand unified theories (GUT's) in which both the Georgi-Glashow electrical charge embedding and its flipped counterpart lead to the renormalizable theories.

  5. Modeling the complete Otto cycle: Preliminary version. [computer programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the equations and the computer program being developed to model the complete Otto cycle. The program incorporates such important features as: (1) heat transfer, (2) finite combustion rates, (3) complete chemical kinetics in the burned gas, (4) exhaust gas recirculation, and (5) manifold vacuum or supercharging. Changes in thermodynamic, kinetic and transport data as well as model parameters can be made without reprogramming. Preliminary calculations indicate that: (1) chemistry and heat transfer significantly affect composition and performance, (2) there seems to be a strong interaction among model parameters, and (3) a number of cycles must be calculated in order to obtain steady-state conditions.

  6. U.S. Coastal Relief Model - Southern California Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC's U.S. Coastal Relief Model (CRM) provides a comprehensive view of the U.S. coastal zone integrating offshore bathymetry with land topography into a seamless...

  7. A local version of the Hughes model for pedestrian flow

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo, José A.; Martin, Stephan; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2015-01-01

    Roger Hughes proposed a macroscopic model for pedestrian dynamics, in which individuals seek to minimize their travel time but try to avoid regions of high density. One of the basic assumptions is that the overall density of the crowd is known to every agent. In this paper we present a modification of the Hughes model to include local effects, namely limited vision, and a conviction towards decision making. The modified velocity field enables smooth turning and temporary waiting behavior. We ...

  8. Macro System Model (MSM) User Guide, Version 1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.

    2011-09-01

    This user guide describes the macro system model (MSM). The MSM has been designed to allow users to analyze the financial, environmental, transitional, geographical, and R&D issues associated with the transition to a hydrogen economy. Basic end users can use the MSM to answer cross-cutting questions that were previously difficult to answer in a consistent and timely manner due to various assumptions and methodologies among different models.

  9. Parameter Estimation in Rainfall-Runoff Modelling Using Distributed Versions of Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michala Jakubcová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper provides the analysis of selected versions of the particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The tested versions of the PSO were combined with the shuffling mechanism, which splits the model population into complexes and performs distributed PSO optimization. One of them is a new proposed PSO modification, APartW, which enhances the global exploration and local exploitation in the parametric space during the optimization process through the new updating mechanism applied on the PSO inertia weight. The performances of four selected PSO methods were tested on 11 benchmark optimization problems, which were prepared for the special session on single-objective real-parameter optimization CEC 2005. The results confirm that the tested new APartW PSO variant is comparable with other existing distributed PSO versions, AdaptW and LinTimeVarW. The distributed PSO versions were developed for finding the solution of inverse problems related to the estimation of parameters of hydrological model Bilan. The results of the case study, made on the selected set of 30 catchments obtained from MOPEX database, show that tested distributed PSO versions provide suitable estimates of Bilan model parameters and thus can be used for solving related inverse problems during the calibration process of studied water balance hydrological model.

  10. The Assessment of reliability and validity of Persian Version of the Endometriosis Health Profile (EHP-30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Nojomi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Endometriosis Health Profile-30 (EHP-30 is a disease-specific questionnaire to measure the health-related quality of life in patients with endometriosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Endometriosis Health Profile (EHP-30 in women with endometriosis referring to three Gynecology Clinics in Tehran, Iran. Methods: One hundred women (20 to 50 years old with surgically confirmed endometriosis recruited from three outpatient Gynecology Clinics affiliated to the Iran University of Medical Sciences. All 100 patients were asked to complete EHP-30 questionnaire while referring to the Clinics. The findings were analyzed using descriptive statistics, internal reliability consistency, construct validity (using short form-36, which had already been validated in Iran, factor analysis (with principle component analysis method, and item total correlation to assess the validity and reliability of the questionnaire. Results: The internal consistency reliability of the questionnaire was high (Cronbach’s α ranged between 0.80 and 0.93 for core, and 0.78 and 0.90 for modular parts. All items were loaded on their own factors except item 17 (feeling aggressive or violent and item 18 (feeling unwell, which were loaded on pain and social support domains, respectively. Construct validity of EHP-30, established by using SF-36, indicates good correlations in several similar scales of these two questionnaires. Conclusion: The findings of the study demonstrate that Persian version of EHP-30 is a valid and reliable measure to assess the quality of life in women with endometriosis

  11. The Polish version of the Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire: an exploratory structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brytek-Matera, Anna; Rogoza, Radosław

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the study was to validate a Polish version of the Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire (BIAQ). The study included 115 participants with no diagnosis (control group) (Mage = 20.53, SD = 1.80) on which we have based factor analyses, 48 participants diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (Mage = 18.69, SD = 3.52) and 39 participants diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (Mage = 22.28, SD = 3.80). In the current study, we have run confirmatory factor analysis; however, the analysis did not fit the data (CFI = 0.81, RMSEA = 0.09). Three-factor solution (number of factors were chosen basing on parallel analysis and MAP) was assessed using exploratory structural equation modeling approach (extraction: Maximum Likelihood; rotation: Geomin) which appeared to fit the data well (CFI = 0.90, RMSEA = 0.07). Validation with the clinical sample was performed using multi-group ESEM. Since the models achieved only configural level of invariance, we have examined the structure of clinical group with next ESEM model (CFI = 0.95, RMSEA = 0.05). To evaluate internal consistency, we have employed Omega (ω) and Cronbach's α with bootstrapped 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI). The first factor (food and weight preoccupation) was 0.79 (95 % CI = 0.74-0.83), for second factor (social activities) was 0.86 (95 % CI = 0.81-0.90), and for third factor (clothing) was 0.84 (95 % CI = 0.79-0.87). Convergent validity was assessed by correlating the Eating Disorder Inventory and the Body Attitude Test scores. The results have shown that the Polish version of the BIAQ fulfilled basic psychometric criteria and may be used for evaluation of body image avoidance behaviors among Polish women. PMID:26183601

  12. PUMA Version 6 Multiplatform with Facilities to be coupled with other Simulation Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PUMA is a code for nuclear reactor calculation used in all nuclear installations in Argentina for simulation of fuel management, power cycles and transient events by means of spatial kinetic diffusion theory in 3D. For the versions used up to now the WINDOWS platform was used with very good results. Nowadays PUMA must work in different operative systems, LINUX among others, and must also have facilities to be coupled with other models. For this reason this new version was reprogrammed in ADA, language oriented to a safe programming and be found in any operative system. In former versions PUMA was executed through macro instructions written in LOGO. For this version it is possible to use also PYTHON, which makes also possible the access in execution time to internal data of PUMA. The use of PYTHON allows a easy way to couple PUMA with other codes. The possibilities of this new version of PUMA are shown by means of examples of input data and process control using PYTHON and LOGO. It is discussed the implementation of this methodology in other codes to be coupled with PUMA for versions run in WINDOWS and LINUX. (author)

  13. The translation and psychometric assessment of the persian version of the sheehan disability scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Amin-Esmaeili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS assesses disability in four domains of home management, work responsibilities, close relationships and social life. The main objective of this study was to develop the Persian version of the SDS.Two steps of field work followed the Persian translation and cultural adaptation of the tool: First, the internal consistency and convergent validity was examined in 104 clinical cases recruited from inpatient and outpatient psychiatric services, using 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. Then 88 individuals were randomly selected from the adult general population to assess internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and known group validity.In the clinical settings, Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.88 and item-total correlation ranged from 0.71 to 0.78 in various domains. The correlation between SDS and SF-36 (P< 0.001 was significant in all the areas of the performance; and neither of the correlations was statistically significant when SDS and GAF were compared. In the general population study, the SDS met a good internal consistency (α = 0.81 and known group validity, and the inter-rater reliability was perfect for "school/work responsibility ."The Persian translation of the SDS is a simple and short scale, and it seems to be a valid scale for the measurement of disability in clinical settings and in the Iranian general population.

  14. Internet-based Modeling, Mapping, and Analysis for the Greater Everglades (IMMAGE; Version 1.0): web-based tools to assess the impact of sea level rise in south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Paul; Strong, David; Swain, Eric; Decker, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    South Florida's Greater Everglades area is particularly vulnerable to sea level rise, due to its rich endowment of animal and plant species and its heavily populated urban areas along the coast. Rising sea levels are expected to have substantial impacts on inland flooding, the depth and extent of surge from coastal storms, the degradation of water supplies by saltwater intrusion, and the integrity of plant and animal habitats. Planners and managers responsible for mitigating these impacts require advanced tools to help them more effectively identify areas at risk. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Internet-based Modeling, Mapping, and Analysis for the Greater Everglades (IMMAGE) Web site has been developed to address these needs by providing more convenient access to projections from models that forecast the effects of sea level rise on surface water and groundwater, the extent of surge and resulting economic losses from coastal storms, and the distribution of habitats. IMMAGE not only provides an advanced geographic information system (GIS) interface to support decision making, but also includes topic-based modules that explain and illustrate key concepts for nontechnical users. The purpose of this report is to familiarize both technical and nontechnical users with the IMMAGE Web site and its various applications.

  15. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  16. Zig-zag version of the Frenkel-Kontorova model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A.V.; Zolotaryuk, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    We study a generalization of the Frenkel-Kontorova model which describes a zig-zag chain of particles coupled by both the first- and second-neighbor harmonic forces and subjected to a planar substrate with a commensurate potential relief. The particles are supposed to have two degrees of freedom:...

  17. A node-based version of the cellular Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, Marco; Preziosi, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The cellular Potts model (CPM) is a lattice-based Monte Carlo method that uses an energetic formalism to describe the phenomenological mechanisms underlying the biophysical problem of interest. We here propose a CPM-derived framework that relies on a node-based representation of cell-scale elements. This feature has relevant consequences on the overall simulation environment. First, our model can be implemented on any given domain, provided a proper discretization (which can be regular or irregular, fixed or time evolving). Then, it allowed an explicit representation of cell membranes, whose displacements realistically result in cell movement. Finally, our node-based approach can be easily interfaced with continuous mechanics or fluid dynamics models. The proposed computational environment is here applied to some simple biological phenomena, such as cell sorting and chemotactic migration, also in order to achieve an analysis of the performance of the underlying algorithm. This work is finally equipped with a critical comparison between the advantages and disadvantages of our model with respect to the traditional CPM and to some similar vertex-based approaches. PMID:27416549

  18. Development of polygonal-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms: Lymphatic node modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, Ngyen Tat; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Among radiosensitive organs/tissues considered in ICRP Publication 103, lymphatic nodes are many small size tissues and widely distributed in the ICRP reference phantoms. It is difficult to directly convert lymphatic nodes of ICRP reference voxel phantoms to polygonal surfaces. Furthermore, in the ICRP reference phantoms lymphatic nodes were manually drawn only in six lymphatic node regions and the reference number of lymphatic nodes reported in ICRP Publication 89 was not considered. To address aforementioned limitations, the present study developed a new lymphatic node modeling method for the polygonal-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms. By using the developed method, lymphatic nodes were modelled in the preliminary version of ICRP male polygonal-surface phantom. Then, lymphatic node dose values were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP reference male voxel phantom to validate the developed modeling method. The present study developed the new lymphatic node modeling method and successfully modeled lymphatic nodes in the preliminary version of the ICRP male polygonal-surface phantom. From the results, it was demonstrated that the developed modeling method can be used to model lymphatic nodes in polygonal-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms.

  19. Implementation of a parallel version of a regional climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstengarbe, F.W. [ed.; Kuecken, M. [Potsdam-Institut fuer Klimafolgenforschung (PIK), Potsdam (Germany); Schaettler, U. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach am Main (Germany). Geschaeftsbereich Forschung und Entwicklung

    1997-10-01

    A regional climate model developed by the Max Planck Institute for Meterology and the German Climate Computing Centre in Hamburg based on the `Europa` and `Deutschland` models of the German Weather Service has been parallelized and implemented on the IBM RS/6000 SP computer system of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research including parallel input/output processing, the explicit Eulerian time-step, the semi-implicit corrections, the normal-mode initialization and the physical parameterizations of the German Weather Service. The implementation utilizes Fortran 90 and the Message Passing Interface. The parallelization strategy used is a 2D domain decomposition. This report describes the parallelization strategy, the parallel I/O organization, the influence of different domain decomposition approaches for static and dynamic load imbalances and first numerical results. (orig.)

  20. System cost model user's manual, version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The System Cost Model (SCM) was developed by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies in Idaho Falls, Idaho and MK-Environmental Services in San Francisco, California to support the Baseline Environmental Management Report sensitivity analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SCM serves the needs of the entire DOE complex for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. The model can be used to evaluate total complex costs based on various configuration options or to evaluate site-specific options. The site-specific cost estimates are based on generic assumptions such as waste loads and densities, treatment processing schemes, existing facilities capacities and functions, storage and disposal requirements, schedules, and cost factors. The SCM allows customization of the data for detailed site-specific estimates. There are approximately forty TSD module designs that have been further customized to account for design differences for nonalpha, alpha, remote-handled, and transuranic wastes. The SCM generates cost profiles based on the model default parameters or customized user-defined input and also generates costs for transporting waste from generators to TSD sites

  1. Geological Model of the Olkiluoto Site. Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rocks of Olkiluoto can be divided into two major classes: 1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, tonalitic-granodioriticgranitic gneisses, mica gneisses, quartz gneisses and mafic gneisses, and 2) igneous rocks including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite structure: veined gneisses, stromatic gneisses and diatexitic gneisses. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subjected to polyphased ductile deformation, consisting of five stages, the D2 being locally the most intensive phase, producing thrust-related folding, strong migmatisation and pervasive foliation. In 3D modelling of the lithological units, an assumption has been made, on the basis of measurements in the outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, that the pervasive, composite foliation produced as a result of polyphase ductile deformation has a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from the surface to the drillholes. In addition, the largest ductile deformation zones and tectonic units are described in 3D model. The bedrock at the Olkiluoto site has been subjected to extensive hydrothermal alteration, which has taken place at reasonably low temperature conditions, the estimated temperature interval being from slightly over 300 deg C to less than 100 deg C. Two types of alteration can be observed: firstly, pervasive alteration and secondly fracturecontrolled alteration. Clay mineralisation and sulphidisation are the most prominent alteration events in the site area. Sulphides are located in the uppermost part of the model volume following roughly the foliation and lithological trend. Kaolinite is also mainly located in the

  2. Geological Model of the Olkiluoto Site. Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, I. (ed.) (and others)

    2010-10-15

    The rocks of Olkiluoto can be divided into two major classes: 1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, tonalitic-granodioriticgranitic gneisses, mica gneisses, quartz gneisses and mafic gneisses, and 2) igneous rocks including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite structure: veined gneisses, stromatic gneisses and diatexitic gneisses. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subjected to polyphased ductile deformation, consisting of five stages, the D2 being locally the most intensive phase, producing thrust-related folding, strong migmatisation and pervasive foliation. In 3D modelling of the lithological units, an assumption has been made, on the basis of measurements in the outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, that the pervasive, composite foliation produced as a result of polyphase ductile deformation has a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from the surface to the drillholes. In addition, the largest ductile deformation zones and tectonic units are described in 3D model. The bedrock at the Olkiluoto site has been subjected to extensive hydrothermal alteration, which has taken place at reasonably low temperature conditions, the estimated temperature interval being from slightly over 300 deg C to less than 100 deg C. Two types of alteration can be observed: firstly, pervasive alteration and secondly fracturecontrolled alteration. Clay mineralisation and sulphidisation are the most prominent alteration events in the site area. Sulphides are located in the uppermost part of the model volume following roughly the foliation and lithological trend. Kaolinite is also mainly located in the

  3. Astral V2.1: a new version to better assess post-accidental situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, Ph.; Mourlon, Ch. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Service d' Etude sur le Comportement des Radionucleides dans les Ecosystemes, CEA-Cadarache, 13 - St Paul-les-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Should an important release of radionuclides occur in the environment, one would quickly have to assess radionuclide concentration in media and foodstuff, deduce the potential exposition of concerned populations to the radiations, predict the evolution of the situation and propose different scenarios of managing the contaminated zones. To achieve this, the ASTRAL code was created, which can be used by a relatively large group of people composing crisis centers or making predictive impact studies. The starting point of the assessments is the ground deposit of radionuclides: the atmospheric dispersion phase and the cloud exposure are not taken into account here. The calculations achieved concern time evolution of radionuclide concentration in compartments of the agricultural and forest food chain as well as assessment of doses due to external and internal exposure. These values are compared to regulation limits and/or intervention levels. Different simulations of contaminated zones management can be led by applying counter-measures, dispositions meant to reduce the accident impact on environment and populations. The seventy radionuclides taken into account in the present version are some of those met in case of accidents or during the exploitation of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). They relate to 37 elements that are: Ag, Am, Ba, Br, Cd, Ce, Cl, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, I, Ir, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Np, Pm, Pr, Rb, Rh, Ru, Sb, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc, Te, Y, Zn, Zr. On a temporal point of view, the predictions extend to 3 years after the deposition. The internet technology chosen for this version offer important advantages: the spreading and maintenance of the tool are very easy, the code may be installed on a portable computer, the access to results is much quicker, the interface is very user friendly, so that no training is needed to perform calculations. As for any radioecological tool, a large number of parameters intervene in the calculations. All parameters can be

  4. The ``Nordic`` HBV model. Description and documentation of the model version developed for the project Climate Change and Energy Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saelthun, N.R.

    1996-12-31

    The model described in this report is a version of the HBV model developed for the project Climate Change and Energy Production. This was a Nordic project aimed at evaluating the impacts of the Scandinavian countries including Greenland with emphasis on hydropower production. The model incorporates many of the features found in individual versions of the HBV model in use in the Nordic countries, and some new ones. It has catchment subdivision in altitude intervals, a simple vegetation parametrization including interception, temperature based evapotranspiration calculation, lake evaporation, lake routing, glacier mass balance simulation, special functions for climate change simulations etc. The user interface is very basic, and the model is primarily intended for research and educational purposes. Commercial versions of the model should be used for operational implementations. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The Oak Ridge Heat Pump Design Model: Mark 3 version program documentationon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, S. K.; Rice, C. K.; Jackson, W. L.

    1988-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a leader in the development of analytical tools for the design of electrically driven, air-to-air heat pumps. Foremost among these tools is the ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, which can be used to predict the steady-state heating and cooling performance of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump. The ORNL Heat Pump Design Model has continued to evolve since the users' manual for the program, ORNL/CON-80/R1, was last revised in August 1983. This series of modifications to the heat pump model resulted in the Mark 3 Version, which is three to five times faster, easier to use, and more versatile than earlier versions and can be executed on a personal computer. The major changes made to earlier versions of the heat pump model relate to the organization of the input data, elimination of redundant calculations in the compressor and refrigerant property computations, improvement of thermostatic expansion valve and capillary tube correlations, revision of output format, and modifications to enable the model to run on a personal computer. The Mark 3 version is a comprehensive, easy-to-use program for the simulation of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump.

  6. Validating a Short Bulgarian Version of a Psychometric Instrument for Multidimensional Noise Sensitivity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhambov Angel M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noise sensitivity (NS is a key construct in the fields of hygiene, planning and occupational medicine. It refers to a personality trait representing the reactivity to noise and is associated with various psycho-physiological health outcomes. AIM: This study aimed to develop a shorter version of the original Noise Sensitivity Questionnaire (NoiSeQ, retaining its dimensions and assess its validity and reliability. METHODS: A test-retest study was carried out in a convenience sample of 56 participants. A short 15-item form of the original NoiSeQ (NoiSeQSF questionnaire was developed and then administered. All major analyses were based on the coeffi cient of equivalence and stability, the generalizability theory and linear regression. RESULTS: Relative (ρ = 0.83 and absolute (ρ = 0.80 G coefficients for global NS exceeded the lower reliability limit according to G- and D-studies. Sleep subscale can readily be used to assess sleep-related NS (ρ = 0.76/θ = 0.75. Moreover, NoiSeQSF predicted some cardiac symptoms (with age of participants as a moderator factor, which demonstrated nomological validity. CONCLUSION: NoiSeQSF is a reliable estimate for global NS and NS related to sleep quality. It might prove useful to experts in environmental hygiene, urban planning and occupational diseases when dealing with noise-impaired occupational, social or psycho-physiological functioning.

  7. Geological model of the Olkiluoto site. Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rocks of Olkiluoto can be divided into two major classes: (1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, tonalitic-granodioriticgranitic gneisses, mica gneisses, quartz gneisses and mafic gneisses, and (2) igneous rocks including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite structure: veined gneisses, stromatic gneisses and diatexitic gneisses. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subjected to polyphased ductile deformation, consisting of five stages, the D2 being locally the most intensive phase, producing thrust-related folding, strong migmatisation and pervasive foliation. In 3D modelling of the lithological units, an assumption has been made, on the basis of measurements in the outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, that the pervasive, composite foliation produced as a result of polyphase ductile deformation has a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from the surface to the drillholes. The bedrock at the Olkiluoto site has been subjected to extensive hydrothermal alteration, which has taken place at reasonably low temperature conditions, the estimated temperature interval being from slightly over 300 deg C to less than 100 deg C. Two types of alteration can be observed: (1) pervasive (disseminated) alteration and (2) fracture-controlled (veinlet) alteration. Kaolinisation and sulphidisation are the most prominent alteration events in the site area. Sulphides are located in the uppermost part of the model volume following roughly the lithological trend (slightly dipping to the SE). Kaolinite is also located in the uppermost part, but the orientation is opposite to the main lithological trend

  8. Assessment of validity and reliability of Hindi version of geriatric oral health assessment index (GOHAI in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romi Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to translate the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI into the Hindi language and assess its validity and reliability for use among people in India. Materials and Methods: GOHAI was translated into the Hindi language and self-administered to 420 subjects aged 55 years or above. The measures for reliability, and concurrent, convergent, and discriminant validity were assessed. The questionnaire sought information about sociodemographic details, habits related to tobacco, dental visits, tooth brushing, and self-reported perceptions of general and oral health. Results: Cronbach′s alpha (0.774 showed high internal consistency and homogeneity between items. Low GOHAI scores were associated with the perceptions of poor oral and general health, low satisfaction with oral health, and a perceived need for dental care. Respondents with high socioeconomic status were likely to have high GOHAI scores. Conclusion: The Hindi version of the GOHAI demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability, and will be an important instrument to measure oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL for people in this region.

  9. Integrated Assessment Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

    2012-10-31

    This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

  10. Response Surface Modeling Tool Suite, Version 1.x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-07-05

    The Response Surface Modeling (RSM) Tool Suite is a collection of three codes used to generate an empirical interpolation function for a collection of drag coefficient calculations computed with Test Particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) simulations. The first code, "Automated RSM", automates the generation of a drag coefficient RSM for a particular object to a single command. "Automated RSM" first creates a Latin Hypercube Sample (LHS) of 1,000 ensemble members to explore the global parameter space. For each ensemble member, a TPMC simulation is performed and the object drag coefficient is computed. In the next step of the "Automated RSM" code, a Gaussian process is used to fit the TPMC simulations. In the final step, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is used to evaluate the non-analytic probability distribution function from the Gaussian process. The second code, "RSM Area", creates a look-up table for the projected area of the object based on input limits on the minimum and maximum allowed pitch and yaw angles and pitch and yaw angle intervals. The projected area from the look-up table is used to compute the ballistic coefficient of the object based on its pitch and yaw angle. An accurate ballistic coefficient is crucial in accurately computing the drag on an object. The third code, "RSM Cd", uses the RSM generated by the "Automated RSM" code and the projected area look-up table generated by the "RSM Area" code to accurately compute the drag coefficient and ballistic coefficient of the object. The user can modify the object velocity, object surface temperature, the translational temperature of the gas, the species concentrations of the gas, and the pitch and yaw angles of the object. Together, these codes allow for the accurate derivation of an object's drag coefficient and ballistic coefficient under any conditions with only knowledge of the object's geometry and mass.

  11. Performance of Versions 1,2 and 3 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Duncan, Bryan N.

    2008-01-01

    Version 1 of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM) was used in the first CCMVa1 model evaluation and forms the basis for several studies of links between ozone and the circulation. That version of the CCM was based on the GEOS-4 GCM. Versions 2 and 3 of the GEOS CCM are based on the GEOS-5 GCM, which retains the "Lin-Rood" dynamical core but has a totally different set of physical parameterizatiOns to GEOS-4. In Version 2 of the GEOS CCM the Goddard stratospheric chemistry module is retained. Difference between Versions 1 and 2 thus reflect the physics changes of the underlying GCMs. Several comparisons between these two models are made, several of which reveal improvements in Version 2 (including a more realistic representation of the interannual variability of the Antarctic vortex). In Version 3 of the GEOS CCM, the stratospheric chemistry mechanism is replaced by the "GMI COMBO" code that includes tropospheric chemistry and different computational approaches. An advantage of this model version. is the reduction of high ozone biases that prevail at low chlorine loadings in Versions 1 and 2. This poster will compare and contrast various aspects of the three model versions that are relevant for understanding interactions between ozone and climate.

  12. A new version of code Java for 3D simulation of the CCA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kebo; Xiong, Hailing; Li, Chao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a new version of the program of CCA model. In order to benefit from the advantages involved in the latest technologies, we migrated the running environment from JDK1.6 to JDK1.7. And the old program was optimized into a new framework, so promoted extendibility.

  13. ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 - summary of validation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Tetushi; Kaku, Manabu; Iwasaki, Akira; Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Zhang, Z.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Krieger, Tabatha; Curtis, Bill; Haase, Jeff; Abrams, Michael; Carabajal, C.; Meyer, Dave

    2011-01-01

    On June 29, 2009, NASA and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan released a Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) to users worldwide at no charge as a contribution to the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). This “version 1” ASTER GDEM (GDEM1) was compiled from over 1.2 million scenebased DEMs covering land surfaces between 83°N and 83°S latitudes. A joint U.S.-Japan validation team assessed the accuracy of the GDEM1, augmented by a team of 20 cooperators. The GDEM1 was found to have an overall accuracy of around 20 meters at the 95% confidence level. The team also noted several artifacts associated with poor stereo coverage at high latitudes, cloud contamination, water masking issues and the stacking process used to produce the GDEM1 from individual scene-based DEMs (ASTER GDEM Validation Team, 2009). Two independent horizontal resolution studies estimated the effective spatial resolution of the GDEM1 to be on the order of 120 meters.

  14. User guide for MODPATH Version 7—A particle-tracking model for MODFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, David W.

    2016-09-26

    MODPATH is a particle-tracking post-processing program designed to work with MODFLOW, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) finite-difference groundwater flow model. MODPATH version 7 is the fourth major release since its original publication. Previous versions were documented in USGS Open-File Reports 89–381 and 94–464 and in USGS Techniques and Methods 6–A41.MODPATH version 7 works with MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW–USG. Support for unstructured grids in MODFLOW–USG is limited to smoothed, rectangular-based quadtree and quadpatch grids.A software distribution package containing the computer program and supporting documentation, such as input instructions, output file descriptions, and example problems, is available from the USGS over the Internet (http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/modpath/).

  15. Content validation of a Danish version of "The McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment" for dysphagia management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Lambert, H.C.; Faber, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the first steps in the cross-cultural adaptation of a Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment (MISA), which quantifies eating and drinking abilities by scoring a meal observation. The original Canadian MISA was translated and adapted into Danish (MISA...

  16. The Dimensional Assessment of Personality Psychopathology Basic Questionnaire: shortened versions item analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Àngel; Blanco, Eduardo; Martí-Guiu, Maite; Balada, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    This study has been designed to evaluate and replicate the psychometric properties of the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Psychopathology-Basic Questionnaire (DAPP-BQ) and the DAPP-BQ short form (DAPP-SF) in a large Spanish general population sample. Additionally, we have generated a reduced form called DAPP-90, using a strategy based on a structural equation modeling (SEM) methodology in two independent samples, a calibration and a validation sample. The DAPP-90 scales obtained a more satisfactory fit on SEM adjustment values (average: TLI > .97 and RMSEA assessment of patients in hospital consultation or in brief psychological assessments.

  17. A Fast Version of LASG/IAP Climate System Model and Its 1000-year Control Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Tianjun; WU Bo; WEN Xinyu; LI Lijuan; WANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    A fast version of the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geo- physical Fluid Dynamics (LASG)/Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) climate system model is briefly documented. The fast coupled model employs a low resolution version of the atmospheric component Grid Atmospheric Model of IAP/LASG (GAMIL), with the other parts of the model, namely an oceanic com- ponent LASG/IAP Climate Ocean Model (LICOM), land component Common Land Model (CLM), and sea ice component from National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model (NCAR CCSM2), as the same as in the standard version of LASG/IAP Flexible Global Ocean Atmosphere Land System model (FGOALS_g). The parameterizatious of physical and dynamical processes of the at- mospheric component in the fast version are identical to the standard version, although some parameter values are different. However, by virtue of reduced horizontal resolution and increased time-step of the most time-consuming atmospheric component, it runs faster by a factor of 3 and can serve as a useful tool for long- term and large-ensemble integrations. A 1000-year control simulation of the present-day climate has been completed without flux adjustments. The final 600 years of this simulation has virtually no trends in global mean sea surface temperatures and is recommended for internal variability studies. Several aspects of the control simulation's mean climate and variability axe evaluated against the observational or reanalysis data. The strengths and weaknesses of the control simulation are evaluated. The mean atmospheric circulation is well simulated, except in high latitudes. The Asian-Australian monsoonal meridional cell shows realistic features, however, an artificial rainfall center is located to the eastern periphery of the Tibetan Plateau persists throughout the year. The mean bias of SST resembles that of the standard version, appearing as a "double ITCZ" (Inter

  18. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  19. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment: Comparison of Version 4.2.1i on Linux and Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul D. Bayless

    2014-06-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.2i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  20. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment. Comparison of Version 4.3.4i on Linux and Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.3i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  1. Assessing Tropical Cyclone Forecast Skill in the GEFS Reforecast Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; LI, W.; Peng, M.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction skill of tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the Global Ensemble Forecasting System (GEFS) Reforecast Version-2 is evaluated. The GEFS captures the seasonality of TC genesis (TCG) reasonably well over the Atlantic. The performance of the model varies over different basins, and quantitative errors are found in the spatial distribution of TCGs. The biases in TC tracks are largely attributed to the biases in the TCG and the the large-scale steering flows. Analyzing the genesis potential index (GPI) shows that the biases in the monsoon trough and subtropical high induce the TC biases in the western North Pacific, while the southward displacement of the ITCZ leads to errors in TCG over the eastern North Pacific. The over-prediction of TCGs near the West African coast is associated with the hyperactive tropical easterly waves over the African continent. The diabatic heating rate (Q1) field in the GEFS forecasts suggests a much deeper and stronger convection than in the ERA-Interim, which can be attributed to the deficiency of model cumulus scheme. The study suggests that the better prediction of the large-scale circulation and synoptic-scale waves can help improve the TC forecasts.

  2. 78 FR 76791 - Availability of Version 4.0 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Adopting Current...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... workbook. Buried excavation costs are used. A toggle allows the user to exclude manholes (the current... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Availability of Version 4.0 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Adopting Current Default Inputs in Final Version of Model AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission....

  3. The Hamburg Oceanic Carbon Cycle Circulation Model. Version 1. Version 'HAMOCC2s' for long time integrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, C.; Maier-Reimer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    The Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle Circulation Model (HAMOCC, configuration HAMOCC2s) predicts the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (as induced by oceanic processes), production rates of biogenic particulate matter, and geochemical tracer distributions in the water column as well as the bioturbated sediment. Besides the carbon cycle this model version includes also the marine silicon cycle (silicic acid in the water column and the sediment pore waters, biological opal production, opal flux through the water column and opal sediment pore water interaction). The model is based on the grid and geometry of the LSG ocean general circulation model (see the corresponding manual, LSG=Large Scale Geostrophic) and uses a velocity field provided by the LSG-model in 'frozen' state. In contrast to the earlier version of the model (see Report No. 5), the present version includes a multi-layer sediment model of the bioturbated sediment zone, allowing for variable tracer inventories within the complete model system. (orig.)

  4. A one-dimensional material transfer model for HECTR version 1. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, A.S.; Wong, C.C.

    1991-08-01

    HECTR (Hydrogen Event Containment Transient Response) is a lumped-parameter computer code developed for calculating the pressure-temperature response to combustion in a nuclear power plant containment building. The code uses a control-volume approach and subscale models to simulate the mass, momentum, and energy transfer occurring in the containment during a loss-of-collant-accident (LOCA). This document describes one-dimensional subscale models for mass and momentum transfer, and the modifications to the code required to implement them. Two problems were analyzed: the first corresponding to a standard problem studied with previous HECTR versions, the second to experiments. The performance of the revised code relative to previous HECTR version is discussed as is the ability of the code to model the experiments. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Description and evaluation of the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Emmons

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4 is an offline global chemical transport model particularly suited for studies of the troposphere. The updates of the model from its previous version MOZART-2 are described, including an expansion of the chemical mechanism to include more detailed hydrocarbon chemistry and bulk aerosols. Online calculations of a number of processes, such as dry deposition, emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes and photolysis frequencies, are now included. Results from an eight-year simulation (2000–2007 are presented and evaluated. The MOZART-4 source code and standard input files are available for download from the NCAR Community Data Portal (http://cdp.ucar.edu.

  6. The NASA/MSFC Global Reference Atmospheric Model: 1999 Version (GRAM-99)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    The latest version of Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is presented and discussed. GRAM-99 uses either (binary) Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) or (ASCII) Global Gridded Upper Air Statistics (GGUAS) CD-ROM data sets, for 0-27 km altitudes. As with earlier versions, GRAM-99 provides complete geographical and altitude coverage for each month of the year. GRAM-99 uses a specially-developed data set, based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) data, for 20-120 km altitudes, and NASA's 1999 version Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-99) model for heights above 90 km. Fairing techniques assure smooth transition in overlap height ranges (20-27 km and 90-120 km). GRAM-99 includes water vapor and 11 other atmospheric constituents (O3, N2O, CO, CH4, CO2, N2, O2, O, A, He and H). A variable-scale perturbation model provides both large-scale (wave) and small-scale (stochastic) deviations from mean values for thermodynamic variables and horizontal and vertical wind components. The small-scale perturbation model includes improvements in representing intermittency ("patchiness"). A major new feature is an option to substitute Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data for conventional GRAM climatology when a trajectory passes sufficiently near any RRA site. A complete user's guide for running the program, plus sample input and output, is provided. An example is provided for how to incorporate GRAM-99 as subroutines in other programs (e.g., trajectory codes).

  7. Inter-rater reliability and factor analysis of the Brazilian version of the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight: Expanded Version (SAI-E Estudo de confiabilidade entre avaliadores e análise fatorial da versão brasileira do Schedule for the Assessment of Insight: Expanded Version (SAI-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa de Rosalmeida Dantas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The Schedule for the Assessment of Insight - Expanded Version consists of 11 items that encompass: awareness of having a mental illness, ability to rename psychotic phenomena as abnormal, and compliance with treatment. The objective of the study was to evaluate the inter-rater reliability and to study the factorial structure of the Brazilian version of the instrument. METHOD: The Brazilian version of the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight - Expanded Version was used for the assessment of insight of 109 psychotic inpatients, 60 of whom had the interview tape-recorded in order to be scored by an independent evaluator. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was adopted as the inter-rater reliability coefficient. In the factor analysis, principal components analysis and Varimax rotation were adopted. RESULTS: Inter-rater reliability coefficients from good to excellent were found for the individual items of the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight - Expanded Version with ICC values ranging from 0.54 to 0.82. Regarding the total score, inter-rater reliability was excellent, with ICC = 0.90. A factorial structure similar to the one obtained by the original version of the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight - Expanded Version was found, with 3 factors accounting for 71.72% of variance. CONCLUSION: In the Brazilian context, the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight - Expanded Version presented good inter-rater reliability and factorial structure compatible to the insight dimensions that are intended to be evaluated.OBJETIVOS: O Schedule for the Assessment of Insight - Expanded Version é constituído por 11 itens que abordam: reconhecimento de se ter um transtorno mental, capacidade de renomear fenômenos psicóticos como anormais e adesão ao tratamento. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a confiabilidade entre avaliadores e estudar a estrutura fatorial da versão brasileira do Schedule for the Assessment of Insight - Expanded

  8. Psychometric assessment of the Brazilian version of the Male Body Dissatisfaction Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Berbert de Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The study of male body image has increased substantially, but there are few assessment tools available for this population. The Male Body Dissatisfaction Scale (MBDS has been widely used among students to research body image disturbances and eating disorders. However, the psychometric properties of this instrument have not been tested in the Brazilian context.Objectives To explore the psychometric properties (convergent validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and factor structure of the Brazilian version of the MBDS.Methods Two-hundred sixty-four undergraduate students were evaluated. Pearson’s correlation was used to test the convergent validity of the MBDS and the Drive for Muscularity Scale, the Swansea Muscularity Attitudes Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Eating Attitudes Test-26, and the Commitment to Exercise Scale. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using t-tests for repeated measures and by calculating the coefficient of intraclass correlation. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted, and Cronbach’s α coefficients were determined. A significance level of 5% was adopted.Results The MBDS had an adequate factor structure, with two factors explaining 52.67% of the total variance. It showed excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s α between 0.90 and 0.92, a high intraclass correlation coefficient (0.81, and convergent validity with the drive for muscularity, the psychological commitment to exercise, low self-esteem, and eating disorder risk behaviour measures.Discussion The MBDS appears to be a valid and reliable tool for evaluating Brazilian male body image dissatisfaction.

  9. The German Version of the Manchester Triage System and its quality criteria--first assessment of validity and reliability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Gräff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The German Version of the Manchester Triage System (MTS has found widespread use in EDs across German-speaking Europe. Studies about the quality criteria validity and reliability of the MTS currently only exist for the English-language version. Most importantly, the content of the German version differs from the English version with respect to presentation diagrams and change indicators, which have a significant impact on the category assigned. This investigation offers a preliminary assessment in terms of validity and inter-rater reliability of the German MTS. METHODS: Construct validity of assigned MTS level was assessed based on comparisons to hospitalization (general / intensive care, mortality, ED and hospital length of stay, level of prehospital care and number of invasive diagnostics. A sample of 45,469 patients was used. Inter-rater agreement between an expert and triage nurses (reliability was calculated separately for a subset group of 167 emergency patients. RESULTS: For general hospital admission the area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic was 0.749; for admission to ICU it was 0.871. An examination of MTS-level and number of deceased patients showed that the higher the priority derived from MTS, the higher the number of deaths (p<0.0001 / χ² Test. There was a substantial difference in the 30-day survival among the 5 MTS categories (p<0.0001 / log-rank test.The AUC for the predict 30-day mortality was 0.613. Categories orange and red had the highest numbers of heart catheter and endoscopy. Category red and orange were mostly accompanied by an emergency physician, whereas categories blue and green were walk-in patients. Inter-rater agreement between expert triage nurses was almost perfect (κ = 0.954. CONCLUSION: The German version of the MTS is a reliable and valid instrument for a first assessment of emergency patients in the emergency department.

  10. Thermal modelling. Preliminary site description. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Back, Paer-Erik; Bengtsson, Anna; Laendell, Maerta [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    This report presents the thermal site descriptive model for the Forsmark area, version 1.2. The main objective of this report is to present the thermal modelling work where data has been identified, quality controlled, evaluated and summarised in order to make an upscaling to lithological domain level possible. The thermal conductivity at canister scale has been modelled for two different lithological domains (RFM029 and RFM012, both dominated by granite to granodiorite (101057)). A main modelling approach has been used to determine the mean value of the thermal conductivity. Two alternative/complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the spatial variability of the thermal conductivity at domain level. The thermal modelling approaches are based on the lithological model for the Forsmark area, version 1.2 together with rock type models constituted from measured and calculated (from mineral composition) thermal conductivities. Results indicate that the mean of thermal conductivity is expected to exhibit a small variation between the different domains, 3.46 W/(mxK) for RFM012 to 3.55 W/(mxK) for RFM029. The spatial distribution of the thermal conductivity does not follow a simple model. Lower and upper 95% confidence limits are based on the modelling results, but have been rounded of to only two significant figures. Consequently, the lower limit is 2.9 W/(mxK), while the upper is 3.8 W/(mxK). This is applicable to both the investigated domains. The temperature dependence is rather small with a decrease in thermal conductivity of 10.0% per 100 deg C increase in temperature for the dominating rock type. There are a number of important uncertainties associated with these results. One of the uncertainties considers the representative scale for the canister. Another important uncertainty is the methodological uncertainties associated with the upscaling of thermal conductivity from cm-scale to canister scale. In addition, the representativeness of rock samples is

  11. GARUSO - Version 1.0. Uncertainty model for multipath ultrasonic transit time gas flow meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunde, Per; Froeysa, Kjell-Eivind; Vestrheim, Magne

    1997-09-01

    This report describes an uncertainty model for ultrasonic transit time gas flow meters configured with parallel chords, and a PC program, GARUSO Version 1.0, implemented for calculation of the meter`s relative expanded uncertainty. The program, which is based on the theoretical uncertainty model, is used to carry out a simplified and limited uncertainty analysis for a 12`` 4-path meter, where examples of input and output uncertainties are given. The model predicts a relative expanded uncertainty for the meter at a level which further justifies today`s increasing tendency to use this type of instruments for fiscal metering of natural gas. 52 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Translation and equivalence assessment for a Japanese version of the modified Parental Nurturance Scale: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Peter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports on the modification of the Parental Nurturance Scale (PNS, translation of the modified version (PNSM from English to Japanese, and equivalence assessment between the PNSM and the translated version (PNSM-J. The PNS was modified so as to enable its use in nurturance studies where the prime source of nurturance might vary between respondents. Method It was translated into Japanese through the forward-backward translation procedure. With attempting to enhance representativeness of language in the target populations, translators used were married couples that consisted of a native English speaker and a native Japanese speaker. Multiple translations were produced and used to make a single Japanese version. A panel of reviewers identified problems in conceptual and semantic equivalence between the original and the translated versions. The Japanese version was altered accordingly with reference to alternate Japanese forms from the original English to Japanese translations. The altered translation was again re-translated into English and problematic differences were checked. This forward-backward process was repeated until satisfactory agreement was attained. The PNSM was administered to 222 native English speakers and the PNSM-J to 1320 native Japanese speakers. Results Factor analysis and target rotation revealed a nearly identical factor structure and factor loadings of the items of the PNSM and PNSM-J between the different cultural groups. High Cronbach's alpha coefficient supported the reliability of the test scores on both versions. Conclusion The equivalence between the two scales was supported. It is suggested that the PNSM and PNSM-J are suitable tools for comparative cross-cultural studies.

  13. Validation of the Spanish-language version of the Rapid Assessment for Adolescent Preventive Services among Colombian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Pinto, Tatiana A; Blanco-Gómez, Argénida; Díaz-Martínez, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    Seventy percent of adolescent morbidity and mortality is related to six risky behaviors. The Rapid Assessment for Adolescent Preventive Services is a screening questionnaire consisting of 21 questions but there is not a validated Spanish-language version. The obj ective of this study was to validate the Spanish-language version of the Rapid Assessment for Adolescent Preventive Services in two Colombian cities: Bucaramanga and Medellin. The questionnaire was administered to 270 randomly selected adolescent students aged between 11 and 19 years old. Its internal consistency measured using Cronbach's alpha was 0.7207. The factor analysis showed that two factors accounted for 84.5% of variance, but factor loading indicates that only one of these is valid in Colombia: substance use (tobacco, alcohol, narcotics, and psychoactive substances). PMID:27606643

  14. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  15. Assessment of the Psychometric Properties of the New Version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet Intelligence Scale in Children with Dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Abas Mahvashe-Wernosfaderani; Sanaz Javidnia; Hamzeh Sadeghi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cognitive abilities assessment, is considered to be one of the most complicated and controversial issues in psychological tests. In spite of great usage of new version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet intelligence scale in screening and diagnosis, they have not made so many endeavors to use this valid test in our country and little researches have been conducted to survey psychometric characteristics of mentioned scale. Given the above considerations, the aim of this study is to investi...

  16. Psychosocial risk assessment in organizations: Concurrent validity of the brief version of the Management Standards Indicator Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Houdmont, Jonathan; Randall, Raymond; Kerr, Robert; Addley, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Management Standards Indicator Tool (MSIT) is a 35-item self-report measure of the psychosocial work environment designed to assist organizations with psychosocial risk assessment. It is also used in work environment research. Edwards and Webster presented a 25-item version of the MSIT based on the deletion of items having a factor loading of < .65. Stress theory and research suggest that psychosocial hazard exposures may result in harm to the health of workers. Thus, using data collected...

  17. Assessment of the reliability of the Serbian version of the sickness impact profile questionnaire in patients with chronic viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Majstorović Biljana; Janković Slobodan; Dimoski Zvonko; Kekuš Divna; Kocić Sanja; Mijailović Željko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) of chronic patients has been researched as the ultimate goal of modern treatment of chronic diseases to improve patients’ quality of life. Objective. The objective was to assess the reliability of the Serbian version of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) questionnaire on the sample of patients with chronic viral hepatitis. Methods. The research covered 102 patients with chronic hepatitis (47 type B and 55 t...

  18. Validity and reliability of the Finnish version of the Functioning Assessment Short Test (FAST) in bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Suominen, Kirsi; Salminen, Elina; Lähteenmäki, Susanna; Tupala, Tiina; Isometsä, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Background The Functioning Assessment Short Test (FAST) was developed for the clinical evaluation of functional impairment of patients suffering from bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to validate the Finnish version of FAST. Methods Translation and back-translation of FAST were performed. Fifty patients with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth edition (DSM-IV) bipolar type I and II were interviewed at the Bipolar Disorder Research and Treatment Centre, C...

  19. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF version 3.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioude, J.; Arnold, D.; Stohl, A.; Cassiani, M.; Morton, D.; Seibert, P.; Angevine, W.; Evan, S.; Dingwell, A.; Fast, J. D.; Easter, R. C.; Pisso, I.; Burkhart, J.; Wotawa, G.

    2013-11-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally designed for calculating long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such that occurring after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime, FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis at different scales. A need for further multiscale modeling and analysis has encouraged new developments in FLEXPART. In this paper, we present a FLEXPART version that works with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteorological model. We explain how to run this new model and present special options and features that differ from those of the preceding versions. For instance, a novel turbulence scheme for the convective boundary layer has been included that considers both the skewness of turbulence in the vertical velocity as well as the vertical gradient in the air density. To our knowledge, FLEXPART is the first model for which such a scheme has been developed. On a more technical level, FLEXPART-WRF now offers effective parallelization, and details on computational performance are presented here. FLEXPART-WRF output can either be in binary or Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format, both of which have efficient data compression. In addition, test case data and the source code are provided to the reader as a Supplement. This material and future developments will be accessible at http://www.flexpart.eu.

  20. Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, FM

    2004-12-21

    This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit

  1. Actuarial Assessment of Sex Offender Recidivism Risk: A Validation of the German version of the Static-991

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Rettenberger; Reinhard Eher

    2006-01-01

    The Static-99 and the RRASOR are actuarial risk assessment tools for evaluating the risk of sexual and violent recidivism in sexual offenders. The Static-99 was developed in 1999 by Karl R. Hanson (Canada) and David Thornton (Great Britain) and is in the mean time regularly used for risk assessment in North America and some countries in Europe. The RRASOR can be described as a predecessor of the Static-99 and was published by Hanson in 1997. At first we translated the revised version of the S...

  2. A p-version embedded model for simulation of concrete temperature fields with cooling pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pipe cooling is an effective method of mass concrete temperature control, but its accurate and convenient numerical simulation is still a cumbersome problem. An improved embedded model, considering the water temperature variation along the pipe, was proposed for simulating the temperature field of early-age concrete structures containing cooling pipes. The improved model was verified with an engineering example. Then, the p-version self-adaption algorithm for the improved embedded model was deduced, and the initial values and boundary conditions were examined. Comparison of some numerical samples shows that the proposed model can provide satisfying precision and a higher efficiency. The analysis efficiency can be doubled at the same precision, even for a large-scale element. The p-version algorithm can fit grids of different sizes for the temperature field simulation. The convenience of the proposed algorithm lies in the possibility of locating more pipe segments in one element without the need of so regular a shape as in the explicit model.

  3. Functional disability in Alzheimer disease: a validation study of the Turkish version of the disability assessment for dementia scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozlu, Mukaddes; Cankurtaran, Mustafa; Yavuz, Burcu Balam; Cankurtaran, Eylem Sahin; Kutluer, Ibrahim; Erkek, Burcu Manisalı; Halil, Meltem; Ulger, Zekeriya; Cosgun, Erdal; Ariogul, Servet

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD) scale in the Turkish elderly population with Alzheimer disease (AD). The DAD scale was administered to the primary caregivers of 157 patients (age 77.7 ± 6.8 years) with AD. The Turkish version of the DAD scale showed high internal consistency (Cronbach α = .942), excellent test-retest, and interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.996 and ICC = 0.994, respectively). The DAD scale was significantly correlated with activities of daily living (ADL; Modified Older Americans Research Survey ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL; Lawton and Brody IADL) scales (r = .89, P differences in the mean DAD scores in different GDS stages. Construct validity was estimated using total score correlation analyses between the standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the DAD scale. Results revealed high and significant correlation between MMSE score and DAD scale (r = .812, P < .001). The results of multivariate analysis showed that DAD score was not correlated with gender, education, and age. The DAD total score was affected mostly by GDS, MMSE, and duration of the disease. Turkish version of the DAD scale was found to be a reliable and valid instrument to assess functional disability in Turkish elderly patients with AD. This scale assists caregivers and physicians to decide for proper interventions.

  4. A Psychometric Analysis and Standardization of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-2, Self-Report of Personality, College Version, among a Korean Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Christine M.; Ebesutani, Chad; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was the first to examine the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-2, Self-Report of Personality, College Version (K-BASC-2 SRP-COL), among a Korean national sample. Using 1,000 Korean college students, ages 18 to 25 years, we found support for the reliability (via internal…

  5. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF version 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioude, J.; Arnold, D.; Stohl, A.; Cassiani, M.; Morton, D.; Seibert, P.; Angevine, W.; Evan, S.; Dingwell, A.; Fast, J. D.; Easter, R. C.; Pisso, I.; Burkhart, J.; Wotawa, G.

    2013-07-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally designed for calculating long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis at different scales. This multiscale need has encouraged new developments in FLEXPART. In this document, we present a FLEXPART version that works with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteorological model. We explain how to run and present special options and features that differ from its predecessor versions. For instance, a novel turbulence scheme for the convective boundary layer has been included that considers both the skewness of turbulence in the vertical velocity as well as the vertical gradient in the air density. To our knowledge, FLEXPART is the first model for which such a scheme has been developed. On a more technical level, FLEXPART-WRF now offers effective parallelization and details on computational performance are presented here. FLEXPART-WRF output can either be in binary or Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format with efficient data compression. In addition, test case data and the source code are provided to the reader as Supplement. This material and future developments will be accessible at http://www.flexpart.eu.

  6. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF version 3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brioude

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally designed for calculating long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis at different scales. This multiscale need has encouraged new developments in FLEXPART. In this document, we present a FLEXPART version that works with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale meteorological model. We explain how to run and present special options and features that differ from its predecessor versions. For instance, a novel turbulence scheme for the convective boundary layer has been included that considers both the skewness of turbulence in the vertical velocity as well as the vertical gradient in the air density. To our knowledge, FLEXPART is the first model for which such a scheme has been developed. On a more technical level, FLEXPART-WRF now offers effective parallelization and details on computational performance are presented here. FLEXPART-WRF output can either be in binary or Network Common Data Form (NetCDF format with efficient data compression. In addition, test case data and the source code are provided to the reader as Supplement. This material and future developments will be accessible at http://www.flexpart.eu.

  7. A new version of the ERICA tool to facilitate impact assessments of radioactivity on wild plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E; Alfonso, B; Avila, R; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Hosseini, A

    2016-03-01

    A new version of the ERICA Tool (version 1.2) was released in November 2014; this constitutes the first major update of the Tool since release in 2007. The key features of the update are presented in this article. Of particular note are new transfer databases extracted from an international compilation of concentration ratios (CRwo-media) and the modification of 'extrapolation' approaches used to select transfer data in cases where information is not available. Bayesian updating approaches have been used in some cases to draw on relevant information that would otherwise have been excluded in the process of deriving CRwo-media statistics. All of these efforts have in turn led to the requirement to update Environmental Media Concentration Limits (EMCLs) used in Tier 1 assessments. Some of the significant changes with regard to EMCLs are highlighted.

  8. RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways Version 3. 0 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebla, E.

    1989-01-01

    The RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways is a computer program for calculation of numeric criteria for land application and distribution and marketing of sludges under the sewage-sludge regulations at 40 CFR Part 503. The risk-assessment models covered assume that municipal sludge with specified characteristics is spread across a defined area of ground at a known rate once each year for a given number of years. Risks associated with direct land application of sludge applied after distribution and marketing are both calculated. The computer program calculates the maximum annual loading of contaminants that can be land applied and still meet the risk criteria specified as input. Software Description: The program is written in the Turbo/Basic programming language for implementation on IBM PC/AT or compatible machines using DOS 3.0 or higher operating system. Minimum core storage is 512K.

  9. Translation and validation of the Dutch language version of the CDC Symptom Inventory for assessment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Ruud CW

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a study by Wagner et al., the CDC Symptom Inventory was validated in a population selected from the inhabitants of a city in the USA, and proofed reliable for the assessment of the accompanying symptoms of CFS. The Dutch translation of the CDC Symptom Inventory is compared to the original and the psychometric properties are presented for patients in a tertiary care setting. Methods One hundred thirty-nine consecutive patients who visited the CFS Center Amsterdam for the first time were asked to complete the CDC Symptom Inventory in the Dutch Language Version (DLV together with the usual set of questionnaires. Sixty-one patients had Chronic Fatigue (CF and 78 patients fulfilled the criteria for CFS. Forty-three healthy accompanying persons completed the CDC Symptom Inventory DLV, the Physical Functioning scale of the Medical Outcome Survey Short Form-36 DLV, and the Fatigue and Concentration scales of the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS-20. Results The healthy controls group contained fewer women and was overall older than the patient groups. The influence of gender on the CDC Symptom Inventory DLV was significant but the effect of age was not. The Dutch version had a good internal consistency and convergent validity. The results were comparable to the original English version, but the sex-related difference needs further study. Conclusion The Dutch version of the CDC Symptom Inventory is a reliable tool for the assessment of the secondary criteria for CFS. The results show that it is comparable to the outcome of studies in English speaking countries.

  10. Turkish version of the chronic urticaria quality of life questionnaire: cultural adaptation, assessment of reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocatürk, Emek; Weller, Karsten; Martus, Peter; Aktas, Selin; Kavala, Mukaddes; Sarigul, Sükran; Baiardini, Ilaria; Canonica, Giorgio W; Brzoza, Zenon; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Maurer, Marcus

    2012-07-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria has a substantial impact on patients' quality of life. The first disease-specific tool to assess quality of life impairment in this condition, the Chronic Urticaria Quality of Life Questionnaire (CU-Q2oL), was developed recently. The aim of this study was to adapt the original Italian version to the Turkish language and to evaluate its reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change. The Turkish version was developed by performing forward- and back-translation. It was then applied to 140 consecutive patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria, along with the Dermatology Life Quality Index and the Skindex-29. Disease activity was assessed using the Urticaria Activity Score. Sensitivity to change was measured in 101 patients, who completed the instruments twice at intervals of 4 weeks. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the six-scale structure of the original Italian version ("pruritus", "swelling", "impact on life activities", "sleep problems", "limits", "looks") can be retained in the Turkish instrument. Analysis regarding convergent validity showed good correlations of the Turkish CU-Q2oL with the other instruments. In addition, it was found to discriminate well between patients with different levels of urticaria activity, and to be sensitive to change. In conclusion, the Turkish version of CU-Q2oL is a reliable, valid, and sensitive instrument, which will help to characterize better the clinical impact of chronic spontaneous urticaria and treatment outcomes in Turkish patients. Its identical scale structure to that of other CU-Q2oL instruments makes it ideal for cross-cultural comparisons and for its application in future national and multinational studies. PMID:21918791

  11. Description and evaluation of a new 4-mode version of Modal Aerosol Module (MAM4 within version 5.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in the climate system by influencing the Earth's radiation budgets and modifying the cloud properties. Despite the importance, their representations in large-scale atmospheric models are still crude, which can influence model simulated burden, lifetime, physical, chemical and optical properties, and the climate forcing of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study, we improve the current 3-mode version of modal aerosol module (MAM3 in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 by introducing an additional primary carbon mode to explicitly account for the microphysical ageing of primary carbonaceous aerosols in the atmosphere. Compared to MAM3, the 4-mode version of MAM (MAM4 significantly increases the column burdens of primary particulate organic matter (POM and black carbon (BC by up to 40 % in many remote regions, where in-cloud scavenging plays an important role in determining the aerosol concentrations. Differences in the column burdens for other types of aerosol (e.g., sulfate, secondary organic aerosols, mineral dust, sea salt are less than 1 %. Evaluating the MAM4 simulation against in situ surface and aircraft observations, we find that MAM4 significantly improves the simulation of seasonal variation of BC concentrations in the polar regions, by increasing the BC concentrations in all seasons and particularly in cold seasons. However, it exacerbates the overestimation of modeled BC concentrations in the upper troposphere in the Pacific regions. The comparisons suggest that, to address the remaining model POM and BC biases, future improvements are required related to (1 in-cloud scavenging and vertical transport in convective clouds and (2 emissions of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols.

  12. QMM – A Quarterly Macroeconomic Model of the Icelandic Economy. Version 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Tjörvi

    This paper documents and describes Version 2.0 of the Quarterly Macroeconomic Model of the Central Bank of Iceland (QMM). QMM and the underlying quarterly database have been under construction since 2001 at the Research and Forecasting Division of the Economics Department at the Bank and was first...... implemented in the forecasting round for the Monetary Bulletin 2006/1 in March 2006. QMM is used by the Bank for forecasting and various policy simulations and therefore plays a key role as an organisational framework for viewing the medium-term future when formulating monetary policy at the Bank. This paper...

  13. The Terrestrial Investigation Model: A probabilistic risk assessment model for birds exposed to pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the major recommendations of the National Academy of Science to the USEPA, NMFS and USFWS was to utilize probabilistic methods when assessing the risks of pesticides to federally listed endangered and threatened species. The Terrestrial Investigation Model (TIM, version 3....

  14. Blade Assessment for Ice Impact (BLASIM). User's manual, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, E. S.; Abumeri, G. H.

    1993-04-01

    The Blade Assessment Ice Impact (BLASIM) computer code can analyze solid, hollow, composite, and super hybrid blades. The solid blade is made up of a single material where hollow, composite, and super hybrid blades are constructed with prescribed composite layup. The properties of a composite blade can be specified by inputting one of two options: (1) individual ply properties, or (2) fiber/matrix combinations. When the second option is selected, BLASIM utilizes ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer) to generate the temperature/moisture dependent ply properties of the composite blade. Two types of geometry input can be given: airfoil coordinates or NASTRAN type finite element model. These features increase the flexibility of the program. The user's manual provides sample cases to facilitate efficient use of the code while gaining familiarity.

  15. Integrated Environmental Assessment Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardanz, R.; Gimeno, B. S.; Bermejo, V.; Elvira, S.; Martin, F.; Palacios, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Donaire, I. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the results of the Spanish participation in the project Coupling CORINAIR data to cost-effect emission reduction strategies based on critical threshold. (EU/LIFE97/ENV/FIN/336). The subproject has focused on three tasks. Develop tools to improve knowledge on the spatial and temporal details of emissions of air pollutants in Spain. Exploit existing experimental information on plant response to air pollutants in temperate ecosystem and Integrate these findings in a modelling framework that can asses with more accuracy the impact of air pollutants to temperate ecosystems. The results obtained during the execution of this project have significantly improved the models of the impact of alternative emission control strategies on ecosystems and crops in the Iberian Peninsula. (Author) 375 refs.

  16. Actuarial Assessment of Sex Offender Recidivism Risk: A Validation of the German version of the Static-991

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rettenberger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Static-99 and the RRASOR are actuarial risk assessment tools for evaluating the risk of sexual and violent recidivism in sexual offenders. The Static-99 was developed in 1999 by Karl R. Hanson (Canada and David Thornton (Great Britain and is in the mean time regularly used for risk assessment in North America and some countries in Europe. The RRASOR can be described as a predecessor of the Static-99 and was published by Hanson in 1997. At first we translated the revised version of the Static-99 (Harris, Phenix, Hanson & Thornton, 2003 and adapted the instrument and the manual to the forensic context in Germany and Austria (Rettenberger & Eher, 2006. In this retrospective study, interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the RRASOR and of the German adaption of the Static-99 is presented. Furthermore we evaluated the predictive accuracy of the Static-99 and the RRASOR and compared their results. The instruments were validated from file information of Austrian sexuel offenders, who were convicted between 1968 and 2002. Both the Static-99 and the RRASOR had good interrater reliability and concurrent validity. The Static-99 showed good predictive validity for general (r = .41, AUC = .74, sexual (r = .35, AUC = .74 and violent (r = .41, AUC = .76 recidivism, whereas the predictive accuracy of the RRASOR was moderate for general (r = .29, AUC = .66, sexual (r = .30, AUC = .68 and violent (r = .28, AUC = .67 recidivism. The Static-99 exhibited a higher accuracy for the prediction of sexual offender recidivism. Although further validation studies on German-speaking populations of sex offenders are necessary, these results support the utility of the German version of the revised version of the Static-99 in improving risk assessment of sexual offenders.

  17. Assessing sexual problems in women at midlife using the short version of the female sexual function index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedraui, Peter; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of sexual function is a complex process, especially in women, which requires in any individual case: time, appropriate training and experience. The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction is quite variable depending on the studied population, assessment methods, comorbid conditions and treatments, and age. A large number of screening methods have been developed over the last decades which range from tedious, exhaustive and boring tools to very simple standardized questionnaires. The 19-item female sexual function index (FSFI-19) is among the most used and useful- instrument designed to assess female sexual function in all types of circumstances, sexual orientation and perform the comparison of transcultural factors. A short 6-item- version of the FSFI-19 has been developed to provide a quick general approach to the six original domains (one item per domain). Nevertheless, further studies are needed to demonstrate its validity in different clinical situations as it has been extensively demonstrated with the original tool. PMID:26323235

  18. User guide for MODPATH version 6 - A particle-tracking model for MODFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, David W.

    2012-01-01

    MODPATH is a particle-tracking post-processing model that computes three-dimensional flow paths using output from groundwater flow simulations based on MODFLOW, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) finite-difference groundwater flow model. This report documents MODPATH version 6. Previous versions were documented in USGS Open-File Reports 89-381 and 94-464. The program uses a semianalytical particle-tracking scheme that allows an analytical expression of a particle's flow path to be obtained within each finite-difference grid cell. A particle's path is computed by tracking the particle from one cell to the next until it reaches a boundary, an internal sink/source, or satisfies another termination criterion. Data input to MODPATH consists of a combination of MODFLOW input data files, MODFLOW head and flow output files, and other input files specific to MODPATH. Output from MODPATH consists of several output files, including a number of particle coordinate output files intended to serve as input data for other programs that process, analyze, and display the results in various ways. MODPATH is written in FORTRAN and can be compiled by any FORTRAN compiler that fully supports FORTRAN-2003 or by most commercially available FORTRAN-95 compilers that support the major FORTRAN-2003 language extensions.

  19. Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale - Thai Version: Translation and Assessment of Psychometric Properties Among Psychiatric Outpatients in Central Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Anuchit, Choochart; Mills, Andrew C; Schneider, Joanne Kraenzle; Rujkorakarn, Darunee; Kerdpongbunchote, Chusri; Panyayong, Benjaporn

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the translation of the English Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale into Thai and assessment of its psychometric properties. After forward- and backward-translation, Thai experts completed the content validity index with item agreements of .86 to 1.00. Data were collected from 390 psychiatric clinic patients in central Thailand using systematic random sampling. Unweighted least squares factor analysis with Promax rotation identified five subscales. Cronbach's alpha for scale reliability was .88, and correlations for construct validity ranged from r=.55 to .69. These findings support the validity and reliability of the Thai version of the scale. PMID:27455917

  20. Assessment of the SF-36 version 2 in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkinson, C.; STEWART-BROWN, S.; Petersen, S.; Paice, C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To introduce the UK SF36 Version II (SF36-II), and to (a) gain population norms for the UK SF36-II in a large community sample as well as to explore the instrument's internal consistency reliability and construct validity, and (b) to derive the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) algorithms for the UK SF36-II. DESIGN: Postal survey using a questionnaire booklet, containing the SF-36-II and questions on demographics and long term illness. SETTI...

  1. The Assessment Cycle: A Model for Learning through Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper advances a model describing how peer assessment supports self-assessment. Although prior research demonstrates that peer assessment promotes self-assessment, the connection between these two activities is underspecified. This model, the assessment cycle, draws from theories of self-assessment to elaborate how learning takes place…

  2. Version 3.0 of code Java for 3D simulation of the CCA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kebo; Zuo, Junsen; Dou, Yifeng; Li, Chao; Xiong, Hailing

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we provide a new version of program for replacing the previous version. The frequency of traversing the clusters-list was reduced, and some code blocks were optimized properly; in addition, we appended and revised the comments of the source code for some methods or attributes. The compared experimental results show that new version has better time efficiency than the previous version.

  3. APPLICATION OF TWO VERSIONS OF A RNG BASED k-ε MODEL TO NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF TURBULENT IMPINGING JET FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qing-guang; Xu Zhong; Zhang Yong-jian

    2003-01-01

    Two independent versions of the RNG based k-ε turbulence model in conjunction with the law of the wall have been applied to the numerical simulation of an axisymmetric turbulent impinging jet flow field. The two model predictions are compared with those of the standard k-ε model and with the experimental data measured by LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry). It shows that the original version of the RNG k-ε model with the choice of Cε1=1.063 can not yield good results, among them the predicted turbulent kinetic energy profiles in the vicinity of the stagnation region are even worse than those predicted by the standard k-ε model. However, the new version of RNG k-ε model behaves well. This is mainly due to the corrections to the constants Cε1 and Cε2 along with a modification of the production term to account for non-equilibrium strain rates in the flow.

  4. Igpet software for modeling igneous processes: examples of application using the open educational version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael J.; Gazel, Esteban

    2016-09-01

    We provide here an open version of Igpet software, called t-Igpet to emphasize its application for teaching and research in forward modeling of igneous geochemistry. There are three programs, a norm utility, a petrologic mixing program using least squares and Igpet, a graphics program that includes many forms of numerical modeling. Igpet is a multifaceted tool that provides the following basic capabilities: igneous rock identification using the IUGS (International Union of Geological Sciences) classification and several supplementary diagrams; tectonic discrimination diagrams; pseudo-quaternary projections; least squares fitting of lines, polynomials and hyperbolae; magma mixing using two endmembers, histograms, x-y plots, ternary plots and spider-diagrams. The advanced capabilities of Igpet are multi-element mixing and magma evolution modeling. Mixing models are particularly useful for understanding the isotopic variations in rock suites that evolved by mixing different sources. The important melting models include, batch melting, fractional melting and aggregated fractional melting. Crystallization models include equilibrium and fractional crystallization and AFC (assimilation and fractional crystallization). Theses, reports and proposals concerning igneous petrology are improved by numerical modeling. For reviewed publications some elements of modeling are practically a requirement. Our intention in providing this software is to facilitate improved communication and lower entry barriers to research, especially for students.

  5. Exact solution for a metapopulation version of Schelling’s model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrett, Richard; Zhang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    In 1971, Schelling introduced a model in which families move if they have too many neighbors of the opposite type. In this paper, we will consider a metapopulation version of the model in which a city is divided into N neighborhoods, each of which has L houses. There are ρNL red families and ρNL blue families for some ρ ρb, a new segregated equilibrium appears; for ρb < ρ < ρd, there is bistability, but when ρ increases past ρd the random state is no longer stable. When ρc is small enough, the random state will again be the stationary distribution when ρ is close to 1/2. If so, this is preceded by a region of bistability. PMID:25225367

  6. Validity study of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (Portuguese version by the Rasch Rating Scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Quintão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to conduct a validation study of the Portuguese version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI by means of the Rasch Rating Scale Model, and then compare it with the most used scales of anxiety in Portugal. The sample consisted of 1,160 adults (427 men and 733 women, aged 18-82 years old (M=33.39; SD=11.85. Instruments were Beck Anxiety Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. It was found that Beck Anxiety Inventory's system of four categories, the data-model fit, and people reliability were adequate. The measure can be considered as unidimensional. Gender and age-related differences were not a threat to the validity. BAI correlated significantly with other anxiety measures. In conclusion, BAI shows good psychometric quality.

  7. Description of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Goosse

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and sea ice, the land surface (including vegetation, the ice sheets, the icebergs and the carbon cycle. The atmospheric component is ECBilt2, a T21, 3-level quasi-geostrophic model. The oceanic component is CLIO3, which is made up of an ocean general circulation model coupled to a comprehensive thermodynamic-dynamic sea-ice model. Its horizontal resolution is 3° by 3°, and there are 20 levels in the ocean. ECBilt-CLIO is coupled to VECODE, a vegetation model that simulates the dynamics of two main terrestrial plant functional types, trees and grasses, as well as desert. VECODE also simulates the evolution of the carbon cycle over land while the oceanic carbon cycle is represented in LOCH, a comprehensive model that takes into account both the solubility and biological pumps. The ice sheet component AGISM is made up of a three-dimensional thermomechanical model of the ice sheet flow, a visco-elastic bedrock model and a model of the mass balance at the ice-atmosphere and ice ocean interfaces. For both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, calculations are made on a 10 km by 10 km resolution grid with 31 sigma levels. LOVECLIM 1.2 reproduces well the major characteristics of the observed climate both for present-day conditions and for key past periods such as the last millennium, the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum. However, despite some improvements compared to earlier versions, some biases are still present in the model. The most serious ones are mainly located at low latitudes with an overestimation of the temperature there, a too symmetric distribution of precipitation between the two hemispheres, an overestimation of precipitation and vegetation cover in the subtropics. In addition, the atmospheric circulation is

  8. Development and validation of a short version of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT among professionals in Dutch disease-management partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieboer Anna P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which partnership synergy is created within quality improvement programmes in the Netherlands is unknown. In this article, we describe the psychometric testing of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT among professionals in twenty-two disease-management partnerships participating in quality improvement projects focused on chronic care in the Netherlands. Our objectives are to validate the PSAT in the Netherlands and to reduce the number of items of the original PSAT while maintaining validity and reliability. Methods The Dutch version of the PSAT was tested in twenty-two disease-management partnerships with 218 professionals. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity and reliability. Results After eliminating 14 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 15-item PSAT-Short version (PSAT-S. Internal consistency as represented by Cronbach's alpha ranged from acceptable (0.75 for the 'efficiency' subscale to excellent for the 'leadership' subscale (0.87. Convergent validity was provided with high correlations of the partnership dimensions and partnership synergy (ranged from 0.512 to 0.609 and high correlations with chronic illness care (ranged from 0.447 to 0.329. Conclusion The psychometric properties and convergent validity of the PSAT-S were satisfactory rendering it a valid and reliable instrument for assessing partnership synergy and its dimensions of partnership functioning.

  9. Validity and reliability assessment of the Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale Arabic version in Saudi nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas P; Colet, Paolo C; Al-Otaibi, Jazi H; Soriano, Shiela S; Cacho, Gabby M; Cruz, Charlie P

    2016-01-01

    Strict compliance with standard precautions (SPs) is warranted to ensure the safety of patients in healthcare facilities. Nursing students (NSs), who are regarded as nurses in training, potentially play a role in cross-contamination in the hospital. NSs are also at high risk of acquiring infections in cases of ineffective compliance with SPs. Thus, an assessment of NSs' compliance with SPs should be conducted on a regular basis, which necessitates a valid and reliable tool. This study was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale Arabic version (CSPS-A) in Saudi NSs. A convenient sample of 230 respondents (158 NSs and 72 staff nurses) was included in this descriptive, cross-sectional study. The CSPS English version was translated into the Arabic language following a recommended guideline from cross-cultural adaptation and translation instruments. The Cronbach's alpha, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of the test-retest scores, and the item-total correlations (ITC) were computed to establish the reliability. Content validity and construct validity by the known-groups method and hypothesis testing method were performed. The CSPS-A exhibited good internal consistency and reliability (Cronbach's alpha, 0.89; ICC, 0.88; ITCs, 0.325-0.728). A satisfactory content and construct validity was also reported. The CSPS-A is a valid and reliable tool that can measure the compliance to SPs among NSs in Saudi Arabia. PMID:26947548

  10. Construction of an instrument designed to assess prosocial reasoning in children aged 7 to 8: a graphic version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Noemí Lemos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop an instrument that would allow the assessment of prosocial thinking in children of 7 and 8 years of age. This work presents the procedures that were followed and the psychometric results of a version with pictographic support.A consistency was observed in the hierarchy of prosocial reasoning applied by children in each of the stories used in this instrument. The indexes of internal consistency were acceptable, based on the age of the children and the complexity of the construct being assessed. Results consistent with the theory were also found, as regards the relationship between the types of prosocial reasoning and the differences between sex and age, which support the construct validity of the instrument.

  11. Hydrogeochemical evaluation for Simpevarp model version 1.2. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to April, 2004. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1.7 km. Model version 1.2 focusses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1000 m depth. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1000 m depending on local topography. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical groups of groundwaters (types A-D) have been identified: TYPE A: This type comprises dilute groundwaters (3 type present at shallow (300 m) levels at Simpevarp, and at even greater depths (approx. 1200 m) at Laxemar. At Simpevarp the groundwaters are mainly Na-Ca-Cl with increasingly enhanced Br and SO4 with depth. At Laxemar they are mainly Ca-Na-Cl also with increasing enhancements of Br and SO4 with depth. Main reactions involve ion exchange (Ca). At both sites a glacial component and a deep saline component are present. At Simpevarp the saline component may be potentially non marine and/or non-marine/old Littorina marine in origin; at Laxemar it is more likely to be non-marine in origin. TYPE D: This type comprises reducing highly saline groundwaters (> 20 000 mg/L Cl; to a maximum of ∼70 g/L TDS) and only has been identified at Laxemar at depths exceeding 1200 m. It is mainly Ca-Na-Cl with higher Br but lower SO4 compared to

  12. Diagnostic and assessment models patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Núñez Martínez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A bibliographic review was carried out about the professional competence assessment of human resources in the Health System and the main characteristics of different models that contribute to their improvement, establishing direct links with the present context of National Health System in Cuba. We include trends and common practices related with assessment models, highlighting those aspects associated with professional competence assessment and its inclusion in the dynamic of a strategy to increase the quality of human resources in Health Services. It has been proved that the appropriate assessment of competences among these professionals assures, through its results, to make valuable decisions on the need of knowledge associated with skills and attitudes that should be present in their daily professional practice.

  13. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2/version 3 daytime aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP, on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010. To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. space-borne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73 while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm. This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i CALIOP's low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth's surface; (ii the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa used in CALIOP's extinction retrievals; and (iv calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction

  14. Reliability of Malayalam version of Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index among institutionalized elderly in Alleppey, Kerala (India): A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Kuldeep Singh; Chauhan, Arunima; Koshy, Anitha Ann; Rekha, P.; Kumar, Hemanth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral health has a profound effect on the daily activities of geriatric group. India being a multilingual country, it is essential that instruments used to evaluate the quality of life is in local languages. However, the validation and translational aspect are important before involving a larger cohort of geriatrics. Aim: To assess the reliability of Malayalam version of Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI-m). Settings and Design: Institutionalized elderly in Alleppey, Kerala, cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The 12 items in GOHAI were translated into Malayalam using a back-translation technique. The comprehensibility of the Malayalam version was assessed by a pilot study. Fifty institutionalized elderly answered the questionnaire. Impact based on age and marital status was also assessed. Statistical Analysis: Independent sample t-test, Cronbach's alpha, test–retest reliability using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The mean GOHAI-m scores were higher for elderly participants with slightly more impact on quality of life such as for biting or chewing food, and lower mean GOHAI-m scores indicated a positive impact on quality of life such as their self-conscious of oral health. Cronbach's alpha of 0.677 was reached with 12 items. Item 12 had a negative item-total correlation, −0.016, the deletion of Item-12 increased the item correlation to 0.7. Test–retest reliability of 0.65 for ICC indicated moderate stability. Females had more impact than males (P < 0.05). Age and marital status had no impact on their quality of life. Conclusion: The primary analysis of GOHAI-m indicated moderate stability. The elimination of negative items depends on the objectives of the study and/or after conducting a larger study keeping in view various parameters of the study. PMID:27307659

  15. The Yale Interactive terrestrial Biosphere model version 1.0: description, evaluation and implementation into NASA GISS ModelE2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Unger, N.

    2015-08-01

    The land biosphere, atmospheric chemistry and climate are intricately interconnected, yet the modeling of carbon-climate and chemistry-climate interactions have evolved as entirely separate research communities. We describe the Yale Interactive terrestrial Biosphere (YIBs) model version 1.0, a land carbon cycle model that has been developed for coupling to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2 global chemistry-climate model. The YIBs model adapts routines from the mature TRIFFID (Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics) and CASA (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach) models to simulate interactive carbon assimilation, allocation, and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. Dynamic daily leaf area index is simulated based on carbon allocation and temperature- and drought-dependent prognostic phenology. YIBs incorporates a semi-mechanistic ozone vegetation damage scheme. Here, we validate the present-day YIBs land carbon fluxes for three increasingly complex configurations: (i) offline local site level, (ii) offline global forced with WFDEI (WATCH Forcing Data methodology applied to ERA-Interim data) meteorology, and (iii) online coupled to the NASA ModelE2 (NASA ModelE2-YIBs). Offline YIBs has hourly and online YIBs has half-hourly temporal resolution. The large observational database used for validation includes carbon fluxes from 145 flux tower sites and multiple satellite products. At the site level, YIBs simulates reasonable seasonality (correlation coefficient R > 0.8) of gross primary productivity (GPP) at 121 out of 145 sites with biases in magnitude ranging from -19 to 7 % depending on plant functional type. On the global scale, the offline model simulates an annual GPP of 125 ± 3 Pg C and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of -2.5 ± 0.7 Pg C for 1982-2011, with seasonality and spatial distribution consistent with the satellite observations. We assess present-day global ozone vegetation damage using the

  16. The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System Model,Spectral Version 2:FGOALS-s2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Qing; LIN Pengfei; ZHOU Tianjun; LIU Yimin; YU Yongqiang; WU Guoxiong; HE Bian

    2013-01-01

    The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model,Spectral Version 2 (FGOALS-s2) was used to simulate realistic climates and to study anthropogenic influences on climate change.Specifically,the FGOALS-s2 was integrated with Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) to conduct coordinated experiments that will provide valuable scientific information to climate research communities.The performances of FGOALS-s2 were assessed in simulating major climate phenomena,and documented both the strengths and weaknesses of the model.The results indicate that FGOALS-s2 successfully overcomes climate drift,and realistically models global and regional climate characteristics,including SST,precipitation,and atmospheric circulation.In particular,the model accurately captures annual and semi-annual SST cycles in the equatorial Pacific Ocean,and the main characteristic features of the Asian summer monsoon,which include a low-level southwestern jet and five monsoon rainfall centers.The simulated climate variability was further examined in terms of teleconnections,leading modes of global SST (namely,ENSO),Pacific Decadal Oscillations (PDO),and changes in 19th-20th century climate.The analysis demonstrates that FGOALS-s2 realistically simulates extra-tropical teleconnection patterns of large-scale climate,and irregular ENSO periods.The model gives fairly reasonable reconstructions of spatial patterns of PDO and global monsoon changes in the 20th century.However,because the indirect effects of aerosols are not included in the model,the simulated global temperature change during the period 1850-2005 is greater than the observed warming,by 0.6℃.Some other shortcomings of the model are also noted.

  17. A new version of the NeQuick ionosphere electron density model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, B.; Coïsson, P.; Radicella, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    NeQuick is a three-dimensional and time dependent ionospheric electron density model developed at the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy and at the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology of the University of Graz, Austria. It is a quick-run model particularly tailored for trans-ionospheric applications that allows one to calculate the electron concentration at any given location in the ionosphere and thus the total electron content (TEC) along any ground-to-satellite ray-path by means of numerical integration. Taking advantage of the increasing amount of available data, the model formulation is continuously updated to improve NeQuick capabilities to provide representations of the ionosphere at global scales. Recently, major changes have been introduced in the model topside formulation and important modifications have also been introduced in the bottomside description. In addition, specific revisions have been applied to the computer package associated to NeQuick in order to improve its computational efficiency. It has therefore been considered appropriate to finalize all the model developments in a new version of the NeQuick. In the present work the main features of NeQuick 2 are illustrated and some results related to validation tests are reported.

  18. A description of the FAMOUS (version XDBUA climate model and control run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Osprey

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, capable of simulating approximately 120 years of model climate per wallclock day using current high performance computing facilities. It uses most of the same code as HadCM3, a widely used climate model of higher resolution and computational cost, and has been tuned to reproduce the same climate reasonably well. FAMOUS is useful for climate simulations where the computational cost makes the application of HadCM3 unfeasible, either because of the length of simulation or the size of the ensemble desired. We document a number of scientific and technical improvements to the original version of FAMOUS. These improvements include changes to the parameterisations of ozone and sea-ice which alleviate a significant cold bias from high northern latitudes and the upper troposphere, and the elimination of volume-averaged drifts in ocean tracers. A simple model of the marine carbon cycle has also been included. A particular goal of FAMOUS is to conduct millennial-scale paleoclimate simulations of Quaternary ice ages; to this end, a number of useful changes to the model infrastructure have been made.

  19. Investigating Key Psychometric Properties of the French Version of the Early Years Evaluation-Teacher Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Robert; Sloat, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates key psychometric properties of the French Early Years Evaluation-Teacher Assessment measure designed to systematically assess kindergarten children across five social and academic developmental domains: awareness of self and environment, social skills and behaviour, cognitive abilities, language and communication, and…

  20. Solid waste projection model: Database user's guide (Version 1.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for preparing to use Version 1 of the SWPM database, for entering and maintaining data, and for performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions, and does not provide instructions in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established. 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database User`s Guide. Version 1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for using Version 1.4 of the SWPM database: system requirements and preparation, entering and maintaining data, and performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions and does not Provide instruction in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established.

  2. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Forsmark site, model version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [GeoPoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Gimeno, Maria; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Gurban, Ioana [3D-Terra, Montreal (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Forsmark and Simpevarp, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, geochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Forsmark groundwater analytical data collected up to May 1, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze'). The HAG group had access to a total of 456 water samples collected mostly from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest samples reflected depths down to 200 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (74%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Forsmark are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and closeness to the Baltic Sea resulting in relative small hydrogeological driving forces which can preserve old water types from being flushed out, b) the changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Based on the general geochemical character and the apparent age two major water types occur in Forsmark: fresh-meteoric waters with a bicarbonate imprint and low residence times (tritium values above detection limit), and brackish-marine waters with Cl contents up to 6,000 mg/L and longer residence times (tritium

  3. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Forsmark site, model version 1.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Forsmark and Simpevarp, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, geochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Forsmark groundwater analytical data collected up to May 1, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze'). The HAG group had access to a total of 456 water samples collected mostly from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest samples reflected depths down to 200 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (74%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Forsmark are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and closeness to the Baltic Sea resulting in relative small hydrogeological driving forces which can preserve old water types from being flushed out, b) the changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Based on the general geochemical character and the apparent age two major water types occur in Forsmark: fresh-meteoric waters with a bicarbonate imprint and low residence times (tritium values above detection limit), and brackish-marine waters with Cl contents up to 6,000 mg/L and longer residence times (tritium values below

  4. Thermal modelling. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Wrafter, John; Back, Paer-Erik; Laendell, Maerta [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2006-02-15

    This report presents the thermal site descriptive model for the Laxemar subarea, version 1.2. The main objective of this report is to present the thermal modelling work where data has been identified, quality controlled, evaluated and summarised in order to make an upscaling to lithological domain level possible. The thermal conductivity at canister scale has been modelled for five different lithological domains: RSMA (Aevroe granite), RSMBA (mixture of Aevroe granite and fine-grained dioritoid), RSMD (quartz monzodiorite), RSME (diorite/gabbro) and RSMM (mix domain with high frequency of diorite to gabbro). A base modelling approach has been used to determine the mean value of the thermal conductivity. Four alternative/complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the spatial variability of the thermal conductivity at domain level. The thermal modelling approaches are based on the lithological domain model for the Laxemar subarea, version 1.2 together with rock type models based on measured and calculated (from mineral composition) thermal conductivities. For one rock type, Aevroe granite (501044), density loggings have also been used in the domain modelling in order to evaluate the spatial variability within the Aevroe granite. This has been possible due to an established relationship between density and thermal conductivity, valid for the Aevroe granite. Results indicate that the means of thermal conductivity for the various domains are expected to exhibit a variation from 2.45 W/(m.K) to 2.87 W/(m.K). The standard deviation varies according to the scale considered, and for the 0.8 m scale it is expected to range from 0.17 to 0.29 W/(m.K). Estimates of lower tail percentiles for the same scale are presented for all five domains. The temperature dependence is rather small with a decrease in thermal conductivity of 1.1-5.3% per 100 deg C increase in temperature for the dominant rock types. There are a number of important uncertainties associated with these

  5. Thermal modelling. Preliminary site description Simpevarp subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Back, Paer-Erik; Bengtsson, Anna; Laendell, Maerta [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-08-15

    This report presents the thermal site descriptive model for the Simpevarp subarea, version 1.2. The main objective of this report is to present the thermal modelling work where data has been identified, quality controlled, evaluated and summarised in order to make an upscaling to lithological domain level possible. The thermal conductivity at possible canister scale has been modelled for four different lithological domains (RSMA01 (Aevroe granite), RSMB01 (Fine-grained dioritoid), RSMC01 (mixture of Aevroe granite and Quartz monzodiorite), and RSMD01 (Quartz monzodiorite)). A main modelling approach has been used to determine the mean value of the thermal conductivity. Three alternative/complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the spatial variability of the thermal conductivity at domain level. The thermal modelling approaches are based on the lithological model for the Simpevarp subarea, version 1.2 together with rock type models constituted from measured and calculated (from mineral composition) thermal conductivities. For one rock type, the Aevroe granite (501044), density loggings within the specific rock type has also been used in the domain modelling in order to consider the spatial variability within the Aevroe granite. This has been possible due to the presented relationship between density and thermal conductivity, valid for the Aevroe granite. Results indicate that the mean of thermal conductivity is expected to exhibit only a small variation between the different domains, from 2.62 W/(m.K) to 2.80 W/(m.K). The standard deviation varies according to the scale considered and for the canister scale it is expected to range from 0.20 to 0.28 W/(m.K). Consequently, the lower confidence limit (95% confidence) for the canister scale is within the range 2.04-2.35 W/(m.K) for the different domains. The temperature dependence is rather small with a decrease in thermal conductivity of 1.1-3.4% per 100 deg C increase in temperature for the dominating rock

  6. The response of plants to interacting stresses: PGSM Version 1.3 model documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the principles and application procedures of the Plant-Growth-Stress model (PGSM) Version 1.3 as of December 1992. The PGSM model simulates a tree growing in soil, subject to the real time stimulation of CO2 and stresses of ozone, acid deposition, drought, and nutrient deficiency. The model is coded with instructions for how a tree grows and reacts to air and soil environments. It is also coded with information about biogeochemical processes occurring in the soil. The model begins with initial conditions of tree and soil characteristics. Each day, the model updates the meteorological and air quality conditions from input files. According to the coded instructions, the model simulates hydrological, geochemical, and physiological processes to generate the daily output of tree parameters (sugar production, nutrient uptake, growth and mortality of canopy, roots, and stem) and soil parameters (moisture, temperature, and ion concentrations). The model also keeps track of water deficit, ozone damage, nutrient deficiency, and aluminum toxicity. The model uses an hourly time step for photosynthesis and a daily time step for all other processes. It can be set up to run for as many years as desired, to show growth from a small seedling to a large mature tree. Menus are provided for the on-screen changes of input data and on-screen review of graphical outputs. Model application requires a step by step procedure of data acquisition, calibration to seedlings data from fumigation experiments, extension to mature trees in forest plots, sensitivity analysis, hypothesis testing, scenario evaluation, and uncertainty analysis. Real time climate conditions (temperature and precipitation) and air pollution levels (CO2, O3, SO2, SO4, etc.) can be altered for scenario evaluations

  7. Original and entropy-corrected versions of the holographic and new agegraphic f(T)-gravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Karami, K

    2013-01-01

    In the present work we obtain the different $f(T)$-gravity models corresponding to the original and entropy-corrected versions of the holographic and new agegraphic dark energy models. We conclude that the equation of state parameter of the holographic and new agegraphic $f(T)$-gravity models always crosses the phantom-divide line. Whereas for the entropy-corrected models, crossing the phantom-divide line depends on the constant parameters of the models.

  8. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  9. User manual for GEOCOST: a computer model for geothermal cost analysis. Volume 2. Binary cycle version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Walter, R.A.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1976-03-01

    A computer model called GEOCOST has been developed to simulate the production of electricity from geothermal resources and calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. GEOCOST combines resource characteristics, power recovery technology, tax rates, and financial factors into one systematic model and provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate their impacts on the cost of geothermal power. Both the geothermal reservoir and power plant are simulated to model the complete energy production system. In the version of GEOCOST in this report, geothermal fluid is supplied from wells distributed throughout a hydrothermal reservoir through insulated pipelines to a binary power plant. The power plant is simulated using a binary fluid cycle in which the geothermal fluid is passed through a series of heat exchangers. The thermodynamic state points in basic subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles are calculated for a variety of working fluids. Working fluids which are now in the model include isobutane, n-butane, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-113, R-114, and ammonia. Thermodynamic properties of the working fluids at the state points are calculated using empirical equations of state. The Starling equation of state is used for hydrocarbons and the Martin-Hou equation of state is used for fluorocarbons and ammonia. Physical properties of working fluids at the state points are calculated.

  10. The MARINA model (Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs)

    OpenAIRE

    Strokal, Maryna; Kroeze, Carolien; Wang, Mengru; Bai, Zhaohai; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chinese agriculture has been developing fast towards industrial food production systems that discharge nutrient-rich wastewater into rivers. As a result, nutrient export by rivers has been increasing, resulting in coastal water pollution. We developed a Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs (MARINA) for China. The MARINA Nutrient Model quantifies river export of nutrients by source at the sub-basin scale as a function of human activities on land. MARINA is a downscaled version for...

  11. HRST architecture modeling and assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents work supporting the assessment of advanced concept options for the Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) study. It describes the development of computer models as the basis for creating an integrated capability to evaluate the economic feasibility and sustainability of a variety of system architectures. It summarizes modeling capabilities for use on the HRST study to perform sensitivity analysis of alternative architectures (consisting of different combinations of highly reusable vehicles, launch assist systems, and alternative operations and support concepts) in terms of cost, schedule, performance, and demand. In addition, the identification and preliminary assessment of alternative market segments for HRST applications, such as space manufacturing, space tourism, etc., is described. Finally, the development of an initial prototype model that can begin to be used for modeling alternative HRST concepts at the system level is presented.

  12. Coupling animo with Fussim : technical documentation of the coupled model running in the Fortran Simulation Environment version 4.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappoldt, C.; Heinen, M.; Groenendijk, P.

    2008-01-01

    The model Animo for nutrient management and nutrient conversion processes in a onedimensional soil column has been adapted for running under FSE, the Fortran SImulation Environment version 4.4. The FSE4 environment synchronizes the execution of coupled simulation models and facilitates the exchange

  13. The psychological mindedness assessment procedure - validation study of a Dutch version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Smith; W.Chr. Kleijn; R.W. Trijsburg; J.A. Segaar; C.P.F. van der Staak; G.J.M. Hutschemaekers

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The Psychological Mindedness Assessment Procedure [PMAP; McCallum, M. & Piper, W. E. (1990)] operationalizes psychological mindedness as a participant's understanding of the problem presented by two videotaped enacted patients. To possibly enhance predictive power for psychotherapy outcom

  14. The psychological mindedness assessment procedure - Validation study of a Dutch version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Smith (Annemarie J.); W.Chr. Kleijn (Wim); R.W. Trijsburg (Wim); R.W. Segaar (Robert); C. van der Staak; G.J.M. Hutschemaekers (Giel J.)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjective. The Psychological Mindedness Assessment Procedure [PMAP; McCallum, M. & Piper, W. E. (1990)] operationalizes psychological mindedness as a participant's understanding of the problem presented by two videotaped enacted patients. To possibly enhance predictive power for psychoth

  15. Assessing the reliability and validity of a shorter version of RIASEC in Turkish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süerdem Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Holland’s RIASEC types are being frequently utilized in commercial vocational profiling tools for various human resources purposes. On the other hand, the length of the RIASEC scale and the copyright restrictions put by the publishers, are important barriers to application. In the present study, a RIASEC scale consisting of 41 items and adapted to Turkish language and culture, was developed. Each RIASEC type was represented with 6 or 7 items. Responses were obtained from a sample of 364 business professionals. Survey results indicated a good reliability for the scale, with a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.889. However, reliability analysis pointed out to the need for revision of certain scale items when each RIASEC facet was separately analysed. Then, feedback regarding scale composition, wording and structure were gathered from 20 PhD students. Lastly, feedback of 7 HR professionals were sought, regarding scale items’ expression and application of the scale in regular HR processes of companies. Results from face and content validity have been that for some items of the scale, more descriptive and specific expressions in Turkish are required. Moreover, some of the items would need to be reallocated to another facet where they would be more relevant. In line with findings from face and content validity, construct validity through confirmatory factor analysis also indicated that the short version of RIASEC must be revised substantially in order to become a valid tool for vocational profiling in Turkish context.

  16. Reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item CTS symptoms scale for outcomes assessment in carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales, Roberto S.; Martin-Hidalgo, Yolanda; Reboso-Morales, Luis; Atroshi, Isam

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms scale (CTS-6). Methods In this cross-sectional study 40 patients diagnosed with CTS based on clinical and neurophysiologic criteria, completed the standard Spanish versions of the CTS-6 and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (QuickDASH) scales on two occasions with a 1-week interval. Internal-consistency reliability wa...

  17. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_C Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima; Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP satellite was successfully launched January 31st 2015, and began acquiring Earth observation data following in-orbit sensor calibration. Global data products derived from the SMAP L-band microwave measurements include Level 1 calibrated and geolocated radiometric brightness temperatures, Level 23 surface soil moisture and freezethaw geophysical retrievals mapped to a fixed Earth grid, and model enhanced Level 4 data products for surface to root zone soil moisture and terrestrial carbon (CO2) fluxes. The post-launch SMAP mission CalVal Phase had two primary objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product pertaining to the validated release. The L4_C validated product release effectively replaces an earlier L4_C beta-product release (Kimball et al. 2015). The validated release described in this report incorporates a longer data record and benefits from algorithm and CalVal refinements acquired during the SMAP post-launch CalVal intensive period. The SMAP L4_C algorithms utilize a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and component carbon fluxes for vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw (FT) controls on GPP and respiration (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and

  18. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  19. Assessment of the Psychometric Properties of the New Version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet Intelligence Scale in Children with Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Mahvashe-Wernosfaderani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive abilities assessment, is considered to be one of the most complicated and controversial issues in psychological tests. In spite of great usage of new version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet intelligence scale in screening and diagnosis, they have not made so many endeavors to use this valid test in our country and little researches have been conducted to survey psychometric characteristics of mentioned scale. Given the above considerations, the aim of this study is to investigate Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence scale psychometric characteristics in dyslectic children. Materials and Methods: In this psychometric study with classical approach, the statistical society was all the students with dyslexia in the elementary schools of Tehran provinces in 1390. The sample size was equal with 120 students with dyslexia who were selected based on purposive sampling. The new version of Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence Scale which includes 10 subtests in verbal and nonverbal domains (fluid reasoning, knowledge, quantitative reasoning, visual spatial processing and working memory and eight IQ was used for them. Findings highlight characteristics of this tool is its ability to calculate the combined scores connected to the reading skills. ROC curve methods, kronbach alpha and pearson correlation was used to analyze the data. Results: Result show that SB5 Test has a good reliability and diagnostic validity. It has 98% sensitivity and a desirable potential to identify student with dyslexia (72%. Conclusion: SB5 could be used as an identificationtoal test for dyslexia.

  20. A Malay version of the Child Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (Child-OIDP index: assessing validity and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusof Zamros YM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study aimed to develop and test a Malay version of the Child-OIDP index, evaluate its psychometric properties and report on the prevalence of oral impacts on eight daily performances in a sample of 11–12 year old Malaysian schoolchildren. Methods The Child-OIDP index was translated from English into Malay. The Malay version was tested for reliability and validity on a non-random sample of 132, 11–12 year old schoolchildren from two urban schools in Kuala Lumpur. Psychometric analysis of the Malay Child-OIDP involved face, content, criterion and construct validity tests as well as internal and test-retest reliability. Non-parametric statistical methods were used to assess relationships between Child-OIDP scores and other subjective outcome measures. Results The standardised Cronbach’s alpha was 0.80 and the weighted Kappa was 0.84 (intraclass correlation = 0.79. The index showed significant associations with different subjective measures viz. perceived satisfaction with mouth, perceived needs for dental treatment, perceived oral health status and toothache experience in the previous 3 months (p  Conclusion This study indicated that the Malay Child-OIDP index is a valid and reliable instrument to measure the oral impacts of daily performances in 11–12 year old urban schoolchildren in Malaysia.

  1. Questionnaire for the Assessment of Classroom Disturbances: The Factor Structure of the Pupil’s Version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wettstein

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present a newly developed student questionnaire for the assessment of aggressive and non-aggressive student behavior, teacher aggression and disruption of the class setting as well as classroom management and relationship and we focus on the statistical proprieties of the questionnaire. The factor structure of this questionnaire was identified on a sample of 1341 pupils of grades 5 and 6. In an exploratory factor analysis using direct oblimin-rotation, 7 clear factors, which correspond to the theoretical constructs, were obtained. Four factors assess disruptions and three factors capture preventive features. The internal consistencies of the scales are between .60 and .88.

  2. Evaluating and improving cloud phase in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 using spaceborne lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jennifer E.; Bourdages, Line; Miller, Nathaniel B.; Morrison, Ariel; Yettella, Vineel; Chepfer, Helene; Eaton, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Spaceborne lidar observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite are used to evaluate cloud amount and cloud phase in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the atmospheric component of a widely used state-of-the-art global coupled climate model (Community Earth System Model). By embedding a lidar simulator within CAM5, the idiosyncrasies of spaceborne lidar cloud detection and phase assignment are replicated. As a result, this study makes scale-aware and definition-aware comparisons between model-simulated and observed cloud amount and cloud phase. In the global mean, CAM5 has insufficient liquid cloud and excessive ice cloud when compared to CALIPSO observations. Over the ice-covered Arctic Ocean, CAM5 has insufficient liquid cloud in all seasons. Having important implications for projections of future sea level rise, a liquid cloud deficit contributes to a cold bias of 2-3°C for summer daily maximum near-surface air temperatures at Summit, Greenland. Over the midlatitude storm tracks, CAM5 has excessive ice cloud and insufficient liquid cloud. Storm track cloud phase biases in CAM5 maximize over the Southern Ocean, which also has larger-than-observed seasonal variations in cloud phase. Physical parameter modifications reduce the Southern Ocean cloud phase and shortwave radiation biases in CAM5 and illustrate the power of the CALIPSO observations as an observational constraint. The results also highlight the importance of using a regime-based, as opposed to a geographic-based, model evaluation approach. More generally, the results demonstrate the importance and value of simulator-enabled comparisons of cloud phase in models used for future climate projection.

  3. An Earth Penetrating Modeling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, E; Yarrington, P; Glenn, L

    2005-06-21

    Documentation of a study to assess the capability of computer codes to predict lateral loads on earth penetrating projectiles under conditions of non-normal impact. Calculations simulated a set of small scale penetration tests into concrete targets with oblique faces at angles of 15 and 30 degrees to the line-of-flight. Predictive codes used by the various calculational teams cover a wide range of modeling approaches from approximate techniques, such as cavity expansion, to numerical methods, such as finite element codes. The modeling assessment was performed under the auspices of the Phenomenology Integrated Product Team (PIPT) for the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator Program (RNEP). Funding for the penetration experiments and modeling was provided by multiple earth penetrator programs.

  4. NMSU-Alamogordo Institutional Assessment and Strategic Planning (IASP) Process: A Handbook. (Version 1.1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Fred; And Others

    New Mexico State University-Alamogordo's (NMSU-A) Institutional Assessment and Strategic Planning (IASP) process is designed to identify what the institution is doing, what the community is doing that may affect NMSU-A, how well NMSU-A is achieving its mission and purposes, and what the college should do in the future. The IASP is an integrated…

  5. Re-evaluation of Predictive Models in Light of New Data: Sunspot Number Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkana, A.; Zachilas, L.

    2016-10-01

    The original version of the Zürich sunspot number (Sunspot Number Version 1.0) has been revised by an entirely new series (Sunspot Number Version 2.0). We re-evaluate the performance of our previously proposed models for predicting solar activity in the light of the revised data. We perform new monthly and yearly predictions using the Sunspot Number Version 2.0 as input data and compare them with our original predictions (using the Sunspot Number Version 1.0 series as input data). We show that our previously proposed models are still able to produce quite accurate solar-activity predictions despite the full revision of the Zürich Sunspot Number, indicating that there is no significant degradation in their performance. Extending our new monthly predictions (July 2013 - August 2015) by 50 time-steps (months) ahead in time (from September 2015 to October 2019), we provide evidence that we are heading into a period of dramatically low solar activity. Finally, our new future long-term predictions endorse our previous claim that a prolonged solar activity minimum is expected to occur, lasting up to the year ≈ 2100.

  6. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2011-09-01

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  7. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  8. Modeling radiocarbon dynamics in soils: SoilR version 1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon is an important tracer of the global carbon cycle that helps to understand carbon dynamics in soils. It is useful to estimate rates of organic matter cycling as well as the mean residence or transit time of carbon in soils. We included a set of functions to model the fate of radiocarbon in soil organic matter within the SoilR package for the R environment for computing. Here we present the main system equations and functions to calculate the transfer and release of radiocarbon from different soil organic matter pools. Similarly, we present functions to calculate the mean transit time for different pools and the entire soil system. This new version of SoilR also includes a group of datasets describing the amount of radiocarbon in the atmosphere over time, data necessary to estimate the incorporation of radiocarbon in soils. Also, we present examples on how to obtain parameters of pool-based models from radiocarbon data using inverse parameter estimation. This implementation is general enough so it can also be used to trace the incorporation of radiocarbon in other natural systems that can be represented as linear dynamical systems.

  9. Modeling radiocarbon dynamics in soils: SoilR version 1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon is an important tracer of the global carbon cycle that helps to understand carbon dynamics in soils. It is useful to estimate rates of organic matter cycling as well as the mean residence or transit time of carbon in soils. We included a set of functions to model the fate of radiocarbon in soil organic matter within the SoilR package for the R environment for computing. Here we present the main system equations and functions to calculate the transfer and release of radiocarbon from different soil organic matter pools. Similarly, we present functions to calculate the mean transit time for different pools and the entire soil system. This new version of SoilR also includes a group of data sets describing the amount of radiocarbon in the atmosphere over time, data necessary to estimate the incorporation of radiocarbon in soils. Also, we present examples on how to obtain parameters of pool-based models from radiocarbon data using inverse parameter estimation. This implementation is general enough so it can also be used to trace the incorporation of radiocarbon in other natural systems that can be represented as linear dynamical systems.

  10. A multi-sectoral version of the Post-Keynesian growth model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Azevedo Araujo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With this inquiry, we seek to develop a disaggregated version of the post-Keynesian approach to economic growth, by showing that indeed it can be treated as a particular case of the Pasinettian model of structural change and economic expansion. By relying upon vertical integration it becomes possible to carry out the analysis initiated by Kaldor (1956 and Robinson (1956, 1962, and followed by Dutt (1984, Rowthorn (1982 and later Bhaduri and Marglin (1990 in a multi-sectoral model in which demand and productivity increase at different paces in each sector. By adopting this approach it is possible to show that the structural economic dynamics is conditioned not only to patterns of evolving demand and diffusion of technological progress but also to the distributive features of the economy, which can give rise to different regimes of economic growth. Besides, we find it possible to determine the natural rate of profit that makes the mark-up rate to be constant over time.

  11. Psychometric Assessment of a Self-Administered Version of the Significant Other Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Benishek, Lois A.; Carter, Meridith; Clements, Nicolle T.; Allen, Cassandra; Salber, Kristin E.; Dugosh, Karen; Kirby, Kimberly C.

    2012-01-01

    While there are a number of general measures that assess interpersonal and psychological distress experienced by individuals who are in a close relationship with a substance abusing adult, until recently the field has lacked a psychometrically sound, self-administered multidimensional measure explicitly designed to measure the problems of non-substance abusing adults who are concerned about a substance using loved one. This study examined the psychometric properties of a 54-item, self-adminis...

  12. Questionnaire for the Assessment of Classroom Disturbances: The Factor Structure of the Pupil’s Version

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Wettstein; Marion Scherzinger; Sara Wyler

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we present a newly developed student questionnaire for the assessment of aggressive and non-aggressive student behavior, teacher aggression and disruption of the class setting as well as classroom management and relationship and we focus on the statistical proprieties of the questionnaire. The factor structure of this questionnaire was identified on a sample of 1341 pupils of grades 5 and 6. In an exploratory factor analysis using direct oblimin-rotation, 7 clear factors,...

  13. Climate Modeling Computing Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraska, K. E.; McCabe, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses early findings of an assessment of computing needs for NASA science, engineering and flight communities. The purpose of this assessment is to document a comprehensive set of computing needs that will allow us to better evaluate whether our computing assets are adequately structured to meet evolving demand. The early results are interesting, already pointing out improvements we can make today to get more out of the computing capacity we have, as well as potential game changing innovations for the future in how we apply information technology to science computing. Our objective is to learn how to leverage our resources in the best way possible to do more science for less money. Our approach in this assessment is threefold: Development of use case studies for science workflows; Creating a taxonomy and structure for describing science computing requirements; and characterizing agency computing, analysis, and visualization resources. As projects evolve, science data sets increase in a number of ways: in size, scope, timelines, complexity, and fidelity. Generating, processing, moving, and analyzing these data sets places distinct and discernable requirements on underlying computing, analysis, storage, and visualization systems. The initial focus group for this assessment is the Earth Science modeling community within NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). As the assessment evolves, this focus will expand to other science communities across the agency. We will discuss our use cases, our framework for requirements and our characterizations, as well as our interview process, what we learned and how we plan to improve our materials after using them in the first round of interviews in the Earth Science Modeling community. We will describe our plans for how to expand this assessment, first into the Earth Science data analysis and remote sensing communities, and then throughout the full community of science, engineering and flight at NASA.

  14. Implementation of the Stochastic Multicloud Model in the NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, B. B.; Krishna, R. P. M.; Khouider, B.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Majda, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present here the implementation of the stochastic multicloud model (SMCM) (khouider et al 2010) in the NCEP Climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2). The final goal of this effort is to improve the Indian Summer Monsoon weather and climate through better-organized tropical convection in CFSv2. The fidelity of CFSv2 in simulating the mean state of the global climate, particularly the Indian summer monsoon, relative to the CMIP5 models (Sabeer et al 2013) is the reason behind choosing CFSv2 as the GCM to implement SMCM. We expect to see an improved climate simulation in SMCM-CFSv2 because of the theoretically sound and tested design of the multicloud approach (Khouider and Majda 2006, and the relevant subsequent work thereafter). In order to implement SMCM in CFSv2, first we identify different climatic regions based on the mean state of the global climate (using the CFSR 20year monthly climatology). Then we initialize the climatological values (computed from the CFSR 20year monthly climatology) of the variables required in the multicloud parameterization scheme, for the different climatic zones. We input moisture, temperature and PBL height from the CFSv2 to the multicloud parameterization module and then compute the corresponding variables that were initialized from the mean state. Then we compute the deviation of those variables from the background state. Based on middle troposphere dryness, we compute the heating rates for the deep, congestus and stratiform convection from these deviations from the background (deterministic approach). The stochastic extension involves the evolution of the cloud area fractions, associated to each one of the three cloud types, which are represented by a stochastic lattice subgrid model whose random transitions depend on CAPE and large-scale tropospheric dryness. The stochastic model feedback, to the GCM dynamics, occurs through the modulation of the heating rates by the cloud area fractions.

  15. Validation Evidence for the Elementary School Version of the MUSIC® Model of Academic Motivation Inventory (Pruebas de validación para el Modelo MUSIC® de Inventario de Motivación Educativa para Escuela Primaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brett D.; Sigmon, Miranda L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of our study was to assess whether the Elementary School version of the MUSIC® Model of Academic Motivation Inventory was valid for use with elementary students in classrooms with regular classroom teachers and student teachers enrolled in a university teacher preparation program. Method: The participants included 535…

  16. Hydrogeochemical evaluation for Simpevarp model version 1.2. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to April, 2004. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1.7 km. Model version 1.2 focusses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1000 m depth. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1000 m depending on local topography. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical groups of groundwaters (types A-D) have been identified: TYPE A: This type comprises dilute groundwaters (< 1000 mg/L Cl; 0.5-2.0 g/L TDS) of Na-HCO{sub 3} type present at shallow (<200 m) depths at Simpevarp, but at greater depths (0-900 m) at Laxemar. At both localities the groundwaters are marginally oxidising close to the surface, but otherwise reducing. Main reactions involve weathering, ion exchange (Ca, Mg), surface complexation, and dissolution of calcite. Redox reactions include precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxides and some microbially mediated reactions (SRB). Meteoric recharge water is mainly present at Laxemar whilst at Simpevarp potential mixing of recharge meteoric water and a modern sea component is observed. Localised mixing of meteoric water with deeper saline groundwaters is indicated at both Laxemar and Simpevarp. TYPE B: This type comprises brackish groundwaters (1000-6000 mg/L Cl; 5-10 g/L TDS) present at

  17. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of the DYMUS questionnaire for the assessment of dysphagia in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sales, Déborah S; Alvarenga, Regina MP; Vasconcelos, Claudia CF; Silva, Roberta G; Thuler, Luiz CS

    2013-01-01

    Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the DYMUS questionnaire for the assessment of dysphagia in multiple sclerosis. The original English version of the DYMUS was translated using the forward-backward technique, cross-culturally adaptated, pilot-tested in 40 patients, and then applied to 100 multiple sclerosis patients to assess the reliability and construct validity. Construct validity was assessed by Mann–Whitney test and Spearman’s correlation coefficient (rs). The inter...

  18. The relationship between the interacting boson model and the algebraic version of Bohr's collective model in its triaxial limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments and applications of an algebraic version of Bohr's collective model, known as the algebraic collective model (ACM), have shown that fully converged calculations can be performed for a large range of Hamiltonians. Examining the algebraic structure underlying the Bohr model (BM) has also clarified its relationship with the interacting boson model (IBM), with which it has related solvable limits and corresponding dynamical symmetries. In particular, the algebraic structure of the IBM is obtained as a compactification of the BM and conversely the BM is regained in various contraction limits of the IBM. In a previous paper, corresponding contractions were identified and confirmed numerically for axially-symmetric states of relatively small deformation. In this paper, we extend the comparisons to realistic deformations and compare results of the two models in the rotor-vibrator limit. These models describe rotations and vibrations about an axially symmetric prolate or oblate rotor, and rotations and vibrations of a triaxial rotor. It is determined that most of the standard results of the BM can be obtained as contraction limits of the IBM in its U(5)-SO(6) dynamical symmetries.

  19. Quick screening of cognitive function in Indian multiple sclerosis patients using Montreal cognitive assessment test-short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshpreet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis (MS are now well recognized worldwide, but unfortunately this domain has been less explored in India due to many undermining factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive impairments in Indian MS patients with visual or upper limb motor problems with the help of short version of Montreal cognitive assessment test (MoCA. Subjects and Methods: Thirty MS patients and 50 matched controls were recruited for the 12 points MoCA task. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis was performed to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity of the 12 points MoCA in differentiating cognitively impaired patients and controls. Results: The mean 12 points MoCA scores of the controls and MS patients were 11.56 ± 0.67 and 8.06 ± 1.99, respectively. In our study, the optimal cut-off value for 12 points MoCA to be able to differentiate patients with cognitive impairments from controls is 10/12. Accordingly, 73.3% patients fell below the cut off value. Both the groups did not have significant statistical differences with regard to age and educational years. Conclusion: The 12 points, short version of MoCA, is a useful brief screening tool for quick and early detection of mild cognitive impairments in subjects with MS. It can be administered to patients having visual and motor problems. It is of potential use by primary care physicians, nurses, and other allied health professionals who need a quick screening test. No formal training for administration is required. Financial and time constraints should not limit the use of the proposed instrument.

  20. Validity and reliability of the Thai version of the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipanmekaporn T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanyong Pipanmekaporn,1 Nahathai Wongpakaran,2 Sirirat Mueankwan,3 Piyawat Dendumrongkul,2 Kaweesak Chittawatanarat,3 Nantiya Khongpheng,3 Nongnut Duangsoy31Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Division of Surgical Critical Care and Trauma, Department of Surgery, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, ThailandPurpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the Thai version of the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU, when compared to the diagnoses made by delirium experts.Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in both surgical intensive care and subintensive care units in Thailand between February–June 2011. Seventy patients aged 60 years or older who had been admitted to the units were enrolled into the study within the first 48 hours of admission. Each patient was randomly assessed as to whether they had delirium by a nurse using the Thai version of the CAM-ICU algorithm (Thai CAM-ICU or by a delirium expert using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision.Results: The prevalence of delirium was found to be 18.6% (n=13 by the delirium experts. The sensitivity of the Thai CAM-ICU’s algorithms was found to be 92.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] =64.0%-99.8%, while the specificity was 94.7% (95% CI =85.4%-98.9%. The instrument displayed good interrater reliability (Cohen’s κ=0.81; 95% CI =0.64-0.99. The time taken to complete the Thai CAM-ICU was 1 minute (interquatile range, 1-2 minutes.Conclusion: The Thai CAM-ICU demonstrated good validity, reliability, and ease of use when diagnosing delirium in a surgical intensive care unit setting. The use of this diagnostic tool should be encouraged for daily, routine use, so as to promote the early detection

  1. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0; ARTM. Atmosphaerisches Radionuklid-Transport-Modell mit Radon Postprozessor und SBG-Modul. Modellbeschreibung zu Version 2.8.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald; Martens, Reinhard

    2015-04-20

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  2. Development of a user-friendly interface version of the Salmonella source-attribution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Lund, Jan

    allow for the identification of the most important animal reservoirs of the zoonotic agent, assisting risk managers to prioritize interventions and focus control strategies at the animal production level. The model can provide estimates for the effect on the number of human cases originating from......Project developed on the procurement project NP/EFSA/BIOHAZ/2011/04 EFSA has been working on a series of Scientific Opinions originating from a mandate received by the European Commission (EC) in July 2008 on the review of Salmonella targets in poultry primary production. For evaluating targets...... of questions, where the use of a classical quantitative risk assessment model (i.e. transmission models) would be impaired due to a lack of data and time limitations. As these models require specialist knowledge, it was requested by EFSA to develop a flexible user-friendly source attribution model for use...

  3. Complementary Safety Margin Assessment. Public version; Europees robuustheidsonderzoek voor kerncentrales. Publieksversie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-10-15

    On March 11, 2011, a large part of the Japanese eastern coastal area was devastated by an earthquake, followed by an immense tsunami. As a result, thousands of people were killed, injured or made homeless. In the days that followed, the situation was further complicated because of the failing nuclear reactors on the Fukushima coast. The local environment suffered from radioactive releases, requiring evacuation zones, and generating international concerns about nuclear safety. In the wake of this disaster the European Union decided to assess safety on all operating nuclear reactors in its member states. This safety evaluation initiated by the European Union focusses on extreme natural hazards, beyond the standard safety evaluations which regularly have to be performed to demonstrate the safety of a nuclear power plant. Consequences of these extreme hazards for the Borssele NPP have been evaluated based on available safety analyses, supplemented by engineering judgement. In this way, the robustness of the existing plant has been assessed and possible measures to further increase the safety margins have been identified. This document presents the results of the Complementary Safety margin Assessment (CSA) performed for the NPP Borssele. The distinct difference between this report and former risk analysis reports in general and the existing Safety Report of the NPP Borssele is that the maximum resistance of the plant against redefined and more challenging events has been investigated, whereas traditionally the plant design is investigated against certain events that are determined on a historical basis. This different approach requires different analyses and studies, which in turn presents new insights into the robustness of the plant. This document has been prepared in the short time period between June 1 and October 31, 2011. If more time had been granted for this study, some of the subjects could have been pursued in greater depth. The EPZ project team has been

  4. User's guide to the MESOI diffusion model: Version 1.1 (for Data General Eclipse S/230 with AFOS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MESOI is an interactive, Langrangian puff trajectory model. The model theory is documented separately (Ramsdell and Athey, 1981). Version 1.1 is a modified form of the original 1.0. It is designed to run on a Data General Eclipse computer. The model has improved support features which make it useful as an emergency response tool. This report is intended to provide the user with the information necessary to successfully conduct model simulations using MESOI Version 1.1 and to use the support programs STAPREP and EXPLT. The user is also provided information on the use of the data file maintenance and review program UPDATE. Examples are given for the operation of the program. Test data sets are described which allow the user to practice with the programs and to confirm proper implementation and execution

  5. Recent advances in pathogenesis, assessment, and treatment of atherosclerosis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Spence

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been a number of advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis and in assessing prognosis in carotid atherosclerosis. Risk stratification to improve vascular prevention by identifying patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapy is much improved by measuring carotid plaque burden. In patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis, a number of modalities can be used to identify the 10-15% who could benefit from endarterectomy or stenting. Transcranial Doppler embolus detection, echolucency and ulceration on 3D ultrasound, intraplaque hemorrhage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and reduced cerebrovascular reserve are useful already; new approaches including plaque texture on ultrasound and imaging of plaque inflammation and early calcification on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT are in development. The discovery that the intestinal microbiome produces vasculotoxic metabolites from dietary constituents such as carnitine in meat (particularly red meat and phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk and other sources has revolutionized nutritional aspects of vascular prevention. Because many of these vasculotoxic metabolites are removed by the kidney, it is particularly important in patients with renal failure to limit their intake of red meat and egg yolk. A new approach to lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol by blocking the action of an enzyme that destroys LDL receptors promises to revolutionize vascular prevention once less costly treatments are developed, and a new approach to vascular prevention—“treating arteries instead of risk factors”—shows promise but requires randomized trials. These advances all promise to help in the quest to prevent strokes in high-risk patients.

  6. Earth Observations and the Role of UAVs: A Capabilities Assessment. Version 1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Timothy H.; Somers, Ivan; Fratello, David J.

    2006-01-01

    This document provides an assessment of the civil UAV missions and technologies and is intended to parallel the Office of the Secretary of Defense UAV Roadmap. The intent of this document is four-fold: 1. Determine and document desired future missions of Earth observation UAVs based on user-defined needs 2. Determine and document the technologies necessary to support those missions 3. Discuss the present state of the platform capabilities and required technologies, identifying those in progress, those planned, and those for which no current plans exist 4. Provide the foundations for development of a comprehensive civil UAV roadmap to complement the Department of Defense (DoD) effort (http://www.acq.osd.mil/uas/). Two aspects of the President's Management Agenda (refer to the document located at: www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2002/mgmt.pdf ) are supported by this undertaking. First, it is one that will engage multiple Agencies in the effort as stakeholders and benefactors of the systems. In that sense, the market will be driven by the user requirements and applications. The second aspect is one of supporting economic development in the commercial sector. Market forecasts for the civil use of UAVs have indicated an infant market stage at present with a sustained forecasted growth. There is some difficulty in quantifying the value of the market since the typical estimate excludes system components other than the aerial platforms. Section 2.4 addresses the civil UAV market forecast and lists several independent forecasts. One conclusion that can be drawn from these forecasts is that all show a sustained growth for the duration of each long-term forecast.

  7. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Simpevarp area, model version 1.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to July 1st, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze' of the site). The HAG (Hydrochemical Analytical Group) group had access to a total of 535 water samples collected from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 250 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (79%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Simpevarp are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees of modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Higher topography to the west of Simpevarp has resulted in hydraulic gradients which have partially flushed out old water types. Except for sea waters, most surface waters and some groundwaters from percussion boreholes are fresh, non-saline waters according to the classification used for Aespoe groundwaters. The rest of the

  8. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Simpevarp area, model version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Gimeno, Maria; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Gurban, Ioana [3D-Terra (Sweden)

    2004-02-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to July 1st, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze' of the site). The HAG (Hydrochemical Analytical Group) group had access to a total of 535 water samples collected from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 250 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (79%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Simpevarp are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees of modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Higher topography to the west of Simpevarp has resulted in hydraulic gradients which have partially flushed out old water types. Except for sea waters, most surface waters and some groundwaters from percussion boreholes are fresh, non-saline waters according to the classification used for Aespoe groundwaters. The rest

  9. AERONET Version 3 processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holben, B. N.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) database has evolved in measurement accuracy, data quality products, availability to the scientific community over the course of 21 years with the support of NASA, PHOTONS and all federated partners. This evolution is periodically manifested as a new data version release by carefully reprocessing the entire database with the most current algorithms that fundamentally change the database and ultimately the data products used by the community. The newest processing, Version 3, will be released in 2015 after the entire database is reprocessed and real-time data processing becomes operational. All V 3 algorithms have been developed, individually vetted and represent four main categories: aerosol optical depth (AOD) processing, inversion processing, database management and new products. The primary trigger for release of V 3 lies with cloud screening of the direct sun observations and computation of AOD that will fundamentally change all data available for analysis and all subsequent retrieval products. This presentation will illustrate the innovative approach used for cloud screening and assesses the elements of V3 AOD relative to the current version. We will also present the advances in the inversion product processing with emphasis on the random and systematic uncertainty estimates. This processing will be applied to the new hybrid measurement scenario intended to provide inversion retrievals for all solar zenith angles. We will introduce automatic quality assurance criteria that will allow near real time quality assured aerosol products necessary for real time satellite and model validation and assimilation. Last we will introduce the new management structure that will improve access to the data database. The current version 2 will be supported for at least two years after the initial release of V3 to maintain continuity for on going investigations.

  10. Caudal epidural injections for lumbar prolapsed inter vertebral disc: assessment with urdu version of oswestry disability index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background/Aims: Oswestry Disability index is an established tool for assessment of Spinal Disability. It has been translated into many languages and but not to Urdu. The aim of this prospective observational study was translation, application and validation of Urdu version of the Oswestry Disability Index (Urdu ODI) for our specific cultural background. Methods: Urdu version of ODI was developed and applied for outcome assessment in 50 patients, suffering from lumbar prolapsed inter vertebral discs and treated with caudal epidural steroid injection. All patients having mechanical low backache with radiculopathy and single level disc prolapse at L-4-5 or L5- S 1 on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were included in the study. Single Steroid Injection with local anesthetic was injected into sacral caudal epidural space through sacral hiatus. A Performa was made for each patient and records were kept in a custom built Microsoft access database. Outcome was assessed using Urdu ODI and validation by comparing with Numeric rating Scale 0-10 at each visit. Results: Fifty patients received caudal epidural injections, 23 (46%) were male and 27 (54%) were female. The mean age was 34 years, with the range being 21-55. Low mechanical backache with right sided radiculopathy was in 29 (58%) and left sided in 21 (42%) patients. The commonest involved disc was L4-S in 28 (56%) and L5-S1 in 22 (44%) patients Pain was assessed with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) of ten points. This was mean 7.35, range 9-6 at presentation and mean improvement was 4.15 with range 5-3 at fist week, 3.80 with range 5-2 at first month and 3.05 with range 4-1 after six months. Functional disability assessment was done using Urdu ODI. The mean Urdu ODI at the time of presentation was 66.23% with range 81%-48%. The mean functional status was found to be 38.64% with range 26%-45% at the end of the first week, 43.65% with range 31%-48% after one month and 44.85% with range 28%-48% after six months. So there was

  11. Romanian version of the oral health impact profile-49 questionnaire: validation and preliminary assessment of the psychometrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    GRECU, ALEXANDRU-GRATIAN; DUDEA, DIANA; BALAZSI, ROBERT; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) represents a multidimensional structure, being measured by complex instruments, such as the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). The aim of this present study is to develop and test the psychometric properties of an initial Romanian (OHIP-49Ro) version. Methods The original OHIP-49 version was translated using a forward-backward technique into the Romanian OHIP-49Ro, which was applied in an interview form to 150 patients of the Second Medical Clinique of Internal Medicine, Cluj-Napoca. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was applied, in order to evaluate the factor structure and construct validity of the OHIP-49Ro. Results The correlations between the OHIP-49Ro subscales were all positive and statistically significant. Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients values are above 0.7 for all subscales, providing support for the internal consistency of OHIP-49Ro scale scores. Regarding the CFA, for the seven factor model, the Bentler scaled chi-square (S–Bχ2) indicated a value of 2193.74 (df=1091; p=0.001), the CFI a value of 0.740, the TLI a value of 0.72 and RMSEA the value of 0.82. Conclusions The results of this study suggest a high internal consistency of the OHIP-49Ro instrument. Due to the correlations between several sets of factors, and the multiple-factorial load for several items, the OHIP-49Ro’s factorial structure requires further research on different samples and in different cultural and educational contexts. PMID:26733752

  12. Assessment of Psychopathological Problems in the School Context: The Psychometric Properties of a Portuguese Version of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale--Short Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Ida Timoteo; Faisca, Luis Madeira; Valadas, Sandra Teodosio

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Portuguese version of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale-Short Form (APS-SF) were studied in a sample of 656 Portuguese adolescents, aged 12 to 19 years, assessed in school context. Also, the aim of the study was to gather data concerning age- and gender-related differences in the expression of psychopathological…

  13. Persian version of frontal assessment battery: Correlations with formal measures of ‎executive functioning and providing normative data for Persian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Asaadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD mainly involves executive function (EF. The frontal assessment battery (FAB is an efficient tool for the assessment of EFs. The aims of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of the psychometric properties of the Persian version of FAB and assess its correlation with formal measures of EFs to provide normative data for the Persian version of FAB in patients with PD.Methods: The study recruited 149 healthy participants and 49 patients with idiopathic PD. In PD patients, FAB results were compared to their performance on EF tests. Reliability analysis involved test-retest reliability and internal consistency, whereas validity analysis involved convergent validity approach. FAB scores compared in normal controls and in PD patients matched for age, education, and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score.Results: In PD patients, FAB scores were significantly decreased compared to normal controls, and correlated with Stroop test and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST. In healthy subjects, FAB scores varied according to the age, education, and MMSE. In the FAB subtest analysis, the performances of PD patients were worse than the healthy participants on similarities, fluency tasks, and Luria’s motor series.Conclusions: Persian version of FAB could be used as a reliable scale for the assessment of frontal lobe functions in Iranian patients with PD. Furthermore, normative data provided for the Persian version of this test improve the accuracy and confidence in the clinical application of the FAB.

  14. A Psychometric Analysis and Standardization of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-2, Self-Report of Personality, Child Version among a Korean Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Christine M.; Ebesutani, Chad; Kamphaus, Randy

    2014-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-2, Self-Report of Personality, Child Form (K-BASC-2 SRP-C) are reported. A total of 1100 Korean children ages 8-11 years participated in the study to establish normative data. The results of this study generally supported the factor structure and…

  15. Efficient and valid assessment of personality traits: population norms of a brief version of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Korner

    2015-03-01

    In sum, the 30-item-version of the NEO-FFI constitutes an assessment tool comparable to the full-length instrument regarding psychometric properties. As such, the NEO-FFI-30 is a promising alternative to longer questionnaires, as well as to single-item measures of personality used in research and clinical practice.

  16. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment: Comparison of Versions 4.2.1i and 4.1.3i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul D. Bayless

    2014-06-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code using versions 4.2.1i and 4.1.3i. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions changed between these two code versions and can be used to identify cases in which the assessment judgment may need to be changed in Volume III of the code manual. Changes to the assessment judgments made after reviewing all of the assessment cases are also provided.

  17. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment: Comparison of Versions 4.3.4i and 4.2.1i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code using versions 4.3.4i and 4.2.1i. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions changed between these two code versions and can be used to identify cases in which the assessment judgment may need to be changed in Volume III of the code manual. Changes to the assessment judgments made after reviewing all of the assessment cases are also provided.

  18. Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Preliminary Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, Garill A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Brothers, Alan J.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2009-06-01

    This Preliminary Assessment draft report will present the results of a literature search and preliminary assessment of the body of research, analysis methods, models and data deemed to be relevant to the Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment research. This report will provide: 1) a description of the problem space and the kinds of information pertinent to the problem space, 2) a discussion of key relevant or representative literature, 3) a discussion of models and modeling approaches judged to be potentially useful to the research, and 4) the next steps of this research that will be pursued based on this preliminary assessment. This draft report represents a technical deliverable for the NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling (SAM) program. Specifically this draft report is the Task 1 deliverable for project PL09-UtilSocial-PD06, Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment. This project investigates non-traditional use of social and cultural information to improve nuclear proliferation assessment, including nonproliferation assessment, proliferation resistance assessments, safeguards assessments and other related studies. These assessments often use and create technical information about the State’s posture towards proliferation, the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system to an undesired event, and the effectiveness of safeguards. This project will find and fuse social and technical information by explicitly considering the role of cultural, social and behavioral factors relevant to proliferation. The aim of this research is to describe and demonstrate if and how social science modeling has utility in proliferation assessment.

  19. Geometric Clutch model version 3: the role of the inner and outer arm dyneins in the ciliary beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Charles B

    2002-08-01

    The Geometric Clutch model of ciliary and flagellar beating uses the transverse force (t-force) that develops between the outer doublets of the axoneme as the regulator for activating and deactivating the dynein motors and organizing the flagellar beat. The version of the model described here adds detail to the formulations used in the two previous versions as follows: (1) In place of two opposing sets of dyneins, the new model has four sets of dyneins, corresponding to two sets on each side of the axoneme acting in series. (2) The four sets of dyneins are each subdivided into two ranks representing inner and outer arm dyneins. (3) The force produced by each dynein is governed by a force-velocity relationship that is independently specified for the inner and outer arms. Consistent with the original model, the new version of the Geometric Clutch model can simulate both the effective and recovery stroke phases of the ciliary beat using a single uniform algorithm. In addition, the new version can operate with the outer arms disabled. Under this condition, the simulation exhibits a beat pattern similar to the original but the beat frequency is reduced to approximately one third. These results are contingent on using force-velocity relationships for the inner and outer arms similar to those described by Brokaw [1999: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 42:134-148], where the inner arms contribute most of the driving force at low shear velocities. This constitutes the first examination of the effects of the force-velocity characteristics of dynein on a cilia-like beat in a theoretical framework. PMID:12112138

  20. Behavior model for performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every individual channels information differently based on their preference of the sensory modality or representational system (visual auditory or kinesthetic) we tend to favor most (our primary representational system (PRS)). Therefore, some of us access and store our information primarily visually first, some auditorily, and others kinesthetically (through feel and touch); which in turn establishes our information processing patterns and strategies and external to internal (and subsequently vice versa) experiential language representation. Because of the different ways we channel our information, each of us will respond differently to a task--the way we gather and process the external information (input), our response time (process), and the outcome (behavior). Traditional human models of decision making and response time focus on perception, cognitive and motor systems stimulated and influenced by the three sensory modalities, visual, auditory and kinesthetic. For us, these are the building blocks to knowing how someone is thinking. Being aware of what is taking place and how to ask questions is essential in assessing performance toward reducing human errors. Existing models give predications based on time values or response times for a particular event, and may be summed and averaged for a generalization of behavior(s). However, by our not establishing a basic understanding of the foundation of how the behavior was predicated through a decision making strategy process, predicative models are overall inefficient in their analysis of the means by which behavior was generated. What is seen is the end result

  1. Behavior model for performance assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borwn-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1999-07-23

    Every individual channels information differently based on their preference of the sensory modality or representational system (visual auditory or kinesthetic) we tend to favor most (our primary representational system (PRS)). Therefore, some of us access and store our information primarily visually first, some auditorily, and others kinesthetically (through feel and touch); which in turn establishes our information processing patterns and strategies and external to internal (and subsequently vice versa) experiential language representation. Because of the different ways we channel our information, each of us will respond differently to a task--the way we gather and process the external information (input), our response time (process), and the outcome (behavior). Traditional human models of decision making and response time focus on perception, cognitive and motor systems stimulated and influenced by the three sensory modalities, visual, auditory and kinesthetic. For us, these are the building blocks to knowing how someone is thinking. Being aware of what is taking place and how to ask questions is essential in assessing performance toward reducing human errors. Existing models give predications based on time values or response times for a particular event, and may be summed and averaged for a generalization of behavior(s). However, by our not establishing a basic understanding of the foundation of how the behavior was predicated through a decision making strategy process, predicative models are overall inefficient in their analysis of the means by which behavior was generated. What is seen is the end result.

  2. Hybrid version of the tilted axis cranking model and its application to 128Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid version the deformed nuclear potential is suggested, which combines a spherical Woods-Saxon potential with a deformed Nilsson potential. It removes the problems of the conventional Nilsson potential in the mass 130 region. Based on the hybrid potential, tilted axis cranking calculations are carried out for the magnetic dipole band in 128Ba. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  3. The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System Model,Grid-point Version 2:FGOALS-g2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lijuan; LIN Pengfei; YU Yongqiang; WANG Bin; ZHOU Tianjun; LIU Li; LIU Jiping

    2013-01-01

    This study mainly introduces the development of the Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System Model:Grid-point Version 2 (FGOALS-g2) and the preliminary evaluations of its performances based on results from the pre-industrial control run and four members of historical runs according to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiment design.The results suggest that many obvious improvements have been achieved by the FGOALS-g2 compared with the previous version,FGOALS-g1,including its climatological mean states,climate variability,and 20th century surface temperature evolution.For example,FGOALS-g2 better simulates the frequency of tropical land precipitation,East Asian Monsoon precipitation and its seasonal cycle,MJO and ENSO,which are closely related to the updated cumulus parameterization scheme,as well as the alleviation of uncertainties in some key parameters in shallow and deep convection schemes,cloud fraction,cloud macro/microphysical processes and the boundary layer scheme in its atmospheric model.The annual cycle of sea surface temperature along the equator in the Pacific is significantly improved in the new version.The sea ice salinity simulation is one of the unique characteristics of FGOALS-g2,although it is somehow inconsistent with empirical observations in the Antarctic.

  4. Business models for renewable energy in the built environment. Updated version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuertenberger, L.; Menkveld, M.; Vethman, P.; Van Tilburg, X. [ECN Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bleyl, J.W. [Energetic Solutions, Graz (Austria)

    2012-04-15

    The project RE-BIZZ aims to provide insight to policy makers and market actors in the way new and innovative business models (and/or policy measures) can stimulate the deployment of renewable energy technologies (RET) and energy efficiency (EE) measures in the built environment. The project is initiated and funded by the IEA Implementing Agreement for Renewable Energy Technology Deployment (IEA-RETD). It analysed ten business models in three categories (amongst others different types of Energy Service Companies (ESCOs), Developing properties certified with a 'green' building label, Building owners profiting from rent increases after EE measures, Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing, On-bill financing, and Leasing of RET equipment) including their organisational and financial structure, the existing market and policy context, and an analysis of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT). The study concludes with recommendations for policy makers and other market actors.

  5. The NASA/MSFC global reference atmospheric model: 1990 version (GRAM-90). Part 2: Program/data listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Alyea, F. N.; Cunnold, D. M.; Jeffries, W. R., III; Johnson, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    A new (1990) version of the NASA/MSFC Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-90) was completed and the program and key data base listing are presented. GRAM-90 incorporate extensive new data, mostly collected under the Middle Atmosphere Program, to produce a completely revised middle atmosphere model (20 to 120 km). At altitudes greater than 120 km, GRAM-90 uses the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere model. Complete listings of all program and major data bases are presented. Also, a test case is included.

  6. Evaluation of forced reflooding experiments using the FLUT-FDWR-MM (modified version of FLUT-FDWR with moving mesh in heat conductor model)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new version of the FLUT-FDWR code, named FLUT-FDWR-MM, has been developed in KfK in order to reduce an oscillation trend observed in the predictions by the original code. In the new version, a finer mesh moving with the quench-front propagation is introduced into the heat conductor model. This version has been tested by means of post-test calculations of various reflooding experiments in both PWR (FEBA/SEFLEX, NEPTUN I and II) and APWR (NEPTUN III) geometries. The parameters Rv and Rl of Oseen's relation for interfacial drag between liquid and vapour phases are reoptimised for the new version. (orig.)

  7. Hydrogeochemical evaluation for Simpevarp model version 1.2. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to April, 2004. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1.7 km. Model version 1.2 focusses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1000 m depth. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1000 m depending on local topography. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical groups of groundwaters (types A-D) have been identified: TYPE A: This type comprises dilute groundwaters (< 1000 mg/L Cl; 0.5-2.0 g/L TDS) of Na-HCO{sub 3} type present at shallow (<200 m) depths at Simpevarp, but at greater depths (0-900 m) at Laxemar. At both localities the groundwaters are marginally oxidising close to the surface, but otherwise reducing. Main reactions involve weathering, ion exchange (Ca, Mg), surface complexation, and dissolution of calcite. Redox reactions include precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxides and some microbially mediated reactions (SRB). Meteoric recharge water is mainly present at Laxemar whilst at Simpevarp potential mixing of recharge meteoric water and a modern sea component is observed. Localised mixing of meteoric water with deeper saline groundwaters is indicated at both Laxemar and Simpevarp. TYPE B: This type comprises brackish groundwaters (1000-6000 mg/L Cl; 5-10 g/L TDS) present at

  8. 新版护理评估单的设计与应用%Design and application of new version nursing assessment sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈辉; 刘茂才; 刘贵真; 潘传利

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of nursing assessment sheet(new version)in clinical nursing.Methods The nursing assessment sheet(new version)was designed and applied in clinic nursing practice.The new version and the old one were compared in terms of the incidence of nursing accidents,pressure sores,falling out of bed and lying in the bed and the time for nursing assessment between old and new-edited nursing assessment sheet.Result The incidence of pressure sores and the time for assessment by the new one were significantly lower than those before application the old one(all P<0.05).Conclusion The nursing assessment sheet(new version)is better in decreasing the incidence of pressure sores and thus increase the nursing efficiency.%目的:探讨新版护理评估单在临床中的应用效果。方法设计新版护理评估单,并应用于临床,观察采用新旧版护理评估单,护理不良事件发生情况、患者发生压疮及坠床情况和护士评估时间。结果应用新版护理评估单后,患者压疮发生率和护士评估患者病情时间均低于应用旧版护理评估单(均P<0.05)。结论应用新版护理评估单可降低压疮发生率,提高护理工作效率,值得临床推广应用。

  9. Validation of a new mass screening tool for cognitive impairment: Cognitive Assessment for Dementia, iPad version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onoda K

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Keiichi Onoda,1 Tsuyoshi Hamano,2 Yoko Nabika,1 Atsuo Aoyama,1 Hiroyuki Takayoshi,1 Tomonori Nakagawa,1 Masaki Ishihara,1 Shingo Mitaki,1 Takuya Yamaguchi,1 Hiroaki Oguro,1 Kuninori Shiwaku,3 Shuhei Yamaguchi1 1Department of Neurology, 2Center for Community-Based Health Research and Education, Shimane University, Izumo, 3Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane, Japan Background: We have developed a new screening test for dementia that runs on an iPad and can be used for mass screening, known as the Cognitive Assessment for Dementia, iPad version (CADi. The CADi consists of items involving immediate recognition memory for three words, semantic memory, categorization of six objects, subtraction, backward repetition of digits, cube rotation, pyramid rotation, trail making A, trail making B, and delayed recognition memory for three words. The present study examined the reliability and validity of the CADi. Methods: CADi evaluations were conducted for patients with dementia, healthy subjects selected from a brain checkup system, and community-dwelling elderly people participating in health checkups. Results: CADi scores were lower for dementia patients than for healthy elderly individuals and correlated significantly with Mini-Mental State Examination scores. Cronbach’s alpha values for the CADi were acceptable (over 0.7, and test–retest reliability was confirmed via a significant correlation between scores separated by a one-year interval. Conclusion: These results suggest that the CADi is a useful tool for mass screening of dementia in Japanese populations. Keywords: dementia, mass screening, early detection, iPad

  10. An assessment of the measurement equivalence of English and French versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D Scale in systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C Delisle

    Full Text Available Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D Scale scores in English- and French-speaking Canadian systemic sclerosis (SSc patients are commonly pooled in analyses, but no studies have evaluated the metric equivalence of the English and French CES-D. The study objective was to examine the metric equivalence of the CES-D in English- and French-speaking SSc patients.The CES-D was completed by 1007 English-speaking and 248 French-speaking patients from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Registry. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was used to assess the factor structure in both samples. The Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause (MIMIC model was utilized to assess differential item functioning (DIF.A two-factor model (Positive and Negative affect showed excellent fit in both samples. Statistically significant, but small-magnitude, DIF was found for 3 of 20 CES-D items, including items 3 (Blues, 10 (Fearful, and 11 (Sleep. Prior to accounting for DIF, French-speaking patients had 0.08 of a standard deviation (SD lower latent scores for the Positive factor (95% confidence interval [CI]-0.25 to 0.08 and 0.09 SD higher scores (95% CI-0.07 to 0.24 for the Negative factor than English-speaking patients. After DIF correction, there was no change on the Positive factor and a non-significant increase of 0.04 SD on the Negative factor for French-speaking patients (difference = 0.13 SD, 95% CI-0.03 to 0.28.The English and French versions of the CES-D, despite minor DIF on several items, are substantively equivalent and can be used in studies that combine data from English- and French-speaking Canadian SSc patients.

  11. Geological discrete fracture network model for the Olkiluoto site, Eurajoki, Finland. Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, A.; Forchhammer, K.; Pettersson, A. [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); La Pointe, P.; Lim, D-H. [Golder Associates Inc. (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    account for most (65 % - 75 %, depending on fracture domain) of the total observed fracture intensity at Olkiluoto. Inside a given fracture domain, fracture intensity is adequately represented as a Gamma distribution at the 10 m scale and larger, though near-surface depth-dependence is noted in the foliation-subparallel set in a few fracture domains. There is little difference between open and sealed fractures, though flowing fracture intensity decreases rapidly below approximately -200 masl. Fracture locations are modeled assuming a 3D Poisson point process. Two alternative size models are assessed; the models differ in terms of whether the power-law scaling exponent is derived solely from surface outcrop data (OSM) or from a combination of outcrop-scale, tunnel-scale, and deformation-zone scale data (TCM). The consequences of the uncertainty in the model parameterization is identified and quantified, with the largest effects (on the order of five to seven times) due to uncertainty in the size model. (orig.)

  12. Offshore Wind Guidance Document: Oceanography and Sediment Stability (Version 1) Development of a Conceptual Site Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-06-01

    This guidance document provide s the reader with an overview of the key environmental considerations for a typical offshore wind coastal location and the tools to help guide the reader through a thoro ugh planning process. It will enable readers to identify the key coastal processes relevant to their offshore wind site and perform pertinent analysis to guide siting and layout design, with the goal of minimizing costs associated with planning, permitting , and long - ter m maintenance. The document highlight s site characterization and assessment techniques for evaluating spatial patterns of sediment dynamics in the vicinity of a wind farm under typical, extreme, and storm conditions. Finally, the document des cribe s the assimilation of all of this information into the conceptual site model (CSM) to aid the decision - making processes.

  13. A new inventory for assessing cognitions in social phobia: The validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the social thoughts and beliefs scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Doğan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of The Social Thoughts and Beliefs Scale (STABS, it’s developed for assessing cognitions in social phobia by Turner and et al. (2003. STABS was administered 532 university students (343 female and 188 male from two different universities in Turkey. In order to examine the structure validity and of STABS confirmatory factor analysis have been carried out. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the two-factor model fitted the research data. The reliability of the scale was examined by test re-test and Cronbach alpha methods. The Cronbach alpha for the STABS’ total score was .90. The computed test re-test reliability coefficient for the STABS was .88. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965, and Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions Scale (Hamamcı and Büyüköztürk, 2003 was used for the criterion validity. There were statistically significant positive correlations between STABS and these scales. The Turkish version of STABS demonstrated good psychometric properties, with a high level of internal consistency.

  14. Simulations of the Mid-Pliocene Warm Period Using Two Versions of the NASA-GISS ModelE2-R Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Jonas, J. A.; Dowsett, H. J.; Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    The mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP) bears many similarities to aspects of future global warming as projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007). Both marine and terrestrial data point to high-latitude temperature amplification, including large decreases in sea ice and land ice, as well as expansion of warmer climate biomes into higher latitudes. Here we present our most recent simulations of the mid-Pliocene climate using the CMIP5 version of the NASAGISS Earth System Model (ModelE2-R). We describe the substantial impact associated with a recent correction made in the implementation of the Gent-McWilliams ocean mixing scheme (GM), which has a large effect on the simulation of ocean surface temperatures, particularly in the North Atlantic Ocean. The effect of this correction on the Pliocene climate results would not have been easily determined from examining its impact on the preindustrial runs alone, a useful demonstration of how the consequences of code improvements as seen in modern climate control runs do not necessarily portend the impacts in extreme climates.Both the GM-corrected and GM-uncorrected simulations were contributed to the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Experiment 2. Many findings presented here corroborate results from other PlioMIP multi-model ensemble papers, but we also emphasize features in the ModelE2-R simulations that are unlike the ensemble means. The corrected version yields results that more closely resemble the ocean core data as well as the PRISM3D reconstructions of the mid-Pliocene, especially the dramatic warming in the North Atlantic and Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Sea, which in the new simulation appears to be far more realistic than previously found with older versions of the GISS model. Our belief is that continued development of key physical routines in the atmospheric model, along with higher resolution and recent corrections to mixing parameterisations in the ocean model, have led

  15. Aerosol-cloud interactions in the NASA GMI: model development and indirect forcing assessments

    OpenAIRE

    N. Meskhidze; R. E. P. Sotiropoulou; Nenes, A.; J. Kouatchou; Das, B.; Rodriguez, J. M

    2007-01-01

    This study uses the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) for assessments of indirect forcing and its sensitivity to the treatment of aerosol, aerosol-cloud interactions and meteorological fields. Three different meteorological datasets from NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO), NASA finite volume GCM (FVGCM) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies version II' (GISS II') GCM were used. GMI is ideal for this study as different model components (s...

  16. ABEL model: Evaluates corporations` claims of inability to afford penalties and compliance costs (version 3.0.16). Model-simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The easy-to-use ABEL software evaluates for-profit company claims of inability to afford penalties, clean-up costs, or compliance costs. Violators raise the issue of inability to pay in most of EPA`s enforcement actions regardless of whether there is any hard evidence supporting those claims. The program enables Federal, State and local enforcement professionals to quickly determine if there was any validity to those claims. ABEL is a tool that promotes quick settlements by performing screening analyses of defendants and potentially responsible parties (PRP`s) to determine their financial capacity. After analyzing some basic financial ratios that reflect a company`s solvency, ABEL assesses the firm`s ability to pay by focusing on projected cash flows. The model explicitly calculates the value of projected, internally generated cash flows from historical tax information, and compares these cash flows to the proposed environmental expenditure(s). The software is extremely easy to use. Version 3.0.16 updates the standard values for inflation and discount rate.

  17. Clinical assessment of bipolar depression: validity, factor structure and psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Young-Eun; Kim, Moon-Doo; Bahk, Won-Myong; Woo, Young Sup; Lee, Jonghun; Jang, Sae-Heon; Won, Seunghee; Min, Kyung Joon; Chung, Sangkeun; Kwon, Young-Joon; Jon, Duk-In; Lee, Kwanghun; Yoon, Bo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background The Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS) is a scale for assessment of the clinical characteristics of bipolar depression. The primary aims of this study were to describe the development of the Korean version of the BDRS (K-BDRS) and to establish more firmly its psychometric properties in terms of reliability and validity. Methods The study included 141 patients (62 male and 79 female) who had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, were currently experiencing symptoms of depression...

  18. Screening of cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease: diagnostic validity of the Brazilian versions of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Sobreira; Márcio A. Pena-Pereira; Alan L. Eckeli; Manoel A. Sobreira-Neto; Chagas, Marcos H. N.; Maria P. Foss; Brenna Cholerton; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Mata, Ignacio F.; Vitor Tumas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective The aim of the present study is to examine the accuracy of the Brazilian versions of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R) to screen for mild cognitive impairment (PDMCI) and dementia (PDD) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).Method Both scales were administered to a final convenience sample of 79 patients with PD. Patients were evaluated by a neurologist, a psychiatrist and a neuropsychologist using UPDRS,...

  19. Land-total and Ocean-total Precipitation and Evaporation from a Community Atmosphere Model version 5 Perturbed Parameter Ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, Curt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lucas, Donald D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Trenberth, Kevin E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-03-02

    This document presents the large scale water budget statistics of a perturbed input-parameter ensemble of atmospheric model runs. The model is Version 5.1.02 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). These runs are the “C-Ensemble” described by Qian et al., “Parametric Sensitivity Analysis of Precipitation at Global and Local Scales in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5” (Journal of Advances in Modeling the Earth System, 2015). As noted by Qian et al., the simulations are “AMIP type” with temperature and sea ice boundary conditions chosen to match surface observations for the five year period 2000-2004. There are 1100 ensemble members in addition to one run with default inputparameter values.

  20. Simple geometrical explanation of Gurtin-Murdoch model of surface elasticity with clarification of its related versions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is showed that all equations of the linearized Gurtin-Murdoch model of surface elasticity can be derived, in a straightforward way, from a simple second-order expression for the ratio of deformed surface area to initial surface area. This elementary derivation offers a simple explanation for all unique features of the model and its simplified/modified versions, and helps to clarify some misunderstandings of the model already occurring in the literature. Finally, it is demonstrated that, because the Gurtin-Murdoch model is based on a hybrid formulation combining linearized deformation of bulk material with 2nd-order finite deformation of the surface, caution is needed when the original form of this model is applied to bending deformation of thin-walled elastic structures with surface stress.

  1. Evaluation of the tropospheric aerosol number concentrations simulated by two versions of the global model ECHAM5-HAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.; Kazil, J.; Feichter, J.

    2009-04-01

    Since its first version developed by Stier et al. (2005), the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM has gone through further development and updates. The changes in the model include (1) a new time integration scheme for the condensation of the sulfuric acid gas on existing particles, (2) a new aerosol nucleation scheme that takes into account the charged nucleation caused by cosmic rays, and (3) a parameterization scheme explicitly describing the conversion of aerosol particles to cloud nuclei. In this work, simulations performed with the old and new model versions are evaluated against some measurements reported in recent years. The focus is on the aerosol size distribution in the troposphere. Results show that modifications in the parameterizations have led to significant changes in the simulated aerosol concentrations. Vertical profiles of the total particle number concentration (diameter > 3nm) compiled by Clarke et al. (2002) suggest that, over the Pacific in the upper free troposphere, the tropics are associated with much higher concentrations than the mid-latitude regions. This feature is more reasonably reproduced by the new model version, mainly due to the improved results of the nucleation mode aerosols. In the lower levels (2-5 km above the Earth's surface), the number concentrations of the Aitken mode particles are overestimated compared to both the Pacific data given in Clarke et al. (2002) and the vertical profiles over Europe reported by Petzold et al. (2007). The physical and chemical processes that have led to these changes are identified by sensitivity tests. References: Clarke and Kapustin: A Pacific aerosol survey - part 1: a decade of data on production, transport, evolution and mixing in the troposphere, J. Atmos. Sci., 59, 363-382, 2002. Petzold et al.: Perturbation of the European free troposphere aerosol by North American forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP experiment in summer 2004, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 5105-5127, 2007

  2. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire".

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Lopes, Sofia Manuela; Duarte, José Alberto; Mesquita, Cristina Teresa Torrão Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge is an important factor in patients with ankylosing spondylitis regarding the adoption of appropriate behaviours and education. The aim of this study was to culturally adapt and validate "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire" for the Portuguese population with ankylosing spondylitis. The Portuguese version of "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire" was administered to a sample of 180 subjects, from which 63 individuals responded. The adaptation process involved translation, back-translation and submission to a committee of experts in the area, culminating with a Portuguese version of the instrument. Next, the scale reliability and validity were assessed. There was a statistically significant decrease from test to retest, although the intra-class correlation coefficient between test and retest was 0.76 (95 % CI 0.61-0.86), which was considered good. From 180 individuals, 63 (35.0 %) subjects were available for the present study. The proportion of individuals that correctly answered each item ranged from 19 to 92 %, corresponding to items 8 and 13, respectively. The mean number of correct answers was 8.5 [mean (SD) = 2.4] in 12 questions. The proposed Portuguese version of the ankylosing spondylitis knowledge scale showed good reliability, reproducibility and construct validity.

  3. Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2008). Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification. Presentation at the ICWL 2008 conference. August, 20, 2008, Jinhua, China.

  4. The Influence of Education on Chinese Version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment in Detecting Amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment among Older People in a Beijing Rural Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu'aijun Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the influence of education on the performance of Chinese version of Montreal cognitive assessment (C-MoCA in relation to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE in detecting amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI among rural-dwelling older people C-MoCA and MMSE was administered and diagnostic interviews were conducted among community-dwelling elderly in two villages in Beijing. The performance of C-MoCA and MMSE in detecting aMCI was evaluated by the area under the ROC curve (AUC. Effect size of education on variations in C-MoCA scores was estimated with general linear model. Among 172 study participants (24 cases of aMCI and 148 normal controls, the AUC of C-MoCA was 0.72 (95% CI = 0.62–0.81, cutoff = 20/21, compared to AUC of MMSE of 0.74 (95% CI = 0.64–0.84, cutoff = 26/27. The performance of both C-MoCA and MMSE was especially poorer among those with low (0–6 years education. After controlling for gender and age, education (η2 = 0.204 had a surpassing effect over aMCI diagnosis (η2 = 0.052 on variations in C-MoCA scores. Among rural older people, the MoCA showed modest accuracy and was no better than MMSE in detecting aMCI, especially in those with low education, due to the overwhelming effect of education relative to aMCI diagnosis on variations in C-MoCA performance.

  5. The Progression of Alzheimer's Disease Can Be Assessed with a Short Version of the CERAD Neuropsychological Battery: The Kuopio ALSOVA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallikainen, Ilona; Martikainen, Janne; Lin, Pei-Jung; Cohen, Joshua T.; Lahoz, Raquel; Välimäki, Tarja; Hongisto, Kristiina; Väätäinen, Saku; Vanhanen, Matti; Neumann, Peter J.; Hänninen, Tuomo; Koivisto, Anne Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Measuring and predicting Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression is important in order to adjust treatment and allocate care resources. We aimed to identify a combination of subtests from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease Neuropsychological Battery (CERAD-NB) that best correlated with AD progression in follow-up as well as to predict AD progression. Method A total of 236 participants with very mild [Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) = 0.5] or mild AD (CDR = 1.0) at baseline were followed up for 3 years. The CERAD-NB and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were used to assess cognition, and the CDR scale sum of boxes (CDR-sb) was employed to evaluate AD progression. Generalized estimating equations were used to develop models to predict and follow up disease progression. Results Performance declined on all CERAD-NB subtests. The ability of the separate subtests to distinguish between groups (baseline CDR = 0.5 or 1.0) diminished during follow-up. The best combination of subtests that explained 62% of CDR-sb variance in follow-up included verbal fluency, constructional praxis, the clock drawing test, and the MMSE. Baseline values of the same combination predicted 37% of the CDR-sb change. Conclusion A short version of the CERAD-NB subtests provides a promising and time-efficient alternative for measuring cognitive deterioration during AD follow-up. Although the initial signs of AD include memory difficulties, it may be useful to assess non-memory tasks in follow-up. PMID:25685140

  6. A new version of variational integrated technology for environmental modeling with assimilation of available data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    the equations of the model of processes as desired deterministic control functions. This method of data assimilation with control functions is implemented by direct algorithms. The modeling technology presented here focuses on various scientific and applied problems of environmental prediction and design, including risk assessment in relation to existing and potential sources of natural and anthropogenic influences. The work is partially supported by the Programs No 4 of Presidium RAS and No 3 of Mathematical Department of RAS; by RFBR projects NN 11-01-00187 and 14-01-31482; by Integrating projects of SD RAS No 8 and 35. Our studies are in the line with the goals of COST Action ES1004. References 1. V. Penenko, A.Baklanov, E. Tsvetova and A. Mahura. Direct and Inverse Problems in a Variational Concept of Environmental Modeling, Pure and Applied Geoph. 2012.V.169:447-465. 2. A.V. Penenko, Discrete-analytic schemes for solving an inverse coefficient heat conduction problem in a layered medium with gradient methods, Numerical Analysis and Applications, 2012. V. 5:326-341. 3. V. Penenko, E. Tsvetova. Variational methods for constructing the monotone approximations for atmospheric chemistry models, Numerical analysis and applications, 2013. V. 6: 210-220.

  7. The Parallelized Large-Eddy Simulation Model (PALM) version 4.0 for atmospheric and oceanic flows: model formulation, recent developments, and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronga, B.; Gryschka, M.; Heinze, R.; Hoffmann, F.; Kanani-Sühring, F.; Keck, M.; Ketelsen, K.; Letzel, M. O.; Sühring, M.; Raasch, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present the current version of the Parallelized Large-Eddy Simulation Model (PALM) whose core has been developed at the Institute of Meteorology and Climatology at Leibniz Universität Hannover (Germany). PALM is a Fortran 95-based code with some Fortran 2003 extensions and has been applied for the simulation of a variety of atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers for more than 15 years. PALM is optimized for use on massively parallel computer architectures and was recently ported to general-purpose graphics processing units. In the present paper we give a detailed description of the current version of the model and its features, such as an embedded Lagrangian cloud model and the possibility to use Cartesian topography. Moreover, we discuss recent model developments and future perspectives for LES applications.

  8. RadCon: A radiological consequences model. Technical guide - Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Radiological Consequence model (RadCon) is being developed at ANSTO to assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in any climate, using appropriate meteorological and radiological transfer parameters. The major areas of interest to the developers are tropical and subtropical climates. This is particularly so given that it is anticipated that nuclear energy will become a mainstay for economies in these regions within the foreseeable future. Therefore, data acquisition and use of parameter values have been concentrated primarily on these climate types. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition for Australia can be modelled and supplied by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC, one of five in the world) which is part of the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC), Puri et al. (1992). RadCon combines these data (i.e. the time dependent air and ground concentration generated by the dispersion model or measured quantities in the case of an actual incident) with specific regional parameter values to determine the dose to people via the major pathways of external and internal irradiation. For the external irradiation calculations, data are needed on lifestyle information such as the time spent indoors/outdoors, the high/low physical activity rates for different groups of people (especially critical groups) and shielding factors for housing types. For the internal irradiation calculations, data are needed on food consumption, effect of food processing, transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) and interception values appropriate for the region under study. Where the relevant data are not available default temperate data are currently used. The results of a wide ranging literature search has highlighted where specific research will be initiated to determine the information required for tropical and sub-tropical regions. The user is able to initiate sensitivity analyses within RadCon. This allows the parameters to be ranked in

  9. The Nexus Land-Use model version 1.0, an approach articulating biophysical potentials and economic dynamics to model competition for land-use

    OpenAIRE

    Souty, F.; Brunelle, T.; Dumas, P.; Dorin, B.; Ciais, P.; Crassous, R.; C. Müller; A. Bondeau

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between food demand, biomass energy and forest preservation are driving both food prices and land-use changes, regionally and globally. This study presents a new model called Nexus Land-Use version 1.0 which describes these interactions through a generic representation of agricultural intensification mechanisms. The Nexus Land-Use model equations combine biophysics and economics into a single coherent framework to calculate crop yields, food prices, and resulting pasture and crop...

  10. [Spanish version of the new World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS-II): initial phase of development and pilot study. Cantabria disability work group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Barquero, J L; Vázquez Bourgón, E; Herrera Castanedo, S; Saiz, J; Uriarte, M; Morales, F; Gaite, L; Herrán, A; Ustün, T B

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to present the initial phases of the development of the Spanish version of the "World Health Organization Disablement Assessment Schedule II" WHO-DAS-II and also to describe the quantitative and qualitative methodological strategies used in the elaboration process of an instrument: i) compatible with the new International Classification of Functioning and Disability -ICIDH-2- of the World Health Organisation; ii) with criteria of cross-cultural applicability and; iii) to allow us to assess the disability in all its dimensions. PMID:10937388

  11. COMGEN - A PROGRAM FOR GENERATING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AT THE MICRO LEVEL (SGI IRIS VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    A significant percentage of time spent in a typical finite element analysis is taken up in the modeling and assignment of loads and constraints. This process not only requires the analyst to be well-versed in the art of finite element modeling, but also demands familiarity with some sort of preprocessing software in order to complete the task expediently. COMGEN (COmposite Model GENerator) is an interactive FORTRAN program which can be used to create a wide variety of finite element models of continuous fiber composite materials at the micro level. It quickly generates batch or "session files" to be submitted to the finite element pre- and post-processor program, PATRAN. (PDA Engineering, Costa Mesa, CA.) In modeling a composite material, COMGEN assumes that its constituents can be represented by a "unit cell" of a fiber surrounded by matrix material. Two basic cell types are available. The first is a square packing arrangement where the fiber is positioned in the center of a square matrix cell. The second type, hexagonal packing, has the fiber centered in a hexagonal matrix cell. Different models can be created using combinations of square and hexagonal packing schemes. Variations include two- and three- dimensional cases, models with a fiber-matrix interface, and different constructions of unit cells. User inputs include fiber diameter and percent fiber-volume of the composite to be analyzed. In addition, various mesh densities, boundary conditions, and loads can be assigned to the models within COMGEN. The PATRAN program then uses a COMGEN session file to generate finite element models and their associated loads which can then be translated to virtually any finite element analysis code such as NASTRAN or MARC. COMGEN is written in FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on DEC VAX series computers under VMS and SGI IRIS series workstations under IRIX. If the user has the PATRAN package available, the output can be graphically displayed. Without PATRAN, the output is

  12. COMGEN - A PROGRAM FOR GENERATING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AT THE MICRO LEVEL (DEC VAX VMS VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    A significant percentage of time spent in a typical finite element analysis is taken up in the modeling and assignment of loads and constraints. This process not only requires the analyst to be well-versed in the art of finite element modeling, but also demands familiarity with some sort of preprocessing software in order to complete the task expediently. COMGEN (COmposite Model GENerator) is an interactive FORTRAN program which can be used to create a wide variety of finite element models of continuous fiber composite materials at the micro level. It quickly generates batch or "session files" to be submitted to the finite element pre- and post-processor program, PATRAN. (PDA Engineering, Costa Mesa, CA.) In modeling a composite material, COMGEN assumes that its constituents can be represented by a "unit cell" of a fiber surrounded by matrix material. Two basic cell types are available. The first is a square packing arrangement where the fiber is positioned in the center of a square matrix cell. The second type, hexagonal packing, has the fiber centered in a hexagonal matrix cell. Different models can be created using combinations of square and hexagonal packing schemes. Variations include two- and three- dimensional cases, models with a fiber-matrix interface, and different constructions of unit cells. User inputs include fiber diameter and percent fiber-volume of the composite to be analyzed. In addition, various mesh densities, boundary conditions, and loads can be assigned to the models within COMGEN. The PATRAN program then uses a COMGEN session file to generate finite element models and their associated loads which can then be translated to virtually any finite element analysis code such as NASTRAN or MARC. COMGEN is written in FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on DEC VAX series computers under VMS and SGI IRIS series workstations under IRIX. If the user has the PATRAN package available, the output can be graphically displayed. Without PATRAN, the output is

  13. Assessing the aging effect on auditory-verbal memory by Persian version of dichotic auditory verbal memory test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, significant reduction in auditory memory was seen in aged group and the Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test, like many other auditory verbal memory tests, showed the aging effects on auditory verbal memory performance.

  14. Sensitivity Assessment of Ozone Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorter, Jeffrey A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Armstrong, Russell A.

    2000-01-24

    The activities under this contract effort were aimed at developing sensitivity analysis techniques and fully equivalent operational models (FEOMs) for applications in the DOE Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). MRC developed a new model representation algorithm that uses a hierarchical, correlated function expansion containing a finite number of terms. A full expansion of this type is an exact representation of the original model and each of the expansion functions is explicitly calculated using the original model. After calculating the expansion functions, they are assembled into a fully equivalent operational model (FEOM) that can directly replace the original mode.

  15. Urban Air Quality Assessment Model UAQAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pul WAJ; van Zantvoort EDG; de Leeuw FAAM; Sluyter RJCF; LLO

    1996-01-01

    Het Urban Air Quality Assessment Model (UAQAM) berekent de concentratie van luchtverontreiniging in stedelijk gebied veroorzaakt door emissies uit de stad zelf. In een werkversie van dit model werden 3 beschrijvingen van de verspreiding bestudeerd: een Box-model, het Gifford-Hanna (GH)-model en een

  16. Modeling Diagnostic Assessments with Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Russell G.; DiBello, Louis V.; Moulder, Brad; Zapata-Rivera, Juan-Diego

    2007-01-01

    This paper defines Bayesian network models and examines their applications to IRT-based cognitive diagnostic modeling. These models are especially suited to building inference engines designed to be synchronous with the finer grained student models that arise in skills diagnostic assessment. Aspects of the theory and use of Bayesian network models…

  17. A comparison between comprehensive system and an early version of the rorschach performance assessment system administration with outpatient children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jennifer B; Viglione, Donald J; Giromini, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the effects of variability in the length of Rorschach records has been debated, and a new administration procedure aimed at reducing the proportion of short and long records has recently been introduced. Using an outpatient sample of children and adolescents, this study explored the impact of an early version of the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS) administration, on the central tendencies of Rorschach variables. Specifically, the mean values of 51 variables in 142 Comprehensive System versus 99 R-PAS collected records were compared with each other. Results found comparable mean values across CS and R-PAS administration methods for the variables that guide interpretation with children and adolescents. Both methods produced a comparable number of long (> 27 responses) records. The only relevant difference that emerged is that the early R-PAS administration version yielded significantly fewer short (14-16 responses) records and lower variability in the number of responses. PMID:24624977

  18. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion—PEST++ Version 3, a Parameter ESTimation and uncertainty analysis software suite optimized for large environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, David E.; White, Jeremy T.; Hunt, Randall J.; Doherty, John E.

    2015-09-18

    The PEST++ Version 1 object-oriented parameter estimation code is here extended to Version 3 to incorporate additional algorithms and tools to further improve support for large and complex environmental modeling problems. PEST++ Version 3 includes the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg (GML) algorithm for nonlinear parameter estimation, Tikhonov regularization, integrated linear-based uncertainty quantification, options of integrated TCP/IP based parallel run management or external independent run management by use of a Version 2 update of the GENIE Version 1 software code, and utilities for global sensitivity analyses. The Version 3 code design is consistent with PEST++ Version 1 and continues to be designed to lower the barriers of entry for users as well as developers while providing efficient and optimized algorithms capable of accommodating large, highly parameterized inverse problems. As such, this effort continues the original focus of (1) implementing the most popular and powerful features of the PEST software suite in a fashion that is easy for novice or experienced modelers to use and (2) developing a software framework that is easy to extend.

  19. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion—PEST++ Version 3, a Parameter ESTimation and uncertainty analysis software suite optimized for large environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, David E.; White, Jeremy T.; Hunt, Randall J.; Doherty, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The PEST++ Version 1 object-oriented parameter estimation code is here extended to Version 3 to incorporate additional algorithms and tools to further improve support for large and complex environmental modeling problems. PEST++ Version 3 includes the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg (GML) algorithm for nonlinear parameter estimation, Tikhonov regularization, integrated linear-based uncertainty quantification, options of integrated TCP/IP based parallel run management or external independent run management by use of a Version 2 update of the GENIE Version 1 software code, and utilities for global sensitivity analyses. The Version 3 code design is consistent with PEST++ Version 1 and continues to be designed to lower the barriers of entry for users as well as developers while providing efficient and optimized algorithms capable of accommodating large, highly parameterized inverse problems. As such, this effort continues the original focus of (1) implementing the most popular and powerful features of the PEST software suite in a fashion that is easy for novice or experienced modelers to use and (2) developing a software framework that is easy to extend.

  20. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  1. Ecosystem Model Skill Assessment. Yes We Can!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Erik; Fay, Gavin; Gaichas, Sarah; Gamble, Robert; Lucey, Sean; Link, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Need to Assess the Skill of Ecosystem Models Accelerated changes to global ecosystems call for holistic and integrated analyses of past, present and future states under various pressures to adequately understand current and projected future system states. Ecosystem models can inform management of human activities in a complex and changing environment, but are these models reliable? Ensuring that models are reliable for addressing management questions requires evaluating their skill in representing real-world processes and dynamics. Skill has been evaluated for just a limited set of some biophysical models. A range of skill assessment methods have been reviewed but skill assessment of full marine ecosystem models has not yet been attempted. Northeast US Atlantis Marine Ecosystem Model We assessed the skill of the Northeast U.S. (NEUS) Atlantis marine ecosystem model by comparing 10-year model forecasts with observed data. Model forecast performance was compared to that obtained from a 40-year hindcast. Multiple metrics (average absolute error, root mean squared error, modeling efficiency, and Spearman rank correlation), and a suite of time-series (species biomass, fisheries landings, and ecosystem indicators) were used to adequately measure model skill. Overall, the NEUS model performed above average and thus better than expected for the key species that had been the focus of the model tuning. Model forecast skill was comparable to the hindcast skill, showing that model performance does not degenerate in a 10-year forecast mode, an important characteristic for an end-to-end ecosystem model to be useful for strategic management purposes. Skill Assessment Is Both Possible and Advisable We identify best-practice approaches for end-to-end ecosystem model skill assessment that would improve both operational use of other ecosystem models and future model development. We show that it is possible to not only assess the skill of a complicated marine ecosystem model, but that

  2. Assimilation of MODIS Snow Cover Through the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Community Land Model Version 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Fei; Hoar, Tim J.; Yang, Zong-Liang; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Toure, Ally M.; Rodell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    To improve snowpack estimates in Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover fraction (SCF) was assimilated into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) via the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). The interface between CLM4 and DART is a flexible, extensible approach to land surface data assimilation. This data assimilation system has a large ensemble (80-member) atmospheric forcing that facilitates ensemble-based land data assimilation. We use 40 randomly chosen forcing members to drive 40 CLM members as a compromise between computational cost and the data assimilation performance. The localization distance, a parameter in DART, was tuned to optimize the data assimilation performance at the global scale. Snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth are adjusted via the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter, particularly in regions with large SCF variability. The root-mean-square error of the forecast SCF against MODIS SCF is largely reduced. In DJF (December-January-February), the discrepancy between MODIS and CLM4 is broadly ameliorated in the lower-middle latitudes (2345N). Only minimal modifications are made in the higher-middle (4566N) and high latitudes, part of which is due to the agreement between model and observation when snow cover is nearly 100. In some regions it also reveals that CLM4-modeled snow cover lacks heterogeneous features compared to MODIS. In MAM (March-April-May), adjustments to snowmove poleward mainly due to the northward movement of the snowline (i.e., where largest SCF uncertainty is and SCF assimilation has the greatest impact). The effectiveness of data assimilation also varies with vegetation types, with mixed performance over forest regions and consistently good performance over grass, which can partly be explained by the linearity of the relationship between SCF and SWE in the model ensembles. The updated snow depth was compared to the Canadian Meteorological

  3. Integrated assessment modeling: Modules for cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Carlo C.; Leimbach, Marian; Carraro, Carlo; HASSELMANN, KLAUS; Hourcade, Jean-Charles

    2002-01-01

    An integrated assessment (IA) model combines knowledge from very different disciplines in view of a practical problem. Most models developed so far are rather monolithic in the sense that it is difficult to combine components from different models for purposes of new assessments. We propose to develop a modular approach to IA based on advances in knowledge management as well as in object oriented software engineering. The incentive structure of modular IA is based on turning the knowledge pro...

  4. An Useful Toolf for Diabetes Emotional Distress Assessment: Validation of the Romanian Version of Diabetes Distress Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocan Andreia Ştefana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of the present study was to validate the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS on Romanian diabetes patients. Material and Methods: A total number of 529 type 1 and type 2 diabetes outpatients were included in the study. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the construct validity, Cronbach’s Alpha for internal consistency and Pearson’s correlation for predictive properties. Results: Distress level was lower in Romanian diabetes patients when compared to other studies. Model fit for the scale was moderate. The four factor structure of the original scale was maintained, with a good internal consistency for the entire scale (0.824 and for the four subscales: emotional burden (0.775, distress related to the physician (0.798, distress related to diabetes regimen (0.708, and interpersonal distress (0.733. Regarding predictive properties, DDS-Ro was positively correlated to depressive symptoms measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (r = 0.415, p < 0.05 and to diabetes self-care activities measured with the Summary of Diabetes-Self-Care Activities, with the strongest correlation between diabetes regimen distress and physical activities (r = - 0.358, p < 0.01. Conclusions: DDS-Ro has good psychometric properties in Romanian diabetes patients and can be used when diabetes emotional impact is assessed.

  5. Development of models for the sodium version of the two-phase three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code THERMIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several different models and correlations were developed and incorporated in the sodium version of THERMIT, a thermal-hydraulics code written at MIT for the purpose of analyzing transients under LMFBR conditions. This includes: a mechanism for the inclusion of radial heat conduction in the sodium coolant as well as radial heat loss to the structure surrounding the test section. The fuel rod conduction scheme was modified to allow for more flexibility in modelling the gas plenum regions and fuel restructuring. The formulas for mass and momentum exchange between the liquid and vapor phases were improved. The single phase and two phase friction factors were replaced by correlations more appropriate to LMFBR assembly geometry

  6. Vintage Capital in the AK growth model: a Dynamic Programming approach. Extended version.

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, Giorgio; Gozzi, Fausto

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with an endogenous growth model with vintage capital and, more precisely, with the AK model proposed in [18]. In endogenous growth models the introduction of vintage capital allows to explain some growth facts but strongly increases the mathematical difficulties. So far, in this approach, the model is studied by the Maximum Principle; here we develop the Dynamic Programming approach to the same problem by obtaining sharper results and we provide more insight about the economi...

  7. Cultural adaptation and reproducibility validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD-Brazil) scale in non-verbal adult patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marcia Carla Morete; Minson, Fabiola Peixoto; Lopes, Ana Carolina Biagioni; Laselva, Claudia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To adapt the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale to Brazilian Portuguese with respect to semantic equivalence and cultural aspects, and to evaluate the respective psychometric properties (validity, feasibility, clinical utility and inter-rater agreement). Methods Two-stage descriptive, cross-sectional retrospective study involving cultural and semantic validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the scale, and investigation of its psychometric properties (validity, reliability and clinical utility). The sample consisted of 63 inpatients presenting with neurological deficits and unable to self-report pain. Results Semantic and cultural validation of the PAINAD scale was easily achieved. The scale indicators most commonly used by nurses to assess pain were “Facial expression”, “Body language” and “Consolability”. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the scale has proved to be valid and accurate; good levels of inter-rater agreement assured reproducibility. Conclusion The scale has proved to be useful in daily routine care of hospitalized adult and elderly patients in a variety of clinical settings. Short application time, ease of use, clear instructions and the simplicity of training required for application were emphasized. However, interpretation of facial expression and consolability should be given special attention during pain assessment training. PMID:25993063

  8. Earth System Chemistry Integrated Modelling (ESCiMo with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy, version 2.51

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jöckel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With version 2.51 of the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model three types of reference simulations as recommended by the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI have been performed: hindcast simulations (1950–2011, hindcast simulations with specified dynamics (1978–2013, i.e., nudged towards ERA-Interim reanalysis data, and combined hindcast and projection simulations (1950–2100. The manuscript summarises the updates of the model system and details the different model setups used, including the on-line calculated diagnostics. Simulations have been performed with two different nudging setups, with and without interactive tropospheric aerosol, and with and without a coupled ocean model. Two different vertical resolutions have been applied. The on-line calculated sources and sinks of reactive species are quantified and a first evaluation of the simulation results from a global perspective is provided as a quality check of the data. The focus is on the inter-comparison of the different model setups. The simulation data will become publicly available via CCMI and the CERA database of the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ. This manuscript is intended to serve as an extensive reference for further analyses of the ESCiMo simulations.

  9. Assessing quality of life in children and adolescents: development and validation of the Italian version of the EQ-5D-Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Scalone

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Although assessment of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL in paediatric populations is gaining interest, it is not sufficiently assessed. While a number of specific paediatric instruments have been developed, some users appear to prefer generic tools such as the EQ-5D, which is a widely used and recommended tool to describe and value health across many different adult populations. We adapted the EQ-5D generic instrument into the EQ-5D-Y(youth for the assessment of HRQoL in children and adolescents, and investigated the feasibility, acceptability, validity and reliability of this new version of the tool.

    Methods: The Italian version of the EQ-5D-Y was administered to 415 children and adolescents from a general population aged between 8 and 15, and to 25 paediatric patients diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL.

    Results: The Italian version of the EQ-5D-Y was found to be feasible and acceptable for self-completion in the target age-group, with less than 1% refusing to complete it and no invalid answers given. Convergent and divergent validity tested with a child specific standard instrument was satisfactory overall. The test-retest reliability was moderate to good in all the domains of the descriptive system, and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS showed optimal levels of reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient = 0.82. As regards known-group validity, compared with the youths from general population, the ALL patients reported more difficulties in four of the five domains of the descriptive system and, on average, had a lower VAS score.

    Conclusions:The Italian version of the EQ-5D-Y shows to be a promising tool for assessing HRQoL in children and adolescents from 8 to 15 years of age. Future studies should further investigate and optimize its applicability to clinical research and carry out economic evaluations within the health

  10. A model for assessment of telemedicine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Ekeland, Anne Granstrøm; Jensen, Lise Kvistgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine applications could potentially solve many of the challenges faced by the healthcare sectors in Europe. However, a framework for assessment of these technologies is need by decision makers to assist them in choosing the most efficient and cost-effective technologies. Therefore in 2009...... the European Commission initiated the development of a framework for assessing telemedicine applications, based on the users' need for information for decision making. This article presents the Model for ASsessment of Telemedicine applications (MAST) developed in this study....

  11. E-Government Readiness Assessment Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed A. Omari; Hussein A. Omari

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a general framework model for E-Government Readiness Assessment. There are six necessary key factors to implement any E-government initiative worldwide. These factors represent the basic components to be assessed before launching the "e-initiative" to guarantee the right implementation in the right direction. The organization building blocks need to be assessed are: Organizational Readiness, Governance and leadership Readiness, Customer Readiness, Competency Readiness, Tec...

  12. A new dust cycle model with dynamic vegetation: LPJ-dust version 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shannon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new offline dust cycle model which uses the Lund-Potsdam-Jena dynamic global vegetation model (Sitch et al., 2003 to calculate time varying dust sources. Surface emissions are calculated by simulating the processes of saltation and sandblasting using an existing model (Tegen et al., 2002. Dust is transported using the TOMCAT chemical transport model (Chipperfield, 2006. Dust particles are removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition and sub-cloud scavenging. The model is designed so that it can be driven using reanalysis data or GCM derived fields.

    To improve the performance of the model, threshold values for vegetation cover, soil moisture, snow depth and threshold friction velocity, used to determine surface emissions are tuned. The effectiveness of three sub-cloud scavenging schemes are also tested. An ensemble of tuning experiments are evaluated against dust deposition and surface concentration measurements.

  13. PRAGMATIC MODEL OF TRASLATION QUALITY ASSESSMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vorobjeva, S.; Podrezenko, V.

    2006-01-01

    The study analyses various approaches to translation quality assessment. Functional and pragmatic translation quality evaluation model which is based on target text function being equivalent to source text function has been proposed.

  14. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1: an extended and updated framework for modeling biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Guenther

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1 is a modeling framework for estimating fluxes of 147 biogenic compounds between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere using simple mechanistic algorithms to account for the major known processes controlling biogenic emissions. It is available as an offline code and has also been coupled into land surface models and atmospheric chemistry models. MEGAN2.1 is an update from the previous versions including MEGAN2.0 for isoprene emissions and MEGAN2.04, which estimates emissions of 138 compounds. Isoprene comprises about half of the estimated total global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emission of 1 Pg (1000 Tg or 1015 g. Another 10 compounds including methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, α-pinene, β-pinene, t−β-ocimene, limonene, ethene, and propene together contribute another 30% of the estimated emission. An additional 20 compounds (mostly terpenoids are associated with another 17% of the total emission with the remaining 3% distributed among 125 compounds. Emissions of 41 monoterpenes and 32 sesquiterpenes together comprise about 15% and 3%, respectively, of the total global BVOC emission. Tropical trees cover about 18% of the global land surface and are estimated to be responsible for 60% of terpenoid emissions and 48% of other VOC emissions. Other trees cover about the same area but are estimated to contribute only about 10% of total emissions. The magnitude of the emissions estimated with MEGAN2.1 are within the range of estimates reported using other approaches and much of the differences between reported values can be attributed to landcover and meteorological driving variables. The offline version of MEGAN2.1 source code and driving variables is available from http://acd.ucar.edu/~guenther/MEGAN/MEGAN.htm and the version integrated into the

  15. New Version of the Universal Modeling for Centrifugal Compressor Gas Dynamic Design

    OpenAIRE

    Soldatova, Kristina; Yuri, Galerkin; Aleksandr, Drozdov

    2014-01-01

    Decades ago at pre – computer era design process consisted of empirically based set of rules application to choose main flow path dimensions. Serious model tests were obligatory before compressor manufacturing to check delivery pressure and efficiency. Better flow physical models and computer progress made possible to develop quickly operating programs to predict gas dynamic performance curves of an arbitrary flow path. TU SPb set of computer programs was named “The Universal modeling method”...

  16. Models of soil organic matter decomposition: the SoilR package, version 1.0

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. Sierra; Müller, M.; S. E. Trumbore

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic matter decomposition is a very important process within the Earth system because it controls the rates of mineralization of carbon and other biogeochemical elements, determining their flux to the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. SoilR is a modeling framework that contains a library of functions and tools for modeling soil organic matter decomposition under the R environment for computing. It implements a variety of model structures and tools to represent carbon storage and release...

  17. Models of soil organic matter decomposition: the SoilR package, version 1.0

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. Sierra; Müller, M.; S. E. Trumbore

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic matter decomposition is a very important process within the Earth system because it controls the rates of mineralization of carbon and other biogeochemical elements, determining their flux to the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. SoilR is a modeling framework that contains a library of functions and tools for modeling soil organic matter decomposition under the R environment for computing. It implements a variety of model structures and tools to represent carbon...

  18. Modular Description of a Comprehensive Semantics Model for the UML (Version 2.0)

    OpenAIRE

    Broy, Manfred; Cengarle, Maria Victoria; Grönninger, Hans; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    In this document, we introduce a system model as a semantic domain for the Unified Modeling Language (UML) [OMG07a, OMG07b]. The system model is supposed to form a possible core and foundation of the UML semantics definition. For that purpose, the definitions in this document are targeted towards UML which means that central concepts of UML have been formalized as theories of the system model. This document is structured as follows: In the rest of Chapter 1, we discuss the general approach an...

  19. Constraining the strength of the terrestrial CO2 fertilization effect in the Canadian Earth system model version 4.2 (CanESM4.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vivek K.; Scinocca, John F.

    2016-07-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) explicitly simulate the interactions between the physical climate system components and biogeochemical cycles. Physical and biogeochemical aspects of ESMs are routinely compared against their observation-based counterparts to assess model performance and to evaluate how this performance is affected by ongoing model development. Here, we assess the performance of version 4.2 of the Canadian Earth system model against four land carbon-cycle-focused, observation-based determinants of the global carbon cycle and the historical global carbon budget over the 1850-2005 period. Our objective is to constrain the strength of the terrestrial CO2 fertilization effect, which is known to be the most uncertain of all carbon-cycle feedbacks. The observation-based determinants include (1) globally averaged atmospheric CO2 concentration, (2) cumulative atmosphere-land CO2 flux, (3) atmosphere-land CO2 flux for the decades of 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, and (4) the amplitude of the globally averaged annual CO2 cycle and its increase over the 1980 to 2005 period. The optimal simulation that satisfies constraints imposed by the first three determinants yields a net primary productivity (NPP) increase from ˜ 58 Pg C year-1 in 1850 to about ˜ 74 Pg C year-1 in 2005; an increase of ˜ 27 % over the 1850-2005 period. The simulated loss in the global soil carbon amount due to anthropogenic land use change (LUC) over the historical period is also broadly consistent with empirical estimates. Yet, it remains possible that these determinants of the global carbon cycle are insufficient to adequately constrain the historical carbon budget, and consequently the strength of terrestrial CO2 fertilization effect as it is represented in the model, given the large uncertainty associated with LUC emissions over the historical period.

  20. Ecosystem Model Skill Assessment. Yes We Can!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Olsen

    Full Text Available Accelerated changes to global ecosystems call for holistic and integrated analyses of past, present and future states under various pressures to adequately understand current and projected future system states. Ecosystem models can inform management of human activities in a complex and changing environment, but are these models reliable? Ensuring that models are reliable for addressing management questions requires evaluating their skill in representing real-world processes and dynamics. Skill has been evaluated for just a limited set of some biophysical models. A range of skill assessment methods have been reviewed but skill assessment of full marine ecosystem models has not yet been attempted.We assessed the skill of the Northeast U.S. (NEUS Atlantis marine ecosystem model by comparing 10-year model forecasts with observed data. Model forecast performance was compared to that obtained from a 40-year hindcast. Multiple metrics (average absolute error, root mean squared error, modeling efficiency, and Spearman rank correlation, and a suite of time-series (species biomass, fisheries landings, and ecosystem indicators were used to adequately measure model skill. Overall, the NEUS model performed above average and thus better than expected for the key species that had been the focus of the model tuning. Model forecast skill was comparable to the hindcast skill, showing that model performance does not degenerate in a 10-year forecast mode, an important characteristic for an end-to-end ecosystem model to be useful for strategic management purposes.We identify best-practice approaches for end-to-end ecosystem model skill assessment that would improve both operational use of other ecosystem models and future model development. We show that it is possible to not only assess the skill of a complicated marine ecosystem model, but that it is necessary do so to instill confidence in model results and encourage their use for strategic management. Our methods

  1. INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS (ICE) MODEL, VERSION 6.0. USER'S MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report is a user's manual for the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model. It summarizes user options and software characteristics, and describes both the input data files and procedures for operating the model. It discusses proper formatting of files and creation of job ...

  2. Technical documentation and user's guide for City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The City-County Allocation Model (CCAM) was developed as part of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program. The CCAM model was designed to allocate population changes forecasted by the MASTER model to specific local communities within commuting distance of the MRS facility. The CCAM model was designed to then forecast the potential changes in demand for key community services such as housing, police protection, and utilities for these communities. The CCAM model uses a flexible on-line data base on demand for community services that is based on a combination of local service levels and state and national service standards. The CCAM model can be used to quickly forecast the potential community service consequence of economic development for local communities anywhere in the country. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. The purpose of this manual is to assist the user in understanding and operating the City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). The annual explains the data sources for the model and code modifications as well as the operational procedures

  3. Hydrogen Macro System Model User Guide, Version 1.2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.; Genung, K.; Hoseley, R.; Smith, A.; Yuzugullu, E.

    2009-07-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  4. Description of the Mountain Cloud Chemistry Program version of the PLUVIUS MOD 5. 0 reactive storm simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecken, D.J.; Whiteman, C.D.; Chapman, E.G.; Andrews, G.L.; Bader, D.C.

    1987-07-01

    Damage to forest ecosystems on mountains in the eastern United States has prompted a study conducted for the US Environmental Protection Agency's Mountain Cloud Chemistry Program (MCCP). This study has led to the development of a numerical model called MCCP PLUVIUS, which has been used to investigate the chemical transformations and cloud droplet deposition in shallow, nonprecipitating orographic clouds. The MCCP PLUVIUS model was developed as a specialized version of the existing PLUVIUS MOD 5.0 reactive storm model. It is capable of simulating aerosol scavenging, nonreactive gas scavenging, aqueous phase SO/sub 2/ reactions, and cloud water deposition. A description of the new model is provided along with information on model inputs and outputs, as well as suggestions for its further development. The MCCP PLUVIUS incorporates a new method to determine the depth of the layer of air which flows over a mountaintop to produce an orographic cloud event. It provides a new method for calculating hydrogen ion concentrations, and provides updated expressions and values for solubility, dissociation and reaction rate constants.

  5. Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) version le as coupled to the NCAR community climate model. Technical note. [NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, R.E.; Henderson-Sellers, A.; Kennedy, P.J.

    1993-08-01

    A comprehensive model of land-surface processes has been under development suitable for use with various National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) General Circulation Models (GCMs). Special emphasis has been given to describing properly the role of vegetation in modifying the surface moisture and energy budgets. The result of these efforts has been incorporated into a boundary package, referred to as the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS). The current frozen version, BATS1e is a piece of software about four thousand lines of code that runs as an offline version or coupled to the Community Climate Model (CCM).

  6. Parameterization Improvements and Functional and Structural Advances in Version 4 of the Community Land Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G. Slater

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Community Land Model is the land component of the Community Climate System Model. Here, we describe a broad set of model improvements and additions that have been provided through the CLM development community to create CLM4. The model is extended with a carbon-nitrogen (CN biogeochemical model that is prognostic with respect to vegetation, litter, and soil carbon and nitrogen states and vegetation phenology. An urban canyon model is added and a transient land cover and land use change (LCLUC capability, including wood harvest, is introduced, enabling study of historic and future LCLUC on energy, water, momentum, carbon, and nitrogen fluxes. The hydrology scheme is modified with a revised numerical solution of the Richards equation and a revised ground evaporation parameterization that accounts for litter and within-canopy stability. The new snow model incorporates the SNow and Ice Aerosol Radiation model (SNICAR - which includes aerosol deposition, grain-size dependent snow aging, and vertically-resolved snowpack heating –– as well as new snow cover and snow burial fraction parameterizations. The thermal and hydrologic properties of organic soil are accounted for and the ground column is extended to ~50-m depth. Several other minor modifications to the land surface types dataset, grass and crop optical properties, atmospheric forcing height, roughness length and displacement height, and the disposition of snow-capped runoff are also incorporated.Taken together, these augmentations to CLM result in improved soil moisture dynamics, drier soils, and stronger soil moisture variability. The new model also exhibits higher snow cover, cooler soil temperatures in organic-rich soils, greater global river discharge, and lower albedos over forests and grasslands, all of which are improvements compared to CLM3.5. When CLM4 is run with CN, the mean biogeophysical simulation is slightly degraded because the vegetation structure is prognostic rather

  7. Statistical analysis of fracture data, adapted for modelling Discrete Fracture Networks-Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond

    2004-04-01

    The report describes the parameters which are necessary for DFN modelling, the way in which they can be extracted from the data base acquired during site investigations, and their assignment to geometrical objects in the geological model. The purpose here is to present a methodology for use in SKB modelling projects. Though the methodology is deliberately tuned to facilitate subsequent DFN modelling with other tools, some of the recommendations presented here are applicable to other aspects of geo-modelling as well. For instance, we here recommend a nomenclature to be used within SKB modelling projects, which are truly multidisciplinary, to ease communications between scientific disciplines and avoid misunderstanding of common concepts. This report originally occurred as an appendix to a strategy report for geological modelling (SKB-R--03-07). Strategy reports were intended to be successively updated to include experience gained during site investigations and site modelling. Rather than updating the entire strategy report, we choose to present the update of the appendix as a stand-alone document. This document thus replaces Appendix A2 in SKB-R--03-07. In short, the update consists of the following: The target audience has been broadened and as a consequence thereof, the purpose of the document. Correction of errors found in various formulae. All expressions have been rewritten. Inclusion of more worked examples in each section. A new section describing area normalisation. A new section on spatial correlation. A new section describing anisotropy. A new chapter describing the expected output from DFN modelling, within SKB projects.

  8. A Scalable Version of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System Spectral Forecast Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Rosmond

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS includes a state-of-the-art spectral forecast model similar to models run at several major operational numerical weather prediction (NWP centers around the world. The model, developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL in Monterey, California, has run operational at the Fleet Numerical Meteorological and Oceanographic Center (FNMOC since 1982, and most recently is being run on a Cray C90 in a multi-tasked configuration. Typically the multi-tasked code runs on 10 to 15 processors with overall parallel efficiency of about 90%. resolution is T159L30, but other operational and research applications run at significantly lower resolutions. A scalable NOGAPS forecast model has been developed by NRL in anticipation of a FNMOC C90 replacement in about 2001, as well as for current NOGAPS research requirements to run on DOD High-Performance Computing (HPC scalable systems. The model is designed to run with message passing (MPI. Model design criteria include bit reproducibility for different processor numbers and reasonably efficient performance on fully shared memory, distributed memory, and distributed shared memory systems for a wide range of model resolutions. Results for a wide range of processor numbers, model resolutions, and different vendor architectures are presented. Single node performance has been disappointing on RISC based systems, at least compared to vector processor performance. This is a common complaint, and will require careful re-examination of traditional numerical weather prediction (NWP model software design and data organization to fully exploit future scalable architectures.

  9. A spatially-dynamic preliminary risk assessment of the American peregrine falcon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (version 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require protection of the American peregrine falcon. A preliminary risk assessment of the peregrine was performed using a custom FORTRAN model and a geographical information system. Estimated doses to the falcon were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices. Hazard index results indicated no unacceptable risk to the falcon from the soil ingestion pathway, including a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes a linear additive toxicity type. Scaling home ranges on the basis of maximizing falcon height for viewing prey decreased estimated risk by 69% in a canyons-based home range and increased estimated risk by 40% in a river-based home range. Improving model realism by weighting simulated falcon foraging based on distance from potential nest sites decreased risk by 93% in one exposure unit and by 82% in a second exposure unit. It was demonstrated that choice of toxicity reference values can have a substantial impact on risk estimates. Adding bioaccumulation factors for several organics increased partial hazard quotients by a factor of 110, but increased the mean hazard index by only 0.02 units. Adding a food consumption exposure pathway in the form of biomagnification factors for 15 contaminants of potential ecological concern increased the mean hazard index to 1.16 ({+-} 1.0), which is above the level of acceptability (1.0). Aroclor-1254, dichlorodiphenyltrichlorethane (DDT) and dichlorodiphenylethelyne (DDE) accounted for 81% of the estimated risk that includes soil ingestion and food consumption Contaminant pathways and a biomagnification component. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, falcon habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations. 123 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A spatially-dynamic preliminary risk assessment of the American peregrine falcon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (version 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Endangered Species Act and the Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require protection of the American peregrine falcon. A preliminary risk assessment of the peregrine was performed using a custom FORTRAN model and a geographical information system. Estimated doses to the falcon were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices. Hazard index results indicated no unacceptable risk to the falcon from the soil ingestion pathway, including a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes a linear additive toxicity type. Scaling home ranges on the basis of maximizing falcon height for viewing prey decreased estimated risk by 69% in a canyons-based home range and increased estimated risk by 40% in a river-based home range. Improving model realism by weighting simulated falcon foraging based on distance from potential nest sites decreased risk by 93% in one exposure unit and by 82% in a second exposure unit. It was demonstrated that choice of toxicity reference values can have a substantial impact on risk estimates. Adding bioaccumulation factors for several organics increased partial hazard quotients by a factor of 110, but increased the mean hazard index by only 0.02 units. Adding a food consumption exposure pathway in the form of biomagnification factors for 15 contaminants of potential ecological concern increased the mean hazard index to 1.16 (± 1.0), which is above the level of acceptability (1.0). Aroclor-1254, dichlorodiphenyltrichlorethane (DDT) and dichlorodiphenylethelyne (DDE) accounted for 81% of the estimated risk that includes soil ingestion and food consumption Contaminant pathways and a biomagnification component. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, falcon habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations. 123 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Assessing the construct validity of the Italian version of the EQ-5D: preliminary results from a cross-sectional study in North Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandolfi Pier

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on health related quality of life (HR-QOL can be integrated with other classical health status indicators and be used to assist policy makers in resource allocation decisions. For this reason instruments such as the SF-12 and EQ-5D have been widely proposed as assessment tools to monitor changes in HR-QOL in general populations and very recently in general practice settings as well Aim The primary goal of our study was to assess the construct validity of the Italian version of the EQ-5D in a general population of North Italy using socio-demographic factors and diagnostic sub-groups. Our secondary goal was to assess the concurrent validity of the EQ-5D and SF-12. Methods The SF-12, the EQ-5D plus an additional questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, clinical conditions and symptoms were completed by 1,622 adults, randomly selected from the Registry of the Health Authorities of the city of Bologna, Italy. The primary care physician of each subject was contacted to report on the subject's health status. Results Our findings indicate that the Italian version of the EQ-5D is well accepted by the general population (91% response rate, has good reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.73, and shows evidence of construct validity. Conclusion Our data provide a basis for further research to be conducted to assess the validity of the EQ-5D in Italy. In particular future studies should focus on assessing its ability to detect a clinically important change in health related quality of life over time (responsiveness.

  12. Brazilian version of the instrument of environmental assessment Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF: translation, cross-cultural adaptation and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyla R. C. Furtado

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental factors are essential for the characterization of human functioning and disability; however, the shortage of standardized instruments to assess environmental factors has limited the design of scientific investigations directed at identifying barriers to and facilitators of social participation of people with disabilities. Objectives : To translate to Brazilian Portuguese, cross-culturally adapt, and verify the reliability of an environmental assessment questionnaire, entitled Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF. Method : The questionnaire was translated to Portuguese, analyzed, translated back to English, and compared with the original version. The final version (CHIEF-BR was submitted to 47 caregivers of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP. The intra-rater reliability was tested using quadratic kappa and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC, through interviews of 23 caregivers drawn from the total sample, on two occasions 10 days apart. Results : During submission of the questionnaires, it was observed that examples were needed in order to facilitate the understanding of the questions related to the politics sub-scale. Quadratic kappa showed that test-retest reliability of each question varied from 0.28 to 1.0 for the frequency score and from 0.30 to 0.98 for the magnitude score. Intraclass correlation coefficients for total scores showed high consistency indices (ICC≥0.92 for test-retest. Conclusion : The Brazilian version of the CHIEF was reproducible and applicable to the study sample. It may serve as an instrument to characterize the environmental barriers as well as a way to document the effects of interventions aimed at minimizing the impact of such barriers on the participation of children and adolescents with CP.

  13. Models of soil organic matter decomposition: the SOILR package, version 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter decomposition is a very important process within the Earth System because it controls the rates of mineralization of carbon and other biogeochemical elements, determining their flux to the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. SOILR is a modeling framework that contains a library of functions and tools for modeling soil organic matter decomposition under the R environment for computing. It implements a variety of model structures and tools to represent carbon storage and release from soil organic matter. In SOILR organic matter decomposition is represented as a linear system of ordinary differential equations that generalizes the structure of most compartment-based decomposition models. A variety of functions is also available to represent environmental effects on decomposition rates. This document presents the conceptual basis for the functions implemented in the package. It is complementary to the help pages released with the software.

  14. Models of soil organic matter decomposition: the SoilR package, version 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Sierra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter decomposition is a very important process within the Earth system because it controls the rates of mineralization of carbon and other biogeochemical elements, determining their flux to the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. SoilR is a modeling framework that contains a library of functions and tools for modeling soil organic matter decomposition under the R environment for computing. It implements a variety of model structures and tools to represent carbon storage and release from soil organic matter. In SoilR, organic matter decomposition is represented as a linear system of ordinary differential equations that generalizes the structure of most compartment-based decomposition models. A variety of functions is also available to represent environmental effects on decomposition rates. This document presents the conceptual basis for the functions implemented in the package. It is complementary to the help pages released with the software.

  15. FAME: Friendly Applied Modelling Environment. Version 2.2 User Manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortelboer FG; Aldenberg T

    1989-01-01

    FAME (Friendly Applied Modelling Environment) is een algemene modelleer omgeving, ontwikkeld voor de dynamische simulatie van waterkwaliteitsmodellen. De modellen worden beschreven als sets van differentiaalvergelijkingen, waarbij van een algemene notatie gebruik wordt gemaakt. Geen kennis van een

  16. Technical manual for basic version of the Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Markov Chain Nest Productivity Model (or MCnest) integrates existing toxicity information from three standardized avian toxicity tests with information on species life history and the timing of pesticide applications relative to the timing of avian breeding seasons to quantit...

  17. PhytoSFDM version 1.0.0: Phytoplankton Size and Functional Diversity Model

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Smith, S. Lan; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity is one of the key mechanisms that facilitate the adaptive response of planktonic communities to a fluctuating environment. How to allow for such a flexible response in marine ecosystem models is, however, not entirely clear. One particular way is to resolve the natural complexity of phytoplankton communities by explicitly incorporating a large number of species or plankton functional types. Alternatively, models of aggregate community properties focus on macroecological quantitie...

  18. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1)

    OpenAIRE

    G. Shaffer; S. Malskær Olsen; Pepke Pedersen, J. O.

    2008-01-01

    A new, low-order Earth System Model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years. The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow...

  19. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus (ZIKV is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  20. Acidification of Forest Soils: A Model for Analyzing Impacts of Acidic Deposition in Europe - Version II

    OpenAIRE

    Kauppi, P.; Kaemaeri, J.; Posch, M; Kauppi, L.; Matzner, E.

    1985-01-01

    Acidification is an unfavorable process in forest soils. Timber logging, natural accumulation of biomass in the ecosystem, and acidic deposition are sources of acidification. Acidification causes a risk of damage to plant roots and a subsequent risk of a decline in ecosystem productivity. A dynamic model is introduced for describing the acidification of forest soils. In one-year time steps the model calculates the soil pH as function of acid stress and the buffer mechanisms of the soil. ...

  1. Influence of Solar and Thermal Radiation on Future Heat Stress Using CMIP5 Archive Driving the Community Land Model Version 4.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.

    2015-12-01

    The summer of 2015 has experienced major heat waves on 4 continents, and heat stress left ~4000 people dead in India and Pakistan. Heat stress is caused by a combination of meteorological factors: temperature, humidity, and radiation. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) uses Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT)—an empirical metric this is calibrated with temperature, humidity, and radiation—for determining labor capacity during heat stress. Unfortunately, most literature studying global heat stress focuses on extreme temperature events, and a limited number of studies use the combination of temperature and humidity. Recent global assessments use WBGT, yet omit the radiation component without recalibrating the metric.Here we explicitly calculate future WBGT within a land surface model, including radiative fluxes as produced by a modeled globe thermometer. We use the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5), which is a component model of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), and is maintained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). To drive our CLM4.5 simulations, we use greenhouse gasses Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (business as usual), and atmospheric output from the CMIP5 Archive. Humans work in a variety of environments, and we place the modeled globe thermometer in a variety of environments. We modify CLM4.5 code to calculate solar and thermal radiation fluxes below and above canopy vegetation, and in bare ground. To calculate wet bulb temperature, we implemented the HumanIndexMod into CLM4.5. The temperature, wet bulb temperature, and radiation fields are calculated at every model time step and are outputted 4x Daily. We use these fields to calculate WBGT and labor capacity for two time slices: 2026-2045 and 2081-2100.

  2. Confidence assessment. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Laxemar). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface-based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. Procedures for this assessment have been progressively refined during the course of the site descriptive modelling, and applied to all previous versions of the Forsmark and Laxemar site descriptive models. They include assessment of whether all relevant data have been considered and understood, identification of the main uncertainties and their causes, possible alternative models and their handling, and consistency between disciplines. The assessment then forms the basis for an overall confidence statement. The confidence in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface based site investigations, has been assessed by exploring: - Confidence in the site characterization data base, - remaining issues and their handling, - handling of alternatives, - consistency between disciplines and - main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. Generally, the site investigation database is of high quality, as assured by the quality procedures applied. It is judged that the Laxemar site descriptive model has an overall high level of confidence. Because of the relatively robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in the Laxemar Site Descriptive model is judged to be high, even though details of the spatial variability remain unknown. The overall reason for this confidence is the wide spatial distribution of the data and the consistency between

  3. Confidence assessment. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Laxemar). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface-based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. Procedures for this assessment have been progressively refined during the course of the site descriptive modelling, and applied to all previous versions of the Forsmark and Laxemar site descriptive models. They include assessment of whether all relevant data have been considered and understood, identification of the main uncertainties and their causes, possible alternative models and their handling, and consistency between disciplines. The assessment then forms the basis for an overall confidence statement. The confidence in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface based site investigations, has been assessed by exploring: - Confidence in the site characterization data base, - remaining issues and their handling, - handling of alternatives, - consistency between disciplines and - main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. Generally, the site investigation database is of high quality, as assured by the quality procedures applied. It is judged that the Laxemar site descriptive model has an overall high level of confidence. Because of the relatively robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in the Laxemar Site Descriptive model is judged to be high, even though details of the spatial variability remain unknown. The overall reason for this confidence is the wide spatial distribution of the data and the consistency between

  4. Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model (18-sector version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M.H. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics); Thimmapuram, P.; Fisher, R.E.; Maciorowski, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-05-01

    The new 18-sector Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model is designed for convenient study of future industrial energy consumption, taking into account the composition of production, energy prices, and certain kinds of policy initiatives. Electricity and aggregate fossil fuels are modeled. Changes in energy intensity in each sector are driven by autonomous technological improvement (price-independent trend), the opportunity for energy-price-sensitive improvements, energy price expectations, and investment behavior. Although this decision-making framework involves more variables than the simplest econometric models, it enables direct comparison of an econometric approach with conservation supply curves from detailed engineering analysis. It also permits explicit consideration of a variety of policy approaches other than price manipulation. The model is tested in terms of historical data for nine manufacturing sectors, and parameters are determined for forecasting purposes. Relatively uniform and satisfactory parameters are obtained from this analysis. In this report, LIEF is also applied to create base-case and demand-side management scenarios to briefly illustrate modeling procedures and outputs.

  5. Hybrid model of the context dependent vestibulo-ocular reflex: implications for vergence-version interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2015-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g., fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations.

  6. Hybrid Model of the Context Dependent Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex: Implications for Vergence-Version Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eRanjbaran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g. fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations.

  7. Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base

  8. Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C W [ed.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  9. Empirical generalization assessment of neural network models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the assessment of generalization performance of neural network models by use of empirical techniques. We suggest to use the cross-validation scheme combined with a resampling technique to obtain an estimate of the generalization performance distribution of a specific model...

  10. Does the Danube exist? Versions of reality given by various regional climate models and climatological datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Lucarini, V; Kriegerova, I; Speranza, A; Danihlik, Robert; Kriegerova, Ida; Lucarini, Valerio; Speranza, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    We present an intercomparison and verification analysis of several regional climate models (RCMs) nested into the same run of the same Atmospheric Global Circulation Model (AGCM) regarding their representation of the statistical properties of the hydrological balance of the Danube river basin for 1961-1990. We also consider the datasets produced by the driving AGCM, from the ECMWF and NCEP-NCAR reanalyses. The hydrological balance is computed by integrating the precipitation and evaporation fields over the area of interest. Large discrepancies exist among RCMs for the monthly climatology as well as for the mean and variability of the annual balances, and only few datasets are consistent with the observed discharge values of the Danube at its Delta, even if the driving AGCM provides itself an excellent estimate. Since the considered approach relies on the mass conservation principle and bypasses the details of the air-land interface modeling, we propose that the atmospheric components of RCMs still face diffic...

  11. Predictions of models for environmental radiological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Sueli da Silva; Lauria, Dejanira da Costa, E-mail: suelip@ird.gov.br, E-mail: dejanira@irg.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Servico de Avaliacao de Impacto Ambiental, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mahler, Claudio Fernando [Coppe. Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) - Programa de Engenharia Civil, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In the field of environmental impact assessment, models are used for estimating source term, environmental dispersion and transfer of radionuclides, exposure pathway, radiation dose and the risk for human beings Although it is recognized that the specific information of local data are important to improve the quality of the dose assessment results, in fact obtaining it can be very difficult and expensive. Sources of uncertainties are numerous, among which we can cite: the subjectivity of modelers, exposure scenarios and pathways, used codes and general parameters. The various models available utilize different mathematical approaches with different complexities that can result in different predictions. Thus, for the same inputs different models can produce very different outputs. This paper presents briefly the main advances in the field of environmental radiological assessment that aim to improve the reliability of the models used in the assessment of environmental radiological impact. The intercomparison exercise of model supplied incompatible results for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co, enhancing the need for developing reference methodologies for environmental radiological assessment that allow to confront dose estimations in a common comparison base. The results of the intercomparison exercise are present briefly. (author)

  12. Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2008). Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification. In F. W. B. Li, J. Zhao, T. K. Shih, R. W. H. Lau, Q. Li & D. McLeod (Eds.), Advances in Web Based Learning - Proceedings of the 7th Inter

  13. First implementation of secondary inorganic aerosols in the MOCAGE version R2.15.0 chemistry transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, J.; Josse, B.; Marécal, V.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop a secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) module for the MOCAGE chemistry transport model developed at CNRM. The aim is to have a module suitable for running at different model resolutions and for operational applications with reasonable computing times. Based on the ISORROPIA II thermodynamic equilibrium module, the new version of the model is presented and evaluated at both the global and regional scales. The results show high concentrations of secondary inorganic aerosols in the most polluted regions: Europe, Asia and the eastern part of North America. Asia shows higher sulfate concentrations than other regions thanks to emission reductions in Europe and North America. Using two simulations, one with and the other without secondary inorganic aerosol formation, the global model outputs are compared to previous studies, to MODIS AOD retrievals, and also to in situ measurements from the HTAP database. The model shows a better agreement with MODIS AOD retrievals in all geographical regions after introducing the new SIA scheme. It also provides a good statistical agreement with in situ measurements of secondary inorganic aerosol composition: sulfate, nitrate and ammonium. In addition, the simulation with SIA generally gives a better agreement with observations for secondary inorganic aerosol precursors (nitric acid, sulfur dioxide, ammonia), in particular with a reduction of the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB). At the regional scale, over Europe, the model simulation with SIA is compared to the in situ measurements from the EMEP database and shows a good agreement with secondary inorganic aerosol composition. The results at the regional scale are consistent with those obtained from the global simulations. The AIRBASE database was used to compare the model to regulated air quality pollutants: particulate matter, ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations. Introduction of the SIA in MOCAGE provides a reduction in the PM2.5 MNMB of 0.44 on a

  14. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal P. Sarma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  15. FINITE-DIFFERENCE ELECTROMAGNETIC DEPOSITION/THERMOREGULATORY MODEL: COMPARISON BETWEEN THEORY AND MEASUREMENTS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rate of the electromagnetic energy deposition and the resultant thermoregulatory response of a block model of a squirrel monkey exposed to plane-wave fields at 350 MHz were calculated using a finite-difference procedure. Noninvasive temperature measurements in live squirrel m...

  16. Stochastic empirical loading and dilution model (SELDM) version 1.0.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Gregory E.

    2013-01-01

    The Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM) is designed to transform complex scientific data into meaningful information about the risk of adverse effects of runoff on receiving waters, the potential need for mitigation measures, and the potential effectiveness of such management measures for reducing these risks. The U.S. Geological Survey developed SELDM in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration to help develop planning-level estimates of event mean concentrations, flows, and loads in stormwater from a site of interest and from an upstream basin. Planning-level estimates are defined as the results of analyses used to evaluate alternative management measures; planning-level estimates are recognized to include substantial uncertainties (commonly orders of magnitude). SELDM uses information about a highway site, the associated receiving-water basin, precipitation events, stormflow, water quality, and the performance of mitigation measures to produce a stochastic population of runoff-quality variables. SELDM provides input statistics for precipitation, prestorm flow, runoff coefficients, and concentrations of selected water-quality constituents from National datasets. Input statistics may be selected on the basis of the latitude, longitude, and physical characteristics of the site of interest and the upstream basin. The user also may derive and input statistics for each variable that are specific to a given site of interest or a given area. SELDM is a stochastic model because it uses Monte Carlo methods to produce the random combinations of input variable values needed to generate the stochastic population of values for each component variable. SELDM calculates the dilution of runoff in the receiving waters and the resulting downstream event mean concentrations and annual average lake concentrations. Results are ranked, and plotting positions are calculated, to indicate the level of risk of adverse effects caused by runoff concentrations

  17. A new version of the CNRM Chemistry-Climate Model, CNRM-CCM: description and improvements from the CCMVal-2 simulations

    OpenAIRE

    M. Michou; D. Saint-Martin; Teyssèdre, H.; Alias, A.; Karcher, F.; Olivié, D.; Voldoire, A.; B. Josse; Peuch, V.-H.; Clark, H.; Lee, J. N.; F. Chéroux

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new version of the Météo-France CNRM Chemistry-Climate Model, so-called CNRM-CCM. It includes some fundamental changes from the previous version (CNRM-ACM) which was extensively evaluated in the context of the CCMVal-2 validation activity. The most notable changes concern the radiative code of the GCM, and the inclusion of the detailed stratospheric chemistry of our Chemistry-Transport model MOCAGE on-line within the GCM. A 47-yr transient simulation (1960–2006) ...

  18. SADRWMS: The International Project on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions. Final Report. Version 1.0, April 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety assessment is a process which is used to evaluate the safety of radioactive waste management facilities and activities. Such assessments, which are iterative in nature, evaluate the potential impact that these facilities or activities could have on human health and the environment. The SADRWMS (Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions) Project was an international programme of work to examine international approaches to safety assessment in aspects of predisposal radioactive waste management, including waste conditioning and storage. In comparing international approaches to safety assessment in those areas, it developed a safety assessment framework and the SAFRAN software tool that implements international best practice in these areas. The SADRWMS project encompassed all types of radioactive waste including disused sources, limited volumes, legacy and decommissioning waste, operational waste, and large volume NORM residues. Participants in the SADRWMS Project (operators, regulators and other specialists) were from organizations or regulatory bodies concerned with assessing and improving the safety and management of predisposal radioactive waste treatment and storage facilities in their own countries. They contributed to the project by participating in technical discussions, applying methodologies to real problems, and taking part in the development of test cases. The results of the SADRWMS project have been incorporated into the Safety Guide DS284: Safety Case and Safety Assessment for Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste

  19. Implementing and Evaluating Variable Soil Thickness in the Community Land Model, Version 4.5 (CLM4.5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunke, Michael A.; Broxton, Patrick; Pelletier, Jon; Gochis, David; Hazenberg, Pieter; Lawrence, David M.; Leung, L. Ruby; Niu, Guo-Yue; Troch, Peter A.; Zeng, Xubin

    2016-05-01

    One of the recognized weaknesses of land surface models as used in weather and climate models is the assumption of constant soil thickness due to the lack of global estimates of bedrock depth. Using a 30 arcsecond global dataset for the thickness of relatively porous, unconsolidated sediments over bedrock, spatial variation in soil thickness is included here in version 4.5 of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). The number of soil layers for each grid cell is determined from the average soil depth for each 0.9° latitude x 1.25° longitude grid cell. Including variable soil thickness affects the simulations most in regions with shallow bedrock corresponding predominantly to areas of mountainous terrain. The greatest changes are to baseflow, with the annual minimum generally occurring earlier, while smaller changes are seen in surface fluxes like latent heat flux and surface runoff in which only the annual cycle amplitude is increased. These changes are tied to soil moisture changes which are most substantial in locations with shallow bedrock. Total water storage (TWS) anomalies do not change much over most river basins around the globe, since most basins contain mostly deep soils. However, it was found that TWS anomalies substantially differ for a river basin with more mountainous terrain. Additionally, the annual cycle in soil temperature are affected by including realistic soil thicknesses due to changes to heat capacity and thermal conductivity.

  20. The big challenges in modeling human and environmental well-being [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shripad Tuljapurkar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is a selective review of quantitative research, historical and prospective, that is needed to inform sustainable development policy. I start with a simple framework to highlight how demography and productivity shape human well-being. I use that to discuss three sets of issues and corresponding challenges to modeling: first, population prehistory and early human development and their implications for the future; second, the multiple distinct dimensions of human and environmental well-being and the meaning of sustainability; and, third, inequality as a phenomenon triggered by development and models to examine changing inequality and its consequences. I conclude with a few words about other important factors: political, institutional, and cultural.

  1. Antikaons in neutron star studied with recent versions of relativistic mean-field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neha; Arumugam, P.

    2013-03-01

    We study the impact of additional couplings in the relativistic mean field (RMF) models, in conjunction with antikaon condensation, on various neutron star properties. We analyze different properties such as in-medium antikaon and nucleon effective masses, antikaon energies, chemical potentials and the mass-radius relations of neutron star (NS). We calculate the NS properties with the RMF (NL3), E-RMF (G1, G2) and FSU2.1 models, which are quite successful in explaining several finite nuclear properties. Our results show that the onset of kaon condensation in NS strongly depends on the parameters of the Lagrangian, especially the additional couplings which play a significant role at higher densities where antikaons dominate the behavior of equation of state.

  2. Antikaons in neutron star studied with recent versions of relativistic mean-field models

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Neha

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of additional couplings in the relativistic mean field (RMF) models, in conjunction with antikaon condensation, on various neutron star properties. We analyze different properties such as in-medium antikaon and nucleon effective masses, antikaon energies, chemical potentials and the mass-radius relations of neutron star (NS). We calculate the NS properties with the RMF (NL3), E-RMF (G1, G2) and FSU2.1 models, which are quite successful in explaining several finite nuclear properties. Our results show that the onset of kaon condensation in NS strongly depends on the parameters of the Lagrangian, especially the additional couplings which play a significant role at higher densities where antikaons dominate the behavior of equation of state.

  3. Validating an Icelandic Version of the MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Schram, Asta Bryndis

    2015-01-01

    Students' motivation generally declines during the middle school years, a period of time when important foundations for further studies are laid. There is a move in many countries to improve science education, especially science literacy that is inadequate according to international research (Halldorsson, Olafsson, and Bjornsson, 2007, 2013). The subject of this dissertation is the translation and validation of the MUSICSM Model of Academic Motivation Inventory (MMAMI; Jones, 2012) from Engli...

  4. The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) surface-water model, version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telis, Pamela A.; Xie, Zhixiao; Liu, Zhongwei; Li, Yingru; Conrads, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of water-level gages, interpolation models that generate daily water-level and water-depth data, and applications that compute derived hydrologic data across the freshwater part of the greater Everglades landscape. The U.S. Geological Survey Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystems Science provides support for EDEN in order for EDEN to provide quality-assured monitoring data for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

  5. A Finite-Volume Version of Aizenman-Higuchi Theorem for the 2d Ising Model

    OpenAIRE

    Coquille, Loren; Velenik, Yvan Alain

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1970s, in two celebrated papers, Aizenman and Higuchi independently established that all infinite-volume Gibbs measures of the two-dimensional ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor Ising model are convex combinations of the two pure phases. We present here a new approach to this result, with a number of advantages: (i) We obtain an optimal finite-volume, quantitative analogue (implying the classical claim); (ii) the scheme of our proof seems more natural and provides a better picture of ...

  6. Modelling turbulent vertical mixing sensitivity using a 1-D version of NEMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reffray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Through two numerical experiments, a 1-D vertical model called NEMO1D was used to investigate physical and numerical turbulent-mixing behaviour. The results show that all the turbulent closures tested (k + l from Blanke and Delecluse, 1993 and two equation models: Generic Lengh Scale closures from Umlauf and Burchard, 2003 are able to correctly reproduce the classical test of Kato and Phillips (1969 under favourable numerical conditions while some solutions may diverge depending on the degradation of the spatial and time discretization. The performances of turbulence models were then compared with data measured over a one-year period (mid-2010 to mid-2011 at the PAPA station, located in the North Pacific Ocean. The modelled temperature and salinity were in good agreement with the observations, with a maximum temperature error between −2 and 2 °C during the stratified period (June to October. However the results also depend on the numerical conditions. The vertical RMSE varied, for different turbulent closures, from 0.1 to 0.3 °C during the stratified period and from 0.03 to 0.15 °C during the homogeneous period. This 1-D configuration at the PAPA station (called PAPA1D is now available in NEMO as a reference configuration including the input files and atmospheric forcing set described in this paper. Thus, all the results described can be recovered by downloading and launching PAPA1D. The configuration is described on the NEMO site (http://www.nemo-ocean.eu/Using-NEMO/Configurations/C1D_PAPA. This package is a good starting point for further investigation of vertical processes.

  7. FAME: Friendly Applied Modelling Environment. Version 2.2 User Manual

    OpenAIRE

    Wortelboer FG; Aldenberg T

    1989-01-01

    FAME (Friendly Applied Modelling Environment) is een algemene modelleer omgeving, ontwikkeld voor de dynamische simulatie van waterkwaliteitsmodellen. De modellen worden beschreven als sets van differentiaalvergelijkingen, waarbij van een algemene notatie gebruik wordt gemaakt. Geen kennis van een specifieke computer programmeertaal is vereist. Het programma draait onder MS-DOS op PC's (een hard-disk is vereist). De modelvergelijkingen worden met behulp van een preporcessor omgezet in Tu...

  8. An approach for modeling the name lookup problem in the C++ programming language (extended version)

    OpenAIRE

    Power, James F.; Malloy, Brian A.

    2000-01-01

    Formal grammars are well established for specifying the syntax of programming languages. However, the formal specification of programming language semantics has proven more elusive. A recent standard, the Unified Modeling Language (UML), has quickly become established as a common framework for the specification of large scale software applications. In this paper, we describe an approach for using the UML to specify aspects of the static semantics of programming languages. In particular, we de...

  9. T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model for TOUGH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2001-05-22

    The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models that can be used by operators to predict and design optimal treatment processes. T2LBM is a module for the TOUGH2 simulator that implements a Landfill Bioreactor Model to provide simulation capability for the processes of aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid in the aqueous phase by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. Acetic acid is considered a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. Aerobic and anaerobic microbes are assumed to be immobile and not limited by nutrients in their growth. Methane and carbon dioxide generation due to biodegradation with corresponding thermal effects are modeled. The numerous parameters needed to specify biodegradation are input by the user in the SELEC block of the TOUGH2 input file. Test problems show that good matches to laboratory experiments of biodegradation can be obtained. A landfill test problem demonstrates the capabilities of T2LBM for a hypothetical two-dimensional landfill scenario with permeability heterogeneity and compaction.

  10. A continuous time version and a generalization of a Markov-recapture model for trapping experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpizar-Jara, Russell; Smith, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Wileyto et al. [E.P. Wileyto, W.J. Ewens, M.A. Mullen, Markov-recapture population estimates: a tool for improving interpretation of trapping experiments, Ecology 75 (1994) 1109] propose a four-state discrete time Markov process, which describes the structure of a marking-capture experiment as a method of population estimation. They propose this method primarily for estimation of closed insect populations. Their method provides a mark-recapture estimate from a single trap observation by allowing subjects to mark themselves. The estimate of the unknown population size is based on the assumption of a closed population and a simple Markov model in which the rates of marking, capture, and recapture are assumed to be equal. Using the one step transition probability matrix of their model, we illustrate how to go from an embedded discrete time Markov process to a continuous time Markov process assuming exponentially distributed holding times. We also compute the transition probabilities after time t for the continuous time case and compare the limiting behavior of the continuous and discrete time processes. Finally, we generalize their model by relaxing the assumption of equal per capita rates for marking, capture, and recapture. Other questions about how their results change when using a continuous time Markov process are examined. PMID:18556026

  11. System cost model user`s manual, version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, D.

    1995-06-01

    The System Cost Model (SCM) was developed by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies in Idaho Falls, Idaho and MK-Environmental Services in San Francisco, California to support the Baseline Environmental Management Report sensitivity analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SCM serves the needs of the entire DOE complex for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. The model can be used to evaluate total complex costs based on various configuration options or to evaluate site-specific options. The site-specific cost estimates are based on generic assumptions such as waste loads and densities, treatment processing schemes, existing facilities capacities and functions, storage and disposal requirements, schedules, and cost factors. The SCM allows customization of the data for detailed site-specific estimates. There are approximately forty TSD module designs that have been further customized to account for design differences for nonalpha, alpha, remote-handled, and transuranic wastes. The SCM generates cost profiles based on the model default parameters or customized user-defined input and also generates costs for transporting waste from generators to TSD sites.

  12. Salmon welfare index model 2.0: an extended model for overall welfare assessment of caged Atlantic salmon, based on a review of selected welfare indicators and intended for fish health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettersen, J.M.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Midtlyng, P.J.; Folkedal, O.; Stien, L.H.; Steffenak, H.; Kristiansen, T.S.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present an extended version of a semantic model for overall welfare assessment of Atlantic salmon reared in sea cages. The model, called SWIM 2.0, is designed to enable fish health professionals to make a formal and standardized assessment of fish welfare using a set of reviewed welfare ind

  13. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Pepke Pedersen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A new, low-order Earth System Model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years. The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow cover. Gases considered are carbon dioxide and methane for all three carbon isotopes, nitrous oxide and oxygen. The ocean module has 100 m vertical resolution, carbonate chemistry and prescribed circulation and mixing. Ocean biogeochemical tracers are phosphate, dissolved oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon for all three carbon isotopes and alkalinity. Biogenic production of particulate organic matter in the ocean surface layer depends on phosphate availability but with lower efficiency in the high latitude zone, as determined by model fit to ocean data. The calcite to organic carbon rain ratio depends on surface layer temperature. The semi-analytical, ocean sediment module considers calcium carbonate dissolution and oxic and anoxic organic matter remineralisation. The sediment is composed of calcite, non-calcite mineral and reactive organic matter. Sediment porosity profiles are related to sediment composition and a bioturbated layer of 0.1 m thickness is assumed. A sediment segment is ascribed to each ocean layer and segment area stems from observed ocean depth distributions. Sediment burial is calculated from sedimentation velocities at the base of the bioturbated layer. Bioturbation rates and oxic and anoxic remineralisation rates depend on organic carbon rain rates and dissolved oxygen concentrations. The land biosphere module considers leaves, wood, litter and soil. Net primary production depends on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and

  14. OLS Estimator for a Mixed Regressive, Spatial Autoregressive Model: Extended Version

    OpenAIRE

    Mynbaev, Kairat

    2009-01-01

    We find the asymptotic distribution of the OLS estimator of the parameters $% \\beta$ and $\\rho$ in the mixed spatial model with exogenous regressors $% Y_n=X_n\\beta+\\rho W_nY_n+V_n$. The exogenous regressors may be bounded or growing, like polynomial trends. The assumption about the spatial matrix $W_n $ is appropriate for the situation when each economic agent is influenced by many others. The error term is a short-memory linear process. The key finding is that in general the asymptotic dist...

  15. Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) user's guide, version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmillin, Mark L.; Spangler, Jan L.; Dahmen, Stephen M.; Rehder, John J.

    1993-01-01

    The Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) software package is used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles. It provides a highly interactive and dynamic capability for generating geometries with Bezier cubic patches. Features include automatic generation of commonly used aerospace constructs (e.g., wings and multilobed tanks); cross-section skinning; wireframe and shaded presentation; area, volume, inertia, and center-of-gravity calculations; and interfaces to various aerodynamic and structural analysis programs. A comprehensive description of SMART and how to use it is provided.

  16. On mathematical models for Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices (expanded version)

    CERN Document Server

    Aftalion, Amandine; 10.1142/S0129055X0900361X

    2009-01-01

    Our aim is to analyze the various energy functionals appearing in the physics literature and describing the behavior of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice. We want to justify the use of some reduced models. For that purpose, we will use the semi-classical analysis developed for linear problems related to the Schr\\"odinger operator with periodic potential or multiple wells potentials. We justify, in some asymptotic regimes, the reduction to low dimensional problems and analyze the reduced problems.

  17. Using Rasch rating scale model to reassess the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the PedsQLTM 4.0 Generic Core Scales in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Peyman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Item response theory (IRT is extensively used to develop adaptive instruments of health-related quality of life (HRQoL. However, each IRT model has its own function to estimate item and category parameters, and hence different results may be found using the same response categories with different IRT models. The present study used the Rasch rating scale model (RSM to examine and reassess the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the PedsQLTM 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Methods The PedsQLTM 4.0 Generic Core Scales was completed by 938 Iranian school children and their parents. Convergent, discriminant and construct validity of the instrument were assessed by classical test theory (CTT. The RSM was applied to investigate person and item reliability, item statistics and ordering of response categories. Results The CTT method showed that the scaling success rate for convergent and discriminant validity were 100% in all domains with the exception of physical health in the child self-report. Moreover, confirmatory factor analysis supported a four-factor model similar to its original version. The RSM showed that 22 out of 23 items had acceptable infit and outfit statistics (0.6, person reliabilities were low, item reliabilities were high, and item difficulty ranged from -1.01 to 0.71 and -0.68 to 0.43 for child self-report and parent proxy-report, respectively. Also the RSM showed that successive response categories for all items were not located in the expected order. Conclusions This study revealed that, in all domains, the five response categories did not perform adequately. It is not known whether this problem is a function of the meaning of the response choices in the Persian language or an artifact of a mostly healthy population that did not use the full range of the response categories. The response categories should be evaluated in further validation studies, especially in large samples of chronically ill patients.

  18. A binary model for the UV-upturn of elliptical galaxies (MNRAS version)

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Z; Lynas-Gray, A E

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of a flux excess in the far-ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of elliptical galaxies was a major surprise in 1969. While it is now clear that this UV excess is caused by an old population of hot helium-burning stars without large hydrogen-rich envelopes, rather than young stars, their origin has remained a mystery. Here we show that these stars most likely lost their envelopes because of binary interactions, similar to the hot subdwarf population in our own Galaxy. We have developed an evolutionary population synthesis model for the far-UV excess of elliptical galaxies based on the binary model developed by Han et al. (2002, 2003) for the formation of hot subdwarfs in our Galaxy. Despite its simplicity, it successfully reproduces most of the properties of elliptical galaxies with a UV excess, e.g. the range of observed UV excesses, both in $(1550-V)$ and $(2000-V)$, and their evolution with redshift. We also present colour-colour diagrams for use as diagnostic tools in the study of elliptical galaxies. ...

  19. Model for Analysis of the Energy Demand (MAED) users' manual for version MAED-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual is organized in two major parts. The first part includes eight main sections describing how to use the MAED-1 computer program and the second one consists of five appendices giving some additional information about the program. Concerning the main sections of the manual, Section 1 gives a summary description and some background information about the MAED-1 model. Section 2 extends the description of the MAED-1 model in more detail. Section 3 introduces some concepts, mainly related to the computer requirements imposed by the program, that are used throughout this document. Sections 4 to 7 describe how to execute each of the various programs (or modules) of the MAED-1 package. The description for each module shows the user how to prepare the control and data cards needed to execute the module and how to interpret the printed output produced. Section 8 recapitulates about the use of MAED-1 for carrying out energy and electricity planning studies, describes the several phases normally involved in this type of study and provides the user with practical hints about the most important aspects that need to be verified at each phase while executing the various MAED modules

  20. 精神分裂症前驱期问卷(简版)信效度的初步评价%Primary assessment of reliability and validity of the Chinese version of prodromal questionnaire-brief version

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐; 陈发展; 赵旭东

    2013-01-01

    目的 初步检验精神分裂症前驱期问卷(简版)(PQ-B)的信度和效度.方法 采用方便取样的原则选取122名在校大学生和心理门诊患者,同时完成PQ-B和症状自评量表(SCL-90).2周后对其中的80人进行了PQ-B重测.采用相关分析、探索性因子分析等对数据进行处理.结果 PQ-B总的Cronbach系数为0.894,条目与总分的相关系数在0.347 ~ 0.688之间(均P<0.01),各条目被逐一删除后的Cronbach系数均小于0.894.PQ-B总分的重测相关系数为0.710(P<0.01);Guttman折半系数为0.874.探索性因子分析提取6个公因子,累计方差贡献率为65.22%,斜交旋转后各条目的因子载荷在0.404~0.896.PQ-B与SCL-90总分的相关系数为0.808 (P<0.01);除了因子5与SCL-90的强迫、人际敏感、抑郁、敌对的相关性偏低外(r=0.154~0.206,P>0.01),PQ-B其余各因子与SCL-90的总分和因子分均呈成正相关(r=0.233 ~0.725,P<0.01).结论 中文版PQ-B的内部一致性信度,重测信度,结构效度及同时效度基本良好.%Objective To assess the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of Prodromal Questionnaire-Brief Version (PQ-B).Methods By convenience sampling,122 college students and clinical psychology outpatients were assessed by PQ-B and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90).Eighty among them were rctcstcd with the PQ-B after 2 weeks to test test-retest reliability.Correlation analysis,exploratory factor analysis were used for data processing.Results The internal consistency reliability of the Chinese version of PQ-B was 0.894,the correlation coefficient between each item and total score were higher than 0.347 (all P < 0.01),and when each of the total items deleted,the Cronbach' s Alpha of the whole score was lower than 0.894.Moreover,the test-retest reliability was 0.71 (P < 0.01) and the Guttman Split-Half Coefficient was 0.874.The exploratory factor analysis showed that KMO was 0.833,and 65.22% of the total variation could be

  1. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  2. MAFIA Version 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, T.; Bartsch, M.; Becker, U.; Bihn, M.; Blell, U.; Clemens, M.; Dehler, M.; Dohlus, M.; Drevlak, M.; Du, X.; Ehmann, R.; Eufinger, A.; Gutschling, S.; Hahne, P.; Klatt, R.; Krietenstein, B.; Langstrof, A.; Pinder, P.; Podebrad, O.; Pröpper, T.; van Rienen, U.; Schmidt, D.; Schuhmann, R.; Schulz, A.; Schupp, S.; Schütt, P.; Thoma, P.; Timm, M.; Wagner, B.; Weber, R.; Wipf, S.; Wolter, H.; Min, Z.

    1997-02-01

    MAFIA Version 4.0 is an almost completely new version of the general purpose electromagnetic simulator known since 13 years. The major improvements concern the new graphical user interface based on state of the art technology as well as a series of new solvers for new physics problems. MAFIA now covers heat distribution, electro-quasistatics, S-parameters in frequency domain, particle beam tracking in linear accelerators, acoustics and even elastodynamics. The solvers that were available in earlier versions have also been improved and/or extended, as for example the complex eigenmode solver, the 2D-3D coupled PIC solvers. Time domain solvers have new waveguide boundary conditions with an extremely low reflection even near cutoff frequency, concentrated elements are available as well as a variety of signal processing options. Probably the most valuable addition are recursive sub-grid capabilities that enable modeling of very small details in large structures.

  3. MAFIA Version 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, T. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bartsch, M. [CST Computer Simulations Technology GmbH, Lauteschlaegerstr. 38, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Becker, U.; Bihn, M. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Blell, U. [GS1 mbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Clemens, M.; Dehler, M. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Dohlus, M. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D22607 (Germany); Drevlak, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D22607 (Germany); Du, X. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Ehmann, R.; Eufinger, A. [CST Computer Simulations Technology GmbH, Lauteschlaegerstr. 38, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Gutschling, S. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Hahne, P. [CST Computer Simulations Technology GmbH, Lauteschlaegerstr. 38, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Klatt, R.; Krietenstein, B.; Langstrof, A.; Pinder, P.; Podebrad, O.; Proepper, T.; van Rienen, U.; Schmidt, D.; Schuhmann, R. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Schulz, A. [CST Computer Simulations Technology GmbH, Lauteschlaegerstr. 38, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Schupp, S.; Schuett, P.; Thoma, P.; Timm, M. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Wagner, B. [CSS Computer Simulation Services GbRmbH, Lauteschlaegerstr. 38, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Weber, R. [AET Inc., 1-1-7 Mukaibara, Asaoku, Kawasaki City (Japan); Wipf, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D22607 (Germany); Wolter, H. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Min, Z. [TH-Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, Schlossgartenstr.8, D64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    MAFIA Version 4.0 is an almost completely new version of the general purpose electromagnetic simulator known since 13 years. The major improvements concern the new graphical user interface based on state of the art technology as well as a series of new solvers for new physics problems. MAFIA now covers heat distribution, electro-quasistatics, S-parameters in frequency domain, particle beam tracking in linear accelerators, acoustics and even elastodynamics. The solvers that were available in earlier versions have also been improved and/or extended, as for example the complex eigenmode solver, the 2D--3D coupled PIC solvers. Time domain solvers have new waveguide boundary conditions with an extremely low reflection even near cutoff frequency, concentrated elements are available as well as a variety of signal processing options. Probably the most valuable addition are recursive sub-grid capabilities that enable modeling of very small details in large structures. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Modeling Flocks and Prices: Jumping Particles with an Attractive Interaction (shortened version)

    CERN Document Server

    Balazs, Marton; Toth, Balint

    2011-01-01

    We introduce and investigate a new model of a finite number of particles jumping forward on the real line. The jump lengths are independent of everything, but the jump rate of each particle depends on the relative position of the particle compared to the center of mass of the system. The rates are higher for those left behind, and lower for those ahead of the center of mass, providing an attractive interaction keeping the particles together. We prove that in the fluid limit, as the number of particles goes to infinity, the evolution of the system is described by a mean field equation that exhibits traveling wave solutions. A connection to extreme value statistics is also provided.

  5. Theoretical modelling of epigenetically modified DNA sequences [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Teresa Pires Carvalho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report herein a set of calculations designed to examine the effects of epigenetic modifications on the structure of DNA. The incorporation of methyl, hydroxymethyl, formyl and carboxy substituents at the 5-position of cytosine is shown to hardly affect the geometry of CG base pairs, but to result in rather larger changes to hydrogen-bond and stacking binding energies, as predicted by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT methods. The same modifications within double-stranded GCG and ACA trimers exhibit rather larger structural effects, when including the sugar-phosphate backbone as well as sodium counterions and implicit aqueous solvation. In particular, changes are observed in the buckle and propeller angles within base pairs and the slide and roll values of base pair steps, but these leave the overall helical shape of DNA essentially intact. The structures so obtained are useful as a benchmark of faster methods, including molecular mechanics (MM and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM methods. We show that previously developed MM parameters satisfactorily reproduce the trimer structures, as do QM/MM calculations which treat bases with dispersion-corrected DFT and the sugar-phosphate backbone with AMBER. The latter are improved by inclusion of all six bases in the QM region, since a truncated model including only the central CG base pair in the QM region is considerably further from the DFT structure. This QM/MM method is then applied to a set of double-stranded DNA heptamers derived from a recent X-ray crystallographic study, whose size puts a DFT study beyond our current computational resources. These data show that still larger structural changes are observed than in base pairs or trimers, leading us to conclude that it is important to model epigenetic modifications within realistic molecular contexts.

  6. Columbia River Statistical Update Model, Version 4. 0 (COLSTAT4): Background documentation and user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, G.; Damschen, D.W.; Brockhaus, R.D.

    1987-08-01

    Daily-averaged temperature and flow information on the Columbia River just downstream of Priest Rapids Dam and upstream of river mile 380 were collected and stored in a data base. The flow information corresponds to discharges that were collected daily from October 1, 1959, through July 28, 1986. The temperature information corresponds to values that were collected daily from January 1, 1965, through May 27, 1986. The computer model, COLSTAT4 (Columbia River Statistical Update - Version 4.0 model), uses the temperature-discharge data base to statistically analyze temperature and flow conditions by computing the frequency of occurrence and duration of selected temperatures and flow rates for the Columbia River. The COLSTAT4 code analyzes the flow and temperature information in a sequential time frame (i.e., a continuous analysis over a given time period); it also analyzes this information in a seasonal time frame (i.e., a periodic analysis over a specific season from year to year). A provision is included to enable the user to edit and/or extend the data base of temperature and flow information. This report describes the COLSTAT4 code and the information contained in its data base.

  7. School version of ESTE EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESTE EU is information system and software for radiological impacts assessment to the territory of the country in case of radiation accident inside/outside of the country .The program enables to model dispersion of radioactive clouds in small-scale and meso-scale. The system enables the user to estimate prediction of the source term (release to the atmosphere ) for any point of radiation/nuclear accident in Europe (for any point of the release, but especially for the sites of European power reactors ). The system enables to utilize results of real radiological monitoring in the process of source term estimation. Radiological impacts of release to the atmosphere are modelled and calculated across the Europe and displayed in the geographical information system (GIS). The school version of ESTE EU is intended for students of the universities which are interested in or could work in the field of emergency response, radiological and nuclear accidents, dispersion modelling, radiological impacts calculation and urgent or preventive protective measures implementation. The school version of ESTE EU is planned to be donated to specialized departments of faculties in Slovakia, Czech Republic, etc. System can be fully operated in Slovak, Czech or English language. (authors)

  8. Assessment of Venous Thrombosis in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Steven P; Evans, Colin E; Patel, Ashish S; Modarai, Bijan; Saha, Prakash; Smith, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here, we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro-computed tomography, and high-frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition.

  9. Reliability of the Brazilian version of HCR-20 Assessing Risk for Violence Confiabilidade da versão brasileira do HCR-20 Assessing Risk for Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Lisieux Elaine de Borba Telles; Vivian Peres Day; Jorge Oscar Folino; José Geraldo Vernet Taborda

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Assessing risk for violence is a complex task often based on not objective or structured clinical evaluations. HCR-20 Assessing Risk for Violence has been used in several countries to increase the accuracy of this exam. The purpose of this study was to inform on central aspects of this instrument, as well as the results of the reliability assessment of the HCR-20 Assessing Risk for Violence in a Brazilian inpatient criminal population. METHOD: Two examiners independently assessed a...

  10. MIG version 0.0 model interface guidelines: Rules to accelerate installation of numerical models into any compliant parent code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannon, R.M.; Wong, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    A set of model interface guidelines, called MIG, is presented as a means by which any compliant numerical material model can be rapidly installed into any parent code without having to modify the model subroutines. Here, {open_quotes}model{close_quotes} usually means a material model such as one that computes stress as a function of strain, though the term may be extended to any numerical operation. {open_quotes}Parent code{close_quotes} means a hydrocode, finite element code, etc. which uses the model and enforces, say, the fundamental laws of motion and thermodynamics. MIG requires the model developer (who creates the model package) to specify model needs in a standardized but flexible way. MIG includes a dictionary of technical terms that allows developers and parent code architects to share a common vocabulary when specifying field variables. For portability, database management is the responsibility of the parent code. Input/output occurs via structured calling arguments. As much model information as possible (such as the lists of required inputs, as well as lists of precharacterized material data and special needs) is supplied by the model developer in an ASCII text file. Every MIG-compliant model also has three required subroutines to check data, to request extra field variables, and to perform model physics. To date, the MIG scheme has proven flexible in beta installations of a simple yield model, plus a more complicated viscodamage yield model, three electromechanical models, and a complicated anisotropic microcrack constitutive model. The MIG yield model has been successfully installed using identical subroutines in three vectorized parent codes and one parallel C++ code, all predicting comparable results. By maintaining one model for many codes, MIG facilitates code-to-code comparisons and reduces duplication of effort, thereby reducing the cost of installing and sharing models in diverse new codes.

  11. Hybrid2: The hybrid system simulation model, Version 1.0, user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    In light of the large scale desire for energy in remote communities, especially in the developing world, the need for a detailed long term performance prediction model for hybrid power systems was seen. To meet these ends, engineers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Massachusetts (UMass) have spent the last three years developing the Hybrid2 software. The Hybrid2 code provides a means to conduct long term, detailed simulations of the performance of a large array of hybrid power systems. This work acts as an introduction and users manual to the Hybrid2 software. The manual describes the Hybrid2 code, what is included with the software and instructs the user on the structure of the code. The manual also describes some of the major features of the Hybrid2 code as well as how to create projects and run hybrid system simulations. The Hybrid2 code test program is also discussed. Although every attempt has been made to make the Hybrid2 code easy to understand and use, this manual will allow many organizations to consider the long term advantages of using hybrid power systems instead of conventional petroleum based systems for remote power generation.

  12. Sensitivity of precipitation to parameter values in the community atmosphere model version 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Gardar; Lucas, Donald; Qian, Yun; Swiler, Laura Painton; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-03-01

    One objective of the Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) program is to develop the capability to thoroughly test and understand the uncertainties in the overall climate model and its components as they are being developed. The focus on uncertainties involves sensitivity analysis: the capability to determine which input parameters have a major influence on the output responses of interest. This report presents some initial sensitivity analysis results performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LNNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In the 2011-2012 timeframe, these laboratories worked in collaboration to perform sensitivity analyses of a set of CAM5, 2° runs, where the response metrics of interest were precipitation metrics. The three labs performed their sensitivity analysis (SA) studies separately and then compared results. Overall, the results were quite consistent with each other although the methods used were different. This exercise provided a robustness check of the global sensitivity analysis metrics and identified some strongly influential parameters.

  13. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.0.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; Kelly, J. T.; Bash, J. O.

    2015-11-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. Model evaluations of SSA emissions have mainly focused on the global scale, but regional-scale evaluations are also important due to the localized impact of SSAs on atmospheric chemistry near the coast. In this study, SSA emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were updated to enhance the fine-mode size distribution, include sea surface temperature (SST) dependency, and reduce surf-enhanced emissions. Predictions from the updated CMAQ model and those of the previous release version, CMAQv5.0.2, were evaluated using several coastal and national observational data sets in the continental US. The updated emissions generally reduced model underestimates of sodium, chloride, and nitrate surface concentrations for coastal sites in the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) near Tampa, Florida. Including SST dependency to the SSA emission parameterization led to increased sodium concentrations in the southeastern US and decreased concentrations along parts of the Pacific coast and northeastern US. The influence of sodium on the gas-particle partitioning of nitrate resulted in higher nitrate particle concentrations in many coastal urban areas due to increased condensation of nitric acid in the updated simulations, potentially affecting the predicted nitrogen deposition in sensitive ecosystems. Application of the updated SSA emissions to the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) study period resulted in a modest improvement in the predicted surface concentration of sodium and nitrate at several central and southern California coastal sites. This update of SSA emissions enabled a more realistic simulation of the atmospheric chemistry in coastal environments where marine air mixes with urban pollution.

  14. Introducing data parallelism into climate model post-processing through a parallel version of the NCAR Command Language (NCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, R. L.; Xu, X.; Krishna, J.; Tautges, T.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between the needs of post-processing climate model output and the capability of the available tools has reached a crisis point. The large volume of data currently produced by climate models is overwhelming the current, decades-old analysis workflow. The tools used to implement that workflow are now a bottleneck in the climate science discovery processes. This crisis will only worsen as ultra-high resolution global climate models with horizontal scales of 4 km or smaller, running on leadership computing facilities, begin to produce tens to hundreds of terabytes for a single, hundred-year climate simulation. While climate models have used parallelism for several years, the post-processing tools are still mostly single-threaded applications. We have created a Parallel Climate Analysis Library (ParCAL) which implements many common climate analysis operations in a data-parallel fashion using the Message Passing Interface. ParCAL has in turn been built on sophisticated packages for describing grids in parallel (the Mesh Oriented database (MOAB) and for performing vector operations on arbitrary grids (Intrepid). ParCAL is also using parallel I/O through the PnetCDF library. ParCAL has been used to implement a parallel version of the NCAR Command Language (NCL). ParNCL/ParCAL not only speeds up analysis of large datasets but also allows operations to be performed on native grids, eliminating the need to transform everything to latitude-longitude grids. In most cases, users NCL scripts can run unaltered in parallel using ParNCL.

  15. The Adolescent Sexual Abuser Project (ASAP) Assessment Measures-Dutch Revised Version: A Comparison of Personality Characteristics between Juvenile Sex Offenders, Juvenile Perpetrators of Non-Sexual Violent Offences and Non-Delinquent Youth in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Outsem, Ron; Beckett, Richard; Bullens, Ruud; Vermeiren, Robert; van Horn, Joan; Doreleijers, Theo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the Adolescent Sexual Abuser Project (ASAP) assessment pack-Dutch Revised Version (ASAP-D) is presented. The ASAP-D is an assessment instrument which measures the personality characteristics that are generally considered relevant in the literature for the development and perpetuation of sexually abusive behaviour in juveniles. After…

  16. Reconstructing f(R) modified gravity from ordinary and entropy-corrected versions of the holographic and new agegraphic dark energy models

    OpenAIRE

    Karami, K.; Khaledian, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we peruse cosmological usage of the most promising candidates of dark energy in the framework of f(R) theory. We reconstruct the different f(R) modified gravity models in the spatially flat FRW universe according to the ordinary and entropy-corrected versions of the holographic and new agegraphic dark energy models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. We also obtain the equation of state parameter of the corresponding f(R)-gravity models. We conclude that the holograph...

  17. The CAO Short-Run Macroeconometric Model of Japanese Economy (2004 version) -Basic Structure, Multipliers, and Economic Policy Analyses- (in Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    Keiko Murata; Tatsuo Saito

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the basic structure and multipliers of the revised version of the CAO Short-Run Macroeconometric Model of the Japanese Economy, which was firstly released in 1998 (Hori et al. [1998]).The model is basically a demand-oriented, traditional Keynesian-type model with IS-LM-BP framework; however, it adopts recent developments in econometrics, such as co-integration, and error-correction to ensure a long-run equilibrium.

  18. The Malay version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (Malay-ECOHIS) – assessing validity and reliability

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim, Azlina N.; Yusof, Zamros Y. M.; Esa, Rashidah

    2015-01-01

    Background The Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) is used to assess oral impacts on the quality of life of preschool aged children and their families. The objective of this study was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the ECOHIS into Malay and assess its psychometric properties. Methods The cross-cultural adaptation of ECOHIS into Malay comprised of translating the ECOHIS into the Malay language (Malay-ECOHIS) by experts followed by face validation of the Malay-ECOHIS by...

  19. The ModFOLD4 server for the quality assessment of 3D protein models

    OpenAIRE

    McGuffin, Liam J; Buenavista, Maria T.; Roche, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Once you have generated a 3D model of a protein, how do you know whether it bears any resemblance to the actual structure? To determine the usefulness of 3D models of proteins, they must be assessed in terms of their quality by methods that predict their similarity to the native structure. The ModFOLD4 server is the latest version of our leading independent server for the estimation of both the global and local (per-residue) quality of 3D protein models. The server produces both machine reada...

  20. Applying sustainability theory to transport infrastructure assessment using a multiplicative ahp decision support model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryn, Marie Ridley; Cornet, Yannick; Salling, Kim Bang

    2015-01-01

    of sustainability supported by ecological economists. This conceptualisation is operationalized by the use of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) and a multiplicative version of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The planning and decision-making process related to a new connection across the Roskilde Fjord...... to sustainability based on the nested model is therefore presented seeking to provide an alternative approach to sustainable transportation assessment, namely the SUSTAIN Decision Support System (DSS) model. This model is based on a review of basic notions of sustainability presented by the Brundtland Commission...

  1. Models to Assess the Bankruptcy Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Valeria TOMA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Closely related to financial risk assessment, one of the main concerns of the organizations should be the evaluation of bankruptcy risk, in this period of slow economic growth. Organization bankruptcies have increased in recent years worldwide. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the methods and models for forecasting bankruptcy of organizations, for the bankruptcy risk assessment are seeing for the health financing of an entity in financial accounting diagnosis and that the organizations requires assessment of risks accompanying the work, in which some signals fragility (vulnerable health this and other projected bankruptcy (insolvability threatens its survival (continuity. The bankruptcy risk assessment is important for profit-seeking investors because they must know how to value a company in or near bankruptcy is an important skill, but to detect any signs of looming bankruptcy is necessary to calculate and to analyse all kinds of financial rations: working capital, profitability, debt levels and liquidity.

  2. Translation, cultural adaptation assessment, and both validity and reliability testing of the kidney disease quality of life - short form version 1.3 for use with Iranian patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir; Yekaninejad, Mirsaeed; Mølsted, Stig;

    2011-01-01

    was extracted by performing exploratory factor analysis. RESULTS: All of the scales in the questionnaire showed good test-retest reliability (i.e. intraclass correlations between test and retest scores were >0.7). All of the scales met the minimal criteria (0.7) for internal consistency and Cronbach's-a ranged...... 0.71-0.93. Furthermore, results from a discriminate validity evaluation showed that the questionnaire could be used to discriminate between subgroups of the patients. Finally, a principal component analysis of the disease-specific scales indicated that this part of the questionnaire could......AIM: The aims of the study were to translate the Kidney Disease Quality of Life--Short Form version 1.3 (KDQOL-SF ver. 1.3) questionnaire into Iranian (Farsi), and to then assess it in terms of validity and reliability on Iranian patients. METHODS: The questionnaire was first translated into Farsi...

  3. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and discriminative validity of the Danish version of the short questionnaire to assess health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie Sandell; Sørensen, Lotte; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer;

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is abundant evidence that physical activity has a fundamental role in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. Questionnaires are simple and inexpensive to apply to measure physical activity. Purpose / Aim of Study: Translate and cross-cultural adapt the short...... questionnaire to assess health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH) to Danish and to investigate the reliability and discriminative validity of the Danish version. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted according to the COSMIN guidelines. The reliability was evaluated in 50 healthy individuals, mean age...... of SQUASH can distinguish between individuals, but the absolute reliability was poor and SQUASH is not considered suitable for measuring physical activity on an individual level. SQUASH was unable to discriminate between healthy individuals and patients with hip dysplasia with respect to total activity...

  4. Comparing Student Assessments and Perceptions of Online and Face-to-Face Versions of an Introductory Linguistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Palmer, Chris C.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the issue of whether linguistics is better suited for a face-to-face (F2F) environment than an online teaching environment. Specifically, it examines assessment scores and student perceptions of the effectiveness of an introductory linguistics course at an undergraduate state university that has been taught multiple times in…

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Dutch version of the scored patient-generated subjective global assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine J.; Hass, Ulrike; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Schans, Cees P. van der; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët

    2014-01-01

    Posterpresentatie gehouden tijdens en in het kader van Clinical Nutrition Week 2014. Background: Nutritional assessment is considered to be an important element in the nutrition care process of cancer patients, since nutritional status is positively associated with health outcome. The Scored Patient

  6. 78 FR 54365 - Uniform Fine Assessment Version 4.0 Software; Calculating Amounts of Civil Penalties for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... calculated by UFA 4.0 would not promote enhanced commercial motor vehicle safety or induce prompt and... FMCSA entitled, ``Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology. '' 76 FR 71431, November 17, 2011. DATES: The..., serious injury, illness or destruction of property, a maximum fine of $175,000 may be assessed,...

  7. Cosmetics Fact Sheet. To assess the risks for the consumer. Updated version for ConsExpo 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer HJ; Prud'homme de Lodder LCH; Engelen JGM van; SIR

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to compounds in consumer products can be assessed using the computer program ConsExpo (Consumer Exposure). Given the huge number of consumer products, it is not possible to calculate the exposure for each separate product, so a limited number of groups containing similar products are define

  8. Applying Positive Behavioral Support and Functional Behavioral Assessment in Schools. Technical Assistance Guide 1, Version 1.4.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, George; Horner, Robert H.; Dunlap, Glen; Hieneman, Meme; Lewis, Timothy J.; Nelson, C. Michael; Scott, Terrance; Liaupsin, Carl; Sailor, Wayne; Turnbull, Ann P.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III; Wickham, Donna; Ruef, Michael; Wilcox, Brennan

    This paper discusses how educators can apply positive behavioral support (PBS) to students with and without disabilities and conduct functional behavioral assessments (FBAs). It begins by describing the challenges that educators face in educating an increasingly heterogeneous population of students, including students with external and internal…

  9. Assessment Models and Software Support for Assistive Technology Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Len; Sanche, Bob

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews requirements for considering the need for assistive technology (AT) services within the Individualized Education Program process and highlights the importance of collaborative teamwork. Current AT models are described, along with the AT Co-Planner. The use of a software version of the model is discussed. (Contains references.)…

  10. Assessing attitudes towards statistics among medical students: psychometric properties of the Serbian version of the Survey of Attitudes Towards Statistics (SATS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejana Stanisavljevic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medical statistics has become important and relevant for future doctors, enabling them to practice evidence based medicine. Recent studies report that students' attitudes towards statistics play an important role in their statistics achievements. The aim of the study was to test the psychometric properties of the Serbian version of the Survey of Attitudes Towards Statistics (SATS in order to acquire a valid instrument to measure attitudes inside the Serbian educational context. METHODS: The validation study was performed on a cohort of 417 medical students who were enrolled in an obligatory introductory statistics course. The SATS adaptation was based on an internationally accepted methodology for translation and cultural adaptation. Psychometric properties of the Serbian version of the SATS were analyzed through the examination of factorial structure and internal consistency. RESULTS: Most medical students held positive attitudes towards statistics. The average total SATS score was above neutral (4.3±0.8, and varied from 1.9 to 6.2. Confirmatory factor analysis validated the six-factor structure of the questionnaire (Affect, Cognitive Competence, Value, Difficulty, Interest and Effort. Values for fit indices TLI (0.940 and CFI (0.961 were above the cut-off of ≥0.90. The RMSEA value of 0.064 (0.051-0.078 was below the suggested value of ≤0.08. Cronbach's alpha of the entire scale was 0.90, indicating scale reliability. In a multivariate regression model, self-rating of ability in mathematics and current grade point average were significantly associated with the total SATS score after adjusting for age and gender. CONCLUSION: Present study provided the evidence for the appropriate metric properties of the Serbian version of SATS. Confirmatory factor analysis validated the six-factor structure of the scale. The SATS might be reliable and a valid instrument for identifying medical students' attitudes towards statistics in the

  11. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cervix (FACT-Cx measuring health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT is one of the most commonly used self-report instruments for evaluation of health-related quality of life in oncology patients. However, cultural considerations necessitate testing of the subscales in different populations. We sought to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the applicability and psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the FACT-Cervix (FACT-Cx in Chinese women with cervical cancer. Methods Ten personal interviews were conducted in order to explore patients’ opinions about the scale and its items in depth. In addition the questionnaire was administered to 400 women with cervical cancer to test its psychometric properties. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and item-subscale correlation while validity was evaluated using factor analysis and known-group validity. Results Some items related to sex and the ability to give birth were questioned in the personal interviews, mostly regarding their significance and acceptance in the Chinese cultural context. The Cronbach’s alphas of FACT-Cx and the subscales were greater than 0.7, except for the cervical-cancer-specific subscale which was 0.57. Factor analysis demonstrated that the FACT-G construct generally paralleled the original. There were significant differences in the FACT-Cx and some subscales between those receiving and not receiving treatment and among the patients with different performance status. Conclusions In general, psychometric properties of the Chinese version supported its use with cervical cancer patients in Mainland China. Further work is needed to improve the psychometric adequacy of the cervical-cancer-specific subscale and adjust it to cultural considerations.

  12. Updating sea spray aerosol emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model version 5.0.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sea spray aerosols (SSA impact the particle mass concentration and gas-particle partitioning in coastal environments, with implications for human and ecosystem health. Despite their importance, the emission magnitude of SSA remains highly uncertain with global estimates varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model was updated to enhance fine mode SSA emissions, include sea surface temperature (SST dependency, and reduce coastally-enhanced emissions. Predictions from the updated CMAQ model and those of the previous release version, CMAQv5.0.2, were evaluated using several regional and national observational datasets in the continental US. The updated emissions generally reduced model underestimates of sodium, chloride, and nitrate surface concentrations for an inland site of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE near Tampa, Florida. Including SST-dependency to the SSA emission parameterization led to increased sodium concentrations in the southeast US and decreased concentrations along parts of the Pacific coast and northeastern US. The influence of sodium on the gas-particle partitioning of nitrate resulted in higher nitrate particle concentrations in many coastal urban areas due to increased condensation of nitric acid in the updated simulations, potentially affecting the predicted nitrogen deposition in sensitive ecosystems. Application of the updated SSA emissions to the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex study period resulted in modest improvement in the predicted surface concentration of sodium and nitrate at several central and southern California coastal sites. This SSA emission update enabled a more realistic simulation of the atmospheric chemistry in environments where marine air mixes with urban pollution.

  13. Study of the Eco-Economic Indicators by Means of the New Version of the Merge Integrated Model. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Vadimovich Digas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most relevant issues of the day is the forecasting problem of climatic changes and mitigation of their consequences. The official point of view reflected in the Climate doctrine of the Russian Federation consists in the recognition of the need of the development of the state approach to the climatic problems and related issues on the basis of the comprehensive scientific analysis of ecological, economic and social factors. For this purpose, the integrated estimation models of interdisciplinary character are attracted. Their functionality is characterized by the possibility of construction and testing of various dynamic scenarios of complex systems. The main purposes of the computing experiments described in the article are a review of the consequences of hypothetical participation of Russia in initiatives for greenhouse gas reduction as the Kyoto Protocol and approbation of one of the calculation methods of the green GDP representing the efficiency of environmental management in the modelling. To implement the given goals, the MERGE optimization model is used, its classical version is intended for the quantitative estimation of the application results of nature protection strategies. The components of the model are the eco-power module, climatic module and the module of loss estimates. In the work, the main attention is paid to the adaptation of the MERGE model to a current state of the world economy in the conditions of a complicated geopolitical situation and introduction of a new component to the model, realizing a simplified method for calculation the green GDP. The Project of scenario conditions and the key macroeconomic forecast parameters of the socio-economic development of Russia for 2016 and the schedule date of 2017−2018 made by the Ministry of Economic Development of the Russian Federation are used as a basic source of entrance data for the analysis of possible trajectories of the economic development of Russia and the

  14. Study of the Eco-Economic Indicators by Means of the New Version of the Merge Integrated Model Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Vadimovich Digas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most relevant issues of the day is the forecasting problem of climatic changes and mitigation of their consequences. The official point of view reflected in the Climate doctrine of the Russian Federation consists in the recognition of the need of the development of the state approach to the climatic problems and related issues on the basis of the comprehensive scientific analysis of ecological, economic and social factors. For this purpose, the integrated estimation models of interdisciplinary character are attracted. Their functionality is characterized by the possibility of construction and testing of various dynamic scenarios of complex systems. The main purposes of the computing experiments described in the article are a review of the consequences of hypothetical participation of Russia in initiatives for greenhouse gas reduction as the Kyoto Protocol and approbation of one of the calculation methods of the green gross domestic product representing the efficiency of environmental management in the modelling. To implement the given goals, the MERGE optimization model is used, its classical version is intended for the quantitative estimation of the application results of nature protection strategies. The components of the model are the eco-power module, climatic module and the module of loss estimates. In the work, the main attention is paid to the adaptation of the MERGE model to a current state of the world economy in the conditions of a complicated geopolitical situation and introduction of a new component to the model, realizing a simplified method for calculation the green gross domestic product. The Project of scenario conditions and the key macroeconomic forecast parameters of the socio-economic development of Russia for 2016 and the schedule date of 2017−2018 made by the Ministry of Economic Development of the Russian Federation are used as a basic source of entrance data for the analysis of possible trajectories of the

  15. [Assessment of balance in community dwelling older adults: reliability and validity of the German version of the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, N

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the German translation of the originally English Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FAB-D). The 10-item test battery is a performance-based measure that addresses the multiple dimensions of balance. The German FAB-D using a forward-backward procedure was examined by a sample of n = 96 community dwelling older adults (71,6 ± 7,5 years of age) who had reported no history of a fall in the previous 6 months (non-fallers) and 66 older adults (age 75,3 ± 7,3 years of age) who reported falling one or more times (recurrent fallers). The following internationally accepted instruments were used for validation: The Berg-Balance-Scale (BBS), the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC-D) scale, the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), the Trail-Making-Test (TMT), and motor tests (balance, strength, mobility). Explorative and confirmative factor analysis showed the best fit for a one dimensional solution. Cronbach's alpha of the German version of the FAB-D was 0.988. Test-retest reliability for the total score was 0.965 and ranged from 0.86-0.88 for individual items. The scales correlate with convergent measures assessing postural control and falls-related confidence (BBS, r = 0.685; Timed-Up-and-Go-Test, r = -0.632; ABC-D, r = 0.561). Criterion validity of the FAB-D was established by statistically significant correlations between the total scale, and the subdimensions of the SF-36 (physical 0.52, mental 0.38), the PASE (0.29), the TMT A (-0.30) and B (-0.41), the Chair Rising Test (0.59) and the 10 m walk (normal velocity -0.49; fast velocity -0.56). Significant differences in the FAB-D scores were found in older adults with (30,3 ± 8,6) and without falls (36,1 ± 4,2). Older adults with a recent fall history scored lower on the FAB-D than older adults without a recent fall history. To conclude, the German version of the FAB-D has properties analogous to the original English

  16. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  17. Model based risk assessment - the CORAS framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gran, Bjoern Axel; Fredriksen, Rune; Thunem, Atoosa P-J.

    2004-04-15

    Traditional risk analysis and assessment is based on failure-oriented models of the system. In contrast to this, model-based risk assessment (MBRA) utilizes success-oriented models describing all intended system aspects, including functional, operational and organizational aspects of the target. The target models are then used as input sources for complementary risk analysis and assessment techniques, as well as a basis for the documentation of the assessment results. The EU-funded CORAS project developed a tool-supported methodology for the application of MBRA in security-critical systems. The methodology has been tested with successful outcome through a series of seven trial within the telemedicine and ecommerce areas. The CORAS project in general and the CORAS application of MBRA in particular have contributed positively to the visibility of model-based risk assessment and thus to the disclosure of several potentials for further exploitation of various aspects within this important research field. In that connection, the CORAS methodology's possibilities for further improvement towards utilization in more complex architectures and also in other application domains such as the nuclear field can be addressed. The latter calls for adapting the framework to address nuclear standards such as IEC 60880 and IEC 61513. For this development we recommend applying a trial driven approach within the nuclear field. The tool supported approach for combining risk analysis and system development also fits well with the HRP proposal for developing an Integrated Design Environment (IDE) providing efficient methods and tools to support control room systems design. (Author)

  18. An interactive code (NETPATH) for modeling NET geochemical reactions along a flow PATH, version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, L. Niel; Prestemon, Eric C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    1994-01-01

    NETPATH is an interactive Fortran 77 computer program used to interpret net geochemical mass-balance reactions between an initial and final water along a hydrologic flow path. Alternatively, NETPATH computes the mixing proportions of two to five initial waters and net geochemical reactions that can account for the observed composition of a final water. The program utilizes previously defined chemical and isotopic data for waters from a hydrochemical system. For a set of mineral and (or) gas phases hypothesized to be the reactive phases in the system, NETPATH calculates the mass transfers in every possible combination of the selected phases that accounts for the observed changes in the selected chemical and (or) isotopic compositions observed along the flow path. The calculations are of use in interpreting geochemical reactions, mixing proportions, evaporation and (or) dilution of waters, and mineral mass transfer in the chemical and isotopic evolution of natural and environmental waters. Rayleigh distillation calculations are applied to each mass-balance model that satisfies the constraints to predict carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and strontium isotopic compositions at the end point, including radiocarbon dating. DB is an interactive Fortran 77 computer program used to enter analytical data into NETPATH, and calculate the distribution of species in aqueous solution. This report describes the types of problems that can be solved, the methods used to solve problems, and the features available in the program to facilitate these solutions. Examples are presented to demonstrate most of the applications and features of NETPATH. The codes DB and NETPATH can be executed in the UNIX or DOS1 environment. This report replaces U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 91-4078, by Plummer and others, which described the original release of NETPATH, version 1.0 (dated December, 1991), and documents revisions and enhancements that are included in version 2.0. 1 The

  19. Determination of inter-rater reliability in pediatric burn scar assessment using a modified version of the Vancouver Scar Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Duchart, Lisa; Marshall, Sheryle; Strock, Anne; Cooper, Juliette E

    2007-01-01

    The Vancouver Scar Scale is too subjective for our needs and is not culturally sensitive to our Aboriginal clients. The VSS was modified by developing a color scale to aid with vascularity rating. This study was designed to measure the inter-rater reliability of the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (MVSS). Three raters assessed 14 pediatric patients, resulting in a total of 32 scars. Data were analyzed using a Spearman Rank Order Correlation, intraclass correlation coefficient, and the kappa statistic. All subtests were shown to have significant (P < .05) correlations except for the pigmentation subtest. Because the pigmentation subtest has poor reliability, its inclusion in scar assessment should be questioned. Results indicate that only total scores of the MVSS should be used when determining burn scar outcomes because individual subtest scores appear to have little reliability. Further modifications to the MVSS followed by additional research with greater numbers of subjects are warranted.

  20. Comparative assessment of national bioenergy strategies and biomass action plans in 12 EU countries. European Best Practice Report. Extended version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a key output of the EU project 'BAP Driver', an initiative of energy agencies from 8 European key bioenergy nations and the European Biomass Association (AEBIOM). The BAP Driver project aims at identifying ways for improvement of current national policy frameworks for bioenergy in Europe, and at leveraging the process of developing country-specific Biomass Action Plans (BAP). From a strategic perspective, the general approach of this report focuses on four stages, required for setting up national biomass strategies and action plans: Assessment of national biomass resources; Formulation of national bioenergy strategies and biomass action plans; Implementation of national bioenergy policies; Monitoring of national bioenergy markets and policies. Overall the analysis is split into three chapters corresponding to the following logical steps: Chapter B: Country analysis (12 individual country profiles); Chapter C: Benchmark analysis (comparative assessment of 12 countries); Chapter D: Best practice analysis (transnational conclusions across national boundaries)

  1. An Useful Toolf for Diabetes Emotional Distress Assessment: Validation of the Romanian Version of Diabetes Distress Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Mocan Andreia Ştefana; Băban Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The aim of the present study was to validate the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS) on Romanian diabetes patients. Material and Methods: A total number of 529 type 1 and type 2 diabetes outpatients were included in the study. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the construct validity, Cronbach’s Alpha for internal consistency and Pearson’s correlation for predictive properties. Results: Distress level was lower in Romanian diabetes patients when co...

  2. Obstetric care providers assessing psychosocial risk factors during pregnancy : validation of a short screening tool - the KINDEX Spanish version

    OpenAIRE

    Spyridou, Andria; Schauer, Maggie; Ruf-Leuschner, Martina

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundHigh levels of stress due to diverse psychosocial factors have a direct impact on the mothers’ wellbeing during pregnancy and both direct and indirect effects on the fetus. In most cases, psychosocial risk factors present during pregnancy will not disappear after delivery and might influence the parent-child relationship, affecting the healthy development of the offspring in the long term.We introduce a short innovative prenatal assessment to detect psychosocial risk factors through...

  3. Cosmetics Fact Sheet. To assess the risks for the consumer. Updated version for ConsExpo 4

    OpenAIRE

    Bremmer HJ; Prud'Homme de Lodder LCH; van Engelen JGM; SIR

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to compounds in consumer products can be assessed using the computer program ConsExpo (Consumer Exposure). Given the huge number of consumer products, it is not possible to calculate the exposure for each separate product, so a limited number of groups containing similar products are defined. The information for each group of products is described in a fact sheet. Paint, cosmetics, children's toys and cleaning products are examples fact sheets, which have been published already. This...

  4. The Strengths Assessment Inventory-Youth Version: An evaluation of the psychometric properties with male and female justice-involved youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer-Gagnier, Karina; Skilling, Tracey A; Brown, Shelley L; Moore, Timothy E; Rawana, Jennine S

    2016-05-01

    Strengths constitute an important element of developmental assessments. It is consistent with evidence-based practice to use assessment tools that adequately measure a given construct and are appropriate for use with their targeted population. The Strengths Assessment Inventory-Youth Version (SAI-Y; Rawana & Brownlee, 2010)-a self-report measure of personal strengths, self-concept, and emotional functioning-was administered to 230 male and female adolescent offenders. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the SAI-Y's factor structure demonstrated an acceptable fit overall, while some factors fit the data well, and fewer factors displayed a questionable fit. A majority of scale scores were found to exhibit good reliability for both sexes, with three empirical scale scores demonstrating poor reliability. In addition, scores on the SAI-Y also achieved satisfactory convergent and divergent validity. Total strength scores were significantly correlated in the expected direction with most theoretically related measures of emotional and behavioral functioning (e.g., self-esteem, treatment readiness, antisocial attitudes). Lastly, moderate gender effects and small ethnicity differences in response patterns were found. This was the first validation study of the SAI-Y with a justice-involved sample and the results suggest it is an appropriate measure for use with both male and female justice-involved young persons in detention and in the community. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26302098

  5. The relationship development assessment - research version: preliminary validation of a clinical tool and coding schemes to measure parent-child interaction in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Fionnuala; Guerin, Suzanne; Hobson, Jessica A; Gutstein, Steven E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this project was to replicate and extend findings from two recent studies on parent-child relatedness in autism (Beurkens, Hobson, & Hobson, 2013; Hobson, Tarver, Beurkens, & Hobson, 2013, under review) by adapting an observational assessment and coding schemes of parent-child relatedness for the clinical context and examining their validity and reliability. The coding schemes focussed on three aspects of relatedness: joint attentional focus (Adamson, Bakeman, & Deckner, 2004), the capacity to co-regulate an interaction and the capacity to share emotional experiences. The participants were 40 children (20 with autism, 20 without autism) aged 6-14, and their parents. Parent-child dyads took part in the observational assessment and were coded on these schemes. Comparisons were made with standardised measures of autism severity (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS: Lord, Rutter, DiLavore, & Risi, 2001; Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS: Constantino & Gruber, 2005), relationship quality (Parent Child Relationship Inventory, PCRI: Gerard, 1994) and quality of parent-child interaction (Dyadic Coding Scales, DCS: Humber & Moss, 2005). Inter-rater reliability was very good and, as predicted, codes both diverged from the measure of parent-child relationship and converged with a separate measure of parent-child interaction quality. A detailed profile review revealed nuanced areas of group and individual differences which may be specific to verbally-able school-age children. The results support the utility of the Relationship Development Assessment - Research Version for clinical practice. PMID:24366957

  6. The Polish language version of the Confusion Assessment Method – a questionnaire for the screening of consciousness disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudlo, Robert; Wesołowski, Bartosz; Garbacz, Marcin; Morawski, Michał; Jaworska, Izabela; Sołtysik, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Confusion on a somatic basis is a dangerous problem mainly related with aging of the population. Data says that consciousness disorders concern 10-15% of patients in general wards, and up to 50% of patients admitted to geriatric wards. The persistence of the symptoms of confusion results in increase of agitation, disorganization, fear, which increases the risk of self-injuries of patients, it causes the need for parenteral feeding and hydratation, as well as maintaining water balance, and also disturbs cooperation, worsening the course and prognosis of the primary disease. It is believed that consciousness disorders are one of the most difficult diagnostic problems and the most difficult therapy problem among psychotic disorders. So far in Poland there have been no screening evaluation tools to assess the occurrence of confusion on the somatic basis. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Polish translation of the widely used scale to assess consciousness disorders, intended also for middle personnel of health care – Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Numerous studies over 16 years established the position of CAM as an exceptionally effective standardized diagnostic test, specifying the sensitivity of 94-100%, specificity from 90-95%, positive predictive value of 91-94%, negative predictive value of 90-100%. The questionnaire and instructions of its interpretation have been translated by doctors with active help from the original creators of CAM. Further studies are required in order to validate and determine the effectiveness of the newly formed diagnostic tool.

  7. Implementation and comparison of a suite of heat stress metrics within the Community Land Model version 4.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Buzan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We implement and analyze 13 different metrics (4 moist thermodynamic quantities and 9 heat stress metrics in the Community Land Model (CLM4.5, the land surface component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM. We call these routines the HumanIndexMod. These heat stress metrics embody three philosophical approaches: comfort, physiology, and empirically based algorithms. The metrics are directly connected to CLM4.5 BareGroundFuxesMod, CanopyFluxesMod, SlakeFluxesMod, and UrbanMod modules in order to differentiate between the distinct regimes even within one gridcell. This allows CLM4.5 to calculate the instantaneous heat stress at every model time step, for every land surface type, capturing all aspects of non-linearity in moisture-temperature covariance. Secondary modules for initialization and archiving are modified to generate the metrics as standard output. All of the metrics implemented depend on the covariance of near surface atmospheric variables: temperature, pressure, and humidity. Accurate wet bulb temperatures are critical for quantifying heat stress (used by 5 of the 9 heat stress metrics. Unfortunately, moist thermodynamic calculations for calculating accurate wet bulb temperatures are not in CLM4.5. To remedy this, we incorporated comprehensive water vapor calculations into CLM4.5. The three advantages of adding these metrics to CLM4.5 are (1 improved thermodynamic calculations within climate models, (2 quantifying human heat stress, and (3 that these metrics may be applied to other animals as well as industrial applications. Additionally, an offline version of the HumanIndexMod is available for applications with weather and climate datasets. Examples of such applications are the high temporal resolution CMIP5 archived data, weather and research forecasting models, CLM4.5 flux tower simulations (or other land surface model validation studies, and local weather station data analysis. To demonstrate the capabilities of the Human

  8. Modeling and assessment of electricity market initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrian, Pedram

    This body of work is dedicated to the modeling and assessment of initiatives within electricity markets using the underlying hourly market dynamics. The dissertation presents two separate frameworks that take a bottom-up approach for assessing benefits associated with various demand-side initiatives and other emerging interventions in power markets. Models in support of each framework are presented, and numerical results are used to highlight some impacts based on hourly dynamics. The first framework uses stochastic optimization models to explore the economic feasibility of grid-scale energy storage from the perspective of a price taking, profit maximizing firm facing uncertain market dynamics. This model is then extended to incorporate intermittent wind generation, demonstrating how storage can be used as a potential substitute for transmission capacity. The second framework uses a new dynamic market equilibrium simulation model to address broader economic and environmental impacts of various demand-side initiatives including: energy efficiency, distributed generation, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The general model is calibrated for the California electricity market. The model is used to estimate impacts of the various interventions, taking into account varying market adoption levels and natural gas prices.

  9. Modeling the structure of the attitudes and belief scale 2 using CFA and bifactor approaches: Toward the development of an abbreviated version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Philip; Shevlin, Mark; Adamson, Gary; Boduszek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Attitudes and Belief Scale-2 (ABS-2: DiGiuseppe, Leaf, Exner, & Robin, 1988. The development of a measure of rational/irrational thinking. Paper presented at the World Congress of Behavior Therapy, Edinburg, Scotland.) is a 72-item self-report measure of evaluative rational and irrational beliefs widely used in Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy research contexts. However, little psychometric evidence exists regarding the measure's underlying factor structure. Furthermore, given the length of the ABS-2 there is a need for an abbreviated version that can be administered when there are time demands on the researcher, such as in clinical settings. This study sought to examine a series of theoretical models hypothesized to represent the latent structure of the ABS-2 within an alternative models framework using traditional confirmatory factor analysis as well as utilizing a bifactor modeling approach. Furthermore, this study also sought to develop a psychometrically sound abbreviated version of the ABS-2. Three hundred and thirteen (N = 313) active emergency service personnel completed the ABS-2. Results indicated that for each model, the application of bifactor modeling procedures improved model fit statistics, and a novel eight-factor intercorrelated solution was identified as the best fitting model of the ABS-2. However, the observed fit indices failed to satisfy commonly accepted standards. A 24-item abbreviated version was thus constructed and an intercorrelated eight-factor solution yielded satisfactory model fit statistics. Current results support the use of a bifactor modeling approach to determining the factor structure of the ABS-2. Furthermore, results provide empirical support for the psychometric properties of the newly developed abbreviated version.

  10. EIA model documentation: World oil refining logistics demand model,``WORLD`` reference manual. Version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-11

    This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts. Broadly, the manual covers WORLD model features in progressively increasing detail. Section 2 provides an overview of the WORLD model, how it has evolved, what its design goals are, what it produces, and where it can be taken with further enhancements. Section 3 reviews model management covering data sources, managing over-optimization, calibration and seasonality, check-points for case construction and common errors. Section 4 describes in detail the WORLD system, including: data and program systems in overview; details of mainframe and PC program control and files;model generation, size management, debugging and error analysis; use with different optimizers; and reporting and results analysis. Section 5 provides a detailed description of every WORLD model data table, covering model controls, case and technology data. Section 6 goes into the details of WORLD matrix structure. It provides an overview, describes how regional definitions are controlled and defines the naming conventions for-all model rows, columns, right-hand sides, and bounds. It also includes a discussion of the formulation of product blending and specifications in WORLD. Several Appendices supplement the main sections.

  11. Versioning of printed products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2005-01-01

    During the definition of a printed product in an MIS system, a lot of attention is paid to the production process. The MIS systems typically gather all process-related parameters at such a level of detail that they can determine what the exact cost will be to make a specific product. This information can then be used to make a quote for the customer. Considerably less attention is paid to the content of the products since this does not have an immediate impact on the production costs (assuming that the number of inks or plates is known in advance). The content management is typically carried out either by the prepress systems themselves or by dedicated workflow servers uniting all people that contribute to the manufacturing of a printed product. Special care must be taken when considering versioned products. With versioned products we here mean distinct products that have a number of pages or page layers in common. Typical examples are comic books that have to be printed in different languages. In this case, the color plates can be shared over the different versions and the black plate will be different. Other examples are nation-wide magazines or newspapers that have an area with regional pages or advertising leaflets in different languages or currencies. When considering versioned products, the content will become an important cost factor. First of all, the content management (and associated proofing and approval cycles) becomes much more complex and, therefore, the risk that mistakes will be made increases considerably. Secondly, the real production costs are very much content-dependent because the content will determine whether plates can be shared across different versions or not and how many press runs will be needed. In this paper, we will present a way to manage different versions of a printed product. First, we will introduce a data model for version management. Next, we will show how the content of the different versions can be supplied by the customer

  12. Lord-Wingersky Algorithm Version 2.0 for Hierarchical Item Factor Models with Applications in Test Scoring, Scale Alignment, and Model Fit Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2015-06-01

    Lord and Wingersky's (Appl Psychol Meas 8:453-461, 1984) recursive algorithm for creating summed score based likelihoods and posteriors has a proven track record in unidimensional item response theory (IRT) applications. Extending the recursive algorithm to handle multidimensionality is relatively simple, especially with fixed quadrature because the recursions can be defined on a grid formed by direct products of quadrature points. However, the increase in computational burden remains exponential in the number of dimensions, making the implementation of the recursive algorithm cumbersome for truly high-dimensional models. In this paper, a dimension reduction method that is specific to the Lord-Wingersky recursions is developed. This method can take advantage of the restrictions implied by hierarchical item factor models, e.g., the bifactor model, the testlet model, or the two-tier model, such that a version of the Lord-Wingersky recursive algorithm can operate on a dramatically reduced set of quadrature points. For instance, in a bifactor model, the dimension of integration is always equal to 2, regardless of the number of factors. The new algorithm not only provides an effective mechanism to produce summed score to IRT scaled score translation tables properly adjusted for residual dependence, but leads to new applications in test scoring, linking, and model fit checking as well. Simulated and empirical examples are used to illustrate the new applications.

  13. Temperature and Humidity Profiles in the TqJoint Data Group of AIRS Version 6 Product for the Climate Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Fang, Fan; Hearty, Thomas J.; Theobald, Michael; Vollmer, Bruce; Lynnes, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) mission is entering its 13th year of global observations of the atmospheric state, including temperature and humidity profiles, outgoing long-wave radiation, cloud properties, and trace gases. Thus AIRS data have been widely used, among other things, for short-term climate research and observational component for model evaluation. One instance is the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) which uses AIRS version 5 data in the climate model evaluation. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is the home of processing, archiving, and distribution services for data from the AIRS mission. The GES DISC, in collaboration with the AIRS Project, released data from the version 6 algorithm in early 2013. The new algorithm represents a significant improvement over previous versions in terms of greater stability, yield, and quality of products. The ongoing Earth System Grid for next generation climate model research project, a collaborative effort of GES DISC and NASA JPL, will bring temperature and humidity profiles from AIRS version 6. The AIRS version 6 product adds a new "TqJoint" data group, which contains data for a common set of observations across water vapor and temperature at all atmospheric levels and is suitable for climate process studies. How different may the monthly temperature and humidity profiles in "TqJoint" group be from the "Standard" group where temperature and water vapor are not always valid at the same time? This study aims to answer the question by comprehensively comparing the temperature and humidity profiles from the "TqJoint" group and the "Standard" group. The comparison includes mean differences at different levels globally and over land and ocean. We are also working on examining the sampling differences between the "TqJoint" and "Standard" group using MERRA data.

  14. Development of an Information Exchange format for the Observations Data Model version 2 using OGC Observations and Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, D. W., Jr.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Hsu, L.; Lehnert, K. A.; Mayorga, E.; Song, L.; Zaslavsky, I.; Whitenack, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Observations Data Model v1 (ODMv1) schema has been utilized of the basis hydrologic cyberinfrastructures include the CUAHSI HIS. The first version of ODM focused on timeseries, and ultimately led the development of OGC "WaterML2 Part 1: Timeseries", which is being proposed to be developed into OGC TimeseriesML.Our team has developed an ODMv2 model to address ODMv1 shortcomings, and to encompass a wider community of spatially discrete, feature-based earth observations. The development process included collecting requirements from several existing Earth Observations data systems: HIS,CZOData, IEDA and EarthChem system, and IOOS. We developed ODM2 as a set of core entities with additional extensioncomponents that can be utilized. These extensions include for shared functionality (e.g. data quality, provenance), as well as specific use cases (e.g. laboratory analysis, equipment). Initially, we closely followed the Observations and Measures (ISO19156) concept model. After prototyping and reviewing the requirements, we extended the ODMv2 conceptual model to include entities to document ancillary acts that do not always produce a result. Differing from O&M where acts are expected to produce a result. ODMv2 includes the core concept of an "Action" which encapsulates activities or actions associated that are performed in the process of making an observation, but may not produce a result. Actions, such as a sample analysis, that observe a property and produce a result are equivalent to O&M observation. But in many use cases, many actions have no resulting observation. Examples of such actions are a site visit or sample preparation (splitting of a sample). These actions are part of a chain of actions, iwhich produce the final observation. Overall the ODMv2 generally follows the O&M conceptual model. The nearly final ODMv2 includes a core and extensions. The core entities include actions, feature actions (observations), datasets (groupings), methods (procedures), sampling

  15. Discrete-Element bonded-particle Sea Ice model DESIgn, version 1.3a - model description and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents theoretical foundations, numerical implementation and examples of application of the two-dimensional Discrete-Element bonded-particle Sea Ice model - DESIgn. In the model, sea ice is represented as an assemblage of objects of two types: disk-shaped "grains" and semi-elastic bonds connecting them. Grains move on the sea surface under the influence of forces from the atmosphere and the ocean, as well as interactions with surrounding grains through direct contact (Hertzian contact mechanics) and/or through bonds. The model has an experimental option of taking into account quasi-three-dimensional effects related to the space- and time-varying curvature of the sea surface, thus enabling simulation of ice breaking due to stresses resulting from bending moments associated with surface waves. Examples of the model's application to simple sea ice deformation and breaking problems are presented, with an analysis of the influence of the basic model parameters ("microscopic" properties of grains and bonds) on the large-scale response of the modeled material. The model is written as a toolbox suitable for usage with the open-source numerical library LIGGGHTS. The code, together with full technical documentation and example input files, is freely available with this paper and on the Internet.

  16. Discrete-Element bonded particle Sea Ice model DESIgn, version 1.3 – model description and implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents theoretical foundations, numerical implementation and examples of application of a two-dimensional Discrete-Element bonded-particle Sea Ice model DESIgn. In the model, sea ice is represented as an assemblage of objects of two types: disk-shaped "grains", and semi-elastic bonds connecting them. Grains move on the sea surface under the influence of forces from the atmosphere and the ocean, as well as interactions with surrounding grains through a direct contact (Hertzian contact mechanics and/or through bonds. The model has an option of taking into account quasi-threedimensional effects related to space- and time-varying curvature of the sea surface, thus enabling simulation of ice breaking due to stresses resulting from bending moments associated with surface waves. Examples of the model's application to simple sea ice deformation and breaking problems are presented, with an analysis of the influence of the basic model parameters ("microscopic" properties of grains and bonds on the large-scale response of the modeled material. The model is written as a toolbox suitable for usage with the open-source numerical library LIGGGHTS. The code, together with a full technical documentation and example input files, is freely available with this paper and on the Internet.

  17. Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) version 2.51

    OpenAIRE

    Jöckel, Patrick; Tost, Holger; Pozzer, Andrea; Kunze, Markus; Kirner, Oliver; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Brinkop, Sabine; Cai, Duy S.; Dyroff, Christoph; Eckstein, Johannes; Frank, Franziska; Garny, Hella; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk; Graf, Phoebe; Grewe, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Three types of reference simulations, as recommended by the Chemistry–Climate Model Initiative (CCMI), have been performed with version 2.51 of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts – Hamburg (ECHAM)/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model: hindcast simulations (1950–2011), hindcast simulations with specified dynamics (1979–2013), i.e. nudged towards ERA-Interim reanalysis data, and combined hindcast and projection simulations (1950–...

  18. Uncertainty assessment of integrated distributed hydrological models using GLUE with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasone, Roberta-Serena; Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the application of distributed, physically-based and integrated hydrological models. Many questions regarding how to properly calibrate and validate distributed models and assess the uncertainty of the estimated parameters and the spatially......-site validation must complement the usual time validation. In this study, we develop, through an application, a comprehensive framework for multi-criteria calibration and uncertainty assessment of distributed physically-based, integrated hydrological models. A revised version of the generalized likelihood......-distributed responses are, however, still quite unexplored. Especially for complex models, rigorous parameterization, reduction of the parameter space and use of efficient and effective algorithms are essential to facilitate the calibration process and make it more robust. Moreover, for these models multi...

  19. Assessment of galactic cosmic ray models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrigakshi, Alankrita Isha; Matthiä, Daniel; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2012-08-01

    Among several factors involved in the development of a manned space mission concept, the astronauts' health is a major concern that needs to be considered carefully. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), which mainly consist of high-energetic nuclei ranging from hydrogen to iron and beyond, pose a major radiation health risk in long-term space missions. It is therefore required to assess the radiation exposure of astronauts in order to estimate their radiation risks. This can be done either by performing direct measurements or by making computer based simulations from which the dose can be derived. A necessary prerequisite for an accurate estimation of the exposure using simulations is a reliable description of the GCR spectra. The aim of this work is to compare GCR models and to test their applicability for the exposure assessment of astronauts. To achieve this, commonly used models capable of describing both light and heavy GCR particle spectra were evaluated by investigating the model spectra for various particles over several decades. The updated Badhwar-O'Neill model published in the year 2010, CREME2009 which uses the International Standard model for GCR, CREME96 and the Burger-Usoskin model were examined. Hydrogen, helium, oxygen and iron nuclei spectra calculated by the different models are compared with measurements from various high-altitude balloon and space-borne experiments. During certain epochs in the last decade, there are large discrepancies between the GCR energy spectra described by the models and the measurements. All the models exhibit weaknesses in describing the increased GCR flux that was observed in 2009-2010.

  20. Model evaluation methodology applicable to environmental assessment models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaeffer, D.L.

    1979-08-01

    A model evaluation methodology is presented to provide a systematic framework within which the adequacy of environmental assessment models might be examined. The necessity for such a tool is motivated by the widespread use of models for predicting the environmental consequences of various human activities and by the reliance on these model predictions for deciding whether a particular activity requires the deployment of costly control measures. Consequently, the uncertainty associated with prediction must be established for the use of such models. The methodology presented here consists of six major tasks: model examination, algorithm examination, data evaluation, sensitivity analyses, validation studies, and code comparison. This methodology is presented in the form of a flowchart to show the logical interrelatedness of the various tasks. Emphasis has been placed on identifying those parameters which are most important in determining the predictive outputs of a model. Importance has been attached to the process of collecting quality data. A method has been developed for analyzing multiplicative chain models when the input parameters are statistically independent and lognormally distributed. Latin hypercube sampling has been offered as a promising candidate for doing sensitivity analyses. Several different ways of viewing the validity of a model have been presented. Criteria are presented for selecting models for environmental assessment purposes.

  1. Model evaluation methodology applicable to environmental assessment models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model evaluation methodology is presented to provide a systematic framework within which the adequacy of environmental assessment models might be examined. The necessity for such a tool is motivated by the widespread use of models for predicting the environmental consequences of various human activities and by the reliance on these model predictions for deciding whether a particular activity requires the deployment of costly control measures. Consequently, the uncertainty associated with prediction must be established for the use of such models. The methodology presented here consists of six major tasks: model examination, algorithm examination, data evaluation, sensitivity analyses, validation studies, and code comparison. This methodology is presented in the form of a flowchart to show the logical interrelatedness of the various tasks. Emphasis has been placed on identifying those parameters which are most important in determining the predictive outputs of a model. Importance has been attached to the process of collecting quality data. A method has been developed for analyzing multiplicative chain models when the input parameters are statistically independent and lognormally distributed. Latin hypercube sampling has been offered as a promising candidate for doing sensitivity analyses. Several different ways of viewing the validity of a model have been presented. Criteria are presented for selecting models for environmental assessment purposes

  2. Statistical model of fractures and deformations zones for Forsmark. Preliminary site description Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Pointe, Paul R. [Golder Associate Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Olofsson, Isabelle; Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    Compared to version 1.1, a much larger amount of data especially from boreholes is available. Both one-hole interpretation and Boremap indicate the presence of high and low fracture intensity intervals in the rock mass. The depth and width of these intervals varies from borehole to borehole but these constant fracture intensity intervals are contiguous and present quite sharp transitions. There is not a consistent pattern of intervals of high fracture intensity at or near to the surface. In many cases, the intervals of highest fracture intensity are considerably below the surface. While some fractures may have occurred or been reactivated in response to surficial stress relief, surficial stress relief does not appear to be a significant explanatory variable for the observed variations in fracture intensity. Data from the high fracture intensity intervals were extracted and statistical analyses were conducted in order to identify common geological factors. Stereoplots of fracture orientation versus depth for the different fracture intensity intervals were also produced for each borehole. Moreover percussion borehole data were analysed in order to identify the persistence of these intervals throughout the model volume. The main conclusions of these analyses are the following: The fracture intensity is conditioned by the rock domain, but inside a rock domain intervals of high and low fracture intensity are identified. The intervals of high fracture intensity almost always correspond to intervals with distinct fracture orientations (whether a set, most often the NW sub-vertical set, is highly dominant, or some orientation sets are missing). These high fracture intensity intervals are positively correlated to the presence of first and second generation minerals (epidote, calcite). No clear correlation for these fracture intensity intervals has been identified between holes. Based on these results the fracture frequency has been calculated in each rock domain for the

  3. The Rock-Water-Ice Topographic Gravity Field Model RWI_TOPO_2015 and Its Comparison to a Conventional Rock-Equivalent Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grombein, Thomas; Seitz, Kurt; Heck, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    RWI_TOPO_2015 is a new high-resolution spherical harmonic representation of the Earth's topographic gravitational potential that is based on a refined Rock-Water-Ice (RWI) approach. This method is characterized by a three-layer decomposition of the Earth's topography with respect to its rock, water, and ice masses. To allow a rigorous separate modeling of these masses with variable density values, gravity forward modeling is performed in the space domain using tesseroid mass bodies arranged on an ellipsoidal reference surface. While the predecessor model RWI_TOPO_2012 was based on the 5'× 5' global topographic database DTM2006.0 (Digital Topographic Model 2006.0), the new RWI model uses updated height information of the 1'× 1' Earth2014 topography suite. Moreover, in the case of RWI_TOPO_2015, the representation in spherical harmonics is extended to degree and order 2190 (formerly 1800). Beside a presentation of the used formalism, the processing for RWI_TOPO_2015 is described in detail, and the characteristics of the resulting spherical harmonic coefficients are analyzed in the space and frequency domain. Furthermore, this paper focuses on a comparison of the RWI approach to the conventionally used rock-equivalent method. For this purpose, a consistent rock-equivalent version REQ_TOPO_2015 is generated, in which the heights of water and ice masses are condensed to the constant rock density. When evaluated on the surface of the GRS80 ellipsoid (Geodetic Reference System 1980), the differences of RWI_TOPO_2015 and REQ_TOPO_2015 reach maximum amplitudes of about 1 m, 50 mGal, and 20 mE in terms of height anomaly, gravity disturbance, and the radial-radial gravity gradient, respectively. Although these differences are attenuated with increasing height above the ellipsoid, significant magnitudes can even be detected in the case of the satellite altitudes of current gravity field missions. In order to assess their performance, RWI_TOPO_2015, REQ_TOPO_2015, and RWI

  4. The Rock-Water-Ice Topographic Gravity Field Model RWI_TOPO_2015 and Its Comparison to a Conventional Rock-Equivalent Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grombein, Thomas; Seitz, Kurt; Heck, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    RWI_TOPO_2015 is a new high-resolution spherical harmonic representation of the Earth's topographic gravitational potential that is based on a refined Rock-Water-Ice (RWI) approach. This method is characterized by a three-layer decomposition of the Earth's topography with respect to its rock, water, and ice masses. To allow a rigorous separate modeling of these masses with variable density values, gravity forward modeling is performed in the space domain using tesseroid mass bodies arranged on an ellipsoidal reference surface. While the predecessor model RWI_TOPO_2012 was based on the 5'× 5' global topographic database DTM2006.0 (Digital Topographic Model 2006.0), the new RWI model uses updated height information of the 1'× 1' Earth2014 topography suite. Moreover, in the case of RWI_TOPO_2015, the representation in spherical harmonics is extended to degree and order 2190 (formerly 1800). Beside a presentation of the used formalism, the processing for RWI_TOPO_2015 is described in detail, and the characteristics of the resulting spherical harmonic coefficients are analyzed in the space and frequency domain. Furthermore, this paper focuses on a comparison of the RWI approach to the conventionally used rock-equivalent method. For this purpose, a consistent rock-equivalent version REQ_TOPO_2015 is generated, in which the heights of water and ice masses are condensed to the constant rock density. When evaluated on the surface of the GRS80 ellipsoid (Geodetic Reference System 1980), the differences of RWI_TOPO_2015 and REQ_TOPO_2015 reach maximum amplitudes of about 1 m, 50 mGal, and 20 mE in terms of height anomaly, gravity disturbance, and the radial-radial gravity gradient, respectively. Although these differences are attenuated with increasing height above the ellipsoid, significant magnitudes can even be detected in the case of the satellite altitudes of current gravity field missions. In order to assess their performance, RWI_TOPO_2015, REQ_TOPO_2015, and RWI

  5. Applicability of a Serbian version of the “Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP” index - assessment of oral health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Ivica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP is a well-known psychometric test used internationally to assess the oral health-related quality of life. The interview and self-administrated questionnaire both assess the degree to which oral health problems have affected the life of the participants over the previous 6 months. The aim of this study was to translate the OIDP index into Serbian and to assess its reliability in practice as its initial verification in the Serbian speaking area. Methods. Following an internationally established methods, the OIDP scale was translated using standardized methodology that consisted of forward translation, pilot study and backward translation. Results. A pilot study was carried out with 44 respondents (24 males i 20 females using a preliminar Serbian version of the OIDP index. All patients were aged over 65 years. A total of 68.2% of the participants replied that they had at least one OIDP impact on daily life in the past 6 months. These troubles were most prominent during eating (47.7% and speaking (36.4%, but there is a little impact of troubles in the domain of psychosocial sphere. The corrected item-total correlation coefficients for all items were above the minimum recommended level of 0.20 for including an item in a scale. The standardized Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.75. Conclusion. Based on these results, we can conclude that this index is suitable for use in everyday practice in Serbian speaking area providing useful information required to assess oral health-related quality of life.

  6. Model assessment of protective barriers: Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.; Holford, D.J.

    1992-02-01

    Radioactive waste exists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in a variety of locations, including subsurface grout and tank farms, solid waste burial grounds, and contaminated soil sites. Some of these waste sites may need to be isolated from percolating water to minimize the potential for transport of the waste to the ground water, which eventually discharges to the Columbia River. Multilayer protective barriers have been proposed as a means of limiting the flow of water through the waste sites (DOE 1987). A multiyear research program (managed jointly by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company for the DOE) is aimed at assessing the performance of these barriers. One aspect of this program involves the use of computer models to predict barrier performance. Three modeling studies have already been conducted and a test plan was produced. The simulation work reported here was conducted by PNL and extends the previous modeling work. The purpose of this report are to understand phenomena that have been observed in the field and to provide information that can be used to improve hydrologic modeling of the protective barrier. An improved modeling capability results in better estimates of barrier performance. Better estimates can be used to improve the design of barriers and the assessment of their long-term performance.

  7. Risk Assessment Model for Mobile Malware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Stanescu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mobile technology is considered to be the fastest-developing IT security area. Only in the last year security threats around mobile devices have reached new heights in terms of both quality and quantity. The speed of this development has made possible several types of security attacks that, until recently, were only possible on computers. In terms of the most targeted mobile operating systems, Android continues to be the most vulnerable, although new ways of strengthening its security model were introduced by Google. The aim of this article is to provide a model for assessing the risk of mobile infection with malware, starting from a statistical analysis of the permissions required by each application installed into the mobile system. The software implementation of this model will use the Android operating system and in order to do so, we will start by analyzing its permission-based security architecture. Furthermore, based on statistical data regarding the most dangerous permissions, we build the risk assessment model and, to prove its efficiency, we scan some of the most popular apps and interpret the results. To this end, we offer an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of this permission-based model and we also state a short conclusion regarding model’s efficiency.

  8. Rock mechanics modelling of rock mass properties - summary of primary data. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results presented in this report are the summary of the primary data for the Laxemar Site Descriptive Modelling version 1.2. At this stage, laboratory tests on intact rock and fracture samples from borehole KSH01A, KSH02A, KAV01 (already considered in Simpevarp SDM version 1.2) and borehole KLX02 and KLX04 were available. Concerning the mechanical properties of the intact rock, the rock type 'granite to quartz monzodiorite' or 'Aevroe granite' (code 501044) was tested for the first time within the frame of the site descriptive modelling. The average uniaxial compressive strength and Young's modulus of the granite to quartz to monzodiorite are 192 MPa and 72 GPa, respectively. The crack initiation stress is observed to be 0.5 times the uniaxial compressive strength for the same rock type. Non negligible differences are observed between the statistics of the mechanical properties of the granite to quartz monzodiorite in borehole KLX02 and KLX04. The available data on rock fractures were analysed to determine the mechanical properties of the different fracture sets at the site (based on tilt test results) and to determine systematic differences between the results obtained with different sample preparation techniques (based on direct shear tests). The tilt tests show that there are not significant differences of the mechanical properties due to the fracture orientation. Thus, all fracture sets seem to have the same strength and deformability. The average peak friction angle for the Coulomb's Criterion of the fracture sets varies between 33.6 deg and 34.1 deg, while the average cohesion ranges between 0.46 and 0.52 MPa, respectively. The average of the Coulomb's residual cohesion and friction angle vary in the ranges 28.0 deg - 29.2 deg and 0.40-0.45 MPa, respectively. The only significant difference could be observed on the average cohesion between fracture set SA and Sd. The direct shear tests show that the mechanical properties obtained from the laboratory tests

  9. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  10. A hybrid distorted wave model: a (almost) complete-post version of the CDW model for single ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid CDW-CDW-EIS model is developed in order to include the dynamic screening in the post CDW approximation for single ionization. Doubly differential cross sections for single ionization of water molecules are calculated and comparison with available experimental data and other theories are shown

  11. Coupling of the VAMPER permafrost model within the earth system model iLOVECLIM (version 1.0: description and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kitover

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The VAMPER permafrost model has been enhanced for coupling within the iLOVECLIM earth system model of intermediate complexity by including snow thickness and active layer calculations. In addition, the coupling between iLOVECLIM and the VAMPER model includes two spatially variable maps of geothermal heat flux and generalized lithology. A semi-coupled version is validated using the modern day extent of permafrost along with observed permafrost thickness and subsurface temperatures at selected borehole sites. The modeling run not including the effects of snow cover overestimate the present permafrost extent. However, when the snow component is included, the extent is overall reduced too much. It was found that most of the modeled thickness values and subsurface temperatures fall within a reasonable range of the corresponding observed values. Discrepancies are due to lack of captured effects from features such as topography and organic soil layers. In addition, some discrepancy is also due to disequilibrium with the current climate, meaning that some permafrost is a result of colder states and therefore cannot be reproduced accurately with the iLOVECLIM preindustrial forcings.

  12. Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment 2001 Version [Formerly DOE/RL-97-69] [SEC 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANN, F.M.

    2000-08-01

    The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-activity fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the byproduct of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste is stored in underground single- and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low-activity and high-level fractions, and then immobilized by vitrification. The US. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at the Hanford Site until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to modify the current Disposal Authorization Statement for the Hanford Site that would allow the following: construction of disposal trenches; and filling of these trenches with ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers.

  13. BaP (PAH) air quality modelling exercise over Zaragoza (Spain) using an adapted version of WRF-CMAQ model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San José, Roberto; Pérez, Juan Luis; Callén, María Soledad; López, José Manuel; Mastral, Ana

    2013-12-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is one of the most dangerous PAH due to its high carcinogenic and mutagenic character. Because of this reason, the Directive 2004/107/CE of the European Union establishes a target value of 1 ng/m(3) of BaP in the atmosphere. In this paper, the main aim is to estimate the BaP concentrations in the atmosphere by using last generation of air quality dispersion models with the inclusion of the transport, scavenging and deposition processes for the BaP. The degradation of the particulated BaP by the ozone has been considered. The aerosol-gas partitioning phenomenon in the atmosphere is modelled taking into a count that the concentrations in the gas and the aerosol phases. If the pre-existing organic aerosol concentrations are zero gas/particle equilibrium is established. The model has been validated at local scale with data from a sampling campaign carried out in the area of Zaragoza (Spain) during 12 weeks.

  14. Translation, modification and validation of the Chinese version of a knowledge assessment instrument regarding pressure ulcer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Liu; Hao-Bin Yuan; Wei-Ju Chen; Chiuyin Poon; Meihua Hsu; Bo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to translate, modify and validate an instrument developed by Beckman and colleagues to assess the knowledge of clinical nurses regarding pressure ulcers. Methods: A methodological study design was used. The instrument was translated into Chinese and back-translated into English. A six-expert panel was invited to evaluate the content validity, and a pilot test was subsequently performed on the test-retest stability of the translated instrument. A convenience sampling method was used to recruit 240 nurses from a university teaching hospital in the Mainland of China. In total, 186 valid questionnaires were collected with a 77.5%valid return rate. The validity of the multiple-choice test items (item difficulties and discriminating indices) and internal consistency reli-ability were evaluated. Results: The translated and modified instrument demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties, as follows: (1) the overall content validity index (CVI) was 0.91, (2) the overall test-retest reliability was 0.826, (3) the item difficulty indices were between 0.46 and 0.93, (4) the overall values for discrimination were 0.28e0.55, and (5) the Cronbach's a for the internal consistency were 0.792 for the overall in-strument and 0.426e0.804 for the sub-themes. Conclusions: This study represents the first trial to translate and modify an existing instrument that measures the knowledge of pressure ulcers in a Chinese Mainland sample. The instrument demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties and could be applied in cross-cultural nursing practices, including nursing education, research and practice, to evaluate knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention.

  15. Sleep patterns and school performance of Korean adolescents assessed using a Korean version of the pediatric daytime sleepiness scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon kyeong Rhie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Korean adolescents have severe nighttime sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness because of their competitive educational environment. However, daytime sleep patterns and sleepiness have never been studied using age-specific methods, such as the pediatric daytime sleepiness scale (PDSS. We surveyed the daytime sleepiness of Korean adolescents using a Korean translation of the PDSS. Methods: We distributed the 27-item questionnaire, including the PDSS and questions related to sleep pattern, sleep satisfaction, and emotional state, to 3,370 students in grades 5-12. Results: The amount of nighttime sleep decreased significantly with increasing age. During weekday nights, 5- 6th graders slept for 7.95¡?#?.05; h, 7-9th graders for 7.57¡?#?.05; h, and 10-12th graders for 5.78¡?#?.13; h. However, the total amounts of combined daytime and nighttime sleep during weekdays were somewhat greater, 8.15¡?#?.12; h for 5- 6th graders, 8.17¡?#?.20; h for 7-9th graders, and 6.87¡?#?.40; h for 10-12th graders. PDSS scores increased with age, 11.89¡?#?.56; for 5- 6th graders, 16.57¡?#?.57; for 7-9th graders, and 17.71¡?#?.24; for 10-12th graders. Higher PDSS scores were positively correlated with poor school performance and emotional instability. Conclusion: Korean teenagers sleep to an unusual extent during the day because of nighttime sleep deprivation. This negatively affects school performance and emotional stability. A Korean translation of the PDSS was effective in evaluating the severity of daytime sleepiness and assessing the emotional state and school performance of Korean teenagers.

  16. Environmental assessment of amine-based carbon capture Scenario modelling with life cycle assessment (LCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brekke, Andreas; Askham, Cecilia; Modahl, Ingunn Saur; Vold, Bjoern Ivar; Johnsen, Fredrik Moltu

    2012-07-01

    This report contains a first attempt at introducing the environmental impacts associated with amines and derivatives in a life cycle assessment (LCA) of gas power production with carbon capture and comparing these with other environmental impacts associated with the production system. The report aims to identify data gaps and methodological challenges connected both to modelling toxicity of amines and derivatives and weighting of environmental impacts. A scenario based modelling exercise was performed on a theoretical gas power plant with carbon capture, where emission levels of nitrosamines were varied between zero (gas power without CCS) to a worst case level (outside the probable range of actual carbon capture facilities). Because of extensive research and development in the areas of solvents and emissions from carbon capture facilities in the latter years, data used in the exercise may be outdated and results should therefore not be taken at face value.The results from the exercise showed: According to UseTox, emissions of nitrosamines are less important than emissions of formaldehyde with regard to toxicity related to operation of (i.e. both inputs to and outputs from) a carbon capture facility. If characterisation factors for emissions of metals are included, these outweigh all other toxic emissions in the study. None of the most recent weighting methods in LCA include characterisation factors for nitrosamines, and these are therefore not part of the environmental ranking.These results shows that the EDecIDe project has an important role to play in developing LCA methodology useful for assessing the environmental performance of amine based carbon capture in particular and CCS in general. The EDecIDe project will examine the toxicity models used in LCA in more detail, specifically UseTox. The applicability of the LCA compartment models and site specificity issues for a Norwegian/Arctic situation will be explored. This applies to the environmental compartments

  17. Feasibility Risk Assessment of Transport Infrastructure Projects: The CBA-DK Decision Support Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Banister, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the final version of the CBA-DK decision support model for assessment of transport projects. The model makes use of conventional cost-benefit analysis resulting in aggregated single point estimates and quantitative risk analysis using Monte Carlo simulation resulting in interval...... results. Two special concerns in this paper is firstly the treatment of feasibility risk assessment adopted for evaluation of transport infrastructure projects, and secondly whether this can provide a more robust decision support model. This means moving away from a single point estimate to an interval...... result, and the determination of suitable probability distributions. Use is made of the reference class forecasting information, such as that developed in Optimism Bias for adjustments to investment decisions that relate to all modes of transport. The CBA-DK decision support model results in more...

  18. Assessment model validity document FARF31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, Mark; Gylling Bjoern; Lindgren, Maria [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    The prime goal of model validation is to build confidence in the model concept and that the model is fit for its intended purpose. In other words: Does the model predict transport in fractured rock adequately to be used in repository performance assessments. Are the results reasonable for the type of modelling tasks the model is designed for. Commonly, in performance assessments a large number of realisations of flow and transport is made to cover the associated uncertainties. Thus, the flow and transport including radioactive chain decay are preferably calculated in the same model framework. A rather sophisticated concept is necessary to be able to model flow and radionuclide transport in the near field and far field of a deep repository, also including radioactive chain decay. In order to avoid excessively long computational times there is a need for well-based simplifications. For this reason, the far field code FARF31 is made relatively simple, and calculates transport by using averaged entities to represent the most important processes. FARF31 has been shown to be suitable for the performance assessments within the SKB studies, e.g. SR 97. Among the advantages are that it is a fast, simple and robust code, which enables handling of many realisations with wide spread in parameters in combination with chain decay of radionuclides. Being a component in the model chain PROPER, it is easy to assign statistical distributions to the input parameters. Due to the formulation of the advection-dispersion equation in FARF31 it is possible to perform the groundwater flow calculations separately.The basis for the modelling is a stream tube, i.e. a volume of rock including fractures with flowing water, with the walls of the imaginary stream tube defined by streamlines. The transport within the stream tube is described using a dual porosity continuum approach, where it is assumed that rock can be divided into two distinct domains with different types of porosity

  19. Towards a Vygotskyan model of writing assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P.D. Faragher

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article challenges a widely current model of second language writing assessment which focuses on language errors. A significant sample of the examination writing of matriculants from the then (1991 Department of Education and Training in the Cape Town area is assessed using elements of a Vygotskyan approach. Rather than focusing on surface errors, the analysis explores some of the conceptual and communicative processes involved, using three tools: word count, analysis of metaphors, and exploration of idiosyncratic expressions. This preliminary investigation describes underlying aspects of language proficiency in the group studied, and suggests areas to be clarified in developing a new approach to proficiency assessment.In hierdie artikel word 'n model om geskrewe tweede taal te evalueer wat tans wyd in gebruik is, aangespreek. 'n Beduidende monster van die geskrewe eksamens van die 1991-matrikulante van die voormalige Departement van Onderwys en Opleiding in die Kaapstadgebied is volgens elemente van die Vygotskyaanse benadering geevalueer. Die fokus is nie op oppervlaktefoute nie, maar op sommige van die konseptuele en kommunikatiewe prosesse wat betrokke is. Drie instrumente word gebruik, nl. woordtelling, analise van metafore en die eksplorasie van idiosinkratiese uitdrukkings. Hierdie voorlopige ondersoek beskryf die onderliggende aspekte van die studiegroep se taalvaardighede en maar voorstel/e oor areas wat uitgeklaar sal moet word in die ontwikkeling van 'n nuwe benadering tot vaardigheidsevaluasie.

  20. Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2008). Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification. In F. W. B. Li, J. Zhao, T. K. Shih, R. W. H. Lau, Q. Li & D. McLeod (Eds.), Advances in Web Based Learning - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Web-based Learning (ICWL 2008) (pp. 132-144). August, 20-22, 2008, Jinhua, China: Lecture Notes in Computer Science 5145 Springer 2008, ISBN 978-3-540-85032-8.

  1. Assessment of MARMOT Grain Growth Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromm, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Schwen, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Brown, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pokharel, R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This report assesses the MARMOT grain growth model by comparing modeling predictions with experimental results from thermal annealing. The purpose here is threefold: (1) to demonstrate the validation approach of using thermal annealing experiments with non-destructive characterization, (2) to test the reconstruction capability and computation efficiency in MOOSE, and (3) to validate the grain growth model and the associated parameters that are implemented in MARMOT for UO2. To assure a rigorous comparison, the 2D and 3D initial experimental microstructures of UO2 samples were characterized using non-destructive Synchrotron x-ray. The same samples were then annealed at 2273K for grain growth, and their initial microstructures were used as initial conditions for simulated annealing at the same temperature using MARMOT. After annealing, the final experimental microstructures were characterized again to compare with the results from simulations. So far, comparison between modeling and experiments has been done for 2D microstructures, and 3D comparison is underway. The preliminary results demonstrated the usefulness of the non-destructive characterization method for MARMOT grain growth model validation. A detailed analysis of the 3D microstructures is in progress to fully validate the current model in MARMOT.

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II Using the Rasch Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chen; Chang, Lily

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II-C; Chinese Behavioral Science Corporation, 2000) within the Rasch framework in terms of dimensionality, item difficulty, and category functioning. Two underlying scale dimensions, relatively high item difficulties, and a need for collapsing 2 response…

  3. Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Adel; Koshak, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment.

  4. Reliability and Validity of the Youth Version of the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART-Y) in the Assessment of Risk-Taking Behavior among Inner-City Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejuez, C. W.; Aklin, Will; Daughters, Stacey; Zvolensky, Michael; Kahler, Christopher; Gwadz, Marya

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the youth version of the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART-Y) for assessing adolescent risk behaviors among a sample of 98 inner-city African American adolescents (M age = 14.8, SD = 1.5). In addition to a relation with sensation seeking, BART-Y responding evidenced a significant relation with a…

  5. Evaluation of primary care: The "Primary Care Assessment Tools - Facility version" for the Spanish health system Evaluación de la atención primaria de salud: Primary Care Assessment Tools - Facility version para el sistema de salud español

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isabel Pasarín

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain versions of the Primary Care Assessment Tools (PCAT-Facility version to evaluate primary care (PC in the Spanish context, and to analyze its feasibility, reliability and validity. Methods: Cultural adaptation was performed through the use of forward and backward translations into Spanish and Catalan, observations and opinions of a panel of experts, and cognitive interviews with target users (PC team managers. A pilot phase was carried out in a sample of 130 managers of PC teams in Catalonia. A post-test questionnaire was sent 4-5 months later to all 194 managers of PC teams in the Barcelona health region. Analysis of metric properties included: 1 description of items and verification of Likert assumptions, since domain scores are obtained by summing item scores; 2 reliability analysis (Cronbach's alpha coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, test-retest analysis; and 3 validity analysis (expert panel, cognitive interviews, and convergent and discriminant validity. Results: Substantial adaptation was required for the accessory section of the questionnaire, but less was required in PC domain measurements. Items were added to the comprehensiveness domain to reflect services usually available in Spain. The lowest Cronbach's alpha scores were found for Access (0.62 and Coordination (0.59 and 0.65, while values were >0.70 for the remaining domains. Conclusion: The Spanish version of the PCAT-Facility questionnaire is now available and shows adequate reliability and validity. The Spanish PCAT version will facilitate national and international comparisons of PC and analysis of the determinants of quality of service provision.Objetivo: Obtener versiones del Primary Care Assessment Tools-Facility version como herramienta de evaluación de la atención primaria (AP para la aplicación en el contexto español, y analizar su fiabilidad y validez. Métodos: Se realizó una adaptación cultural con traducciones y retrotraducciones

  6. PVWatts Version 5 Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobos, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    The NREL PVWatts calculator is a web application developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that estimates the electricity production of a grid-connected photovoltaic system based on a few simple inputs. PVWatts combines a number of sub-models to predict overall system performance, and makes includes several built-in parameters that are hidden from the user. This technical reference describes the sub-models, documents assumptions and hidden parameters, and explains the sequence of calculations that yield the final system performance estimate. This reference is applicable to the significantly revised version of PVWatts released by NREL in 2014.

  7. Counselling services in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in Delhi, India: an assessment through a modified version of UNICEF-PPTCT tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Bir; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S

    2015-03-01

    The study aims to assess the counselling services provided to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) under the Indian programme of prevention of parent-to-child transmission of HIV (PPTCT). Five hospitals in Delhi providing PMTCT services were randomly selected. A total of 201 post-test counselled women were interviewed using a modified version of the UNICEF-PPTCT evaluation tool. Knowledge about HIV transmission from mother-to-child was low. Post-test counselling mainly helped in increasing the knowledge of HIV transmission; yet 20%-30% of the clients missed this opportunity. Discussion on window period, other sexually transmitted diseases and danger signs of pregnancy were grossly neglected. The PMTCT services during the antenatal period are feasible and agreeable to be provided; however, certain aspects, like lack of privacy, confidentiality of HIV status of the client, counsellor's 'hurried' attitude, communication skills and discriminant behaviour towards HIV-positive clients, and disinterest of clients in the counselling, remain as gaps. These issues may be addressed through refresher training to counsellors with an emphasis on social and behaviour change communication strategies. Addressing attitudinal aspects of the counsellors towards HIV positives is crucial to improve the quality of the services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

  8. Counselling services in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in Delhi, India: an assessment through a modified version of UNICEF-PPTCT tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Bir; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S

    2015-03-01

    The study aims to assess the counselling services provided to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) under the Indian programme of prevention of parent-to-child transmission of HIV (PPTCT). Five hospitals in Delhi providing PMTCT services were randomly selected. A total of 201 post-test counselled women were interviewed using a modified version of the UNICEF-PPTCT evaluation tool. Knowledge about HIV transmission from mother-to-child was low. Post-test counselling mainly helped in increasing the knowledge of HIV transmission; yet 20%-30% of the clients missed this opportunity. Discussion on window period, other sexually transmitted diseases and danger signs of pregnancy were grossly neglected. The PMTCT services during the antenatal period are feasible and agreeable to be provided; however, certain aspects, like lack of privacy, confidentiality of HIV status of the client, counsellor's 'hurried' attitude, communication skills and discriminant behaviour towards HIV-positive clients, and disinterest of clients in the counselling, remain as gaps. These issues may be addressed through refresher training to counsellors with an emphasis on social and behaviour change communication strategies. Addressing attitudinal aspects of the counsellors towards HIV positives is crucial to improve the quality of the services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. PMID:25700918

  9. Implementation and assessment of improved models and options in TRAC-BF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Analytis, G.Th. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-07-01

    A summary of modifications and options introduced in TRAC-BF1 is presented and it is shown that the predicting capabilities of the modified version of the core are greatly improved. These changes include the introduction of a different heat transfer package during reflooding, the implementation of a simple single-phase limit procedure for forcing the two phases to acquire the same velocity if one phase disappears, a close assessment of the annular flow interfacial shear correlation, implementation of a simple radiation model which seems to alleviate some numerical-oscillations problems induced by the existing highly complex model. Furthermore, different options were introduced and tested like upwinding some terms of the momentum equations (which seems to solve a number of problems reported in the past), the second upwind scheme for the convective terms of the phasic momentum equations and the implementation and assessment of a completely different annular flow interfacial shear correlation. The modified TRAC-BF1 is assessed against some bottom-flooding separate-effect experiments, a `benchmark` top flooding simulation as well as against the TLTA test Nr. 6423. In the process of this task, the different options are assessed and discussed and is shown that the predictions of the modified code are physically sound and close to the measurements, while almost all the predicted variables are free of unphysical spurious oscillations. The modifications introduced solve a number of problems associated with the frozen version of the code and result in a version which can be confidently used for LB-LOCA analyses. (author) 19 figs., 16 refs.

  10. The Nexus Land-Use model version 1.0, an approach articulating biophysical potentials and economic dynamics to model competition for land-use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Souty

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between food demand, biomass energy and forest preservation are driving both food prices and land-use changes, regionally and globally. This study presents a new model called Nexus Land-Use version 1.0 which describes these interactions through a generic representation of agricultural intensification mechanisms. The Nexus Land-Use model equations combine biophysics and economics into a single coherent framework to calculate crop yields, food prices, and resulting pasture and cropland areas within 12 regions inter-connected with each other by international trade. The representation of cropland and livestock production systems in each region relies on three components: (i a biomass production function derived from the crop yield response function to inputs such as industrial fertilisers; (ii a detailed representation of the livestock production system subdivided into an intensive and an extensive component, and (iii a spatially explicit distribution of potential (maximal crop yields prescribed from the Lund-Postdam-Jena global vegetation model for managed Land (LPJmL. The economic principles governing decisions about land-use and intensification are adapted from the Ricardian rent theory, assuming cost minimisation for farmers. The land-use modelling approach described in this paper entails several advantages. Firstly, it makes it possible to explore interactions among different types of biomass demand for food and animal feed, in a consistent approach, including indirect effects on land-use change resulting from international trade. Secondly, yield variations induced by the possible expansion of croplands on less suitable marginal lands are modelled by using regional land area distributions of potential yields, and a calculated boundary between intensive and extensive production. The model equations and parameter values are first described in details. Then, idealised scenarios exploring the impact of forest preservation policies or

  11. Obstetric care providers are able to assess psychosocial risks, identify and refer high-risk pregnant women: validation of a short assessment tool – the KINDEX Greek version

    OpenAIRE

    Spyridou, Andria; Schauer, Maggie; Ruf-Leuschner, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal assessment for psychosocial risk factors and prevention and intervention is scarce and, in most cases, nonexistent in obstetrical care. In this study we aimed to evaluate if the KINDEX, a short instrument developed in Germany, is a useful tool in the hands of non-trained medical staff, in order to identify and refer women in psychosocial risk to the adequate mental health and social services. We also examined the criterion-related concurrent validity of the tool through a ...

  12. Student assessment via graded response model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagiulia Matteucci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Faculty of Political Science at the University of Bologna has started a program of didactics reorganization for several courses, introducing more than one evaluation test during the learning process. Student assessment before the final examination has the double aim of measuring both the level of student’s ability and the effectiveness of the teaching process, in order to correct it real-time. In such an evaluation system, common to the Anglo-Saxon countries, Item Response Theory (IRT expresses its effectiveness fully. In this paper, an IRT model for ordered polytomous variables is considered in order to investigate the item properties and to evaluate the student achievement. Particularly, the Graded Response Model (GRM is taken into account in the analysis of three different written tests of a basic Statistics course. The results highlight the different composition of the items and provide a simple description of the student ability distribution.

  13. Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Adel Abdelaziz,1,2 Emad Koshak3 1Medical Education Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Al Baha University, Al Baha, Saudi Arabia; 2Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt; 3Dean and Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Al Baha University, Al Baha, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment. Keywords: curriculum development, teaching, learning, assessment, apprenticeship, community-based settings, health service-based settings

  14. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): scenarios for comparing dose-assessment models. Vol.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program designed to provide rapid assessments of the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. The main body of this document consists of 28 examples of IRDAM input and output, representing various types of accidents and releases. These examples are intended to provide a basis for comparison with other models or for testing IRDAM itself. Figures are included which show dose rates calculated by IRDAM for each scenario. Figures are also included which show calculations made using the computer codes WRAITH (Scherpelz, Borst and Hoenes, 1980) and RADPUR (Dabbert, et. al., 1982). Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. The User's Guide (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 1) describes the setup and operation of equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations

  15. Validation of the Spanish Version of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 (EAT-10spa) in Colombia. A Blinded Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-Cadavid, Luis Fernando; Gutiérrez-Achury, Alejandra María; Ruales-Suárez, Karem; Rengifo-Varona, Maria Leonor; Barros, Camilo; Posada, Andrés; Romero, Carlos; Galvis, Ana María

    2016-06-01

    Dysphagia might affect 12 % of the general population, and its complications include pneumonia, malnutrition, social isolation, and death. No validated Spanish symptom survey exists to quantify dysphagia symptoms among Latin Americans. Therefore, we performed a prospective cohort study in a tertiary care university hospital to validate the Spanish version of the 10-Item Eating-Assessment-Tool (EAT-10spa) for use in Colombia. After an interdisciplinary committee of five bilingual specialists evaluated the EAT-10spa (translated and validated in Spain) and deemed it appropriate for the Colombian culture, its feasibility, reliability, validity, sensitivity to change, and diagnostic capacity were evaluated. As a reference standard, we used the flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing and a standardized clinical evaluation. All assessments were blinded. In total, 133 subjects were included (52 % women, mean age 55 years) and completed the EAT-10spa (median completion time: 2 min [IQR 1-3 min]), 39 % of whom had an elementary-level education. Cronbach's α coefficient: 0.91; test-retest intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.94. The Spearman's correlation coefficient of the EAT-10spa with the 8-point penetration-aspiration scale was 0.54 (P EAT-10spa ≥2 (sensitivity 93.6 %, specificity 36.4 %) and EAT-10spa ≥4 (sensitivity 94.3 %, specificity 49.5 %), respectively. A reduction in the EAT-10 ≥3 was the best cut-off point for a clinically significant improvement (AUC-ROC 0.83; P EAT-10spa showed excellent psychometric properties and discriminatory capacity for use in Colombia.

  16. Enigma Version 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, David; Goza, Sharon P.; McKeegan, Cheyenne; Easley, Rick; Way, Janet; Everett, Shonn; Guerra, Mark; Kraesig, Ray; Leu, William

    2013-01-01

    Enigma Version 12 software combines model building, animation, and engineering visualization into one concise software package. Enigma employs a versatile user interface to allow average users access to even the most complex pieces of the application. Using Enigma eliminates the need to buy and learn several software packages to create an engineering visualization. Models can be created and/or modified within Enigma down to the polygon level. Textures and materials can be applied for additional realism. Within Enigma, these models can be combined to create systems of models that have a hierarchical relationship to one another, such as a robotic arm. Then these systems can be animated within the program or controlled by an external application programming interface (API). In addition, Enigma provides the ability to use plug-ins. Plugins allow the user to create custom code for a specific application and access the Enigma model and system data, but still use the Enigma drawing functionality. CAD files can be imported into Enigma and combined to create systems of computer graphics models that can be manipulated with constraints. An API is available so that an engineer can write a simulation and drive the computer graphics models with no knowledge of computer graphics. An animation editor allows an engineer to set up sequences of animations generated by simulations or by conceptual trajectories in order to record these to highquality media for presentation. Enigma Version 12 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 28 NASA Tech Briefs, September 2013 Planetary Protection Bioburden Analysis Program NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California This program is a Microsoft Access program that performed statistical analysis of the colony counts from assays performed on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft to determine the bioburden density, 3-sigma biodensity, and the total bioburdens required for the MSL prelaunch reports. It also contains numerous

  17. Development and analysis of some versions of the fractional-order point reactor kinetics model for a nuclear reactor with slab geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, Vishwesh A.; Nataraj, P. S. V.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we report the development and analysis of some novel versions and approximations of the fractional-order (FO) point reactor kinetics model for a nuclear reactor with slab geometry. A systematic development of the FO Inhour equation, Inverse FO point reactor kinetics model, and fractional-order versions of the constant delayed neutron rate approximation model and prompt jump approximation model is presented for the first time (for both one delayed group and six delayed groups). These models evolve from the FO point reactor kinetics model, which has been derived from the FO Neutron Telegraph Equation for the neutron transport considering the subdiffusive neutron transport. Various observations and the analysis results are reported and the corresponding justifications are addressed using the subdiffusive framework for the neutron transport. The FO Inhour equation is found out to be a pseudo-polynomial with its degree depending on the order of the fractional derivative in the FO model. The inverse FO point reactor kinetics model is derived and used to find the reactivity variation required to achieve exponential and sinusoidal power variation in the core. The situation of sudden insertion of negative reactivity is analyzed using the FO constant delayed neutron rate approximation. Use of FO model for representing the prompt jump in reactor power is advocated on the basis of subdiffusion. Comparison with the respective integer-order models is carried out for the practical data. Also, it has been shown analytically that integer-order models are a special case of FO models when the order of time-derivative is one. Development of these FO models plays a crucial role in reactor theory and operation as it is the first step towards achieving the FO control-oriented model for a nuclear reactor. The results presented here form an important step in the efforts to establish a step-by-step and systematic theory for the FO modeling of a nuclear reactor.

  18. Assessing uncertainty in stormwater quality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesiri, Buddhi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-10-15

    Designing effective stormwater pollution mitigation strategies is a challenge in urban stormwater management. This is primarily due to the limited reliability of catchment scale stormwater quality modelling tools. As such, assessing the uncertainty associated with the information generated by stormwater quality models is important for informed decision making. Quantitative assessment of build-up and wash-off process uncertainty, which arises from the variability associated with these processes, is a major concern as typical uncertainty assessment approaches do not adequately account for process uncertainty. The research study undertaken found that the variability of build-up and wash-off processes for different particle size ranges leads to processes uncertainty. After variability and resulting process uncertainties are accurately characterised, they can be incorporated into catchment stormwater quality predictions. Accounting of process uncertainty influences the uncertainty limits associated with predicted stormwater quality. The impact of build-up process uncertainty on stormwater quality predictions is greater than that of wash-off process uncertainty. Accordingly, decision making should facilitate the designing of mitigation strategies which specifically addresses variations in load and composition of pollutants accumulated during dry weather periods. Moreover, the study outcomes found that the influence of process uncertainty is different for stormwater quality predictions corresponding to storm events with different intensity, duration and runoff volume generated. These storm events were also found to be significantly different in terms of the Runoff-Catchment Area ratio. As such, the selection of storm events in the context of designing stormwater pollution mitigation strategies needs to take into consideration not only the storm event characteristics, but also the influence of process uncertainty on stormwater quality predictions. PMID:27423532

  19. A model for programmatic assessment fit for purpose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Schuwirth, L.W.; Driessen, E.W.; Dijkstra, J.; Tigelaar, D.; Baartman, L.K.; Tartwijk, J. van

    2012-01-01

    We propose a model for programmatic assessment in action, which simultaneously optimises assessment for learning and assessment for decision making about learner progress. This model is based on a set of assessment principles that are interpreted from empirical research. It specifies cycles of train

  20. The Nexus Land-Use model version 1.0, an approach articulating biophysical potentials and economic dynamics to model competition for land-use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souty, F.; Brunelle, T.; Dumas, P.; Dorin, B.; Ciais, P.; Crassous, R.; Müller, C.; Bondeau, A.

    2012-10-01

    Interactions between food demand, biomass energy and forest preservation are driving both food prices and land-use changes, regionally and globally. This study presents a new model called Nexus Land-Use version 1.0 which describes these interactions through a generic representation of agricultural intensification mechanisms within agricultural lands. The Nexus Land-Use model equations combine biophysics and economics into a single coherent framework to calculate crop yields, food prices, and resulting pasture and cropland areas within 12 regions inter-connected with each other by international trade. The representation of cropland and livestock production systems in each region relies on three components: (i) a biomass production function derived from the crop yield response function to inputs such as industrial fertilisers; (ii) a detailed representation of the livestock production system subdivided into an intensive and an extensive component, and (iii) a spatially explicit distribution of potential (maximal) crop yields prescribed from the Lund-Postdam-Jena global vegetation model for managed Land (LPJmL). The economic principles governing decisions about land-use and intensification are adapted from the Ricardian rent theory, assuming cost minimisation for farmers. In contrast to the other land-use models linking economy and biophysics, crops are aggregated as a representative product in calories and intensification for the representative crop is a non-linear function of chemical inputs. The model equations and parameter values are first described in details. Then, idealised scenarios exploring the impact of forest preservation policies or rising energy price on agricultural intensification are described, and their impacts on pasture and cropland areas are investigated.