WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessment model version

  1. Technical Note: Description and assessment of a nudged version of the new dynamics Unified Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Morgenstern

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a "nudged" version of the Met Office general circulation model, the Unified Model. We constrain this global climate model using ERA-40 re-analysis data with the aim of reproducing the observed "weather" over a year from September 1999. Quantitative assessments are made of its performance, focusing on dynamical aspects of nudging and demonstrating that the "weather" is well simulated.

  2. Probabilistic Model for Integrated Assessment of the Behavior at the T.D.P. Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado, A.; Eguilior, S.; Recreo, F

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the completion of the first phase of the implementation of the methodology ABACO2G (Bayes Application to Geological Storage of CO2) and the final version of the ABACO2G probabilistic model for the injection phase before its future validation in the experimental field of the Technology Development Plant in Hontom (Burgos). The model, which is based on the determination of the probabilistic risk component of a geological storage of CO2 using the formalism of Bayesian networks and Monte Carlo probability yields quantitative probability functions of the total system CO2 storage and of each one of their subsystems (storage subsystem and the primary seal; secondary containment subsystem and dispersion subsystem or tertiary one); the implementation of the stochastic time evolution of the CO2 plume during the injection period, the stochastic time evolution of the drying front, the probabilistic evolution of the pressure front, decoupled from the CO2 plume progress front, and the implementation of submodels and leakage probability functions through major leakage risk elements (fractures / faults and wells / deep boreholes) which together define the space of events to estimate the risks associated with the CO2 geological storage system. The activities included in this report have been to replace the previous qualitative estimation submodels of former ABACO2G version developed during Phase I of the project ALM-10-017, by analytical, semi-analytical or numerical submodels for the main elements of risk (wells and fractures), to obtain an integrated probabilistic model of a CO2 storage complex in carbonate formations that meets the needs of the integrated behavior evaluation of the Technology Development Plant in Hontomín

  3. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute

  4. Assessment of two versions of regional climate model in simulating the Indian Summer Monsoon over South Asia CORDEX domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnayak, K. C.; Panda, S. K.; Saraswat, Vaishali; Dash, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    This study assess the performance of two versions of Regional Climate Model (RegCM) in simulating the Indian summer monsoon over South Asia for the period 1998 to 2003 with an aim of conducting future climate change simulations. Two sets of experiments were carried out with two different versions of RegCM (viz. RegCM4.2 and RegCM4.3) with the lateral boundary forcings provided from European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA-interim) at 50 km horizontal resolution. The major updates in RegCM4.3 in comparison to the older version RegCM4.2 are the inclusion of measured solar irradiance in place of hardcoded solar constant and additional layers in the stratosphere. The analysis shows that the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, moisture flux and surface net downward shortwave flux are better represented in RegCM4.3 than that in the RegCM4.2 simulations. Excessive moisture flux in the RegCM4.2 simulation over the northern Arabian Sea and Peninsular India resulted in an overestimation of rainfall over the Western Ghats, Peninsular region as a result of which the all India rainfall has been overestimated. RegCM4.3 has performed well over India as a whole as well as its four rainfall homogenous zones in reproducing the mean monsoon rainfall and inter-annual variation of rainfall. Further, the monsoon onset, low-level Somali Jet and the upper level tropical easterly jet are better represented in the RegCM4.3 than RegCM4.2. Thus, RegCM4.3 has performed better in simulating the mean summer monsoon circulation over the South Asia. Hence, RegCM4.3 may be used to study the future climate change over the South Asia.

  5. Air Force Systems Engineering Assessment Model (AF SEAM) Management Guide, Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    gleaned from experienced professionals who assisted with the model’s development. Examples of the references used include the following: • ISO /IEC...Defense Acquisition Guidebook, Chapter 4 • AFI 63-1201, Life Cycle Systems Engineering • IEEE/EIA 12207 , Software Life Cycle Processes • Air...Selection criteria Reference Material: IEEE/EIA 12207 , MIL-HDBK-514 Other Considerations: Modeling, simulation and analysis techniques can be

  6. MATILDA Version 2: Rough Earth TIALD Model for Laser Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Hilly Terrain - Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-13

    support of airborne laser designator use during test and training exercises on military ranges. The initial MATILDA tool, MATILDA PRO Version-1.6.1...2]. The use of the ALARP principle in UK hazard assessment arises from the provisions of the UK Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974 [18]. Given...The product of the probabilistic fault/failure laser hazard analysis is the ex- pectation value: the likelihood that an unprotected observer outside

  7. Forsmark site investigation. Assessment of the validity of the rock domain model, version 1.2, based on the modelling of gravity and petrophysical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaksson, Hans; Stephens, Michael B.

    2007-11-01

    This document reports the results gained by the geophysical modelling of rock domains based on gravity and petrophysical data, which is one of the activities performed within the site investigation work at Forsmark. The main objective with this activity is to assess the validity of the geological rock domain model version 1.2, and to identify discrepancies in the model that may indicate a need for revision of the model or a need for additional investigations. The verification is carried out by comparing the calculated gravity model response, which takes account of the geological model, with a local gravity anomaly that represents the measured data. The model response is obtained from the three-dimensional geometry and the petrophysical data provided for each rock domain in the geological model. Due to model boundary conditions, the study is carried out in a smaller area within the regional model area. Gravity model responses are calculated in three stages; an initial model, a base model and a refined base model. The refined base model is preferred and is used for comparison purposes. In general, there is a good agreement between the refined base model that makes use of the rock domain model, version 1.2 and the measured gravity data, not least where it concerns the depth extension of the critical rock domain RFM029. The most significant discrepancy occurs in the area extending from the SFR office to the SFR underground facility and further to the northwest. It is speculated that this discrepancy is caused by a combination of an overestimation of the volume of gabbro (RFM016) that plunges towards the southeast in the rock domain model, and an underestimation of the volume of occurrence of pegmatite and pegmatitic granite that are known to be present and occur as larger bodies around SFR. Other discrepancies are noted in rock domain RFM022, which is considered to be overestimated in the rock domain model, version 1.2, and in rock domain RFM017, where the gravity

  8. The Unified Extensional Versioning Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asklund, U.; Bendix, Lars Gotfred; Christensen, H. B.

    1999-01-01

    Versioning of components in a system is a well-researched field where various adequate techniques have already been established. In this paper, we look at how versioning can be extended to cover also the structural aspects of a system. There exist two basic techniques for versioning - intentional...

  9. Versions of the Waste Reduction Model (WARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides a brief chronology of changes made to EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM), organized by WARM version number. The page includes brief summaries of changes and updates since the previous version.

  10. The SF-8 Spanish Version for Health-Related Quality of Life Assessment: Psychometric Study with IRT and CFA Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, José M; Galiana, Laura; Fernández, Irene

    2018-03-22

    The aim of current research is to analyze the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the SF-8, overcoming previous shortcomings. A double line of analyses was used: competitive structural equations models to establish factorial validity, and Item Response theory to analyze item psychometric characteristics and information. 593 people aged 60 years or older, attending long life learning programs at the University were surveyed. Their age ranged from 60 to 92 years old. 67.6% were women. The survey included scales on personality dimensions, attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors related to aging. Competitive confirmatory models pointed out two-factors (physical and mental health) as the best representation of the data: χ2(13) = 72.37 (p < .01); CFI = .99; TLI = .98; RMSEA = .08 (.06, .10). Item 5 was removed because of unreliability and cross-loading. Graded response models showed appropriate fit for two-parameter logistic model both the physical and the mental dimensions. Item Information Curves and Test Information Functions pointed out that the SF-8 was more informative for low levels of health. The Spanish SF-8 has adequate psychometric properties, being better represented by two dimensions, once Item 5 is removed. Gathering evidence on patient-reported outcome measures is of crucial importance, as this type of measurement instruments are increasingly used in clinical arena.

  11. Model-based version management system framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a model-based version management system. Version Management System (VMS) a branch of software configuration management (SCM) aims to provide a controlling mechanism for evolution of software artifacts created during software development process. Controlling the evolution requires many activities to perform, such as, construction and creation of versions, identification of differences between versions, conflict detection and merging. Traditional VMS systems are file-based and consider software systems as a set of text files. File based VMS systems are not adequate for performing software configuration management activities such as, version control on software artifacts produced in earlier phases of the software life cycle. New challenges of model differencing, merge, and evolution control arise while using models as central artifact. The goal of this work is to present a generic framework model-based VMS which can be used to overcome the problem of tradition file-based VMS systems and provide model versioning services. (author)

  12. MATILDA Version-2: Rough Earth TIALD Model for Laser Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Hilly Terrain - Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    risk assessment for “unsafe” scenarios. Recently, attention in the DoD has turned to Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) models [5,6] as an...corresponding to the CRA undershoot boundary. The magenta- coloured line represents the portion of the C-RX(U) circle that would contribute to the...Tertiary Precaution Surface. Undershoot related laser firing restrictions within the green- coloured C-RX(U) can be ignored. Figure 34

  13. Modeling report of DYMOND code (DUPIC version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hwan; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2003-04-01

    The DYMOND code employs the ITHINK dynamic modeling platform to assess the 100-year dynamic evolution scenarios for postulated global nuclear energy parks. Firstly, DYMOND code has been developed by ANL(Argonne National Laboratory) to perform the fuel cycle analysis of LWR once-through and LWR-FBR mixed plant. Since the extensive application of DYMOND code has been requested, the first version of DYMOND has been modified to adapt the DUPIC, MSR and RTF fuel cycle. DYMOND code is composed of three parts; the source language platform, input supply and output. But those platforms are not clearly distinguished. This report described all the equations which were modeled in the modified DYMOND code (which is called as DYMOND-DUPIC version). It divided into five parts;Part A deals model in reactor history which is included amount of the requested fuels and spent fuels. Part B aims to describe model of fuel cycle about fuel flow from the beginning to the end of fuel cycle. Part C is for model in re-processing which is included recovery of burned uranium, plutonium, minor actinide and fission product as well as the amount of spent fuels in storage and disposal. Part D is for model in other fuel cycle which is considered the thorium fuel cycle for MSR and RTF reactor. Part E is for model in economics. This part gives all the information of cost such as uranium mining cost, reactor operating cost, fuel cost etc

  14. Modeling report of DYMOND code (DUPIC version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo Hwan [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yacout, Abdellatif M [Argonne National Laboratory, Ilinois (United States)

    2003-04-01

    The DYMOND code employs the ITHINK dynamic modeling platform to assess the 100-year dynamic evolution scenarios for postulated global nuclear energy parks. Firstly, DYMOND code has been developed by ANL(Argonne National Laboratory) to perform the fuel cycle analysis of LWR once-through and LWR-FBR mixed plant. Since the extensive application of DYMOND code has been requested, the first version of DYMOND has been modified to adapt the DUPIC, MSR and RTF fuel cycle. DYMOND code is composed of three parts; the source language platform, input supply and output. But those platforms are not clearly distinguished. This report described all the equations which were modeled in the modified DYMOND code (which is called as DYMOND-DUPIC version). It divided into five parts;Part A deals model in reactor history which is included amount of the requested fuels and spent fuels. Part B aims to describe model of fuel cycle about fuel flow from the beginning to the end of fuel cycle. Part C is for model in re-processing which is included recovery of burned uranium, plutonium, minor actinide and fission product as well as the amount of spent fuels in storage and disposal. Part D is for model in other fuel cycle which is considered the thorium fuel cycle for MSR and RTF reactor. Part E is for model in economics. This part gives all the information of cost such as uranium mining cost, reactor operating cost, fuel cost etc.

  15. Validation of the Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment using classical test theory and the Rasch model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Lambert, Heather C; Faber, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to validate the Danish version of the Canadian the "McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment" (MISA-DK) for measuring dysphagia in frail elders. Method: One-hundred and ten consecutive older medical patients were recruited to the study. Reliability was assessed by internal...... consistency (Chronbach's alpha). External construct validity (convergent and known-groups validity) was evaluated against theoretical constructs assessing the complex concept of ingestive skills. Internal construct validity was tested using Rasch analysis. Results: High internal consistency reliability...... with Chronbach's alpha of 0.77-0.95 was evident. External construct validity was supported by expected high correlations with most of the constructs related to ingestive skills (r(s)¿=¿0.53 to r(s)¿=¿0.66). The MISA-DK discriminated significantly between known-groups. Fit to the Rasch model (x(2) (df)¿=¿12 (12...

  16. Inspection of the Math Model Tools for On-Orbit Assessment of Impact Damage Report. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Piascik, Robert S.; Kramer White, Julie; Labbe, Steve G.; Rotter, Hank A.

    2005-01-01

    In Spring of 2005, the NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) was engaged by the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to peer review the suite of analytical tools being developed to support the determination of impact and damage tolerance of the Orbiter Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The NESC formed an independent review team with the core disciplines of materials, flight sciences, structures, mechanical analysis and thermal analysis. The Math Model Tools reviewed included damage prediction and stress analysis, aeroheating analysis, and thermal analysis tools. Some tools are physics-based and other tools are empirically-derived. Each tool was created for a specific use and timeframe, including certification, real-time pre-launch assessments, and real-time on-orbit assessments. The tools are used together in an integrated strategy for assessing the ramifications of impact damage to tile and RCC. The NESC teams conducted a peer review of the engineering data package for each Math Model Tool. This report contains the summary of the team observations and recommendations from these reviews.

  17. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Version 2.0 theory and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, A.S.

    1993-06-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1992). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. In Version 2.0, GWSCREEN has incorporated an additional source model to calculate the impacts to groundwater resulting from the release to percolation ponds. In addition, transport of radioactive progeny has also been incorporated. GWSCREEN has shown comparable results when compared against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool

  18. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination: Version 2.0 theory and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1993-06-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act) sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (DOE, 1992). The code calculates the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. In Version 2.0, GWSCREEN has incorporated an additional source model to calculate the impacts to groundwater resulting from the release to percolation ponds. In addition, transport of radioactive progeny has also been incorporated. GWSCREEN has shown comparable results when compared against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.

  19. GWSCREEN: A Semi-analytical Model for Assessment of the Groundwater Pathway from Surface or Buried Contamination, Theory and User's Manual, Version 2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, Arthur South

    1998-08-01

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non-radioactive substances from surface or buried sources. The code was designed for implementation in the Track I and Track II assessment of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites identified as low probability hazard at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The code calculates 1) the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded, 2) peak aquifer concentration and associated human health impacts, and 3) aquifer concentrations and associated human health impacts as a function of time and space. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: contaminant release from a source volume, vertical contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone, and 2D or 3D contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. In Version 2.5, transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow or dispersive solution model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Three source models are included; leaching from a surface or buried source, infiltration pond, or user-defined arbitrary release. Dispersion in the aquifer may be described by fixed dispersivity values or three, spatial-variable dispersivity functions. Version 2.5 also includes a Monte Carlo sampling routine for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis and a preprocessor to allow multiple input files and multiple contaminants to be run in a single simulation. GWSCREEN has been validated against other codes using similar algorithms and techniques. The code was originally designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data are limited. It was intended to simulate relatively simple

  20. Forsmark - site descriptive model version 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    During 2002, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is starting investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian basement of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Forsmark, which lies in the municipality of Oesthammar, on the east coast of Sweden, about 150 kilometres north of Stockholm. The site description should present all collected data and interpreted parameters of importance for the overall scientific understanding of the site, for the technical design and environmental impact assessment of the deep repository, and for the assessment of long-term safety. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. The site descriptive models are devised and stepwise updated as the site investigations proceed. The point of departure for this process is the regional site descriptive model, version 0, which is the subject of the present report. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. This information, with the exception of data from tunnels and drill holes at the sites of the Forsmark nuclear reactors and the underground low-middle active radioactive waste storage facility, SFR, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. For this reason, the Forsmark site descriptive model, version 0, as detailed in the present report, has been developed at a regional scale. It covers a rectangular area, 15 km in a southwest-northeast and 11 km in a northwest-southeast direction, around the

  1. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, E.; Scott, J. R.; Sokolov, A. P.; Forest, C. E.; Schlosser, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to a human activity model, is linked to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). Since the MIT IGSM-CAM framework (version 1.0) incorporates a human activity model, it is possible to analyze uncertainties in emissions resulting from both uncertainties in the underlying socio-economic characteristics of the economic model and in the choice of climate-related policies. Another major feature is the flexibility to vary key climate parameters controlling the climate system response to changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols concentrations, e.g., climate sensitivity, ocean heat uptake rate, and strength of the aerosol forcing. The IGSM-CAM is not only able to realistically simulate the present-day mean climate and the observed trends at the global and continental scale, but it also simulates ENSO variability with realistic time scales, seasonality and patterns of SST anomalies, albeit with stronger magnitudes than observed. The IGSM-CAM shares the same general strengths and limitations as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3) models in simulating present-day annual mean surface temperature and precipitation. Over land, the IGSM-CAM shows similar biases to the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) version 3, which shares the same atmospheric model. This study also presents 21st century simulations based on two emissions scenarios (unconstrained scenario and stabilization scenario at 660 ppm CO2-equivalent) similar to, respectively, the Representative Concentration Pathways RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 scenarios, and three sets of climate parameters. Results of the simulations with the chosen

  2. Forsmark - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    During 2002, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is starting investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian basement of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Forsmark, which lies in the municipality of Oesthammar, on the east coast of Sweden, about 150 kilometres north of Stockholm. The site description should present all collected data and interpreted parameters of importance for the overall scientific understanding of the site, for the technical design and environmental impact assessment of the deep repository, and for the assessment of long-term safety. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. The site descriptive models are devised and stepwise updated as the site investigations proceed. The point of departure for this process is the regional site descriptive model, version 0, which is the subject of the present report. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. This information, with the exception of data from tunnels and drill holes at the sites of the Forsmark nuclear reactors and the underground low-middle active radioactive waste storage facility, SFR, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. For this reason, the Forsmark site descriptive model, version 0, as detailed in the present report, has been developed at a regional scale. It covers a rectangular area, 15 km in a southwest-northeast and 11 km in a northwest-southeast direction, around the

  3. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  4. Assessment of an extended version of the Jenkinson-Collison classification on CMIP5 models over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Noelia; Sillmann, Jana; Butler, Tim

    2018-03-01

    A gridded, geographically extended weather type classification has been developed based on the Jenkinson-Collison (JC) classification system and used to evaluate the representation of weather types over Europe in a suite of climate model simulations. To this aim, a set of models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) is compared with the circulation from two reanalysis products. Furthermore, we examine seasonal changes between simulated frequencies of weather types at present and future climate conditions. The models are in reasonably good agreement with the reanalyses, but some discrepancies occur in cyclonic days being overestimated over North, and underestimated over South Europe, while anticyclonic situations were overestimated over South, and underestimated over North Europe. Low flow conditions were generally underestimated, especially in summer over South Europe, and Westerly conditions were generally overestimated. The projected frequencies of weather types in the late twenty-first century suggest an increase of Anticyclonic days over South Europe in all seasons except summer, while Westerly days increase over North and Central Europe, particularly in winter. We find significant changes in the frequency of Low flow conditions and the Easterly type that become more frequent during the warmer seasons over Southeast and Southwest Europe, respectively. Our results indicate that in winter the Westerly type has significant impacts on positive anomalies of maximum and minimum temperature over most of Europe. Except in winter, the warmer temperatures are linked to Easterlies, Anticyclonic and Low Flow conditions, especially over the Mediterranean area. Furthermore, we show that changes in the frequency of weather types represent a minor contribution of the total change of European temperatures, which would be mainly driven by changes in the temperature anomalies associated with the weather types themselves.

  5. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  6. Assessment of radionuclide databases in CAP88 mainframe version 1.0 and Windows-based version 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBone, Elizabeth D; Farfán, Eduardo B; Lee, Patricia L; Jannik, G Timothy; Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Foley, Trevor Q

    2009-09-01

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as version 1.0 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Web site (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose, and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, 35 radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, 122 radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  7. [The Confusion Assessment Method: Transcultural adaptation of a French version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, V; Belmin, J; Blain, H; Bonin-Guillaume, S; Goldsmith, L; Guerin, O; Kergoat, M-J; Landais, P; Mahmoudi, R; Morais, J A; Rataboul, P; Saber, A; Sirvain, S; Wolfklein, G; de Wazieres, B

    2018-04-03

    The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) is a validated key tool in clinical practice and research programs to diagnose delirium and assess its severity. There is no validated French version of the CAM training manual and coding guide (Inouye SK). The aim of this study was to establish a consensual French version of the CAM and its manual. Cross-cultural adaptation to achieve equivalence between the original version and a French adapted version of the CAM manual. A rigorous process was conducted including control of cultural adequacy of the tool's components, double forward and back translations, reconciliation, expert committee review (including bilingual translators with different nationalities, a linguist, highly qualified clinicians, methodologists) and pretesting. A consensual French version of the CAM was achieved. Implementation of the CAM French version in daily clinical practice will enable optimal diagnosis of delirium diagnosis and enhance communication between health professionals in French speaking countries. Validity and psychometric properties are being tested in a French multicenter cohort, opening up new perspectives for improved quality of care and research programs in French speaking countries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of the short version of the informal caregiver burden assessment questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE to create a reduced version of the QASCI, which is structurally equivalent to the long one and meets the criteria of reliability and validity. METHOD Through secondary data from previous studies, the participants were divided into two samples, one for the development of reduced version and the second for study of the factorial validity. Participants responded to QASCI, the SF 36, the ADHS and demographic questions. RESULTS A reduced version of 14 items showed adequate psychometric properties of validity and internal consistency, adapted to a heptadimensional structure that assesses positive and negative aspects of care. CONCLUSION Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a good fit with the advocated theoretical model.

  9. Tier I Rice Model - Version 1.0 - Guidance for Estimating Pesticide Concentrations in Rice Paddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes a Tier I Rice Model (Version 1.0) for estimating surface water exposure from the use of pesticides in rice paddies. The concentration calculated can be used for aquatic ecological risk and drinking water exposure assessments.

  10. A Persian version of Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Rashedi, Vahid; Khedmati Morasae, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to translate the original English version of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) into a Persian version and to assess the preliminary psychometric properties of the translated index among a sample of Persian elders. Twelve items included in GOHAI were first translated into Persian using a back-translation technique and then were compared with the original version. Four hundred and seventeen elderly subjects who were admitted to a day care centre answered GOHAI and an attached socio-demographic questionnaire. Internal consistency of the Persian version was measured by Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and weighted kappa. Factor structure of GOHAI was evaluated by principal component factor analysis. Mean of GOHAI score was 45.71 (SD: 5.14; range: 27-51). The mean of GOHAI score was higher for the elders who rated their oral and general health as 'good'. The Cronbach's alpha for GOHAI score was 0.748, indicating a high degree of internal consistency and homogeneity between the GOHAI items. The test-retest correlation for the total GOHAI score using ICC was 0.763 (95% CI = 0.713-0.809). Factor analysis revealed a three-factor solution that bolstered the theoretical construction of the index. Significant differences in the GOHAI scores were found for income and current number of teeth. The Persian version of the GOHAI can be used reliably to identify oral health-related concerns of older Persian speakers, but further research is needed to confirm its cultural consonance in this population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Version control of pathway models using XML patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffrey, Peter; Orton, Richard

    2009-03-17

    Computational modelling has become an important tool in understanding biological systems such as signalling pathways. With an increase in size complexity of models comes a need for techniques to manage model versions and their relationship to one another. Model version control for pathway models shares some of the features of software version control but has a number of differences that warrant a specific solution. We present a model version control method, along with a prototype implementation, based on XML patches. We show its application to the EGF/RAS/RAF pathway. Our method allows quick and convenient storage of a wide range of model variations and enables a thorough explanation of these variations. Trying to produce these results without such methods results in slow and cumbersome development that is prone to frustration and human error.

  12. Investigating soil moisture-climate interactions with prescribed soil moisture experiments: an assessment with the Community Earth System Model (version 1.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate. A valuable technique to investigate this link is the prescription of soil moisture in land surface models, which leads to a decoupling of the atmosphere and land processes. Diverse approaches to prescribe soil moisture, as well as different prescribed soil moisture conditions have been used in previous studies. Here, we compare and assess four methodologies to prescribe soil moisture and investigate the impact of two different estimates of the climatological seasonal cycle used to prescribe soil moisture. Our analysis shows that, though in appearance similar, the different approaches require substantially different long-term moisture inputs and lead to different temperature signals. The smallest influence on temperature and the water balance is found when prescribing the median seasonal cycle of deep soil liquid water, whereas the strongest signal is found when prescribing soil liquid and soil ice using the mean seasonal cycle. These results indicate that induced net water-balance perturbations in experiments investigating soil moisture-climate coupling are important contributors to the climate response, in addition to the intended impact of the decoupling. These results help to guide the set-up of future experiments prescribing soil moisture, as for instance planned within the Land Surface, Snow and Soil Moisture Model Intercomparison Project (LS3MIP).

  13. Comparison of two software versions for assessment of body-composition analysis by DXA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, B; Wang, J; Weyer, C

    2001-01-01

    To compare two software versions provided by Lunar CO: for assessment of body composition analysis by DXA.......To compare two software versions provided by Lunar CO: for assessment of body composition analysis by DXA....

  14. Model Adequacy Analysis of Matching Record Versions in Nosql Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Tsviashchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates a model of matching record versions. The goal of this work is to analyse the model adequacy. This model allows estimating a user’s processing time distribution of the record versions and a distribution of the record versions count. The second option of the model was used, according to which, for a client the time to process record versions depends explicitly on the number of updates, performed by the other users between the sequential updates performed by a current client. In order to prove the model adequacy the real experiment was conducted in the cloud cluster. The cluster contains 10 virtual nodes, provided by DigitalOcean Company. The Ubuntu Server 14.04 was used as an operating system (OS. The NoSQL system Riak was chosen for experiments. In the Riak 2.0 version and later provide “dotted vector versions” (DVV option, which is an extension of the classic vector clock. Their use guarantees, that the versions count, simultaneously stored in DB, will not exceed the count of clients, operating in parallel with a record. This is very important while conducting experiments. For developing the application the java library, provided by Riak, was used. The processes run directly on the nodes. In experiment two records were used. They are: Z – the record, versions of which are handled by clients; RZ – service record, which contains record update counters. The application algorithm can be briefly described as follows: every client reads versions of the record Z, processes its updates using the RZ record counters, and saves treated record in database while old versions are deleted form DB. Then, a client rereads the RZ record and increments counters of updates for the other clients. After that, a client rereads the Z record, saves necessary statistics, and deliberates the results of processing. In the case of emerging conflict because of simultaneous updates of the RZ record, the client obtains all versions of that

  15. GWSCREEN: A semi-analytical model for assessment of the groundwater pathway from surface or buried contamination. Theory and user`s manual, Version 2.0: Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.

    1994-06-01

    Multimedia exposure assessment of hazardous chemicals and radionuclides requires that all pathways of exposure be investigated. The GWSCREEN model was designed to perform initial screening calculations for groundwater pathway impacts resulting from the leaching of surficial and buried contamination at CERCLA sites identified as low probability hazard at the INEL. In Version 2.0, an additional model was added to calculate impacts to groundwater from the operation of a percolation pond. The model was designed to make best use of the data that would potentially be available. These data include the area and depth of contamination, sorptive properties and solubility limit of the contaminant, depth to aquifer, and the physical properties of the aquifer (porosity, velocity, and dispersivity). For the pond model, data on effluent flow rates and operation time are required. Model output includes the limiting soil concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. Also, groundwater concentration as a function of time may be calculated. The model considers only drinking water consumption and does not include the transfer of contamination to food products due to irrigation with contaminated water. Radiological dose, carcinogenic risk, and the hazard quotient are calculated for the peak time using the user-defined input mass (or activity). Appendices contain sample problems and the source code listing.

  16. A novel assessment of the role of land-use and land-cover change in the global carbon cycle, using a new Dynamic Global Vegetation Model version of the CABLE land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverd, Vanessa; Smith, Benjamin; Nieradzik, Lars; Briggs, Peter; Canadell, Josep

    2017-04-01

    In recent decades, terrestrial ecosystems have sequestered around 1.2 PgC y-1, an amount equivalent to 20% of fossil-fuel emissions. This land carbon flux is the net result of the impact of changing climate and CO2 on ecosystem productivity (CO2-climate driven land sink ) and deforestation, harvest and secondary forest regrowth (the land-use change (LUC) flux). The future trajectory of the land carbon flux is highly dependent upon the contributions of these processes to the net flux. However their contributions are highly uncertain, in part because the CO2-climate driven land sink and LUC components are often estimated independently, when in fact they are coupled. We provide a novel assessment of global land carbon fluxes (1800-2015) that integrates land-use effects with the effects of changing climate and CO2 on ecosystem productivity. For this, we use a new land-use enabled Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM) version of the CABLE land surface model, suitable for use in attributing changes in terrestrial carbon balance, and in predicting changes in vegetation cover and associated effects on land-atmosphere exchange. In this model, land-use-change is driven by prescribed gross land-use transitions and harvest areas, which are converted to changes in land-use area and transfer of carbon between pools (soil, litter, biomass, harvested wood products and cleared wood pools). A novel aspect is the treatment of secondary woody vegetation via the coupling between the land-use module and the POP (Populations Order Physiology) module for woody demography and disturbance-mediated landscape heterogeneity. Land-use transitions to and from secondary forest tiles modify the patch age distribution within secondary-vegetated tiles, in turn affecting biomass accumulation and turnover rates and hence the magnitude of the secondary forest sink. The resulting secondary forest patch age distribution also influences the magnitude of the secondary forest harvest and clearance fluxes

  17. Solar Advisor Model User Guide for Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Janzou, S.; Cameron, C.

    2008-08-01

    The Solar Advisor Model (SAM) provides a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, from photovoltaic systems for residential and commercial markets to concentrating solar power and large photovoltaic systems for utility markets. This manual describes Version 2.0 of the software, which can model photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies for electric applications for several markets. The current version of the Solar Advisor Model does not model solar heating and lighting technologies.

  18. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling, Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, Patrick W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  19. The ONKALO area model. Version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemppainen, K.; Ahokas, T.; Ahokas, H.; Paulamaeki, S.; Paananen, M.; Gehoer, S.; Front, K.

    2007-11-01

    The geological model of the ONKALO area consists of three submodels: the lithological model, the brittle deformation model and the alteration model. The lithological model gives properties of definite rock units that can be defined on the basis the migmatite structures, textures and modal compositions. The brittle deformation model describes the results of brittle deformation, where geophysical and hydrogeological results are added. The alteration model describes occurrence of different alteration types and its possible effects. The rocks of Olkiluoto can be divided into two major classes: (1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, tonalitic-granodioriticgranitic gneisses, mica gneisses, quartz gneisses and mafic gneisses, and (2) igneous rocks including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite structure: veined gneisses, stromatic gneisses and diatexitic gneisses. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subject to polyphased ductile deformation, including five stages. In 3D modelling of the lithological units, an assumption has been made, on the basis of measurements in outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, that the pervasive, composite foliation produced as a result a polyphase ductile deformation has a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from the surface to the drillholes. The bedrock in the Olkiluoto site has been subject to extensive hydrothermal alteration, which has taken place at reasonably low temperature conditions, the estimated temperature interval being from slightly over 300 deg C to less than 100 deg C. Two types of alteration can be observed: (1) pervasive (disseminated

  20. Micro dosimetry model. An extended version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vroegindewey, C.

    1994-07-01

    In an earlier study a relative simple mathematical model has been constructed to simulate the energy transfer on a cellular scale and thus gain insight in the fundamental processes of BNCT. Based on this work, a more realistic micro dosimetry model is developed. The new facets of the model are: the treatment of proton recoil, the calculation of the distribution of energy depositions, and the determination of the number of particles crossing the target nucleus subdivided in place of origin. Besides these extensions, new stopping power tables for the emitted particles are generated and biased Monte Carlo techniques are used to reduce computer time. (orig.)

  1. Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, Richard; Hong, Makiko

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazards pose significant threats to the public safety and economic health of many communities throughout the world. Community leaders and decision-makers continually face the challenges of planning and allocating limited resources to invest in protecting their communities against catastrophic losses from natural-hazard events. Public efforts to assess community vulnerability and encourage loss-reduction measures through mitigation often focused on either aggregating site-specific estimates or adopting standards based upon broad assumptions about regional risks. The site-specific method usually provided the most accurate estimates, but was prohibitively expensive, whereas regional risk assessments were often too general to be of practical use. Policy makers lacked a systematic and quantitative method for conducting a regional-scale risk assessment of natural hazards. In response, Bernknopf and others developed the portfolio model, an intermediate-scale approach to assessing natural-hazard risks and mitigation policy alternatives. The basis for the portfolio-model approach was inspired by financial portfolio theory, which prescribes a method of optimizing return on investment while reducing risk by diversifying investments in different security types. In this context, a security type represents a unique combination of features and hazard-risk level, while financial return is defined as the reduction in losses resulting from an investment in mitigation of chosen securities. Features are selected for mitigation and are modeled like investment portfolios. Earth-science and economic data for the features are combined and processed in order to analyze each of the portfolios, which are then used to evaluate the benefits of mitigating the risk in selected locations. Ultimately, the decision maker seeks to choose a portfolio representing a mitigation policy that maximizes the expected return-on-investment, while minimizing the uncertainty associated with that return

  2. Guide for Regional Integrated Assessments: Handbook of Methods and Procedures, Version 5.1. Appendix 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Jones, James W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Antle, John; Ruane, Alex; Boote, Ken; Thorburn, Peter; Valdivia, Roberto; Porter, Cheryl; Janssen, Sander; hide

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to describe recommended methods for a trans-disciplinary, systems-based approach for regional-scale (local to national scale) integrated assessment of agricultural systems under future climate, bio-physical and socio-economic conditions. An earlier version of this Handbook was developed and used by several AgMIP Regional Research Teams (RRTs) in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and South Asia (SA)(AgMIP handbook version 4.2, www.agmip.org/regional-integrated-assessments-handbook/). In contrast to the earlier version, which was written specifically to guide a consistent set of integrated assessments across SSA and SA, this version is intended to be more generic such that the methods can be applied to any region globally. These assessments are the regional manifestation of research activities described by AgMIP in its online protocols document (available at www.agmip.org). AgMIP Protocols were created to guide climate, crop modeling, economics, and information technology components of its projects.

  3. Groundwater flow and transport modelling during the temperate period for the SR-Can assessment. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Hoch, Andrew; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steve; McCarthy, Rachel; Rodwell, William; Swift, Ben [Serco Assurance, Harwell (United Kingdom); Marsic, Niko [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    The focus of the study described in this report has been to perform numerical simulations of the geosphere from post-closure and throughout the temperate period up until the beginning of the next permafrost period around 9,000 AD. Together with providing quantitative results for the immediate temperate period following post-closure, these results are also intended to give a qualitative indication of the evolution of the groundwater system during future temperate periods within an ongoing cycle of glacial/inter-glacial events. Additional calculations were performed to assess the impact of the effects of gas and heat generation in the repository on groundwater flow.

  4. Groundwater flow and transport modelling during the temperate period for the SR-Can assessment. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, Lee; Hoch, Andrew; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steve; McCarthy, Rachel; Rodwell, William; Swift, Ben; Marsic, Niko

    2006-12-01

    The focus of the study described in this report has been to perform numerical simulations of the geosphere from post-closure and throughout the temperate period up until the beginning of the next permafrost period around 9,000 AD. Together with providing quantitative results for the immediate temperate period following post-closure, these results are also intended to give a qualitative indication of the evolution of the groundwater system during future temperate periods within an ongoing cycle of glacial/inter-glacial events. Additional calculations were performed to assess the impact of the effects of gas and heat generation in the repository on groundwater flow

  5. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  6. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, James Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carr, Dorthe B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 SNL IDC Reengineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris V1.1 2/2015 SNL IDC Reengineering Project Team Iteration I2 Review Comments M. Harris

  7. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Dorthe B.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model Survey. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  8. A conceptual model specification language (CMSL Version 2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roelf J.

    1992-01-01

    Version 2 of a language (CMSL) to specify conceptual models is defined. CMSL consists of two parts, the value specification language VSL and the object spercification language OSL. There is a formal semantics and an inference system for CMSL but research on this still continues. A method for

  9. Das Curriculum Health Technology Assessment (HTA, Version 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perleth, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Health Technology Assessments (HTAs liefern für zahlreiche Entscheidungen im Gesundheitswesen relevante Informationen. Die Erstellung von HTA-Berichten erfordert gut ausgebildete, interdisziplinär arbeitende Spezialisten, die angemessene Interpretation und Umsetzung in Entscheidungen erfordert Verständnis seitens der Entscheidungsträger.Der Verein zur Förderung der Technologiebewertung im Gesundheitswesen (Health Technology Assessment e.V. und das Deutsche Netzwerk Evidenzbasierte Medizin e.V. haben bereits 2006 ein HTA-Curriculum entwickelt, das als Grundlage für HTA-Fortbildungskurse sowohl für Nutzer von HTA-Informationen wie auch für HTA-Autoren dient. Das Curriculum ist u.a. Grundlage für Fortbildungskurse an mehreren Universitäten. Aufgrund methodischer Weiterentwicklungen wurde nun eine Überarbeitung des Curriculums erforderlich. Das Curriculum greift auf Struktur und Inhalte international etablierter Studiengänge zurück, berücksichtigt aber auch die Besonderheiten der Regulation von Technologien und der Entscheidungsfindung in den Gesundheitssystemen der deutschsprachigen Länder. Es ist in insgesamt 10 Module untergliedert, die neben Grundlagen und Prinzipien von HTA u.a. auf die Statusbestimmung von Technologien, Prioritätensetzung, Wissens- und Informationsmanagement, Methodik der Erstellung von HTA-Berichten und Interessenkonflikte eingehen. Gegenüber der ursprünglichen Version wurden viele Inhalte präzisiert und Erfahrungen aus Lehrveranstaltungen, die das Curriculum umsetzen, wurden berücksichtigt.

  10. Fiscal impacts model documentation. Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, S.L.; Scott, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    The Fiscal Impacts (FI) Model, Version 1.0 was developed under Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program to aid in development of the MRS Reference Site Environmental Document (PNL 5476). It computes estimates of 182 fiscal items for state and local government jurisdictions, using input data from the US Census Bureau's 1981 Survey of Governments and local population forecasts. The model can be adapted for any county or group of counties in the United States

  11. ONKALO rock mechanics model (RMM). Version 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, T.; Merjama, S.; Moenkkoenen, H. [WSP Finland, Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    The Rock Mechanics Model of the ONKALO rock volume includes the most important rock mechanics features and parameters at the Olkiluoto site. The main objective of the model is to be a tool to predict rock properties, rock quality and hence provide an estimate for the rock stability of the potential repository at Olkiluoto. The model includes a database of rock mechanics raw data and a block model in which the rock mechanics parameters are estimated through block volumes based on spatial rock mechanics raw data. In this version 2.3, special emphasis was placed on refining the estimation of the block model. The model was divided into rock mechanics domains which were used as constraints during the block model estimation. During the modelling process, a display profile and toolbar were developed for the GEOVIA Surpac software to improve visualisation and access to the rock mechanics data for the Olkiluoto area. (orig.)

  12. Latest NASA Instrument Cost Model (NICM): Version VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozinski, Joe; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Fox, George; Ball, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Instrument Cost Model, NICM, is a suite of tools which allow for probabilistic cost estimation of NASA's space-flight instruments at both the system and subsystem level. NICM also includes the ability to perform cost by analogy as well as joint confidence level (JCL) analysis. The latest version of NICM, Version VI, was released in Spring 2014. This paper will focus on the new features released with NICM VI, which include: 1) The NICM-E cost estimating relationship, which is applicable for instruments flying on Explorer-like class missions; 2) The new cluster analysis ability which, alongside the results of the parametric cost estimation for the user's instrument, also provides a visualization of the user's instrument's similarity to previously flown instruments; and 3) includes new cost estimating relationships for in-situ instruments.

  13. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.3 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement

  14. Some Remarks on Stochastic Versions of the Ramsey Growth Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sladký, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 29 (2012), s. 139-152 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/10/1610; GA ČR GAP402/10/0956; GA ČR GAP402/11/0150 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Economic dynamics * Ramsey growth model with disturbance * stochastic dynamic programming * multistage stochastic programs Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/sladky-some remarks on stochastic versions of the ramsey growth model.pdf

  15. H2A Production Model, Version 2 User Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Ramsden, T.; Zuboy, J.

    2008-09-01

    The H2A Production Model analyzes the technical and economic aspects of central and forecourt hydrogen production technologies. Using a standard discounted cash flow rate of return methodology, it determines the minimum hydrogen selling price, including a specified after-tax internal rate of return from the production technology. Users have the option of accepting default technology input values--such as capital costs, operating costs, and capacity factor--from established H2A production technology cases or entering custom values. Users can also modify the model's financial inputs. This new version of the H2A Production Model features enhanced usability and functionality. Input fields are consolidated and simplified. New capabilities include performing sensitivity analyses and scaling analyses to various plant sizes. This User Guide helps users already familiar with the basic tenets of H2A hydrogen production cost analysis get started using the new version of the model. It introduces the basic elements of the model then describes the function and use of each of its worksheets.

  16. Integrated Farm System Model Version 4.3 and Dairy Gas Emissions Model Version 3.3 Software development and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling routines of the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM version 4.2) and Dairy Gas Emission Model (DairyGEM version 3.2), two whole-farm simulation models developed and maintained by USDA-ARS, were revised with new components for: (1) simulation of ammonia (NH3) and greenhouse gas emissions gene...

  17. Validation of the Danish version of the Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions questionnaire (PACIC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Vedsted, Peter

    Objective: To evaluate the level of chronic care patients must be involved. The Danish version of the 20-item Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions PACIC questionnaire consisting of 5 scales and an overall summary score measuring patient reported assessment of structured chronic care ...... the same questionnaire is constructed and applied to different countries with diverse cultural backgrounds and health care systems. It is decisive, that translated questionnaires are validated in country they are used.......Objective: To evaluate the level of chronic care patients must be involved. The Danish version of the 20-item Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions PACIC questionnaire consisting of 5 scales and an overall summary score measuring patient reported assessment of structured chronic care...... interitem correlation), item-rest correlations. Model fit from confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results: We present the psychometric properties of the questionnaire and the first results evaluating chronic care in Danish people with diabetes. Conclusions: The complexity of validation is greater when...

  18. Selecting the Best Version of SHALOM to Assess Spiritual Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fisher

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the reporting of contemporary use of the Spiritual Health and Life-Orientation Measure (SHALOM, which provides flexibility to researchers, enabling them to choose the version of the instrument that best suits the cohort under investigation. SHALOM was built on a solid theoretical foundation, provided by the Four Domains Model of Spiritual Health/Well-Being. It comprises 20 items that assess spiritual well-being, as reflected in the quality of relationships that each person has with themselves, others, the environment, and/or with God. Summary results are reported from 30 recent studies. SHALOM provides a unique form of assessment that is statistically stronger than just assessing lived experiences, in that spiritual harmony/dissonance is studied by comparing each person’s “lived experiences” with her/his “ideals” for spiritual well-being. SHALOM has been sought for use with hundreds of studies in 29 languages, in education, healthcare and wider community. A generic form of SHALOM was developed to expand the Transcendental domain to include more than God. However, recent studies have shown that relating with God is most important for spiritual well-being. The best version of SHALOM to assess spiritual well-being depends on the needs of the clients/participants and the project goals of the researcher. This will involve a selection between the original form of Spiritual Well-Being Questionnaire-SHALOM for comparison with other measures and investigation of characteristics influencing spiritual well-being; or the dissonance method for spiritual care; and either the original or the generic version of SHALOM for use with non-religious/secular participants.

  19. Using the Hemophilia Joint Health Score for assessment of children: Reliability of the Spanish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R, Cuesta-Barriuso; A, Torres-Ortuño; S, Pérez-Alenda; J, Carrasco Juan; F, Querol; J, Nieto-Munuera; Ja, López-Pina

    2018-02-27

    Numerous measuring instruments for the evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy have been developed. One of the most used systems is the Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) given its sensitivity to clinical changes appearing in the joints because of recurrent hemarthrosis. Assessing the interrater reliability, using the Spanish version of the HJHS (version 2.1) in children with hemophilia. Reliability study to assess the interrater reliability of the Spanish version of HJHS. A sample of 36 children aged 7-13 years diagnosed with hemophilia A or B was used. Two physiotherapists performed physical assessments with the Spanish version of the HJHS. Descriptive statistics (range, mean, standard deviation) and the analysis of interrater reliability were calculated. The interrater reliability was heterogeneous since the Kappa coefficient range (ĸ), although significant (p reliability of the Spanish population version of the HJHS is high. This scale should be used generically in evaluating musculoskeletal pediatric patients with hemophilia.

  20. Break model comparison in different RELAP5 versions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzer, I.

    2003-01-01

    The presented work focuses on the break flow prediction in RELAP5/MOD3 code, which is crucial to predict core uncovering and heatup during the Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (SB LOCA). The code prediction has been compared to the IAEA-SPE-4 experiments conducted on the PMK-2 integral test facilities in Hungary. The simulations have been performed with MOD3.2.2 Beta, MOD3.2.2 Gamma, MOD3.3 Beta and MOD3.3 frozen code version. In the present work we have compared the Ransom-Trapp and Henry-Fauske break model predictions. Additionally, both model predictions have been compared to itself, when used as the main modeling tool or when used as another code option, as so-called 'secret developmental options' on input card no.1. (author)

  1. Scale for Assessment of Giftedness - teacher's version: evidence of validity content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana de Cassia Nakano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of high abilities is of great importance in psychology, despite scarce studies in literature. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify, through content validity, the appropriateness of the items of the High Assessment Scale Skills - Teacher Version. The judges were six post-graduate students in the psychological assessment area who rated the 41 items of the instrument in six factors (academic intellectual ability, specific academic skills, leadership, creativity, artistic talent. The results demonstrated the suitability of the items, most of them with concordance rates above 80% (n = 29 and between 60 and 80% (n = 8. Only four items showed agreement at or below 50%, suggesting the need for reformulation. The analysis of the Kappa coefficients showed indices between 0.69 and 0.81. In general, the results indicated the suitability of the scale to the contents of the pretended model.

  2. GLEAM version 3: Global Land Evaporation Datasets and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, B.; Miralles, D. G.; Lievens, H.; van der Schalie, R.; de Jeu, R.; Fernandez-Prieto, D.; Verhoest, N.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial evaporation links energy, water and carbon cycles over land and is therefore a key variable of the climate system. However, the global-scale magnitude and variability of the flux, and the sensitivity of the underlying physical process to changes in environmental factors, are still poorly understood due to limitations in in situ measurements. As a result, several methods have risen to estimate global patterns of land evaporation from satellite observations. However, these algorithms generally differ in their approach to model evaporation, resulting in large differences in their estimates. One of these methods is GLEAM, the Global Land Evaporation: the Amsterdam Methodology. GLEAM estimates terrestrial evaporation based on daily satellite observations of meteorological variables, vegetation characteristics and soil moisture. Since the publication of the first version of the algorithm (2011), the model has been widely applied to analyse trends in the water cycle and land-atmospheric feedbacks during extreme hydrometeorological events. A third version of the GLEAM global datasets is foreseen by the end of 2015. Given the relevance of having a continuous and reliable record of global-scale evaporation estimates for climate and hydrological research, the establishment of an online data portal to host these data to the public is also foreseen. In this new release of the GLEAM datasets, different components of the model have been updated, with the most significant change being the revision of the data assimilation algorithm. In this presentation, we will highlight the most important changes of the methodology and present three new GLEAM datasets and their validation against in situ observations and an alternative dataset of terrestrial evaporation (ERA-Land). Results of the validation exercise indicate that the magnitude and the spatiotemporal variability of the modelled evaporation agree reasonably well with the estimates of ERA-Land and the in situ

  3. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.; Cillan, T.

    1993-09-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.4 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement. Those interested in using the SWPM database should refer to the SWPM Database User's Guide. This document is available from the PNL Task M Project Manager (D. L. Stiles, 509-372-4358), the PNL Task L Project Manager (L. L. Armacost, 509-372-4304), the WHC Restoration Projects Section Manager (509-372-1443), or the WHC Waste Characterization Manager (509-372-1193)

  4. Assessing Reliability of Two Versions of Vocabulary Levels Tests in Iranian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aso Bayazidi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the equivalence and reliability of the two versions of the Vocabulary Levels Test in an Iranian context. This study was motivated by the fact that the Vocabulary Levels test is increasingly being used in Iran for both research and pedagogical purposes without having been checked for validity and reliability in this context. The equivalence and reliability of the two versions of the test were examined through the parallel-form approach to reliability in Classical True Score theory. Seventy-five intermediate learners of English as a foreign language at the Iran Language Institute took the two versions of the test with one week interval between the two administrations in a counterbalanced fashion. To examine the equivalence of the two versions, the means and variances of the scores obtained for the two tests were compared using paired-sample t-test and one-way ANOVA, respectively. The results of the analyses indicated that the difference between the means of the two versions was significant, and the two versions cannot be considered as parallel forms. To assess the reliability of the two versions, the correlation between the scores obtained from them was estimated using Pearson Product Moment correlation. The results of the analyses showed that the two versions are highly correlated and are reliable tests. It is concluded that the two versions should not be treated as equivalent in longitudinal and gain score studies.

  5. A Constrained and Versioned Data Model for TEAM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelman, S.; Baru, C.; Chandra, S.; Fegraus, E.; Lin, K.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network (www.teamnetwork.org) is "To generate real time data for monitoring long-term trends in tropical biodiversity through a global network of TEAM sites (i.e. field stations in tropical forests), providing an early warning system on the status of biodiversity to effectively guide conservation action". To achieve this, the TEAM Network operates by collecting data via standardized protocols at TEAM Sites. The standardized TEAM protocols include the Climate, Vegetation and Terrestrial Vertebrate Protocols. Some sites also implement additional protocols. There are currently 7 TEAM Sites with plans to grow the network to 15 by June 30, 2009 and 50 TEAM Sites by the end of 2010. At each TEAM Site, data is gathered as defined by the protocols and according to a predefined sampling schedule. The TEAM data is organized and stored in a database based on the TEAM spatio-temporal data model. This data model is at the core of the TEAM Information System - it consumes and executes spatio-temporal queries, and analytical functions that are performed on TEAM data, and defines the object data types, relationships and operations that maintain database integrity. The TEAM data model contains object types including types for observation objects (e.g. bird, butterfly and trees), sampling unit, person, role, protocol, site and the relationship of these object types. Each observation data record is a set of attribute values of an observation object and is always associated with a sampling unit, an observation timestamp or time interval, a versioned protocol and data collectors. The operations on the TEAM data model can be classified as read operations, insert operations and update operations. Following are some typical operations: The operation get(site, protocol, [sampling unit block, sampling unit,] start time, end time) returns all data records using the specified protocol and collected at the specified site, block

  6. Probabilistic Model for Integrated Assessment of the Behavior at the T.D.P. Version 2; Modelo Probabilista de Evaluación Integrada del Comportamiento de la P.D.T. Versión 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, A.; Eguilior, S.; Recreo, F

    2015-07-01

    This report documents the completion of the first phase of the implementation of the methodology ABACO2G (Bayes Application to Geological Storage of CO2) and the final version of the ABACO2G probabilistic model for the injection phase before its future validation in the experimental field of the Technology Development Plant in Hontom (Burgos). The model, which is based on the determination of the probabilistic risk component of a geological storage of CO2 using the formalism of Bayesian networks and Monte Carlo probability yields quantitative probability functions of the total system CO2 storage and of each one of their subsystems (storage subsystem and the primary seal; secondary containment subsystem and dispersion subsystem or tertiary one); the implementation of the stochastic time evolution of the CO2 plume during the injection period, the stochastic time evolution of the drying front, the probabilistic evolution of the pressure front, decoupled from the CO2 plume progress front, and the implementation of submodels and leakage probability functions through major leakage risk elements (fractures / faults and wells / deep boreholes) which together define the space of events to estimate the risks associated with the CO2 geological storage system. The activities included in this report have been to replace the previous qualitative estimation submodels of former ABACO2G version developed during Phase I of the project ALM-10-017, by analytical, semi-analytical or numerical submodels for the main elements of risk (wells and fractures), to obtain an integrated probabilistic model of a CO2 storage complex in carbonate formations that meets the needs of the integrated behavior evaluation of the Technology Development Plant in Hontomín.

  7. French version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function (FACT-Cog) version 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, F; Lange, M; Rigal, O; Correia, H; Giffard, B; Beaumont, J L; Clisant, S; Wagner, L

    2012-12-01

    Impairment of cognitive function, a common complaint in patients receiving chemotherapy, is usually measured through neuropsychological tests. Patient self-evaluation of cognitive difficulties is an important complement to those tests. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function (FACT-Cog) is a self-report questionnaire with potential to be used in standard clinical practice as a tool for evaluating patient's cognitive function before, during, and after chemotherapy. The purpose of our study was to conduct linguistic validation of the French version of the FACT-Cog. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this study. After undergoing a rigorous translation methodology, the French FACT-Cog version was pretested in France with 35 cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Interviews were conducted with all patients to ascertain their understanding of each item. The validation of the final version was conducted among 63 cancer patients, and sociodemographic information was collected as well as brief measure of cognitive function and depression score. Patient comments obtained through the cognitive debriefing interviews indicated that patients understand the French FACT-Cog items as they are intended and that the measure is culturally appropriate. Internal consistency reliability of the subscales, evaluated using Cronbach's coefficient alpha, was high for all four subscales: Perceived Cognitive Impairments = 0.93, Impact On QOL = 0.85, Comments From Others = 0.70, and Perceived Cognitive Abilities = 0.89. All item-total correlations for each subscale were greater than 0.20, and most were greater than 0.50. Results from this study effectively demonstrate that the French FACT-Cog is a reliable instrument for the self-reporting of cognitive abilities in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  8. Prediction models for successful external cephalic version: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velzel, Joost; de Hundt, Marcella; Mulder, Frederique M.; Molkenboer, Jan F. M.; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Mol, Ben W.; Kok, Marjolein

    2015-01-01

    To provide an overview of existing prediction models for successful ECV, and to assess their quality, development and performance. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library to identify all articles reporting on prediction models for successful ECV published from inception to January 2015.

  9. Radiosonde Atmospheric Temperature Products for Assessing Climate (RATPAC), Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radiosonde Atmospheric Temperature Products for Assessing Climate (RATPAC) consist of time series of radiosonde-based temperature anomalies for the years...

  10. Prediction models for successful external cephalic version: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velzel, Joost; de Hundt, Marcella; Mulder, Frederique M; Molkenboer, Jan F M; Van der Post, Joris A M; Mol, Ben W; Kok, Marjolein

    2015-12-01

    To provide an overview of existing prediction models for successful ECV, and to assess their quality, development and performance. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library to identify all articles reporting on prediction models for successful ECV published from inception to January 2015. We extracted information on study design, sample size, model-building strategies and validation. We evaluated the phases of model development and summarized their performance in terms of discrimination, calibration and clinical usefulness. We collected different predictor variables together with their defined significance, in order to identify important predictor variables for successful ECV. We identified eight articles reporting on seven prediction models. All models were subjected to internal validation. Only one model was also validated in an external cohort. Two prediction models had a low overall risk of bias, of which only one showed promising predictive performance at internal validation. This model also completed the phase of external validation. For none of the models their impact on clinical practice was evaluated. The most important predictor variables for successful ECV described in the selected articles were parity, placental location, breech engagement and the fetal head being palpable. One model was assessed using discrimination and calibration using internal (AUC 0.71) and external validation (AUC 0.64), while two other models were assessed with discrimination and calibration, respectively. We found one prediction model for breech presentation that was validated in an external cohort and had acceptable predictive performance. This model should be used to council women considering ECV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Incremental testing of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Foley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the scientific and structural updates to the latest release of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ modeling system version 4.7 (v4.7 and points the reader to additional resources for further details. The model updates were evaluated relative to observations and results from previous model versions in a series of simulations conducted to incrementally assess the effect of each change. The focus of this paper is on five major scientific upgrades: (a updates to the heterogeneous N2O5 parameterization, (b improvement in the treatment of secondary organic aerosol (SOA, (c inclusion of dynamic mass transfer for coarse-mode aerosol, (d revisions to the cloud model, and (e new options for the calculation of photolysis rates. Incremental test simulations over the eastern United States during January and August 2006 are evaluated to assess the model response to each scientific improvement, providing explanations of differences in results between v4.7 and previously released CMAQ model versions. Particulate sulfate predictions are improved across all monitoring networks during both seasons due to cloud module updates. Numerous updates to the SOA module improve the simulation of seasonal variability and decrease the bias in organic carbon predictions at urban sites in the winter. Bias in the total mass of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 is dominated by overpredictions of unspeciated PM2.5 (PMother in the winter and by underpredictions of carbon in the summer. The CMAQv4.7 model results show slightly worse performance for ozone predictions. However, changes to the meteorological inputs are found to have a much greater impact on ozone predictions compared to changes to the CMAQ modules described here. Model updates had little effect on existing biases in wet deposition predictions.

  12. OCONUS Compliance Assessment Protocols - Qatar (Army Version) (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krooks, David A

    2004-01-01

    ...: 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 578 KB. ABSTRACT: This environmental compliance assessment manual is based on the Final Governing Standards for Environmental Security of United States Forces in the State of Qatar, 21 May 1999, and the Overseas...

  13. Short version of the “instrument for assessment of stress in nursing students” in the Brazilian reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Siqueira Costa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Goal: validate a short version of the Instrument for assessment of stress in nursing students in the Brazilian reality. Method: Methodological study conducted with 1047 nursing students from five Brazilian institutions, who answered the 30 items initially distributed in eight domains. Data were analyzed in the R Statistical Package and in the latent variable analysis, using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, Cronbach’s alpha and item-total correlation. Results: The short version of the instrument had 19 items distributed into four domains: Environment, Professional Training, Theoretical Activities and Performance of Practical Activities. The confirmatory analysis showed absolute and parsimony fit to the proposed model with satisfactory residual levels. Alpha values per factor ranged from 0.736 (Environment to 0.842 (Performance of Practical Activities. Conclusion: The short version of the instrument has construct validity and reliability for application to Brazilian nursing undergraduates at any stage of the course.

  14. Terrain assessment guidelines : CAGC best practice. Version 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This terrain classification assessment guideline discussed the steps required for personnel to understand terrain hazards present during seismic operations. Maps and other sources must be used to classify terrain steepness and surface conditions using geographical information systems (GIS), LIDAR, or satellite photographs. The impact of managing steep terrain within projects must also be considered when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrains must also be classified according to colours. Secondary terrain assessments must be conducted when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrain management plans should included methods of keeping untrained workers out of areas with classes greater than 3. Methods of entering and exiting steep terrain must be identified. Workers must be trained to work in areas with steep terrains. Methods of rescue and evacuation must also be established. Procedures were outlined for all terrain classes. Footwear, head protection and general safety requirements were outlined. 14 figs.

  15. Incorporation of detailed eye model into polygon-mesh versions of ICRP-110 reference phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang Tat; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Han Sung; Wang, Zhao Jun; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik; Chung, Beom Sun

    2015-11-21

    The dose coefficients for the eye lens reported in ICRP 2010 Publication 116 were calculated using both a stylized model and the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, according to the type of radiation, energy, and irradiation geometry. To maintain consistency of lens dose assessment, in the present study we incorporated the ICRP-116 detailed eye model into the converted polygon-mesh (PM) version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms. After the incorporation, the dose coefficients for the eye lens were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP-116 data. The results showed generally a good agreement between the newly calculated lens dose coefficients and the values of ICRP 2010 Publication 116. Significant differences were found for some irradiation cases due mainly to the use of different types of phantoms. Considering that the PM version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms preserve the original topology of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, it is believed that the PM version phantoms, along with the detailed eye model, provide more reliable and consistent dose coefficients for the eye lens.

  16. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_SM Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf Helmut; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Chen, Fan; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John; hide

    2016-01-01

    close to unity, which would suggest that the magnitude of the modeled errors approximately reflects that of the actual errors. The assessment report also notes several limitations of the "Version 2" L4_SM data product and science algorithm calibration that will be addressed in future releases. Regionally, the time series standard deviation of the normalized O-F residuals deviates considerably from unity, which indicates that the L4_SM assimilation algorithm either over- or under-estimates the actual errors that are present in the system. Planned improvements include revised land model parameters, revised error parameters for the land model and the assimilated SMAP observations, and revised surface meteorological forcing data for the operational period and underlying climatological data. Moreover, a refined analysis of the impact of SMAP observations will be facilitated by the construction of additional variants of the model-only reference data. Nevertheless, the “Version 2” validated release of the L4_SM product is sufficiently mature and of adequate quality for distribution to and use by the larger science and application communities.

  17. BehavePlus fire modeling system, version 5.0: Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    2009-01-01

    This publication has been revised to reflect updates to version 4.0 of the BehavePlus software. It was originally published as the BehavePlus fire modeling system, version 4.0: Variables in July, 2008.The BehavePlus fire modeling system is a computer program based on mathematical models that describe wildland fire behavior and effects and the...

  18. Site investigation SFR. Hydrogeological modelling of SFR. Model version 0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations for a planned extension of the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR). A hydrogeological model is developed in three model versions, which will be used for safety assessment and design analyses. This report presents a data analysis of the currently available hydrogeological data from the ongoing Site Investigation SFR (KFR27, KFR101, KFR102A, KFR102B, KFR103, KFR104, and KFR105). The purpose of this work is to develop a preliminary hydrogeological Discrete Fracture Network model (hydro-DFN) parameterisation that can be applied in regional-scale modelling. During this work, the Geologic model had not yet been updated for the new data set. Therefore, all analyses were made to the rock mass outside Possible Deformation Zones, according to Single Hole Interpretation. Owing to this circumstance, it was decided not to perform a complete hydro-DFN calibration at this stage. Instead focus was re-directed to preparatory test cases and conceptual questions with the aim to provide a sound strategy for developing the hydrogeological model SFR v. 1.0. The presented preliminary hydro-DFN consists of five fracture sets and three depth domains. A statistical/geometrical approach (connectivity analysis /Follin et al. 2005/) was performed to estimate the size (i.e. fracture radius) distribution of fractures that are interpreted as Open in geologic mapping of core data. Transmissivity relations were established based on an assumption of a correlation between the size and evaluated specific capacity of geologic features coupled to inflows measured by the Posiva Flow Log device (PFL-f data). The preliminary hydro-DFN was applied in flow simulations in order to test its performance and to explore the role of PFL-f data. Several insights were gained and a few model technical issues were raised. These are summarised in Table 5-1

  19. Site investigation SFR. Hydrogeological modelling of SFR. Model version 0.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehman, Johan; Follin, Sven

    2010-01-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations for a planned extension of the existing final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR). A hydrogeological model is developed in three model versions, which will be used for safety assessment and design analyses. This report presents a data analysis of the currently available hydrogeological data from the ongoing Site Investigation SFR (KFR27, KFR101, KFR102A, KFR102B, KFR103, KFR104, and KFR105). The purpose of this work is to develop a preliminary hydrogeological Discrete Fracture Network model (hydro-DFN) parameterisation that can be applied in regional-scale modelling. During this work, the Geologic model had not yet been updated for the new data set. Therefore, all analyses were made to the rock mass outside Possible Deformation Zones, according to Single Hole Interpretation. Owing to this circumstance, it was decided not to perform a complete hydro-DFN calibration at this stage. Instead focus was re-directed to preparatory test cases and conceptual questions with the aim to provide a sound strategy for developing the hydrogeological model SFR v. 1.0. The presented preliminary hydro-DFN consists of five fracture sets and three depth domains. A statistical/geometrical approach (connectivity analysis /Follin et al. 2005/) was performed to estimate the size (i.e. fracture radius) distribution of fractures that are interpreted as Open in geologic mapping of core data. Transmissivity relations were established based on an assumption of a correlation between the size and evaluated specific capacity of geologic features coupled to inflows measured by the Posiva Flow Log device (PFL-f data). The preliminary hydro-DFN was applied in flow simulations in order to test its performance and to explore the role of PFL-f data. Several insights were gained and a few model technical issues were raised. These are summarised in Table 5-1

  20. NETPATH-WIN: an interactive user version of the mass-balance model, NETPATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kadi, A. I.; Plummer, Niel; Aggarwal, P.

    2011-01-01

    NETPATH-WIN is an interactive user version of NETPATH, an inverse geochemical modeling code used to find mass-balance reaction models that are consistent with the observed chemical and isotopic composition of waters from aquatic systems. NETPATH-WIN was constructed to migrate NETPATH applications into the Microsoft WINDOWS® environment. The new version facilitates model utilization by eliminating difficulties in data preparation and results analysis of the DOS version of NETPATH, while preserving all of the capabilities of the original version. Through example applications, the note describes some of the features of NETPATH-WIN as applied to adjustment of radiocarbon data for geochemical reactions in groundwater systems.

  1. Computerized transportation model for the NRC Physical Protection Project. Versions I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Details on two versions of a computerized model for the transportation system of the NRC Physical Protection Project are presented. The Version I model permits scheduling of all types of transport units associated with a truck fleet, including truck trailers, truck tractors, escort vehicles and crews. A fixed-fleet itinerary construction process is used in which iterations on fleet size are required until the service requirements are satisfied. The Version II model adds an aircraft mode capability and provides for a more efficient non-fixed-fleet itinerary generation process. Test results using both versions are included

  2. Assessing the safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ), German language version in Swiss university hospitals - a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving patient safety has become a major focus of clinical care and research over the past two decades. An institution’s patient safety climate represents an essential component of ensuring a safe environment and thereby can be vital to the prevention of adverse events. Covering six patient safety related factors, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) is a validated and widely used instrument to measure the patient safety climate in clinical areas. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the German language version of the SAQ. Methods A survey was carried out in two University Hospitals in Switzerland in autumn 2009 where the SAQ was distributed to a sample of 406 nurses and physicians in medical and surgical wards. Following the American Educational Research Association guidelines, we tested the questionnaire validity by levels of evidence: content validity, internal structure and relations to other variables. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine factor structure. Cronbach’s alphas and inter-item correlations were calculated to examine internal consistency reliability. Results A total of 319 questionnaires were completed representing an overall response rate of 78.6%. For three items, the item content validity index was <0.75. Confirmatory factor analysis showed acceptable model fit (RMSEA = 0.045; CFI = 0.944) for the six-factor model. Additional exploratory factor analysis could not identify a better factor model. SAQ factor scores showed positive correlations with the Safety Organizing Scale (r = .56 - .72). The SAQ German version showed moderate to strong internal consistency reliability indices (Cronbach alpha = .65 - .83). Conclusions The German language version of the SAQ demonstrated acceptable to good psychometric properties and therefore shows promise to be a sound instrument to measure patient safety climate in Swiss hospital wards. However, the low item content validity and large number

  3. Validity and Reliability of Persian Version of Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool among Aged People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hadi hojati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: It is crucial to identify aged patients in risk of falls in clinical settings. Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool (JHFRAT is one of most applied international instrument to assess elderly patients for the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to evaluate reliability and internal consistency of the JHFRAT. Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional study for validity assessment of the tool, WHO’s standard protocol was applied for translation-back translation of the tool. Face and content validity of the tool was confirmed by ten person of expert faculty members for its applicability in clinical setting. In this pilot study, the inclusion criteria were being 60 or more years old, hospitalized in the last 8 hours prior to assessment and in proper cognitive condition assessed by MMSE. Subjects of the study were (n=70 elderly patients who were newly hospitalized in Shahroud Emam Hossein Hospital. Data were analyzed using SPSS software- version 16. Internal consistency of the tool was calculated by Cronbach’s alpha. Results: According to the results of the study Persian version of JHFRAT was a valid tool for application on clinical setting. The Persian version of the tool had Cronbach’s alpha equal to 0/733. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the current study, it can be concluded that Persian version of the JHFRAT is a valid and reliable tool to be applied for assessment of elderly senior citizens on admission in any clinical settings.

  4. Developmental assessment of the Fort St. Vrain version of the composite HTGR analysis program (CHAP-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP) consists of a model-independent systems analysis mainframe named LASAN and model-dependent linked code modules, each representing a component, subsystem, or phenomenon of an HTGR plant. The Fort St. Vrain version (CHAP-2) includes 21 coded modules that model the neutron kinetics and thermal response of the core; the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor primary coolant system, secondary steam supply system, and balance-of-plant; the actions of the control system and plant protection system; the response of the reactor building; and the relative hazard resulting from fuel particle failure. FSV steady-state and transient plant data are being used to partially verify the component modeling and dynamic simulation techniques used to predict plant response to postulated accident sequences. Results of these preliminary validation efforts are presented showing good agreement between code output and plant data for the portions of the code that have been tested. Plans for further development and assessment as well as application of the validated code are discussed. (author)

  5. Disability assessment scale for dementia – long version (DADL-BR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Boaro Fernandez Canon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are no functional assessment tools for elderly with dementia available in the literature that will assess all occupations. Objective: To develop a Long Version of Disability Assessment for Dementia Scale (DADL-Br, covering all occupations provided by the American Association of Occupational Therapy (AOTA and the activities that compose them and evaluate its content validity. Method: With the permission of the original version main author (DAD, Isabelle Gélinas PhD, the new items of the Long Version (DADL-Br were developed based on the classification proposed by AOTA for occupations, considering the gaps in the original instrument. We reviewed the Cultural and Conceptual Equivalence by the Expert Committee and Multidisciplinary Committee. The suggestions of the Committees were accepted and the process followed for the pre-test and author analysis. Results: The first version of the instrument received 10 new fields and 64 new items, which after seven reviews of Cultural Equivalence (average concordance 89.2%, six reviews of Conceptual Equivalence (average concordance 81.2%, tree pre-tests and analysis of the original version main author, has resulted in the development of five versions, addition of twelve items and exclusion of seven items, and the final version consists of 20 fields and 109 items, being 10 new fields and 69 new items. Conclusion: This process conferred the content validity of DADL-Br, which includes all occupations proposed by AOTA and can be a useful tool to evaluate the profile of occupational performance of elderly with dementia.

  6. Prospects of a Christian ethics of responsibility (Part 2: an assessment of three German versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE de Villiers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article three versions of a Christian ethics of responsibility, developed by three German theologians, Wolfgang Huber , Johannes Fischer and Ulrich K�rtner , in response to the philosopher Hans Jonas� s introduction of the ethics of responsibility as a completely new and much needed ethical approach in the technological age, are analysed and assessed. The purpose is to assess the prospects of a Christian ethics of responsibility.� An analysis shows the disparate nature of the three versions, but also reveals a number of ways in which responsibility can and should fundamentally qualify contemporary Christian ethics. The conclusion is therefore that the prospects of a Christian ethics� are much more promising than a superficial comparison of the three disparate versions of such an ethics would suggest.

  7. Face and Convergent Validity of Persian Version of Rapid Office Strain Assessment (ROSA Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrouz Armal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this work was the translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the Persian version of the Rapid Office Stress Assessment (ROSA checklist. Material & Methods: This methodological study was conducted according of IQOLA method. 100 office worker were selected in order to carry out a psychometric evaluation of the ROSA checklist by performing validity (face and convergent analyses. The convergent validity was evaluated using RULA checklist. Results: Upon major changes made to the ROSA checklist during the translation/cultural adaptation process, face validity of the Persian version was obtained. Spearman correlation coefficient between total score of ROSA check list and RULA checklist was significant (r=0.76, p<0.0001. Conclusion: The results indicated that the translated version of the ROSA checklist is acceptable in terms of face validity, convergent validity in target society, and hence provides a useful instrument for assessing Iranian office workers

  8. Development of environmental dose assessment system (EDAS) code of PC version

    CERN Document Server

    Taki, M; Kobayashi, H; Yamaguchi, T

    2003-01-01

    A computer code (EDAS) was developed to assess the public dose for the safety assessment to get the license of nuclear reactor operation. This code system is used for the safety analysis of public around the nuclear reactor in normal operation and severe accident. This code was revised and composed for personal computer user according to the Nuclear Safety Guidelines reflected the ICRP1990 recommendation. These guidelines are revised by Nuclear Safety Commission on March, 2001, which are 'Weather analysis guideline for the safety assessment of nuclear power reactor', 'Public dose around the facility assessment guideline corresponding to the objective value for nuclear power light water reactor' and 'Public dose assessment guideline for safety review of nuclear power light water reactor'. This code has been already opened for public user by JAERI, and English version code and user manual are also prepared. This English version code is helpful for international cooperation concerning the nuclear safety assessme...

  9. Psychometric properties and validation of the Italian version of the Family Assessment Measure Third Edition – Short Version – in a nonclinical sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellerone M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Monica Pellerone,1 Tiziana Ramaci,1 Santa Parrello,2 Paola Guariglia,1 Flavio Giaimo1 1Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, “Kore” University of Enna, Enna, 2Department of Humanities Studies, “Federico II” University of Naples, Napoli, Italy Background: Family functioning plays an important role in developing and maintaining dysfunctional behaviors, especially during adolescence. The lack of indicators of family functioning, as determinants of personal and interpersonal problems, represents an obstacle to the activities aimed at developing preventive and intervention strategies. The Process Model of Family Functioning provides a conceptual framework organizing and integrating various concepts into a comprehensive family assessment; this model underlines that through the process of task accomplishment, each family meets objectives central to its life as a group. The Family Assessment Measure Third Edition (FAM III, based on the Process Model of Family Functioning, is among the most frequently used self-report instruments to measure family functioning. Materials and methods: The present study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Family Assessment Measure Third Edition – Short Version (Brief FAM-III. It consists of three modules: General Scale, which evaluates the family as a system; Dyadic Relationships Scale, which examines how each family member perceives his/her relationship with another member; and Self-Rating Scale, which indicates how each family member is perceived within the nucleus. The developed Brief FAM-III together with the Family Assessment Device were administered to 484 subjects, members of 162 Italian families, formed of 162 fathers aged between 35 and 73 years; 162 mothers aged between 34 and 69 years; and 160 children aged between 12 and 35 years. Correlation, paired-sample t-test, and reliability analyses were carried out. Results: General item analysis shows good indices of

  10. Psychometric assessment of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version for nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Albaqawi, Hamdan Mohammad; Alharbi, Sami Melbes; Alicante, Jerico G; Vitorino, Luciano M; Abunab, Hamzeh Y

    2017-12-07

    To assess the psychometric properties of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version for Saudi nurses. Evidence showed that a high level of spiritual climate in the workplace is associated with increased productivity and performance, enhanced emotional intelligence, organisational commitment and job satisfaction among nurses. A convenient sample of 165 Saudi nurses was surveyed in this descriptive, cross-sectional study. Cronbach's α and intraclass correlation coefficient of the 2 week test-retest scores were computed to establish reliability. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to support the validity of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version. The Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version manifested excellent content validity. Exploratory factor analysis supported a single factor with an explained variance of 73.2%. The Cronbach's α values of the scale ranged from .79 to .88, while the intraclass correlation coefficient value was .90. The perceived spiritual climate was associated with the respondents' hospital, gender, age and years of experience. Findings of this study support the sound psychometric properties of the Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version. The Spiritual Climate Scale Arabic version can be used by nurse managers to assess the nurses' perception of the spiritual climate in any clinical area. This process can lead to spiritually centred interventions, thereby ensuring a clinical climate that accepts and respects different spiritual beliefs and practices. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. ANLECIS-1: Version of ANLECIS Program for Calculations with the Asymetric Rotational Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Mendez, R.; Garcia Moruarte, F.

    1986-01-01

    A new modified version of the ANLECIS Code is reported. This version allows to fit simultaneously the cross section of the direct process by the asymetric rotational model, and the cross section of the compound nucleus process by the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with the modern statistical corrections. The calculations based in this version show a dependence of the compound nucleus cross section with respect to the asymetric parameter γ. (author). 19 refs

  12. System Analysis and Risk Assessment System (SARA), Version 4.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, K.D.; Sattison, M.B.; Skinner, N.L.; Stewart, H.D.; Wood, S.T.

    1992-02-01

    This NUREG is the reference manual for the System Analysis and Risk Assessment (SARA) System Version 4.0, a microcomputer-based system used to analyze the safety issues of a family [i.e., a power plant, a manufacturing facility, any facility on which a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) might be performed]. The SARA data base contains PRA data for the dominant accident sequences of a family and descriptive information about the family including event trees, fault trees, and system model diagrams. The number of facility data bases that can be accessed is limited only by the amount of disk storage available. To simulate changes to family systems, SARA users change the failure rates of initiating and basic events and/or modify the structure of the cut sets that make up the event trees, fault trees, and systems. The user then evaluates the effects of these changes through the recalculation of the resultant accident sequence probabilities and importance measures. The results are displayed in tables and graphs

  13. Description of the new version 4.0 of the tritium model UFOTRI including user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1993-08-01

    In view of the future operation of fusion reactors the release of tritium may play a dominant role during normal operation as well as after accidents. Because of its physical and chemical properties which differ significantly from those of other radionuclides, the model UFOTRI for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental tritium releases has been developed. It describes the behaviour of tritium in the biosphere and calculates the radiological impact on individuals and the population due to the direct exposure and by the ingestion pathways. Processes such as the conversion of tritium gas into tritiated water (HTO) in the soil, re-emission after deposition and the conversion of HTO into organically bound tritium, are considered. The use of UFOTRI in its probabilistic mode shows the spectrum of the radiological impact together with the associated probability of occurrence. A first model version was established in 1991. As the ongoing work on investigating the main processes of the tritium behaviour in the environment shows up new results, the model has been improved in several points. The report describes the changes incorporated into the model since 1991. Additionally provides the up-dated user guide for handling the revised UFOTRI version which will be distributed to interested organizations. (orig.) [de

  14. Psychometric properties and validation of the Italian version of the Family Assessment Measure Third Edition - Short Version - in a nonclinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerone, Monica; Ramaci, Tiziana; Parrello, Santa; Guariglia, Paola; Giaimo, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Family functioning plays an important role in developing and maintaining dysfunctional behaviors, especially during adolescence. The lack of indicators of family functioning, as determinants of personal and interpersonal problems, represents an obstacle to the activities aimed at developing preventive and intervention strategies. The Process Model of Family Functioning provides a conceptual framework organizing and integrating various concepts into a comprehensive family assessment; this model underlines that through the process of task accomplishment, each family meets objectives central to its life as a group. The Family Assessment Measure Third Edition (FAM III), based on the Process Model of Family Functioning, is among the most frequently used self-report instruments to measure family functioning. The present study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Family Assessment Measure Third Edition - Short Version (Brief FAM-III). It consists of three modules: General Scale, which evaluates the family as a system; Dyadic Relationships Scale, which examines how each family member perceives his/her relationship with another member; and Self-Rating Scale, which indicates how each family member is perceived within the nucleus. The developed Brief FAM-III together with the Family Assessment Device were administered to 484 subjects, members of 162 Italian families, formed of 162 fathers aged between 35 and 73 years; 162 mothers aged between 34 and 69 years; and 160 children aged between 12 and 35 years. Correlation, paired-sample t -test, and reliability analyses were carried out. General item analysis shows good indices of reliability with Cronbach's α coefficients equal to 0.96. The Brief FAM-III has satisfactory internal consistency, with Cronbach's α equal to 0.90 for General Scale, 0.94 for Dyadic Relationships Scale, and 0.88 for the Self-Rating Scale. The Brief FAM-III can be a psychometrically reliable and valid measure for

  15. CENTURY: Modeling Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change, Version 4 (VEMAP 1995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The CENTURY model, Version 4, is a general model of plant-soil nutrient cycling that is being used to simulate carbon and nutrient dynamics for different...

  16. CENTURY: Modeling Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change, Version 4 (VEMAP 1995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CENTURY model, Version 4, is a general model of plant-soil nutrient cycling that is being used to simulate carbon and nutrient dynamics for different types of...

  17. Validation of the brief version of the Recovery Self-Assessment (RSA-B) using Rasch measurement theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, Skye P; Kidd, Sean A; Davidson, Larry; McKenzie, Kwame; O'Connell, Maria J

    2015-12-01

    In psychiatry, the recovery paradigm is increasingly identified as the overarching framework for service provision. Currently, the Recovery Self-Assessment (RSA), a 36-item rating scale, is commonly used to assess the uptake of a recovery orientation in clinical services. However, the consumer version of the RSA has been found challenging to complete because of length and the reading level required. In response to this feedback, a brief 12-item version of the RSA was developed (RSA-B). This article describes the development of the modified instrument and the application of traditional psychometric analysis and Rasch Measurement Theory to test the psychometrics properties of the RSA-B. Data from a multisite study of adults with serious mental illnesses (n = 1256) who were followed by assertive community treatment teams were examined for reliability, clinical meaning, targeting, response categories, model fit, reliability, dependency, and raw interval-level measurement. Analyses were performed using the Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Model (RUMM 2030). Adequate fit to the Rasch model was observed (χ2 = 112.46, df = 90, p = .06) and internal consistency was good (r = .86). However, Rasch analysis revealed limitations of the 12-item version, with items covering only 39% of the targeted theoretical continuum, 2 misfitting items, and strong evidence for the 5 option response categories not working as intended. This study revealed areas for improvement in the shortened version of the 12-item RSA-B. A revisit of the conceptual model and original 36-item rating scale is encouraged to select items that will help practitioners and researchers measure the full range of recovery orientation. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Further validation of the Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment (MISA-DK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Background/aims The McGill Ingestive Skill Assessment (MISA) for measuring dysphagic patients' functional performance during meals has been previously translated into Danish — the Danish McGill Ingestive Skill Assessment (MISA-DK) and this translated version validated. However, issues about......-DK was then tested using 102 videorecordings of geriatric patients' ingestive skill performance, and the data from the scale were examined using a second Rasch analysis. Results Initially, two of the six proposed subscales of the original MISA-DK failed to fit the Rasch model, and were removed. It was also necessary...

  19. Using the Chinese version of Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale to describe postoperative delirium after hip surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyong eShi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS assesses severity of delirium. However, whether the MDAS can be used in a Chinese population is unknown. Moreover, the optimal postoperative MDAS cutoff point for describing postoperative delirium in Chinese remains largely to be determined. We therefore performed a pilot study to validate MDAS in the Chinese language and to determine the optimal postoperative MDAS cutoff point for delirium. Methods: Eighty-two patients (80 ± 6 years, 18% male who had hip surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled. The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM and Mini-mental state examination (MMSE were administered in the patients before surgery. The CAM and MDAS were performed in the patients on the first, second, and fourth postoperative day. The reliability and validity of the MDAS were determined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to determine the optimal Chinese version MDAS cutoff point for the identification of delirium. Results: The Chinese version of the MDAS had satisfactory internal consistency (α = 0.910. ROC analysis obtained an average optimal MDAS cutoff point of 7.5 in describing the CAM-defined postoperative delirium with an area under the ROC of 0.990 (95% CI 0.977-1.000, P < 0.001. Conclusions: The Chinese version of MDAS had good reliability and validity. The patients whose postoperative Chinese version of MDAS cutoff point was 7.5 would likely have postoperative delirium. These results have established a system for a future larger scale study.

  20. A hybrid version of swan for fast and efficient practical wave modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Genseberger (Menno); J. Donners

    2016-01-01

    htmlabstractIn the Netherlands, for coastal and inland water applications, wave modelling with SWAN has become a main ingredient. However, computational times are relatively high. Therefore we investigated the parallel efficiency of the current MPI and OpenMP versions of SWAN. The MPI version is

  1. GOOSE Version 1.4: A powerful object-oriented simulation environment for developing reactor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nypaver, D.J.; March-Leuba, C.; Abdalla, M.A.; Guimaraes, L.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype software package for a fully interactive Generalized Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (GOOSE) is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dynamic models are easily constructed and tested; fully interactive capabilities allow the user to alter model parameters and complexity without recompilation. This environment provides assess to powerful tools such as numerical integration packages, graphical displays, and online help. In GOOSE, portability has been achieved by creating the environment in Objective-C 1 , which is supported by a variety of platforms including UNIX and DOS. GOOSE Version 1.4 introduces new enhancements like the capability of creating ''initial,'' ''dynamic,'' and ''digital'' methods. The object-oriented approach to simulation used in GOOSE combines the concept of modularity with the additional features of allowing precompilation, optimization, testing, and validation of individual modules. Once a library of classes has been defined and compiled, models can be built and modified without recompilation. GOOSE Version 1.4 is primarily command-line driven

  2. Linguistic Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of Tamil Version of General Oral Health Assessment Index-Tml.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appukuttan, D P; Vinayagavel, M; Balasundaram, A; Damodaran, L K; Shivaraman, P; Gunasshegaran, K

    2015-01-01

    Oral health has an impact on quality of life hence for research purpose validation of a Tamil version of General Oral Health Assessment Index would enable it to be used as a valuable tool among Tamil speaking population. In this study, we aimed to assess the psychometric properties of translated Tamil version of General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI-Tml). Linguistic adaptation involved forward and backward blind translation process. Reliability was analyzed using test-retest, Cronbach alpha, and split half reliability. Inter-item and item-total correlation were evaluated using Spearman rank correlation. Convenience sampling was done, and 265 consecutive patients aged 20-70 years attending the outpatient department were recruited. Subjects were requested to fill a self-reporting questionnaire along with Tamil GOHAI version. Clinical examination was done on the same visit. Concurrent validity was measured by assessing the relationship between GOHAI scores and self-perceived oral health and general health status, satisfaction with oral health, need for dental treatment and esthetic satisfaction. Discriminant validity was evaluated by comparing the GOHAI scores with the objectively assessed clinical parameters. Exploratory factor analysis was done to examine the factor structure. Mean GOHAI-Tml was 52.7 (6.8, range 22-60, median 54). The mean number of negative impacts was 2 (2.4, range 0-11, median 1). The Spearman rank correlation for test-retest ranged from 0.8 to 0.9 (P Tamil speaking population.

  3. Validity and reliability of the Bahasa Melayu version of the Migraine Disability Assessment questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Hassan, Norul Badriah; Tan, Huay Lin; Bhaskar, Shalini; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the validity and reliability of the Bahasa Melayu version (MIDAS-M) of the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire. Patients having migraine for more than six months attending the Neurology Clinic, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia, were recruited. Standard forward and back translation procedures were used to translate and adapt the MIDAS questionnaire to produce the Bahasa Melayu version. The translated Malay version was tested for face and content validity. Validity and reliability testing were further conducted with 100 migraine patients (1st administration) followed by a retesting session 21 days later (2nd administration). A total of 100 patients between 15 and 60 years of age were recruited. The majority of the patients were single (66%) and students (46%). Cronbach's alpha values were 0.84 (1st administration) and 0.80 (2nd administration). The test-retest reliability for the total MIDAS score was 0.73, indicating that the MIDAS-M questionnaire is stable; for the five disability questions, the test-retest values ranged from 0.77 to 0.87. The MIDAS-M questionnaire is comparable with the original English version in terms of validity and reliability and may be used for the assessment of migraine in clinical settings.

  4. Validity and Reliability of the Bahasa Melayu Version of the Migraine Disability Assessment Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munvar Miya Shaik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study was designed to determine the validity and reliability of the Bahasa Melayu version (MIDAS-M of the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS questionnaire. Methods. Patients having migraine for more than six months attending the Neurology Clinic, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia, were recruited. Standard forward and back translation procedures were used to translate and adapt the MIDAS questionnaire to produce the Bahasa Melayu version. The translated Malay version was tested for face and content validity. Validity and reliability testing were further conducted with 100 migraine patients (1st administration followed by a retesting session 21 days later (2nd administration. Results. A total of 100 patients between 15 and 60 years of age were recruited. The majority of the patients were single (66% and students (46%. Cronbach’s alpha values were 0.84 (1st administration and 0.80 (2nd administration. The test-retest reliability for the total MIDAS score was 0.73, indicating that the MIDAS-M questionnaire is stable; for the five disability questions, the test-retest values ranged from 0.77 to 0.87. Conclusion. The MIDAS-M questionnaire is comparable with the original English version in terms of validity and reliability and may be used for the assessment of migraine in clinical settings.

  5. Reliability of the Danish version of the McGill ingestive skills assessment for observation-based measures during meals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Lambert, Heather C; Faber, Jens

    2012-01-01

    To establish measurement equivalence in terms of reliability of the Danish version of the Canadian McGill ingestive skills assessment (MISA) for use by occupational therapists.......To establish measurement equivalence in terms of reliability of the Danish version of the Canadian McGill ingestive skills assessment (MISA) for use by occupational therapists....

  6. A Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model, Version 1.1,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    of a sequence of actions to be taken to perform a given task. [SECMM] 1. A set of activities ( ISO 12207 ). 2. A set of practices that address the...standards One of the design goals of the SE-CMM effort was to capture the salient concepts from emerging standards and initiatives (e.g.; ISO 9001...history for the SE-CMM: Version Designator Content Change Notes Release 1 • architecture rationale • Process Areas • ISO (SPICE) BPG 0.05 summary

  7. Resilience Scale-25 Spanish version: validation and assessment in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Las Hayas, Carlota; Calvete, Esther; Gómez del Barrio, Andrés; Beato, Luís; Muñoz, Pedro; Padierna, Jesús Ángel

    2014-08-01

    To validate into Spanish the Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale - 25 (RS-25), assess and compare the scores on the scale among women from the general population, eating disorder (ED) patients and recovered ED patients. This is a cross-sectional study. ED participants were invited to participate by their respective therapists. The sample from the general population was gathered via an open online survey. Participants (N general population=279; N ED patients=124; and N recovered ED patients=45) completed the RS-25, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale-BREF and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Mean age of participants ranged from 28.87 to 30.42years old. Statistical analysis included a multi-group confirmatory factor analysis and ANOVA. The two-factor model of the RS-25 produced excellent fit indexes. Measurement invariance across samples was generally supported. The ANOVA found statistically significant differences in the RS-25 mean scores between the ED patients (Mean=103.13, SD=31.32) and the recovered ED participants (Mean=138.42, SD=22.26) and between the ED patients and the general population participants (Mean=136.63, SD=19.56). The Spanish version of the RS-25 is a psychometrically sound measurement tool in samples of ED patients. Resilience is lower in people diagnosed with ED than in recovered individuals and the general population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Initial validation of the Personality Assessment Inventory-Spanish version with clients from Mexican American communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, R; Flores, J; Ustad, K; Sewell, K W

    1995-04-01

    Psychological assessment of Hispanic populations are thwarted by the absence of clinical research on comparability of Spanish translations and the stability of their findings. In this study we examined the potential usefulness of the Spanish Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) for Hispanic clients residing in Mexican American communities. We administered the Spanish version on two occasions to 48 monolingual clients and the Spanish and English versions to 21 bilingual clients. Results indicated that the clinical scales had a moderate to good correspondence for Spanish-English (M r = .72) and good test-retest reliability for Spanish-Spanish (M r = .79). Much more variation was observed for the validity scales and the treatment/interpersonal scales. Also more variability was observed in the convergence of elevations across administrations. Because of these mixed results, we discuss the potential usefulness of the PAI clinical scales to screen for major psychopathology.

  9. Evaluation of a new CNRM-CM6 model version for seasonal climate predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Danila; Ardilouze, Constantin; Batté, Lauriane; Dorel, Laurant; Guérémy, Jean-François; Déqué, Michel

    2017-04-01

    This work presents the quality assessment of a new version of the Météo-France coupled climate prediction system, which has been developed in the EU COPERNICUS Climate Change Services framework to carry out seasonal forecast. The system is based on the CNRM-CM6 model, with Arpege-Surfex 6.2.2 as atmosphere/land component and Nemo 3.2 as ocean component, which has directly embedded the sea-ice component Gelato 6.0. In order to have a robust diagnostic, the experiment is composed by 60 ensemble members generated with stochastic dynamic perturbations. The experiment has been performed over a 37-year re-forecast period from 1979 to 2015, with two start dates per year, respectively in May 1st and November 1st. The evaluation of the predictive skill of the model is shown under two perspectives: on the one hand, the ability of the model to faithfully respond to positive or negative ENSO, NAO and QBO events, independently of the predictability of these events. Such assessment is carried out through a composite analysis, and shows that the model succeeds in reproducing the main patterns for 2-meter temperature, precipitation and geopotential height at 500 hPa during the winter season. On the other hand, the model predictive skill of the same events (positive and negative ENSO, NAO and QBO) is evaluated.

  10. Reliability and validity of the Farsi version of the standardized assessment of personality-abbreviated scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sepehri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A short screening tool for high-risk individuals with personality disorder (PD is useful both for clinicians and researchers. The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Farsi version of the Standardized Assessment of Personality-Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS. Methods: The original English version of the SAPAS questionnaire was translated into Farsi, and then, translated back into English by two professionals. A survey was then conducted using the questionnaire on 150 clients of primary health care centers in Tabriz, Iran. A total of 235 medical students were also studied for the reliability assessment of the questionnaire. The SAPAS was compared to the short form of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI. The data analysis was performed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve technique, operating characteristic for diagnostic efficacy, Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest for reliability evaluation. Results: We found an area under the curve (AUC of 0.566 [95% confidence intervals (CI: 0.455-0.677]; sensitivity of 0.89 and specificity of 0.26 at the cut-off score of 2 and higher. The total Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.38 and Cohen's kappa ranged between 0.5 and 0.8. Conclusion: The current study showed that the Farsi version of the SAPAS was relatively less efficient, in term of validity and reliability, in the screening of PD in the population.

  11. Description of Multimedia Environment Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) version 3.2 modification for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, J.W.; Strenge, D.L.; Hoopes, B.L.

    1997-11-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a software tool developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to allow DOE to conduct human health risk analyses nation-wide. This report describes modifications to the MEPAS to meet the requirements of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff in their analyses of Site Decommissioning Management Plan sites. In general, these modifications provide the MEPAS, Version 3.2, with the capability of calculating and reporting annual dose/risk information. Modifications were made to the exposure pathway and health impact modules and the water and atmospheric transport modules. Several example cases used to test the MEPAS, Version 3.2, are also presented. The MEPAS, Version 3.2, also contains a new source-term release component that includes models for estimating contaminant loss from three different types of source zones (contaminated aquifer, contaminated pond/surface impoundment, and contaminated vadose zone) due to decay/degradation, leaching, wind suspension, water erosion, overland flow, and/or volatilization. When multiple loss routes are assumed to occur simultaneously, the models account for their interaction and calculate an appropriate pollutant mass budget to each loss route over time

  12. Estimating Parameters for the PVsyst Version 6 Photovoltaic Module Performance Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Clifford [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We present an algorithm to determine parameters for the photovoltaic module perf ormance model encoded in the software package PVsyst(TM) version 6. Our method operates on current - voltage (I - V) measured over a range of irradiance and temperature conditions. We describe the method and illustrate its steps using data for a 36 cell crystalli ne silicon module. We qualitatively compare our method with one other technique for estimating parameters for the PVsyst(TM) version 6 model .

  13. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  14. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  15. VALIDATION OF THE ASTER GLOBAL DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL VERSION 3 OVER THE CONTERMINOUS UNITED STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gesch

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 (GDEM v3 was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1 in 2009 and GDEM Version 2 (v2 in 2011. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v3 was calculated by comparison with more than 23,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the U.S. National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE measured for GDEM v3 is 8.52 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 8.68 meters for GDEM v2. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v3 mean error of −1.20 meters reflects an overall negative bias in GDEM v3. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover type to provide insight into how GDEM v3 performs in various land surface conditions. While the RMSE varies little across cover types (6.92 to 9.25 meters, the mean error (bias does appear to be affected by land cover type, ranging from −2.99 to +4.16 meters across 14 land cover classes. These results indicate that in areas where built or natural aboveground features are present, GDEM v3 is measuring elevations above the ground level, a condition noted in assessments of previous GDEM versions (v1 and v2 and an expected condition given the type of stereo-optical image data collected by ASTER. GDEM v3 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v3 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM. The overall validation effort also included an evaluation of the GDEM v3 water mask. In general, the number of distinct water polygons in GDEM v3 is much lower than the number in a reference land cover dataset, but the total areas compare much more closely.

  16. Validation of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model version 3 over the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Meyer, David; Halounova, L; Šafář, V.; Jiang, J.; Olešovská, H.; Dvořáček, P.; Holland, D.; Seredovich, V.A.; Muller, J.P.; Pattabhi Rama Rao, E.; Veenendaal, B.; Mu, L.; Zlatanova, S.; Oberst, J.; Yang, C.P.; Ban, Y.; Stylianidis, S.; Voženílek, V.; Vondráková, A.; Gartner, G.; Remondino, F.; Doytsher, Y.; Percivall, George; Schreier, G.; Dowman, I.; Streilein, A.; Ernst, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 (GDEM v3) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009 and GDEM Version 2 (v2) in 2011. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v3 was calculated by comparison with more than 23,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the U.S. National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v3 is 8.52 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 8.68 meters for GDEM v2. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v3 mean error of −1.20 meters reflects an overall negative bias in GDEM v3. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover type to provide insight into how GDEM v3 performs in various land surface conditions. While the RMSE varies little across cover types (6.92 to 9.25 meters), the mean error (bias) does appear to be affected by land cover type, ranging from −2.99 to +4.16 meters across 14 land cover classes. These results indicate that in areas where built or natural aboveground features are present, GDEM v3 is measuring elevations above the ground level, a condition noted in assessments of previous GDEM versions (v1 and v2) and an expected condition given the type of stereo-optical image data collected by ASTER. GDEM v3 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v3 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM. The overall validation effort also included an evaluation of the GDEM v3 water mask. In general, the number of distinct water polygons in GDEM v3 is much lower than the number in a reference land cover dataset, but the total areas compare much more closely.

  17. Development of environmental dose assessment system (EDAS) code of PC version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taki, Mitsumasa; Kikuchi, Masamitsu; Kobayashi, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Takenori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    A computer code (EDAS) was developed to assess the public dose for the safety assessment to get the license of nuclear reactor operation. This code system is used for the safety analysis of public around the nuclear reactor in normal operation and severe accident. This code was revised and composed for personal computer user according to the Nuclear Safety Guidelines reflected the ICRP1990 recommendation. These guidelines are revised by Nuclear Safety Commission on March, 2001, which are 'Weather analysis guideline for the safety assessment of nuclear power reactor', 'Public dose around the facility assessment guideline corresponding to the objective value for nuclear power light water reactor' and 'Public dose assessment guideline for safety review of nuclear power light water reactor'. This code has been already opened for public user by JAERI, and English version code and user manual are also prepared. This English version code is helpful for international cooperation concerning the nuclear safety assessment with JAERI. (author)

  18. Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Optimization Version 4.0 Functional Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, John; Young, M.; Boley, L.; Garcia, Y.; Saile, L.; Walton, M.; Kerstman, E.; Reyes, D.; Goodenow, D. A.; Myers, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The IMMs ability to assess mission outcome risk levels relative to available resources provides a unique capability to provide guidance on optimal operational medical kit and vehicle resources. Post-processing optimization allows IMM to optimize essential resources to improve a specific model outcome such as maximization of the Crew Health Index (CHI), or minimization of the probability of evacuation (EVAC) or the loss of crew life (LOCL). Mass and or volume constrain the optimized resource set. The IMMs probabilistic simulation uses input data on one hundred medical conditions to simulate medical events that may occur in spaceflight, the resources required to treat those events, and the resulting impact to the mission based on specific crew and mission characteristics. Because IMM version 4.0 provides for partial treatment for medical events, IMM Optimization 4.0 scores resources at the individual resource unit increment level as opposed to the full condition-specific treatment set level, as done in version 3.0. This allows the inclusion of as many resources as possible in the event that an entire set of resources called out for treatment cannot satisfy the constraints. IMM Optimization version 4.0 adds capabilities that increase efficiency by creating multiple resource sets based on differing constraints and priorities, CHI, EVAC, or LOCL. It also provides sets of resources that improve mission-related IMM v4.0 outputs with improved performance compared to the prior optimization. The new optimization represents much improved fidelity that will improve the utility of the IMM 4.0 for decision support.

  19. System Analysis and Risk Assessment system (SARA) Version 4.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattison, M.B.; Russell, K.D.; Skinner, N.L.

    1992-01-01

    This NUREG is the tutorial for the System Analysis and Risk Assessment System (SARA) Version 4.0, a microcomputer-based system used to analyze the safety issues of a family [i.e., a power plant, a manufacturing facility, any facility on which a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) might be performed]. A series of lessons are provided that walk the user through some basic steps common to most analyses performed with SARA. The example problems presented in the lessons build on one another, and in combination, lead the user through all aspects of SARA sensitivity analysis

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Persian Version of the Relationship Assessment Scale among Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    غلامرضا دهشیری

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research administrated to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Relationship Assessment scale. Therefore, 315 married individuals (199 women and 116 men from Tehran city were volunteered to respond to four scales: the Relationship Assessment, the Kansas Marital Satisfaction, the Oxford Happiness and the Life Satisfaction. Results from exploratory & confirmatory factor analysis showed that factor structure of Relationship Assessment scale was unidimensional. The internal consistency of the scale in the total sample was 0.88. Significant correlations between scores of the Relationship Assessment scale with the scores of the Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale, the Life Satisfaction Scale and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire demonstrated good convergent validity of the scale. Also, the results showed that there was no significant gender difference between the mean scores of relationship satisfaction. In conclusion, the Relationship Assessment scale is a valid and reliable tool to measure marital satisfaction in Iran.

  1. The Hispanic Stress Inventory Version 2: Improving the assessment of acculturation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C; Fisher, Dennis G; Padilla, Amado M; Napper, Lucy E

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on a 2-phase study to revise the Hispanic Stress Inventory (HSI; Cervantes, Padilla, & Salgado de Snyder, 1991). The necessity for a revised stress-assessment instrument was determined by demographic and political shifts affecting Latin American immigrants and later-generation Hispanics in the United States in the 2 decades since the development of the HSI. The data for the revision of the HSI (termed the HSI2) was collected at 4 sites: Los Angeles, El Paso, Miami, and Boston, and included 941 immigrants and 575 U.S.-born Hispanics and a diverse population of Hispanic subgroups. The immigrant version of the HSI2 includes 10 stress subscales, whereas the U.S.-born version includes 6 stress subscales. Both versions of the HSI2 are shown to possess satisfactory Cronbach's alpha reliabilities and demonstrate expert-based content validity, as well as concurrent validity when correlated with subscales of the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (Kroenke, Spitzer, & Williams, 2001). The new HSI2 instruments are recommended for use by clinicians and researchers interested in assessing psychosocial stress among diverse Hispanic populations of various ethnic subgroups, age groups, and geographic location. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Cross-cultural psychometric assessment of the VAGUS insight into psychosis scale - Spanish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León, Patricia Ponce; Gerretsen, Philip; Shah, Parita; Saracco-Alvarez, Ricardo; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Fresán, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Impaired insight into illness, a core feature of schizophrenia with negative clinical implications, is a multidimensional phenomenon existing on a continuum. However, the degree to which illness perception in distinct cultures influences the appraisal of insight into illness in schizophrenia remains unclear. As such, we aimed to determine if the psychometric properties of the VAGUS insight into psychosis scale (www.vagusonline.com), which was originally assessed in English speaking Canadians, were similar in a sample of Latino Mexican Spanish speaking patients with schizophrenia. To accomplish this, the VAGUS - Self-Report (SR) version was translated from English to Spanish and psychometrically evaluated in 95 participants. The Spanish version of the VAGUS-SR was internally consistent (ᾳ = 0.713), and demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with the subscales of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Factor analysis identified two components of insight, congruent with two of the components of the English version of the VAGUS-SR. In conclusion, the VAGUS-SR is a brief, novel, and valid measure of insight into illness in schizophrenia, which demonstrated similar psychometric properties in two culturally and linguistically distinct samples with schizophrenia. Future studies should assess whether the VAGUS demonstrates similar psychometric properties in non-Western cultures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated Biosphere Simulator Model (IBIS), Version 2.5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Integrated Biosphere Simulator (or IBIS) is designed to be a comprehensive model of the terrestrial biosphere. Tthe model represents a wide range of...

  4. Integrated Biosphere Simulator Model (IBIS), Version 2.5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Biosphere Simulator (or IBIS) is designed to be a comprehensive model of the terrestrial biosphere. Tthe model represents a wide range of processes,...

  5. The MiniBIOS model (version 1A4) at the RIVM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijt de Haag PAM; Laheij GMH

    1993-01-01

    This report is the user's guide of the MiniBIOS model, version 1A4. The model is operational at the Laboratory of Radiation Research of the RIVM. MiniBIOS is a simulation model for calculating the transport of radionuclides in the biosphere and the consequential radiation dose to humans. The

  6. Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Models guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Models Guide summarizes the IBS use of several computer models for predicting the results of emergency situations. These include models for predicting dispersion/doses of airborne contaminants, traffic evacuation, explosion effects, heat radiation from a fire, and siren sound transmission. The guide references additional technical documentation on the models when such documentation is available from other sources. The audience for this manual is chiefly emergency management planners and analysts, but also data managers and system managers.

  7. Sensitivity and applicability of the Brazilian version of the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vinícius Salgado

    Full Text Available Abstract Cognitive assessment in schizophrenia has traditionally used batteries that are long and complex or differ widely in their content. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS has been developed to cover the main cognitive deficits of schizophrenia as well as to be easily and briefly administered, portable, sensitive and reliable. Objectives: To investigate the applicability and sensitivity of the Brazilian Version of the BACS (Brazilian-BACS. Methods: Performance of 20 stable patients with schizophrenia on the Brazilian-BACS was compared to 20 matched healthy controls. Results: Applying the Brazilian-BACS required 43.4±8.4 minutes for patients and 40.5±5.7 minutes for controls (p=0.17. All tests demonstrated significant differences between controls and patients (P<0.01. Pearson's correlation analysis and Cronbach's a evidenced a high internal consistency for patient performance. The cognitive deficit in the patients was approximately 1.5 standard deviations below controls. These results were consistent with those reported in the validation of the original version and in meta-analyses of similar studies. Conclusions: The Brazilian-BACS displayed good applicability and sensitivity in assessing the major cognitive constructs that are impaired in schizophrenia. Thus, the Brazilian-BACS seems to be a promising tool for assessing cognition in patients with schizophrenia in Brazil.

  8. Microsoft Repository Version 2 and the Open Information Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Philip A.; Bergstraesser, Thomas; Carlson, Jason; Pal, Shankar; Sanders, Paul; Shutt, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes the programming interface and implementation of the repository engine and the Open Information Model for Microsoft Repository, an object-oriented meta-data management facility that ships in Microsoft Visual Studio and Microsoft SQL Server. Discusses Microsoft's component object model, object manipulation, queries, and information…

  9. Efficient Modelling and Generation of Markov Automata (extended version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Mark; Katoen, Joost P.; van de Pol, Jan Cornelis; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for the efficient modelling and generation of Markov automata. It consists of (1) the data-rich process-algebraic language MAPA, allowing concise modelling of systems with nondeterminism, probability and Markovian timing; (2) a restricted form of the language, the

  10. STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL USER'S MANUAL VERSION 5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is a dynamic rainfall-runoff simulation model used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. SWMM was first developed in 1971 and has undergone several major upgrade...

  11. Integrated Baseline Bystem (IBS) Version 1.03: Models guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Integrated Baseline System)(IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planning and analysis. This document is the models guide for the IBS and explains how to use the emergency related computer models. This document provides information for the experienced system user, and is the primary reference for the computer modeling software supplied with the system. It is designed for emergency managers and planners, and others familiar with the concepts of computer modeling. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other IBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary.

  12. Flipped version of the supersymmetric strongly coupled preon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajfer, S. (Institut za Fiziku, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, (Yugoslavia)); Milekovic, M.; Tadic, D. (Zavod za Teorijsku Fiziku, Prirodoslovno-Matematicki Fakultet, University of Zagreb, Croatia, (Yugoslavia))

    1989-12-01

    In the supersymmetric SU(5) (SUSY SU(5)) composite model (which was described in an earlier paper) the fermion mass terms can be easily constructed. The SUSY SU(5){direct product}U(1), i.e., flipped, composite model possesses a completely analogous composite-particle spectrum. However, in that model one cannot construct a renormalizable superpotential which would generate fermion mass terms. This contrasts with the standard noncomposite grand unified theories (GUT's) in which both the Georgi-Glashow electrical charge embedding and its flipped counterpart lead to the renormalizable theories.

  13. Radarsat Antarctic Mapping Project Digital Elevation Model, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The high-resolution Radarsat Antarctic Mapping Project (RAMP) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) combines topographic data from a variety of sources to provide consistent...

  14. U.S. Coastal Relief Model - Southern California Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC's U.S. Coastal Relief Model (CRM) provides a comprehensive view of the U.S. coastal zone integrating offshore bathymetry with land topography into a seamless...

  15. ONKALO rock mechanics model (RMM) - Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moenkkoenen, H.; Hakala, M.; Paananen, M.; Laine, E.

    2012-02-01

    The Rock Mechanics Model of the ONKALO rock volume is a description of the significant features and parameters related to rock mechanics. The main objective is to develop a tool to predict the rock properties, quality and hence the potential for stress failure which can then be used for continuing design of the ONKALO and the repository. This is the second implementation of the Rock Mechanics Model and it includes sub-models of the intact rock strength, in situ stress, thermal properties, rock mass quality and properties of the brittle deformation zones. Because of the varying quantities of available data for the different parameters, the types of presentations also vary: some data sets can be presented in the style of a 3D block model but, in other cases, a single distribution represents the whole rock volume hosting the ONKALO. (orig.)

  16. Geological model of the ONKALO area version 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paananen, M.; Paulamaeki, S.; Gehoer, S.; Kaerki, A.

    2006-03-01

    The geological model of the ONKALO area is composed of four submodels: ductile deformation model, lithological model, brittle deformation model and alteration model. The ductile deformation model describes and models the products of polyphase ductile deformation, which facilitates the definition of dimensions and geometrical properties of individual lithological units determined in the lithological model. The lithological model describes the properties of rock units that can be defined on the basis the migmatite structures, textures and modal compositions. The brittle deformation model describes the products of multiple phases of brittle deformation, and the alteration model describes the types, occurrence and the effects of the hydrothermal alteration. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subject to five stages of ductile deformation. This resulted in a pervasive, composite foliation which shows a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Based on observations in outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, 3D modelling of the lithological units is carried out assuming that the contacts are quasiconcordant. Using this assumption, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool to correlate the lithologies between the drillholes, and from surface and tunnel outcrops to drillholes. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from surface to drillholes. The rocks at Olkiluoto can be divided into two major groups: (1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, homogeneous tonaliticgranodioritic- granitic gneisses, mica gneisses and quartzitic gneisses, and mafic gneisses, (2) igneous rocks, including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite

  17. The Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) Model Version 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, Stanton W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baek, Young Sun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model dispatches power plants in a region to meet the electricity demands for any single given year up to 2030. It uses publicly available sources of data describing electric power units such as the National Energy Modeling System and hourly demands from utility submittals to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that are projected to a future year. The model simulates a single region of the country for a given year, matching generation to demands and predefined net exports from the region, assuming no transmission constraints within the region. ORCED can calculate a number of key financial and operating parameters for generating units and regional market outputs including average and marginal prices, air emissions, and generation adequacy. By running the model with and without changes such as generation plants, fuel prices, emission costs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, distributed generation, or demand response, the marginal impact of these changes can be found.

  18. Due Regard Encounter Model Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    Note that no existing model covers encoun- ters between two IFR aircraft in oceanic airspace. The reason for this is that one cannot observe encounters...encounters between instrument flight rules ( IFR ) and non- IFR traffic beyond 12NM. 2 TABLE 1 Encounter model categories. Aircraft of Interest Intruder...Aircraft Location Flight Rule IFR VFR Noncooperative Noncooperative Conventional Unconventional CONUS IFR C C U X VFR C U U X Offshore IFR C C U X VFR C U

  19. [Multi-centre clinical assessment of the Russian language version of the Diagnostic Interview for Psychoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, D A; Petrova, N N; Pavlichenko, A V; Martynikhin, I A; Dorofeikova, M V; Eremkin, V I; Izmailova, O V; Osadshiy, Yu Yu; Romanov, D V; Ubeikon, D A; Fedotov, I A; Sheifer, M S; Shustov, A D; Yashikhina, A A; Clark, M; Badcock, J; Watterreus, A; Morgan, V; Jablensky, A

    2018-01-01

    The Diagnostic Interview for Psychoses (DIP) was developed to enhance the quality of diagnostic assessment of psychotic disorders. The aim of the study was the adaptation of the Russian language version and evaluation of its validity and reliability. Ninety-eight patients with psychotic disorders (89 video recordings) were assessed by 12 interviewers using the Russian version of DIP at 7 clinical sites (in 6 cities of the Russian Federation). DIP ratings on 32 cases of a randomized case sample were made by 9 interviewers and the inter-rater reliability was compared with the researchers' DIP ratings. Overall pairwise agreement and Cohen's kappa were calculated. Diagnostic validity was evaluated on the basis of comparing the researchers' ratings using the Russian version of DIP with the 'gold standard' ratings of the same 62 clinical cases from the Western Australia Family Study Schizophrenia (WAFSS). The mean duration of the interview was 47±21 minutes. The Kappa statistic demonstrated a significant or almost perfect level of agreement on the majority of DIP items (84.54%) and a significant agreement for the ICD-10 diagnoses generated by the DIP computer diagnostic algorithm (κ=0.68; 95% CI 0.53,0.93). The level of agreement on the researchers' diagnoses was considerably lower (κ=0.31; 95% CI 0.06,0.56). The agreement on affective and positive psychotic symptoms was significantly higher than agreement on negative symptoms (F(2,44)=20.72, pRussian language version of DIP was confirmed by 73% (45/62) of the Russian DIP diagnoses matching the original WAFSS diagnoses. Among the mismatched diagnoses were 80 cases with a diagnosis of F20 Schizophrenia in the medical documentation compared to the researchers' F20 diagnoses in only 68 patients and in 62 of the DIP computerized diagnostic outputs. The reported level of subjective difficulties experienced when using the DIP was low to moderate. The results of the study confirm the validity and reliability of the Russian

  20. Geological model of the Olkiluoto site Version O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulamaeki, S.; Paananen, M.; Gehoer, S.

    2006-05-01

    The geological model of the Olkiluoto site consists of four submodels: the lithological model, the ductile deformation model, the brittle deformation model and the alteration model. The lithological model gives properties of definite rock units that can be defined on the basis the migmatite structures, textures and modal compositions. The ductile deformation model describes and models the products of polyphase ductile deformation, which enables to define the dimensions and geometrical properties of individual lithological units determined in the lithological model. The brittle deformation model describes the products of multiple phases of brittle deformation. The alteration model describes the types, occurrence and the effects of the hydrothermal alteration. The rocks of Olkiluoto can be divided into two major classes: (1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, tonalitic-granodioriticgranitic gneisses, mica gneisses, quartz gneisses and mafic gneisses, and (2) igneous rocks including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite structure: veined gneisses, stromatic gneisses and diatexitic gneisses. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subject to polyphased ductile deformation, including five stages. In 3D modelling of the lithological units, an assumption has been made, on the basis of measurements in outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, that the pervasive, composite foliation produced as a result a polyphase ductile deformation has a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from the surface to the drillholes. The bedrock in the Olkiluoto site has been subject to extensive hydrothermal alteration

  1. Institutional Transformation Version 2.5 Modeling and Planning.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mizner, Jack H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Passell, Howard D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, Gerald R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peplinski, William John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vetter, Douglas W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, Christopher A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Addison, Marlin [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Schaffer, Matthew A. [Bridgers and Paxton Engineering Firm, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Higgins, Matthew W. [Vibrantcy, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Reducing the resource consumption and emissions of large institutions is an important step toward a sustainable future. Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) Institutional Transformation (IX) project vision is to provide tools that enable planners to make well-informed decisions concerning sustainability, resource conservation, and emissions reduction across multiple sectors. The building sector has been the primary focus so far because it is the largest consumer of resources for SNL. The IX building module allows users to define the evolution of many buildings over time. The module has been created so that it can be generally applied to any set of DOE-2 ( http://doe2.com ) building models that have been altered to include parameters and expressions required by energy conservation measures (ECM). Once building models have been appropriately prepared, they are checked into a Microsoft Access (r) database. Each building can be represented by many models. This enables the capability to keep a continuous record of models in the past, which are replaced with different models as changes occur to the building. In addition to this, the building module has the capability to apply climate scenarios through applying different weather files to each simulation year. Once the database has been configured, a user interface in Microsoft Excel (r) is used to create scenarios with one or more ECMs. The capability to include central utility buildings (CUBs) that service more than one building with chilled water has been developed. A utility has been created that joins multiple building models into a single model. After using the utility, several manual steps are required to complete the process. Once this CUB model has been created, the individual contributions of each building are still tracked through meters. Currently, 120 building models from SNL's New Mexico and California campuses have been created. This includes all buildings at SNL greater than 10,000 sq. ft

  2. Development and assessment of a modified version of RELAP5/MOD3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Analytis, G.T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    A summary of a number of modifications introduced in RELAP/MOD3 is presented. These include implementation of different heat transfer packages for different processes, modification of the low mass-flux Groeneveld CHF look-up table and of the dispersed flow interfacial area (and shear) as well as of the criterion for transition into and out from this regime, elimination of the under-relaxation schemes of the interfacial closure coefficients etc. The modified code is assessed against a number of separate-effect and integral test experiments and in contrast to the frozen version, is shown to result in physically sound predictions which are close to the measurements.

  3. Preliminary psycometric assessment of the Brazilian version of the DISABKIDS Atopic Dermatitis Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deon, Keila Cristiane; Santos, Danielle Maria de Souza Sério dos; Bullinger, Monika; Santos, Claudia Benedita dos

    2011-12-01

    To assess preliminary psychometric properties of the Brazilian Portuguese version of a questionnaire for measuring health-related quality of life in children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Cross-sectional study with a sample consisting of 52 children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, and their parents or caregivers, selected at the dermatology department of a university hospital in the city of São Paulo, Southeast Brazil, in 2009. Construct validity, internal consistency and agreement between the responses of children and adolescents and their parents or caregivers were assessed in the Brazilian Portuguese version of the DISABKIDS-Atopic Dermatitis Module (ADM). Adequate internal consistency was found with Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.7024/0.8124 and 0.7239/0.8604. The multitrait multimethod analysis for assessing convergent validity showed measures higher than 0.30 for all items. The analysis showed good discriminant validity. Agreement between child self-report and parent proxy-report was evaluated using intra-class correlation with measures impact and social stigma of disease of 0.8173 and 0.7629, respectively. The study results showed that the DISABKIDS-ADM can be used by Brazilian researchers after its complete validation as it showed adequate preliminary psychometric properties and can be considered a valid, reliable instrument.

  4. The German version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Dirk; Foell, Dirk; Horneff, Gerd; Foeldvari, Ivan; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Tzaribachev, Catrin; Minden, Kirsten; Kallinich, Tilmann; Ganser, Gerd; Clara, Lucia; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Hügle, Boris; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Weller, Frank; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the German language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. The participating centres were asked to collect demographic and clinical data along the JAMAR questionnaire in 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability, and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). A total of 319 JIA patients (2.8% systemic, 36.7% oligoarticular, 23.5% RF negative polyarthritis, and 37% other categories) and 100 healthy children were enrolled in eight centres. The JAMAR components discriminated well healthy subjects from JIA patients. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the German version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and in clinical research.

  5. The French version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartier, Pierre; Hofer, Michael; Wouters, Carine; Truong, Thi Thanh Thao; Duong, Ngoc-Phoi; Agbo-Kpati, Kokou-Placide; Uettwiller, Florence; Melki, Isabelle; Mouy, Richard; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the French language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographic, clinical data and the JAMAR in 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). A total of 100 JIA patients (23% systemic, 45% oligoarticular, 20% RF negative polyarthritis, 12% other categories) and 122 healthy children, were enrolled at the paediatric rheumatology centre of the Necker Children's Hospital in Paris. Notably, none of the enrolled JIA patients is affected with psoriatic arthritis. The JAMAR components discriminated well healthy subjects from JIA patients. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the French version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and clinical research.

  6. The Serbian version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, Gordana; Vojinovic, Jelena; Vijatov-Djuric, Gordana; Stevanovic, Dejan; Lazarevic, Dragana; Djurovic, Nada; Novakovic, Dusica; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient-reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the Serbian language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographic, clinical data and the JAMAR in 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability, and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). A total of 248 JIA patients (5.2% systemic, 44.3% oligoarticular, 23.8% RF-negative polyarthritis, 26.7% other categories) and 100 healthy children were enrolled in three centres. The JAMAR components discriminated healthy subjects from JIA patients. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the Serbian version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and clinical research.

  7. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 Version: Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 (Mars-GRAM 2010) and its new features. Mars-GRAM is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Additionally, this TM includes instructions on obtaining the Mars-GRAM source code and data files as well as running Mars-GRAM. It also contains sample Mars-GRAM input and output files and an example of how to incorporate Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  8. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  9. Zig-zag version of the Frenkel-Kontorova model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A.V.; Zolotaryuk, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    We study a generalization of the Frenkel-Kontorova model which describes a zig-zag chain of particles coupled by both the first- and second-neighbor harmonic forces and subjected to a planar substrate with a commensurate potential relief. The particles are supposed to have two degrees of freedom...

  10. The ``KILDER`` air pollution modelling system, version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gram, F.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the KILDER Air Pollution Modelling System, which is a system of small PC-programs for calculation of long-term emission, dispersion, concentration and exposure from different source categories. The system consists of three parts: (1) The dispersion models POI-KILD and ARE-KILD for point- and area-sources, respectively, (2) Meterological programs WINDFREC, STABFREC and METFREC, (3) Supporting programs for calculating emissions and exposure and for operating with binary data fields. The file structure is based on binary files with data fields. The data fields are matrices with different types of values and may be read into the computer or be calculated in other programs. 19 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Implementation of a parallel version of a regional climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstengarbe, F.W. [ed.; Kuecken, M. [Potsdam-Institut fuer Klimafolgenforschung (PIK), Potsdam (Germany); Schaettler, U. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach am Main (Germany). Geschaeftsbereich Forschung und Entwicklung

    1997-10-01

    A regional climate model developed by the Max Planck Institute for Meterology and the German Climate Computing Centre in Hamburg based on the `Europa` and `Deutschland` models of the German Weather Service has been parallelized and implemented on the IBM RS/6000 SP computer system of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research including parallel input/output processing, the explicit Eulerian time-step, the semi-implicit corrections, the normal-mode initialization and the physical parameterizations of the German Weather Service. The implementation utilizes Fortran 90 and the Message Passing Interface. The parallelization strategy used is a 2D domain decomposition. This report describes the parallelization strategy, the parallel I/O organization, the influence of different domain decomposition approaches for static and dynamic load imbalances and first numerical results. (orig.)

  12. External Validation of a Prediction Model for Successful External Cephalic Version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hundt, Marcella; Vlemmix, Floortje; Kok, Marjolein; van der Steeg, Jan W.; Bais, Joke M.; Mol, Ben W.; van der Post, Joris A.

    2012-01-01

    We sought external validation of a prediction model for the probability of a successful external cephalic version (ECV). We evaluated the performance of the prediction model with calibration and discrimination. For clinical practice, we developed a score chart to calculate the probability of a

  13. Regularized integrable version of the one-dimensional quantum sine-Gordon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japaridze, G.I.; Nersesyan, A.A.; Wiegmann, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    The authors derive a regularized exactly solvable version of the one-dimensional quantum sine-Gordon model proceeding from the exact solution of the U(1)-symmetric Thirring model. The ground state and the excitation spectrum are obtained in the region ν 2 < 8π. (Auth.)

  14. Connected Equipment Maturity Model Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butzbaugh, Joshua B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mayhorn, Ebony T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sullivan, Greg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whalen, Scott A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Connected Equipment Maturity Model (CEMM) evaluates the high-level functionality and characteristics that enable equipment to provide the four categories of energy-related services through communication with other entities (e.g., equipment, third parties, utilities, and users). The CEMM will help the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, energy efficiency organizations, and research institutions benchmark the current state of connected equipment and identify capabilities that may be attained to reach a more advanced, future state.

  15. System cost model user's manual, version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.

    1995-06-01

    The System Cost Model (SCM) was developed by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies in Idaho Falls, Idaho and MK-Environmental Services in San Francisco, California to support the Baseline Environmental Management Report sensitivity analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SCM serves the needs of the entire DOE complex for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. The model can be used to evaluate total complex costs based on various configuration options or to evaluate site-specific options. The site-specific cost estimates are based on generic assumptions such as waste loads and densities, treatment processing schemes, existing facilities capacities and functions, storage and disposal requirements, schedules, and cost factors. The SCM allows customization of the data for detailed site-specific estimates. There are approximately forty TSD module designs that have been further customized to account for design differences for nonalpha, alpha, remote-handled, and transuranic wastes. The SCM generates cost profiles based on the model default parameters or customized user-defined input and also generates costs for transporting waste from generators to TSD sites

  16. The Chinese version of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale (MIDAS: Mokken scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Roger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hierarchical scales are very useful in clinical practice due to their ability to discriminate precisely between individuals, and the original English version of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale has been shown to contain a hierarchy of items. The purpose of this study was to analyse a Mandarin Chinese translation of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale for a hierarchy of items according to the criteria of Mokken scaling. Data from 180 Chinese participants who completed the Chinese translation of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale were analysed using the Mokken Scaling Procedure and the 'R' statistical programme using the diagnostics available in these programmes. Correlation between Mandarin Chinese items and a Chinese translation of the Short Form (36 Health Survey was also analysed. Findings Fifteen items from the Mandarin Chinese Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale were retained in a strong and reliable Mokken scale; invariant item ordering was not evident and the Mokken scaled items of the Chinese Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale correlated with the Short Form (36 Health Survey. Conclusions Items from the Mandarin Chinese Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale form a Mokken scale and this offers further insight into how the items of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale relate to the measurement of health-related quality of life people with a myocardial infarction.

  17. Developmental assessment of the Fort St. Vrain version of the Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Composite HTGR Analysis Program (CHAP) consists of a model-independent systems analysis mainframe named LASAN and model-dependent linked code modules, each representing a component, subsystem, or phenomenon of an HTGR plant. The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) version (CHAP-2) includes 21 coded modules that model the neutron kinetics and thermal response of the core; the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor primary coolant system, secondary steam supply system, and balance-of-plant; the actions of the control system and plant protection system; the response of the reactor building; and the relative hazard resulting from fuel particle failure. FSV steady-state and transient plant data are being used to partially verify the component modeling and dynamic smulation techniques used to predict plant response to postulated accident sequences

  18. Geological Model of the Olkiluoto Site. Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, I.

    2010-10-01

    The rocks of Olkiluoto can be divided into two major classes: 1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, tonalitic-granodioriticgranitic gneisses, mica gneisses, quartz gneisses and mafic gneisses, and 2) igneous rocks including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite structure: veined gneisses, stromatic gneisses and diatexitic gneisses. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subjected to polyphased ductile deformation, consisting of five stages, the D2 being locally the most intensive phase, producing thrust-related folding, strong migmatisation and pervasive foliation. In 3D modelling of the lithological units, an assumption has been made, on the basis of measurements in the outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, that the pervasive, composite foliation produced as a result of polyphase ductile deformation has a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from the surface to the drillholes. In addition, the largest ductile deformation zones and tectonic units are described in 3D model. The bedrock at the Olkiluoto site has been subjected to extensive hydrothermal alteration, which has taken place at reasonably low temperature conditions, the estimated temperature interval being from slightly over 300 deg C to less than 100 deg C. Two types of alteration can be observed: firstly, pervasive alteration and secondly fracturecontrolled alteration. Clay mineralisation and sulphidisation are the most prominent alteration events in the site area. Sulphides are located in the uppermost part of the model volume following roughly the foliation and lithological trend. Kaolinite is also mainly located in the

  19. A magnetic version of the Smilansky-Solomyak model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 48 (2017), č. článku 485203. ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Smilansky-Solomyak model * spectral transition * homegeneous magnetic field * discrete spectrum * essential spectrum Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2016

  20. PUMA Version 6 Multiplatform with Facilities to be coupled with other Simulation Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    PUMA is a code for nuclear reactor calculation used in all nuclear installations in Argentina for simulation of fuel management, power cycles and transient events by means of spatial kinetic diffusion theory in 3D. For the versions used up to now the WINDOWS platform was used with very good results. Nowadays PUMA must work in different operative systems, LINUX among others, and must also have facilities to be coupled with other models. For this reason this new version was reprogrammed in ADA, language oriented to a safe programming and be found in any operative system. In former versions PUMA was executed through macro instructions written in LOGO. For this version it is possible to use also PYTHON, which makes also possible the access in execution time to internal data of PUMA. The use of PYTHON allows a easy way to couple PUMA with other codes. The possibilities of this new version of PUMA are shown by means of examples of input data and process control using PYTHON and LOGO. It is discussed the implementation of this methodology in other codes to be coupled with PUMA for versions run in WINDOWS and LINUX. (author)

  1. Development and psychometric testing of the Carter Assessment of Critical Thinking in Midwifery (Preceptor/Mentor version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Creedy, Debra K; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-03-01

    develop and test a tool designed for use by preceptors/mentors to assess undergraduate midwifery students׳ critical thinking in practice. a descriptive cohort design was used. participants worked in a range of maternity settings in Queensland, Australia. 106 midwifery clinicians who had acted in the role of preceptor for undergraduate midwifery students. this study followed a staged model for tool development recommended by DeVellis (2012). This included generation of items, content validity testing through mapping of draft items to critical thinking concepts and expert review, administration of items to a convenience sample of preceptors, and psychometric testing. A 24 item tool titled the XXXX Assessment of Critical Thinking in Midwifery (CACTiM) was completed by registered midwives in relation to students they had recently preceptored in the clinical environment. ratings by experts revealed a content validity index score of 0.97, representing good content validity. An evaluation of construct validity through factor analysis generated three factors: 'partnership in practice', 'reflection on practice' and 'practice improvements'. The scale demonstrated good internal reliability with a Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0.97. The mean total score for the CACTiM scale was 116.77 (SD=16.68) with a range of 60-144. Total and subscale scores correlated significantly. the CACTiM (Preceptor/Mentor version) was found to be a valid and reliable tool for use by preceptors to assess critical thinking in undergraduate midwifery students. given the importance of critical thinking skills for midwifery practice, mapping and assessing critical thinking development in students׳ practice across an undergraduate programme is vital. The CACTiM (Preceptor/Mentor version) has utility for clinical education, research and practice. The tool can inform and guide preceptors׳ assessment of students׳ critical thinking in practice. The availability of a reliable and valid tool can be used to

  2. Improving multitasking assessment in healthy older adults using a prop-based version of the Breakfast task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowicz, Maria; MacPherson, Sarah E

    2017-01-01

    Computerized cognitive assessment is becoming increasingly more common in clinical neuropsychological assessment and cognitive neuropsychological research. A number of computerized tasks now exist to assess multitasking abilities that are essential for everyday tasks such as cooking, shopping, or driving, but little is known about whether these tasks are appropriate for assessing older adults' multitasking. The present study directly compared age effects on multitasking when assessed using a computerized and a prop-based version of Craik and Bialystok's ( 2006 ) Breakfast task. Twenty participants aged 18 to 24 years and 20 participants aged 60 to 79 years were assessed on both versions of the Breakfast task. While age-related decrements in multitasking performance were found using the computerized task, significant age differences were not found on the majority of measures when the prop-based version was administered. The results suggest that age-related deficits in multitasking will be less when more contextualized, noncomputer based tasks are used.

  3. UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayer, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements

  4. Assessment of workplace bullying and harassment: reliability and validity of a Japanese version of the negative acts questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Jiro; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Fujii, Yasuhito; Taniguchi, Toshiyo; Hirokawa, Kumi; Hibino, Yuri; Lemmer, Richard J; Nashiwa, Hitomi; Wang, Da-Hong; Ogino, Keiki

    2010-01-01

    Interest in workplace bullying and harassment has been increasing in Japan. At present, the Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ) is one of the most frequently used questionnaires for assessing these issues. The purpose of this study was to develop a Japanese version of the NAQ. We translated the original version of the NAQ using a back-translation method. Participants in this study were recruited from 737 workers at a manufacturing company in Japan. Data were obtained from questionnaires completed by 517 respondents (response rate: 70.1%). We used a cross-validation approach. A three-factor model was obtained from exploratory factor analyses. The confirmatory factor analysis for this model revealed values of 0.94, 0.91, 0.95, and 0.054 for the goodness-of-fit index, the adjusted goodness-of-fit index, the comparative fit index, and the root mean square error of approximation, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients for the NAQ scores with the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) support scores and the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire scores for respect and job security were significant (psexual harassment score and the JCQ support scores. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the scores on the entire NAQ scale and on three subscales (person-related bullying, work-related bullying, and sexual harassment) were 0.90, 0.84, 0.60, and 0.60, respectively. A Japanese version of the NAQ was developed and it appears to have acceptable levels of internal consistency reliability and factor- and construct-validity.

  5. The Spanish version of the fatique assessment scale : Reliability and validity assessment in postpartum women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cano-Climent, A.; Oliver-Roig, A.; Cabrero-Garcia, J.; de Vries, J.; Richart-Martinez, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Fatigue is the most widely reported symptom by women during pregnancy, labour, the postpartum period, and early parenting. The objective was to translate the Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) into Spanish and assess its psychometric properties. Methods Instrumental Design. The FAS was

  6. Development and Assessment of the Appendix K Version of RELAP5-3D for LOCA Licensing Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Thomas K.S.; Chang, C.-J.; Hung, H.-J.

    2002-01-01

    In light water reactors, particularly the pressurized water reactor (PWR), the severity of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) would limit how high the reactor power can operate. Although the best-estimate LOCA licensing methodology can provide the greatest margin on the peak cladding temperature (PCT) evaluation during a LOCA, it generally takes much more resources to develop. Instead, implementation of evaluation models required by Appendix K of 10CFR50 on an advanced thermal-hydraulic platform such as RELAP5, TRAC, etc., also can gain significant margin for the PCT calculation. Through compliance evaluation against Appendix K of 10CFR50, all of the required evaluation models have been implemented in RELAP5-3D. To verify and assess the development of the Appendix K version of RELAP5-3D, nine kinds of separate-effects experiments and eight sets of LOCA integral experiments were adopted. Through the assessments against separate-effects experiments, the success of the code modification in accordance with Appendix K of 10CFR50 was demonstrated. Besides, one set of a typical integral large-break LOCA from Loss-of-Fluid Test Facility experiments (L2-5) has also been applied to preliminarily evaluate the integral performance of the Appendix K version of RELAP5-3D. The PCT predicted by the evaluation models is greater than the one from best-estimate calculation in the whole LOCA history with the conservatism of 150 K, and the measured PCTs of L2-5 are also well bounded by the evaluation model calculation. Another seven sets of integral-effect experiments will be further applied in the next step to ensure the reasonable integral conservatism of the newly developed LOCA licensing analysis code (RELAP5-3DK/INER), which can cover all the phases of both large- and small LOCA in one code

  7. VALIDATION OF THE ASTER GLOBAL DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL VERSION 2 OVER THE CONTERMINOUS UNITED STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gesch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 (GDEM v2 was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1 in 2009. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v2 was calculated by comparison with more than 18,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE measured for GDEM v2 is 8.68 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 9.34 meters for GDEM v1. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v2 mean error of –0.20 meters is a significant improvement over the GDEM v1 mean error of –3.69 meters. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover to examine the effects of cover types on measured errors. The GDEM v2 mean errors by land cover class verify that the presence of aboveground features (tree canopies and built structures cause a positive elevation bias, as would be expected for an imaging system like ASTER. In open ground classes (little or no vegetation with significant aboveground height, GDEM v2 exhibits a negative bias on the order of 1 meter. GDEM v2 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v2 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM.

  8. Validation of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 over the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Zhang, Zheng; Meyer, David J.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 (GDEM v2) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v2 was calculated by comparison with more than 18,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v2 is 8.68 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 9.34 meters for GDEM v1. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v2 mean error of -0.20 meters is a significant improvement over the GDEM v1 mean error of -3.69 meters. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover to examine the effects of cover types on measured errors. The GDEM v2 mean errors by land cover class verify that the presence of aboveground features (tree canopies and built structures) cause a positive elevation bias, as would be expected for an imaging system like ASTER. In open ground classes (little or no vegetation with significant aboveground height), GDEM v2 exhibits a negative bias on the order of 1 meter. GDEM v2 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v2 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM.

  9. Development of a Brazilian Portuguese adapted version of the Gap-Kalamazoo communication skills assessment form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Anna Beatriz C N; Rider, Elizabeth A; Lajolo, Paula P; Tone, Luiz G; Pinto, Rogerio M C; Lajolo, Marisa P; Calhoun, Aaron W

    2016-12-11

    The goal of this study was to translate, adapt and validate the items of the Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form for use in the Brazilian cultural setting. The Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form was translated into Portuguese by two independent bilingual Brazilian translators and was reconciled by a third bilingual healthcare professional. The translated text was then assessed for content using a modified Delphi technique and adjusted as needed to assure content validity. A total of nine phrases in the completed tool were adjusted. The final tool was then used to assess videotaped simulations as a means of validation.  Response process was assessed using exploratory factor analysis and internal structure was assessed via Cronbach's Alpha (internal consistency) and Intraclass Correlation (test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability). One hundred and four (104) videotaped communication skills simulations were assessed by 38 subjects (6 staff physicians, 4 faculty physicians, 8 resident physicians, 4 professional actors with experience in simulation, and 16 other allied healthcare professionals). Measures of Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.818) and test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.942) were high.  Exploratory factor analysis confirmed the uni-dimensionality of the instrument. Our results support the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form when used among Brazilian medical residents.  The Brazilian version of Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form was found to be adequate both in the linguistic and technical aspects.  The use of this instrument in Brazilian medical education can enhance the assessment of physician-patient-team relationships on an ongoing basis.

  10. Geological model of the Olkiluoto site. Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, J.; Aaltonen, I.; Kemppainen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The rocks of Olkiluoto can be divided into two major classes: (1) supracrustal high-grade metamorphic rocks including various migmatitic gneisses, tonalitic-granodioriticgranitic gneisses, mica gneisses, quartz gneisses and mafic gneisses, and (2) igneous rocks including pegmatitic granites and diabase dykes. The migmatitic gneisses can further be divided into three subgroups in terms of the type of migmatite structure: veined gneisses, stromatic gneisses and diatexitic gneisses. On the basis of refolding and crosscutting relationships, the metamorphic supracrustal rocks have been subjected to polyphased ductile deformation, consisting of five stages, the D2 being locally the most intensive phase, producing thrust-related folding, strong migmatisation and pervasive foliation. In 3D modelling of the lithological units, an assumption has been made, on the basis of measurements in the outcrops, investigation trenches and drill cores, that the pervasive, composite foliation produced as a result of polyphase ductile deformation has a rather constant attitude in the ONKALO area. Consequently, the strike and dip of the foliation has been used as a tool, through which the lithologies have been correlated between the drillholes and from the surface to the drillholes. The bedrock at the Olkiluoto site has been subjected to extensive hydrothermal alteration, which has taken place at reasonably low temperature conditions, the estimated temperature interval being from slightly over 300 deg C to less than 100 deg C. Two types of alteration can be observed: (1) pervasive (disseminated) alteration and (2) fracture-controlled (veinlet) alteration. Kaolinisation and sulphidisation are the most prominent alteration events in the site area. Sulphides are located in the uppermost part of the model volume following roughly the lithological trend (slightly dipping to the SE). Kaolinite is also located in the uppermost part, but the orientation is opposite to the main lithological trend

  11. Assessment of the Greek worry-related metacognitions: the Greek version of the Metacognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typaldou, G M; Konstantakopoulos, G; Roxanis, I; Nidos, A; Vaidakis, N; Papadimitriou, G N; Wells, A

    2014-01-01

    The Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30), developed by Wells and Cartwright-Hatton (2004), represents a multidimensional measure of metacognitive factors considered to be important in the metacognitive model of psychological disorders. The primary aim of the present study was to examine internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity and the factor structure of the Greek version of the MCQ-30. Moreover, we investigated the associations of the extracted factors with trait anxiety in a Greek sample. The study sample consisted of 547 non-clinical participants (213 males and 334 females). All participants completed the Greek version of the MCQ-30. A subsample of 157 participants also completed the Trait Anxiety subscale of the State -Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Meta-worry subscale of the Anxious Thought Inventory. Thirty participants were retested with the MCQ-30 over a retest interval ranging from three to five weeks. The results confirmed the dimensionality of the MCQ-30 and five factors were extracted consistent with the original English version: (1) positive beliefs about worry, (2) negative beliefs about worry concerning uncontrollability and danger, (3) cognitive confidence, (4) beliefs about the need to control thoughts and the negative consequences of not controlling them, and (5) cognitive selfconsciousness. The MCQ-30 showed high levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The correlation between MCQ-30 total score and AnTI-MW was strong, indicating high level of convergent validity. Moreover, all correlations between MCQ-30 total and subscale scores and STAI-T were significant apart from the correlation between 'cognitive confidence' and trait anxiety. The Greek sample scored higher in the MCQ-30 and its subscales than the English sample in the original study. Women scored significantly higher than men in the overall MCQ-30 and the "uncontrollability and danger" and "need to control thoughts" subscales, whereas no

  12. Internet-based Modeling, Mapping, and Analysis for the Greater Everglades (IMMAGE; Version 1.0): web-based tools to assess the impact of sea level rise in south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Paul; Strong, David; Swain, Eric; Decker, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    South Florida's Greater Everglades area is particularly vulnerable to sea level rise, due to its rich endowment of animal and plant species and its heavily populated urban areas along the coast. Rising sea levels are expected to have substantial impacts on inland flooding, the depth and extent of surge from coastal storms, the degradation of water supplies by saltwater intrusion, and the integrity of plant and animal habitats. Planners and managers responsible for mitigating these impacts require advanced tools to help them more effectively identify areas at risk. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Internet-based Modeling, Mapping, and Analysis for the Greater Everglades (IMMAGE) Web site has been developed to address these needs by providing more convenient access to projections from models that forecast the effects of sea level rise on surface water and groundwater, the extent of surge and resulting economic losses from coastal storms, and the distribution of habitats. IMMAGE not only provides an advanced geographic information system (GIS) interface to support decision making, but also includes topic-based modules that explain and illustrate key concepts for nontechnical users. The purpose of this report is to familiarize both technical and nontechnical users with the IMMAGE Web site and its various applications.

  13. Evaluating the Measurement Properties of the Self-Assessment of Treatment Version II, Follow-Up Version, in Patients with Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floortje van Nooten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Self-Assessment of Treatment version II (SAT II measures treatment-related improvements in pain and impacts and impressions of treatment in neuropathic pain patients. The measure has baseline and follow-up versions. This study assesses the measurement properties of the SAT II. Methods. Data from 369 painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN patients from a phase III trial assessing capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza® efficacy and safety were used in these analyses. Reliability, convergent validity, known-groups validity, and responsiveness (using the Brief Pain Inventory-Diabetic Neuropathy [BPI-DN] and Patient Global Impression of Change [PGIC] analyses were conducted, and minimally important differences (MID were estimated. Results. Exploratory factor analysis supported a one-factor solution for the six impact items. The SAT II has good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha: 0.96 and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.62–0.88. Assessment of convergent validity showed moderate to strong correlations with change in other study endpoints. Scores varied significantly by level of pain intensity and sleep interference (p<0.05 defined by the BPI-DN. Responsiveness was shown based on the PGIC. MID estimates ranged from 1.2 to 2.4 (pain improvement and 1.0 to 2.0 (impact scores. Conclusions. The SAT II is a reliable and valid measure for assessing treatment improvement in PDPN patients.

  14. Response Surface Modeling Tool Suite, Version 1.x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-07-05

    The Response Surface Modeling (RSM) Tool Suite is a collection of three codes used to generate an empirical interpolation function for a collection of drag coefficient calculations computed with Test Particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) simulations. The first code, "Automated RSM", automates the generation of a drag coefficient RSM for a particular object to a single command. "Automated RSM" first creates a Latin Hypercube Sample (LHS) of 1,000 ensemble members to explore the global parameter space. For each ensemble member, a TPMC simulation is performed and the object drag coefficient is computed. In the next step of the "Automated RSM" code, a Gaussian process is used to fit the TPMC simulations. In the final step, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is used to evaluate the non-analytic probability distribution function from the Gaussian process. The second code, "RSM Area", creates a look-up table for the projected area of the object based on input limits on the minimum and maximum allowed pitch and yaw angles and pitch and yaw angle intervals. The projected area from the look-up table is used to compute the ballistic coefficient of the object based on its pitch and yaw angle. An accurate ballistic coefficient is crucial in accurately computing the drag on an object. The third code, "RSM Cd", uses the RSM generated by the "Automated RSM" code and the projected area look-up table generated by the "RSM Area" code to accurately compute the drag coefficient and ballistic coefficient of the object. The user can modify the object velocity, object surface temperature, the translational temperature of the gas, the species concentrations of the gas, and the pitch and yaw angles of the object. Together, these codes allow for the accurate derivation of an object's drag coefficient and ballistic coefficient under any conditions with only knowledge of the object's geometry and mass.

  15. The suicide assessment scale: psychometric properties of a Norwegian language version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsland, Bjørn Odd; Mehlum, Lars; Mellesdal, Liv Solrunn; Walby, Fredrik A; Diep, Lien M

    2012-08-07

    Rating scales are valuable tools in suicide research and can also be useful supplements to the clinical interview in suicide risk assessments. This study describes the psychometric properties of a Norwegian language version of the Suicide Assessment Scale Self-report version (SUAS-S). Participants were fifty-two patients (mean age = 39.3 years, SD = 10.7) with major depression (53.8%), bipolar disorder (25.0%) and/or a personality disorder (63.5%) referred to a psychiatric outpatient clinic. The SUAS-S, the screening section of the Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS-5), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck's Hopelessness Scale (BHS), the Symptom Check-List-90 R (SCL-90R) and the Clinical Global Impression for Severity of Suicidality (CGI-SS) were administered. One week later, the patients completed the SUAS-S a second time. Cronbach's alpha for SUAS-S was 0.88 and the test-retest reliability was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93- 0.97). SUAS-S was positively correlated with the BSS-5 (r = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.47-0.85) for the study sample as a whole and for the suicidal (r = 0.52) and non-suicidal groups (r = 0.50) respectively. There was no difference between the SUAS-S and the BSS-5 in the ability to identify suicidality. This ability was more pronounced when the suicide risk was high. There was a substantial intercorrelation between the score on the SUAS-S and the BDI (0.81) and the BHS (0.76). The sensitivity and specificity of the SUAS-S was explored and an appropriate clinical cut-off value was assessed. The study revealed good internal consistency, test-retest reliability and concurrent validity for the Suicide Assessment Scale Self-report version. The discriminatory ability for suicidality was comparable to that of the BSS-5.

  16. The suicide assessment scale: Psychometric properties of a Norwegian language version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koldsland Bjørn

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rating scales are valuable tools in suicide research and can also be useful supplements to the clinical interview in suicide risk assessments. This study describes the psychometric properties of a Norwegian language version of the Suicide Assessment Scale Self-report version (SUAS-S. Methods Participants were fifty-two patients (mean age = 39.3 years, SD = 10.7 with major depression (53.8%, bipolar disorder (25.0% and/or a personality disorder (63.5% referred to a psychiatric outpatient clinic. The SUAS-S, the screening section of the Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS-5, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck’s Hopelessness Scale (BHS, the Symptom Check-List-90 R (SCL-90R and the Clinical Global Impression for Severity of Suicidality (CGI-SS were administered. One week later, the patients completed the SUAS-S a second time. Results Cronbach’s alpha for SUAS-S was 0.88 and the test–retest reliability was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93– 0.97. SUAS-S was positively correlated with the BSS-5 (r = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.47–0.85 for the study sample as a whole and for the suicidal (r = 0.52 and non-suicidal groups (r = 0.50 respectively. There was no difference between the SUAS-S and the BSS-5 in the ability to identify suicidality. This ability was more pronounced when the suicide risk was high. There was a substantial intercorrelation between the score on the SUAS-S and the BDI (0.81 and the BHS (0.76. The sensitivity and specificity of the SUAS-S was explored and an appropriate clinical cut-off value was assessed. Conclusions The study revealed good internal consistency, test–retest reliability and concurrent validity for the Suicide Assessment Scale Self-report version. The discriminatory ability for suicidality was comparable to that of the BSS-5.

  17. A Factor Analytic Investigation of the Person-in-Recovery and Provider Versions of the Revised Recovery Self-Assessment (RSA-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkolÿ Thege, Barna; Ham, Elke; Ball, Laura C

    2017-12-01

    Recovery is understood as living a life with hope, purpose, autonomy, productivity, and community engagement despite a mental illness. The aim of this study was to provide further information on the psychometric properties of the Person-in-Recovery and Provider versions of the Revised Recovery Self-Assessment (RSA-R), a widely used measure of recovery orientation. Data from 654 individuals were analyzed, 519 of whom were treatment providers (63.6% female), while 135 were inpatients (10.4% female) of a Canadian tertiary-level psychiatric hospital. Confirmatory and exploratory techniques were used to investigate the factor structure of both versions of the instrument. Results of the confirmatory factor analyses showed that none of the four theoretically plausible models fit the data well. Principal component analyses could not replicate the structure obtained by the scale developers either and instead resulted in a five-component solution for the Provider and a four-component solution for the Person-in-Recovery version. When considering the results of a parallel analysis, the number of components to retain dropped to two for the Provider version and one for the Person-in-Recovery version. We can conclude that the RSA-R requires further revision to become a psychometrically sound instrument for assessing recovery-oriented practices in an inpatient mental health-care setting.

  18. Factorial Validity and Invariance Assessment of a Short Version of the Recalled Childhood Gender Identity/Role Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Jaimie F

    2016-04-01

    Recalled childhood gender role/identity is a construct that is related to sexual orientation, abuse, and psychological health. The purpose of this study was to assess the factorial validity of a short version of Zucker et al.'s (2006) "Recalled Childhood Gender Identity/Gender Role Questionnaire" using confirmatory factor analysis and to test the stability of the factor structure across groups (measurement invariance). Six items of the questionnaire were completed online by 1929 participants from a variety of gender identity and sexual orientation groups. Models of the six items loading onto one factor had poor fit for the data. Items were removed for having a large proportion of error variance. Among birth-assigned females, a five-item model had good fit for the data, but there was evidence for differences in scale's factor structure across gender identity, age, level of education, and country groups. Among birth-assigned males, the resulting four-item model did not account for all of the relationship between variables, and modeling for this resulted in a model that was almost saturated. This model also had evidence of measurement variance across gender identity and sexual orientation groups. The models had good reliability and factor score determinacy. These findings suggest that results of previous studies that have assessed recalled childhood gender role/identity may have been susceptible to construct bias due to measurement variance across these groups. Future studies should assess measurement invariance between groups they are comparing, and if it is not found the issue can be addressed by removing variant indicators and/or applying a partial invariance model.

  19. The Greek version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratsidou-Gertsi, Polyxeni; Trachana, Maria; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florence; Tsitsami, Elena; Tsinti, Maria; Vougiouka, Olga; Siamopoulou, Antigoni; Alfantaki, Sapfo; Stavrakidou, Maria; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient-reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the Greek language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographics, clinical data, and the JAMAR from 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability, and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). The Greek JAMAR was fully cross-culturally adapted with two forward and three backward translations. A total of 272 JIA patients (5.9% systemic, 57.7% oligoarticular, 21.3% RF negative poly-arthritis, 15.1% other categories), and 100 healthy children were enrolled in all centres. The JAMAR components discriminated well-healthy subjects from JIA patients; notably, there was no significant difference between healthy subjects and their affected peers in psychosocial quality of life and school-related items. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the Greek version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and in clinical research.

  20. Validation of the Turkish version of the Breast Reduction Assessed Severity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececi, Yavuz; Sir, Emin; Zengel, Baha

    2013-01-01

    Measuring patient-reported outcomes has become increasingly important in cosmetic and reconstructive breast surgery. There is no validated questionnaire in Turkish to evaluate quality-of-life issues for patients with mammary hypertrophy. The authors describe the reliability and validity of a translated Breast Reduction Assessed Severity Scale (BRASS) in evaluating Turkish patients. The BRASS, developed by Sigurdson et al, was translated into Turkish adhering strictly to the guidelines of questionnaire translations. Statistical analysis was carried out with Cronbach's α to test the internal consistency and intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability. Exploratory factor analysis was carried out using principal component analysis with oblimin rotation to test its construct validity. Correlations between subscales identified in the factor analysis and corresponding domains in the Short Form-36 and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were analyzed. The total instrument was found to have an α coefficient of 0.92 and subscale α coefficients ranging from 0.76 to 0.87. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 for the total scale and ranged from 0.81 to 0.91 for the subscales. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 5-factor structure: physical implications, body pain, physical appearance, poor self-concept, and negative social interactions. With this study, the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the BRASS were revealed. This translated version can be used to evaluate the effect of mammary hypertrophy on quality of life in Turkish patients.

  1. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  2. A new version of code Java for 3D simulation of the CCA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kebo; Xiong, Hailing; Li, Chao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a new version of the program of CCA model. In order to benefit from the advantages involved in the latest technologies, we migrated the running environment from JDK1.6 to JDK1.7. And the old program was optimized into a new framework, so promoted extendibility.

  3. Validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the pressure ulcer prevention knowledge assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Polat, Cansu; Ozkan, Ilknur; Theofanidis, Dimitris; Togrol, Rifat Erdem

    2016-11-01

    Sound knowledge of pressure ulcers is important to enable good prevention. There are limited instruments assessing pressure ulcer knowledge. The Pressure Ulcer Prevention Knowledge Assessment Instrument is among the scales of which psychometric properties have been studied rigorously and reflects the latest evidence. This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Knowledge Assessment Instrument (PUPKAI-T), an instrument that assesses knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention by using multiple-choice questions. Linguistic validity was verified through front-to-back translation. Psychometric properties of the instrument were studied on a sample of 150 nurses working in a tertiary hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. The content validity index of the translated instrument was 0.94, intra-class correlation coefficients were between 0.37 and 0.80, item difficulty indices were between 0.21 and 0.88, discrimination indices were 0.20-0.78, and the Kuder Richardson for the internal consistency was 0.803. The PUPKAI-T was found to be a valid and reliable tool to evaluate nurses' knowledge on pressure ulcer prevention. The PUPKAI-T may be a useful tool for determining educational needs of nurses on pressure ulcer prevention. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychometric Assessment of the Chinese Version of the Abbreviated Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC-26) and the Clinical Practice Version (EPIC-CP) in Chinese Men With Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy W T; Tse, Michael A; Ng, Chris N L; Chung, Edward K M; Fielding, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) instrument was designed to assess a range of health-related quality-of-life issues specifically relevant to patients with prostate cancer. This study examined the validity and reliability of Chinese versions of the 26-item EPIC and of the 16-item EPIC for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) in Chinese patients with prostate cancer. A Chinese version of the 26-item EPIC and the 16-item EPIC-CP were self-completed by 252 Chinese patients with prostate cancer who were recruited from three community-based cancer service centers. Confirmatory factors analysis assessed the factor structures of the EPIC and the EPIC-CP. Internal consistency and construct and clinical validities of the factor structures were assessed. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the original factor structure of both EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP showed good fit to this sample. A correlated model was superior to a hierarchical model in both EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP supporting the utility of the domain scores over the total scores. Cronbach α ranged from 0.55 to 0.91 for EPIC-26 and 0.44 to 0.67 for EPIC-CP. Construct validity was supported by correlations between EPIC-26/EPIC-CP and psychological distress measures. Clinical validity was supported by differentiation between patients with and without prostatectomy. These Chinese versions of the five-factor EPIC-26 and the EPIC-CP are valid and practical measures for assessing a range of health-related quality-of-life issues related to the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer, highlighting their utility in assessing health-related quality of life for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment and Implications of Social Withdrawal Subtypes in Young Chinese Children: The Chinese Version of the Child Social Preference Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Coplan, Robert J; Gao, Zhu-Qing; Xu, Pin; Li, Linhui; Zhang, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    The authors' goals were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Child Social Preference Scale (CSPS; R. J. Coplan, K. Prakash, K. O'Neil, & M. Armer, 2004) and examine the links between both shyness and unsociability and indices of socioemotional functioning in young Chinese children. Participants included of two samples recruited from kindergarten classes in two public schools in Shanghai, China. Both samples included children 3-5 years old (Sample 1: n = 350, Mage = 4.72 years, SD = 0.58 years; Sample 2: n = 129, Mage = 4.40 years, SD = 0.58 years). In both samples, mothers rated children's social withdrawal using the newly created Chinese version of the CSPS, and in Sample 2, teachers also provided ratings of socioemotional functioning. Consistent with previous findings from other cultures, results from factor analyses suggested a 2-factor model for the CSPS (shyness and unsociability) among young children in China. In contrast to findings from North America, child shyness and unsociability were associated with socioemotional difficulties in kindergarten. Some gender differences were also noted. Results are discussed in terms of the assessment and implications of social withdrawal in early childhood in China.

  6. User's guide to the Yucca Mountain Integrating Model (YMIM) Version 2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.; Lamont, A.

    1995-04-01

    The Yucca Mountain Integrating Model (YMIM) is an integrated model of the engineered barrier system. It contains models of the processes of waste container failure and nuclide release from the fuel rods. YMIM is driven by scenarios of container and rod temperature, near-field chemistry, and near-field hydrology provided by other modules. It is designed to be highly modular so that a model of an individual process can be easily modified to replaced without interfering with the models of other processes. This manual describes the process models and provides instructions for setting up and running YMIM Version 2.1

  7. Development of a Telephone Interview Version of the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment Activity Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Ruth; Miller, Patricia A; Pooyania, Sepideh; Stratford, Paul

    Purpose: To develop a telephone version of the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment Activity Inventory (CMSA-AI) and estimate the test-retest reliability, interrater reliability (between participant and proxy), and construct validity of the scores for individuals with stroke. Methods: Adults with stroke and their caregivers or proxies were included. Participants were assessed with the CMSA-AI at discharge from a stroke rehabilitation unit and interviewed using the telephone version (TCMSA-AI). Two months after discharge, participants were evaluated with the CMSA-AI and interviewed over the phone using the TCMSA-AI on two occasions 2-3 days apart. Proxies were interviewed with the TCMSA-AI within another 2-3 days. Results: The mean age of the 53 participants with stroke was 62 years; 59% were male; 43% had right-side hemiparesis; 42 completed follow-up interviews; and 18 had proxies who also participated. Test-retest reliability showed an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96, 0.99) for the total score, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.98) for the Gross Motor Function Index, and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.98) for the Walking Index, and an interrater reliability (between participant and proxy) of 0.75 (95% CI: 0.28, 0.90) for total score. Spearman's rho correlation between CMSA-AI and TCMSA-AI total scores was 0.62 (lower-sided 95% CI: 0.42) at discharge and 0.90 (lower-sided 95% CI: 0.82) at 2 months after discharge. Correlations between the change scores of the CMSA-AI and TCMSA-AI were 0.50 or lower. Conclusion: There is potential for remote evaluation of the functional mobility of individuals with stroke in research and clinical settings.

  8. The Assessment of reliability and validity of Persian Version of the Endometriosis Health Profile (EHP-30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Nojomi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Endometriosis Health Profile-30 (EHP-30 is a disease-specific questionnaire to measure the health-related quality of life in patients with endometriosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Endometriosis Health Profile (EHP-30 in women with endometriosis referring to three Gynecology Clinics in Tehran, Iran. Methods: One hundred women (20 to 50 years old with surgically confirmed endometriosis recruited from three outpatient Gynecology Clinics affiliated to the Iran University of Medical Sciences. All 100 patients were asked to complete EHP-30 questionnaire while referring to the Clinics. The findings were analyzed using descriptive statistics, internal reliability consistency, construct validity (using short form-36, which had already been validated in Iran, factor analysis (with principle component analysis method, and item total correlation to assess the validity and reliability of the questionnaire. Results: The internal consistency reliability of the questionnaire was high (Cronbach’s α ranged between 0.80 and 0.93 for core, and 0.78 and 0.90 for modular parts. All items were loaded on their own factors except item 17 (feeling aggressive or violent and item 18 (feeling unwell, which were loaded on pain and social support domains, respectively. Construct validity of EHP-30, established by using SF-36, indicates good correlations in several similar scales of these two questionnaires. Conclusion: The findings of the study demonstrate that Persian version of EHP-30 is a valid and reliable measure to assess the quality of life in women with endometriosis

  9. Validity and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the BACS (Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovany Eliberto Araújo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia by examining its temporal stability, internal consistency, and discriminant and convergent validity. METHODS: The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia was administered to 116 stable patients with schizophrenia and 58 matched control subjects. To assess concurrent validity, a subset of patients underwent a traditional neuropsychological assessment. RESULTS: The patients with schizophrenia performed significantly worse than the controls (p0.8. The internal consistency of the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia was high (Cronbach's α ϝ 0.874. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian Portuguese version of the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia exhibits good reliability and discriminant and concurrent validity and is a promising tool for easily assessing cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and for comparing the performance of Brazilian patients with that of patients from other countries.

  10. Validation of the Spanish Version of the Emotional Skills Assessment Process (ESAP) with College Students in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teliz Triujeque, Rosalia

    2009-01-01

    The major purpose of the study was to determine the construct validity of the Spanish version of the Emotional Skills Assessment Process (ESAP) in a targeted population of agriculture college students in Mexico. The ESAP is a self assessment approach that helps students to identify and understand emotional intelligence skills relevant for…

  11. SALT 2010 Bilingual S/E Version: A Tool for Assessing the Language Production of Bilingual (Spanish/English) Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon F.; Iglesias, Aquiles; Rojas, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the language development of bilingual children can be a challenge--too often, children in the complex process of learning both Spanish and English are under- or over-diagnosed with language disorders. SLPs can change that with "SALT 2010 Bilingual S/E Version" for grades K-3, the first tool to comprehensively assess children's language…

  12. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF VERSION 3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brioude, J.; Arnold, D.; Stohl, A.; Cassiani, M.; Morton, Don; Seibert, P.; Angevine, W. M.; Evan, S.; Dingwell, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Pisso, I.; Bukhart, J.; Wotawa, G.

    2013-11-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally designed for cal- culating long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis at different scales. This multiscale need from the modeler community has encouraged new developments in FLEXPART. In this document, we present a version that works with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteoro- logical model. Simple procedures on how to run FLEXPART-WRF are presented along with special options and features that differ from its predecessor versions. In addition, test case data, the source code and visualization tools are provided to the reader as supplementary material.

  13. ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 - summary of validation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Tetushi; Kaku, Manabu; Iwasaki, Akira; Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Zhang, Z.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Krieger, Tabatha; Curtis, Bill; Haase, Jeff; Abrams, Michael; Carabajal, C.; Meyer, Dave

    2011-01-01

    On June 29, 2009, NASA and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan released a Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) to users worldwide at no charge as a contribution to the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). This “version 1” ASTER GDEM (GDEM1) was compiled from over 1.2 million scenebased DEMs covering land surfaces between 83°N and 83°S latitudes. A joint U.S.-Japan validation team assessed the accuracy of the GDEM1, augmented by a team of 20 cooperators. The GDEM1 was found to have an overall accuracy of around 20 meters at the 95% confidence level. The team also noted several artifacts associated with poor stereo coverage at high latitudes, cloud contamination, water masking issues and the stacking process used to produce the GDEM1 from individual scene-based DEMs (ASTER GDEM Validation Team, 2009). Two independent horizontal resolution studies estimated the effective spatial resolution of the GDEM1 to be on the order of 120 meters.

  14. Verification of the 2.00 WAPPA-B [Waste Package Performance Assessment-B version] code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylock, B.; Jansen, G.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-07-01

    The old version of the Waste Package Performance Assessment (WAPPA) code has been modified into a new code version, 2.00 WAPPA-B. The input files and the results for two benchmarks at repository conditions are fully documented in the appendixes of the EA reference report. The 2.00 WAPPA-B version of the code is suitable for computation of barrier failure due to uniform corrosion; however, an improved sub-version, 2.01 WAPPA-B, is recommended for general use due to minor errors found in 2.00 WAPPA-B during its verification procedures. The input files and input echoes have been modified to include behavior of both radionuclides and elements, but the 2.00 WAPPA-B version of the WAPPA code is not recommended for computation of radionuclide releases. The 2.00 WAPPA-B version computes only mass balances and the initial presence of radionuclides that can be released. Future code development in the 3.00 WAPPA-C version will include radionuclide release computations. 19 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  15. Metric properties of the "timed get up and go- modified version" test, in risk assessment of falls in active women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso Mora, Margareth Lorena

    2017-03-30

    To analyse the metric properties of the Timed Get up and Go-Modified Version Test (TGUGM), in risk assessment of falls in a group of physically active women. A sample was constituted by 202 women over 55 years of age, were assessed through a crosssectional study. The TGUGM was applied to assess their fall risk. The test was analysed by comparison of the qualitative and quantitative information and by factor analysis. The development of a logistic regression model explained the risk of falls according to the test components. The TGUGM was useful for assessing the risk of falls in the studied group. The test revealed two factors: the Get Up and the Gait with dual task . Less than twelve points in the evaluation or runtimes higher than 35 seconds was associated with high risk of falling. More than 35 seconds in the test indicated a risk fall probability greater than 0.50. Also, scores less than 12 points were associated with a delay of 7 seconds more in the execution of the test ( p = 0.0016). Factor analysis of TGUGM revealed two dimensions that can be independent predictors of risk of falling: The Get up that explains between 64% and 87% of the risk of falling, and the Gait with dual task, that explains between 77% and 95% of risk of falling.

  16. Scores of a web-based version of the seasonal pattern assessment questionnaire in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Martinez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Seasonal affective disorder (SAD is a proposed mental disorder still controversial. This condition is prevalent in northern latitudes, but few studies have been conducted at locations in the southern hemisphere. It is usually assessed by the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ. This study aimed to evaluate, through on-line questionnaire, the hypothesis that, in the Brazilian population, latitude and longitude influence SPAQ scores. Methods: An advertisement was posted on a sleep medicine website inviting visitors to investigate seasonal patterns of behavior and mood, using a Brazilian Portuguese version of the SPAQ. The geographic coordinates of the place of residence of each respondent were analyzed as a continuous variable or distributed in quartiles of latitude and longitude. The psychometric properties of the SPAQ were assessed by reliability and factor analyses. Results: Answers from 1001 respondents out of 1045 were considered eligible. High SPAQ scores were observed in 287 respondents, equally distributed among all latitude and longitude quartiles. Data collected in different seasons and during daylight saving time did not differ significantly in any of the scores for SPAQ dimensions. No correlations between SPAQ scores and latitude or longitude were observed. Psychometric properties of the SPAQ were preserved in all geographic locations. Conclusion: The finding of similar SPAQ scores at a wide latitude range defies the concept of SAD symptoms as latitude or longitude-dependent phenomena.

  17. The translation and psychometric assessment of the persian version of the sheehan disability scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Amin-Esmaeili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS assesses disability in four domains of home management, work responsibilities, close relationships and social life. The main objective of this study was to develop the Persian version of the SDS.Two steps of field work followed the Persian translation and cultural adaptation of the tool: First, the internal consistency and convergent validity was examined in 104 clinical cases recruited from inpatient and outpatient psychiatric services, using 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. Then 88 individuals were randomly selected from the adult general population to assess internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and known group validity.In the clinical settings, Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.88 and item-total correlation ranged from 0.71 to 0.78 in various domains. The correlation between SDS and SF-36 (P< 0.001 was significant in all the areas of the performance; and neither of the correlations was statistically significant when SDS and GAF were compared. In the general population study, the SDS met a good internal consistency (α = 0.81 and known group validity, and the inter-rater reliability was perfect for "school/work responsibility ."The Persian translation of the SDS is a simple and short scale, and it seems to be a valid scale for the measurement of disability in clinical settings and in the Iranian general population.

  18. Towards New Empirical Versions of Financial and Accounting Models Corrected for Measurement Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Francois-Éric Racicot; Raymond Théoret; Alain Coen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new empirical version of the Fama and French Model based on the Hausman (1978) specification test and aimed at discarding measurement errors in the variables. The proposed empirical framework is general enough to be used for correcting other financial and accounting models of measurement errors. Removing measurement errors is important at many levels as information disclosure, corporate governance and protection of investors.

  19. Objective assessment of movement competence in children using wearable sensors: An instrumented version of the TGMD-2 locomotor subtest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Maria Cristina; Pacini Panebianco, G; Polman, R; Stagni, R

    2017-07-01

    Movement competence (MC) is defined as the development of sufficient skill to assure successful performance in different physical activities. Monitoring children MC during maturation is fundamental to detect early minor delays and define effective intervention. To this purpose, several MC assessment batteries are available. When evaluating movement strategies, with the aim of identifying specific skill components that may need improving, widespread MC assessment is limited by high time consumption for scoring and the need for trained operators to ensure reliability. This work aims to facilitate and support the assessment by designing, implementing and validating an instrumented version of the TGMD-2 locomotor subtest based on Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) to quantify MC in children rapidly and objectively. 45 typically developing children, aged 6-10, performed the TGMD-2 locomotor subtest (six skills). During the tests, children wore five IMUs mounted on lower back, on ankles and on wrists. Sensor and video recordings of the tests were collected. Three expert evaluators performed the standard assessment of TGMD-2. Using theoretical and modelling approaches, algorithms were implemented to automatically score children tests based on IMUs' data. The automatic assessment, compared to the standard one, showed an agreement higher than 87% on average on the entire group for each skill and a reduction of time for scoring from 15 to 2min per participant. Results support the use of IMUs for MC assessment: this approach will allow improving the usability of MC assessment, supporting objectively evaluator decisions and reducing time requirement for the evaluation of large groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. VELMA Ecohydrological Model, Version 2.0 -- Analyzing Green Infrastructure Options for Enhancing Water Quality and Ecosystem Service Co-Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 2-page factsheet describes an enhanced version (2.0) of the VELMA eco-hydrological model. VELMA – Visualizing Ecosystem Land Management Assessments – has been redesigned to assist communities, land managers, policy makers and other decision makers in evaluataing the effecti...

  1. Assessing Stress-Induced Sleep Reactivity in College Students: The European Portuguese Version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST)

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Daniel Ruivo; Allen Gomes, Ana; Drake, Christopher Lawrence; Roth, Thomas; de Azevedo, Maria Helena Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, the comprehensive models of insomnia have exhibited impressive developments. However, there is scarce knowledge on predisposing or vulnerability factors for insomnia. One of the most promising constructs to aid in filling this gap is stress-induced sleep reactivity assessed through self-report. Our aim was to study the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST).

  2. A Turkish Version of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool: Reliability and Validity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Yeşim Yaman; Karabulut, Neziha

    2017-08-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool in critically ill patients. A repeated measures design was used for the study. A convenience sample of 66 patients who had undergone open-heart surgery in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit in Ordu, Turkey, was recruited for the study. The patients were evaluated by using the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool at rest, during a nociceptive procedure (suctioning), and 20 minutes after the procedure while they were conscious and intubated after surgery. The Turkish version of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool has shown statistically acceptable levels of validity and reliability. Inter-rater reliability was supported by moderate-to-high-weighted κ coefficients (weighted κ coefficient = 0.55 to 1.00). For concurrent validity, significant associations were found between the scores on the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool and the Behavioral Pain Scale scores. Discriminant validity was also supported by higher scores during suctioning (a nociceptive procedure) versus non-nociceptive procedures. The internal consistency of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool was 0.72 during a nociceptive procedure and 0.71 during a non-nociceptive procedure. The validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool was determined to be acceptable for pain assessment in critical care, especially for patients who cannot communicate verbally. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Description and evaluation of the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Emmons

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4 is an offline global chemical transport model particularly suited for studies of the troposphere. The updates of the model from its previous version MOZART-2 are described, including an expansion of the chemical mechanism to include more detailed hydrocarbon chemistry and bulk aerosols. Online calculations of a number of processes, such as dry deposition, emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes and photolysis frequencies, are now included. Results from an eight-year simulation (2000–2007 are presented and evaluated. The MOZART-4 source code and standard input files are available for download from the NCAR Community Data Portal (http://cdp.ucar.edu.

  4. A one-dimensional material transfer model for HECTR version 1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, A.S.; Wong, C.C.

    1991-08-01

    HECTR (Hydrogen Event Containment Transient Response) is a lumped-parameter computer code developed for calculating the pressure-temperature response to combustion in a nuclear power plant containment building. The code uses a control-volume approach and subscale models to simulate the mass, momentum, and energy transfer occurring in the containment during a loss-of-collant-accident (LOCA). This document describes one-dimensional subscale models for mass and momentum transfer, and the modifications to the code required to implement them. Two problems were analyzed: the first corresponding to a standard problem studied with previous HECTR versions, the second to experiments. The performance of the revised code relative to previous HECTR version is discussed as is the ability of the code to model the experiments. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. The Hamburg Oceanic Carbon Cycle Circulation Model. Version 1. Version 'HAMOCC2s' for long time integrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, C.; Maier-Reimer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    The Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle Circulation Model (HAMOCC, configuration HAMOCC2s) predicts the atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure (as induced by oceanic processes), production rates of biogenic particulate matter, and geochemical tracer distributions in the water column as well as the bioturbated sediment. Besides the carbon cycle this model version includes also the marine silicon cycle (silicic acid in the water column and the sediment pore waters, biological opal production, opal flux through the water column and opal sediment pore water interaction). The model is based on the grid and geometry of the LSG ocean general circulation model (see the corresponding manual, LSG=Large Scale Geostrophic) and uses a velocity field provided by the LSG-model in 'frozen' state. In contrast to the earlier version of the model (see Report No. 5), the present version includes a multi-layer sediment model of the bioturbated sediment zone, allowing for variable tracer inventories within the complete model system. (orig.)

  6. Astral V2.1: a new version to better assess post-accidental situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmon, Ph.; Mourlon, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    Should an important release of radionuclides occur in the environment, one would quickly have to assess radionuclide concentration in media and foodstuff, deduce the potential exposition of concerned populations to the radiations, predict the evolution of the situation and propose different scenarios of managing the contaminated zones. To achieve this, the ASTRAL code was created, which can be used by a relatively large group of people composing crisis centers or making predictive impact studies. The starting point of the assessments is the ground deposit of radionuclides: the atmospheric dispersion phase and the cloud exposure are not taken into account here. The calculations achieved concern time evolution of radionuclide concentration in compartments of the agricultural and forest food chain as well as assessment of doses due to external and internal exposure. These values are compared to regulation limits and/or intervention levels. Different simulations of contaminated zones management can be led by applying counter-measures, dispositions meant to reduce the accident impact on environment and populations. The seventy radionuclides taken into account in the present version are some of those met in case of accidents or during the exploitation of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). They relate to 37 elements that are: Ag, Am, Ba, Br, Cd, Ce, Cl, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, I, Ir, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Np, Pm, Pr, Rb, Rh, Ru, Sb, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc, Te, Y, Zn, Zr. On a temporal point of view, the predictions extend to 3 years after the deposition. The internet technology chosen for this version offer important advantages: the spreading and maintenance of the tool are very easy, the code may be installed on a portable computer, the access to results is much quicker, the interface is very user friendly, so that no training is needed to perform calculations. As for any radioecological tool, a large number of parameters intervene in the calculations. All parameters can be

  7. Assessing the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), German language version in Swiss university hospitals--a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Natalie; Küng, Kaspar; Sereika, Susan M; Engberg, Sandra; Sexton, Bryan; Schwendimann, René

    2013-09-10

    Improving patient safety has become a major focus of clinical care and research over the past two decades. An institution's patient safety climate represents an essential component of ensuring a safe environment and thereby can be vital to the prevention of adverse events. Covering six patient safety related factors, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) is a validated and widely used instrument to measure the patient safety climate in clinical areas. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the German language version of the SAQ. A survey was carried out in two University Hospitals in Switzerland in autumn 2009 where the SAQ was distributed to a sample of 406 nurses and physicians in medical and surgical wards. Following the American Educational Research Association guidelines, we tested the questionnaire validity by levels of evidence: content validity, internal structure and relations to other variables. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine factor structure. Cronbach's alphas and inter-item correlations were calculated to examine internal consistency reliability. A total of 319 questionnaires were completed representing an overall response rate of 78.6%. For three items, the item content validity index was <0.75. Confirmatory factor analysis showed acceptable model fit (RMSEA = 0.045; CFI = 0.944) for the six-factor model. Additional exploratory factor analysis could not identify a better factor model. SAQ factor scores showed positive correlations with the Safety Organizing Scale (r = .56-.72). The SAQ German version showed moderate to strong internal consistency reliability indices (Cronbach alpha = .65-.83). The German language version of the SAQ demonstrated acceptable to good psychometric properties and therefore shows promise to be a sound instrument to measure patient safety climate in Swiss hospital wards. However, the low item content validity and large number of missing responses for several items suggest

  8. Assessment of energy savings and of side effects associated with consumption cutoffs. Complete report + abridged version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    As France has been the first European country to implement a legal and regulatory framework which acknowledges the role of cut-off operators, and promotes their direct participation to markets, this report aims at preparing an evolution of this framework, notably by focusing on the notion of energy saving. It highlights the importance of definitions regarding levels of consumption deferment and of energy saving associated with consumption cutoffs. The report first analyses the context: assessment of energy savings associated with consumption cutoffs, discussion of the existence or absence of a typical profile of consumption deferment, and definition of a consumption deferment rate, importance of these works for cut-off integration into the electric power system. It proposes a presentation of the present status of knowledge on energy savings and side effects, defines the energy saving rate, and discusses the sensitivity of this rate to calculation parameters. The next part presents the method adopted to analyse results obtained during experiments. The obtained results are then discussed by distinguishing those obtained in the industrial sector, in the tertiary sector, and in the residential sector. Economic studies are then reported regarding the impact of a wrong choice for the deferment rate on market mechanism rules, and the impact of an explicit taking of the deferment into account. Appendices contain detailed presentations of some specific aspects of these assessments and studies. An abridged version of the report is then provided

  9. Assessment of time management skills: psychometric properties of the Swedish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeslätt, Gunnel Kristina; Holmqvist, Kajsa Lidström; White, Suzanne; Holmefur, Marie

    2018-05-01

    Persons with impaired time management skills are often in need of occupational therapy. Valid and reliable instruments to assess time management and organizational skills are needed for the evaluation of intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S) for persons with and without impaired time management skills. A total of 238 persons participated in the study, of whom 94 had self-reported impaired time management skills due to mental disorders such as schizophrenic spectrum or neurodevelopmental disorders such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mild intellectual disabilities, and 144 persons had no reported impaired time management skills. Rasch analysis was used to analyze data. Three subscales were detected: the time management subscale with 11 items, the organization & planning subscale with 11 items, and the subscale of regulation of emotions with 5 items, with excellent to acceptable psychometric properties. The conclusions were that: ATMS-S is a valid instrument for self-rating of time management, organization & planning and for the regulation of emotions. ATMS-S can be useful for persons with mental disorders including mild neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Reliability and validity of migraine disability assessment questionnaire-Thai version (Thai-MIDAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seethong, Piman; Nimmannit, Akarin; Chaisewikul, Rungsan; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Chotinaiwattarakul, Wattanachai

    2013-02-01

    To assess the validity and test-retest reliability of a Thai translation of the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) Questionnaire in Thai patients with migraine. Migraineurs from the Headache Clinic in Siriraj Hospital were recruited and asked to complete a 13-weeks diary and answered the Thai-MIDAS at once. Some participants were asked to provide the 2nd Thai-MIDAS in the next 2 weeks for test-retest reliability. Ninety-three patients had completed the 13-weeks diaries. Age range was 18-58 years with mean 37.69 +/- 9.60 years. All 5 items and the total score of Thai-MIDAS were moderately correlated with data from 13-weeks diary (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.32-0.62). The test-retest reliability of the total score of Thai-MIDAS in 30 patients demonstrated a highly reliable degree of intraclass correlation (ICC = 0.76, 95% CI 0.49-0.88). The present study reveals that the Thai-MIDAS has satisfactory validity and reliability in comparison with the original English MIDAS version.

  11. Single-Column Modeling of Convection During the CINDY2011/DYNAMO Field Campaign With the CNRM Climate Model Version 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Lathif, Ahmat Younous; Roehrig, Romain; Beau, Isabelle; Douville, Hervé

    2018-03-01

    A single-column model (SCM) approach is used to assess the CNRM climate model (CNRM-CM) version 6 ability to represent the properties of the apparent heat source (Q1) and moisture sink (Q2) as observed during the 3 month CINDY2011/DYNAMO field campaign, over its Northern Sounding Array (NSA). The performance of the CNRM SCM is evaluated in a constrained configuration in which the latent and sensible heat surface fluxes are prescribed, as, when forced by observed sea surface temperature, the model is strongly limited by the underestimate of the surface fluxes, most probably related to the SCM forcing itself. The model exhibits a significant cold bias in the upper troposphere, near 200 hPa, and strong wet biases close to the surface and above 700 hPa. The analysis of the Q1 and Q2 profile distributions emphasizes the properties of the convective parameterization of the CNRM-CM physics. The distribution of the Q2 profile is particularly challenging. The model strongly underestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep moistening profiles, which likely involve misrepresentation of the shallow and congestus convection. Finally, a statistical approach is used to objectively define atmospheric regimes and construct a typical convection life cycle. A composite analysis shows that the CNRM SCM captures the general transition from bottom-heavy to mid-heavy to top-heavy convective heating. Some model errors are shown to be related to the stratiform regimes. The moistening observed during the shallow and congestus convection regimes also requires further improvements of this CNRM-CM physics.

  12. The assessment of skin picking in adolescence: psychometric properties of the Skin Picking Scale-Revised (German version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallinat, Christina; Keuthen, Nancy J; Stefini, Annette; Backenstrass, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Skin picking disorder has received growing attention since the release of DSM-5, yet there are no evidence-based assessment instruments for adolescent samples. The present study examines the psychometric properties of the Skin Picking Scale-Revised (SPS-R, German version) in adolescents. A total of 76 adolescents (96% female) completed the SPS-R, the Clinical Psychological Diagnostic System (KPD-38), and a questionnaire assessing demographics and clinical characteristics online. The SPS-R had high internal consistency (α = 0.89) and significant small-to-medium correlations with reduced competence skills, psychological impairment, general life satisfaction, social support, and social problems on the KPD-38. Similar to prior findings for adults, an exploratory factor analysis suggested a two-factor model for the SPS-R in adolescents. Group comparisons failed to show significant differences on SPS-R scores between participants with and without dermatological conditions. The current results suggest that the SPS-R can be useful in adolescent samples as a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of skin picking severity. Future research investigating scale validity and factor structure in a clinical sample of adolescent skin pickers is warranted.

  13. Digital elevation models for site investigation programme in Oskarshamn. Site description version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brydsten, Lars; Stroemgren, Maarten [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Biology and Environmental Science

    2005-06-01

    In the Oskarshamn area, a digital elevation model has been produced using elevation data from many elevation sources on both land and sea. Many elevation model users are only interested in elevation models over land, so the model has been designed in three versions: Version 1 describes land surface, lake water surface, and sea bottom. Version 2 describes land surface, sediment levels at lake bottoms, and sea bottoms. Version 3 describes land surface, sediment levels at lake bottoms, and sea surface. In cases where the different sources of data were not in point form 'such as existing elevation models of land or depth lines from nautical charts' they have been converted to point values using GIS software. Because data from some sources often overlaps with data from other sources, several tests were conducted to determine if both sources of data or only one source would be included in the dataset used for the interpolation procedure. The tests resulted in the decision to use only the source judged to be of highest quality for most areas with overlapping data sources. All data were combined into a database of approximately 3.3 million points unevenly spread over an area of about 800 km{sup 2}. The large number of data points made it difficult to construct the model with a single interpolation procedure, the area was divided into 28 sub-models that were processed one by one and finally merged together into one single model. The software ArcGis 8.3 and its extension Geostatistical Analysis were used for the interpolation. The Ordinary Kriging method was used for interpolation. This method allows both a cross validation and a validation before the interpolation is conducted. Cross validation with different Kriging parameters were performed and the model with the most reasonable statistics was chosen. Finally, a validation with the most appropriate Kriging parameters was performed in order to verify that the model fit unmeasured localities. Since both the

  14. Digital elevation models for site investigation programme in Oskarshamn. Site description version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brydsten, Lars; Stroemgren, Maarten

    2005-06-01

    In the Oskarshamn area, a digital elevation model has been produced using elevation data from many elevation sources on both land and sea. Many elevation model users are only interested in elevation models over land, so the model has been designed in three versions: Version 1 describes land surface, lake water surface, and sea bottom. Version 2 describes land surface, sediment levels at lake bottoms, and sea bottoms. Version 3 describes land surface, sediment levels at lake bottoms, and sea surface. In cases where the different sources of data were not in point form 'such as existing elevation models of land or depth lines from nautical charts' they have been converted to point values using GIS software. Because data from some sources often overlaps with data from other sources, several tests were conducted to determine if both sources of data or only one source would be included in the dataset used for the interpolation procedure. The tests resulted in the decision to use only the source judged to be of highest quality for most areas with overlapping data sources. All data were combined into a database of approximately 3.3 million points unevenly spread over an area of about 800 km 2 . The large number of data points made it difficult to construct the model with a single interpolation procedure, the area was divided into 28 sub-models that were processed one by one and finally merged together into one single model. The software ArcGis 8.3 and its extension Geostatistical Analysis were used for the interpolation. The Ordinary Kriging method was used for interpolation. This method allows both a cross validation and a validation before the interpolation is conducted. Cross validation with different Kriging parameters were performed and the model with the most reasonable statistics was chosen. Finally, a validation with the most appropriate Kriging parameters was performed in order to verify that the model fit unmeasured localities. Since both the quality and the

  15. Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) for the assessment of non-technical skills during resuscitation: Validation of the French version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignan, Maxime; Koch, François-Xavier; Chaix, Jordane; Phellouzat, Pierre; Binauld, Gery; Collomb Muret, Roselyne; Cooper, Simon J; Labarère, José; Danel, Vincent; Viglino, Damien; Debaty, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of team performances during medical simulation must rely on validated and reproducible tools. Our aim was to build and validate a French version of the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) score, which was developed for the assessment of team performance and non-technical skills during resuscitation. A forward and backward translation of the initial TEAM score was made, with the agreement and the final validation by the original author. Ten medical teams were recruited and performed a standardized cardiac arrest simulation scenario. Teams were videotaped and nine raters evaluate non-technical skills for each team thanks to the French TEAM Score. Psychometric properties of the score were then evaluated. French TEAM score showed an excellent reliability with a Cronbach coefficient of 0.95. Mean correlation coefficient between each item and the global score range was 0.78. The inter-rater reliability measured by intraclass correlation coefficient of the global score was 0.93. Finally, expert teams had higher French TEAM score than intermediate and novice teams. The French TEAM score shows good psychometric properties to evaluate team performance during cardiac arrest simulation. Its utilization could help in the assessment of non-technical skills during simulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal modelling. Preliminary site description. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Back, Paer-Erik; Bengtsson, Anna; Laendell, Maerta [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    This report presents the thermal site descriptive model for the Forsmark area, version 1.2. The main objective of this report is to present the thermal modelling work where data has been identified, quality controlled, evaluated and summarised in order to make an upscaling to lithological domain level possible. The thermal conductivity at canister scale has been modelled for two different lithological domains (RFM029 and RFM012, both dominated by granite to granodiorite (101057)). A main modelling approach has been used to determine the mean value of the thermal conductivity. Two alternative/complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the spatial variability of the thermal conductivity at domain level. The thermal modelling approaches are based on the lithological model for the Forsmark area, version 1.2 together with rock type models constituted from measured and calculated (from mineral composition) thermal conductivities. Results indicate that the mean of thermal conductivity is expected to exhibit a small variation between the different domains, 3.46 W/(mxK) for RFM012 to 3.55 W/(mxK) for RFM029. The spatial distribution of the thermal conductivity does not follow a simple model. Lower and upper 95% confidence limits are based on the modelling results, but have been rounded of to only two significant figures. Consequently, the lower limit is 2.9 W/(mxK), while the upper is 3.8 W/(mxK). This is applicable to both the investigated domains. The temperature dependence is rather small with a decrease in thermal conductivity of 10.0% per 100 deg C increase in temperature for the dominating rock type. There are a number of important uncertainties associated with these results. One of the uncertainties considers the representative scale for the canister. Another important uncertainty is the methodological uncertainties associated with the upscaling of thermal conductivity from cm-scale to canister scale. In addition, the representativeness of rock samples is

  17. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  18. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan

    2007-09-01

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  19. COMODI: an ontology to characterise differences in versions of computational models in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharm, Martin; Waltemath, Dagmar; Mendes, Pedro; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2016-07-11

    Open model repositories provide ready-to-reuse computational models of biological systems. Models within those repositories evolve over time, leading to different model versions. Taken together, the underlying changes reflect a model's provenance and thus can give valuable insights into the studied biology. Currently, however, changes cannot be semantically interpreted. To improve this situation, we developed an ontology of terms describing changes in models. The ontology can be used by scientists and within software to characterise model updates at the level of single changes. When studying or reusing a model, these annotations help with determining the relevance of a change in a given context. We manually studied changes in selected models from BioModels and the Physiome Model Repository. Using the BiVeS tool for difference detection, we then performed an automatic analysis of changes in all models published in these repositories. The resulting set of concepts led us to define candidate terms for the ontology. In a final step, we aggregated and classified these terms and built the first version of the ontology. We present COMODI, an ontology needed because COmputational MOdels DIffer. It empowers users and software to describe changes in a model on the semantic level. COMODI also enables software to implement user-specific filter options for the display of model changes. Finally, COMODI is a step towards predicting how a change in a model influences the simulation results. COMODI, coupled with our algorithm for difference detection, ensures the transparency of a model's evolution, and it enhances the traceability of updates and error corrections. COMODI is encoded in OWL. It is openly available at http://comodi.sems.uni-rostock.de/ .

  20. Main modelling features of the ASTEC V2.1 major version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelard, P.; Belon, S.; Bosland, L.; Carénini, L.; Coindreau, O.; Cousin, F.; Marchetto, C.; Nowack, H.; Piar, L.; Chailan, L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent modelling improvements of the ASTEC European severe accident code are outlined. • Key new physical models now available in the ASTEC V2.1 major version are described. • ASTEC progress towards a multi-design reactor code is illustrated for BWR and PHWR. • ASTEC strong link with the on-going EC CESAM FP7 project is emphasized. • Main remaining modelling issues (on which IRSN efforts are now directing) are given. - Abstract: A new major version of the European severe accident integral code ASTEC, developed by IRSN with some GRS support, was delivered in November 2015 to the ASTEC worldwide community. Main modelling features of this V2.1 version are summarised in this paper. In particular, the in-vessel coupling technique between the reactor coolant system thermal-hydraulics module and the core degradation module has been strongly re-engineered to remove some well-known weaknesses of the former V2.0 series. The V2.1 version also includes new core degradation models specifically addressing BWR and PHWR reactor types, as well as several other physical modelling improvements, notably on reflooding of severely damaged cores, Zircaloy oxidation under air atmosphere, corium coolability during corium concrete interaction and source term evaluation. Moreover, this V2.1 version constitutes the back-bone of the CESAM FP7 project, which final objective is to further improve ASTEC for use in Severe Accident Management analysis of the Gen.II–III nuclear power plants presently under operation or foreseen in near future in Europe. As part of this European project, IRSN efforts to continuously improve both code numerical robustness and computing performances at plant scale as well as users’ tools are being intensified. Besides, ASTEC will continue capitalising the whole knowledge on severe accidents phenomenology by progressively keeping physical models at the state of the art through a regular feed-back from the interpretation of the current and

  1. GARUSO - Version 1.0. Uncertainty model for multipath ultrasonic transit time gas flow meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunde, Per; Froeysa, Kjell-Eivind; Vestrheim, Magne

    1997-09-01

    This report describes an uncertainty model for ultrasonic transit time gas flow meters configured with parallel chords, and a PC program, GARUSO Version 1.0, implemented for calculation of the meter`s relative expanded uncertainty. The program, which is based on the theoretical uncertainty model, is used to carry out a simplified and limited uncertainty analysis for a 12`` 4-path meter, where examples of input and output uncertainties are given. The model predicts a relative expanded uncertainty for the meter at a level which further justifies today`s increasing tendency to use this type of instruments for fiscal metering of natural gas. 52 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. A multisensor evaluation of the asymmetric convective model, version 2, in southeast Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolling, Jenna S; Pleim, Jonathan E; Jeffries, Harvey E; Vizuete, William

    2013-01-01

    There currently exist a number of planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes that can represent the effects of turbulence in daytime convective conditions, although these schemes remain a large source of uncertainty in meteorology and air quality model simulations. This study evaluates a recently developed combined local and nonlocal closure PBL scheme, the Asymmetric Convective Model, version 2 (ACM2), against PBL observations taken from radar wind profilers, a ground-based lidar, and multiple daytime radiosonde balloon launches. These observations were compared against predictions of PBLs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model version 3.1 with the ACM2 PBL scheme option, and the Fifth-Generation Meteorological Model (MM5) version 3.7.3 with the Eta PBL scheme option that is currently being used to develop ozone control strategies in southeast Texas. MM5 and WRF predictions during the regulatory modeling episode were evaluated on their ability to predict the rise and fall of the PBL during daytime convective conditions across southeastern Texas. The MM5 predicted PBLs consistently underpredicted observations, and were also less than the WRF PBL predictions. The analysis reveals that the MM5 predicted a slower rising and shallower PBL not representative of the daytime urban boundary layer. Alternatively, the WRF model predicted a more accurate PBL evolution improving the root mean square error (RMSE), both temporally and spatially. The WRF model also more accurately predicted vertical profiles of temperature and moisture in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Inspection of median surface temperature and moisture time-series plots revealed higher predicted surface temperatures in WRF and more surface moisture in MM5. These could not be attributed to surface heat fluxes, and thus the differences in performance of the WRF and MM5 models are likely due to the PBL schemes. An accurate depiction of the diurnal evolution of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is

  3. Development of the Korean version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, J C; Lee, D Y; Kim, K W; Lee, J H; Jhoo, J H; Lee, K U; Ha, J; Woo, J I

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was the development of the Korean Version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-K). ADAS-K was administrated to 84 AD patients as well as 105 non-demented control subjects. Three aspects of reliability were tested. To evaluate the validity of ADAS-K, discriminant validity and concurrent validity were tested. To evaluate the sensitivity of ADAS-K to disease severity, all subjects, AD patients and control subjects, were grouped by CDR scale and their mean scores on ADAS-K were compared. ADAS-K demonstrated high levels of reliability. Mean ADAS-K scores for AD patients were significantly different from the control group (p ADAS-K exhibited significant correlations with other tests and scales (range 0.45-0.85, p ADAS-K displayed high diagnostic efficacy and the optimal cut-off point was selected between 18/19. ADAS-K was able to discriminate the degree of AD severity according to CDR classification. Our results suggested that ADAS-K-cog was sensitive to very mild AD. We demonstrated that ADAS-K is a reliable and valid instrument not only for AD diagnosis but also for evaluation of its severity. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The Dimensional Assessment of Personality Psychopathology Basic Questionnaire: shortened versions item analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Àngel; Blanco, Eduardo; Martí-Guiu, Maite; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-13

    This study has been designed to evaluate and replicate the psychometric properties of the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Psychopathology-Basic Questionnaire (DAPP-BQ) and the DAPP-BQ short form (DAPP-SF) in a large Spanish general population sample. Additionally, we have generated a reduced form called DAPP-90, using a strategy based on a structural equation modeling (SEM) methodology in two independent samples, a calibration and a validation sample. The DAPP-90 scales obtained a more satisfactory fit on SEM adjustment values (average: TLI > .97 and RMSEA assessment of patients in hospital consultation or in brief psychological assessments.

  5. Assessing Autism in Adults: An Evaluation of the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview-Adult Version (3Di-Adult)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, William; Clarke, Kiri; McKenner, Michele; Strydom, Andre; Crabtree, Jason; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Skuse, David

    2018-01-01

    We developed a brief, informant-report interview for assessing autism spectrum conditions (ASC) in adults, called the Developmental, Dimensional and Diagnostic Interview-Adult Version (3Di-Adult); and completed a preliminary evaluation. Informant reports were collected for participants with ASC (n = 39), a non-clinical comparison group (n = 29)…

  6. Persian version of frontal assessment battery: Correlations with formal measures of executive functioning and providing normative data for Persian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaadi, Sina; Ashrafi, Farzad; Omidbeigi, Mahmoud; Nasiri, Zahra; Pakdaman, Hossein; Amini-Harandi, Ali

    2016-01-05

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) mainly involves executive function (EF). The frontal assessment battery (FAB) is an efficient tool for the assessment of EFs. The aims of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of the psychometric properties of the Persian version of FAB and assess its correlation with formal measures of EFs to provide normative data for the Persian version of FAB in patients with PD. The study recruited 149 healthy participants and 49 patients with idiopathic PD. In PD patients, FAB results were compared to their performance on EF tests. Reliability analysis involved test-retest reliability and internal consistency, whereas validity analysis involved convergent validity approach. FAB scores compared in normal controls and in PD patients matched for age, education, and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score. In PD patients, FAB scores were significantly decreased compared to normal controls, and correlated with Stroop test and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). In healthy subjects, FAB scores varied according to the age, education, and MMSE. In the FAB subtest analysis, the performances of PD patients were worse than the healthy participants on similarities, fluency tasks, and Luria's motor series. Persian version of FAB could be used as a reliable scale for the assessment of frontal lobe functions in Iranian patients with PD. Furthermore, normative data provided for the Persian version of this test improve the accuracy and confidence in the clinical application of the FAB.

  7. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3 Version 7 based on the BETHSY Test 6.2 TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.J.; Roth, P.A.; Schultz, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a discussion of the BETHSY test 6.2 TC which was conducted to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena during a 5% cold leg SBLOCA and to provide high quality data for advanced thermal-hydraulic code assessment. BETHSY test 6.2 TC was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 version 7o

  8. The Kuder Skills Assessment-College and Adult Version: Development and Initial Validation in a College Business Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottinghaus, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the Kuder Skills Assessment-College and Adult version (KSA-CA; Rottinghaus, 2006), a new measure incorporating advances in the measurement of self-efficacy across 16 basic occupational domains (e.g., finance, information technology) and the six Kuder Clusters. Similar to the original development sample, all scales of the…

  9. Psychometric properties of a culture-adapted Spanish version of AIDA (Assessment of Identity Development in Adolescence) in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassin, Moises; De Castro, Filipa; Arango, Ivan; Goth, Kirstin

    2013-01-01

    The construct "identity" was discussed to be integrated as an important criterion for diagnosing personality disorders in DSM-5. According to Kernberg, identity diffusion is one of the relevant underlying structures in terms of personality organization for developing psychopathology, especially borderline personality disorder. Therefore, it would be important to differentiate healthy from pathological development already in adolescence. With the questionnaire termed AIDA (Assessment of Identity Development in Adolescence), a reliable and valid self-rating inventory was introduced by Goth, Foelsch, Schlueter-Mueller, & Schmeck (2012) to assess pathology-related identity development in healthy and disturbed adolescents. To test the usefulness of the questionnaire in Mexico, we contributed to the development of a culture-specific Spanish translation of AIDA and tested the reliability and aspects of validity of the questionnaire in a juvenile Mexican sample. An adapted Spanish translation of AIDA was developed by an expert panel from Chile, Mexico, and Spain in cooperation with the original authors, focusing on content equivalence and comprehensibility by considering specific idioms, life circumstances, and culture-specific aspects. The psychometric properties of the Spanish version were first tested in Mexico. Participants were 265 students from a state school (N = 110) and private school (N = 155), aged between 12 and 19 years (mean 14.15 years). Of these, 44.9% were boys and 55.1% were girls. Item characteristics were analyzed by several parameters, scale reliability by Cronbach's Alpha, and systematic effects of gender, age, and socioeconomics by an analysis of variance (ANOVA). We evaluated aspects of criterion validity in a juvenile justice system sample (N = 41) of adolescent boys in conflict with the law who displayed various types of behavioral problems by comparing the AIDA scores of a subgroup with signs for borderline pathology (N = 14

  10. Reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item CTS symptoms scale for outcomes assessment in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Roberto S; Martin-Hidalgo, Yolanda; Reboso-Morales, Luis; Atroshi, Isam

    2016-03-03

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms scale (CTS-6). In this cross-sectional study 40 patients diagnosed with CTS based on clinical and neurophysiologic criteria, completed the standard Spanish versions of the CTS-6 and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (QuickDASH) scales on two occasions with a 1-week interval. Internal-consistency reliability was assessed with the Cronbach alpha coefficient and test-retest reliability with the intraclass correlation coefficient, two way random effect model and absolute agreement definition (ICC2,1). Cross-sectional precision was analyzed with the Standard Error of the Measurement (SEM). Longitudinal precision for test-retest reliability coefficient was assessed with the Standard Error of the Measurement difference (SEMdiff) and the Minimal Detectable Change at 95 % confidence level (MDC95). For assessing construct validity it was hypothesized that the CTS-6 would have a strong positive correlation with the QuickDASH, analyzed with the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The standard Spanish version of the CTS-6 presented a Cronbach alpha of 0.81 with a SEM of 0.3. Test-retest reliability showed an ICC of 0.85 with a SRMdiff of 0.36 and a MDC95 of 0.7. The correlation between CTS-6 and the QuickDASH was concordant with the a priori formulated construct hypothesis (r 0.69) CONCLUSIONS: The standard Spanish version of the 6-item CTS symptoms scale showed good internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity for outcomes assessment in CTS. The CTS-6 will be useful to clinicians and researchers in Spanish speaking parts of the world. The use of standardized outcome measures across countries also will facilitate comparison of research results in carpal tunnel syndrome.

  11. Statistical model of fractures and deformation zones. Preliminary site description, Laxemar subarea, version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanson, Jan; Forssberg, Ola [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Fox, Aaron; La Pointe, Paul [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)

    2005-10-15

    The goal of this summary report is to document the data sources, software tools, experimental methods, assumptions, and model parameters in the discrete-fracture network (DFN) model for the local model volume in Laxemar, version 1.2. The model parameters presented herein are intended for use by other project modeling teams. Individual modeling teams may elect to simplify or use only a portion of the DFN model, depending on their needs. This model is not intended to be a flow model or a mechanical model; as such, only the geometrical characterization is presented. The derivations of the hydraulic or mechanical properties of the fractures or their subsurface connectivities are not within the scope of this report. This model represents analyses carried out on particular data sets. If additional data are obtained, or values for existing data are changed or excluded, the conclusions reached in this report, and the parameter values calculated, may change as well. The model volume is divided into two subareas; one located on the Simpevarp peninsula adjacent to the power plant (Simpevarp), and one further to the west (Laxemar). The DFN parameters described in this report were determined by analysis of data collected within the local model volume. As such, the final DFN model is only valid within this local model volume and the modeling subareas (Laxemar and Simpevarp) within.

  12. RELAP5-3D developmental assessment: Comparison of version 4.2.1i on Linux and Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.2i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  13. Revisiting the psychometric properties of a revised Danish version of the McGill ingestive skills assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Kristiansen, Dorte Melgaard

    2017-01-01

    Background: During a longstanding validation process of the Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment (MISA2-DK) for measuring mealtime performance in dysphagic clients, extensive revisions have been undertaken. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the psychometric properties...... of this revised version. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 328 adults referred to occupational therapy for swallowing evaluation were included. MISA2-DK with 36 items distributed into four subscales (positioning for meals, self-feeding skills, liquid ingestion, and solid ingestion) was administered...

  14. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment. Comparison of Version 4.3.4i on Linux and Windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayless, Paul David

    2015-01-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.3i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  15. A computationally efficient description of heterogeneous freezing: A simplified version of the Soccer ball model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Ervens, Barbara; Clauss, Tina; Voigtländer, Jens; Wex, Heike; Hartmann, Susan; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In a recent study, the Soccer ball model (SBM) was introduced for modeling and/or parameterizing heterogeneous ice nucleation processes. The model applies classical nucleation theory. It allows for a consistent description of both apparently singular and stochastic ice nucleation behavior, by distributing contact angles over the nucleation sites of a particle population assuming a Gaussian probability density function. The original SBM utilizes the Monte Carlo technique, which hampers its usage in atmospheric models, as fairly time-consuming calculations must be performed to obtain statistically significant results. Thus, we have developed a simplified and computationally more efficient version of the SBM. We successfully used the new SBM to parameterize experimental nucleation data of, e.g., bacterial ice nucleation. Both SBMs give identical results; however, the new model is computationally less expensive as confirmed by cloud parcel simulations. Therefore, it is a suitable tool for describing heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in atmospheric models.

  16. Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, FM

    2004-12-21

    This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit

  17. The modified version of the centre-of-mass correction to the bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelski, J.; Tatur, S.

    1986-01-01

    We propose the improvement of the recently considered version of the centre-of-mass correction to the bag model. We identify a nucleon bag with physical nucleon confined in an external fictitious spherical well potential with an additional external fictitious pressure characterized by the parameter b. The introduction of such a pressure restores the conservation of the canonical energy-momentum tensor, which was lost in the former model. We propose several methods to determine the numerical value of b. We calculate the Roper resonance mass as well as static electroweak parameters of a nucleon with centre-of-mass corrections taken into account. 7 refs., 1 tab. (author)

  18. Utility of the UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment-Brief Japanese version: discriminative ability and relation to neurocognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Sumiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment Brief (the UPSA-B has been widely used for evaluating functional capacity in patients with schizophrenia. The utility of the battery in a wide range of cultural contexts has been of concern among developers. The current study investigated the validity of the Japanese version of the UPSA-B as a measure of functional capacity and as a co-primary for neurocognion. Sixty-four Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 83 healthy adults entered the study. The Japanese version of the UPSA-B (UPSA-B Japanese version and the MATRICS Cognitive Consensus Battery Japanese version (MCCB Japanese version were administered. Normal controls performed significantly better than patients, with large effect sizes for the Total and the subscale scores of the UPSA-B. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis revealed that the optimal cut-off point for the UPSA-B Total score was estimated at around 80. The UPSA-B Total score was significantly correlated with the MCCB Composite score and several domain scores, indicating the relationship between this co-primary measure and overall cognitive functioning in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. The results obtained here suggest that the UPSA-B Japanese version is an effective tool for evaluating disturbances of daily-living skills linked to cognitive functioning in schizophrenia, providing an identifiable cut-off point and relationships to neurocognition. Further research is warranted to evaluate the psychometrical properties and response to treatment of the Japanese version of the UPSA-B.

  19. MESOI Version 2.0: an interactive mesoscale Lagrangian puff dispersion model with deposition and decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Glantz, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    MESOI Version 2.0 is an interactive Lagrangian puff model for estimating the transport, diffusion, deposition and decay of effluents released to the atmosphere. The model is capable of treating simultaneous releases from as many as four release points, which may be elevated or at ground-level. The puffs are advected by a horizontal wind field that is defined in three dimensions. The wind field may be adjusted for expected topographic effects. The concentration distribution within the puffs is initially assumed to be Gaussian in the horizontal and vertical. However, the vertical concentration distribution is modified by assuming reflection at the ground and the top of the atmospheric mixing layer. Material is deposited on the surface using a source depletion, dry deposition model and a washout coefficient model. The model also treats the decay of a primary effluent species and the ingrowth and decay of a single daughter species using a first order decay process. This report is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the theoretical and mathematical bases upon which MESOI Version 2.0 is based. The second part contains the MESOI computer code. The programs were written in the ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and were developed on a VAX 11/780 computer. 43 references, 14 figures, 13 tables

  20. A p-version embedded model for simulation of concrete temperature fields with cooling pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pipe cooling is an effective method of mass concrete temperature control, but its accurate and convenient numerical simulation is still a cumbersome problem. An improved embedded model, considering the water temperature variation along the pipe, was proposed for simulating the temperature field of early-age concrete structures containing cooling pipes. The improved model was verified with an engineering example. Then, the p-version self-adaption algorithm for the improved embedded model was deduced, and the initial values and boundary conditions were examined. Comparison of some numerical samples shows that the proposed model can provide satisfying precision and a higher efficiency. The analysis efficiency can be doubled at the same precision, even for a large-scale element. The p-version algorithm can fit grids of different sizes for the temperature field simulation. The convenience of the proposed algorithm lies in the possibility of locating more pipe segments in one element without the need of so regular a shape as in the explicit model.

  1. Psychometric assessment of the Brazilian version of the Male Body Dissatisfaction Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Berbert de Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The study of male body image has increased substantially, but there are few assessment tools available for this population. The Male Body Dissatisfaction Scale (MBDS has been widely used among students to research body image disturbances and eating disorders. However, the psychometric properties of this instrument have not been tested in the Brazilian context.Objectives To explore the psychometric properties (convergent validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and factor structure of the Brazilian version of the MBDS.Methods Two-hundred sixty-four undergraduate students were evaluated. Pearson’s correlation was used to test the convergent validity of the MBDS and the Drive for Muscularity Scale, the Swansea Muscularity Attitudes Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Eating Attitudes Test-26, and the Commitment to Exercise Scale. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using t-tests for repeated measures and by calculating the coefficient of intraclass correlation. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted, and Cronbach’s α coefficients were determined. A significance level of 5% was adopted.Results The MBDS had an adequate factor structure, with two factors explaining 52.67% of the total variance. It showed excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s α between 0.90 and 0.92, a high intraclass correlation coefficient (0.81, and convergent validity with the drive for muscularity, the psychological commitment to exercise, low self-esteem, and eating disorder risk behaviour measures.Discussion The MBDS appears to be a valid and reliable tool for evaluating Brazilian male body image dissatisfaction.

  2. [The psychometric properties of the Turkish version of Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale (MIDAS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Emel; Eser, Erhan; Şekuri, Cevad; Kültürsay, Hakan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric properties of the Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale (MIDAS). This is a methodological cultural adaptation study. The MIDAS consists of 35-items covering seven domains: physical activity, insecurity, emotional reaction, dependency, diet, concerns over medication, and side effects which are rated on a five-point Likert scale from 1: never to 5:always. The highest score of MIDAS is 100.Quality of life (QOL) decreases as the score of scale increases. Overall 185 myocardial infarction (MI) patients were enrolled in this study. Cronbach alpha was used for the reliability analysis. The criterion validity, structural validity, and sensitivity analysis approach was used for validity analysis. New York Heart Association (NYHA) and the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Functional Classifications (CCSFC) for testing the criterion validity; SF-36 for construct validity testing of the Turkish version of the MIDAS were used. The range of Cronbach alpha values is 0.79-0.90 for seven domains of the scale. No problematic items were observed for the entire scale. Medication related domains of the MIDAS showed considerable floor effects (35.7%-22.7%). Confirmatory Factor analysis indicators [Comparative Fit Index (CFI) =0.95 and Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) =0.075] supported the construct validity of MIDAS. Convergent validity of the MIDAS was confirmed with correlation of SF-36 scale where appropriate. Criterion validity results was also satisfactory by comparing different stages of the NYHA and the CCSFC (pMIDAS is a reliable and valid instrument.

  3. Models for Pesticide Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA considers the toxicity of the pesticide as well as the amount of pesticide to which a person or the environments may be exposed in risk assessment. Scientists use mathematical models to predict pesticide concentrations in exposure assessment.

  4. RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways Version 3. 0 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebla, E.

    1989-01-01

    The RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways is a computer program for calculation of numeric criteria for land application and distribution and marketing of sludges under the sewage-sludge regulations at 40 CFR Part 503. The risk-assessment models covered assume that municipal sludge with specified characteristics is spread across a defined area of ground at a known rate once each year for a given number of years. Risks associated with direct land application of sludge applied after distribution and marketing are both calculated. The computer program calculates the maximum annual loading of contaminants that can be land applied and still meet the risk criteria specified as input. Software Description: The program is written in the Turbo/Basic programming language for implementation on IBM PC/AT or compatible machines using DOS 3.0 or higher operating system. Minimum core storage is 512K.

  5. Validation of the French version of the BACS (the brief assessment of cognition in schizophrenia) among 50 French schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralet, Marie-Cécile; Falissard, Bruno; Neveu, Xavier; Lucas-Ross, Margaret; Eskenazi, Anne-Marie; Keefe, Richard S E

    2007-09-01

    Schizophrenic patients demonstrate impairments in several key dimensions of cognition. These impairments are correlated with important aspects of functional outcome. While assessment of these cognition disorders is increasingly becoming a part of clinical and research practice in schizophrenia, there is no standard and easily administered test battery. The BACS (Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia) has been validated in English language [Keefe RSE, Golberg TE, Harvey PD, Gold JM, Poe MP, Coughenour L. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia: reliability, sensibility, and comparison with a standard neurocognitive battery. Schizophr. Res 2004;68:283-97], and was found to be as sensitive to cognitive dysfunction as a standard battery of tests, with the advantage of requiring less than 35 min to complete. We developed a French adaptation of the BACS and this study tested its ease of administration and concurrent validity. Correlation analyses between the BACS (version A) and a standard battery were performed. A sample of 50 stable schizophrenic patients received the French Version A of the BACS in a first session, and in a second session a standard battery. All the patients completed each of the subtests of the French BACS . The mean duration of completion for the BACS French version was 36 min (S.D.=5.56). A correlation analysis between the BACS (version A) global score and the standard battery global score showed a significant result (r=0.81, p<0.0001). The correlation analysis between the BACS (version A) sub-scores and the standard battery sub-scores showed significant results for verbal memory, working memory, verbal fluency, attention and speed of information processing and executive functions (p<0.001) and for motor speed (p<0.05). The French Version of the BACS is easier to use in French schizophrenic patients compared to a standard battery (administration shorter and completion rate better) and its good psychometric properties suggest

  6. Dynamic Computation of Change Operations in Version Management of Business Process Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Jochen Malte; Gerth, Christian; Engels, Gregor

    Version management of business process models requires that changes can be resolved by applying change operations. In order to give a user maximal freedom concerning the application order of change operations, position parameters of change operations must be computed dynamically during change resolution. In such an approach, change operations with computed position parameters must be applicable on the model and dependencies and conflicts of change operations must be taken into account because otherwise invalid models can be constructed. In this paper, we study the concept of partially specified change operations where parameters are computed dynamically. We provide a formalization for partially specified change operations using graph transformation and provide a concept for their applicability. Based on this, we study potential dependencies and conflicts of change operations and show how these can be taken into account within change resolution. Using our approach, a user can resolve changes of business process models without being unnecessarily restricted to a certain order.

  7. A Japanese version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: translation and equivalence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Chizu; Griffiths, Peter

    2007-05-01

    A Japanese version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) was developed through the forward-backward translation procedure. Married couples consisting of a native English speaker and a native Japanese speaker acted as translators to enhance the representativeness of language in the target population. Multiple translations were produced, and a panel of reviewers identified problems in conceptual and semantic equivalence between the original scale and the translated version. The Japanese version was altered accordingly with reference to alternate Japanese forms from the original English to Japanese translations. The altered translation was again retranslated into English, and problematic differences were checked. This forward-backward process was repeated until satisfactory agreement had been attained. The RSES was administered to 222 native English speakers, and the developed Japanese version (RSES-J) was administered to 1320 native Japanese speakers. Factor analysis revealed nearly identical factor structure and structural coefficients of the items between two sets of data. Target rotation confirmed the factorial agreement of the two scales in different cultural groups. High Cronbach's alpha coefficients supported the reliability of test scores on both versions. The equivalence between the RSES and the RSES-J was supported in this study. It is suggested that the RSES and the RSES-J are potential tools for comparative cross-cultural studies.

  8. Functional Assessment of School Attendance Problems : An Adapted Version of the School Refusal Assessment Scale-Revised

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyne, D. A.; Vreeke, L. J.; Maric, M.; Boelens, H.; Van Widenfelt, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    The School Refusal Assessment Scale (SRAS) was developed to identify four factors that might maintain a youth’s school attendance problem (SAP), and thus be targeted for treatment. There is still limited support for the four-factor model inherent to the SRAS and its revision (SRAS-R). Recent studies

  9. Update of the Polar SWIFT model for polar stratospheric ozone loss (Polar SWIFT version 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2017-07-01

    The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate. To date, climate models often use prescribed ozone fields, since a full stratospheric chemistry scheme is computationally very expensive. Polar SWIFT is based on a set of coupled differential equations, which simulate the polar vortex-averaged mixing ratios of the key species involved in polar ozone depletion on a given vertical level. These species are O3, chemically active chlorine (ClOx), HCl, ClONO2 and HNO3. The only external input parameters that drive the model are the fraction of the polar vortex in sunlight and the fraction of the polar vortex below the temperatures necessary for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Here, we present an update of the Polar SWIFT model introducing several improvements over the original model formulation. In particular, the model is now trained on vortex-averaged reaction rates of the ATLAS Chemistry and Transport Model, which enables a detailed look at individual processes and an independent validation of the different parameterizations contained in the differential equations. The training of the original Polar SWIFT model was based on fitting complete model runs to satellite observations and did not allow for this. A revised formulation of the system of differential equations is developed, which closely fits vortex-averaged reaction rates from ATLAS that represent the main chemical processes influencing ozone. In addition, a parameterization for the HNO3 change by denitrification is included. The rates of change of the concentrations of the chemical species of the Polar SWIFT model are purely chemical rates of change in the new version, whereas in the original Polar SWIFT model, they included a transport effect caused by the

  10. QMM – A Quarterly Macroeconomic Model of the Icelandic Economy. Version 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Tjörvi

    This paper documents and describes Version 2.0 of the Quarterly Macroeconomic Model of the Central Bank of Iceland (QMM). QMM and the underlying quarterly database have been under construction since 2001 at the Research and Forecasting Division of the Economics Department at the Bank and was first...... implemented in the forecasting round for the Monetary Bulletin 2006/1 in March 2006. QMM is used by the Bank for forecasting and various policy simulations and therefore plays a key role as an organisational framework for viewing the medium-term future when formulating monetary policy at the Bank. This paper...

  11. Translation and equivalence assessment for a Japanese version of the modified Parental Nurturance Scale: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Peter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports on the modification of the Parental Nurturance Scale (PNS, translation of the modified version (PNSM from English to Japanese, and equivalence assessment between the PNSM and the translated version (PNSM-J. The PNS was modified so as to enable its use in nurturance studies where the prime source of nurturance might vary between respondents. Method It was translated into Japanese through the forward-backward translation procedure. With attempting to enhance representativeness of language in the target populations, translators used were married couples that consisted of a native English speaker and a native Japanese speaker. Multiple translations were produced and used to make a single Japanese version. A panel of reviewers identified problems in conceptual and semantic equivalence between the original and the translated versions. The Japanese version was altered accordingly with reference to alternate Japanese forms from the original English to Japanese translations. The altered translation was again re-translated into English and problematic differences were checked. This forward-backward process was repeated until satisfactory agreement was attained. The PNSM was administered to 222 native English speakers and the PNSM-J to 1320 native Japanese speakers. Results Factor analysis and target rotation revealed a nearly identical factor structure and factor loadings of the items of the PNSM and PNSM-J between the different cultural groups. High Cronbach's alpha coefficient supported the reliability of the test scores on both versions. Conclusion The equivalence between the two scales was supported. It is suggested that the PNSM and PNSM-J are suitable tools for comparative cross-cultural studies.

  12. [Assessment of Couples' Communication in Patients with Advanced Cancer: Validation of a German Version of the Couple Communication Scale (CCS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Martina; Engelmann, Dorit; Friedrich, Michael; Scheffold, Katharina; Philipp, Rebecca; Schulz-Kindermann, Frank; Härter, Martin; Mehnert, Anja; Koranyi, Susan

    2018-04-13

    There are only a few valid instruments measuring couples' communication in patients with cancer for German speaking countries. The Couple Communication Scale (CCS) represents an established instrument to assess couples' communication. However, there is no evidence regarding the psychometric properties of the German version of the CCS until now and the assumed one factor structure of the CCS was not verified for patients with advanced cancer yet. The CCS was validated as a part of the study "Managing cancer and living meaningfully" (CALM) on N=136 patients with advanced cancer (≥18 years, UICC-state III/IV). The psychometric properties of the scale were calculated (factor reliability, item reliability, average variance extracted [DEV]) and a confirmatory factor analysis was conducted (Maximum Likelihood Estimation). The concurrent validity was tested against symptoms of anxiety (GAD-7), depression (BDI-II) and attachment insecurity (ECR-M16). In the confirmatory factor analysis, the one factor structure showed a low, but acceptable model fit and explained on average 49% of every item's variance (DEV). The CCS has an excellent internal consistency (Cronbachs α=0,91) and was negatively associated with attachment insecurity (ECR-M16: anxiety: r=- 0,55, pCCS is a reliable and valid instrument measuring couples' communication in patients with advanced cancer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. A RETRAN-02 model of the Sizewell B PCSR design - the Winfrith one-loop model, version 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnersly, S.R.

    1983-11-01

    A one-loop RETRAN-02 model of the Sizewell B Pre Construction Safety Report (PCSR) design, set up at Winfrith, is described and documented. The model is suitable for symmetrical pressurised transients. Comparison with data from the Sizewell B PCSR shows that the model is a good representation of that design. Known errors, limitations and deficiencies are described. The mode of storage and maintenance at Winfrith using PROMUS (Program Maintenance and Update System) is noted. It is recommended that users modify the standard data by adding replacement cards to the end so as to aid in identification, use and maintenance of local versions. (author)

  14. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and reliability of the German version of the migraine disability assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Thomas; Lehmann, Susanne; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S; Stewart, Walter F; Elfering, Achim; Aeschlimann, André G; Angst, Felix

    2018-03-09

    The Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) is a brief questionnaire and measures headache-related disability. This study aimed to translate and cross-culturally adapt the original English version of the MIDAS to German and to test its reliability. The standardized translation process followed international guidelines. The pre-final version was tested for clarity and comprehensibility by 34 headache sufferers. Test-retest reliability of the final version was quantified by 36 headache patients completing the MIDAS twice with an interval of 48 h. Reliability was determined by intraclass correlation coefficients and internal consistency by Cronbach's α. All steps of the translation process were followed, documented and approved by the developer of the MIDAS. The expert committee discussed in detail the complex phrasing of the questions that refer to one to another, especially exclusion of headache-days from one item to the next. The German version contains more active verb sentences and prefers the perfect to the imperfect tense. The MIDAS scales intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.884 to 0.994 and was 0.991 (95% CI: 0.982-0.995) for the MIDAS total score. Cronbach's α for the MIDAS as a whole was 0.69 at test and 0.67 at retest. The translation process was challenged by the comprehensibility of the questionnaire. The German version of the MIDAS is a highly reliable instrument for assessing headache related disability with moderate internal consistency. Provided validity testing of the German MIDAS is successful, it can be recommended for use in clinical practice as well as in research.

  15. Concurrent validity of the Swedish version of the life-space assessment questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi Fristedt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Life-Space Assessment (LSA, developed in the USA, is an instrument focusing on mobility with respect to reaching different areas defined as life-spaces, extending from the room where the person sleeps to mobility outside one’s hometown. A newly translated Swedish version of the LSA (LSA-S has been tested for test-retest reliability, but the validity remains to be tested. The purpose of the present study was to examine the concurrent validity of the LSA-S, by comparing and correlating the LSA scores to other measures of mobility. Method The LSA was included in a population-based study of health, functioning and mobility among older persons in Sweden, and the present analysis comprised 312 community-dwelling participants. To test the concurrent validity, the LSA scores were compared to a number of other mobility-related variables, including the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB as well as “stair climbing”, “transfers”, “transportation”, “food shopping”, “travel for pleasure” and “community activities”. The LSA total mean scores for different levels of the other mobility-related variables, and measures of correlation were calculated. Results Higher LSA total mean scores were observed with higher levels of all the other mobility related variables. Most of the correlations between the LSA and the other mobility variables were large (r = 0.5–1.0 and significant at the 0.01 level. The LSA total score, as well as independent life-space and assistive life-space correlated with transportation (0.63, 0.66, 0.64 and food shopping (0.55, 0.58, 0.55. Assistive life-space also correlated with SPPB (0.47. With respect to maximal life-space, the correlations with the mobility-related variables were generally lower (below 0.5, probably since this aspect of life-space mobility is highly influenced by social support and is not so dependent on the individual’s own physical function. Conclusion LSA was

  16. A validation study using a modified version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients: Postural Stroke Study in Gothenburg (POSTGOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielsson Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS was created with some changes in the description of the items and clarifications in the manual (e.g. much help was defined as support from 2 persons. The aim of this validation study was to assess intrarater and interrater reliability using this modified version of PASS, at a stroke unit, for patients in the acute phase after their first event of stroke. Methods In the intrarater reliability study 114 patients and in the interrater reliability study 15 patients were examined twice with the test within one to 24 hours in the first week after stroke. Spearman's rank correlation, Kappa coefficients, Percentage Agreement and the newer rank-invariant methods; Relative Position, Relative Concentration and Relative rank Variance were used for the statistical analysis. Results For the intrarater reliability Spearman's rank correlations were 0.88-0.98 and k were 0.70-0.93 for the individual items. Small, statistically significant, differences were found for two items regarding Relative Position and for one item regarding Relative Concentration. There was no Relative rank Variance for any single item. For the interrater reliability, Spearman's rank correlations were 0.77-0.99 for individual items. For some items there was a possible, even if not proved, reliability problem regarding Relative Position and Relative Concentration. There was no Relative rank Variance for the single items, except for a small Relative rank Variance for one item. Conclusions The high intrarater and interrater reliability shown for the modified Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, the Swedish version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, with traditional and newer statistical analyses, particularly for assessments performed by the same rater, support the use of the Swedish version of Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients, in the acute stage after stroke both

  17. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Qualitative Models, Version 1, Release 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouiya, Claudine; Keating, Sarah M; Berenguier, Duncan; Naldi, Aurélien; Thieffry, Denis; van Iersel, Martijn P; Le Novère, Nicolas; Helikar, Tomáš

    2015-09-04

    Quantitative methods for modelling biological networks require an in-depth knowledge of the biochemical reactions and their stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. In many practical cases, this knowledge is missing. This has led to the development of several qualitative modelling methods using information such as, for example, gene expression data coming from functional genomic experiments. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding qualitative models, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The SBML Qualitative Models package for SBML Level 3 adds features so that qualitative models can be directly and explicitly encoded. The approach taken in this package is essentially based on the definition of regulatory or influence graphs. The SBML Qualitative Models package defines the structure and syntax necessary to describe qualitative models that associate discrete levels of activities with entity pools and the transitions between states that describe the processes involved. This is particularly suited to logical models (Boolean or multi-valued) and some classes of Petri net models can be encoded with the approach.

  18. Reliability of the Danish version of the short questionnaire to assess health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lotte; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Jacobsen, Julie Sandell

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To translate and cross-cultural adapt the short questionnaire to assess health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH) to Danish, and to investigate the Danish version’s reliability. Methods: The study was conducted according to the COSMIN guidelines. The reliability was evaluated in 53...... and indicates that the Danish version of SQUASH can be used to distinguish between individuals; however, the absolute reliability was poor and SQUASH is not considered suitable for easuring physical activity on an individual level....

  19. Landfill Gas Energy Cost Model Version 3.0 (LFGcost-Web V3 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help stakeholders estimate the costs of a landfill gas (LFG) energy project, in 2002, LMOP developed a cost tool (LFGcost). Since then, LMOP has routinely updated the tool to reflect changes in the LFG energy industry. Initially the model was designed for EPA to assist landfills in evaluating the economic and financial feasibility of LFG energy project development. In 2014, LMOP developed a public version of the model, LFGcost-Web (Version 3.0), to allow landfill and industry stakeholders to evaluate project feasibility on their own. LFGcost-Web can analyze costs for 12 energy recovery project types. These project costs can be estimated with or without the costs of a gas collection and control system (GCCS). The EPA used select equations from LFGcost-Web to estimate costs of the regulatory options in the 2015 proposed revisions to the MSW Landfills Standards of Performance (also known as New Source Performance Standards) and the Emission Guidelines (herein thereafter referred to collectively as the Landfill Rules). More specifically, equations derived from LFGcost-Web were applied to each landfill expected to be impacted by the Landfill Rules to estimate annualized installed capital costs and annual O&M costs of a gas collection and control system. In addition, after applying the LFGcost-Web equations to the list of landfills expected to require a GCCS in year 2025 as a result of the proposed Landfill Rules, the regulatory analysis evaluated whether electr

  20. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Greek version of the Family Questionnaire for assessing expressed emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutra, Katerina; Economou, Marina; Triliva, Sofia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2014-05-01

    Expressed emotion (EE) has proved to be an established factor in short-term relapse in schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Family Questionnaire (FQ), a brief self-report questionnaire measuring the EE status of relatives of patients with schizophrenia in terms of criticism (CC) and emotional overinvolvement (EOI). The translated and adapted 20-item FQ was administered to 176 family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Caregivers' burden (Family Burden Scale) and psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire-28) were also evaluated. The findings indicated that the Greek version displays a two-factor structure with two subscales of EE-CC and EOI-with 10 items each, similarly to the original version. The convergent validity of the subscales was highly supported by correlations with caregivers' burden and psychological distress. The Cronbach's α coefficient measuring internal consistency for the two scales were 0.90 for CC and 0.82 for EOI. The test-retest correlation coefficients measuring reproducibility were 0.99 and 0.98 for CC and EOI, respectively. The Greek version of the FQ appears to be a valid and reliable instrument to be used in both research and clinical assessment of family EE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Catalan version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale: a useful instrument to assess catastrophic thinking in whiplash patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Jordi; Nieto, Rubén; Huguet, Anna

    2008-05-01

    The main aims of this work were to test the psychometric properties of the Catalan version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and to assess the usefulness of the scale when used with whiplash patients. This article reports results from 2 complementary studies. In the first one, the PCS was administered to 280 students and 146 chronic pain patients to examine the psychometric properties of a new Catalan version of the instrument. A confirmatory factor analysis supported a second-order structure, in which 3 second-order factors (ie, rumination, helplessness, and magnification) load in a higher-order factor (ie, catastrophizing). The reliability of the Catalan version was supported by an acceptable internal consistency and test-retest values. Validity was supported by the correlations found among the PCS and pain intensity, pain interference, and depression. The objective of the second study was to evaluate the PCS when used with whiplash patients. In this second study, 141 patients with whiplash disorders participated. In general, the psychometric properties of the PCS were found appropriate, with factor analysis supporting the structure described in patients with chronic pain. Our data suggest that the PCS is a good instrument to assess catastrophic thinking in whiplash patients. The usefulness of the PCS in whiplash disorders has been explored in this study. Results of our work show that the PCS can be a very useful tool to assess catastrophic thinking about pain in whiplash patients.

  2. A framework for expanding aqueous chemistry in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 5.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Kathleen M.; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Pye, Havala O. T.; Baek, Jaemeen; Hutzell, William T.; Stanier, Charles O.; Baker, Kirk R.; Wyat Appel, K.; Jaoui, Mohammed; Offenberg, John H.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of an extendable aqueous-phase chemistry option (AQCHEM - KMT(I)) for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system, version 5.1. Here, the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP), version 2.2.3, is used to generate a Rosenbrock solver (Rodas3) to integrate the stiff system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describe the mass transfer, chemical kinetics, and scavenging processes of CMAQ clouds. CMAQ's standard cloud chemistry module (AQCHEM) is structurally limited to the treatment of a simple chemical mechanism. This work advances our ability to test and implement more sophisticated aqueous chemical mechanisms in CMAQ and further investigate the impacts of microphysical parameters on cloud chemistry. Box model cloud chemistry simulations were performed to choose efficient solver and tolerance settings, evaluate the implementation of the KPP solver, and assess the direct impacts of alternative solver and kinetic mass transfer on predicted concentrations for a range of scenarios. Month-long CMAQ simulations for winter and summer periods over the US reveal the changes in model predictions due to these cloud module updates within the full chemical transport model. While monthly average CMAQ predictions are not drastically altered between AQCHEM and AQCHEM - KMT, hourly concentration differences can be significant. With added in-cloud secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic epoxides (AQCHEM - KMTI), normalized mean error and bias statistics are slightly improved for 2-methyltetrols and 2-methylglyceric acid at the Research Triangle Park measurement site in North Carolina during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) period. The added in-cloud chemistry leads to a monthly average increase of 11-18 % in cloud SOA at the surface in the eastern United States for June 2013.

  3. MASCOT and MOP programs for probabilistic safety assessment. Pt. E. MOP (Version 3A) user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.; Hopper, M.J.; Sinclair, J.E.; Sumner, P.J.

    1994-04-01

    MOP is a post-processor for the probabilistic safety assessment program MASCOT, which models the consequences of the disposal of radioactive waste. This document provides a general description of the capabilities of the MOP program, together with a comprehensive guide to the MOP user command language. MOP is able to calculate and present various statistical measures of the modelled radiological consequences, in both printed and graphical form. The results of intermediate analyses can be saved from one MOP job to the next, and this allows MOP to be used as many times as desired to process the results of the same MASCOT job. MOP can work with the quantities passed to it from the MASCOT job or with new quantities, defined and calculated according to individual requirements. This is usually done by transforming the MASCOT quantities using algebraic expressions. (Author)

  4. Inter-rater reliability of the German version of the Nurses' Global Assessment of Suicide Risk scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Bernd; Grieser, Manuela; Abderhalden, Christoph; Cutcliffe, John R

    2016-10-01

    In comparison to the general population, the suicide rates of psychiatric inpatient populations in Germany and Switzerland are very high. An important preventive contribution to the lowering of the suicide rates in mental health care is to ensure that the risk of suicide of psychiatric inpatients is assessed as accurately as possible. While risk-assessment instruments can serve an important function in determining such risk, very few have been translated to German. Therefore, in the present study, we reported on the German version of Nurses' Global Assessment of Suicide Risk (NGASR) scale. After translating the original instrument into German and pretesting the German version, we tested the inter-rater reliability of the instrument. Twelve video case studies were evaluated by 13 raters with the NGASR scale in a 'laboratory' trial. In each case, the observer's agreement was calculated for the single items, the overall scale, the risk levels, and the sum scores. The statistical data analysis was conducted with kappa and AC1 statistics for dichotomous (items, scale) scales. A high-to-very high observers' agreement (AC1: 0.62-1.00, kappa: 0.00-1.00) was determined for 16 items of the German version of the NGASR scale. We conclude that the German version of the NGASR scale is a reliable instrument for evaluating risk factors for suicide. A reliable application in the clinical practise appears to be enhanced by training in the use of the instrument and the right implementation instructions. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Integrated Environmental Assessment Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardanz, R; Gimeno, B S; Bermejo, V; Elvira, S; Martin, F; Palacios, M; Rodriguez, E; Donaire, I [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the results of the Spanish participation in the project Coupling CORINAIR data to cost-effect emission reduction strategies based on critical threshold. (EU/LIFE97/ENV/FIN/336). The subproject has focused on three tasks. Develop tools to improve knowledge on the spatial and temporal details of emissions of air pollutants in Spain. Exploit existing experimental information on plant response to air pollutants in temperate ecosystem and Integrate these findings in a modelling framework that can asses with more accuracy the impact of air pollutants to temperate ecosystems. The results obtained during the execution of this project have significantly improved the models of the impact of alternative emission control strategies on ecosystems and crops in the Iberian Peninsula. (Author) 375 refs.

  6. Validity study of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (Portuguese version by the Rasch Rating Scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Quintão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to conduct a validation study of the Portuguese version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI by means of the Rasch Rating Scale Model, and then compare it with the most used scales of anxiety in Portugal. The sample consisted of 1,160 adults (427 men and 733 women, aged 18-82 years old (M=33.39; SD=11.85. Instruments were Beck Anxiety Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. It was found that Beck Anxiety Inventory's system of four categories, the data-model fit, and people reliability were adequate. The measure can be considered as unidimensional. Gender and age-related differences were not a threat to the validity. BAI correlated significantly with other anxiety measures. In conclusion, BAI shows good psychometric quality.

  7. New Source Term Model for the RESRAD-OFFSITE Code Version 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Charley [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gnanapragasam, Emmanuel [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cheng, Jing-Jy [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kamboj, Sunita [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Shih-Yew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This report documents the new source term model developed and implemented in Version 3 of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code. This new source term model includes: (1) "first order release with transport" option, in which the release of the radionuclide is proportional to the inventory in the primary contamination and the user-specified leach rate is the proportionality constant, (2) "equilibrium desorption release" option, in which the user specifies the distribution coefficient which quantifies the partitioning of the radionuclide between the solid and aqueous phases, and (3) "uniform release" option, in which the radionuclides are released from a constant fraction of the initially contaminated material during each time interval and the user specifies the duration over which the radionuclides are released.

  8. The SGHWR version of the Monte Carlo code W-MONTE. Part 1. The theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.R.

    1976-03-01

    W-MONTE provides a multi-group model of neutron transport in the exact geometry of a reactor lattice using Monte Carlo methods. It is currently restricted to uniform axial properties. Material data is normally obtained from a preliminary WIMS lattice calculation in the transport group structure. The SGHWR version has been required for analysis of zero energy experiments and special aspects of power reactor lattices, such as the unmoderated lattice region above the moderator when drained to dump height. Neutron transport is modelled for a uniform infinite lattice, simultaneously treating the cases of no leakage, radial leakage or axial leakage only, and the combined effects of radial and axial leakage. Multigroup neutron balance edits are incorporated for the separate effects of radial and axial leakage to facilitate the analysis of leakage and to provide effective diffusion theory parameters for core representation in reactor cores. (author)

  9. Psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool for older Chinese inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Min; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    To culturally adapt and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool among older inpatients in the mainland of China. Patient falls are an important safety consideration within hospitals among older inpatients. Nurses need specific risk assessment tools for older inpatients to reliably identify at-risk populations and guide interventions that highlight fixable risk factors for falls and consequent injuries. In China, a few tools have been developed to measure fall risk. However, they lack the solid psychometric development necessary to establish their validity and reliability, and they are not widely used for elderly inpatients. A cross-sectional study. A convenient sampling was used to recruit 201 older inpatients from two tertiary-level hospitals in Beijing and Xiamen, China. The Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool was translated using forward and backward translation procedures and was administered to these 201 older inpatients. Reliability of the tool was calculated by inter-rater reliability and Cronbach's alpha. Validity was analysed through content validity index and construct validity. The Inter-rater reliability of Chinese version of Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool was 97·14% agreement with Cohen's Kappa of 0·903. Cronbach's α was 0·703. Content of Validity Index was 0·833. Two factors represented intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors were explored that together explained 58·89% of the variance. This study provided evidence that Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool is an acceptable, valid and reliable tool to identify older inpatients at risk of falls and falls with injury. Further psychometric testing on criterion validity and evaluation of its advanced utility in geriatric clinical settings are warranted. The Chinese version of Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool may be useful for health care personnel to identify older Chinese inpatients at risk of falls and falls

  10. Comparison of three ice cloud optical schemes in climate simulations with community atmospheric model version 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenjie; Peng, Yiran; Wang, Bin; Yi, Bingqi; Lin, Yanluan; Li, Jiangnan

    2018-05-01

    A newly implemented Baum-Yang scheme for simulating ice cloud optical properties is compared with existing schemes (Mitchell and Fu schemes) in a standalone radiative transfer model and in the global climate model (GCM) Community Atmospheric Model Version 5 (CAM5). This study systematically analyzes the effect of different ice cloud optical schemes on global radiation and climate by a series of simulations with a simplified standalone radiative transfer model, atmospheric GCM CAM5, and a comprehensive coupled climate model. Results from the standalone radiative model show that Baum-Yang scheme yields generally weaker effects of ice cloud on temperature profiles both in shortwave and longwave spectrum. CAM5 simulations indicate that Baum-Yang scheme in place of Mitchell/Fu scheme tends to cool the upper atmosphere and strengthen the thermodynamic instability in low- and mid-latitudes, which could intensify the Hadley circulation and dehydrate the subtropics. When CAM5 is coupled with a slab ocean model to include simplified air-sea interaction, reduced downward longwave flux to surface in Baum-Yang scheme mitigates ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic as well as water vapor and cloud feedbacks in low- and mid-latitudes, resulting in an overall temperature decrease by 3.0/1.4 °C globally compared with Mitchell/Fu schemes. Radiative effect and climate feedback of the three ice cloud optical schemes documented in this study can be referred for future improvements on ice cloud simulation in CAM5.

  11. Immersion freezing by natural dust based on a soccer ball model with the Community Atmospheric Model version 5: climate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a simplified version of the soccer ball model (SBM) developed by Niedermeier et al (2014 Geophys. Res. Lett. 41 736-741) into the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). It is the first time that SBM is used in an atmospheric model to parameterize the heterogeneous ice nucleation. The SBM, which was simplified for its suitable application in atmospheric models, uses the classical nucleation theory to describe the immersion/condensation freezing by dust in the mixed-phase cloud regime. Uncertain parameters (mean contact angle, standard deviation of contact angle probability distribution, and number of surface sites) in the SBM are constrained by fitting them to recent natural dust (Saharan dust) datasets. With the SBM in CAM5, we investigate the sensitivity of modeled cloud properties to the SBM parameters, and find significant seasonal and regional differences in the sensitivity among the three SBM parameters. Changes of mean contact angle and the number of surface sites lead to changes of cloud properties in Arctic in spring, which could be attributed to the transport of dust ice nuclei to this region. In winter, significant changes of cloud properties induced by these two parameters mainly occur in northern hemispheric mid-latitudes (e.g., East Asia). In comparison, no obvious changes of cloud properties caused by changes of standard deviation can be found in all the seasons. These results are valuable for understanding the heterogeneous ice nucleation behavior, and useful for guiding the future model developments.

  12. Immersion freezing by natural dust based on a soccer ball model with the Community Atmospheric Model version 5: climate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a simplified version of the soccer ball model (SBM) developed by Niedermeier et al (2014 Geophys. Res. Lett. 41 736–741) into the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). It is the first time that SBM is used in an atmospheric model to parameterize the heterogeneous ice nucleation. The SBM, which was simplified for its suitable application in atmospheric models, uses the classical nucleation theory to describe the immersion/condensation freezing by dust in the mixed-phase cloud regime. Uncertain parameters (mean contact angle, standard deviation of contact angle probability distribution, and number of surface sites) in the SBM are constrained by fitting them to recent natural dust (Saharan dust) datasets. With the SBM in CAM5, we investigate the sensitivity of modeled cloud properties to the SBM parameters, and find significant seasonal and regional differences in the sensitivity among the three SBM parameters. Changes of mean contact angle and the number of surface sites lead to changes of cloud properties in Arctic in spring, which could be attributed to the transport of dust ice nuclei to this region. In winter, significant changes of cloud properties induced by these two parameters mainly occur in northern hemispheric mid-latitudes (e.g., East Asia). In comparison, no obvious changes of cloud properties caused by changes of standard deviation can be found in all the seasons. These results are valuable for understanding the heterogeneous ice nucleation behavior, and useful for guiding the future model developments. (letter)

  13. Incorporating remote sensing-based ET estimates into the Community Land Model version 4.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Land surface models bear substantial biases in simulating surface water and energy budgets despite the continuous development and improvement of model parameterizations. To reduce model biases, Parr et al. (2015 proposed a method incorporating satellite-based evapotranspiration (ET products into land surface models. Here we apply this bias correction method to the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5 and test its performance over the conterminous US (CONUS. We first calibrate a relationship between the observational ET from the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM product and the model ET from CLM4.5, and assume that this relationship holds beyond the calibration period. During the validation or application period, a simulation using the default CLM4.5 (CLM is conducted first, and its output is combined with the calibrated observational-vs.-model ET relationship to derive a corrected ET; an experiment (CLMET is then conducted in which the model-generated ET is overwritten with the corrected ET. Using the observations of ET, runoff, and soil moisture content as benchmarks, we demonstrate that CLMET greatly improves the hydrological simulations over most of the CONUS, and the improvement is stronger in the eastern CONUS than the western CONUS and is strongest over the Southeast CONUS. For any specific region, the degree of the improvement depends on whether the relationship between observational and model ET remains time-invariant (a fundamental hypothesis of the Parr et al. (2015 method and whether water is the limiting factor in places where ET is underestimated. While the bias correction method improves hydrological estimates without improving the physical parameterization of land surface models, results from this study do provide guidance for physically based model development effort.

  14. 78 FR 32224 - Availability of Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional Discussion Topics in Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule... America Cost Model (CAM v3.1.2), which allows Commission staff and interested parties to calculate costs...

  15. A new version of the ERICA tool to facilitate impact assessments of radioactivity on wild plants and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; Alfonso, B.; Avila, R.; Beresford, N.A.; Copplestone, D.; Hosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    A new version of the ERICA Tool (version 1.2) was released in November 2014; this constitutes the first major update of the Tool since release in 2007. The key features of the update are presented in this article. Of particular note are new transfer databases extracted from an international compilation of concentration ratios (CR_w_o_-_m_e_d_i_a) and the modification of ‘extrapolation’ approaches used to select transfer data in cases where information is not available. Bayesian updating approaches have been used in some cases to draw on relevant information that would otherwise have been excluded in the process of deriving CR_w_o_-_m_e_d_i_a statistics. All of these efforts have in turn led to the requirement to update Environmental Media Concentration Limits (EMCLs) used in Tier 1 assessments. Some of the significant changes with regard to EMCLs are highlighted. - Highlights: • The ERICA Tool for performing environmental risk assessment has been updated. • The new version is underpinned by an internationally supported transfer database. • The Tool provides coverage for many organism groups and radioisotopes. • New calculations were required to derive environmental media concentration limits. • Modified approaches to deriving missing transfer parameters are elaborated.

  16. Assessment of health-related quality of life: Swedish version of polycystic ovary syndrome questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedel, Elizabeth; Kowalski, Jan; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome questionnaire (PCOSQ) was developed in USA to ascertain specific health-related quality of life (HRQL) in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The Swedish version of PCOSQ should be tested prior to its use in research and clinical practice and the aims of the study were as follows: (a) determine the test-retest reliability and (b) confirm the domain structure of the Swedish version of PCOSQ; a 26-item questionnaire, divided into the five domains: emotions, body hair, weight concerns, infertility concerns and menstrual irregularities. PCOSQ translation from English to Swedish was followed by a test-retest and a factor analysis of obtained PCOSQ completed twice by 69 women with PCOS. The median age was 30 (21-37) years. The Kappa (kappa) statistic for the five domains ranged from 0.29 to 0.69 demonstrating fair to good agreement among items. The Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for the five domains was high to excellent ranging from 0.79 to 0.96. The factor analysis presented six domains and the original domain structure was partly confirmed. The Swedish version of PCOSQ is reliable and can be used to measure HRQL in PCOS. Researchers and clinicians should be aware of the benefits of PCOSQ.

  17. Version 2.0 of the European Gas Model. Changes and their impact on the German gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmert, David; Petrov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    In January 2015 ACER, the European Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators, presented an updated version of its target model for the inner-European natural gas market, also referred to as version 2.0 of the Gas Target Model. During 2014 the existing model, originally developed by the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) and launched in 2011, had been analysed, revised and updated in preparation of the new version. While it has few surprises to offer, the new Gas Target Model contains specifies and goes into greater detail on many elements of the original model. Some of the new content is highly relevant to the German gas sector, not least the deliberations on the current key issues, which are security of supply and the ability of the gas markets to function.

  18. Assessment of multi-version NPP I and C systems safety. Metric-based approach, technique and tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Vyacheslav; Volkovoy, Andrey; Bakhmach, Eugenii; Siora, Alexander; Duzhyi, Vyacheslav

    2011-01-01

    The challenges related to problem of assessment of actual diversity level and evaluation of diversity-oriented NPP I and C systems safety are analyzed. There are risks of inaccurate assessment and problems of insufficient decreasing probability of CCFs. CCF probability of safety-critical systems may be essentially decreased due to application of several different types of diversity (multi-diversity). Different diversity types of FPGA-based NPP I and C systems, general approach and stages of diversity and safety assessment as a whole are described. Objectives of the report are: (a) analysis of the challenges caused by use of diversity approach in NPP I and C systems in context of FPGA and other modern technologies application; (b) development of multi-version NPP I and C systems assessment technique and tool based on check-list and metric-oriented approach; (c) case-study of the technique: assessment of multi-version FPGA-based NPP I and C developed by use of Radiy TM Platform. (author)

  19. A new version of the ERICA tool to facilitate impact assessments of radioactivity on wild plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E; Alfonso, B; Avila, R; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Hosseini, A

    2016-03-01

    A new version of the ERICA Tool (version 1.2) was released in November 2014; this constitutes the first major update of the Tool since release in 2007. The key features of the update are presented in this article. Of particular note are new transfer databases extracted from an international compilation of concentration ratios (CRwo-media) and the modification of 'extrapolation' approaches used to select transfer data in cases where information is not available. Bayesian updating approaches have been used in some cases to draw on relevant information that would otherwise have been excluded in the process of deriving CRwo-media statistics. All of these efforts have in turn led to the requirement to update Environmental Media Concentration Limits (EMCLs) used in Tier 1 assessments. Some of the significant changes with regard to EMCLs are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Uncertainties in radioecological assessment models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.O.; Miller, C.W.; Ng, Y.C.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental radiological assessments rely heavily on the use of mathematical models. The predictions of these models are inherently uncertain because models are inexact representations of real systems. The major sources of this uncertainty are related to bias in model formulation and imprecision in parameter estimation. The magnitude of uncertainty is a function of the questions asked of the model and the specific radionuclides and exposure pathways of dominant importance. It is concluded that models developed as research tools should be distinguished from models developed for assessment applications. Furthermore, increased model complexity does not necessarily guarantee increased accuracy. To improve the realism of assessment modeling, stochastic procedures are recommended that translate uncertain parameter estimates into a distribution of predicted values. These procedures also permit the importance of model parameters to be ranked according to their relative contribution to the overall predicted uncertainty. Although confidence in model predictions can be improved through site-specific parameter estimation and increased model validation, health risk factors and internal dosimetry models will probably remain important contributors to the amount of uncertainty that is irreducible. 41 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  1. Hydrogeochemical evaluation for Simpevarp model version 1.2. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus

    2004-12-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to April, 2004. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1.7 km. Model version 1.2 focusses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1000 m depth. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1000 m depending on local topography. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical groups of groundwaters (types A-D) have been identified: TYPE A: This type comprises dilute groundwaters ( 3 type present at shallow ( 300 m) levels at Simpevarp, and at even greater depths (approx. 1200 m) at Laxemar. At Simpevarp the groundwaters are mainly Na-Ca-Cl with increasingly enhanced Br and SO 4 with depth. At Laxemar they are mainly Ca-Na-Cl also with increasing enhancements of Br and SO 4 with depth. Main reactions involve ion exchange (Ca). At both sites a glacial component and a deep saline component are present. At Simpevarp the saline component may be potentially non marine and/or non-marine/old Littorina marine in origin; at Laxemar it is more likely to be non-marine in origin. TYPE D: This type comprises reducing highly saline groundwaters (> 20 000 mg/L Cl; to a maximum of ∼70 g/L TDS) and only has been identified at Laxemar at depths exceeding 1200 m. It is mainly Ca-Na-Cl with higher Br but lower SO 4 compared

  2. Hydrogeological DFN modelling using structural and hydraulic data from KLX04. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven [SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden); Stigsson, Martin [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Urban [Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2006-04-15

    SKB is conducting site investigations for a high-level nuclear waste repository in fractured crystalline rocks at two coastal areas in Sweden. The two candidate areas are named Forsmark and Simpevarp. The site characterisation work is divided into two phases, an initial site investigation phase (ISI) and a complete site investigation phase (CSI). The results of the ISI phase are used as a basis for deciding on the subsequent CSI phase. On the basis of the CSI investigations a decision is made as to whether detailed characterisation will be performed (including sinking of a shaft). An integrated component in the site characterisation work is the development of site descriptive models. These comprise basic models in three dimensions with an accompanying text description. Central in the modelling work is the geological model which provides the geometrical context in terms of a model of deformation zones and the less fractured rock mass between the zones. Using the geological and geometrical description models as a basis, descriptive models for other disciplines (surface ecosystems, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, rock mechanics, thermal properties and transport properties) will be developed. Great care is taken to arrive at a general consistency in the description of the various models and assessment of uncertainty and possible needs of alternative models. The main objective of this study is to support the development of a hydrogeological DFN model (Discrete Fracture Network) for the Preliminary Site Description of the Laxemar area on a regional-scale (SDM version L1.2). A more specific objective of this study is to assess the propagation of uncertainties in the geological DFN modelling reported for L1.2 into the groundwater flow modelling. An improved understanding is necessary in order to gain credibility for the Site Description in general and the hydrogeological description in particular. The latter will serve as a basis for describing the present

  3. Hydrogeological DFN modelling using structural and hydraulic data from KLX04. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin, Sven; Stigsson, Martin; Svensson, Urban

    2006-04-01

    SKB is conducting site investigations for a high-level nuclear waste repository in fractured crystalline rocks at two coastal areas in Sweden. The two candidate areas are named Forsmark and Simpevarp. The site characterisation work is divided into two phases, an initial site investigation phase (ISI) and a complete site investigation phase (CSI). The results of the ISI phase are used as a basis for deciding on the subsequent CSI phase. On the basis of the CSI investigations a decision is made as to whether detailed characterisation will be performed (including sinking of a shaft). An integrated component in the site characterisation work is the development of site descriptive models. These comprise basic models in three dimensions with an accompanying text description. Central in the modelling work is the geological model which provides the geometrical context in terms of a model of deformation zones and the less fractured rock mass between the zones. Using the geological and geometrical description models as a basis, descriptive models for other disciplines (surface ecosystems, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, rock mechanics, thermal properties and transport properties) will be developed. Great care is taken to arrive at a general consistency in the description of the various models and assessment of uncertainty and possible needs of alternative models. The main objective of this study is to support the development of a hydrogeological DFN model (Discrete Fracture Network) for the Preliminary Site Description of the Laxemar area on a regional-scale (SDM version L1.2). A more specific objective of this study is to assess the propagation of uncertainties in the geological DFN modelling reported for L1.2 into the groundwater flow modelling. An improved understanding is necessary in order to gain credibility for the Site Description in general and the hydrogeological description in particular. The latter will serve as a basis for describing the present

  4. A description of the FAMOUS (version XDBUA climate model and control run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Osprey

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, capable of simulating approximately 120 years of model climate per wallclock day using current high performance computing facilities. It uses most of the same code as HadCM3, a widely used climate model of higher resolution and computational cost, and has been tuned to reproduce the same climate reasonably well. FAMOUS is useful for climate simulations where the computational cost makes the application of HadCM3 unfeasible, either because of the length of simulation or the size of the ensemble desired. We document a number of scientific and technical improvements to the original version of FAMOUS. These improvements include changes to the parameterisations of ozone and sea-ice which alleviate a significant cold bias from high northern latitudes and the upper troposphere, and the elimination of volume-averaged drifts in ocean tracers. A simple model of the marine carbon cycle has also been included. A particular goal of FAMOUS is to conduct millennial-scale paleoclimate simulations of Quaternary ice ages; to this end, a number of useful changes to the model infrastructure have been made.

  5. The Terrestrial Investigation Model: A probabilistic risk assessment model for birds exposed to pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the major recommendations of the National Academy of Science to the USEPA, NMFS and USFWS was to utilize probabilistic methods when assessing the risks of pesticides to federally listed endangered and threatened species. The Terrestrial Investigation Model (TIM, version 3....

  6. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Forsmark site, model version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [GeoPoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Gimeno, Maria; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Gurban, Ioana [3D-Terra, Montreal (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Forsmark and Simpevarp, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, geochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Forsmark groundwater analytical data collected up to May 1, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze'). The HAG group had access to a total of 456 water samples collected mostly from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest samples reflected depths down to 200 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (74%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Forsmark are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and closeness to the Baltic Sea resulting in relative small hydrogeological driving forces which can preserve old water types from being flushed out, b) the changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Based on the general geochemical character and the apparent age two major water types occur in Forsmark: fresh-meteoric waters with a bicarbonate imprint and low residence times (tritium values above detection limit), and brackish-marine waters with Cl contents up to 6,000 mg/L and longer residence times (tritium

  7. Thermal modelling. Preliminary site description Simpevarp subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Back, Paer-Erik; Bengtsson, Anna; Laendell, Maerta [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-08-15

    This report presents the thermal site descriptive model for the Simpevarp subarea, version 1.2. The main objective of this report is to present the thermal modelling work where data has been identified, quality controlled, evaluated and summarised in order to make an upscaling to lithological domain level possible. The thermal conductivity at possible canister scale has been modelled for four different lithological domains (RSMA01 (Aevroe granite), RSMB01 (Fine-grained dioritoid), RSMC01 (mixture of Aevroe granite and Quartz monzodiorite), and RSMD01 (Quartz monzodiorite)). A main modelling approach has been used to determine the mean value of the thermal conductivity. Three alternative/complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the spatial variability of the thermal conductivity at domain level. The thermal modelling approaches are based on the lithological model for the Simpevarp subarea, version 1.2 together with rock type models constituted from measured and calculated (from mineral composition) thermal conductivities. For one rock type, the Aevroe granite (501044), density loggings within the specific rock type has also been used in the domain modelling in order to consider the spatial variability within the Aevroe granite. This has been possible due to the presented relationship between density and thermal conductivity, valid for the Aevroe granite. Results indicate that the mean of thermal conductivity is expected to exhibit only a small variation between the different domains, from 2.62 W/(m.K) to 2.80 W/(m.K). The standard deviation varies according to the scale considered and for the canister scale it is expected to range from 0.20 to 0.28 W/(m.K). Consequently, the lower confidence limit (95% confidence) for the canister scale is within the range 2.04-2.35 W/(m.K) for the different domains. The temperature dependence is rather small with a decrease in thermal conductivity of 1.1-3.4% per 100 deg C increase in temperature for the dominating rock

  8. Thermal modelling. Preliminary site description Simpevarp subarea - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundberg, Jan; Back, Paer-Erik; Bengtsson, Anna; Laendell, Maerta

    2005-08-01

    This report presents the thermal site descriptive model for the Simpevarp subarea, version 1.2. The main objective of this report is to present the thermal modelling work where data has been identified, quality controlled, evaluated and summarised in order to make an upscaling to lithological domain level possible. The thermal conductivity at possible canister scale has been modelled for four different lithological domains (RSMA01 (Aevroe granite), RSMB01 (Fine-grained dioritoid), RSMC01 (mixture of Aevroe granite and Quartz monzodiorite), and RSMD01 (Quartz monzodiorite)). A main modelling approach has been used to determine the mean value of the thermal conductivity. Three alternative/complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the spatial variability of the thermal conductivity at domain level. The thermal modelling approaches are based on the lithological model for the Simpevarp subarea, version 1.2 together with rock type models constituted from measured and calculated (from mineral composition) thermal conductivities. For one rock type, the Aevroe granite (501044), density loggings within the specific rock type has also been used in the domain modelling in order to consider the spatial variability within the Aevroe granite. This has been possible due to the presented relationship between density and thermal conductivity, valid for the Aevroe granite. Results indicate that the mean of thermal conductivity is expected to exhibit only a small variation between the different domains, from 2.62 W/(m.K) to 2.80 W/(m.K). The standard deviation varies according to the scale considered and for the canister scale it is expected to range from 0.20 to 0.28 W/(m.K). Consequently, the lower confidence limit (95% confidence) for the canister scale is within the range 2.04-2.35 W/(m.K) for the different domains. The temperature dependence is rather small with a decrease in thermal conductivity of 1.1-3.4% per 100 deg C increase in temperature for the dominating rock

  9. Thermal modelling. Preliminary site description Laxemar subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Wrafter, John; Back, Paer-Erik; Laendell, Maerta [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2006-02-15

    This report presents the thermal site descriptive model for the Laxemar subarea, version 1.2. The main objective of this report is to present the thermal modelling work where data has been identified, quality controlled, evaluated and summarised in order to make an upscaling to lithological domain level possible. The thermal conductivity at canister scale has been modelled for five different lithological domains: RSMA (Aevroe granite), RSMBA (mixture of Aevroe granite and fine-grained dioritoid), RSMD (quartz monzodiorite), RSME (diorite/gabbro) and RSMM (mix domain with high frequency of diorite to gabbro). A base modelling approach has been used to determine the mean value of the thermal conductivity. Four alternative/complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the spatial variability of the thermal conductivity at domain level. The thermal modelling approaches are based on the lithological domain model for the Laxemar subarea, version 1.2 together with rock type models based on measured and calculated (from mineral composition) thermal conductivities. For one rock type, Aevroe granite (501044), density loggings have also been used in the domain modelling in order to evaluate the spatial variability within the Aevroe granite. This has been possible due to an established relationship between density and thermal conductivity, valid for the Aevroe granite. Results indicate that the means of thermal conductivity for the various domains are expected to exhibit a variation from 2.45 W/(m.K) to 2.87 W/(m.K). The standard deviation varies according to the scale considered, and for the 0.8 m scale it is expected to range from 0.17 to 0.29 W/(m.K). Estimates of lower tail percentiles for the same scale are presented for all five domains. The temperature dependence is rather small with a decrease in thermal conductivity of 1.1-5.3% per 100 deg C increase in temperature for the dominant rock types. There are a number of important uncertainties associated with these

  10. Solid waste projection model: Database user's guide (Version 1.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, F.; Stiles, D.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for preparing to use Version 1 of the SWPM database, for entering and maintaining data, and for performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions, and does not provide instructions in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established. 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database user's guide (Version 1.3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for preparing to use Version 1.3 of the SWPM database, for entering and maintaining data, and for performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions and does not provide instruction in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established

  12. HAM Construction modeling using COMSOL with MatLab Modeling Guide version 1.0.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijndel, van A.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a first modeling guide for the modeling and simulation of up to full 3D dynamic Heat, Air & Moisture (HAM) transport of building constructions using COMSOL with Matlab. The modeling scripts are provided at the appendix. Furthermore, all modeling files and results are published at

  13. HAM Construction modeling using COMSOL with MatLab Modeling Guide, version 1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijndel, van A.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a first modeling guide for the modeling and simulation of up to full 3D dynamic Heat, Air & Moisture (HAM) transport of building constructions using COMSOL with Matlab. The modeling scripts are provided at the appendix. Furthermore, all modeling files and results are published at

  14. VALIDATION OF THE RUSSIAN VERSION OF A QUESTIONNAIRE FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF UTILITARIAN INDICES IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE. STAGE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vinyarskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To create the Russian-language version of the standardized international questionnaire Health Utilities Index (HUI applicable for children's age, on the basis of the relevant international requirements to linguistic ratification and validation of tools. Patients and methods: 427 children of the first and 233 children of the second health group have taken part in the research. Average age of patients made10.8 ± 4.6 years. Criteria validity of the HUI questionnaire was assessed by comparison of patients' answers who had the different health status, a convergent validity — by comparison of the HUI attributes with scales of the PedsQL questionnaire, reliability — by calculation of Cronbach's alfa and the analysis of correlations between questions of the HUI classification. Results: Between the first and second health group there were significant distinctions on each attribute of the HUI questionnaire (p < 0.001. Average value of a number of the reduced attributes significantly differed depending on the state of health of patients: the worse the state of health is, the higher number of limited attributes is (p < 0.05. Significant correlations between the scales estimating similar concepts on questionnaires HUI and PedsQL are established. In assessment of the reliability Cronbach's according to the HUI3 and HUI2 system made 0.79 and 0.8, respectively. Significantcorrelations between the questions estimating identical attributes (sight, hearing, speech, cognitive abilities are shown. The validity and reliability assessment executed for children with various state of health, allowed to assess all attributes of the HUI2 and HUI3 systems. The received results showed satisfactory psychometric properties of the new language version of a questionnaire. Conclusion: The offeredRussian version of the international questionnaire HUI is a validated tool for the development of utility coefficients for various chronic diseases in children, creation of the

  15. The Korean Version of the Cognitive Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (K-CASP): A Reliability and Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwon-Hee; Lee, Hee-Won; Park, Kee-Boem; Lee, Jin-Youn; Cho, Ah-Ra; Oh, Hyun-Mi; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-06-01

    To develop the Korean version of the Cognitive Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (K-CASP) and to evaluate the test reliability and validity of the K-CASP in stroke patients. The original CASP was translated into Korean, back-translated into English, then reviewed and compared with the original version. Thirty-three stroke patients were assessed independently by two examiners using the K-CASP twice, with a one-day interval, for a total of four test results. To evaluate the reliability of the K-CASP, intra-class correlation coefficients were used. Pearson correlations were calculated and simple regression analyses performed with the Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) and the aphasia quotient (AQ) to assess the validity. The mean score was 24.42±9.47 (total score 36) for the K-CASP and 21.50±7.01 (total score 30) for the K-MMSE. The inter-rater correlation coefficients of the K-CASP were 0.992 on the first day and 0.995 on the second day. The intra-rater correlation coefficients of the K-CASP were 0.997 for examiner 1 and 0.996 for examiner 2. In the Pearson correlation analysis, the K-CASP score significantly correlated with the K-MMSE score (r=0.825, preliable and valid instrument for cognitive dysfunction screening in post-stroke patients. It is more applicable than other cognitive assessment tools in stroke patients with aphasia.

  16. Use of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for physical activity assessment in postpartum Latinas: a validation study of a linguistically translated Spanish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rodney P; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Vega-López, Sonia; Keller, Colleen S

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the concurrent validity of the English and a linguistic Spanish translation of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey (SBAS) with pedometer-measured physical activity (PA) among postpartum Latinas. Latinas (n 97) completed the SBAS in either English (n 47) or Spanish (n 50) and wore pedometers 7 days at three different assessment periods. The English version demonstrated significant trends (p .01) for differentiating aerobic walking steps (AWS) and aerobic walking time (AWT) across SBAS intensity categories at two of the three assessment periods. The Spanish version showed marginally significant trends for differentiating AWS (p .048) and AWT (p .052) across SBAS intensity categories at only one assessment period. The English version of the SBAS is effective in assessing PA status among Latinas; however, the Spanish version indicates a need for research to further explore cultural and linguistic adaptations of the SBAS.

  17. Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML Level 2 Version 5: Structures and Facilities for Model Definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hucka Michael

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 5 of SBML Level 2. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org/.

  18. Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 2 Version 5: Structures and Facilities for Model Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucka, Michael; Bergmann, Frank T; Dräger, Andreas; Hoops, Stefan; Keating, Sarah M; Le Novère, Nicolas; Myers, Chris J; Olivier, Brett G; Sahle, Sven; Schaff, James C; Smith, Lucian P; Waltemath, Dagmar; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2015-09-04

    Computational models can help researchers to interpret data, understand biological function, and make quantitative predictions. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is a file format for representing computational models in a declarative form that can be exchanged between different software systems. SBML is oriented towards describing biological processes of the sort common in research on a number of topics, including metabolic pathways, cell signaling pathways, and many others. By supporting SBML as an input/output format, different tools can all operate on an identical representation of a model, removing opportunities for translation errors and assuring a common starting point for analyses and simulations. This document provides the specification for Version 5 of SBML Level 2. The specification defines the data structures prescribed by SBML as well as their encoding in XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This specification also defines validation rules that determine the validity of an SBML document, and provides many examples of models in SBML form. Other materials and software are available from the SBML project web site, http://sbml.org.

  19. Overview of the Meso-NH model version 5.4 and its applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lac

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Meso-NH model version 5.4. Meso-NH is an atmospheric non hydrostatic research model that is applied to a broad range of resolutions, from synoptic to turbulent scales, and is designed for studies of physics and chemistry. It is a limited-area model employing advanced numerical techniques, including monotonic advection schemes for scalar transport and fourth-order centered or odd-order WENO advection schemes for momentum. The model includes state-of-the-art physics parameterization schemes that are important to represent convective-scale phenomena and turbulent eddies, as well as flows at larger scales. In addition, Meso-NH has been expanded to provide capabilities for a range of Earth system prediction applications such as chemistry and aerosols, electricity and lightning, hydrology, wildland fires, volcanic eruptions, and cyclones with ocean coupling. Here, we present the main innovations to the dynamics and physics of the code since the pioneer paper of Lafore et al. (1998 and provide an overview of recent applications and couplings.

  20. Conceptual Model of an Application for Automated Generation of Webpage Mobile Versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Rachovski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accessing webpages through various types of mobile devices with different screen sizes and using different browsers has put new demands on web developers. The main challenge is the development of websites with responsive design that is adaptable depending on the mobile device used. The article presents a conceptual model of an app for automated generation of mobile pages. It has five-layer architecture: database, database management layer, business logic layer, web services layer and a presentation layer. The database stores all the data needed to run the application. The database management layer uses an ORM model to convert relational data into an object-oriented format and control the access to them. The business logic layer contains components that perform the actual work on building a mobile version of the page, including parsing, building a hierarchical model of the page and a number of transformations. The web services layer provides external applications with access to lower-level functionalities, and the presentation layer is responsible for choosing and using the appropriate CSS. A web application that uses the proposed model was developed and experiments were conducted.

  1. The reliability, validity, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the Chinese version of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Wei; Chu, Hsin; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Yang, Hui-Ling; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Chung, Min-Huey; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Chi, Mei-Ju; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale into Chinese and to evaluate the psychometric properties (reliability and validity) and the diagnostic properties (sensitivity, specificity and predictive values) of the Chinese version of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale. The accurate detection of early dementia requires screening tools with favourable cross-cultural linguistic and appropriate sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values, particularly for Chinese-speaking populations. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Overall, 130 participants suspected to have cognitive impairment were enrolled in the study. A test-retest for determining reliability was scheduled four weeks after the initial test. Content validity was determined by five experts, whereas construct validity was established by using contrasted group technique. The participants' clinical diagnoses were used as the standard in calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. The study revealed that the Chinese version of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale exhibited a test-retest reliability of 0.90, an internal consistency reliability of 0.71, an inter-rater reliability (kappa value) of 0.88 and a content validity index of 0.97. Both the patients and healthy contrast group exhibited significant differences in their cognitive ability. The optimal cut-off points for the Chinese version of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale in the test for mild cognitive impairment and dementia were 24 and 22, respectively; moreover, for these two conditions, the sensitivities of the scale were 0.79 and 0.76, the specificities were 0.91 and 0.81, the areas under the curve were 0.85 and 0.78, the positive predictive values were 0.99 and 0.83 and the negative predictive values were 0.96 and 0.91 respectively. The Chinese version of the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale

  2. Forms of ethnic prejudice: assessing the dimensionality of a Spanish-language version of the Blatant and Subtle Prejudice Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Castro, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the dimensionality of a Spanish-language version of the Blatant and Subtle Prejudice Scale via exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). No research has confirmed the hypothesized factor structure in Latin American countries. Using data from a random and probability survey in population of the northern area of Chile (N= 896), four models were specified: single factor model (global prejudice factor), correlated two-factor model (subtle and blatant prejudice), correlated two-factor second-order model, and single-factor second-order model. The findings indicated that the two-factor second-order model had the best fit. The corresponding alpha coefficients were .82 (subtle prejudice) and .76 (blatant prejudice). Lastly, differences were examined between , , and regarding their feelings toward immigrants, their feelings about their beliefs concerning the state aid received by these out-groups, and their feelings about their beliefs regarding future policies for them.

  3. Assessment of sexually related personal distress accompanying premenopausal sexual dysfunction with an Arabic version of the Female Sexual Distress Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Magdy R; Shaaban, Mohamed M; Meky, Heba K

    2017-10-01

    To assess sexually related personal distress among premenopausal women with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) via a validated Arabic version of the Female Sexual Distress Scale (FSDS). A cross-sectional study was conducted among women attending Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, between May 2015 and July 2016. In a pilot study to evaluate test-retest reliability and internal consistency, 42 sexually active premenopausal women (aged ≥20 years) completed the Arabic FSDS at recruitment and 2 weeks later. Subsequently, premenopausal sexually active women (aged 20-45 years) were asked to complete the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire; those with FSD (FSFI score ≤26.55) were invited to return to complete the validated version of the Arabic FSDS. The Arabic FSDS showed good test-retest reliability (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.93-0.98) and internal consistency (Cronbach α 0.83-0.92). Overall, 140 (58.1%) of 241 women who completed the FSFI had sexual dysfunction, of whom 51 (36.4%) had sexually related personal distress. Marriage duration was significantly increased among women with FSD (P<0.001). All FSFI sexual domains except lubrication were negatively correlated with FSDS. FSD and sexually related personal distress were highly interrelated and prevalent. An Arabic version of the FSDS was found to be valid and reliable for evaluation of sexually related personal distress. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  4. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the open-quotes constructionclose quotes of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc

  5. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  6. Simulating the 2012 High Plains Drought Using Three Single Column Model Versions of the Community Earth System Model (SCM-CESM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, I. D.; Denning, S.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of changes in the frequency and severity of drought on fresh water sustainability is a great concern for many regions of the world. One such location is the High Plains, where the local economy is primarily driven by fresh water withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer, which accounts for approximately 30% of total irrigation withdrawals from all U.S. aquifers combined. Modeling studies that focus on the feedback mechanisms that control the climate and eco-hydrology during times of drought are limited in the sense that they use conventional General Circulation Models (GCMs) with grid length scales ranging from one hundred to several hundred kilometers. Additionally, these models utilize crude statistical parameterizations of cloud processes for estimating sub-grid fluxes of heat and moisture and have a poor representation of land surface heterogeneity. For this research, we focus on the 2012 High Plains drought, and will perform numerical simulations using three single column model versions of the Community Earth System Model (SCM-CESM) at multiple sites overlying the Ogallala Aquifer for the 2010-2012 period. In the first version of SCM-CESM, CESM will be used in standard mode (Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a single instance of the Community Land Model (CLM)), secondly, CESM will be used in Super-Parameterized mode (SP-CESM), where a cloud resolving model (CRM consists of 32 atmospheric columns) replaces the standard CAM atmospheric parameterization and is coupled to a single instance of CLM, and thirdly, CESM is used in "Multi Instance" SP-CESM mode, where an instance of CLM is coupled to each CRM column of SP-CESM (32 CRM columns coupled to 32 instances of CLM). To assess the physical realism of the land-atmosphere feedbacks simulated at each site by all versions of SCM-CESM, differences in simulated energy and moisture fluxes will be computed between years for the 2010-2012 period, and will be compared to differences calculated using

  7. Translation and psychometric assessment of the Persian version of the Rhodes Index of Nausea, Vomiting and Retching (INVR) scale for the assessment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, S; Shahidsales, S; Ghavam Nasiri, M R; Pilling, M; Molassiotis, A; Walshe, C

    2014-11-01

    No tools are available to assess or measure the experience of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) for Persian/Farsi speakers. The purpose of this study is to translate the Rhodes Index of Nausea, Vomiting and Retching (INVR) scale for use with Persian-speaking cancer patients. A sample of 94 cancer patients were recruited from a cancer research centre in Mashhad-Iran. A standard two phase process of scale translation and validation was conducted. In phase I, standard 'forward-backward' translation procedure was used to translate the original version of the INVR questionnaire into Persian. The translated questionnaire was reviewed and revised and a Persian version of the scale was produced. In the second phase, a multiphase instrumentation study describing the internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the translated version was conducted. The inter-item correlation measured by Cronbach's alpha was 0.88. Test/re-test reliability was measured by the weighted kappa and was between 0.63 and 0.79, indicating 'substantial agreement' and stability between the initial and subsequent administrations for each item. These results demonstrate that the Persian version of the INVR is acceptable for use among Iranian cancer patients. Researchers could use this study as a model for future translation and application of psychometric instrumentation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Simulated pre-industrial climate in Bergen Climate Model (version 2: model description and large-scale circulation features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Otterå

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Bergen Climate Model (BCM is a fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate. Here, a pre-industrial multi-century simulation with an updated version of BCM is described and compared to observational data. The model is run without any form of flux adjustments and is stable for several centuries. The simulated climate reproduces the general large-scale circulation in the atmosphere reasonably well, except for a positive bias in the high latitude sea level pressure distribution. Also, by introducing an updated turbulence scheme in the atmosphere model a persistent cold bias has been eliminated. For the ocean part, the model drifts in sea surface temperatures and salinities are considerably reduced compared to earlier versions of BCM. Improved conservation properties in the ocean model have contributed to this. Furthermore, by choosing a reference pressure at 2000 m and including thermobaric effects in the ocean model, a more realistic meridional overturning circulation is simulated in the Atlantic Ocean. The simulated sea-ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere is in general agreement with observational data except for summer where the extent is somewhat underestimated. In the Southern Hemisphere, large negative biases are found in the simulated sea-ice extent. This is partly related to problems with the mixed layer parametrization, causing the mixed layer in the Southern Ocean to be too deep, which in turn makes it hard to maintain a realistic sea-ice cover here. However, despite some problematic issues, the pre-industrial control simulation presented here should still be appropriate for climate change studies requiring multi-century simulations.

  9. Delirium assessment in postoperative patients: Validation of the Portuguese version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando; Veiga, Dalila; Norton, Maria; Santos, Cristina; Gaudreau, Jean-David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the Portuguese version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale (Nu-DESC) for use in critical care settings. We simultaneously and independently evaluated all postoperative patients admitted to a surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) over a 1-month period for delirium, using the Portuguese versions of both the Nu-DESC and the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC) within 24 hours of admission by both the research staff physician and one bedside nurse. We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Nu-DESC using sensitivity, specificity and ROC curve analyses. We assessed reliability between nurses and the research staff physician for Nu-DESC by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We assessed agreement and reliability between Nu-DESC and ICDSC by overall and specific proportions of agreement and by kappa statistics. Based on the ICDSC, we diagnosed delirium in 12 of the 78 patients. Reliability between nurses and the staff physician for total Nu-DESC score was high. Agreement between nurses and staff physician in the delirium diagnosis was perfect. The proportion of overall agreement between Nu-DESC and ICDSC in the delirium diagnosis was 0.88 and the kappa ranged from 0.79 to 0.93. Nu-DESC Sensitivity was 100 and specificity was 86%. The Portuguese version of the Nu-DESC appears to be an accurate and reliable assessment and monitoring instrument for delirium in critical care settings. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Using the Violence Risk Scale-Sexual Offense version in sexual violence risk assessments: Updated risk categories and recidivism estimates from a multisite sample of treated sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Mark E; Mundt, James C; Thornton, David; Beggs Christofferson, Sarah M; Kingston, Drew A; Sowden, Justina N; Nicholaichuk, Terry P; Gordon, Audrey; Wong, Stephen C P

    2018-04-30

    The present study sought to develop updated risk categories and recidivism estimates for the Violence Risk Scale-Sexual Offense version (VRS-SO; Wong, Olver, Nicholaichuk, & Gordon, 2003-2017), a sexual offender risk assessment and treatment planning tool. The overarching purpose was to increase the clarity and accuracy of communicating risk assessment information that includes a systematic incorporation of new information (i.e., change) to modify risk estimates. Four treated samples of sexual offenders with VRS-SO pretreatment, posttreatment, and Static-99R ratings were combined with a minimum follow-up period of 10-years postrelease (N = 913). Logistic regression was used to model 5- and 10-year sexual and violent (including sexual) recidivism estimates across 6 different regression models employing specific risk and change score information from the VRS-SO and/or Static-99R. A rationale is presented for clinical applications of select models and the necessity of controlling for baseline risk when utilizing change information across repeated assessments. Information concerning relative risk (percentiles) and absolute risk (recidivism estimates) is integrated with common risk assessment language guidelines to generate new risk categories for the VRS-SO. Guidelines for model selection and forensic clinical application of the risk estimates are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Validation of the Persian version of the brief assessment of cognition in schizophrenia in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhari, Shahrzad; Parvaresh, Nooshin; Eslami Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Sadeghi, Mohammad M; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Keefe, Richard S E

    2014-02-01

    The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) is designed for assessment of cognitive function in patients with schizophrenia. Versions of the BACS in English and other languages have been shown to be as sensitive to cognitive dysfunction as a standard test battery, with the advantage of brief administration and scoring time. The present study aimed to test the concurrent validity of the Persian version of the BACS (Persian-BACS). A group of 50 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and a group of 50 healthy controls received the Persian-BACS in a first session, and in a second session a standard neurocognitive battery. Cronbach's alpha for the Persian-BACS was 0.74. All the Persian-BACS subscales were significantly correlated with the corresponding standard neurocognitive subscales and the Pearson correlation of the composite scores from the two instruments was 0.71. Moreover, a one-factor solution was found that accounted for 67.9% of the variance. Finally, the Persian-BACS demonstrated high ability to discriminate patients with schizophrenia from healthy controls. Good psychometric properties of the Persian-BACS suggest that it is a useful tool for assessing cognition in schizophrenic patients with Persian as their primary language. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  12. A generic method for automatic translation between input models for different versions of simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serfontein, Dawid E.; Mulder, Eben J.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    A computer code was developed for the semi-automatic translation of input models for the VSOP-A diffusion neutronics simulation code to the format of the newer VSOP 99/05 code. In this paper, this algorithm is presented as a generic method for producing codes for the automatic translation of input models from the format of one code version to another, or even to that of a completely different code. Normally, such translations are done manually. However, input model files, such as for the VSOP codes, often are very large and may consist of many thousands of numeric entries that make no particular sense to the human eye. Therefore the task, of for instance nuclear regulators, to verify the accuracy of such translated files can be very difficult and cumbersome. This may cause translation errors not to be picked up, which may have disastrous consequences later on when a reactor with such a faulty design is built. Therefore a generic algorithm for producing such automatic translation codes may ease the translation and verification process to a great extent. It will also remove human error from the process, which may significantly enhance the accuracy and reliability of the process. The developed algorithm also automatically creates a verification log file which permanently record the names and values of each variable used, as well as the list of meanings of all the possible values. This should greatly facilitate reactor licensing applications

  13. A generic method for automatic translation between input models for different versions of simulation codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfontein, Dawid E., E-mail: Dawid.Serfontein@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North West University (PUK-Campus), PRIVATE BAG X6001 (Internal Post Box 360), Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Mulder, Eben J. [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North West University (South Africa); Reitsma, Frederik [Calvera Consultants (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    A computer code was developed for the semi-automatic translation of input models for the VSOP-A diffusion neutronics simulation code to the format of the newer VSOP 99/05 code. In this paper, this algorithm is presented as a generic method for producing codes for the automatic translation of input models from the format of one code version to another, or even to that of a completely different code. Normally, such translations are done manually. However, input model files, such as for the VSOP codes, often are very large and may consist of many thousands of numeric entries that make no particular sense to the human eye. Therefore the task, of for instance nuclear regulators, to verify the accuracy of such translated files can be very difficult and cumbersome. This may cause translation errors not to be picked up, which may have disastrous consequences later on when a reactor with such a faulty design is built. Therefore a generic algorithm for producing such automatic translation codes may ease the translation and verification process to a great extent. It will also remove human error from the process, which may significantly enhance the accuracy and reliability of the process. The developed algorithm also automatically creates a verification log file which permanently record the names and values of each variable used, as well as the list of meanings of all the possible values. This should greatly facilitate reactor licensing applications.

  14. RALOC Mod 1/81: Program description of RALOC version by the structural heat model HECU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, V.T.

    1984-01-01

    In the version RALOC-Mod 1/81 an expanded heat transfer model and structure heat model is included. This feature allows for a realistic simulation of the thermodynamic and fluiddynamic characteristics of the containment atmosphere. Steel and concrete substructures with a plain or rotational symmetry can be represented. The treat transfer calculations for the structures are problem oriented, taking into account, the time- and space dependencies. The influence of the heat transfer on the gas transport (in particular convection) in the reactor vessel is demonstrated by the numerical calculations. In contrast to the calculations without a simulation of the heat storage effects of the container structures showing a widely homogenious hydrogen distribution, the results on the basis of the HECU-model give an inhomogenious distribution during the first 8 to 12 days. However these results are only examples for the application of the RALOC-Mod 1/81 -code, which have not been intended to contribute to the discussion of hydrogen distributions in a PWR-type reactor. (orig./GL) [de

  15. Structure function of holographic quark-gluon plasma: Sakai-Sugimoto model versus its noncritical version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bu Yanyan; Yang Jinmin

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent studies of deep inelastic scattering off the N=4 super-Yang-Mills (SYM) plasma, holographically dual to an AdS 5 xS 5 black hole, we use the spacelike flavor current to probe the internal structure of one holographic quark-gluon plasma, which is described by the Sakai-Sugimoto model at high temperature phase (i.e., the chiral-symmetric phase). The plasma structure function is extracted from the retarded flavor current-current correlator. Our main aim in this paper is to explore the effect of nonconformality on these physical quantities. As usual, our study is under the supergravity approximation and the limit of large color number. Although the Sakai-Sugimoto model is nonconformal, which makes the calculations more involved than the well-studied N=4 SYM case, the result seems to indicate that the nonconformality has little essential effect on the physical picture of the internal structure of holographic plasma, which is consistent with the intuition from the asymptotic freedom of QCD at high energy. While the physical picture underlying our investigation is same as the deep inelastic scattering off the N=4 SYM plasma with(out) flavor, the plasma structure functions are quantitatively different, especially their scaling dependence on the temperature, which can be recognized as model dependent. As a comparison, we also do the same analysis for the noncritical version of the Sakai-Sugimoto model which is conformal in the sense that it has a constant dilaton vacuum. The result for this noncritical model is quite similar to the conformal N=4 SYM plasma. We therefore attribute the above difference to the effect of nonconformality of the Sakai-Sugimoto model.

  16. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genetics risk assessment and genetic counseling includes family history, psychosocial assessments, and education on hereditary cancer syndromes, testing, and risk. Get more information including the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetic testing in this summary for clinicians.

  17. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2/version 3 daytime aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP, on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010. To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. space-borne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73 while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm. This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i CALIOP's low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth's surface; (ii the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa used in CALIOP's extinction retrievals; and (iv calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction

  18. Assessment of Biopsychosocial Complexity and Health Care Needs: Measurement Properties of the INTERMED Self-Assessment Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reedt Dortland, Arianne K B; Peters, Lilian L; Boenink, Annette D; Smit, Jan H; Slaets, Joris P J; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W; Joos, Andreas; Latour, Corine H M; Stiefel, Friedrich; Burrus, Cyrille; Guitteny-Collas, Marie; Ferrari, Silvia

    2017-05-01

    The INTERMED Self-Assessment questionnaire (IMSA) was developed as an alternative to the observer-rated INTERMED (IM) to assess biopsychosocial complexity and health care needs. We studied feasibility, reliability, and validity of the IMSA within a large and heterogeneous international sample of adult hospital inpatients and outpatients as well as its predictive value for health care use (HCU) and quality of life (QoL). A total of 850 participants aged 17 to 90 years from five countries completed the IMSA and were evaluated with the IM. The following measurement properties were determined: feasibility by percentages of missing values; reliability by Cronbach α; interrater agreement by intraclass correlation coefficients; convergent validity of IMSA scores with mental health (Short Form 36 emotional well-being subscale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), medical health (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) and QoL (Euroqol-5D) by Spearman rank correlations; and predictive validity of IMSA scores with HCU and QoL by (generalized) linear mixed models. Feasibility, face validity, and reliability (Cronbach α = 0.80) were satisfactory. Intraclass correlation coefficient between IMSA and IM total scores was .78 (95% CI = .75-.81). Correlations of the IMSA with the Short Form 36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, and Euroqol-5D (convergent validity) were -.65, .15, .28, and -.59, respectively. The IMSA significantly predicted QoL and also HCU (emergency department visits, hospitalization, outpatient visits, and diagnostic examinations) after 3- and 6-month follow-up. Results were comparable between hospital sites, inpatients and outpatients, as well as age groups. The IMSA is a generic and time-efficient method to assess biopsychosocial complexity and to provide guidance for multidisciplinary care trajectories in adult patients, with good reliability and validity across different cultures.

  19. The Extrapolar SWIFT model (version 1.0): fast stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2018-03-01

    The Extrapolar SWIFT model is a fast ozone chemistry scheme for interactive calculation of the extrapolar stratospheric ozone layer in coupled general circulation models (GCMs). In contrast to the widely used prescribed ozone, the SWIFT ozone layer interacts with the model dynamics and can respond to atmospheric variability or climatological trends.The Extrapolar SWIFT model employs a repro-modelling approach, in which algebraic functions are used to approximate the numerical output of a full stratospheric chemistry and transport model (ATLAS). The full model solves a coupled chemical differential equation system with 55 initial and boundary conditions (mixing ratio of various chemical species and atmospheric parameters). Hence the rate of change of ozone over 24 h is a function of 55 variables. Using covariances between these variables, we can find linear combinations in order to reduce the parameter space to the following nine basic variables: latitude, pressure altitude, temperature, overhead ozone column and the mixing ratio of ozone and of the ozone-depleting families (Cly, Bry, NOy and HOy). We will show that these nine variables are sufficient to characterize the rate of change of ozone. An automated procedure fits a polynomial function of fourth degree to the rate of change of ozone obtained from several simulations with the ATLAS model. One polynomial function is determined per month, which yields the rate of change of ozone over 24 h. A key aspect for the robustness of the Extrapolar SWIFT model is to include a wide range of stratospheric variability in the numerical output of the ATLAS model, also covering atmospheric states that will occur in a future climate (e.g. temperature and meridional circulation changes or reduction of stratospheric chlorine loading).For validation purposes, the Extrapolar SWIFT model has been integrated into the ATLAS model, replacing the full stratospheric chemistry scheme. Simulations with SWIFT in ATLAS have proven that the

  20. Ariadne version 4 - a program for simulation of QCD cascades implementing the colour dipole model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennblad, L.

    1992-01-01

    The fourth version of the Ariadne program for generating QCD cascades in the colour dipole approximation is presented. The underlying physics issues are discussed and a manual for using the program is given together with a few sample programs. The major changes from previous versions are the introduction of photon radiation from quarks and inclusion of interfaces to the LEPTO and PYTHIA programs. (orig.)

  1. Dichotic assessment of verbal memory function: development and validation of the Persian version of Dichotic Verbal Memory Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamollaei, Maryam; Jafari, Zahra; Tahaei, Aliakbar; Toufan, Reyhane; Keyhani, Mohammadreza; Rahimzade, Shadi; Esmaeili, Mahdieh

    2013-09-01

    The Dichotic Verbal Memory Test (DVMT) is useful in detecting verbal memory deficits and differences in memory function between the brain hemispheres. The purpose of this study was to prepare the Persian version of DVMT, to obtain its results in 18- to 25-yr-old Iranian individuals, and to examine the ear, gender, and serial position effect. The Persian version of DVMT consisted of 18 10-word lists. After preparing the 18 lists, content validity was assessed by a panel of eight experts and the equivalency of the lists was evaluated. Then the words were recorded on CD in a dichotic mode such that 10 words were presented to one ear, with the same words reversed simultaneously presented to the other ear. Thereafter, it was performed on a sample of young, normal, Iranian individuals. Thirty normal individuals (no history of neurological, ontological, or psychological diseases) with ages ranging from 18 to 25 yr were examined for evaluating the equivalency of the lists, and 110 subjects within the same age range participated in the final stage of the study to obtain the normative data on the developed test. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of the 18 developed lists (p > 0.05). The mean content validity index (CVI) score was .96. A significant difference was found between the mean score of the two ears (p < 0.05) and between female and male participants (p < 0.05). The Persian version of DVMT has good content validity and can be used for verbal memory assessment in Iranian young adults. American Academy of Audiology.

  2. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  3. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2011-09-01

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  4. Planar version of the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira Junior, Manoel M.; Casana, Rodolfo; Gomes, Adalto Rodrigues; Carvalho, Eduardo S.

    2011-01-01

    The CPT-even abelian gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension is represented by the Maxwell term supplemented by (K F ) μνρσ F μν F ρσ , where the Lorentz-violating background tensor, (K F ) μνρσ , possesses the symmetries of the Riemann tensor and a double null trace, which renders nineteen independent components. From these ones, ten components yield birefringence while nine are nonbirefringent ones. In the present work, we examine the planar version of this theory, obtained by means of a typical dimensional reduction procedure to (1 + 2) dimensions. We obtain a kind of planar scalar electrodynamics, which is composed of a gauge sector containing six Lorentz-violating coefficients, a scalar field endowed with a noncanonical kinetic term, and a coupling term that links the scalar and gauge sectors. The dispersion relation is exactly determined, revealing that the six parameters related to the pure electromagnetic sector do not yield birefringence at any order. In this model, the birefringence may appear only as a second order effect associated with the coupling tensor linking the gauge and scalar sectors.The equations of motion are written and solved in the stationary regime. The Lorentz-violating parameters do not alter the asymptotic behavior of the fields but induce an angular dependence not observed in the Maxwell planar theory. The energy-momentum tensor was evaluated as well, revealing that the theory presents energy stability. (author)

  5. A multi-sectoral version of the Post-Keynesian growth model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Azevedo Araujo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With this inquiry, we seek to develop a disaggregated version of the post-Keynesian approach to economic growth, by showing that indeed it can be treated as a particular case of the Pasinettian model of structural change and economic expansion. By relying upon vertical integration it becomes possible to carry out the analysis initiated by Kaldor (1956 and Robinson (1956, 1962, and followed by Dutt (1984, Rowthorn (1982 and later Bhaduri and Marglin (1990 in a multi-sectoral model in which demand and productivity increase at different paces in each sector. By adopting this approach it is possible to show that the structural economic dynamics is conditioned not only to patterns of evolving demand and diffusion of technological progress but also to the distributive features of the economy, which can give rise to different regimes of economic growth. Besides, we find it possible to determine the natural rate of profit that makes the mark-up rate to be constant over time.

  6. Reliability and validity of the German version of the Utrecht Questionnaire for Outcome Assessment in Aesthetic Rhinoplasty (D-OAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekermann, Christoph; Rudack, Claudia; Stenner, Markus

    2017-11-01

    The outcome of aesthetic rhinoplasty is determined by the patient's subjective satisfaction with the nasal appearance which is difficult to assess. The Utrecht Questionnaire for Outcome Assessment in Aesthetic Rhinoplasty (OAR) is a brief and reliable instrument to assess the influence of the subjective nasal appearance on quality of life in patients undergoing aesthetic rhinoplasty. Preoperative application of this questionnaire reveals important aspects and possible disturbances of the body image which could be negative predictors concerning the result. On the other hand, it represents an appropriate tool to assess the postoperative outcome. The aim of this study was to determine the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the adapted German version of the OAR (D-OAR). The adaption of the OAR to German language was performed by a forward and backward translation process. Patients undergoing rhinoplasty were asked to complete the D-OAR preoperatively, 1, 3 and 12 months after procedure and healthy volunteers without any nasal complaints served as controls to test validity, reliability and responsiveness. An excellent internal consistency, a good test-retest reliability and good inter-item and item-total correlations demonstrated a good reliability of the D-OAR. The convincing validity of the adapted version was proven by an excellent discriminant and a sufficient content validity. Significant differences between pre- and postoperative D-OAR scores revealed a good responsiveness of the instrument. Hence, with a sufficient validity, reliability and sensitivity to changes, the D-OAR is a short and helpful instrument to assess the subjective perception of the nasal appearance in German patients.

  7. Systems Security Engineering Capability Maturity Model (SSECMM), Model Description, Version 1.1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    This document is designed to acquaint the reader with the SSE-CMM Project as a whole and present the project's major work product - the Systems Security Engineering Capability Maturity Model (SSE- CMM...

  8. Development and validation of a short version of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT among professionals in Dutch disease-management partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieboer Anna P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which partnership synergy is created within quality improvement programmes in the Netherlands is unknown. In this article, we describe the psychometric testing of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT among professionals in twenty-two disease-management partnerships participating in quality improvement projects focused on chronic care in the Netherlands. Our objectives are to validate the PSAT in the Netherlands and to reduce the number of items of the original PSAT while maintaining validity and reliability. Methods The Dutch version of the PSAT was tested in twenty-two disease-management partnerships with 218 professionals. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity and reliability. Results After eliminating 14 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 15-item PSAT-Short version (PSAT-S. Internal consistency as represented by Cronbach's alpha ranged from acceptable (0.75 for the 'efficiency' subscale to excellent for the 'leadership' subscale (0.87. Convergent validity was provided with high correlations of the partnership dimensions and partnership synergy (ranged from 0.512 to 0.609 and high correlations with chronic illness care (ranged from 0.447 to 0.329. Conclusion The psychometric properties and convergent validity of the PSAT-S were satisfactory rendering it a valid and reliable instrument for assessing partnership synergy and its dimensions of partnership functioning.

  9. Assessment of pressurized nuclear equipment compliance - ASN guide no. 8, version of 04/09/2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document describes the modalities according to which the compliance assessment of pressurized nuclear equipment must be performed by inspecting organisations according to a decree of December 1999 and an order of December 2005. After an indication of reference documents and some technical definitions, this guide describes the equipment classification and the principles of intervention. These principles concern the assessment request and the various assessment tasks to be performed by the inspecting organisation

  10. Model uncertainty in safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkinen, U.; Huovinen, T.

    1996-01-01

    The uncertainty analyses are an essential part of any risk assessment. Usually the uncertainties of reliability model parameter values are described by probability distributions and the uncertainty is propagated through the whole risk model. In addition to the parameter uncertainties, the assumptions behind the risk models may be based on insufficient experimental observations and the models themselves may not be exact descriptions of the phenomena under analysis. The description and quantification of this type of uncertainty, model uncertainty, is the topic of this report. The model uncertainty is characterized and some approaches to model and quantify it are discussed. The emphasis is on so called mixture models, which have been applied in PSAs. Some of the possible disadvantages of the mixture model are addressed. In addition to quantitative analyses, also qualitative analysis is discussed shortly. To illustrate the models, two simple case studies on failure intensity and human error modeling are described. In both examples, the analysis is based on simple mixture models, which are observed to apply in PSA analyses. (orig.) (36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.)

  11. Model uncertainty in safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulkkinen, U; Huovinen, T [VTT Automation, Espoo (Finland). Industrial Automation

    1996-01-01

    The uncertainty analyses are an essential part of any risk assessment. Usually the uncertainties of reliability model parameter values are described by probability distributions and the uncertainty is propagated through the whole risk model. In addition to the parameter uncertainties, the assumptions behind the risk models may be based on insufficient experimental observations and the models themselves may not be exact descriptions of the phenomena under analysis. The description and quantification of this type of uncertainty, model uncertainty, is the topic of this report. The model uncertainty is characterized and some approaches to model and quantify it are discussed. The emphasis is on so called mixture models, which have been applied in PSAs. Some of the possible disadvantages of the mixture model are addressed. In addition to quantitative analyses, also qualitative analysis is discussed shortly. To illustrate the models, two simple case studies on failure intensity and human error modeling are described. In both examples, the analysis is based on simple mixture models, which are observed to apply in PSA analyses. (orig.) (36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.).

  12. Regional hydrogeological simulations. Numerical modelling using ConnectFlow. Preliminary site description Simpevarp sub area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Hoch, Andrew; Hunter, Fiona; Jackson, Peter [Serco Assurance, Risley (United Kingdom); Marsic, Niko [Kemakta Konsult, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    objective of this study is to support the development of a preliminary Site Description of the Simpevarp area on a regional-scale based on the available data of August 2004 (Data Freeze S1.2) and the previous Site Description. A more specific objective of this study is to assess the role of known and unknown hydrogeological conditions for the present-day distribution of saline groundwater in the Simpevarp area on a regional-scale. An improved understanding of the paleo-hydrogeology is necessary in order to gain credibility for the Site Description in general and the hydrogeological description in particular. This is to serve as a basis for describing the present hydrogeological conditions on a local-scale as well as predictions of future hydrogeological conditions. Other key objectives were to identify the model domain required to simulate regional flow and solute transport at the Simpevarp area and to incorporate a new geological model of the deformation zones produced for Version S1.2.Another difference with Version S1.1 is the increased effort invested in conditioning the hydrogeological property models to the fracture boremap and hydraulic data. A new methodology was developed for interpreting the discrete fracture network (DFN) by integrating the geological description of the DFN (GeoDFN) with the hydraulic test data from Posiva Flow-Log and Pipe-String System double-packer techniques to produce a conditioned Hydro-DFN model. This was done in a systematic way that addressed uncertainties associated with the assumptions made in interpreting the data, such as the relationship between fracture transmissivity and length. Consistent hydraulic data was only available for three boreholes, and therefore only relatively simplistic models were proposed as there isn't sufficient data to justify extrapolating the DFN away from the boreholes based on rock domain, for example. Significantly, a far greater quantity of hydro-geochemical data was available for calibration in the

  13. Investigating Key Psychometric Properties of the French Version of the Early Years Evaluation-Teacher Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Robert; Sloat, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates key psychometric properties of the French Early Years Evaluation-Teacher Assessment measure designed to systematically assess kindergarten children across five social and academic developmental domains: awareness of self and environment, social skills and behaviour, cognitive abilities, language and communication, and…

  14. Hydrogeochemical evaluation for Simpevarp model version 1.2. Preliminary site description of the Simpevarp area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in Model version 1.2 which represents the second evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to April, 2004. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 1.7 km. Model version 1.2 focusses on geochemical and mixing processes affecting the groundwater composition in the uppermost part of the bedrock, down to repository levels, and eventually extending to 1000 m depth. The groundwater flow regimes at Laxemar/Simpevarp are considered local and extend down to depths of around 600-1000 m depending on local topography. The marked differences in the groundwater flow regimes between Laxemar and Simpevarp are reflected in the groundwater chemistry where four major hydrochemical groups of groundwaters (types A-D) have been identified: TYPE A: This type comprises dilute groundwaters (< 1000 mg/L Cl; 0.5-2.0 g/L TDS) of Na-HCO{sub 3} type present at shallow (<200 m) depths at Simpevarp, but at greater depths (0-900 m) at Laxemar. At both localities the groundwaters are marginally oxidising close to the surface, but otherwise reducing. Main reactions involve weathering, ion exchange (Ca, Mg), surface complexation, and dissolution of calcite. Redox reactions include precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxides and some microbially mediated reactions (SRB). Meteoric recharge water is mainly present at Laxemar whilst at Simpevarp potential mixing of recharge meteoric water and a modern sea component is observed. Localised mixing of meteoric water with deeper saline groundwaters is indicated at both Laxemar and Simpevarp. TYPE B: This type comprises brackish groundwaters (1000-6000 mg/L Cl; 5-10 g/L TDS) present at

  15. Assessing the reliability and validity of a shorter version of RIASEC in Turkish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süerdem Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Holland’s RIASEC types are being frequently utilized in commercial vocational profiling tools for various human resources purposes. On the other hand, the length of the RIASEC scale and the copyright restrictions put by the publishers, are important barriers to application. In the present study, a RIASEC scale consisting of 41 items and adapted to Turkish language and culture, was developed. Each RIASEC type was represented with 6 or 7 items. Responses were obtained from a sample of 364 business professionals. Survey results indicated a good reliability for the scale, with a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.889. However, reliability analysis pointed out to the need for revision of certain scale items when each RIASEC facet was separately analysed. Then, feedback regarding scale composition, wording and structure were gathered from 20 PhD students. Lastly, feedback of 7 HR professionals were sought, regarding scale items’ expression and application of the scale in regular HR processes of companies. Results from face and content validity have been that for some items of the scale, more descriptive and specific expressions in Turkish are required. Moreover, some of the items would need to be reallocated to another facet where they would be more relevant. In line with findings from face and content validity, construct validity through confirmatory factor analysis also indicated that the short version of RIASEC must be revised substantially in order to become a valid tool for vocational profiling in Turkish context.

  16. Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life Questionnaire: Translation, Cultural Adaptation, Reliability, and Validity of the Persian Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikjooy, Afsaneh; Jafari, Hassan; Saba, Maryam A; Ebrahimi, Naghmeh; Mirzaei, Rezvan

    2018-05-01

    The Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life (PAC-QOL) questionnaire is the most validated and the most specific tool for measuring the quality of life of patients with constipation. Over 120 million people live in countries whose official language is Persian. There is no reported Persian version of the PAC-QOL questionnaire yet. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the PAC-QOL questionnaire and to assess its reliability and validity among Persian patients with chronic constipation. Following the translation and cultural adaptation of the PAC-QOL questionnaire to Persian, 100 patients (mean±SD age=40.51±13.67) with constipation were recruited for validity measurement and 20 patients were re-examined for reliability. Content validity was assessed based on the opinions of an expert committee and the floor/ceiling effect. Construct validity was evaluated according to the hypothesis test. The SF-36 questionnaire was used for concurrent criterion validity, intra-class correlation coefficient for reliability, and Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency. The content validity of the PAC-QOL questionnaire was proven, and there was no floor/ceiling effect. Construct validity also was confirmed based on the hypothesis test. The overall Cronbach's alpha of the PAC-QOL questionnaire was 0.92 (range=0.72-0.92), and the overall intra-class correlation coefficient of the questionnaire was 0.88 (range=0.69-0.87). The correlation between the SF-36 and PAC-QOL questionnaires was moderate. The Persian version of the PAC-QOL questionnaire demonstrated good validity and reliability properties in chronic constipation. Accordingly, Persian researchers and clinicians can benefit from this questionnaire in further research and assessment of treatment outcomes.

  17. Validation of the Sinhala version of the Repeatable Battery for Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraweera, Chathurie; Anandakumar, D; Dahanayake, D; Subendran, M; Perera, U T; Hanwella, Raveen; de Silva, Varuni

    2016-12-30

    Only the Mini mental state examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale have been validated in a Sri Lankan population for the assessment of cognitive functions. Both tests are deficient in the number of domains assessed. Therefore validation of Repeatable Battery for Assessment of Neuropsychological Status is important as it assesses most of the cognitive domains. To culturally adapt RBANS and investigate the validity and reliability of culturally adapted RBANS (RBANS-S). Fifty four participants with major neurocognitive disorder and 60 normal controls aged >50 were administered with RBANS-S at the Cognitive Assessment Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Colombo and National Hospital of Sri Lanka. The participants were selected after a detailed clinical assessment according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – 5 criteria. Data were analysed using SPSS data package. The mean age of the sample was 69.5 years. RBANS-S total scale correlated highly with MMSE total score, (Pearson correlational coefficient = 0.793 p=0.01). Criterion validity was assessed using receiver operating curve characteristic analysis and the area under the curve was 0.937. RBANS-S showed strong concurrent validity us indicated by its significant correlations with the MMSE. All of the RBANS-S subtests demonstrated significant correlations with the MMSE subsets. The sensitivity and specificity for RBANS-S was 89% and 85% respectively at a totals score of 80.5. The RBANS-S yielded a reliability coefficient of 0.929. Culturally adapted RBANS-S is a valid and reliable instrument which can be used in assessment of cognitive functions.

  18. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_C Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima; Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP satellite was successfully launched January 31st 2015, and began acquiring Earth observation data following in-orbit sensor calibration. Global data products derived from the SMAP L-band microwave measurements include Level 1 calibrated and geolocated radiometric brightness temperatures, Level 23 surface soil moisture and freezethaw geophysical retrievals mapped to a fixed Earth grid, and model enhanced Level 4 data products for surface to root zone soil moisture and terrestrial carbon (CO2) fluxes. The post-launch SMAP mission CalVal Phase had two primary objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product pertaining to the validated release. The L4_C validated product release effectively replaces an earlier L4_C beta-product release (Kimball et al. 2015). The validated release described in this report incorporates a longer data record and benefits from algorithm and CalVal refinements acquired during the SMAP post-launch CalVal intensive period. The SMAP L4_C algorithms utilize a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and component carbon fluxes for vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw (FT) controls on GPP and respiration (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and

  19. A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kelin; North, Gerald R.; Stevens, Mark J.

    A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid method in Fortran is introduced for both pedagogical and research purposes. Based on the land-sea-ice distribution, orbital elements, greenhouse gases concentration, and albedo, the code calculates the global seasonal surface temperature. A step-by-step guide with examples is provided for practice.

  20. The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System Version 4 Updates: Merging Toward Capabilities of the National Water Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, M.; Gochis, D.; Dugger, A. L.; Karsten, L. R.; McCreight, J. L.; Pan, L.; Rafieeinasab, A.; Read, L. K.; Sampson, K. M.; Yu, W.

    2017-12-01

    The community WRF-Hydro modeling system is publicly available and provides researchers and operational forecasters a flexible and extensible capability for performing multi-scale, multi-physics options for hydrologic modeling that can be run independent or fully-interactive with the WRF atmospheric model. The core WRF-Hydro physics model contains very high-resolution descriptions of terrestrial hydrologic process representations such as land-atmosphere exchanges of energy and moisture, snowpack evolution, infiltration, terrain routing, channel routing, basic reservoir representation and hydrologic data assimilation. Complementing the core physics components of WRF-Hydro are an ecosystem of pre- and post-processing tools that facilitate the preparation of terrain and meteorological input data, an open-source hydrologic model evaluation toolset (Rwrfhydro), hydrologic data assimilation capabilities with DART and advanced model visualization capabilities. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), through collaborative support from the National Science Foundation and other funding partners, provides community support for the entire WRF-Hydro system through a variety of mechanisms. This presentation summarizes the enhanced user support capabilities that are being developed for the community WRF-Hydro modeling system. These products and services include a new website, open-source code repositories, documentation and user guides, test cases, online training materials, live, hands-on training sessions, an email list serve, and individual user support via email through a new help desk ticketing system. The WRF-Hydro modeling system and supporting tools which now include re-gridding scripts and model calibration have recently been updated to Version 4 and are merging toward capabilities of the National Water Model.

  1. Psychometric assessment of the Persian version of the Ferrans and Powers 3.0 index in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehesh, Tania; Zare, Najaf; Jafari, Peyman; Sagheb, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Ferrans and Powers 3.0 quality of life index (dialysis type) in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) in order to describe their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The sample (n = 150) consisted of adult HD patients receiving HD for at least 6 months from the establishment of the study. A total of 88 men and 62 women, with an average age of 50.47, from Shiraz, southern Iran, were enrolled in this study. The questionnaire was translated into Persian language using back translation and bilingual techniques. Convergent, discriminant, and construct validity of the Ferrans and Powers 3.0 dialysis version was evaluated. To check the internal consistency of the data, Cronbach's alpha, which indicates the reliability of the data, was used for the entire questionnaire and for the subscales. The convergent and discriminant validity and success scaling rate for both sexes were 100 %. Cronbach's alpha was 0.95 overall, which was greater than 0.7 for all the subscales except for the family subscale. Our results suggest that HD patients in southern Iran have higher HRQOL scores when compared with those in other countries. Despite the higher mean HRQOL score for men compared with women, men had significantly higher HRQOL scores only in the health and functioning subscale. There was no significant correlation between HD patients' HRQOL and educational level. The Persian version of Ferrans and Powers 3.0 has sufficient reliability and validity for measuring the quality of life of Persian-speaking HD patients. Female HD patients need more support and attention from family and society.

  2. OCONUS Compliance Assessment Protocols (OCAP) - Saudi Arabia (Army Version) (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krooks, David A; Schell, Donna J

    2004-01-01

    ...: 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 670 KB. ABSTRACT: This environmental compliance assessment manual is based on the Final Governing Standards for Environmental Security by United States Forces in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (FGS-SA...

  3. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0; ARTM. Atmosphaerisches Radionuklid-Transport-Modell mit Radon Postprozessor und SBG-Modul. Modellbeschreibung zu Version 2.8.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald; Martens, Reinhard

    2015-04-20

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  4. Uniform California earthquake rupture forecast, version 3 (UCERF3): the time-independent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Edward H.; Biasi, Glenn P.; Bird, Peter; Dawson, Timothy E.; Felzer, Karen R.; Jackson, David D.; Johnson, Kaj M.; Jordan, Thomas H.; Madden, Christopher; Michael, Andrew J.; Milner, Kevin R.; Page, Morgan T.; Parsons, Thomas; Powers, Peter M.; Shaw, Bruce E.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Weldon, Ray J.; Zeng, Yuehua; ,

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present the time-independent component of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 3 (UCERF3), which provides authoritative estimates of the magnitude, location, and time-averaged frequency of potentially damaging earthquakes in California. The primary achievements have been to relax fault segmentation assumptions and to include multifault ruptures, both limitations of the previous model (UCERF2). The rates of all earthquakes are solved for simultaneously, and from a broader range of data, using a system-level "grand inversion" that is both conceptually simple and extensible. The inverse problem is large and underdetermined, so a range of models is sampled using an efficient simulated annealing algorithm. The approach is more derivative than prescriptive (for example, magnitude-frequency distributions are no longer assumed), so new analysis tools were developed for exploring solutions. Epistemic uncertainties were also accounted for using 1,440 alternative logic tree branches, necessitating access to supercomputers. The most influential uncertainties include alternative deformation models (fault slip rates), a new smoothed seismicity algorithm, alternative values for the total rate of M≥5 events, and different scaling relationships, virtually all of which are new. As a notable first, three deformation models are based on kinematically consistent inversions of geodetic and geologic data, also providing slip-rate constraints on faults previously excluded because of lack of geologic data. The grand inversion constitutes a system-level framework for testing hypotheses and balancing the influence of different experts. For example, we demonstrate serious challenges with the Gutenberg-Richter hypothesis for individual faults. UCERF3 is still an approximation of the system, however, and the range of models is limited (for example, constrained to stay close to UCERF2). Nevertheless, UCERF3 removes the apparent UCERF2 overprediction of

  5. Predictors of successful external cephalic version and assessment of success for vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Liat; Nagar, Ran; Melamed, Nir; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Peled, Yoav; Yogev, Yariv

    2015-01-01

    To identify predictors of successful external cephalic version (ECV) and to compare delivery outcome between women who had a successful ECV and women with spontaneous vertex presentation. A retrospective cohort study of all women who underwent ECV in a single tertiary medical center between 2007 and 2011. Delivery outcome was compared between women who underwent a trial of vaginal delivery following successful ECV with that of a control group in a 2:1 ratio. Multivariate analysis was used to identify predictors of successful ECV. Overall 287 were eligible for the study group. Of these 130 (45.3%) had a successful ECV. Polyhydramnios was the strongest factor associated with successful ECV (OR=3.1, 95%-CI 1.4-7.2), followed by transverse lie (versus breech presentation, OR=2.6, 95%-CI 1.2-6.7) and a posterior placenta (OR=1.7, 95%-CI 1.1-3.9), while nulliparity was associated with a lower likelihood of successful ECV (OR=0.4, 95%-CI 0.2-0.6). Women who had a successful ECV and underwent a trial of labor were more likely to deliver by operative vaginal delivery (OVD) (OR=1.8, 95%-CI 1.2-3.6), mainly due to a higher rate of prolonged 2nd, but were not at an increased risk for CS (OR=0.9, 95%-CI 0.4-2.4). Counselling to women prior to ECV should address the likelihood of success based on the predicting factors described above, as well as the increased risk for OVD in the case of successful ECV.

  6. Taking Stock and Taking Steps: The Case for an Adolescent Version of the Short-Assessment of Risk and Treatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Jodi L; Cruise, Keith R; Nicholls, Tonia L; Desmarais, Sarah L; Webster, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The field of violence risk assessment has matured considerably, possibly advancing beyond its own adolescence. At this point in the field's evolution, it is more important than ever for the development of any new device to be accompanied by a strong rationale and the capacity to provide a unique contribution. With this issue in mind, we first take stock of the field of adolescent risk assessment in order to describe the rapid progress that this field has made, as well as the gaps that led us to adapt the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START; Webster, Martin, Brink, Nicholls, & Desmarais, 2009) for use with adolescents. We view the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV; Nicholls, Viljoen, Cruise, Desmarais, & Webster, 2010; Viljoen, Cruise, Nicholls, Desmarais, & Webster, in progress) as complementing other risk measures in four primary ways: 1) rather than focusing solely on violence risk, it examines broader adverse outcomes to which some adolescents are vulnerable (including self-harm, suicide, victimization, substance abuse, unauthorized leave, self-neglect, general offending); 2) it places a balanced emphasis on adolescents' strengths; 3) it focuses on dynamic factors that are relevant to short-term assessment, risk management, and treatment planning; and 4) it is designed for both mental health and justice populations. We describe the developmentally-informed approach we took in the adaptation of the START for adolescents, and outline future steps for the continuing validation and refinement of the START:AV.

  7. Community Practice Implementation of a Self-administered Version of PREMM1,2,6 to Assess Risk for Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luba, Daniel G; DiSario, James A; Rock, Colleen; Saraiya, Devki; Moyes, Kelsey; Brown, Krystal; Rushton, Kristen; Ogara, Maydeen M; Raphael, Mona; Zimmerman, Dayna; Garrido, Kimmie; Silguero, Evelyn; Nelson, Jonathan; Yurgelun, Matthew B; Kastrinos, Fay; Wenstrup, Richard J; Syngal, Sapna

    2018-01-01

    incorporation of PREMM 1,2,6 into their clinical practice, and that they would continue using it to assess risk for Lynch syndrome. A patient self-administered version of the PREMM 1,2,6 Lynch syndrome risk assessment model can be used systematically in community-based gastroenterology and endoscopy practices. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Chinese version of the City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy Questionnaire: validity and reliability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenjun; Yuan, Changrong; Wang, Jichuan; Du, Jiarui; Wu, Huiqiao; Qian, Xiaojie; Hinds, Pamela S

    2013-01-01

    The City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy Questionnaire is a widely accepted scale to assess quality of life in ostomy patients. However, the validity and reliability of the Chinese version (C-COH) have not been studied. The objective of the study was to assess the validity and reliability of the C-COH among ostomy patients sampled from Shanghai from August 2010 to June 2011. Content validity was examined based on the reviews of a panel of 10 experts; test-retest was conducted to assess the item reliabilities of the scale; a pilot sample (n = 274) was selected to explore the factorial structure of the C-COH using exploratory factor analysis; a validation sample (n = 370) was selected to confirm the findings from the exploratory study using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Statistical package SPSS version 16.0 was used for the exploratory factor analysis, and Amos 17.0 was used for the CFA. The C-COH was developed by modifying 1 item and excluding 11 items from the original scale. Four factors/subscales (physical well-being, psychological well-being, social well-being, and spiritual well-being) were identified and confirmed in the C-COH The scale reliabilities estimated from the CFA results for the 4 subscales were 0.860, 0.885, 0.864, and 0.686, respectively. Findings support the reliability and validity of the C-COH. The C-COH could be a useful measure of the level of quality of life among Chinese patients with a stoma and may provide important intervention implications for healthcare providers to help improve the life quality of patients with a stoma.

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation of an environmental health measurement instrument: Brazilian version of the health-care waste management • rapid assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozendey-Silva, Eliana Napoleão; da Silva, Cintia Ribeiro; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Wasserman, Julio Cesar; Rozemberg, Brani; Teixeira, Liliane Reis

    2016-09-05

    Periodic assessment is one of the recommendations for improving health-care waste management worldwide. This study aimed at translating and adapting the Health-Care Waste Management - Rapid Assessment Tool (HCWM-RAT), proposed by the World Health Organization, to a Brazilian Portuguese version, and resolving its cultural and legal issues. The work focused on the evaluation of the concepts, items and semantic equivalence between the original tool and the Brazilian Portuguese version. A cross-cultural adaptation methodology was used, including: initial translation to Brazilian Portuguese; back translation to English; syntheses of these translation versions; formation of an expert committee to achieve consensus about the preliminary version; and evaluation of the target audience's comprehension. Both the translated and the original versions' concepts, items and semantic equivalence are presented. The constructs in the original instrument were considered relevant and applicable to the Brazilian context. The Brazilian version of the tool has the potential to generate indicators, develop official database, feedback and subsidize political decisions at many geographical and organizational levels strengthening the Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) mechanism. Moreover, the cross-cultural translation expands the usefulness of the instrument to Portuguese-speaking countries in developing regions. The translated and original versions presented concept, item and semantic equivalence and can be applied to Brazil.

  10. Assessment of thought-shape fusion: initial validation of a short version of the trait thought-shape fusion scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Jennifer S; Baeyens, Céline; Purdon, Christine; Shafran, Roz; Roulin, Jean-Luc; Bouvard, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Thought-shape fusion (TSF) is a cognitive distortion that has been linked to eating pathology. Two studies were conducted to further explore this phenomenon and to establish the psychometric properties of a French short version of the TSF scale. In Study 1, students (n = 284) completed questionnaires assessing TSF and related psychopathology. In Study 2, the responses of women with eating disorders (n = 22) and women with no history of an eating disorder (n = 23) were compared. The French short version of the TSF scale has a unifactorial structure, with convergent validity with measures of eating pathology, and good internal consistency. Depression, eating pathology, body dissatisfaction, and thought-action fusion emerged as predictors of TSF. Individuals with eating disorders have higher TSF, and more clinically relevant food-related thoughts than do women with no history of an eating disorder. This research suggests that the shortened TSF scale can suitably measure this construct, and provides support for the notion that TSF is associated with eating pathology. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Internal Consistency of Reliability Assessment of the Persian version of the ‘Home Falls and Accident Screening Tool’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Hassani Mehraban

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Falling is a common problem among the elderly. Falling indoors and outdoors is highly prevalent among the Iranian elderly. Therefore, identification of the contributing factors at home and their modification can reduce falls and subsequent injuries inthe elderly. The goal of this study was to identify the elderly at risk of fall, using the ‘Home Falls and Accident Screening Tool’ (HOME FAST, and to determine the reliability of this tool. Methods: Sixty old people were selected from five geographical regions of Tehran through the Local Town Councils. Participants were aged 60 to 65 years, and HOME FAST was used to assess inter rater and test- retest reliability. Results: Test-retest reliability in the study showed that agreement between the items of the Persian version of HOME FAST was over 0.8, which is a very good reliability. The agreement between the domains was 0.65-1.00, indicative of moderate to high reliability. Moreover, the Inter rater reliability of the items was over 0.8, which is also very good. The correlation of each item between the domains was 0.01-1.00, which shows poor to high reliability. Discussion: This study showed that the reliability of the Persian version of HOME FAST is high. This tool can therefore be used as an appropriate screening tool by professionals to take necessary preventive measures for the Iranian elderly population.

  12. A Malay version of the Child Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (Child-OIDP index: assessing validity and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusof Zamros YM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study aimed to develop and test a Malay version of the Child-OIDP index, evaluate its psychometric properties and report on the prevalence of oral impacts on eight daily performances in a sample of 11–12 year old Malaysian schoolchildren. Methods The Child-OIDP index was translated from English into Malay. The Malay version was tested for reliability and validity on a non-random sample of 132, 11–12 year old schoolchildren from two urban schools in Kuala Lumpur. Psychometric analysis of the Malay Child-OIDP involved face, content, criterion and construct validity tests as well as internal and test-retest reliability. Non-parametric statistical methods were used to assess relationships between Child-OIDP scores and other subjective outcome measures. Results The standardised Cronbach’s alpha was 0.80 and the weighted Kappa was 0.84 (intraclass correlation = 0.79. The index showed significant associations with different subjective measures viz. perceived satisfaction with mouth, perceived needs for dental treatment, perceived oral health status and toothache experience in the previous 3 months (p  Conclusion This study indicated that the Malay Child-OIDP index is a valid and reliable instrument to measure the oral impacts of daily performances in 11–12 year old urban schoolchildren in Malaysia.

  13. Assessment of fatigue in cancer patients and community dwellers: validation study of the Filipino version of the brief fatigue inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Tito R; Laudico, Adriano V; Wang, Xin Shelley; Guo, Hong; Matsuda, Maria Lourdes; Yosuico, Victor D; Fragante, Edilberto P; Cleeland, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials that might identify effective therapies for cancer-related fatigue, one of the most distressing symptoms experienced by patients, require a validated fatigue assessment tool. We developed and validated a Filipino language version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-F) for describing the prevalence and severity of fatigue among Filipino patients with cancer. We conducted a cross-sectional study in Manila, Philippines, in 206 patients with cancer and 170 age-matched community-dwelling adults who had never had a diagnosis of cancer. Validity and reliability were evaluated by principal factor analysis and Cronbach's α coefficients. Factor analysis extracted 1 factor, i.e. fatigue severity, with a Cronbach's α of 0.95; this is consistent with the original BFI English version validation study. Approximately 49% of the patients with cancer had mild fatigue, 34% had moderate fatigue, and 17% had severe fatigue. Patients with a poorer performance status had significantly worse fatigue than patients with a better performance status (5.0 ± 2.8 vs. 3.8 ± 2.2; p Filipino cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of the Simpevarp area, model version 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (ed.) [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Gimeno, Maria; Auque, Luis; Gomez, Javier [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Gurban, Ioana [3D-Terra (Sweden)

    2004-02-01

    Siting studies for SKB's programme of deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste currently involves the investigation of two locations, Simpevarp and Forsmark, on the eastern coast of Sweden to determine their geological, hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics. Present work completed has resulted in model version 1.1 which represents the first evaluation of the available Simpevarp groundwater analytical data collected up to July 1st, 2003 (i.e. the first 'data freeze' of the site). The HAG (Hydrochemical Analytical Group) group had access to a total of 535 water samples collected from the surface and sub-surface environment (e.g. soil pipes in the overburden, streams and lakes); only a few samples were collected from drilled boreholes. The deepest fracture groundwater samples with sufficient analytical data reflected depths down to 250 m. Furthermore, most of the waters sampled (79%) lacked crucial analytical information that restricted the evaluation. Consequently, model version 1.1 focussed on the processes taking place in the uppermost part of the bedrock rather than at repository levels. The complex groundwater evolution and patterns at Simpevarp are a result of many factors such as: a) the flat topography and proximity to the Baltic Sea, b) changes in hydrogeology related to glaciation/deglaciation and land uplift, c) repeated marine/lake water regressions/transgressions, and d) organic or inorganic alteration of the groundwater composition caused by microbial processes or water/rock interactions. The sampled groundwaters reflect to various degrees of modern or ancient water/rock interactions and mixing processes. Higher topography to the west of Simpevarp has resulted in hydraulic gradients which have partially flushed out old water types. Except for sea waters, most surface waters and some groundwaters from percussion boreholes are fresh, non-saline waters according to the classification used for Aespoe groundwaters. The rest

  15. User's guide to the MESOI diffusion model: Version 1.1 (for Data General Eclipse S/230 with AFOS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athey, G.F.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1982-09-01

    MESOI is an interactive, Langrangian puff trajectory model. The model theory is documented separately (Ramsdell and Athey, 1981). Version 1.1 is a modified form of the original 1.0. It is designed to run on a Data General Eclipse computer. The model has improved support features which make it useful as an emergency response tool. This report is intended to provide the user with the information necessary to successfully conduct model simulations using MESOI Version 1.1 and to use the support programs STAPREP and EXPLT. The user is also provided information on the use of the data file maintenance and review program UPDATE. Examples are given for the operation of the program. Test data sets are described which allow the user to practice with the programs and to confirm proper implementation and execution

  16. Assessing the factor structures of the 55- and 22-item versions of the conformity to masculine norms inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse

    2011-03-01

    The current study examined the psychometric properties of the abbreviated versions, 55- and 22-items, of the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory (CMNI). The authors tested the factor structure for the 11 subscales of the CMNI-55 and the global masculinity factor for the CMNI-55 and the CMNI-22. In a clinical sample of men and women (n=522), the results supported the 11-factor model. Furthermore, the factor structure was invariant for men and women. The higher order model, which tested the utility of the global masculine score, demonstrated marginal fit. The factor structures for the global masculinity score for the CMNI-22 demonstrated poor fit. Collectively, the results suggest that the CMNI-55 is better represented in a multidimensional construct. The subscales' alpha levels and factor loadings were, generally, within acceptable limits. Gender and ethnic mean level differences are also reported. © The Author(s) 2011

  17. A pilot evaluation of external quality assessment of GenoType MTBDRplus versions 1 and 2 using dried culture spot material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gous, N; Isherwood, L E; David, A; Stevens, W; Scott, L E

    2015-04-01

    Dried culture spots (DCS) of inactivated Mycobacteria strains designed as part of an external quality assessment (EQA) program for the GeneXpert system has applications to other molecular tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic platforms. DCS tested on the GenoType MTBDRplus and Mycobacterium CM assays performed well with MTBDRplus version 2 but require increased bacterial concentration for use with version 1. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics Version 4 (ANAM4): Select Psychometric Properties and Administration Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    disorders (including attention deficit hyperac- tivity disorder [ ADHD ]), and no gross visual (no worse than 20/30 corrected or uncorrected) or hearing...of conscious- ness, substance abuse problems/treatment, known neuro- logical disorders , major psychiatric disorders (including attention deficit ... hyperactivity disorder ), vision worse than 20/30 after correction, and hearing problems. Family his- tory of psychiatric disorders was not assessed.

  19. Adaptation and Validation of the Spanish Version of the Leisure Assessment Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Marta; Orgaz-Baz, M. Begona; Verdugo, Miguel-Angel; Martinez-Aguirre, M. Magdalena; Longo-Araujo-de-Melo, Egmar; Ullan-de-la-Fuente, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    "Participation"--defined as engagement in life situations, including leisure and recreational activities--is associated with the improvement of people with disabilities' quality of life. Several specific instruments assess leisure, but none of them has been adapted to the Spanish context. The goal of this study is to adapt and validate the Spanish…

  20. EMDS users guide (version 2.0): knowledge-based decision support for ecological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith M. Reynolds

    1999-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station in Corvallis, Oregon, has developed the ecosystem management decision support (EMDS) system. The system integrates the logical formalism of knowledge-based reasoning into a geographic information system (GIS) environment to provide decision support for ecological landscape assessment and evaluation. The...

  1. Template for assessing climate change impacts and management options: TACCIMO user guide version 2.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrys Treasure; Steven McNulty; Jennifer Moore Myers; Lisa Nicole Jennings

    2014-01-01

    The Template for Assessing Climate Change Impacts and Management Options (TACCIMO) is a Web-based tool developed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture to assist Federal, State, and private land managers and planners with evaluation of climate change science implications for sustainable natural resource management. TACCIMO is a dynamic information...

  2. Human Capital: A Self-Assessment Checklist for Agency Leaders. Version 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document presents and discusses a self-assessment checklist that the General Accounting Office (GAO) developed to enable agency leaders to examine their human capital efforts through a process consisting of the following stages: analyze and plan; implement change; and evaluate and continuously improve. The preface defines the term "human…

  3. The Validity and Reliability of the Turkish Version of the Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Çiğdem; Altay, Naime

    2017-03-01

    The study created a Turkish translation of the Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale (NSRAS) that was developed by Huffines and Longsdon in 1997. Study authors used a cross-sectional survey design in order to determine the validity and reliability of the Turkish translation. The study was conducted at the neonatal intensive care unit of a university hospital in Ankara between March 15 and June 30, 2014. The research sample included 130 neonatal assessments from 17 patients. Data were collected by questionnaire regarding the characteristics of the participating neonates, 7 nurse observers, and the NSRAS and its subarticles. After translation and back-translation were performed to assess language validity of the scale, necessary corrections were made in line with expert suggestions, and content validity was ensured. Internal consistency of the scale was assessed by its homogeneity, Cronbach's α, and subarticle-general scale grade correlation. Cronbach's α for the scale overall was .88, and Cronbach's α values for the subarticles were between .83 and .90. Results showed a positive relationship among all the subarticles and the overall NSRAS scale grade (P Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin analysis was applied for sample sufficiency, and Bartlett test analysis was applied in order to assess the factor analysis of the sample. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin coefficient was 0.73, and the χ value found according to the Bartlett test was statistically significant at an advanced level (P < .05). In the 6 subarticles of the scale and in the general scale total grade, a high, positive, and significant relationship among the grades given by the researcher and the nurse observers was found (P < .05). The Turkish NSRAS is reliable and valid.

  4. New insights in symptom assessment: the Chinese Versions of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short Form (MSAS-SF) and the Condensed MSAS (CMSAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Law, Chi Ching; Fu, Yiu Tung; Wong, Kam Hung; Chang, Victor T; Fielding, Richard

    2008-12-01

    There are very few symptom assessment instruments in Chinese. We present the validity and reliability of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short Form (MSAS-SF) and the Condensed Form MSAS (CMSAS) in Chinese cancer patients. The Chinese version of the 32-item MSAS-SF, a self-report measure for assessing symptom distress and frequency in cancer patients, was administered to 256 Chinese patients with colorectal cancer at a clinical oncology outpatient unit. Highly prevalent symptoms included worrying (59%), dry mouth (54%), lack of energy (54%), feeling sad (48%), feeling irritable (48%), and pain (41%). Both the MSAS-SF and CMSAS demonstrated good validity and reliability. For the MSAS-SF subscales, Cronbach alphas ranged from 0.84 to 0.91, and for CMSAS subscales, from 0.79 to 0.87. Moderate-to-high correlations of MSAS-SF and CMSAS subscales with appropriate European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 subscales (0.42-0.71, PsRosenberg Self-Esteem and Optimism Scale (0.22, Pscales--the Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ) and the Life Orientation Scale. Construct validity of both MSAS versions was demonstrated by effective differentiation between clinically distinct patient groups (Karnofsky scores or =80% [P4 [Pscales (0.31-0.64, P<0.001). The average time to complete the MSAS-SF was six minutes. The Chinese versions of the MSAS-SF and CMSAS are valid and practical measures. Further validation is needed for Chinese patients with other cancer types and with other symptom instruments.

  5. NEW MODEL OF QUALITY ASSESSMENT IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION - UPGRADING THE COMMON ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK (CAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Macur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study, we developed new model of quality assessment in public administration. The Common Assessment Framework (CAF is frequently used in continental Europe for this purpose. Its use has many benefits, however we believe its assessment logic is not adequate for public administration. Upgraded version of CAF is conceptually different: instead of analytical and linear CAF we get the instrument that measures organisation as a network of complex processes. Original and upgraded assessment approaches are presented in the paper and compared in the case of self-assessment of selected public administration organisation. The two approaches produced different, sometimes contradictory results. The upgraded model proved to be logically more consistent and it produced higher interpretation capacity.

  6. Preparing a persian version of kimberley indigenous cognitive assessment for assessing the cognitive problems of illiterate geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrollah Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The KICA test has been seen to be a reliable and valid tool to assess cognitive impairment in the aged people of Iran. The KICA test can be used as a cognitive assessment test for distinguishing patients with dementia, especially illiterate ones from other healthy people in Iran.

  7. Climate Modeling Computing Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraska, K. E.; McCabe, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses early findings of an assessment of computing needs for NASA science, engineering and flight communities. The purpose of this assessment is to document a comprehensive set of computing needs that will allow us to better evaluate whether our computing assets are adequately structured to meet evolving demand. The early results are interesting, already pointing out improvements we can make today to get more out of the computing capacity we have, as well as potential game changing innovations for the future in how we apply information technology to science computing. Our objective is to learn how to leverage our resources in the best way possible to do more science for less money. Our approach in this assessment is threefold: Development of use case studies for science workflows; Creating a taxonomy and structure for describing science computing requirements; and characterizing agency computing, analysis, and visualization resources. As projects evolve, science data sets increase in a number of ways: in size, scope, timelines, complexity, and fidelity. Generating, processing, moving, and analyzing these data sets places distinct and discernable requirements on underlying computing, analysis, storage, and visualization systems. The initial focus group for this assessment is the Earth Science modeling community within NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). As the assessment evolves, this focus will expand to other science communities across the agency. We will discuss our use cases, our framework for requirements and our characterizations, as well as our interview process, what we learned and how we plan to improve our materials after using them in the first round of interviews in the Earth Science Modeling community. We will describe our plans for how to expand this assessment, first into the Earth Science data analysis and remote sensing communities, and then throughout the full community of science, engineering and flight at NASA.

  8. [Assessment of Work Engagement in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Psychometric Properties of the German Version of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale 9 (UWES-9)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautier, L P; Scherwath, A; Weis, J; Sarkar, S; Bosbach, M; Schendel, M; Ladehoff, N; Koch, U; Mehnert, A

    2015-10-01

    Our purpose was the psychometric evaluation of the German version of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-9 (UWES-9), a self-assessment tool measuring work-related resources consisting of 9 items. Based on a sample of 179 patients with hematological malignancies in in-patient and rehabilitative oncological settings, we tested the dimensional structure by confirmatory and explorative factor analysis. We further evaluated reliability, item characteristics, and construct validity of the UWES-9. The confirmatory factor analysis showed acceptable fit for both a 1-dimensional factor structure and the original 3-factor model. Based on an explorative principal component analysis, we were able to replicate the 1-dimensional factor accounting for 67% of the total variance and showing very high internal consistency (α=0.94) and high factor loads (0.73-0.88). The construct validity was further supported by significant positive correlations between work engagement and meaning of work, corporate feeling, commitment to the workplace, and job satisfaction. The German version of the UWES-9 shows good psychometric qualities in measuring dedication to work in patients with hematological malignancies in in-patient and rehabilitative oncological settings. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Validity and reliability assessment of the Brazilian version of the game addiction scale (GAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Igor Lins; Cardoso, Adriana; Sougey, Everton Botelho

    2016-05-01

    The uncontrolled use of video games can be addictive. The Game Addiction Scale (GAS) is an instrument that was developed to assess this type of addiction. The GAS consists of 21 items that are divided into the following seven factors: salience, tolerance, mood modification, relapse, withdrawal, conflict and problems. This study assessed the convergent validity and reliability of the GAS according to measures of internal consistency and test-retest stability. Three hundred and eighty four students completed the GAS, the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Video Game Addiction Test (VAT). A subgroup of the participants (n=76) completed the GAS again after 30days to determine test-retest stability. The GAS demonstrated excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.92), was highly correlated with the VAT (r=0.883) and was moderately correlated with the BDI (r=0.358), the LSAS (r=0.326) and the IAT (r=0.454). In the Brazilian Portuguese population, the GAS shows good internal consistency. These data indicate that the GAS can be used to assess video game addiction due to its demonstrated psychometric validity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Orthorexia nervosa behavior in a sample of Brazilian dietitians assessed by the Portuguese version of ORTO-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, M S; Martins, M C T; Sato, K S C J; Vargas, S V A; Philippi, S T; Scagliusi, F B

    2012-03-01

    Orthorexia nervosa (ON) is described as an obsessive pathological behavior characterized by a strong preoccupation with healthy eating and the avoidance of foods or ingredients considered unhealthy by the subject. Although it is still not officially recognized as an eating disorder, previous studies have discussed its frequency in some groups and a fifteen-question test (ORTO-15) was developed elsewhere to assess ON behavior. The present study aimed to evaluate ON behavior in a sample of Brazilian dietitians after testing the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of ORTO-15. A total of 392 dietitians answered an online version of the test. The answers were analyzed regarding ON tendency, according with the scoring grid proposed by its authors. Exploratory factor analysis was performed and internal consistency was assessed. It was found that three questions of the test presented loadings lower than 0.5. The 12 remaining question formed 3 factors with internal consistency of -0.51, 0.63 and 0.47. The answers of the participants to these questions revealed a tendency to orthorexic behavior, mainly regarding aspects such as: making food choices conditioned by worry about health status, evaluating food rather from nutritional quality than from its taste, believing that consuming healthy food may improve appearance, discrediting the influence of mood on eating behavior and banning food choices considered by them as eating transgressions. There is no evidence of the validity and reliability of the ORTO-15 with the initial psychometric evaluation performed. Further analyses are needed. Nevertheless, it was possible to observe a high frequency of orthorexic behavior among the studied Brazilian dietitians. However, additional studies are needed to completely understand dietitians behavior toward ON.

  11. Validation Evidence for the Elementary School Version of the MUSIC® Model of Academic Motivation Inventory (Pruebas de validación para el Modelo MUSIC® de Inventario de Motivación Educativa para Escuela Primaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brett D.; Sigmon, Miranda L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of our study was to assess whether the Elementary School version of the MUSIC® Model of Academic Motivation Inventory was valid for use with elementary students in classrooms with regular classroom teachers and student teachers enrolled in a university teacher preparation program. Method: The participants included 535…

  12. Assessment of Social Information Processing in early childhood: development and initial validation of the Schultz Test of Emotion Processing-Preliminary Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David; Ambike, Archana; Logie, Sean Kevin; Bohner, Katherine E; Stapleton, Laura M; Vanderwalde, Holly; Min, Christopher B; Betkowski, Jennifer A

    2010-07-01

    Crick and Dodge's (Psychological Bulletin 115:74-101, 1994) social information processing model has proven very useful in guiding research focused on aggressive and peer-rejected children's social-cognitive functioning. Its application to early childhood, however, has been much more limited. The present study responds to this gap by developing and validating a video-based assessment tool appropriate for early childhood, the Schultz Test of Emotion Processing-Preliminary Version (STEP-P). One hundred twenty-five Head Start preschool children participated in the study. More socially competent children more frequently attributed sadness to the victims of provocation and labeled aggressive behaviors as both morally unacceptable and less likely to lead to positive outcomes. More socially competent girls labeled others' emotions more accurately. More disruptive children more frequently produced physically aggressive solutions to social provocations, and more disruptive boys less frequently interpreted social provocations as accidental. The STEP-P holds promise as an assessment tool that assesses knowledge structures related to the SIP model in early childhood.

  13. The Persian version of satisfaction assessment module of Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Fardipour, Shima; Kashani, Reza Vahab; Asadi, Farnoosh; Asghari, Azizeh

    2016-01-01

    Orthotics and Prosthetics User's Survey (OPUS) was developed to measure patient satisfaction in Prosthetic and Orthotic (P&O) field. To translate the satisfaction assessment module of OPUS (OPUS-SM) into Persian language (Persian OPUS-SM) and investigate its psychometric properties. For cross-cultural adaptation of the OPUS-SM, the guideline suggested by the World Health Organization was recruited. A sample of 116 Persian-speaking people who received P&O devices and services, participated in this study. During the first session, participants filled out the Persian OPUS-SM and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) regarding their satisfaction from delivered devices and services. Drawing from the above sample of 116 participants, 41 participants retook the Persian OPUS-SM 5-7 days after their first time. The results of the first and second administration sessions were analyzed to assess internal consistency, test-retest reliability, item-subscale correlation, minimal detectable change, floor and ceiling effects, criterion validity, and dimensionality of the Persian OPUS-SM. The Cronbach's alphas of the Persian OPUS-SM were 0.71 and 0.89 for device and service satisfaction subscales, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.76 and 0.90 for device and service satisfaction subscales, respectively. The SEM and MDC for device satisfaction were 6.21 and ±17.21, respectively. The SEM and MDC for service satisfaction were 2.25 and ±6.22, respectively. There was a strong correlation between VAS and satisfaction subscales of the Persian OPUS-SM. Dimensionality assessment revealed that Persian OPUS-SM is a unidimensional measure. The adapted and translated Persian OPUS-SM is a reliable and validated measure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Turkish version of myocardial infarction dimensional assessment scale (TR-MIDAS): reliability-validity assesment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Hilal; Ozcan, Şeyda

    2011-06-01

    Many new measuring devices have been developed so that broader psychometric measurements in the coronary artery disease, disease-specific health status measurements, and identification of the broader quality of life can be performed in the recent years. The study was intended to determine whether, and to what extent, MIDAS is a valid and reliable measurement to the patients suffering from myocardial infarction for the first time in Turkey. The research was conducted with the patients hospitalized and treated with myocardial infarction in the cardiology departments of 2 hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey, between 2007 and 2008. Psychometric evaluations of TR-MIDAS were used for validity studies; language validity, content validity, construct validity were examined. For reliability studies; the tool's internal consistency reliability, Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient, and test-retest reliability were completed. The instrument's content validity index was determined to be "0.95". Principal component analysis revealed six factors with an eigenvalue >1.5. Cronbach's alpha was found to be 0.89 for total scale which was an acceptable value. The total's test-retest reliability was 0.51 (p<0.01). Data obtained at the end of the study supports that Turkish Myocardial Infarction Dimensional Assessment Scale is a valid and reliable instrument as a disease-specific scale to assess the patients' quality of life suffering from myocardial infarction in Turkey. Copyright © 2010 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale in Patients with Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Kabuk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluation reliability and validity of the Turkish version of Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS in patients with burns. Methods: This is a methodologically study. Data were collected using POSAS, survey form and plexiglas. Patient Scar Assessment Scale (PSAS was completed by patients (n=53 and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (OSAS was completed by two observers separately. The test-retest was measured applying the scales in 25 patients after two weeks. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Content validity was determined using Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin, Barlett’s test and structure validity was performed by explanatory factor analysis (EFA and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA; reliability was evaluated using internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results: Factor weights were in appropriate range according to EFA, 6 items single factor structure of the original scale was valid and had high consistency index according to CFA, ICC between the 7th item and the total points was proportional, inner consistency was highly reliable (PSAS a=0.992, OSAS a=0.993, consistency between the observers was high (a=0.952, r=0.909. It was determined OSAS scores increased as the burn degree increased (p<0.05. Conclusion: POSAS was determined to be a valid and reliable scale in patients with burns in the Turkish society.

  16. [Validation of the German version of Eating Assessment Tool for head and neck cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Eugen; Steinbach-Hundt, Silke; Pluschinski, Petra; Grethel, Isabel

    2018-04-10

    The assessment of subjective swallowing complaints constitutes an important element in a multidimensional, modern management of head and neck cancer patients suffering from dysphagia. For this purpose, an internationally recognized and validated 10-item questionnaire EAT-10 is used that was developed and validated by Belafski et al. in 2008. The purpose of the present study is the translation of EAT-10 into the German language and its validation for head and neck cancer patients. After the translation of EAT-10 into German according to the guidelines for the translation of foreign measuring instruments, a validation of gEAT-10 was carried out on the basis of the sample of 210 head and neck cancer patients. The reliability was determined by means of the internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha) and item-total correlations (Spearman). The construct validity was verified by the uni- and multivariate analyses of the distribution of gEAT-10 total scores depending on gender, age, BMI, tumor stage and localization as well as type of the oncological therapy. The internal consistency amounted to α = .94, the item-total correlations varied between ρ = .59 and ρ = .85. No significant associations between gEAT-10 total scores and gender as well as age were identified in univariate calculations. Such associations were found for BMI, tumor stage and localization as well as type of the oncological therapy. However, only the tumor stage yielded a significant result in a regression. The gEAT-10 was shown to be a reliable and construct valid questionnaire for the assessment of subjective swallowing complaints in patients with head and neck cancer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation of an environmental health measurement instrument: Brazilian version of the health-care waste management • rapid assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Napoleão Cozendey-Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodic assessment is one of the recommendations for improving health-care waste management worldwide. This study aimed at translating and adapting the Health-Care Waste Management - Rapid Assessment Tool (HCWM-RAT, proposed by the World Health Organization, to a Brazilian Portuguese version, and resolving its cultural and legal issues. The work focused on the evaluation of the concepts, items and semantic equivalence between the original tool and the Brazilian Portuguese version. Methods A cross-cultural adaptation methodology was used, including: initial translation to Brazilian Portuguese; back translation to English; syntheses of these translation versions; formation of an expert committee to achieve consensus about the preliminary version; and evaluation of the target audience’s comprehension. Results Both the translated and the original versions’ concepts, items and semantic equivalence are presented. The constructs in the original instrument were considered relevant and applicable to the Brazilian context. The Brazilian version of the tool has the potential to generate indicators, develop official database, feedback and subsidize political decisions at many geographical and organizational levels strengthening the Monitoring and evaluation (M&E mechanism. Moreover, the cross-cultural translation expands the usefulness of the instrument to Portuguese-speaking countries in developing regions. Conclusion The translated and original versions presented concept, item and semantic equivalence and can be applied to Brazil

  18. Quick screening of cognitive function in Indian multiple sclerosis patients using Montreal cognitive assessment test-short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshpreet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis (MS are now well recognized worldwide, but unfortunately this domain has been less explored in India due to many undermining factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive impairments in Indian MS patients with visual or upper limb motor problems with the help of short version of Montreal cognitive assessment test (MoCA. Subjects and Methods: Thirty MS patients and 50 matched controls were recruited for the 12 points MoCA task. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis was performed to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity of the 12 points MoCA in differentiating cognitively impaired patients and controls. Results: The mean 12 points MoCA scores of the controls and MS patients were 11.56 ± 0.67 and 8.06 ± 1.99, respectively. In our study, the optimal cut-off value for 12 points MoCA to be able to differentiate patients with cognitive impairments from controls is 10/12. Accordingly, 73.3% patients fell below the cut off value. Both the groups did not have significant statistical differences with regard to age and educational years. Conclusion: The 12 points, short version of MoCA, is a useful brief screening tool for quick and early detection of mild cognitive impairments in subjects with MS. It can be administered to patients having visual and motor problems. It is of potential use by primary care physicians, nurses, and other allied health professionals who need a quick screening test. No formal training for administration is required. Financial and time constraints should not limit the use of the proposed instrument.

  19. Validity, reliability, and feasibility of the German version of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment scale (G-CRA): a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Astrid; Mayer, Herbert; Renom Guiteras, Anna; Meyer, Gabriele

    2013-10-01

    Instruments measuring caregiver reactions usually disregard positive aspects, and focus predominately on home care. The Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA) scale is an exception. Until now, no German version has been available. We translated the instrument to German (G-CRA) and evaluated its psychometric properties and feasibility. Face-to-face interviews with 234 informal caregivers of persons with dementia were performed. Half of the persons with dementia (n = 118) had been recently admitted to institutional long-term care (iLTC); the remainder (n = 116) lived at home. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed. Subscales were intercorrelated and further correlated with the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and the EuroQuol (EQ-5D). Internal consistency was measured (Cronbach's α), and interviewers (n = 9) appraised feasibility. The time needed to apply the scale was measured in 20 interviews. The EFA yielded six factors (Kaiser criterion), but a scree plot supported the five dimensions of the original version that explained 56.2% of variance. Low-to-moderate subscales' inter-correlation was revealed. Highest correlation (r = 0.5) was found between impact on health and impact on daily schedule, indicating slight overlap. Criterion validity was supported by reasonable correlations between subscales and ZBI and GHQ-12 (r = -0.21-0.71). Subscale impact on health was negatively correlated with the EQ-5D. The internal consistency was sufficient (α = 0.67 − 0.78). Interviewers judged the G-CRA to be appropriate. Completion took 6.50 min (median value). Our results suggest that the G-CRA is sufficiently valid and internally reliable. The instrument is applicable in home care and iLTC as well as in the transitional phase.

  20. [Validity of the Child Psychiatric Hospital Teacher Questionnaire for the assessment of ADHD. Teacher's version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, R E; Narváez, M R; Arroyo, E; del Bosque, J; de la Peña, F

    2009-01-01

    Teacher's rating scales for the evaluation of attention deficit and superactivity disorder (TDAH) and conduct disorders have been shown to be useful and valid tools. The Child Psychiatric Hospital Teacher Questionnaire (CPHTQ) of the Hospital Psiquiátrico Infantil Dr. Juan N. Navarro was designed for the assessment of ADHD symptoms, externalizing symptoms and school functioning difficulties of children and adolescents. Internal consistency, criterion validity, construct validity and sensitivity of the scale to changes in symptom severity were evaluated in this study. The scale was administered to 282 teachers of children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years who came to a unit specialized in child psychiatry. The validity analysis of the instrument showed that the internal consistency measured by Cronbach's alpha was 0.94. The factorial analysis yielded 5 factors accounting for 59.1% of the variance: hyperactivity and conduct symptoms, predatory, conduct disorder, inattentive, poor functioning and motor disturbances. The CPHTQ scores on the scale showed positive correlation with the Clinical Global impression (CGI) scale in the patients' response to drug treatment. The CPHTQ shows adequate validity characteristics that demonstrate its utility in the evaluation of patients with ADHD and its comorbidity with other behavior disorders.

  1. Using Beta-Version mHealth Technology for Team-Based Care Management to Support Stroke Prevention: An Assessment of Utility and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Magaly; Wu, Shinyi; Ryan, Gery; Towfighi, Amytis; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-05-23

    Beta versions of health information technology tools are needed in service delivery models with health care and community partnerships to confirm the key components and to assess the performance of the tools and their impact on users. We developed a care management technology (CMT) for use by community health workers (CHWs) and care managers (CMs) working collaboratively to improve risk factor control among recent stroke survivors. The CMT was expected to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the CHW-CM team. The primary objective was to describe the Secondary Stroke Prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic Care Model Teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED) CMT and investigate CM and CHW perceptions of the CMT's usefulness and challenges for team-based care management. We conducted qualitative interviews with all users of the beta-version SUCCEED CMT, namely two CMs and three CHWs. They were asked to demonstrate and describe their perceptions of the CMT's ease of use and usefulness for completing predefined key care management activities. They were also probed about their general perceptions of the CMT's information quality, ease of use, usefulness, and impact on CM and CHW roles. Interview transcripts were coded using a priori codes. Coded excerpts were grouped into broader themes and then related in a conceptual model of how the CMT facilitated care management. We also conducted a survey with 14 patients to obtain their perspective on CHW tablet use during CHW-patient interactions. Care managers and community health workers expressed that the CMT helped them keep track of patient interactions and plan their work. It guided CMs in developing and sharing care plans with CHWs. For CHWs, the CMT enabled electronic collection of clinical assessment data, provided decision support, and provided remote access to patients' risk factor values. Long loading times and downtimes due to outages were the most significant challenges encountered. Additional issues

  2. Modeling CANDU type fuel behaviour during extended burnup irradiations using a revised version of the ELESIM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimescu, V.I.; Richmond, W.R.

    1992-05-01

    The high-burnup database for CANDU fuel, with a variety of cases, offers a good opportunity to check models of fuel behaviour, and to identify areas for improvement. Good agreement of calculated values of fission-gas release, and sheath hoop strain, with experimental data indicates that the global behaviour of the fuel element is adequately simulated by a computer code. Using, the ELESIM computer code, the fission-gas release, swelling, and fuel pellet expansion models were analysed, and changes made for gaseous swelling, and diffusional release of fission-gas atoms to the grain boundaries. Using this revised version of ELESIM, satisfactory agreement between measured values of fission-gas release was found for most of the high-burnup database cases. It is concluded that the revised version of the ELESIM code is able to simulate with reasonable accuracy high-burnup as well as low-burnup CANDU fuel

  3. The SAVI vulnerability assessment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winblad, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The assessment model ''Systematic Analysis of Vulnerability to Intrusion'' (SAVI) presented in this report is a PC-based path analysis model. It can provide estimates of protection system effectiveness (or vulnerability) against a spectrum of outsider threats including collusion with an insider adversary. It calculates one measure of system effectiveness, the probability of interruption P(I), for all potential adversary paths. SAVI can perform both theft and sabotage vulnerability analyses. For theft, the analysis is based on the assumption that adversaries should be interrupted either before they can accomplish removal of the target material from its normal location or removal from the site boundary. For sabotage, the analysis is based on the assumption that adversaries should be interrupted before completion of their sabotage task

  4. Recent advances in pathogenesis, assessment, and treatment of atherosclerosis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Spence

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been a number of advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis and in assessing prognosis in carotid atherosclerosis. Risk stratification to improve vascular prevention by identifying patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapy is much improved by measuring carotid plaque burden. In patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis, a number of modalities can be used to identify the 10-15% who could benefit from endarterectomy or stenting. Transcranial Doppler embolus detection, echolucency and ulceration on 3D ultrasound, intraplaque hemorrhage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and reduced cerebrovascular reserve are useful already; new approaches including plaque texture on ultrasound and imaging of plaque inflammation and early calcification on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT are in development. The discovery that the intestinal microbiome produces vasculotoxic metabolites from dietary constituents such as carnitine in meat (particularly red meat and phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk and other sources has revolutionized nutritional aspects of vascular prevention. Because many of these vasculotoxic metabolites are removed by the kidney, it is particularly important in patients with renal failure to limit their intake of red meat and egg yolk. A new approach to lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol by blocking the action of an enzyme that destroys LDL receptors promises to revolutionize vascular prevention once less costly treatments are developed, and a new approach to vascular prevention—“treating arteries instead of risk factors”—shows promise but requires randomized trials. These advances all promise to help in the quest to prevent strokes in high-risk patients.

  5. Validity and reliability of the Thai version of the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipanmekaporn T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanyong Pipanmekaporn,1 Nahathai Wongpakaran,2 Sirirat Mueankwan,3 Piyawat Dendumrongkul,2 Kaweesak Chittawatanarat,3 Nantiya Khongpheng,3 Nongnut Duangsoy31Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Division of Surgical Critical Care and Trauma, Department of Surgery, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, ThailandPurpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the Thai version of the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU, when compared to the diagnoses made by delirium experts.Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in both surgical intensive care and subintensive care units in Thailand between February–June 2011. Seventy patients aged 60 years or older who had been admitted to the units were enrolled into the study within the first 48 hours of admission. Each patient was randomly assessed as to whether they had delirium by a nurse using the Thai version of the CAM-ICU algorithm (Thai CAM-ICU or by a delirium expert using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision.Results: The prevalence of delirium was found to be 18.6% (n=13 by the delirium experts. The sensitivity of the Thai CAM-ICU’s algorithms was found to be 92.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] =64.0%-99.8%, while the specificity was 94.7% (95% CI =85.4%-98.9%. The instrument displayed good interrater reliability (Cohen’s κ=0.81; 95% CI =0.64-0.99. The time taken to complete the Thai CAM-ICU was 1 minute (interquatile range, 1-2 minutes.Conclusion: The Thai CAM-ICU demonstrated good validity, reliability, and ease of use when diagnosing delirium in a surgical intensive care unit setting. The use of this diagnostic tool should be encouraged for daily, routine use, so as to promote the early detection

  6. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  7. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  8. A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelin Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid method in Fortran is introduced for both pedagogical and research purposes. Based on the land–sea–ice distribution, orbital elements, greenhouse gases concentration, and albedo, the code calculates the global seasonal surface temperature. A step-by-step guide with examples is provided for practice.

  9. Translation and Validation of the Thai Version of a Modified Brief Pain Inventory: A Concise Instrument for Pain Assessment in Postoperative Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawnantawat, Pakamas; Thanasilp, Sureeporn; Preechawong, Sunida

    2017-07-01

    Acute pain after cardiac surgery can be assessed using validated instruments such as the modified interference subscale of the Brief Pain Inventory (mod-BPI). Despite the available knowledge, the Thai version of a mod-BPI has not yet been presented. To translate a mod-BPI into the Thai language (BPI-T) and to validate it in acute pain after cardiac surgery. This multisetting, cross-sectional study was done from 4 cardiac centers. With a convenience sampling technique, 132 cardiac surgery patients were enrolled during the first 72 postoperative hours. A BPI-T composed of 4 items on the intensity subscale and 6 items on the interference subscale was translated following Brislin's model. Convergent validity against the numeric rating scale (NRS), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and internal consistency reliability were examined. Of the total sample, 70% experienced moderate to severe pain (cutoff points of worst pain ≥ 4/10), and 65% had moderate to severe interference with deep breathing and coughing, 53% with general activity, and 49% with walking. The CFA confirmed the 2-factor structure of intensity and interference subscales consistent with the original version (root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.08, comparative fit index = 0.95, χ 2 = 39.00, df = 27, χ 2 /df = 1.44, P = 0.06). The physical and mental subdimensions under the interference subscale were determined (standardized factor loading = 0.70 and 0.42, respectively). The BPI-T also has good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients 0.76 and 0.85). Pearson's correlation coefficients at 0.35 to 0.70 supported the convergent validity to the NRS. The BPI-T is a concise instrument for pain assessment in postoperative cardiac surgery. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  10. Assessing fears of preschool children with nighttime fears by a parent version of the fear survey schedule for preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Jonathan; Gothelf, Doron; Sadeh, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Although excessive fears are common in preschool children, validated assessment tools for this age are lacking. Our aim was to modify and provide preliminary evidence of the utility of a preschoolers' fear screening tool, a parent-reported Fear Survey Schedule for Preschool Children (FSS-PC). 109 Israeli preschool children (aged 4-6 years) with chronic night time fears (NF) and 30 healthy children (controls) participated. The FSS-PC analysis included: 1) internal reliability, 2) correlations between FSS-PC scores and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) measures, 3) differences between NF and a comparison sample of FSS-PC scores, and 4) FSS-PC sensitivity in detecting change in NF following an intervention for NF. There were low-to-medium positive correlations between the FSS-PC scores and several internalizing scales of the CBCL measures. FSS-PC scores in the NF group were significantly higher than the control children's score. FSS-PC scores had adequate internal reliability and were also sensitive for detecting significant changes in fear levels following behavioral interventions. Unique cultural and environmental circumstances and specific study group. This new version of the FSS-PC may provide clinicians with a novel and useful screening tool for early assessment of fear- and anxiety-related phenomena of preschool children.

  11. Gender, age, and cultural differences in the Japanese version of the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yago, Satoshi; Hirose, Taiko; Kawamura, Aki; Omori, Takahide; Okamitsu, Motoko

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the characteristics of the Japanese version of the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (J-ITSEA), a parentreport questionnaire concerning social-emotional/behavioral problems and delays in competence in 1- to 3-year-old children. The differences in score between genders, ages, and between the J-ITSEA and the original Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment were examined. The data of 617 participants recruited from Saitama prefecture through stratified two-stage sampling were analyzed. The Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.76 to 0.93. Gender differences emerged for some problems and all competence scales, with boys rated higher in the Externalizing problem domain and Activity/Impulsivity subscale and girls rated higher in the Internalizing problem domain, Inhibition to Novelty subscale, and all Competence scales. The Competence domain score increased across age groups. Compared with a normative sample in the US, participants in this study rated higher in Aggression/Defiance and Separation Distress, and rated lower in Peer Aggression and most of the Competence scales. The results indicate that the J-ITSEA scores should be interpreted in comparison with standard scores assigned for gender and 6-month age groups, and that specific criteria for the cut-off points for the J-ITSEA are required instead of those in the original questionnaire.

  12. Measuring adjustment in Japanese juvenile delinquents with learning disabilities using Japanese version of Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagami, Takashi; Kumagai, Keiko

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to create a profile of the cognitive and academic abilities of juvenile delinquents (JD) in Japan using the newly validated Japanese version of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II-J). We administered the KABC-II-J to 22 JD (Mage  = 15.9 years, standard deviation [SD] = 1.4), 28 typically developing high school students (Mage  = 16.0 years, SD = 0.08), and (as controls) 12 special education students (Mage  = 16.9, SD = 0.83) with mild intellectual disabilities. We observed significant differences between JD and typically developing students on learning index of the Mental Process Index, and the vocabulary, reading, writing, and mathematics indices on the Achievement Index. JD had lower scores than did typically developing high school students. Fourteen JD had a 1 SD discrepancy (43%) in scores on these indices. These cases were suspected of having learning disabilities. The KABC-II-J is a suitable means of assessing academic and cognitive problems in JD; professionals working in the field of juvenile delinquency should recognize that offenders might have severe academic delays and learning disabilities. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  13. Validation of the Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ for the assessment of acceptance in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Juan V

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ. Pain acceptance is the process of giving up the struggle with pain and learning to live a worthwhile life despite it. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ is the questionnaire most often used to measure pain acceptance in chronic pain populations. Methods A total of 205 Spanish patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome who attended our pain clinic were asked to complete a battery of psychometric instruments: the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (PVAS for pain intensity, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36, the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ. Results Analysis of results showed that the Spanish CPAQ had good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.83 and internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α: 0.83. The Spanish CPAQ score significantly correlated with pain intensity, anxiety, depression, pain catastrophising, health status and physical and psychosocial disability. The Scree plot and a Principal Components Factor analysis confirmed the same two-factor construct as the original English CPAQ. Conclusion The Spanish CPAQ is a reliable clinical assessment tool with valid construct validity for the acceptance measurement among a sample of Spanish fibromyalgia patients. This study will make it easier to assess pain acceptance in Spanish populations with fibromyalgia.

  14. Test-retest reliability of Brazilian version of Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale for assessing symptoms in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Josiane Roberta de; Luvisaro, Bianca Maria Oliveira; Rodrigues, Claudia Fernandes; Muzi, Camila Drumond; Guimarães, Raphael Mendonça

    2017-01-01

    To assess the test-retest reliability of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale translated and culturally adapted into Brazilian Portuguese. The scale was applied in an interview format for 190 patients with various cancers type hospitalized in clinical and surgical sectors of the Instituto Nacional de Câncer José de Alencar Gomes da Silva and reapplied in 58 patients. Data from the test-retest were double typed into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed by the weighted Kappa. The reliability of the scale was satisfactory in test-retest. The weighted Kappa values obtained for each scale item had to be adequate, the largest item was 0.96 and the lowest was 0.69. The Kappa subscale was also evaluated and values were 0.84 for high frequency physic symptoms, 0.81 for low frequency physical symptoms, 0.81 for psychological symptoms, and 0.78 for Global Distress Index. High level of reliability estimated suggests that the process of measurement of Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale aspects was adequate. Avaliar a confiabilidade teste-reteste da versão traduzida e adaptada culturalmente para o português do Brasil do Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. A escala foi aplicada em forma de entrevista em 190 pacientes com diversos tipos de câncer internados nos setores clínicos e cirúrgicos do Instituto Nacional de Câncer José de Alencar Gomes da Silva e reaplicada em 58 pacientes. Os dados dos testes-retestes foram inseridos num banco de dados por dupla digitação independente em Excel e analisados pelo Kappa ponderado. A confiabilidade da escala mostrou-se satisfatória nos testes-retestes. Os valores do Kappa ponderado obtidos para cada item da escala apresentaram-se adequados, sendo o maior item de 0,96 e o menor de 0,69. Também se avaliou o Kappa das subescalas, sendo de 0,84 para sintomas físicos de alta frequência, de 0,81 para sintomas físicos de baixa frequência, de 0,81 também para sintomas psicológicos, e de 0,78 para Índice Geral de Sofrimento

  15. Programs OPTMAN and SHEMMAN Version 6 (1999) - Coupled-Channels optical model and collective nuclear structure calculation -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Lee, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ouk; Sukhovitski, Efrem Sh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Programs SHEMMAN and OPTMAN (Version 6) have been developed for determinations of nuclear Hamiltonian parameters and for optical model calculations, respectively. The optical model calculations by OPTMAN with coupling schemes built on wave functions functions of non-axial soft-rotator are self-consistent, since the parameters of the nuclear Hamiltonian are determined by adjusting the energies of collective levels to experimental values with SHEMMAN prior to the optical model calculation. The programs have been installed at Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory of KAERI. This report is intended as a brief manual of these codes. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tabs. (Author)

  16. Business models for renewable energy in the built environment. Updated version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuertenberger, L.; Menkveld, M.; Vethman, P.; Van Tilburg, X. [ECN Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bleyl, J.W. [Energetic Solutions, Graz (Austria)

    2012-04-15

    The project RE-BIZZ aims to provide insight to policy makers and market actors in the way new and innovative business models (and/or policy measures) can stimulate the deployment of renewable energy technologies (RET) and energy efficiency (EE) measures in the built environment. The project is initiated and funded by the IEA Implementing Agreement for Renewable Energy Technology Deployment (IEA-RETD). It analysed ten business models in three categories (amongst others different types of Energy Service Companies (ESCOs), Developing properties certified with a 'green' building label, Building owners profiting from rent increases after EE measures, Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing, On-bill financing, and Leasing of RET equipment) including their organisational and financial structure, the existing market and policy context, and an analysis of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT). The study concludes with recommendations for policy makers and other market actors.

  17. Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) (Final Report, Version 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's announced the availability of the final report, Updates to the Demographic and Spatial Allocation Models to Produce Integrated Climate and Land Use Scenarios (ICLUS) (Version 2). This update furthered land change modeling by providing nationwide housing developmen...

  18. Concurrent validity of persian version of wechsler intelligence scale for children - fourth edition and cognitive assessment system in patients with learning disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Reza; Sadeghi, Vahid; Zarei, Jamileh; Haddadi, Parvaneh; Mohazzab-Torabi, Saman; Salamati, Payman

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the Persian version of the wechsler intelligence scale for children - fourth edition (WISC-IV) and cognitive assessment system (CAS) tests, to determine the correlation between their scales and to evaluate the probable concurrent validity of these tests in patients with learning disorders. One-hundered-sixty-two children with learning disorder who were presented at Atieh Comprehensive Psychiatry Center were selected in a consecutive non-randomized order. All of the patients were assessed based on WISC-IV and CAS scores questionnaires. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to analyze the correlation between the data and to assess the concurrent validity of the two tests. Linear regression was used for statistical modeling. The type one error was considered 5% in maximum. There was a strong correlation between total score of WISC-IV test and total score of CAS test in the patients (r=0.75, Ptest in children with learning disorders. A concurrent validity is established between the two tests and their scales.

  19. Assessing Mediation in Dyadic Data Using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Thomas; Macho, Siegfried; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of mediation in dyadic data is an important issue if researchers are to test process models. Using an extended version of the actor-partner interdependence model the estimation and testing of mediation is complex, especially when dyad members are distinguishable (e.g., heterosexual couples). We show how the complexity of the model…

  20. SITE-94. The CRYSTAL Geosphere Transport Model: Technical documentation version 2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worgan, K.; Robinson, P.

    1995-12-01

    CRYSTAL, a one-dimensional contaminant transport model of a densely fissured geosphere, was originally developed for the SKI Project-90 performance assessment program. It has since been extended to include matrix blocks of alternative basic geometries. CRYSTAL predicts the transport of arbitrary-length decay chains by advection, diffusion and surface sorption in the fissures and diffusion into the rock matrix blocks. The model equations are solved in Laplace transform space, and inverted numerically to the time domain. This approach avoids time-stepping and consequently is numerically very efficient. The source term for crystal may be supplied internally using either simple leaching or band release submodels or by input of a general time-series output from a near-field model. The time series input is interfaced with the geosphere model using the method of convolution. The response of the geosphere to delta-function inputs from each nuclide is combined with the time series outputs from the near-field, to obtain the nuclide flux emerging from the far-field. 14 refs

  1. SHADOW3: a new version of the synchrotron X-ray optics modelling package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, Manuel, E-mail: srio@esrf.eu [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Canestrari, Niccolo [CNRS, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Jiang, Fan; Cerrina, Franco [Boston University, 8 St Mary’s Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    SHADOW3, a new version of the X-ray tracing code SHADOW, is introduced. A new version of the popular X-ray tracing code SHADOW is presented. An important step has been made in restructuring the code following new computer engineering standards, ending with a modular Fortran 2003 structure and an application programming interface (API). The new code has been designed to be compatible with the original file-oriented SHADOW philosophy, but simplifying the compilation, installation and use. In addition, users can now become programmers using the newly designed SHADOW3 API for creating scripts, macros and programs; being able to deal with optical system optimization, image simulation, and also low transmission calculations requiring a large number of rays (>10{sup 6}). Plans for future development and questions on how to accomplish them are also discussed.

  2. SHADOW3: a new version of the synchrotron X-ray optics modelling package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez del Rio, Manuel; Canestrari, Niccolo; Jiang, Fan; Cerrina, Franco

    2011-01-01

    SHADOW3, a new version of the X-ray tracing code SHADOW, is introduced. A new version of the popular X-ray tracing code SHADOW is presented. An important step has been made in restructuring the code following new computer engineering standards, ending with a modular Fortran 2003 structure and an application programming interface (API). The new code has been designed to be compatible with the original file-oriented SHADOW philosophy, but simplifying the compilation, installation and use. In addition, users can now become programmers using the newly designed SHADOW3 API for creating scripts, macros and programs; being able to deal with optical system optimization, image simulation, and also low transmission calculations requiring a large number of rays (>10 6 ). Plans for future development and questions on how to accomplish them are also discussed

  3. Caudal epidural injections for lumbar prolapsed inter vertebral disc: assessment with urdu version of oswestry disability index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha, I.F.; Qureshi, M.A.; Farooq, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims: Oswestry Disability index is an established tool for assessment of Spinal Disability. It has been translated into many languages and but not to Urdu. The aim of this prospective observational study was translation, application and validation of Urdu version of the Oswestry Disability Index (Urdu ODI) for our specific cultural background. Methods: Urdu version of ODI was developed and applied for outcome assessment in 50 patients, suffering from lumbar prolapsed inter vertebral discs and treated with caudal epidural steroid injection. All patients having mechanical low backache with radiculopathy and single level disc prolapse at L-4-5 or L5- S 1 on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were included in the study. Single Steroid Injection with local anesthetic was injected into sacral caudal epidural space through sacral hiatus. A Performa was made for each patient and records were kept in a custom built Microsoft access database. Outcome was assessed using Urdu ODI and validation by comparing with Numeric rating Scale 0-10 at each visit. Results: Fifty patients received caudal epidural injections, 23 (46%) were male and 27 (54%) were female. The mean age was 34 years, with the range being 21-55. Low mechanical backache with right sided radiculopathy was in 29 (58%) and left sided in 21 (42%) patients. The commonest involved disc was L4-S in 28 (56%) and L5-S1 in 22 (44%) patients Pain was assessed with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) of ten points. This was mean 7.35, range 9-6 at presentation and mean improvement was 4.15 with range 5-3 at fist week, 3.80 with range 5-2 at first month and 3.05 with range 4-1 after six months. Functional disability assessment was done using Urdu ODI. The mean Urdu ODI at the time of presentation was 66.23% with range 81%-48%. The mean functional status was found to be 38.64% with range 26%-45% at the end of the first week, 43.65% with range 31%-48% after one month and 44.85% with range 28%-48% after six months. So there was

  4. Behavior model for performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    Every individual channels information differently based on their preference of the sensory modality or representational system (visual auditory or kinesthetic) we tend to favor most (our primary representational system (PRS)). Therefore, some of us access and store our information primarily visually first, some auditorily, and others kinesthetically (through feel and touch); which in turn establishes our information processing patterns and strategies and external to internal (and subsequently vice versa) experiential language representation. Because of the different ways we channel our information, each of us will respond differently to a task--the way we gather and process the external information (input), our response time (process), and the outcome (behavior). Traditional human models of decision making and response time focus on perception, cognitive and motor systems stimulated and influenced by the three sensory modalities, visual, auditory and kinesthetic. For us, these are the building blocks to knowing how someone is thinking. Being aware of what is taking place and how to ask questions is essential in assessing performance toward reducing human errors. Existing models give predications based on time values or response times for a particular event, and may be summed and averaged for a generalization of behavior(s). However, by our not establishing a basic understanding of the foundation of how the behavior was predicated through a decision making strategy process, predicative models are overall inefficient in their analysis of the means by which behavior was generated. What is seen is the end result

  5. Behavior model for performance assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borwn-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1999-07-23

    Every individual channels information differently based on their preference of the sensory modality or representational system (visual auditory or kinesthetic) we tend to favor most (our primary representational system (PRS)). Therefore, some of us access and store our information primarily visually first, some auditorily, and others kinesthetically (through feel and touch); which in turn establishes our information processing patterns and strategies and external to internal (and subsequently vice versa) experiential language representation. Because of the different ways we channel our information, each of us will respond differently to a task--the way we gather and process the external information (input), our response time (process), and the outcome (behavior). Traditional human models of decision making and response time focus on perception, cognitive and motor systems stimulated and influenced by the three sensory modalities, visual, auditory and kinesthetic. For us, these are the building blocks to knowing how someone is thinking. Being aware of what is taking place and how to ask questions is essential in assessing performance toward reducing human errors. Existing models give predications based on time values or response times for a particular event, and may be summed and averaged for a generalization of behavior(s). However, by our not establishing a basic understanding of the foundation of how the behavior was predicated through a decision making strategy process, predicative models are overall inefficient in their analysis of the means by which behavior was generated. What is seen is the end result.

  6. Italian version of Nursing Students’ Perception of Instructor Caring (I-NSPIC: assessment of reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arrigoni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience is an essential component of nursing education since it provides students with the opportunity to construct and develop clinical competencies. Instructor caring is a pivotal facilitator at the forefront of clinical education, playing a key and complex educating role in clinical sectors. For these reasons the aims of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Italian version of NSPIC (I-NSPIC. Methods A validation multicentre study was conducted in three different Italian universities. A total of 333 nursing students were enrolled in the 2014/2015 academic year. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA with oblique rotation was performed to test the construct validity of I-NSPIC. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and test retest via Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC analyses were done to assess the internal consistency and stability of the scale. A Spearman’s correlation with another scale (CLES-T was used to examine the concurrent validities. Results Four factors (control versus flexibility, supportive learning climate, confidence through caring, appreciation of life meaning and respectful sharing were identified in EFA. The Cronbach’s alpha value showed that I-NSPIC was a reliable instrument (α = 0.94 and the ICC coefficient was satisfactory. Conclusion The I-NSPIC is a valid instrument for assessing the perception of instructor caring in Italian nursing students. It may also prove helpful in promoting the caring ability of nursing students and in increasing the caring interactions in the relationship between instructor and nursing students. The knowledge emerged from this study provide important insight in developing effective training strategies in the clinical training of undergraduate nursing students.

  7. Preliminary site description: Groundwater flow simulations. Simpevarp area (version 1.1) modelled with CONNECTFLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, Lee; Worth, David; Gylling, Bjoern; Marsic, Niko; Holmen, Johan

    2004-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the role of known and unknown hydrogeological conditions for the present-day distribution of saline groundwater at the Simpevarp and Laxemar sites. An improved understanding of the paleo-hydrogeology is necessary in order to gain credibility for the Site Descriptive Model in general and the Site Hydrogeological Description in particular. This is to serve as a basis for describing the present hydrogeological conditions as well as predictions of future hydrogeological conditions. This objective implies a testing of: geometrical alternatives in the structural geology and bedrock fracturing, variants in the initial and boundary conditions, and parameter uncertainties (i.e. uncertainties in the hydraulic property assignment). This testing is necessary in order to evaluate the impact on the groundwater flow field of the specified components and to promote proposals of further investigations of the hydrogeological conditions at the site. The general methodology for modelling transient salt transport and groundwater flow using CONNECTFLOW that was developed for Forsmark has been applied successfully also for Simpevarp. Because of time constraints only a key set of variants were performed that focussed on the influences of DFN model parameters, the kinematic porosity, and the initial condition. Salinity data in deep boreholes available at the time of the project was too limited to allow a good calibration exercise. However, the model predictions are compared with the available data from KLX01 and KLX02 below. Once more salinity data is available it may be possible to draw more definite conclusions based on the differences between variants. At the moment though the differences should just be used understand the sensitivity of the models to various input parameters

  8. Geological discrete fracture network model for the Olkiluoto site, Eurajoki, Finland. Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, A.; Forchhammer, K.; Pettersson, A.; La Pointe, P.; Lim, D-H.

    2012-06-01

    account for most (65 % - 75 %, depending on fracture domain) of the total observed fracture intensity at Olkiluoto. Inside a given fracture domain, fracture intensity is adequately represented as a Gamma distribution at the 10 m scale and larger, though near-surface depth-dependence is noted in the foliation-subparallel set in a few fracture domains. There is little difference between open and sealed fractures, though flowing fracture intensity decreases rapidly below approximately -200 masl. Fracture locations are modeled assuming a 3D Poisson point process. Two alternative size models are assessed; the models differ in terms of whether the power-law scaling exponent is derived solely from surface outcrop data (OSM) or from a combination of outcrop-scale, tunnel-scale, and deformation-zone scale data (TCM). The consequences of the uncertainty in the model parameterization is identified and quantified, with the largest effects (on the order of five to seven times) due to uncertainty in the size model. (orig.)

  9. Geological discrete fracture network model for the Olkiluoto site, Eurajoki, Finland. Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, A.; Forchhammer, K.; Pettersson, A. [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); La Pointe, P.; Lim, D-H. [Golder Associates Inc. (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    account for most (65 % - 75 %, depending on fracture domain) of the total observed fracture intensity at Olkiluoto. Inside a given fracture domain, fracture intensity is adequately represented as a Gamma distribution at the 10 m scale and larger, though near-surface depth-dependence is noted in the foliation-subparallel set in a few fracture domains. There is little difference between open and sealed fractures, though flowing fracture intensity decreases rapidly below approximately -200 masl. Fracture locations are modeled assuming a 3D Poisson point process. Two alternative size models are assessed; the models differ in terms of whether the power-law scaling exponent is derived solely from surface outcrop data (OSM) or from a combination of outcrop-scale, tunnel-scale, and deformation-zone scale data (TCM). The consequences of the uncertainty in the model parameterization is identified and quantified, with the largest effects (on the order of five to seven times) due to uncertainty in the size model. (orig.)

  10. Item and response-category functioning of the Persian version of the KIDSCREEN-27: Rasch partial credit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Peyman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to determine whether the Persian version of the KIDSCREEN-27 has the optimal number of response category to measure health-related quality of life (HRQoL in children and adolescents. Moreover, we aimed to determine if all the items contributed adequately to their own domain. Findings The Persian version of the KIDSCREEN-27 was completed by 1083 school children and 1070 of their parents. The Rasch partial credit model (PCM was used to investigate item statistics and ordering of response categories. The PCM showed that no item was misfitting. The PCM also revealed that, successive response categories for all items were located in the expected order except for category 1 in self- and proxy-reports. Conclusions Although Rasch analysis confirms that all the items belong to their own underlying construct, response categories should be reorganized and evaluated in further studies, especially in children with chronic conditions.

  11. The sagittal stem alignment and the stem version clearly influence the impingement-free range of motion in total hip arthroplasty: a computer model-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Michael; Duda, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Tohtz, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    The component alignment in total hip arthroplasty influences the impingement-free range of motion (ROM). While substantiated data is available for the cup positioning, little is known about the stem alignment. Especially stem rotation and the sagittal alignment influence the position of the cone in relation to the edge of the socket and thus the impingement-free functioning. Hence, the question arises as to what influence do these parameters have on the impingement-free ROM? With the help of a computer model the influence of the sagittal stem alignment and rotation on the impingement-free ROM were investigated. The computer model was based on the CT dataset of a patient with a non-cemented THA. In the model the stem version was set at 10°/0°/-10° and the sagittal alignment at 5°/0°/-5°, which resulted in nine alternative stem positions. For each position, the maximum impingement-free ROM was investigated. Both stem version and sagittal stem alignment have a relevant influence on the impingement-free ROM. In particular, flexion and extension as well as internal and external rotation capability present evident differences. In the position intervals of 10° sagittal stem alignment and 20° stem version a difference was found of about 80° in the flexion and 50° in the extension capability. Likewise, differences were evidenced of up to 72° in the internal and up to 36° in the external rotation. The sagittal stem alignment and the stem torsion have a relevant influence on the impingement-free ROM. To clarify the causes of an impingement or accompanying problems, both parameters should be examined and, if possible, a combined assessment of these factors should be made.

  12. Simulations of the Mid-Pliocene Warm Period Using Two Versions of the NASA-GISS ModelE2-R Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Jonas, J. A.; Dowsett, H. J.; Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    The mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP) bears many similarities to aspects of future global warming as projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007). Both marine and terrestrial data point to high-latitude temperature amplification, including large decreases in sea ice and land ice, as well as expansion of warmer climate biomes into higher latitudes. Here we present our most recent simulations of the mid-Pliocene climate using the CMIP5 version of the NASAGISS Earth System Model (ModelE2-R). We describe the substantial impact associated with a recent correction made in the implementation of the Gent-McWilliams ocean mixing scheme (GM), which has a large effect on the simulation of ocean surface temperatures, particularly in the North Atlantic Ocean. The effect of this correction on the Pliocene climate results would not have been easily determined from examining its impact on the preindustrial runs alone, a useful demonstration of how the consequences of code improvements as seen in modern climate control runs do not necessarily portend the impacts in extreme climates.Both the GM-corrected and GM-uncorrected simulations were contributed to the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Experiment 2. Many findings presented here corroborate results from other PlioMIP multi-model ensemble papers, but we also emphasize features in the ModelE2-R simulations that are unlike the ensemble means. The corrected version yields results that more closely resemble the ocean core data as well as the PRISM3D reconstructions of the mid-Pliocene, especially the dramatic warming in the North Atlantic and Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Sea, which in the new simulation appears to be far more realistic than previously found with older versions of the GISS model. Our belief is that continued development of key physical routines in the atmospheric model, along with higher resolution and recent corrections to mixing parameterisations in the ocean model, have led

  13. COMPARATIVE USABILITY ASSESSMENT OF REBA (RAPID ENTIRE BODY ASSESSMENT ERGONOMIC EVALUATION TOOL ON PAPER AND APP VERSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella de Souza Sierra

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ferramentas para auxílio de análise ergonômica são frequentemente utilizadas quando há a necessidade de avaliação de riscos musculoesqueléticos no trabalho. Dessas ferramentas, uma das mais conhecidas é a REBA (Rapid Entire Body Assessment. Seu amplo uso fez com que suas formas de distribuição e aplicação fossem alteradas por vários autores, de forma a tentar encontrar a melhor maneira de aplicação. Inclusive, com o advento de celulares e tablets, foram feitas diversas versões em aplicativo da ferramenta. Pouco pode ser encontrado sobre a usabilidade desse método, ainda mais em qual versão é mais apropriado, em termos de usabilidade. Objetivou-se neste artigo realizar uma avaliação de usabilidade da ferramenta REBA em duas diferentes versões para verificar a influência que a usabilidade da ferramenta tem nos seus resultados. Acredita-se que qualquer tipo de ferramenta para uma avaliação ergonômica deve, de forma intrínseca, ser usável, pois sua usabilidade tem influência direta em sua confiabilidade e replicabilidade. Sendo assim, fez-se uma análise comparativa de usabilidade com a ferramenta em versão papel e aplicativos para celular com oito sujeitos para a verificação de tal usabilidade. Encontrou-se melhor usabilidade para o aplicativo, mas confiabilidade equiparada para as duas versões. Assim, constata-se que as duas podem ser igualmente usadas para avaliação REBA.

  14. Content validation of a Danish version of "The McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment" for dysphagia management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Tina; Lambert, Heather C; Faber, Jens

    2011-12-01

    This study addresses the first steps in the cross-cultural adaptation of a Danish version of the McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment (MISA), which quantifies eating and drinking abilities by scoring a meal observation. The original Canadian MISA was translated and adapted into Danish (MISA-DK). For content validation of the MISA-DK, a judgemental quantification process was applied using 13 experts. Thereafter, the MISA-DK was pilot tested by 16 occupational therapists. Finally, the MISA-DK was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Content validity of 43 items was found for 93% in terms of adequacy, 67% in terms of clarity of item description, 86% in terms of clarity of score descriptions, and 93% in terms of relevance. Thirteen of 14 sections of the instruction manual and score sheet were content valid. In light of these results, a revised MISA-DK was produced for the pilot test, which then found content validity for all sections and 98% of the items. The ICF linking resulted in 41 ICF-categories, which may reflect the complexity of eating and drinking as well as a multidimensional structure of the MISA-DK. In conclusion, the MISA-DK is prepared for psychometric testing using classical as well as modern test theory.

  15. Offshore Wind Guidance Document: Oceanography and Sediment Stability (Version 1) Development of a Conceptual Site Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-06-01

    This guidance document provide s the reader with an overview of the key environmental considerations for a typical offshore wind coastal location and the tools to help guide the reader through a thoro ugh planning process. It will enable readers to identify the key coastal processes relevant to their offshore wind site and perform pertinent analysis to guide siting and layout design, with the goal of minimizing costs associated with planning, permitting , and long - ter m maintenance. The document highlight s site characterization and assessment techniques for evaluating spatial patterns of sediment dynamics in the vicinity of a wind farm under typical, extreme, and storm conditions. Finally, the document des cribe s the assimilation of all of this information into the conceptual site model (CSM) to aid the decision - making processes.

  16. Psychometric Validation of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0-Twelve-Item Version in Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Ruiz, Derek; Mohr, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the factorial and concurrent validity and internal consistency reliability of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) 12-item version in persons with spinal cord injuries. Method: Two hundred forty-seven adults with spinal cord injuries completed an online survey consisting of the WHODAS…

  17. Validation of the Spanish Version of the CAPES: A Brief Instrument for Assessing Child Psychological Difficulties and Parental Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Anilena; Filus, Ania; Calam, Rachel; Morawska, Alina; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we explored the factor structure as well as validity and reliability of the Spanish version of the Child Adjustment and Parent Efficacy Scale (CAPES) suitable for assessing child behavioural and emotional difficulties (Intensity Scale) and parental self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale) among Spanish-speaking parents from the…

  18. Assessment of Psychopathological Problems in the School Context: The Psychometric Properties of a Portuguese Version of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale--Short Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Ida Timoteo; Faisca, Luis Madeira; Valadas, Sandra Teodosio

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Portuguese version of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale-Short Form (APS-SF) were studied in a sample of 656 Portuguese adolescents, aged 12 to 19 years, assessed in school context. Also, the aim of the study was to gather data concerning age- and gender-related differences in the expression of psychopathological…

  19. Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Preliminary Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, Garill A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Brothers, Alan J.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2009-06-01

    This Preliminary Assessment draft report will present the results of a literature search and preliminary assessment of the body of research, analysis methods, models and data deemed to be relevant to the Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment research. This report will provide: 1) a description of the problem space and the kinds of information pertinent to the problem space, 2) a discussion of key relevant or representative literature, 3) a discussion of models and modeling approaches judged to be potentially useful to the research, and 4) the next steps of this research that will be pursued based on this preliminary assessment. This draft report represents a technical deliverable for the NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling (SAM) program. Specifically this draft report is the Task 1 deliverable for project PL09-UtilSocial-PD06, Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment. This project investigates non-traditional use of social and cultural information to improve nuclear proliferation assessment, including nonproliferation assessment, proliferation resistance assessments, safeguards assessments and other related studies. These assessments often use and create technical information about the State’s posture towards proliferation, the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system to an undesired event, and the effectiveness of safeguards. This project will find and fuse social and technical information by explicitly considering the role of cultural, social and behavioral factors relevant to proliferation. The aim of this research is to describe and demonstrate if and how social science modeling has utility in proliferation assessment.

  20. Validation of the Korean Version of the Spatial Hearing Questionnaire for Assessing the Severity and Symmetry of Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tae Hoon; Park, Yoon Ah; Bong, Jeong Pyo; Park, Sang Yoo

    2017-07-01

    Spatial hearing refers to the ability to understand speech and identify sounds in various environments. We assessed the validity of the Korean version of the Spatial Hearing Questionnaire (K-SHQ). We performed forward translation of the original English SHQ to Korean and backward translation from the Korean to English. Forty-eight patients who were able to read and understand Korean and received a score of 24 or higher on the Mini-Mental Status Examination were included in the study. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry (PTA) using a standard protocol and completed the K-SHQ. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha, and factor analysis was performed to prove reliability. Construct validity was tested by comparing K-SHQ scores from patients with normal hearing to those with hearing impairment. Scores were compared between subjects with unilateral or bilateral hearing loss and between symmetrical and asymmetrical hearing impairment. Cronbach's alpha showed good internal consistency (0.982). Two factors were identified by factor analysis: There was a significant difference in K-SHQ scores for patients with normal hearing compared to those with hearing impairment. Patients with asymmetric hearing impairment had higher K-SHQ scores than those with symmetric hearing impairment. This is related to a lower threshold of PTA in the better ear of subjects. The hearing ability of the better ear is correlated with K-SHQ score. The K-SHQ is a reliable and valid tool with which to assess spatial hearing in patients who speak and read Korean. K-SHQ score reflects the severity and symmetry of hearing impairment. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  1. The Greek version of the Gagging Assessment Scale in children and adolescents: psychometric properties, prevalence of gagging, and the association between gagging and dental fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouda, Maria; Provatenou, Efthymia; Arapostathis, Konstantinos; Coolidge, Trilby; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2017-03-01

    No studies assessing the association between gagging and dental fear are available in pediatric samples. To assess the psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Gagging Assessment Scale (GAS), to explore the prevalence of gagging, and to evaluate the relationship between gagging and dental fear in a pediatric sample. A total of 849 8- and 14-year-old children filled out a questionnaire consisting of demographic items, the Greek version of the GAS, and the Greek Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS); the older children also completed the Greek version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS). The short form of dentist part of the Gagging Problem Assessment (GPA-de-c/SF) was used to objectively assess gagging. A total of 51 children (6.0%) demonstrated gagging on the GPA-de-c/SF. Children rated as gaggers on the GPA-de-c/SF had significantly higher GAS scores. There were no relationships between GPA-de-c/SF and the CFSS-DS or MDAS. The GAS ratings were significantly correlated with the CFSS-DS (rho = 0.420, P fear was correlated with the self-report gagging assessment, but not with the objective gagging assessment. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Categorical Inputs, Sensitivity Analysis, Optimization and Importance Tempering with tgp Version 2, an R Package for Treed Gaussian Process Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Gramacy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This document describes the new features in version 2.x of the tgp package for R, implementing treed Gaussian process (GP models. The topics covered include methods for dealing with categorical inputs and excluding inputs from the tree or GP part of the model; fully Bayesian sensitivity analysis for inputs/covariates; sequential optimization of black-box functions; and a new Monte Carlo method for inference in multi-modal posterior distributions that combines simulated tempering and importance sampling. These additions extend the functionality of tgp across all models in the hierarchy: from Bayesian linear models, to classification and regression trees (CART, to treed Gaussian processes with jumps to the limiting linear model. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the baseline functionality of the package, outlined in the first vignette (Gramacy 2007.

  3. Land-total and Ocean-total Precipitation and Evaporation from a Community Atmosphere Model version 5 Perturbed Parameter Ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, Curt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lucas, Donald D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Trenberth, Kevin E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-03-02

    This document presents the large scale water budget statistics of a perturbed input-parameter ensemble of atmospheric model runs. The model is Version 5.1.02 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). These runs are the “C-Ensemble” described by Qian et al., “Parametric Sensitivity Analysis of Precipitation at Global and Local Scales in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5” (Journal of Advances in Modeling the Earth System, 2015). As noted by Qian et al., the simulations are “AMIP type” with temperature and sea ice boundary conditions chosen to match surface observations for the five year period 2000-2004. There are 1100 ensemble members in addition to one run with default inputparameter values.

  4. Evaluation of dust and trace metal estimates from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model version 5.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Appel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model is a state-of-the-science air quality model that simulates the emission, transformation, transport, and fate of the many different air pollutant species that comprise particulate matter (PM, including dust (or soil. The CMAQ model version 5.0 (CMAQv5.0 has several enhancements over the previous version of the model for estimating the emission and transport of dust, including the ability to track the specific elemental constituents of dust and have the model-derived concentrations of those elements participate in chemistry. The latest version of the model also includes a parameterization to estimate emissions of dust due to wind action. The CMAQv5.0 modeling system was used to simulate the entire year 2006 for the continental United States, and the model estimates were evaluated against daily surface-based measurements from several air quality networks. The CMAQ modeling system overall did well replicating the observed soil concentrations in the western United States (mean bias generally around ±0.5 μg m−3; however, the model consistently overestimated the observed soil concentrations in the eastern United States (mean bias generally between 0.5–1.5 μg m−3, regardless of season. The performance of the individual trace metals was highly dependent on the network, species, and season, with relatively small biases for Fe, Al, Si, and Ti throughout the year at the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE sites, while Ca, K, and Mn were overestimated and Mg underestimated. For the urban Chemical Speciation Network (CSN sites, Fe, Mg, and Mn, while overestimated, had comparatively better performance throughout the year than the other trace metals, which were consistently overestimated, including very large overestimations of Al (380%, Ti (370% and Si (470% in the fall. An underestimation of nighttime mixing in the urban areas appears to contribute to the overestimation of

  5. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment: Comparison of Versions 4.2.1i and 4.1.3i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code using versions 4.2.1i and 4.1.3i. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions changed between these two code versions and can be used to identify cases in which the assessment judgment may need to be changed in Volume III of the code manual. Changes to the assessment judgments made after reviewing all of the assessment cases are also provided.

  6. The Reasons for Living Scale-Military Version: Assessing Protective Factors Against Suicide in a Military Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Anne-Marie; Lande, R Gregory

    2017-07-01

    Military suicide rates have been rising over the past decade and continue to challenge military treatment facilities. Assessing suicide risk and improving treatments are a large part of the mission for clinicians who work with uniformed service members. This study attempts to expand the toolkit of military suicide prevention by focusing on protective factors over risk factors. In 1983, Marsha Linehan published a checklist called the Reasons for Living Scale, which asked subjects to check the reasons they choose to continue living, rather than choosing suicide. The authors of this article hypothesized that military service members may have different or additional reasons to live which may relate to their military service. They created a new version of Linehan's inventory by adding protective factors related to military life. The purpose of these additions was to make the inventory more acceptable and relevant to the military population, as well as to identify whether these items constitute a separate subscale as distinguished from previously identified factors. A commonly used assessment tool, the Reasons for Living Inventory (RFL) designed by Marsha Linehan, was expanded to offer items geared to the military population. The RFL presents users with a list of items which may be reasons to not commit suicide (e.g., "I have a responsibility and commitment to my family"). The authors used focus groups of staff and patients in a military psychiatric partial hospitalization program to identify military-centric reasons to live. This process yielded 20 distinct items which were added to Linehan's original list of 48. This expanded list became the Reasons for Living-Military Version. A sample of 200 patients in the military partial hospitalization program completed the inventory at time of or close to admission. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Walter Reed National Military Center for adhering to ethical principles related to pursuing research

  7. RadCon: A radiological consequences model. Technical guide - Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J; Domel, R.U.; Harris, F.F.; Twining, J.R.

    2000-05-01

    A Radiological Consequence model (RadCon) is being developed at ANSTO to assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in any climate, using appropriate meteorological and radiological transfer parameters. The major areas of interest to the developers are tropical and subtropical climates. This is particularly so given that it is anticipated that nuclear energy will become a mainstay for economies in these regions within the foreseeable future. Therefore, data acquisition and use of parameter values have been concentrated primarily on these climate types. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition for Australia can be modelled and supplied by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC, one of five in the world) which is part of the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC), Puri et al. (1992). RadCon combines these data (i.e. the time dependent air and ground concentration generated by the dispersion model or measured quantities in the case of an actual incident) with specific regional parameter values to determine the dose to people via the major pathways of external and internal irradiation. For the external irradiation calculations, data are needed on lifestyle information such as the time spent indoors/outdoors, the high/low physical activity rates for different groups of people (especially critical groups) and shielding factors for housing types. For the internal irradiation calculations, data are needed on food consumption, effect of food processing, transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) and interception values appropriate for the region under study. Where the relevant data are not available default temperate data are currently used. The results of a wide ranging literature search has highlighted where specific research will be initiated to determine the information required for tropical and sub-tropical regions. The user is able to initiate sensitivity analyses within RadCon. This allows the parameters to be ranked in

  8. Refinement and evaluation of the Massachusetts firm-yield estimator model version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Sara B.; Archfield, Stacey A.; Massey, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    to assess the sensitivity of firm-yield estimates to errors in daily-streamflow input data. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations indicate that underestimation in the lowest stream inflows can cause firm yields to be underestimated by an average of 1 to 10 percent. Errors in the stage-storage relation can arise when the point density of bathymetric survey measurements is too low. Existing bathymetric surfaces were resampled using hypothetical transects of varying patterns and point densities in order to quantify the uncertainty in stage-storage relations. Reservoir-volume calculations and resulting firm yields were accurate to within 5 percent when point densities were greater than 20 points per acre of reservoir surface. Methods for incorporating summer water-demand-reduction scenarios into the firm-yield model were developed as well as the ability to relax the no-fail reliability criterion. Although the original firm-yield model allowed monthly reservoir releases to be specified, there have been no previous studies examining the feasibility of controlled releases for downstream flows from Massachusetts reservoirs. Two controlled-release scenarios were tested—with and without a summer water-demand-reduction scenario—for a scenario with a no-fail criterion and a scenario that allows for a 1-percent failure rate over the entire simulation period. Based on these scenarios, about one-third of the reservoir systems were able to support the flow-release scenarios at their 2000–2004 usage rates. Reservoirs with higher storage ratios (reservoir storage capacity to mean annual streamflow) and lower demand ratios (mean annual water demand to annual firm yield) were capable of higher downstream release rates. For the purposes of this research, all reservoir systems were assumed to have structures which enable controlled releases, although this assumption may not be true for many of the reservoirs studied.

  9. Assessing the aging effect on auditory-verbal memory by Persian version of dichotic auditory verbal memory test

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Shahidipour; Ahmad Geshani; Zahra Jafari; Shohreh Jalaie; Elham Khosravifard

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Memory is one of the aspects of cognitive function which is widely affected among aged people. Since aging has different effects on different memorial systems and little studies have investigated auditory-verbal memory function in older adults using dichotic listening techniques, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the auditory-verbal memory function among old people using Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test. Methods: The Persian version of dic...

  10. Regional groundwater flow model for a glaciation scenario. Simpevarp subarea - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaquet, O.; Siegel, P.

    2006-10-01

    to the base case calibrated for the Simpevarp regional model, average travel time and F-factor are reduced by about two orders and one order of magnitude, respectively, for phases of ice sheet displacement. The following recommendations regarding further work on open issues may be postulated: 1. Investigations of the conceptual uncertainty linked to the sub-glacial layer. Alternative concepts are currently under study by SKB glaciologists. One concept in particular considers the replacement of the transient flow boundary with a transient head boundary with the values depending on the ice sheet thickness and head drawdowns being specified at the locations of the conductive features. Another option would be to apply a mix of time-dependent boundary conditions; i.e. to use a prescribed flux dynamically constrained by the ice-sheet thickness from one time step to the next. This type of boundary would allow the computation of subglacial infiltration in a more realistic manner. 2. Assessment of the impact of a lower value for the flow wetted surface with respect to the concentration fields and the performance measures. First estimates of the characteristic diffusion time reveal that instantaneous equilibrium between the concentration of the flowing fractures and the rock matrix is no longer likely to occur which could lead to additional transport of salinity. . Evaluation of geomechanical effects and permafrost conditions through the application of temporally variable hydraulic parameters related to the location of the ice sheet. Geomechanical effects due to ice loading are likely to induce modifications in the groundwater flow field. In terms of rock deformation, the impact of the ice sheet loading leads to variations in porosity, hydraulic conductivity and pore pressure. The modelling of groundwater flow (with geomechanical effects) should be initiated with scoping calculations of hydromechanical coupling following the approach of Lemieux. During the progression of the

  11. Regional groundwater flow model for a glaciation scenario. Simpevarp subarea - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaquet, O.; Siegel, P. [Colenco Power Engineering Ltd, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2006-10-15

    to the base case calibrated for the Simpevarp regional model, average travel time and F-factor are reduced by about two orders and one order of magnitude, respectively, for phases of ice sheet displacement. The following recommendations regarding further work on open issues may be postulated: 1. Investigations of the conceptual uncertainty linked to the sub-glacial layer. Alternative concepts are currently under study by SKB glaciologists. One concept in particular considers the replacement of the transient flow boundary with a transient head boundary with the values depending on the ice sheet thickness and head drawdowns being specified at the locations of the conductive features. Another option would be to apply a mix of time-dependent boundary conditions; i.e. to use a prescribed flux dynamically constrained by the ice-sheet thickness from one time step to the next. This type of boundary would allow the computation of subglacial infiltration in a more realistic manner. 2. Assessment of the impact of a lower value for the flow wetted surface with respect to the concentration fields and the performance measures. First estimates of the characteristic diffusion time reveal that instantaneous equilibrium between the concentration of the flowing fractures and the rock matrix is no longer likely to occur which could lead to additional transport of salinity. . Evaluation of geomechanical effects and permafrost conditions through the application of temporally variable hydraulic parameters related to the location of the ice sheet. Geomechanical effects due to ice loading are likely to induce modifications in the groundwater flow field. In terms of rock deformation, the impact of the ice sheet loading leads to variations in porosity, hydraulic conductivity and pore pressure. The modelling of groundwater flow (with geomechanical effects) should be initiated with scoping calculations of hydromechanical coupling following the approach of Lemieux. During the progression of the

  12. Update of the Polar SWIFT model for polar stratospheric ozone loss (Polar SWIFT version 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Wohltmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Polar SWIFT model is a fast scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion in polar winter. It is intended for use in global climate models (GCMs and Earth system models (ESMs to enable the simulation of mutual interactions between the ozone layer and climate. To date, climate models often use prescribed ozone fields, since a full stratospheric chemistry scheme is computationally very expensive. Polar SWIFT is based on a set of coupled differential equations, which simulate the polar vortex-averaged mixing ratios of the key species involved in polar ozone depletion on a given vertical level. These species are O3, chemically active chlorine (ClOx, HCl, ClONO2 and HNO3. The only external input parameters that drive the model are the fraction of the polar vortex in sunlight and the fraction of the polar vortex below the temperatures necessary for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Here, we present an update of the Polar SWIFT model introducing several improvements over the original model formulation. In particular, the model is now trained on vortex-averaged reaction rates of the ATLAS Chemistry and Transport Model, which enables a detailed look at individual processes and an independent validation of the different parameterizations contained in the differential equations. The training of the original Polar SWIFT model was based on fitting complete model runs to satellite observations and did not allow for this. A revised formulation of the system of differential equations is developed, which closely fits vortex-averaged reaction rates from ATLAS that represent the main chemical processes influencing ozone. In addition, a parameterization for the HNO3 change by denitrification is included. The rates of change of the concentrations of the chemical species of the Polar SWIFT model are purely chemical rates of change in the new version, whereas in the original Polar SWIFT model, they included a transport effect

  13. Implementation of methane cycling for deep time, global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Villanueva, Esteban Fernández; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Geological records reveal a number of ancient, large and rapid negative excursions of carbon-13 isotope. Such excursions can only be explained by massive injections of depleted carbon to the Earth System over a short duration. These injections may have forced strong global warming events, sometimes....... With this improved DCESS model version and paleo-reconstructions, we are now better armed to gauge the amounts, types, time scales and locations of methane injections driving specific, observed deep time, global warming events....

  14. Vortex dynamics in nonrelativistic version of Abelian Higgs model: Effects of the medium on the vortex motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhevnikov Arkadii

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The closed vortex dynamics is considered in the nonrelativistic version of the Abelian Higgs Model. The effect of the exchange of excitations propagating in the medium on the vortex string motion is taken into account. The obtained are the effective action and the equation of motion both including the exchange of the propagating excitations between the distant segments of the vortex and the possibility of its interaction with the static fermion asymmetric background. They are applied to the derivation of the time dependence of the basic geometrical contour characteristics.

  15. Assessing Households Preparedness for Earthquakes: An Exploratory Study in the Development of a Valid and Reliable Persian-version Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, Ali; Sohrabizadeh, Sanaz

    2016-02-25

    Iran is placed among countries suffering from the highest number of earthquake casualties. Household preparedness, as one component of risk reduction efforts, is often supported in quake-prone areas. In Iran, lack of a valid and reliable household preparedness tool was reported by previous disaster studies. This study is aimed to fill this gap by developing a valid and reliable tool for assessing household preparedness in the event of an earthquake.  This survey was conducted through three phases including literature review and focus group discussions with the participation of eight key informants, validity measurements and reliability measurements. Field investigation was completed with the participation of 450 households within three provinces of Iran. Content validity, construct validity, the use of factor analysis; internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and test-retest reliability were carried out to develop the tool.  Based on the CVIs, ranging from 0.80 to 0.100, and exploratory factor analysis with factor loading of more than 0.5, all items were valid. The amount of Cronbach's alpha (0.7) and test-retest examination by Spearman correlations indicated that the scale was also reliable. The final instrument consisted of six categories and 18 questions including actions at the time of earthquakes, nonstructural safety, structural safety, hazard map, communications, drill, and safety skills.  Using a Persian-version tool that is adjusted to the socio-cultural determinants and native language may result in more trustful information on earthquake preparedness. It is suggested that disaster managers and researchers apply this tool in their future household preparedness projects. Further research is needed to make effective policies and plans for transforming preparedness knowledge into behavior.

  16. Validation of a new mass screening tool for cognitive impairment: Cognitive Assessment for Dementia, iPad version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onoda K

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Keiichi Onoda,1 Tsuyoshi Hamano,2 Yoko Nabika,1 Atsuo Aoyama,1 Hiroyuki Takayoshi,1 Tomonori Nakagawa,1 Masaki Ishihara,1 Shingo Mitaki,1 Takuya Yamaguchi,1 Hiroaki Oguro,1 Kuninori Shiwaku,3 Shuhei Yamaguchi1 1Department of Neurology, 2Center for Community-Based Health Research and Education, Shimane University, Izumo, 3Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane, Japan Background: We have developed a new screening test for dementia that runs on an iPad and can be used for mass screening, known as the Cognitive Assessment for Dementia, iPad version (CADi. The CADi consists of items involving immediate recognition memory for three words, semantic memory, categorization of six objects, subtraction, backward repetition of digits, cube rotation, pyramid rotation, trail making A, trail making B, and delayed recognition memory for three words. The present study examined the reliability and validity of the CADi. Methods: CADi evaluations were conducted for patients with dementia, healthy subjects selected from a brain checkup system, and community-dwelling elderly people participating in health checkups. Results: CADi scores were lower for dementia patients than for healthy elderly individuals and correlated significantly with Mini-Mental State Examination scores. Cronbach’s alpha values for the CADi were acceptable (over 0.7, and test–retest reliability was confirmed via a significant correlation between scores separated by a one-year interval. Conclusion: These results suggest that the CADi is a useful tool for mass screening of dementia in Japanese populations. Keywords: dementia, mass screening, early detection, iPad

  17. Dose assessment models. Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The models presented in this chapter have been separated into 2 general categories: environmental transport models which describe the movement of radioactive materials through all sectors of the environment after their release, and dosimetric models to calculate the absorbed dose following an intake of radioactive materials or exposure to external irradiation. Various sections of this chapter also deal with atmospheric transport models, terrestrial models, and aquatic models.

  18. Assessing Mindfulness on a Sample of Catalan-Speaking Spanish Adolescents: Validation of the Catalan Version of the Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, Ferran; Malo, Sara; González, Mònica; Navarro, Dolors; Casas, Ferran

    2015-06-22

    Interest in mindfulness has increased over the last decade, resulting in several mindfulness-based interventions being developed and their efficacy empirically demonstrated. The practice of mindfulness has been associated with low levels of anxiety or depression and improved quality of life or personal well-being. The aim of this study is to translate the Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure (CAMM) and adapt it to Catalan so as to analyze its internal consistency and construct and convergent validity. The CAMM was administered to a sample of secondary school students ranging in age from 11 to 16 years old. The Catalan version of the CAMM shows a good fit with the unidimensional model and internal consistency similar to the original version (α = .80). Furthermore, CAMM scores correlated positively with subjective well-being, temperamental dimensions of effortful control and self-esteem. The Catalan Version of CAMM is a valid and reliable measure of mindfulness skills.

  19. Cross-cultural Adaptation and Linguistic Validation of the Korean Version of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cholhee; Lee, Youn-Woo; Yoon, Duck Mi; Kim, Do Wan; Nam, Da Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Distinction between neuropathic pain and nociceptive pain helps facilitate appropriate management of pain; however, diagnosis of neuropathic pain remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to develop a Korean version of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) pain scale and assess its reliability and validity. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the original LANSS pain scale into Korean was established according to the published guidelines. The Korean version of the LANSS pain scale was applied to a total of 213 patients who were expertly diagnosed with neuropathic (n = 113) or nociceptive pain (n = 100). The Korean version of the scale had good reliability (Cronbach's α coefficient = 0.815, Guttman split-half coefficient = 0.800). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.928 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.885-0.959 (P < 0.001), suggesting good discriminate value. With a cut-off score ≥ 12, sensitivity was 72.6%, specificity was 98.0%, and the positive and negative predictive values were 98% and 76%, respectively. The Korean version of the LANSS pain scale is a useful, reliable, and valid instrument for screening neuropathic pain from nociceptive pain. PMID:26339176

  20. Assessing cancer-specific anxiety in Chinese men with prostate cancer: psychometric evaluation of the Chinese version of the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingmei; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Zijun; Luo, Jie; Dai, Yun; Zheng, Li; Wang, Wei

    2017-12-01

    The Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) was developed to identify and assess cancer-specific anxiety among men with prostate cancer (PCa); however, there is no Chinese version. The aim of our study was to translate the English version of MAX-PC into Chinese and evaluate the psychometric properties of it. The study cohort comprised 254 participants. Internal consistency including the Cronbach's alpha coefficient and item-total correlations were used to measure the reliability of the scale. Factor structure was analyzed by exploratory factor analysis and concurrent validity by comparing MAX-PC scores with anxiety subscale scores of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Divergent validity was assessed by correlating MAX-PC with HADS depression subscale, while discriminant ability by comparing differences in MAX-PC scores between different patient groups. The Chinese version of MAX-PC demonstrated good reliability; the Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total and three subscales (prostate cancer anxiety, PSA anxiety, and fear of recurrence) being 0.94, 0.93, 0.82, and 0.85, respectively. Exploratory factor analysis supported the three-factor structure of the scale established in the original version. Despite the somewhat underperformed divergent validity, the scale demonstrated good concurrent validity with a strong correlation with the HADS anxiety subscale (r = 0.71, p anxiety in Chinese PCa patients.

  1. Recent extensions and use of the statistical model code EMPIRE-II - version: 2.17 Millesimo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.

    2003-01-01

    This lecture notes describe new features of the modular code EMPIRE-2.17 designed to perform comprehensive calculations of nuclear reactions using variety of nuclear reaction models. Compared to the version 2.13, the current release has been extended by including Coupled-Channel mechanism, exciton model, Monte Carlo approach to preequilibrium emission, use of microscopic level densities, widths fluctuation correction, detailed calculation of the recoil spectra, and powerful plotting capabilities provided by the ZVView package. The second part of this lecture concentrates on the use of the code in practical calculations, with emphasis on the aspects relevant to nuclear data evaluation. In particular, adjusting model parameters is discussed in details. (author)

  2. Reliability, Construct Validity and Interpretability of the Brazilian version of the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) and Strain Index (SI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentim, Daniela Pereira; Sato, Tatiana de Oliveira; Comper, Maria Luiza Caíres; Silva, Anderson Martins da; Boas, Cristiana Villas; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini

    There are very few observational methods for analysis of biomechanical exposure available in Brazilian-Portuguese. This study aimed to cross-culturally adapt and test the measurement properties of the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) and Strain Index (SI). The cross-cultural adaptation and measurement properties test were established according to Beaton et al. and COSMIN guidelines, respectively. Several tasks that required static posture and/or repetitive motion of upper limbs were evaluated (n>100). The intra-raters' reliability for the RULA ranged from poor to almost perfect (k: 0.00-0.93), and SI from poor to excellent (ICC 2.1 : 0.05-0.99). The inter-raters' reliability was very poor for RULA (k: -0.12 to 0.13) and ranged from very poor to moderate for SI (ICC 2.1 : 0.00-0.53). The agreement was good for RULA (75-100% intra-raters, and 42.24-100% inter-raters) and to SI (EPM: -1.03% to 1.97%; intra-raters, and -0.17% to 1.51% inter-raters). The internal consistency was appropriate for RULA (α=0.88), and low for SI (α=0.65). Moderate construct validity were observed between RULA and SI, in wrist/hand-wrist posture (rho: 0.61) and strength/intensity of exertion (rho: 0.39). The adapted versions of the RULA and SI presented semantic and cultural equivalence for the Brazilian Portuguese. The RULA and SI had reliability estimates ranged from very poor to almost perfect. The internal consistency for RULA was better than the SI. The correlation between methods was moderate only of muscle request/movement repetition. Previous training is mandatory to use of observations methods for biomechanical exposure assessment, although it does not guarantee good reproducibility of these measures. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. An assessment of the measurement equivalence of English and French versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D Scale in systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C Delisle

    Full Text Available Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D Scale scores in English- and French-speaking Canadian systemic sclerosis (SSc patients are commonly pooled in analyses, but no studies have evaluated the metric equivalence of the English and French CES-D. The study objective was to examine the metric equivalence of the CES-D in English- and French-speaking SSc patients.The CES-D was completed by 1007 English-speaking and 248 French-speaking patients from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Registry. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was used to assess the factor structure in both samples. The Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause (MIMIC model was utilized to assess differential item functioning (DIF.A two-factor model (Positive and Negative affect showed excellent fit in both samples. Statistically significant, but small-magnitude, DIF was found for 3 of 20 CES-D items, including items 3 (Blues, 10 (Fearful, and 11 (Sleep. Prior to accounting for DIF, French-speaking patients had 0.08 of a standard deviation (SD lower latent scores for the Positive factor (95% confidence interval [CI]-0.25 to 0.08 and 0.09 SD higher scores (95% CI-0.07 to 0.24 for the Negative factor than English-speaking patients. After DIF correction, there was no change on the Positive factor and a non-significant increase of 0.04 SD on the Negative factor for French-speaking patients (difference = 0.13 SD, 95% CI-0.03 to 0.28.The English and French versions of the CES-D, despite minor DIF on several items, are substantively equivalent and can be used in studies that combine data from English- and French-speaking Canadian SSc patients.

  4. An assessment of the measurement equivalence of English and French versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Vanessa C; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Hudson, Marie; Baron, Murray; Thombs, Brett D

    2014-01-01

    Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale scores in English- and French-speaking Canadian systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients are commonly pooled in analyses, but no studies have evaluated the metric equivalence of the English and French CES-D. The study objective was to examine the metric equivalence of the CES-D in English- and French-speaking SSc patients. The CES-D was completed by 1007 English-speaking and 248 French-speaking patients from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group Registry. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to assess the factor structure in both samples. The Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause (MIMIC) model was utilized to assess differential item functioning (DIF). A two-factor model (Positive and Negative affect) showed excellent fit in both samples. Statistically significant, but small-magnitude, DIF was found for 3 of 20 CES-D items, including items 3 (Blues), 10 (Fearful), and 11 (Sleep). Prior to accounting for DIF, French-speaking patients had 0.08 of a standard deviation (SD) lower latent scores for the Positive factor (95% confidence interval [CI]-0.25 to 0.08) and 0.09 SD higher scores (95% CI-0.07 to 0.24) for the Negative factor than English-speaking patients. After DIF correction, there was no change on the Positive factor and a non-significant increase of 0.04 SD on the Negative factor for French-speaking patients (difference = 0.13 SD, 95% CI-0.03 to 0.28). The English and French versions of the CES-D, despite minor DIF on several items, are substantively equivalent and can be used in studies that combine data from English- and French-speaking Canadian SSc patients.

  5. Online dynamical downscaling of temperature and precipitation within the iLOVECLIM model (version 1.1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiquet, Aurélien; Roche, Didier M.; Dumas, Christophe; Paillard, Didier

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the inclusion of an online dynamical downscaling of temperature and precipitation within the model of intermediate complexity iLOVECLIM v1.1. We describe the following methodology to generate temperature and precipitation fields on a 40 km × 40 km Cartesian grid of the Northern Hemisphere from the T21 native atmospheric model grid. Our scheme is not grid specific and conserves energy and moisture in the same way as the original climate model. We show that we are able to generate a high-resolution field which presents a spatial variability in better agreement with the observations compared to the standard model. Although the large-scale model biases are not corrected, for selected model parameters, the downscaling can induce a better overall performance compared to the standard version on both the high-resolution grid and on the native grid. Foreseen applications of this new model feature include the improvement of ice sheet model coupling and high-resolution land surface models.

  6. Online dynamical downscaling of temperature and precipitation within the iLOVECLIM model (version 1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Quiquet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the inclusion of an online dynamical downscaling of temperature and precipitation within the model of intermediate complexity iLOVECLIM v1.1. We describe the following methodology to generate temperature and precipitation fields on a 40 km  ×  40 km Cartesian grid of the Northern Hemisphere from the T21 native atmospheric model grid. Our scheme is not grid specific and conserves energy and moisture in the same way as the original climate model. We show that we are able to generate a high-resolution field which presents a spatial variability in better agreement with the observations compared to the standard model. Although the large-scale model biases are not corrected, for selected model parameters, the downscaling can induce a better overall performance compared to the standard version on both the high-resolution grid and on the native grid. Foreseen applications of this new model feature include the improvement of ice sheet model coupling and high-resolution land surface models.

  7. Assessing self-management in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in Germany: validation of a German version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities measure (SDSCA-G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Krisam, Johannes; Freund, Tobias; Kiel, Marion; Qreini, Markus; Flum, Elisabeth; Berger, Sarah; Besier, Werner; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2014-12-18

    One of the most widely used self-reporting tools assessing diabetes self-management in English is the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) measure. To date there is no psychometric validated instrument in German to assess self-management in patients with diabetes mellitus. Therefore, this study aimed to translate the SDSCA into German and examine its psychometric properties. The English version of the SDSCA was translated into German following the guidelines for cultural adaptation. The German version of the SDSCA (SDSCA-G) was administered to a random sample of 315 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Reliability was analyzed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and item characteristics were assessed. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (EFA and CFA) were carried out to explore the construct validity. A multivariable linear regression model was used to identify the influence of predictor variables on the SDSCA-G sum score. The Cronbach's alpha for the SDSCA-G (all items) was α = 0.618 and an acceptable correlation between the SDSCA-G and Self-management Diabetes Mellitus-Questionnaire (SDQ) (ρ = 0.664) was identified. The EFA suggested a four factor construct as did the postulated model. The CFA showed the goodness of fit of the SDSCA-G. However, item 4 was found to be problematic regarding the analysis of psychometric properties. The omission of item 4 yielded an increase in Cronbach's alpha (α = 0.631) and improvements of the factor structure and model fit. No statistically significant influences of predictor variables on the SDSCA-G sum score were observed. The revised German version of the SDSCA (SDSCA-G) is a reliable and valid tool assessing self-management in adults with type 2 diabetes in Germany.

  8. A psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Research Utilization Questionnaire using a Rasch measurement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Veronica; Boström, Anne-Marie; Malinowsky, Camilla

    2017-07-30

    Evidence-based practice and research utilisation has become a commonly used concept in health care. The Research Utilization Questionnaire (RUQ) has been recognised to be a widely used instrument measuring the perception of research utilisation among nursing staff in clinical practice. Few studies have however analysed the psychometric properties of the RUQ. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the three subscales in RUQ using a Rasch measurement model. This study has a cross-sectional design using a sample of 163 staff (response rate 81%) working in one nursing home in Sweden. Data were collected using the Swedish version of RUQ in 2012. The three subscales Attitudes towards research, Availability of and support for research use and Use of research findings in clinical practice were investigated. Data were analysed using a Rasch measurement model. The results indicate presence of multidimensionality in all subscales. Moreover, internal scale validity and person response validity also provide some less satisfactory results, especially for the subscale Use of research findings. Overall, there seems to be a problem with the negatively worded statements. The findings suggest that clarification and refining of items, including additional psychometric evaluation of the RUQ, are needed before using the instrument in clinical practice and research studies among staff in nursing homes. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. The German version of the Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE): evaluation of content validity and adaptation to the German-speaking context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Janine; Luppa, Melanie; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2015-11-01

    The Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE) was developed for the assessment of physical-, psychological-, and environment-related needs in the elderly. The aim of this study was to revise and adapt the German version of the CANE with regard to the content validity of the instrument. Following a multistage approach, face-to-face interviews using the CANE, an expert survey and a multidisciplinary consensus conference were conducted in order to evaluate the frequency and relevance of met and unmet needs in the German elderly population, and to modify the content of the CANE for the German-speaking countries. In Germany, unmet physical needs including physical health, medication, eyesight/hearing/communication, mobility/falls, self-care, and continence were found to have top priority closely followed by social needs (company, intimate relationships, daytime activities, information, and abuse/neglect). Psychological needs were the lowest ranked care category. Experts' proposals for the improvement of the German version of the CANE were collected. All findings were discussed and integrated in the multidisciplinary consensus conference with the result of a revised and adapted CANE that is applicable in the German-speaking context. The provision of an adapted and improved German version of the CANE may substantially contribute to a comprehensive and valid assessment of needs in the elderly population. The results of this study represent an important basis for comprehensive needs assessment in the elderly in the theoretical and practical field of healthcare and health services research.

  10. Validation of the malaysian versions of parents and children health survey for asthma by using rasch-model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Maryam Se; Akram, Waqas; Mamat, Mohd Nor; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Ismail, Nahlah Elkudssiah Binti

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important outcome measure in epidemiologic studies and clinical trials. For patients with asthma there are many instruments but most of them have been developed in English. With the increase in research project, researchers working in other languages have two options; either to develop a new measure or to translate an already developed measure. Children Health Survey for Asthma is developed by American Academy of Paediatrics which has two versions one for the parents (CHSA) and the other for the child (CHSA-C). However, there is no Malay version of the CHSA or the CHSA-C. The aim of this study was to translate and determine the validity and reliability of the Malaysian versions of Parent and Children Health Survey for Asthma. Questionnaires were translated to Bahasa Malayu using previously established guidelines, data from 180 respondents (asthmatic children and their parent) were analysed using Rasch-Model; as, it is an approach that has been increasingly used in health field and also it explores the performance of each item rather than total set score. The internal consistency was high for the parent questionnaire (CHSA) (reliability score for persons = 0.88 and for items was 0.97), and good for child questionnaire (CHSA-C) (reliability score for persons = 0.83 and for items was 0.94). Also, this study shows that all items measure for both questionnaires (CHSA and CHSA-C) are fitted to Rasch-Model. This study produced questionnaires that are conceptually equivalent to the original, easy to understand for the children and their parents, and good in terms of internal consistency. Because of the questionnaire has two versions one for the child and the other for the parents, they could be used in clinical practice to measure the effect of asthma on the child and their families. This current research had translated two instruments to other language (BahasaMalayu) and evaluated their reliability and

  11. Assessing uncertainty in mechanistic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin J. Green; David W. MacFarlane; Harry T. Valentine

    2000-01-01

    Concern over potential global change has led to increased interest in the use of mechanistic models for predicting forest growth. The rationale for this interest is that empirical models may be of limited usefulness if environmental conditions change. Intuitively, we expect that mechanistic models, grounded as far as possible in an understanding of the biology of tree...

  12. Modeling for operational event risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattison, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been using risk models to evaluate the risk significance of operational events in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants for more seventeen years. During that time, the models have evolved in response to the advances in risk assessment technology and insights gained with experience. Evaluation techniques fall into two categories, initiating event assessments and condition assessments. The models used for these analyses have become uniquely specialized for just this purpose

  13. Sensitivity Assessment of Ozone Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorter, Jeffrey A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Armstrong, Russell A.

    2000-01-24

    The activities under this contract effort were aimed at developing sensitivity analysis techniques and fully equivalent operational models (FEOMs) for applications in the DOE Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). MRC developed a new model representation algorithm that uses a hierarchical, correlated function expansion containing a finite number of terms. A full expansion of this type is an exact representation of the original model and each of the expansion functions is explicitly calculated using the original model. After calculating the expansion functions, they are assembled into a fully equivalent operational model (FEOM) that can directly replace the original mode.

  14. Accounting for observation uncertainties in an evaluation metric of low latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes: application to the comparison of a suite of IPSL model versions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servonnat, Jérôme; Găinuşă-Bogdan, Alina; Braconnot, Pascale

    2017-09-01

    Turbulent momentum and heat (sensible heat and latent heat) fluxes at the air-sea interface are key components of the whole energetic of the Earth's climate. The evaluation of these fluxes in the climate models is still difficult because of the large uncertainties associated with the reference products. In this paper we present an objective metric accounting for reference uncertainties to evaluate the annual cycle of the low latitude turbulent fluxes of a suite of IPSL climate models. This metric consists in a Hotelling T 2 test between the simulated and observed field in a reduce space characterized by the dominant modes of variability that are common to both the model and the reference, taking into account the observational uncertainty. The test is thus more severe when uncertainties are small as it is the case for sea surface temperature (SST). The results of the test show that for almost all variables and all model versions the model-reference differences are not zero. It is not possible to distinguish between model versions for sensible heat and meridional wind stress, certainly due to the large observational uncertainties. All model versions share similar biases for the different variables. There is no improvement between the reference versions of the IPSL model used for CMIP3 and CMIP5. The test also reveals that the higher horizontal resolution fails to improve the representation of the turbulent surface fluxes compared to the other versions. The representation of the fluxes is further degraded in a version with improved atmospheric physics with an amplification of some of the biases in the Indian Ocean and in the intertropical convergence zone. The ranking of the model versions for the turbulent fluxes is not correlated with the ranking found for SST. This highlights that despite the fact that SST gradients are important for the large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, other factors such as wind speed, and air-sea temperature contrast play an

  15. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion—PEST++ Version 3, a Parameter ESTimation and uncertainty analysis software suite optimized for large environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, David E.; White, Jeremy T.; Hunt, Randall J.; Doherty, John E.

    2015-09-18

    The PEST++ Version 1 object-oriented parameter estimation code is here extended to Version 3 to incorporate additional algorithms and tools to further improve support for large and complex environmental modeling problems. PEST++ Version 3 includes the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg (GML) algorithm for nonlinear parameter estimation, Tikhonov regularization, integrated linear-based uncertainty quantification, options of integrated TCP/IP based parallel run management or external independent run management by use of a Version 2 update of the GENIE Version 1 software code, and utilities for global sensitivity analyses. The Version 3 code design is consistent with PEST++ Version 1 and continues to be designed to lower the barriers of entry for users as well as developers while providing efficient and optimized algorithms capable of accommodating large, highly parameterized inverse problems. As such, this effort continues the original focus of (1) implementing the most popular and powerful features of the PEST software suite in a fashion that is easy for novice or experienced modelers to use and (2) developing a software framework that is easy to extend.

  16. The MIRAB Model of Small Island Economies in the Pacific and their Security Issues: Revised Version

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clem

    2014-01-01

    The MIRAB model of Pacific island micro-economies was developed in the mid-1980s by the New Zealand economists, Bertram and Watters, and dominated the literature on the economics of small island nations and economies until alternative models were proposed two decades later. Nevertheless, it is still an influential theory. MIRAB is an acronym for migration (MI), remittance (R) and foreign aid (A) and the public bureaucracy (B); the main components of the MIRAB model. The nature of this model i...

  17. Translation, cultural adaptation assessment, and both validity and reliability testing of the kidney disease quality of life - short form version 1.3 for use with Iranian patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir; Yekaninejad, Mirsaeed; Mølsted, Stig

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aims of the study were to translate the Kidney Disease Quality of Life--Short Form version 1.3 (KDQOL-SF ver. 1.3) questionnaire into Iranian (Farsi), and to then assess it in terms of validity and reliability on Iranian patients. METHODS: The questionnaire was first translated into Farsi...... a larger group (212 patients with end-stage renal disease on haemodialysis). Afterwards, reliability was estimated by internal consistency, and validity was assessed using known group comparisons and constructs for the patient group as a whole. Finally, the factor structure of the questionnaire...... be summarized into an 11 factor structure that jointly accounted for 79.81% of the variance. CONCLUSION: The Iranian version of the KDQOL-SF questionnaire is both highly reliable and valid for use with Iranian patients on haemodialysis....

  18. Implementation of methane cycling for deep time, global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Villanueva, Esteban Fernández; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Geological records reveal a number of ancient, large and rapid negative excursions of carbon-13 isotope. Such excursions can only be explained by massive injections of depleted carbon to the Earth System over a short duration. These injections may have forced strong global warming events, sometimes....... With this improved DCESS model version and paleo-reconstructions, we are now better armed to gauge the amounts, types, time scales and locations of methane injections driving specific, observed deep time, global warming events......., or from warming-induced dissociation of methane hydrate, a solid compound of methane and water found in ocean sediments. As a consequence of the ubiquity and importance of methane in major Earth events, Earth System models should include a comprehensive treatment of methane cycling but such a treatment...

  19. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  20. Screening of cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease: diagnostic validity of the Brazilian versions of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Sobreira; Márcio A. Pena-Pereira; Alan L. Eckeli; Manoel A. Sobreira-Neto; Marcos H. N. Chagas; Maria P. Foss; Brenna Cholerton; Cyrus P. Zabetian; Ignacio F. Mata; Vitor Tumas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective The aim of the present study is to examine the accuracy of the Brazilian versions of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R) to screen for mild cognitive impairment (PDMCI) and dementia (PDD) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).Method Both scales were administered to a final convenience sample of 79 patients with PD. Patients were evaluated by a neurologist, a psychiatrist and a neuropsychologist using UPDRS,...

  1. Assessing the aging effect on auditory-verbal memory by Persian version of dichotic auditory verbal memory test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, significant reduction in auditory memory was seen in aged group and the Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test, like many other auditory verbal memory tests, showed the aging effects on auditory verbal memory performance.

  2. Mindful Parenting Assessed Further : Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Version of the Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (IM-P)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Esther I.; Zijlstra, Bonne J H; Geurtzen, Naline; van Zundert, Rinka M P; van de Weijer-Bergsma, Eva|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834335; Hartman, Esther E.; Nieuwesteeg, Anke M.; Duncan, Larissa G.; Bögels, Susan M.

    Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Interpersonal Mindfulness in Parenting Scale (IM-P) were studied in a general population sample of mothers of adolescents (n = 866) (study 1). A six-factor structure (29 items) emerged using exploratory factor analysis. A main difference from the

  3. Utility of the 3Di Short Version for the Diagnostic Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Compatibility with DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Slappendel (Geerte); F. Mandy (Frank); J. van der Ende (Jan); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); A. van der Sijde (Ad); J. Duvekot (Jorieke); D. Skuse (David); K. Greaves-Lord (Kirstin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Developmental Diagnostic Dimensional Interview-short version (3Di-sv) provides a brief standardized parental interview for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study explored its validity, and compatibility with DSM-5 ASD. 3Di-sv classifications showed good sensitivity but

  4. Utility of the 3Di Short Version for the Diagnostic Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Compatibility with DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slappendel, Geerte; Mandy, William; van der Ende, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C.; van der Sijde, Ad; Duvekot, Jorieke; Skuse, David; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    The Developmental Diagnostic Dimensional Interview-short version (3Di-sv) provides a brief standardized parental interview for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study explored its validity, and compatibility with DSM-5 ASD. 3Di-sv classifications showed good sensitivity but low specificity when compared to ADOS-2-confirmed clinical…

  5. On-the-fly confluence detection for statistical model checking (extended version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmanns, Arnd; Timmer, Mark

    Statistical model checking is an analysis method that circumvents the state space explosion problem in model-based verification by combining probabilistic simulation with statistical methods that provide clear error bounds. As a simulation-based technique, it can only provide sound results if the

  6. Technical documentation and user's guide for City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, L.T. Jr.; Scott, M.J.; Hammer, P.

    1986-05-01

    The City-County Allocation Model (CCAM) was developed as part of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program. The CCAM model was designed to allocate population changes forecasted by the MASTER model to specific local communities within commuting distance of the MRS facility. The CCAM model was designed to then forecast the potential changes in demand for key community services such as housing, police protection, and utilities for these communities. The CCAM model uses a flexible on-line data base on demand for community services that is based on a combination of local service levels and state and national service standards. The CCAM model can be used to quickly forecast the potential community service consequence of economic development for local communities anywhere in the country. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. The purpose of this manual is to assist the user in understanding and operating the City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). The annual explains the data sources for the model and code modifications as well as the operational procedures

  7. Comments on a time-dependent version of the linear-quadratic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, S.L.; Travis, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy and interpretation of the 'LQ + time' model are discussed. Evidence is presented, based on data in the literature, that this model does not accurately describe the changes in isoeffect dose occurring with protraction of the overall treatment time during fractionated irradiation of the lung. This lack of fit of the model explains, in part, the surprisingly large values of γ/α that have been derived from experimental lung data. The large apparent time factors for lung suggested by the model are also partly explained by the fact that γT/α, despite having units of dose, actually measures the influence of treatment time on the effect scale, not the dose scale, and is shown to consistently overestimate the change in total dose. The unusually high values of α/β that have been derived for lung using the model are shown to be influenced by the method by which the model was fitted to data. Reanalyses of the data using a more statistically valid regression procedure produce estimates of α/β more typical of those usually cited for lung. Most importantly, published isoeffect data from lung indicate that the true deviation from the linear-quadratic (LQ) model is nonlinear in time, instead of linear, and also depends on other factors such as the effect level and the size of dose per fraction. Thus, the authors do not advocate the use of the 'LQ + time' expression as a general isoeffect model. (author). 32 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Hydrogen Macro System Model User Guide, Version 1.2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.; Genung, K.; Hoseley, R.; Smith, A.; Yuzugullu, E.

    2009-07-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  9. Model Package Report: Central Plateau Vadose Zone Geoframework Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Sarah D.

    2018-03-27

    The purpose of the Central Plateau Vadose Zone (CPVZ) Geoframework model (GFM) is to provide a reasonable, consistent, and defensible three-dimensional (3D) representation of the vadose zone beneath the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site to support the Composite Analysis (CA) vadose zone contaminant fate and transport models. The GFM is a 3D representation of the subsurface geologic structure. From this 3D geologic model, exported results in the form of point, surface, and/or volumes are used as inputs to populate and assemble the various numerical model architectures, providing a 3D-layered grid that is consistent with the GFM. The objective of this report is to define the process used to produce a hydrostratigraphic model for the vadose zone beneath the Hanford Site Central Plateau and the corresponding CA domain.

  10. The Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Clemensen, Jane; Caffery, Liam J

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of telemedicine can be achieved using different evaluation models or theoretical frameworks. This paper presents a scoping review of published studies which have applied the Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST). MAST includes pre-implementation assessment (e.g. by use...

  11. A multi-model assessment of terrestrial biosphere model data needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardella, A.; Cowdery, E.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Desai, A. R.; Duveneck, M.; Fer, I.; Fisher, R.; Knox, R. G.; Kooper, R.; LeBauer, D.; McCabe, T.; Minunno, F.; Raiho, A.; Serbin, S.; Shiklomanov, A. N.; Thomas, A.; Walker, A.; Dietze, M.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models provide us with the means to simulate the impacts of climate change and their uncertainties. Going beyond direct observation and experimentation, models synthesize our current understanding of ecosystem processes and can give us insight on data needed to constrain model parameters. In previous work, we leveraged the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn) to assess the contribution of different parameters to the uncertainty of the Ecosystem Demography model v2 (ED) model outputs across various North American biomes (Dietze et al., JGR-G, 2014). While this analysis identified key research priorities, the extent to which these priorities were model- and/or biome-specific was unclear. Furthermore, because the analysis only studied one model, we were unable to comment on the effect of variability in model structure to overall predictive uncertainty. Here, we expand this analysis to all biomes globally and a wide sample of models that vary in complexity: BioCro, CABLE, CLM, DALEC, ED2, FATES, G'DAY, JULES, LANDIS, LINKAGES, LPJ-GUESS, MAESPA, PRELES, SDGVM, SIPNET, and TEM. Prior to performing uncertainty analyses, model parameter uncertainties were assessed by assimilating all available trait data from the combination of the BETYdb and TRY trait databases, using an updated multivariate version of PEcAn's Hierarchical Bayesian meta-analysis. Next, sensitivity analyses were performed for all models across a range of sites globally to assess sensitivities for a range of different outputs (GPP, ET, SH, Ra, NPP, Rh, NEE, LAI) at multiple time scales from the sub-annual to the decadal. Finally, parameter uncertainties and model sensitivities were combined to evaluate the fractional contribution of each parameter to the predictive uncertainty for a specific variable at a specific site and timescale. Facilitated by PEcAn's automated workflows, this analysis represents the broadest assessment of the sensitivities and uncertainties in terrestrial

  12. Assessment of the Rescorla-Wagner model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R R; Barnet, R C; Grahame, N J

    1995-05-01

    The Rescorla-Wagner model has been the most influential theory of associative learning to emerge from the study of animal behavior over the last 25 years. Recently, equivalence to this model has become a benchmark in assessing connectionist models, with such equivalence often achieved by incorporating the Widrow-Hoff delta rule. This article presents the Rescorla-Wagner model's basic assumptions, reviews some of the model's predictive successes and failures, relates the failures to the model's assumptions, and discusses the model's heuristic value. It is concluded that the model has had a positive influence on the study of simple associative learning by stimulating research and contributing to new model development. However, this benefit should neither lead to the model being regarded as inherently "correct" nor imply that its predictions can be profitably used to assess other models.

  13. Multicomponent mass transport model: theory and numerical implementation (discrete-parcel-random-walk version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, S.W.; Foote, H.P.; Arnett, R.C.; Cole, C.R.; Serne, R.J.

    1977-05-01

    The Multicomponent Mass Transfer (MMT) Model is a generic computer code, currently in its third generation, that was developed to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. This model was designed to use the water movement patterns produced by the unsaturated and saturated flow models coupled with dispersion and soil-waste reaction submodels to predict contaminant transport. This report documents the theorical foundation and the numerical solution procedure of the current (third) generation of the MMT Model. The present model simulates mass transport processes using an analog referred to as the Discrete-Parcel-Random-Walk (DPRW) algorithm. The basic concepts of this solution technique are described and the advantages and disadvantages of the DPRW scheme are discussed in relation to more conventional numerical techniques such as the finite-difference and finite-element methods. Verification of the numerical algorithm is demonstrated by comparing model results with known closed-form solutions. A brief error and sensitivity analysis of the algorithm with respect to numerical parameters is also presented. A simulation of the tritium plume beneath the Hanford Site is included to illustrate the use of the model in a typical application. 32 figs

  14. Statistical analysis of fracture data, adapted for modelling Discrete Fracture Networks-Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond

    2004-04-01

    The report describes the parameters which are necessary for DFN modelling, the way in which they can be extracted from the data base acquired during site investigations, and their assignment to geometrical objects in the geological model. The purpose here is to present a methodology for use in SKB modelling projects. Though the methodology is deliberately tuned to facilitate subsequent DFN modelling with other tools, some of the recommendations presented here are applicable to other aspects of geo-modelling as well. For instance, we here recommend a nomenclature to be used within SKB modelling projects, which are truly multidisciplinary, to ease communications between scientific disciplines and avoid misunderstanding of common concepts. This report originally occurred as an appendix to a strategy report for geological