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Sample records for assess viscosity reduction

  1. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work

  2. Geometry-dependent viscosity reduction in sheared active fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Słomka, Jonasz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate flow pattern formation and viscosity reduction mechanisms in active fluids by studying a generalized Navier-Stokes model that captures the experimentally observed bulk vortex dynamics in microbial suspensions. We present exact analytical solutions including stress-free vortex lattices and introduce a computational framework that allows the efficient treatment of previously intractable higher-order shear boundary conditions. Large-scale parameter scans identify the conditions for spontaneous flow symmetry breaking, geometry-dependent viscosity reduction and negative-viscosity states amenable to energy harvesting in confined suspensions. The theory uses only generic assumptions about the symmetries and long-wavelength structure of active stress tensors, suggesting that inviscid phases may be achievable in a broad class of non-equilibrium fluids by tuning confinement geometry and pattern scale selection.

  3. Drag reduction by linear viscosity model in turbulent channel flow of polymer solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴桂芬; 李昌烽; 黄东升; 赵作广; 冯晓东; 王瑞

    2008-01-01

    A further numerical study of the theory that the drag reduction in the turbulence is related to the viscosity profile growing linearly with the distance from the wall was performed.The constant viscosity in the Navier-Stokes equations was replaced using this viscosity model.Some drag reduction characteristics were shown comparing with Virk’s phenomenology.The mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles are consistent with the experimental and direct numerical simulation results.A drag reduction level of 45% was obtained.It is reasonable for this linear viscosity model to explain the mechanism of turbulence drag reduction in some aspects.

  4. Modification of Platelet Margination Rate via Reduction of Viscosity Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasor, Daniel; Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David; Aidun, Cyrus

    2011-11-01

    Experimental investigations of platelet margination have primarily been limited to effects of hematocrit (Ht.) and shear rate. The suspending fluids used commonly have viscosities greater than plasma which can modify the transition in dynamical regimes from tumbling to tank-treading for isolated RBCs. This work focuses on the effects of λ, the ratio of internal to suspending fluid viscosity of RBCs, on the rate of platelet margination in a rigid 41.3 μm diameter vessel. Simulations are performed with a lattice-Boltzmann fluid solver using the standard bounce-back boundary condition coupled with a coarse-grained spectrin-link RBC membrane model and a Newtonian dynamics solver for rigid platelets. Our results are consistent with observations that an increase in Ht. increases the rate of platelet margination for Ht.=20-40%, but we focus on the modification of λ at Ht.=20%. Our results show that rigid RBCs inhibit margination, but modifying λ with deformable RBCs show significant increases in margination rate. Our observations demonstrate an increase in platelet wall-normal velocity fluctuations, enhanced margination rate, and an increase in the wall-normal diffusivity as λ is reduced from the physiological value of five. NSF TeraGrid Grant: TG-CTS100012.

  5. Alkali-aided enzymatic viscosity reduction of sugar beet mash for novel bioethanol production process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srichuwong, Sathaporn; Arakane, Mitsuhiro; Fujiwara, Maki; Zhang, Zilian; Tokuyasu, Ken [National Food Research Institute, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Takahashi, Hiroyuki [National Agricultural Research Center for Hokkaido Region, NARO, Shinsei, Memuro, Hokkaido 082-0081 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Ethanol fermentation of fresh sugar beet mash (SBM) could give a benefit on reducing energy input for sugar diffusion, juice separation, and water evaporation as used in conventional practices, thus offering promise as a low energy process. Actions of cell-wall degrading enzymes provide a mash with low viscosity, which can be easily fermented to ethanol. However, a several-fold higher enzyme loading was required for viscosity reduction of SBM compared with that of potato mash. In this study, the use of dilute alkali treatment (0.025-0.15 N NaOH, 25 C, 1 h) in enhancing enzymatic viscosity reduction of SBM was evaluated. The results showed that higher NaOH concentration enhanced demethylation and deacetylation of SBM, resulting in greater performances of the enzymes on reducing viscosity. Efficient enzymatic viscosity reduction of SBM was observed with the 0.1 N NaOH treatment. On the other hand, untreated SBM was highly resistant to viscosity reduction, even though a 20-fold more enzyme loading was used. The resulting mash containing 12-13% (w/v) sucrose yielded 7-8% (v/v) ethanol after 24 h of fermentation (90% efficiency). Accordingly, alkali treatment can be applied for facilitating the use of fresh sugar beet for ethanol production. (author)

  6. Alkali-aided enzymatic viscosity reduction of sugar beet mash for novel bioethanol production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanol fermentation of fresh sugar beet mash (SBM) could give a benefit on reducing energy input for sugar diffusion, juice separation, and water evaporation as used in conventional practices, thus offering promise as a low energy process. Actions of cell-wall degrading enzymes provide a mash with low viscosity, which can be easily fermented to ethanol. However, a several-fold higher enzyme loading was required for viscosity reduction of SBM compared with that of potato mash. In this study, the use of dilute alkali treatment (0.025-0.15 N NaOH, 25 oC, 1 h) in enhancing enzymatic viscosity reduction of SBM was evaluated. The results showed that higher NaOH concentration enhanced demethylation and deacetylation of SBM, resulting in greater performances of the enzymes on reducing viscosity. Efficient enzymatic viscosity reduction of SBM was observed with the 0.1 N NaOH treatment. On the other hand, untreated SBM was highly resistant to viscosity reduction, even though a 20-fold more enzyme loading was used. The resulting mash containing 12-13% (w/v) sucrose yielded 7-8% (v/v) ethanol after 24 h of fermentation (90% efficiency). Accordingly, alkali treatment can be applied for facilitating the use of fresh sugar beet for ethanol production.

  7. Field study of heavy oil viscosity reduction for production transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, J.; Annichiariccom, G.; Montanez, M. [Ecopetrol S.A. (Venezuela); Faust, M.; Weathers, T. [Nalco Energy Services (Colombia); Parra, R. [Nalco de Colombia Ltda. (Colombia)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, production and transportation are expensive processes requiring complex equipment and procedures. The main issue with heavy crude oil is its high viscosity. A method using naphtha injection was developed to dilute the fluids and aid in water separation, but this method is expensive and raises safety issues. To reduce naphtha consumption, Ecopetrol and Nalco Energy Services developed a new dispersion technology. This paper presents this technology and the results of its field trial in the Chichimene oil field. Key production indicators were monitored to determine how effective the emulsion method was in enhancing production. Results showed no negative effect on the separation facility or oil and water quality while reducing by 75% the injection of diluent. This paper presents a dispersion technology which successfully reduced the need for naphtha and thus reduced production costs.

  8. Turbulent Drag Reduction of polyelectrolyte (DNA) solutions relation with the elongational viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, C; Doyle, P G; Bonn, D A; Wagner, Christian; Amarouchene, Yassine; Doyle, Patrick; Bonn, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    We report measurements of turbulent drag reduction of two different polyelectrolyte solutions: DNA and hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide. Changing the salt concentration in the solutions allows us to change the flexibility of the polymer chains. For both polymers the amount of drag reduction was found to increase with the flexibility. Rheological studies reveal that the elongational viscosity of the solutions increases simultaneously. Hence we conclude that the elongational viscosity is the pertinent macroscopic quantity to describe the ability of a polymer to cause turbulent drag reduction.

  9. Optimization of reaction conditions for enzymatic viscosity reduction and hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan in an industrial ethanol fermentation residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.R.; Pedersen, S.; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2006-01-01

    This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished with...... viscosity and that a compromise in the dry matter must be found if enzymatic efficiency must be balanced with monosaccharide yields.......This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished with a...... increased enzyme dosage and treatment time at pH 5, 50 degrees C, 5 wt % vinasse dry matter. After 24 It of enzymatic treatment, 76-84%, 75-80%, and 43-47%, respectively, of the theoretically maximal arabinose, xylose, and glucose releases were achieved, indicating that the viscosity decrease was a result...

  10. Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enpeng

    topic. Dr. Tao with his group at Temple University, using his electro or magnetic rheological viscosity theory has developed a new technology, which utilizes electric or magnetic fields to change the rheology of complex fluids to reduce the viscosity, while keeping the temperature unchanged. After we successfully reduced the viscosity of crude oil with field and investigated the microstructure changing in various crude oil samples with SANS, we have continued to reduce the viscosity of heavy crude oil, bunker diesel, ultra low sulfur diesel, bio-diesel and crude oil and ultra low temperature with electric field treatment. Our research group developed the viscosity electrorheology theory and investigated flow rate with laboratory and field pipeline. But we never visualize this aggregation. The small angle neutron scattering experiment has confirmed the theoretical prediction that a strong electric field induces the suspended nano-particles inside crude oil to aggregate into short chains along the field direction. This aggregation breaks the symmetry, making the viscosity anisotropic: along the field direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced. The experiment enables us to determine the induced chain size and shape, verifies that the electric field works for all kinds of crude oils, paraffin-based, asphalt-based, and mix-based. The basic physics of such field induced viscosity reduction is applicable to all kinds of suspensions.

  11. Inhibitory effects of psyllium on rat mineral absorption were abolished by reduction of viscosity with partial hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asvarujanon, Patchana; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-08-01

    Psyllium husk, a highly viscous fiber, has beneficial effects for health, but has been reported to inhibit absorption of calcium. The present study found the effects of fiber viscosity on calcium, magnesium, and zinc absorption with partially degraded psyllium preparations to be one fifth viscosity (LD-HP) and one seventieth viscosity (HD-HP) using normal and ovariectomized rats. Magnesium absorption was reduced with ingestion of intact psyllium (50 g/kg diet) for 4 weeks but this reduced absorption was increased with lower viscous psyllium preparations. Moreover, the absorption in the HD-HP group was higher than in the control group (100 g cellulose/kg diet) in ovariectomized rats. Changes in calcium and zinc absorption were similar to those in magnesium absorption. Cecal pH was reduced only in rats fed HD-HP in both normal and ovariectomized rats. These results indicate that reduction of psyllium viscosity tends to counter inhibitory effects on mineral absorption. PMID:15322358

  12. Revisiting the assessment of semen viscosity and its relationship to leucocytospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, M; du Plessis, S S; Menkveld, R

    2014-10-01

    With infertility challenges posing an obstacle to many couples, the extension of variables to assess male fertility is an important line of research. At the Reproductive Biology Unit where the study was undertaken, a considerable proportion of male patient's seeking fertility assessment presented with hyperviscous semen samples and elevated concentrations of leucocytes. Despite viscosity being included as part of a routine spermiogram, it raises a considerable amount of concern as it is assessed semiquantitatively. The study was undertaken to evaluate the quantification of semen viscosity in centipoise (cP) and to investigate whether a correlation exists between hyperviscosity and leucocytospermia. A total of 200 semen samples were assessed from a sample cohort of two population groups: 162 male patients undergoing fertility assessment and 38 volunteer donors. Semen viscosity was determined by measuring the filling time of a capillary-loaded Leja chamber and quantifying the viscosity in cP. Leucocytes were identified histochemically with a leucocyte peroxidase test. The viscosity when quantified in cP was significantly higher in the peroxidase positive sample group (9.01 ± 0.49 vs. 7.39 ± 0.23 cP; P viscosity may possibly help to identify, diagnose and treat patients suffering from leucocytospermia to ultimately enhance their fertility potential. PMID:24007306

  13. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma viscosity, and whole blood viscosity by the application of pulsed corona discharges and filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin M.; Fridman, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J.; Cho, Young I.

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of applying pulsed corona discharges to blood plasma to reduce the viscosity of blood plasma and whole blood. Blood plasma was separated from blood cells, treated with corona discharges, and filtered before it was re-mixed with blood cells. Plasma viscosity (PV), whole blood viscosity (WBV), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-c concentration were measured before and after the corona treatment and filtration. Both PV and WBV increased in the case of the corona treatment only, whereas both of them decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration. In particular, the LDL-c decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration by 31.5% from the baseline value. The effect of the corona treatment on the reduction of the WBV was significant at low shear rates, but not at high shear rates, suggesting that the precipitation of the molecules in blood plasma by the corona treatment and subsequent removal may suppress the aggregation of erythrocytes and improve rheological properties of blood.

  14. Varying properties of in situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation based on assessed viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2014-03-04

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A viscosity of one or more zones of the hydrocarbon layer is assessed. The heating rates in the zones are varied based on the assessed viscosities. The heating rate in a first zone of the formation is greater than the heating rate in a second zone of the formation if the viscosity in the first zone is greater than the viscosity in the second zone. Fluids are produced from the formation through the production wells.

  15. Physicochemical properties and starch structure of a rice mutant with reduction of starch paste viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variations in starch physicochemical properties and starch structure between the rice low-paste viscosity mutant RSV-1 and its original parent II-32B were investigated. The results indicated that the apparent amylose content (AAC), gel consistency (GC), alkali spreading value (ASV) of mutant RSV-1 were higher than the wild type. However, major parameters of starch paste viscosity in mutant RSV-1 starch, i. e. peak paste viscosity, hot paste viscosity, and cool paste viscosity were significantly lower than those of the original parent. Compared to the original parent, the mutant had a similar peak time, but less energy and longer time needed for gelatinization. The starch manifested C-type crystalline and starch granule in the endosperm were irregular with different diameters. The mutation of the starch structure might play a key role for the decrease of starch paste viscosity in the mutant RSV-1. (authors)

  16. Energy-saving direct ethanol production from viscosity reduction mash of sweet potato at very high gravity (VHG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liang; Chen, Qian; Jin, Yanlin; Xue, Huilin; Guan, Jiafa; Wang, Zhongyan; Zhao, Hai

    2010-12-15

    Sweet potato is an important dietary and economic material in China (accounting for 85% of global production in 2005) and Southeast Asia. The limitation of using root and tuber of sweet potato mash at high solids content is attributed to its high viscous nature. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different viscosity reduction factors and found optimal parameters via a surface response design. The optimal xylanase enzyme dose, pretreatment time and temperature were 1.56 AGU/g, 87.6 min and 44.1 C, respectively. Using pretreatment sweet potato mash on the optimized condition, the final viscosity 498.1 cp and ethanol yield of 135.1 g/kg was obtained by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which was equivalent to 90.7% of the theoretical yield. (author)

  17. Assessment and distinction of commercial soy protein isolate product functionalities using viscosity characteristic curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ting Xu; He Liu; Jian Hua Ren; Shun Tang Guo

    2012-01-01

    To simplify the assessment method of soy protein isolate (SPI) funcfionalites,the viscosity and functionalities of commercial SPI products were studied.Viscosity value (y) increases with increasing concentration (x) and exhibits a highly significant correlation with the exponential equation y =a · ebx.The b values of products are gradually enhanced from dispersion,emulsion and injected to gel type.Products with low b values (<0.2),and high dispersivity were dispersion-type.Products having high b values (>0.4) and gel springiness were gel-type.The other products with centered b value (0.2-0.4),high solubility and emulsifying capacity were emulsion-type.

  18. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications. PMID:26875795

  19. Optimization of reaction conditions for enzymatic viscosity reduction and hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan in an industrial ethanol fermentation residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.R.; Pedersen, S.; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2006-01-01

    arabinoxylan in the different vinasse fractions irrespective of the state of solubility of the substrate material. The levels of liberated arabinose and xylose increased with increased dry matter concentration during enzymatic hydrolysis in the vinasse and the vinasse supernatant, but at the same time......, increased substrate dry matter concentrations gave corresponding linear decreases in the hydrolytic efficiency as evaluated from levels of monosaccharide release per weight unit dry matter. The study thus documents that enzymatic arabinoxylan hydrolysis of the vinasse significantly decreases the vinasse......This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished with a...

  20. Magma viscosity estimation based on analysis of erupted products. Potential assessment for large-scale pyroclastic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the formulation of guidelines for volcanic hazards in site evaluation for nuclear installations (e.g. JEAG4625-2009), it is required to establish appropriate methods to assess potential of large-scale pyroclastic eruptions at long-dormant volcanoes, which is one of the most hazardous volcanic phenomena on the safety of the installations. In considering the volcanic dormancy, magma eruptability is an important concept. The magma eruptability is dominantly controlled by magma viscosity, which can be estimated from petrological analysis of erupted materials. Therefore, viscosity estimation of magmas erupted in past eruptions should provide important information to assess future activities at hazardous volcanoes. In order to show the importance of magma viscosity in the concept of magma eruptability, this report overviews dike propagation processes from a magma chamber and nature of magma viscosity. Magma viscosity at pre-eruptive conditions of magma chambers were compiled based on previous petrological studies on past eruptions in Japan. There are only 16 examples of eruptions at 9 volcanoes satisfying data requirement for magma viscosity estimation. Estimated magma viscosities range from 102 to 107 Pa·s for basaltic to rhyolitic magmas. Most of examples fall below dike propagation limit of magma viscosity (ca. 106 Pa·s) estimated based on a dike propagation model. Highly viscous magmas (ca. 107 Pa·s) than the dike propagation limit are considered to lose eruptability which is the ability to form dikes and initiate eruptions. However, in some cases, small precursory eruptions of less viscous magmas commonly occurred just before climactic eruptions of the highly viscous magmas, suggesting that the precursory dike propagation by the less viscous magmas induced the following eruptions of highly viscous magmas (ca. 107 Pa·s). (author)

  1. Inhibitory effects of psyllium on rat mineral absorption were abolished by reduction of viscosity with partial hydrolysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Asvarujanon, Patchana; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Psyllium husk, a highly viscous fiber, has beneficial effects for health, but has been reported to inhibit absorption of calcium. The present study found the effects of fiber viscosity on calcium, magnesium, and zinc absorption with partially degraded psyllium preparations to be one fifth viscosity (LD-HP) and one seventieth viscosity (HD-HP) using normal and ovariectomized rats. Magnesium absorption was reduced with ingestion of intact psyllium (50 g/kg diet) for 4 weeks but this reduced abs...

  2. 表面活性剂对油溶性降黏剂降黏效果的影响及作用机制%Influence and mechanism of surfactants on viscosity reduction effect of oil-soluble viscosity depressant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔敏; 李传; 文萍; 邓文安

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide(CTAB),Sodium dodecyl-sulfonate(SDS) and OP-10(OP) on the viscosity reduction rate of self-manufactured oil-soluble viscosity depressant,the copolymer of maleic anhydride,styrene and octadecyl acrylate(MSA) with Lungu heavy oil as raw oil were investigated.The influencing mechanism of surfactants was analyzed from the standpoints of asphaltene association properties and colloidal stability of heavy oil by the methods of relative viscosity and mass fraction normalized conductivity.The results indicate that 1% MSA can reduce the viscosity of heavy oil from 6.720 Pa · s to 2.810 Pa · s,decrease the aggregation number of asphaltene,and enhance the colloidal stability of heavy oil.All of CTAB,SDS and OP can improve the viscosity reduction effect of MSA,and the influencing order is CTAB>SDS>OP.SDS and OP can improve the dissociation of MSA to asphaltene,make the aggregation number of asphaltene decrease continuously,but CTAB does not have the ability to improve the dissociation of MSA to asphaltene.All of CTAB,SDS and OP can improve the ability of MSA to enhance the colloidal stability of heavy oil,and the influencing order is CTAB>SDS>OP,which is consistent with the results of surfactants improving the viscosity reduction effect of MSA.The results show that compared with the asphaltene aggregation properties,the colloidal stability of heavy oil is the primary factor affecting the viscosity reduction effect of MSA for Lungu heavy oil.%以轮古稠油为原料,考察十六烷基三甲基溴化铵(CTAB)、十二烷基磺酸钠(SDS)和OP-10 (OP)对自制的油溶性降黏剂马来酸酐-苯乙烯-丙烯酸十八醇酯共聚物(MSA)降黏效果的影响;通过相对黏度法和质量分数电导率法,从沥青质缔合性和稠油胶体稳定性两个方面分析表面活性剂在稠油降黏过程中的作用机制.结果表明:1%的MSA能使稠油黏度从6.720 Pa·s下降到2.810 Pa·s,同时使稠油沥青

  3. Dimethyl Ether (DME) Assessment of Viscosity Using the New Volatile Fuel Viscometer (VFVM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Sorenson, Spencer C; Jakobsen, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development and test of a viscometer capable of handling dimethyl Ether (DME) and other volatile fuels. DME has excellent combustion characteristics in diesel engines but the injection equipment can break down prematurely due to extensive wear when handling this fuel. It...... was established, in earlier work, that the wear in the pumps is substantial even if the lubricity of DME is raised to a believed acceptable level using anti-wear additives. An influence of the viscosity on the wear in the pumps was suspected. The problem, up to now, was that the viscosity of DME has...... only been estimated or calculated but never actually measured. In the present work a volatile fuel viscometer (VFVM) was developed. It is of the capillary type and it was designed to handle DME, neat or additised. The kinematic and dynamic viscosities of pure DME were measured at 0.185 cSt and 0.122 c...

  4. Whole blood viscosity assessment issues IV: Prevalence in acute phase inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperviscosity syndrome has been suggested as not simply an acute reaction. Yet, erythrocyte sedimentation rate is associated with whole blood viscosity and it is an indirect acute phase inflammation marker. Aims: This work investigates the prevalence of hyperviscosity in acute phase inflammation. Materials and Methods: Archived clinical pathology data for the period of 1999 to 2008 were utilized. 40,632-cases tested for C-reactive protein and/or erythrocyte sedimentation rate from five alternate years, which were concomitantly tested for haematocrit and total proteins, were extracted. The prevalence of abnormal viscosity associated with positive results of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were evaluated. Results: Hyperviscosity is infrequently associated with positive C-reactive protein (2.9% and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (2.7% sub-populations, and are not statistically different from their respective negative sub-populations. Normoviscosity is significantly more prevalent in the positive sub-populations (p < 0.01. Further analyses indicate that prevalence of acute phase inflammation is statistically significantly less in hyperviscosity compared to normoviscosity sub-population (p < 0.00001. Actual blood viscosity level increases with level of inflammation though. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that although blood viscosity level may increase with inflammation, hyperviscosity is not frequent in, or sensitive to acute phase inflammation. It portends that whole blood viscosity is not unspecific as acute phase inflammation markers. It calls for clinicians to consider utilizing whole blood viscosity in disease conditions where stasis is implicated, in which it is specific and valuable. It would also benefit to establish whether hyperviscosity is a chronic phase inflammation marker.

  5. Application of nickel nanoparticles as catalyst in the viscosity reduction of Venezuelan atmospheric residues by water reformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golindano, T.; Martinez, S.; Pimentel, M.; Segovia, X.; Pena, J.P.; Sanchez, R.; Sardella, R. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). INTEVEP Dept. of Residue and Heavy Crude Processing; Canizales, E. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). INTEVEP Dept. of Analytics

    2009-07-01

    A catalytic upgrading process for extra-heavy crude oil was presented. Nickel nanoparticles were combined with transition metals and used as a catalyst for a water reformation process used to reduce oil viscosity. Thermal and catalytic process experiments were conducted in order to determine the catalytic activity of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were dispersed in gasoil in order to promote better interactions between the heavy feeds and the catalyst. The nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and chemical analyses. The study showed that the nanoparticles increased the conversion rate from 14.6 p/p to 37.4 p/p. Bottom products generated by the catalytic process were of higher quality than products produced using thermal processing techniques. It was concluded that the nanostructured materials diminished the viscosity of the atmospheric residue. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  6. Preliminary Assessments of Combined Effects of Surface Tension and Viscosity on Bubble Column Hydrodynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olivieri, G.; Grillo, S.; D’Errico, G.; Marzocchella, A.; Růžička, Marek; Salatino, P.

    Vol. Part 2. Milan o: Aidic Servizi, 2013 - (Pierucci, S.; Klemeš, J.), 1579-1584-6 ISBN 978-88-95608-23-5. ISSN 1974-9791. [International Conference on Chemical and Process Engineering /11./. Milan (IT), 02.06.2013-05.06.2013] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble column hydrodynamics * viscosity * sodium Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.aidic.it/cet/13/32/programma.html#264.pdf

  7. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  8. Portfolio Assessment: Production and Reduction of Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the education system has witnessed a shift from summative, product-oriented assessment towards formative, process-oriented assessment. Among the different learning and assessment initiatives introduced in the slipstream of this paradigmatic turn, the portfolio seems to...

  9. Scene reduction for subjective image quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska (Tomaszewska), Anna

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of image quality is important for many image processing systems, such as those used for acquisition, compression, restoration, enhancement, or reproduction. Its measurement is often accompanied by user studies, in which a group of observers rank or rate results of several algorithms. Such user studies, known as subjective image quality assessment experiments, can be very time consuming and do not guarantee conclusive results. This paper is intended to help design an efficient and rigorous quality assessment experiment. We propose a method of limiting the number of scenes that need to be tested, which can significantly reduce the experimental effort and still capture relevant scene-dependent effects. To achieve it, we employ a clustering technique and evaluate it on the basis of compactness and separation criteria. The correlation between the results obtained from a set of images in an initial database and the results received from reduced experiment are analyzed. Finally, we propose a procedure for reducing the initial scenes number. Four different assessment techniques were tested: single stimulus, double stimulus, forced choice, and similarity judgments. We conclude that in most cases, 9 to 12 judgments per evaluated algorithm for a large scene collection is sufficient to reduce the initial set of images.

  10. Density, Viscosity, and Diffusion Coefficients in Hypoeutectic Al-Si Liquid Alloys: An Assessment of Available Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, David R.

    2014-08-01

    This article is a review of empirical and calculated data on density, viscosity, and diffusion coefficients in hypereutectic Al-Si liquid alloys. Many regressions of the data were effected in order to consolidate the data as functions, which can be used to calculate each property as a function of temperature and concentration of Si. The chemical diffusion coefficient in the alloys was derived based on the Sutherland model, which relates the diffusion coefficient to viscosity.

  11. Viscosity Reduction with Self-Assembly of Cationic Surfactant on Tetra-n-butyl Ammonium Bromide Semi-Clathrate Hydrate Aqueous Slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Kawamura, Kazushi

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To utilize hydrate slurry for phase change refrigerants, the rheological properties are essential. In the present study, the viscosity characteristics of hydrate slurry are investigated. Additionally, the effect of cationic surfactant on viscosity is also evaluated. Study Design: Experimental and analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Division of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, between D...

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of the Eating Assessment Tool and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test for clinical evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Rofes, L; Arreola, V; R. Mukherjee(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027, USA); Clavé, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is an underdiagnosed digestive disorder that causes severe nutritional and respiratory complications. Our aim was to determine the accuracy of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test (V-VST) for clinical evaluation of OD. Methods We studied 120 patients with swallowing difficulties and 14 healthy subjects. OD was evaluated by the 10-item screening questionnaire EAT-10 and the bedside method V-VST, videofluoroscopy (VFS)...

  13. Nepal; Joint Staff Assessment of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Staff Assessment on Nepal’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) highlights the PRSP process aimed to provide sustainable macroeconomic framework, improving governance and the overall policy environment. It reviews the execution of the envisaged programs, expenditure planning, public expenditure management system, and the effectiveness of the monitoring system. It also identifies some shortcomings of the PRSP that could be addressed over time and reflected in the annual progres...

  14. Cytokine modulation of human blood viscosity from vivax malaria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Cantarini, Déborah Giovanna; Siqueira, Renan; Ribeiro, Elton Brito; Braga, Érika Martins; Honório-França, Adenilda Cristina; França, Eduardo Luzía

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major infectious disease in several countries and is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. In vivax malaria patients, inflammatory processes occur, as well as changes in cytokines and blood flow. The present study analyzed the cytokine modulation of blood viscosity from patients infected with Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). Blood samples were collected from 42 non-infected individuals (control group) and 37 individuals infected with P. vivax. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, TGF-β and IL-17 cytokine concentrations in the serum were assessed, and the blood rheological properties were determined. The analysis of blood viscosity for shear rates revealed that the blood viscosity of the infected patients was significantly greater than that of the non-infected individuals. The viscosity of the blood was greater in the infected individuals than in the non-infected subjects. The serum from individuals with P. vivax infections exhibited higher IFN-γ and IL-17 concentrations and lower TGF-β levels. Incubation of the blood from infected individuals with IL-17 or IL-17 associated with IFN-γ reduced the viscosity to rates equivalent to the blood from non-infected individuals. Independently of cytokine modulation, no correlation was found between the parasitemia and blood viscosity of the infected patients. These data suggest that the alterations of blood viscosity are relevant as an auxiliary tool for the clinical diagnosis of disease. In malaria, erythrocytes are more sensitive to osmotic shock, and the reduction of viscosity by IL-17 may be related to a possible immunomodulator agent during infection. PMID:26948901

  15. Artificial neural network model to predict slag viscosity over a broad range of temperatures and slag compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchesne, Marc A. [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada); CanmetENERGY, 1 Haanel Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Macchi, Arturo [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada); Lu, Dennis Y.; Hughes, Robin W.; McCalden, David; Anthony, Edward J. [CanmetENERGY, 1 Haanel Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Threshold slag viscosity heuristics are often used for the initial assessment of coal gasification projects. Slag viscosity predictions are also required for advanced combustion and gasification models. Due to unsatisfactory performance of theoretical equations, an artificial neural network model was developed to predict slag viscosity over a broad range of temperatures and slag compositions. This model outperforms other slag viscosity models, resulting in an average error factor of 5.05 which is lower than the best obtained with other available models. Genesee coal ash viscosity predictions were made to investigate the effect of adding Canadian limestone and dolomite. The results indicate that magnesium in the fluxing agent provides a greater viscosity reduction than calcium for the threshold slag tapping temperature range. (author)

  16. Waiting for Disasters: A Risk Reduction Assessment of Technological Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovins, Jane; Winningham, Sam

    2010-05-01

    This session provides a risk reduction/mitigation assessment of natural hazards causation of technological disasters and possible solution. People use technology in an attempt to not only control their environment but nature itself in order to make them feel safe and productive. Most strategies for managing hazards followed a traditional planning model i.e. study the problem, identify and implement a solution, and move on to the next problem. This approach is often viewed as static model and risk reduction is more of an upward, positive, linear trend. However, technological disasters do not allow risk reduction action to neatly fit this upward, positive, linear trend with actual or potential threats to the environment and society. There are different types of technological disasters, including industrial accidents; pipeline ruptures; accidents at power, water and heat supply systems and other lines of communication; sudden collapse of buildings and mines; air crashes; shipwrecks; automobile and railway accidents to name a few. Natural factors can play an essential role in triggering or magnifying technological disasters. They can result from the direct destruction of given technical objects by a hazardous natural process such as the destruction of an atomic power plant or chemical plant due to an earthquake. Other examples would include the destruction of communications or infrastructure systems by heavy snowfalls, strong winds, avalanches. Events in the past ten years clearly demonstrate that natural disasters and the technological disasters that accompany them are not problems that can be solved in isolation and risk reduction can play an important part. Risk reduction was designed to head off the continuing rising financial and structural tolls from disasters. All Hazard Risk Reduction planning was supposed to include not only natural, but technological, and human-made disasters as well. The subsequent disaster risk reduction (DRR) indicators were to provide the

  17. Characterization of asphaltene molecular structures by cracking under hydrogenation conditions and prediction of the viscosity reduction from visbreaking of heavy oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda Velasquez, Rosa Imelda

    The chemical building blocks that comprise petroleum asphaltenes were determined by cracking samples under conditions that minimized alterations to aromatic and cycloalkyl groups. Hydrogenation conditions that used tetralin as hydrogen-donor solvent, with an iron-based catalyst, allowed asphaltenes from different geological regions to yield 50-60 wt% of distillates (Paraffins and 1-3 ring aromatics were the most abundant building blocks. The diversity of molecules identified, and the high yield of paraffins were consistent with high heterogeneity and complexity of molecules, built up by smaller fragments attached to each other by bridges. The sum of material remaining as vacuum residue and coke was in the range of 35-45 wt%; this total represents the maximum amount of large clusters in asphaltenes that could not be converted to lighter compounds under the evaluated cracking conditions. These analytical data for Cold Lake asphaltenes were transformed into probability density functions that described the molecular weight distributions of the building blocks. These distributions were input for a Monte Carlo approach that allowed stochastic construction of asphaltenes and simulation of their cracking reactions to examine differences in the distributions of products associated to the molecular topology. The construction algorithm evidenced that a significant amount of asphaltenes would consist of 3-5 building blocks. The results did not show significant differences between linear and dendritic molecular architectures, but suggested that dendritic molecules would experience slower reaction rates as they required more breakages to reach a given yield of distillates. Thermal cracking of asphaltenes in heavy oils and bitumens can dramatically reduce viscosity, enabling pipeline transportation with less solvent addition. The viscosities of the products from visbreaking reactions of two different heavy oils were modeled with lumped kinetics based on boiling point pseudo

  18. Thermophysical properties of alkali metal vapours. Part II - assessment of experimental data on thermal conductivity and viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Fialho, Paulo; Ramires, Maria de Lurdes V.; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A.; João M. N. A. Fareleira; Mardolcar, Umesh V.

    1994-01-01

    Copyright © 1994 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Article first published online: 8 MAY 2010. An analysis of the available data on the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of the alkali metal vapours is presented. The analysis is based upon theoretical calculations of the properties of the monatomic systems, described in the preceding parts I and I.A of the present paper, and making use of the kinetic theory of a binary gas reacting mixture. A summary of the measur...

  19. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility's operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high

  20. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-09-19

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

  1. How Polymers Behave as Viscosity Index Improvers in Lubricating Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Covitch; Kieran J. Trickett

    2015-01-01

    One of the requirements of engine lubricating oil is that it must have a low enough viscosity at low temperatures to assist in cold starting and a high enough viscosity at high temperatures to maintain its load-bearing characteristics. Viscosity Index (VI) is one approach used widely in the lubricating field to assess the variation of viscosity with temperature. The VI of both mineral and synthetic base oils can be improved by the addition of polymeric viscosity modifiers (VMs). VI improvemen...

  2. Scientific opinion on the safety assessment of medium viscosity white mineral oils with a kinematic viscosity between 8.5 – 11 mm2/s at 100 °C for the proposed uses as a food additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS delivers a scientific opinion evaluating the safety in use of medium viscosity white mineral oil (MVMO (kinematic viscosity between 8.5 – 11 mm2/s at 100 °C as a food additive. In 2009, EFSA evaluated the safety of high viscosity white mineral oils (HVMO (kinematic viscosity ≥ 11 mm2/s at 100 °C. In this evaluation, the ANS Panel considered as pivotal a 2-year feeding study in the rat on chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity of two mineral oils: MVMO and HVMO. Based on the results of the study the Panel concluded that no carcinogenic effect was observed in F344 rats tested with MVMO and HVMO. The ANS Panel considered the NOAEL for both MVMO and HVMO in the above study to be 1200 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. Presently the Panel confirmed this conclusion and established a group ADI of 12 mg/kg bw/day for HVMO (kinematic viscosity ≥11 mm2/s at 100 °C and for MVMO (kinematic viscosity between 8.5 - 11 mm2/s at 100 °C. The Panel noted that conservative estimates indicated that the potential dietary intake of MVMO and/or HVMO from the proposed uses and use levels as food additive in high consumers would reach up to approximately 10.1 mg/kg bw/day for toddlers. This exposure is below the established group ADI. The Panel also noted that additional exposure to MVMO and/or HVMO via other sources could represent a major source of exposure. With the data presently available it is difficult to draw conclusions as to the magnitude of exposure and the number of consumers affected by this potential additional exposure.

  3. Assessment of aircraft risk reduction at Pantex Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of an aircraft crashing into the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex plant facility has been of concern in risk assessments. In response to public concerns, and in an effort to reduce risks associated with overflights of Pantex, several changes to navigational aids at Amarillo International Airport have been implemented. For over one year, a radar airspace monitor and recording system has been connected to the airport surveillance radar at Amarillo to record the flight paths, aircraft types, and traffic density of aircraft in the vicinity of the Pantex plant. The data has provided a better understanding of the overflight risk at Pantex as well as a means to measure the effectiveness of risk reduction efforts

  4. Assessment of Wooded Area Reduction by Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Huong Giang Tran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS data hold a great deal of promise in monitoring the reduction of single trees and forests with high accuracy. In the literature, the canopy height model (CHM is the main input used frequently for forest change detection. ALS also has the key capability of delivering 3D point clouds, not only from the top canopy surface, but also from the entire canopy profile and also from the terrain. We investigated the use of two additional parameters, which exploit these capabilities for assessing the reduction of wooded area: Slope-adapted echo ratio (sER and Sigma0. In this study, two ALS point cloud data sets (2005 and 2011 were used to calculate Digital Surface Model (DSM, sER, and Sigma0 in 1.5 km2 forest area in Vorarlberg, Austria. Image differencing was applied to indicate the change in the three difference models individually and in their combinations. Decision trees were used to classify the area of removed trees with the minimum mapping unit of 13 m2. The final results were evaluated by a knowledge-based manual digitization using completeness and correctness measures. The best result is achieved using the combination of sER and DSM, namely a correctness of 92% and a completeness of 85%.

  5. ASTARTE: Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M. A.; Yalciner, A. C.; Canals, M.

    2014-12-01

    enhancement of the Tsunami Warning System in the NEAM region in terms of monitoring, early warning and forecast, governance and resilience. This work is funded by project ASTARTE - Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe. Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013.6.4-3 ENV.2013.6.4-3)

  6. Hall Viscosity II: Extracting Viscosity from Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Moshe; Bradlyn, Barry; Read, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    When time reversal symmetry is broken, the viscosity tensor of a fluid can have non-dissipative components, similarly to the non-dissipative off-diagonal Hall conductivity. This ``Hall viscosity'' was recently shown to be half the particle density times the orbital angular momentum per particle. Its observation can thus help elucidate the nature of the more exotic quantum Hall states and related systems (e.g., p+ip superconductors). However, no concrete measurement scheme has hitherto been proposed. Motivated by this question we use linear response theory to derive a general relation between the viscosity tensor and the wave-vector dependent conductivity tensor for a Galilean-invariant quantum fluid. This relation enables one to extract the Hall viscosity, as well as other viscosity coefficients (shear and bulk) when relevant, from electromagnetic response measurements. We also discuss the connection between this result and a similar one recently derived by C. Hoyos and D. T. Son [arXiv:1109.2651].

  7. Reduction of inequalities in health: assessing evidence-based tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea Beverley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reduction of health inequalities is a focus of many national and international health organisations. The need for pragmatic evidence-based approaches has led to the development of a number of evidence-based equity initiatives. This paper describes a new program that focuses upon evidence- based tools, which are useful for policy initiatives that reduce inequities. Methods This paper is based on a presentation that was given at the "Regional Consultation on Policy Tools: Equity in Population Health Reports," held in Toronto, Canada in June 2002. Results Five assessment tools were presented. 1. A database of systematic reviews on the effects of educational, legal, social, and health interventions to reduce unfair inequalities is being established through the Cochrane and Campbell Collaborations. 2 Decision aids and shared decision making can be facilitated in disadvantaged groups by 'health coaches' to help people become better decision makers, negotiators, and navigators of the health system; a pilot study in Chile has provided proof of this concept. 3. The CIET Cycle: Combining adapted cluster survey techniques with qualitative methods, CIET's population based applications support evidence-based decision making at local and national levels. The CIET map generates maps directly from survey or routine institutional data, to be used as evidence-based decisions aids. Complex data can be displayed attractively, providing an important tool for studying and comparing health indicators among and between different populations. 4. The Ottawa Equity Gauge is applying the Global Equity Gauge Alliance framework to an industrialised country setting. 5 The Needs-Based Health Assessment Toolkit, established to assemble information on which clinical and health policy decisions can be based, is being expanded to ensure a focus on distribution and average health indicators. Conclusion Evidence-based planning tools have much to offer the

  8. Effect of plasma exchange on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M M; Marshall, J

    1982-01-01

    The effects of plasma exchange using a low viscosity plasma substitute on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow were investigated in eight subjects with normal cerebral vasculature. Plasma exchange resulted in significant reductions in plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity, globulin and fibrinogen concentration without affecting packed cell volume. The reduction in whole blood viscosity was more pronounced at low shear rates suggesting an additional effect on red cell aggregation. Despite...

  9. Viscosity of water fog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fog stream velocity profiles were analysed inside narrow and wide flat channels. To calculate the shear viscosity coefficient, we used the Navier–Stokes equation. It was revealed that fog is a non-Newtonian liquid: its viscosity grows when the shear speed drops, and it can exceed the viscosity of clean air hundreds of times when the speed gradient is less than 0.01 sec−1. The high viscosity can be explained by the electrostatic interaction of the charged water drops. (paper)

  10. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  11. Viscosity and Solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  12. Viscosity Reduction During Fuel Ethanol Production by Fresh Sweet Potato Fermentation%鲜甘薯发酵生产燃料乙醇中的降粘工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉红; 靳艳玲; 赵云; 李宇浩; 方扬; 张国华; 赵海

    2012-01-01

    reduced to less than1.0×103mPa.s, with the lowest value of 2.7×102mPa.s. The viscosity reduction rates were all more than 95%. (4) Under optimal conditions, the viscosity of fermented sweet potatoes decreased from 1.9×105mPa.s to 2.7×103mPa.s after treated for 2 h by enzyme, and reduced to 790 mPa.s after fermentation of 23 h. The ethanol concentration reached 10.56% {V/V). The results were validated further that the viscosity-reducing enzyme had potential in industrial scale ethanol fermentation with fresh sweet potato. Tab 8, Ref 19

  13. Reduction of Measuring Items- Contemporary Issue in Assessing Internal Consistency

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwaseun Gbenga Fadare; Hezekiah Oluleye Babatunde; Gbenga Olayinka Ojo; John Niyi Iyanda; Fisayo Caleb Sangogboye

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses principal component analysis (PCA) as an underlying factor reduction and as a complex, sequential variable reduction procedure in measuring and evaluating internal consistency of measuring instrument. This review paper provides theoretically and practical contemporary-issues on PCA and factor analysis, variable redundancy illustration, concepts of principal component, number of meaningful component to retain, and factor analysis extraction method in multivariate analysis....

  14. Reduction of Measuring Items- Contemporary Issue in Assessing Internal Consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Gbenga Fadare

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses principal component analysis (PCA as an underlying factor reduction and as a complex, sequential variable reduction procedure in measuring and evaluating internal consistency of measuring instrument. This review paper provides theoretically and practical contemporary-issues on PCA and factor analysis, variable redundancy illustration, concepts of principal component, number of meaningful component to retain, and factor analysis extraction method in multivariate analysis. This paper collects in one review article information for researchers and practitioners in understanding the subject matter in further simplification of steps in multivariate analysis.

  15. Governance or Poverty Reduction? Assessing Budget Support in Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. Dijkstra (Geske)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ General Budget Support (GBS) is assumed to lead to more effective poverty reduction through non-earmarking of the money and through recipient country ownership. A second and more hidden objective of GBS, however, is to influence policies and governance of recipient

  16. Insurance-related instruments for disaster risk reduction (2011 Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction)

    OpenAIRE

    P. Suarez; J. Linnerooth-Bayer

    2011-01-01

    Strategies and measures for disaster risk reduction (DRR) are not being implemented at the scale called for by the Hyogo Framework of Action. Part of the problem is that, from the perspective of decision makers with resource constraints, it is risky to invest in something that reaps benefits only in the case of a relatively unlikely event (such as a hurricane or a drought). People and institutions are understandably prone to invest in choices that yield less uncertain benefits. DRR, in itself...

  17. The effect of glycosaminoglycan enzymes and proteases on the viscosity of alpaca seminal plasma and sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw-Young, C M; Stuart, C; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2013-05-01

    In order to advance the development of cryopreservation and other assisted reproductive technologies in camelids it is necessary to eliminate the viscous component of the seminal plasma without impairing sperm function. It has been postulated that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or proteoglycans are responsible for this viscosity. This study investigated the effect of the GAG enzymes hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and keratanase and the proteases papain and proteinase K on seminal plasma viscosity and sperm function in order to aid identification of the cause of seminal plasma viscosity and propose methods for the reduction of viscosity. Sperm motility, DNA integrity, acrosome integrity and viability were assessed during 2h incubation. All enzymes reduced seminal plasma viscosity compared to control (Pviscosity within 30 min of treatment. Sperm motility and DNA integrity was not affected by enzyme treatment. The proportion of viable, acrosome intact sperm was reduced in all enzyme treated samples except those treated with papain (Pviscosity. Papain treatment of alpaca semen may be a suitable technique for reduction of seminal plasma viscosity prior to sperm cryopreservation. PMID:23537479

  18. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Verberg, R; Cohen, E G D

    1997-01-01

    Simple expressions are given for the Newtonian viscosity \\eta_N(\\phi) as well as the viscoelastic behavior of the viscosity \\eta(\\phi,\\omega) of neutral monodisperse hard sphere colloidal suspensions as a function of volume fraction \\phi and frequency \\omega over the entire fluid range, i.e., for volume fractions 0 < \\phi < 0.55. These expressions are based on an approximate theory which considers the viscosity as composed as the sum of two relevant physical processes: \\eta (\\phi,\\omega) = \\eta_{\\infty}(\\phi) + \\eta_{cd}(\\phi,\\omega), where \\eta_{\\infty}(\\phi) = \\eta_0 \\chi(\\phi) is the infinite frequency (or very short time) viscosity, with \\eta_0 the solvent viscosity, \\chi(\\phi) the equilibrium hard sphere radial distribution function at contact, and \\eta_{cd}(\\phi,\\omega) the contribution due to the diffusion of the colloidal particles out of cages formed by their neighbors, on the P\\'{e}clet time scale \\tau_P, the dominant physical process in concentrated colloidal suspensions. The Newtonian viscos...

  19. Vietnam; Joint Staff Assessment of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Progress Report

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the Joint Staff Assessment on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper of Vietnam. It analyzes the progress in achieving the Comprehensive Poverty Reduction and Growth Strategy (CPRGS) goals and identifies the challenges. It assesses the macroeconomic performance, structural and social change, progress in reducing poverty, the Vietnam Development Goals, targets of the CPRGS, and the monitoring and evaluation systems. The staff recognizes the country’s efforts toward the imple...

  20. Mama Lus Frut scheme: an assessment of poverty reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Robert; Bauer, Marcia

    2002-01-01

    The Mama Lus Frut scheme was established to increase the productivity of smallholder palm-oil plantations in Papua New Guinea. ACIAR project ASEM/1999/084, ‘Improving Productivity of the Smallholder Oil Palm Sector in Papua New Guinea: a Study of Biophysical and Socioeconomic Interactions’, included an assessment of the impact of the Mama Lus Frut scheme. The ACIAR project was also involved in refining and extending the scheme both geographically and demographically, including extending it fr...

  1. Influence of the uniform electric field on viscosity of magnetic nanofluid (Fe3O4-EG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monajjemi Rarani, E.; Etesami, N.; Nasr Esfahany, M.

    2012-11-01

    Viscosity of Fe3O4/ethylene glycol nanofluids under electric field (ac and dc) was investigated experimentally. Magnetic nanofluids were prepared by dispersing Fe3O4 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol using a sonicator. Experiments showed that dilute magnetic nanofluids (fluid exhibit Newtonian behavior. Viscosity of Fe3O4 / ethylene glycol nanofluids in electric field was measured using capillary tube viscometer. Electric field decreased the viscosity of magnetic nanofluids and base fluid. The viscosity reduction was more profound in higher volume concentrations of nanoparticles. dc electric field caused greater viscosity reduction in magnetic nanofluids relative to ac electric field while ac electric field showed greater reduction effect for base liquid.

  2. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  3. Bulk and shear viscosities of hot and dense hadron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kadam, Guru Prakash

    2014-01-01

    We estimate bulk and shear viscosity at finite temperature and baryon densities of hadronic matter within hadron resonance gas model. For bulk viscosity we use low energy theorems of QCD for the energy momentum tensor correlators. For shear viscosity coefficient, we estimate the same using molecular kinetic theory to relate the shear viscosity coefficient to average momentum of the hadrons in the hot and dense hadron gas. The bulk viscosity to entropy ratio increases with chemical potential and is related to the reduction of velocity of sound at nonzero chemical potential. The shear viscosity to entropy ratio on the other hand, shows a nontrivial behavior with the ratio decreasing with chemical potential for small temperatures but increasing with chemical potential at high temperatures and is related to decrease of entropy density with chemical potential at high temperature due to finite volume of the hadrons.

  4. An Assessment of Psychological Noise Reduction by Landscape Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The emphasis in the term ‘Green Transportation’ is on the word ‘green’. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG. Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants’ actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects’ emotional processing, which we term ‘psychological noise reduction’.

  5. Viscosity model of high-viscosity dispersing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏先福; 王娜; 黄蓓青; 孙承博

    2008-01-01

    High-viscosity dispersing system is formed by dispersing the solid particles in the high-viscosity continuous medium.It is very easy to form the three-dimensional network structure for solid particles in the system and the rheology behavior becomes complicated.The apparent viscosity of this dispersing system always has the connection with the volume ratio and the shear rate.In order to discuss the rheology behavior and put up the viscosity model,the suspension of silicon dioxide and silicon oil were prepared.Through testing the viscosity,the solid concentration and the shear rate,the effects of the ratio and the shear rate on viscosity was analyzed,the model of the high-viscosity dispersing system was designed and the model with the printing ink were validated.The experiment results show that the model is applicable to the high-viscosity dispersing systems.

  6. Making Development Sustainable: The Future of Disaster Risk Management, Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, B; Maskrey, A.; Peduzzi, Pascal; De Bono, Andréa; Herold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR15), Making Development Sustainable: The Future of Disaster Risk Management, is the fourth in the series coordinated by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) in the context of the Hyogo Frame - work for Action 2005-2015: Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters (HFA). This report includes new results regarding the identification of disaster risk. It features a new global characteri...

  7. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaishnav, J. Y., E-mail: jay.vaishnav@fda.hhs.gov; Jung, W. C. [Diagnostic X-Ray Systems Branch, Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Devices and Radiological Health, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, United States Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Popescu, L. M.; Zeng, R.; Myers, K. J. [Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, United States Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality.

  8. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality

  9. Critical exponent for viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The critical exponent y characterizing the divergence of the viscosity for carbon dioxide and xenon has been measured. The values of y for both fluids fall within the range y = 0.041 + or - 0.001 and are consistent with the range y = 0.042 + or - 0.002 spanned by earlier data for four binary liquid mixtures. This agreement is the strongest evidence that pure fluids and binary liquids are in the same dynamic universality class; however, the results for y are inconsistent with the recent theoretical value of 0.032.

  10. Class Size Reduction or Rapid Formative Assessment?: A Comparison of Cost-Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2009-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of class size reduction (CSR) was compared with the cost-effectiveness of rapid formative assessment, a promising alternative for raising student achievement. Drawing upon existing meta-analyses of the effects of student-teacher ratio, evaluations of CSR in Tennessee, California, and Wisconsin, and RAND cost estimates, CSR…

  11. Assessment of methods for methyl iodide emission reduction and pest control using a simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various methods have been developed to reduce atmospheric emissions from the agricultural use of highly volatile pesticides and mitigate their adverse environmental effects. The effectiveness of various methods on emissions reduction and pest control was assessed using simulation model in this study...

  12. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  13. Viscosity of Quantum Hall Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Avron, J. E.; Seiler, R.; Zograf, P. G.

    1995-01-01

    The viscosity of quantum fluids with an energy gap at zero temperature is non-dissipative and is related to the adiabatic curvature on the space of flat background metrics (which plays the role of the parameter space). For a quantum Hall fluid on two dimensional tori this viscosity is computed. In this case the average viscosity is quantized and is proportional to the total magnetic flux through the torus.

  14. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports my recent study[1] on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Dependence of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied. (authors)

  15. High-Frequency Shear Viscosity of Low-Viscosity Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, U.; Behrends, R.

    2014-11-01

    A thickness shear quartz resonator technique is described to measure the shear viscosity of low-viscosity liquids in the frequency range from 6 MHz to 130 MHz. Examples of shear-viscosity spectra in that frequency range are presented to show that various molecular processes are accompanied by shear-viscosity relaxation. Among these processes are conformational variations of alkyl chains, with relaxation times of about 0.3 ns for -pentadecane and -hexadecane at 25 C. These variations can be well represented in terms of a torsional oscillator model. Also featured briefly are shear-viscosity relaxations associated with fluctuations of hydrogen-bonded clusters in alcohols, for which values between 0.3 ns (-hexanol) and 1.5 ns (-dodecanol) have been found at 25 C. In addition, the special suitability of high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy to the study of critically demixing mixtures is demonstrated by some illustrative examples. Due to slowing, critical fluctuations do not contribute to the shear viscosity at sufficiently high frequencies of measurements so that the non-critical background viscosity of critical systems can be directly determined from high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy. Relaxations in appear also in the shear-viscosity spectra with, for example, 2 ns for the critical triethylamine-water binary mixture at temperatures between 10 C and 18 C. Such relaxations noticeably influence the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations. They may be also the reason for the need of a special mesoscopic viscosity when mutual diffusion coefficients of critical polymer solutions are discussed in terms of mode-coupling theory.

  16. Poverty reduction Approaches in Kenya: Assessing the Usefulness of the Right Based Approach in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wambua Leonard Munyao, Ph.D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available While billions of dollars have been spent in development projects in least developed countries, poverty continues to increase. This study proposes human-rights based approach to poverty eradication. To this end, the study seeks to assess the key determinants of use of rights- based approaches to poverty reduction and it’s usefulness in Kenya with special reference to NGOs in Kibera. The study further high lights some of the basic skills of implementing the rights based approach to poverty reduction. The attempts to establish the proportion of NGOs applying rights based approach to poverty reduction in Kibera Division as well. The review of relevant literature has been undertaken and a field study done. The study is informed by a qualitative human rights framework.

  17. Viscosity of endodontic irrigants: Influence of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of temperature on the viscosity of different endodontic irrigants. Materials and Methods: The measurements of viscosity of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride, aqueous solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX and 0.2% cetrimide, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA at different temperatures (22°C, 30°C, 40°C, 50°C and 60°C were obtained using Mohr balance and Ostwald viscometer. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used for the statistical analysis. (α = 0.05. Results: No significant differences were recorded at each temperature among 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride and aqueous solution of 0.2% CHX and 0.2% cetrimide. 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA showed the higher values. Viscosity statistically decreased with increasing temperature. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA are significantly viscous at room temperature and their viscosity reduces with elevating temperature.

  18. Viscosity of endodontic irrigants: Influence of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Dagna, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of temperature on the viscosity of different endodontic irrigants. Materials and Methods: The measurements of viscosity of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride, aqueous solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 0.2% cetrimide, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at different temperatures (22°C, 30°C, 40°C, 50°C and 60°C) were obtained using Mohr balance and Ostwald viscometer. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used for the statistical analysis. (α = 0.05). Results: No significant differences were recorded at each temperature among 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride and aqueous solution of 0.2% CHX and 0.2% cetrimide. 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA showed the higher values. Viscosity statistically decreased with increasing temperature. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA are significantly viscous at room temperature and their viscosity reduces with elevating temperature. PMID:26604955

  19. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves. The...... experiments show a significant increase in extensional viscosity with increasing pressure....

  20. Hall Viscosity and Electromagnetic Response

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos, Carlos; Son, Dam Thanh

    2011-01-01

    We show that, for Galilean invariant quantum Hall states, the Hall viscosity appears in the electromagnetic response at finite wave numbers q. In particular, the leading q dependence of the Hall conductivity at small q receives a contribution from the Hall viscosity. The coefficient of the q^2 term in the Hall conductivity is universal in the limit of strong magnetic field.

  1. The viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    NOx traps are installed. The most significant problem encountered when engines are fuelled with DME is that the injection equipment breaks down prematurely due to extensive wear. This tribology issue can be explained by the very low lubricity and viscosity of DME. Recently, laboratory methods have...... appeared capable of measuring these properties of DME. The development of this is rendered difficult because DME has to be pressurised to remain in the liquid state and it dissolves most of the commercially available elastomers. This paper deals fundamentally with the measurement of the viscosity of DME...... and extends the discussion to the difficulty of viscosity establishing of very thin fluids. The main issue here is that it is not easy to calibrate the viscometers in the very low viscosity range corresponding to about one-fifth of that of water. The result is that the low viscosity is measured at...

  2. Lesotho; Joint Staff Assessment of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Status Report

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This Joint Staff Assessment reviews the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) Status Report for Lesotho. The report states that the authorities are in the final stages of completing the PRSP and expect to submit it to the Cabinet for approval by mid-October and to the Bank and the IMF by mid-November 2004. Consultations with community-based working and thematic groups were concluded by mid-2003. Subsequently, the authorities carried out detailed exercises regarding costing, development of p...

  3. Assessment of IFAD/FGN poverty reduction programme among farm households in Ondo State of Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Fakayode Segun B.; Adesanlu Ayorinde; Olagunju F.I.; Olowogbon Toyin S.

    2015-01-01

    Household poverty, especially among the farm families which are the highest population in Nigeria is still a major issue of discourse among policy makers and analysts. This study assesses the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the Federal Government of Nigeria (IFAD/FGN) poverty reduction programme among farm households in Ondo State, Nigeria. The study employed a multi-stage sampling procedure. A total of 60 beneficiaries and 60 non-benefi...

  4. Inflation from bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2015-01-01

    We explore the perfect fluid description of the inflationary universe. In particular, we investigate a fluid model with the bulk-viscosity term. We find that the three observables of inflationary cosmology: the spectral index of the curvature perturbations, the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the density perturbations, and the running of the spectral index, can be consistent with the recent Planck results. We also reconstruct the explicit equation of state (EoS) of the viscous fluid from the spectral index of the curvature perturbations compatible with the Planck analysis. In the reconstructed models of the viscous fluid, the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the density perturbations can satisfy the constraints obtained from the Planck satellite. The running of the spectral index can explain the Planck data. In addition, it is demonstrated that in the reconstructed models of the viscous fluid, the graceful exit from inflation can be realized. Furthermore, we show that the singular inflation can occur in the viscous fluid ...

  5. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T (ρc—critical density and Tc—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region

  6. Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

  7. Viscosity coefficient with pairing interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study of dynamic process (for example, deep-inelastic scattering of heavy ion, nuclear fission), viscosity, which describes the coupling between the intrinsic degrees of freedom and the collective one, is a basic quantity. In this paper, under BCS approximation, we derive a microscopic expression of viscosity coefficient with pairing interaction by means of a linear response theory. Taking the fission process of 236U as an example, we discuss the effect of pairing interaction on the viscosity coefficient. The results show that pairing interaction must be taken into account at lower temperature and can be neglected at a high-temperature region

  8. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  9. Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  10. Statistical Dimensioning of Nutrient Loading Reduction: LLR Assessment Tool for Lake Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamäki, Niina; Pätynen, Anita; Taskinen, Antti; Huttula, Timo; Malve, Olli

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) has set a great challenge on river basin management planning. Assessing the water quality of lakes and coastal waters as well as setting the accepted nutrient loading levels requires appropriate decision supporting tools and models. Uncertainty that is inevitably related to the assessment results and rises from several sources calls for more precise quantification and consideration. In this study, we present a modeling tool, called lake load response (LLR), which can be used for statistical dimensioning of the nutrient loading reduction. LLR calculates the reduction that is needed to achieve good ecological status in a lake in terms of total nutrients and chlorophyll a (chl- a) concentration. We show that by combining an empirical nutrient retention model with a hierarchical chl- a model, the national lake monitoring data can be used more efficiently for predictions to a single lake. To estimate the uncertainties, we separate the residual variability and the parameter uncertainty of the modeling results with the probabilistic Bayesian modeling framework. LLR has been developed to answer the urgent need for fast and simple assessment methods, especially when implementing WFD at such an extensive scale as in Finland. With a case study for an eutrophic Finnish lake, we demonstrate how the model can be utilized to set the target loadings and to see how the uncertainties are quantified and how they are accumulating within the modeling chain.

  11. Quantitative assessment of resilience of a water supply system under rainfall reduction due to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasinghe, Pradeep; Liu, An; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Barnes, Paul; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-09-01

    A water supply system can be impacted by rainfall reduction due to climate change, thereby reducing its supply potential. This highlights the need to understand the system resilience, which refers to the ability to maintain service under various pressures (or disruptions). Currently, the concept of resilience has not yet been widely applied in managing water supply systems. This paper proposed three technical resilience indictors to assess the resilience of a water supply system. A case study analysis was undertaken of the Water Grid system of Queensland State, Australia, to showcase how the proposed indicators can be applied to assess resilience. The research outcomes confirmed that the use of resilience indicators is capable of identifying critical conditions in relation to the water supply system operation, such as the maximum allowable rainfall reduction for the system to maintain its operation without failure. Additionally, resilience indicators also provided useful insight regarding the sensitivity of the water supply system to a changing rainfall pattern in the context of climate change, which represents the system's stability when experiencing pressure. The study outcomes will help in the quantitative assessment of resilience and provide improved guidance to system operators to enhance the efficiency and reliability of a water supply system.

  12. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Mazumdar

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the role of nuclear viscosity in hindering the fission of heavy nuclei as observed in the experimental measurements of GDR -ray spectra from the fissioning nuclei. We review a set of experiments carried out and reported by us previously [see Dioszegi et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 024613 (2000); Shaw et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 044612 (2000)] and argue that the nuclear viscosity parameter has no apparent dependence on temperature. However, it may depend upon the deformation of the nucleus.

  13. Bulk and shear viscosities of hot and dense hadron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We estimate the bulk and the shear viscosity at finite temperature and baryon densities of hadronic matter within a hadron resonance gas model which includes a Hagedorn spectrum. The parameters of the Hagedorn spectrum are adjusted to fit recent lattice QCD simulations at finite chemical potential. For the estimation of the bulk viscosity we use low energy theorems of QCD for the energy momentum tensor correlators. For the shear viscosity coefficient, we estimate the same using molecular kinetic theory to relate the shear viscosity coefficient to average momentum of the hadrons in the hot and dense hadron gas. The bulk viscosity to entropy ratio increases with chemical potential and is related to the reduction of velocity of sound at nonzero chemical potential. The shear viscosity to entropy ratio on the other hand, shows a nontrivial behavior with the ratio decreasing with chemical potential for small temperatures but increasing with chemical potential at high temperatures and is related to decrease of entropy density with chemical potential at high temperature due to finite volume of the hadrons

  14. Titin Based Viscosity in Ventricular Physiology: An Integrative Investigation of PEVK-Actin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Charles S; Methawasin, Methajit; Nelson, O Lynne; Radke, Michael H; Hidalgo, Carlos G; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    Viscosity is proposed to modulate diastolic function, but only limited understanding of the source(s) of viscosity exists. In-vitro experiments have shown that the proline-glutamic acid-valine-lysine (PEVK) rich element of titin interacts with actin, causing a viscous force in the sarcomere. It is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to viscosity in-vivo. We tested the hypothesis that PEVK-actin interaction causes cardiac viscosity and is important in-vivo via an integrative physiological study on a unique PEVK-knockout (KO) model. Both skinned cardiomyocytes and papillary muscle fibers were isolated from wildtype (WT) and PEVK KO mice and passive viscosity was examined using stretch-hold-release and sinusoidal analysis. Viscosity was reduced by ~60% in KO myocytes and ~50% in muscle fibers at room temperature. The PEVK-actin interaction was not modulated by temperature or diastolic calcium, but was increased by lattice compression. Stretch-hold and sinusoidal frequency protocols on intact isolated mouse hearts showed a smaller, 30–40% reduction in viscosity, possibly due to actomyosin interactions, and showed that microtubules did not contribute to viscosity. Transmitral Doppler echocardiography similarly revealed a 40% decrease in LV chamber viscosity in the PEVK KO in-vivo. This integrative study is the first to quantify the influence of a specific molecular (PEVK-actin) viscosity in-vivo and shows that PEVK-actin interactions are an important physiological source of viscosity. PMID:21708170

  15. A decision support system for emission reduction assessment: the OPERA LIFE+ project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Claudio; Bianchessi, Nicola; Finzi, Giovanna; Pederzoli, Anna; Pisoni, Enrico; Volta, Marialuisa; Deserti, Marco; De Munari, Eriberto; Stortini, Michele; Veronesi, Paolo; Gianfreda, Roberta; Maffeis, Giuseppe; Blond, Nadege; Mark-Hummel, Lioba; Clappier, Alain; Perron, Gilles

    2013-04-01

    In last decades, air pollution modelling assumed a key role for the definition and evaluation of suitable emission control strategies, supporting Regional Decision Makers in the design of long-term plans for air quality improvement. This is a complex task, due to the non-linear chemical reactions and physical processes that bring to secondary pollution formation and accumulation, involving precursor emissions, namely VOC, NOx, NH3, primary PM and SO2. The problem is even more complex when constraining policy to a fixed budget. This paper presents the first results of the OPERA (Operational Procedure for Emission Reduction Assessment) LIFE+ project (2010-2013, www.operatool.eu) aiming to design and to implement an enhanced approach to identify efficient regional policies (1) complying with National and EU air quality standards, (2) with local emission and meteorological features, financial, technological and social constraints and (3) considering potential synergies with actions to reduce GHG emissions. The proposed methodology is based on a multi-objective (air quality, internal and external costs) optimization problem. The decision variables are the technical and non-technical emission abatement measures. Artificial neural networks, identified processing long-term 3D deterministic multi-phase modelling system simulation outputs, describe the nonlinear relations between the control variables (precursor emissions reduction) and the air quality indexes (AQIs), defining the air quality objective. The internal costs are due to emission reduction measures implementation, while the external costs assess the damage due to population pollution exposure. The methodology has been implemented in a software tool (RIAT+) and tested on two regional applications, Emilia Romagna (IT) and Alsace (FR).

  16. Assessment of reductive acetogenesis with indigenous ruminal bacterium populations and Acetitomaculum ruminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Van, T D; Robinson, J A; Ralph, J; Greening, R C; Smolenski, W J; Leedle, J A; Schaefer, D M

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of reductive acetogenesis as an alternative H2 disposal mechanism in the rumen. H2/CO2-supported acetogenic ruminal bacteria were enumerated by using a selective inhibitor of methanogenesis, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES). Acetogenic bacteria ranged in density from 2.5 x 10(5) cells/ml in beef cows fed a high-forage diet to 75 cells/ml in finishing steers fed a high-grain diet. Negligible endogenous acetogenic activity was demonstrated in incubations containing ruminal contents, NaH13CO3, and 100% H2 gas phase since [U-13C]acetate, as measured by mass spectroscopy, did not accumulate. Enhancement of acetogenesis was observed in these incubations when methanogenesis was inhibited by BES and/or by the addition of an axenic culture of the rumen acetogen Acetitomaculum ruminis 190A4 (10(7) CFU/ml). To assess the relative importance of population density and/or H2 concentration for reductive acetogenesis in ruminal contents, incubations as described above were performed under a 100% N2 gas phase. Both selective inhibition of methanogenesis and A. ruminis 190A4 fortification (>10(5) CFU/ml) were necessary for the detection of reductive acetogenesis under H2-limiting conditions. Under these conditions, H2 accumulated to 4, 800 ppm. In contrast, H2 accumulated to 400 ppm in incubations with active methanogenesis (without BES). These H2 concentrations correlated well with the pure culture H2 threshold concentrations determined for A. ruminis 190A4 (3,830 ppm) and the ruminal methanogen 10-16B (126 ppm). The data demonstrate that ruminal methanogenic bacteria limited reductive acetogenesis by lowering the H2 partial pressure below the level necessary for H2 utilization by A. ruminis 190A4. PMID:9726893

  17. The effect of gasses on the viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    media, but their effect on DME viscosity is unknown. Argon (Ar), nitrogen (NA carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen (H-2) and propane (C3H8) have been investigated at pressure levels of 12-15 bar. A Cannon-Manning semi-micro capillary glass viscometer, size 25, enclosed in a cylindrical pressure container, of...... glass, submerged completely in a constant temperature bath, has been used. A distinct reduction of efflux times was found only for the gas, CO2. The reduction in efflux time was about 9%. The kinematic viscosity of pure DME was determined to be: 0.188 +/- 0.001 cSt, 25 degrees C. A previously reported...... viscosity of pure DME has been corrected for the surface tension effect. Viscosity determination was initially based on a direct comparison of efflux times of DME with that of distilled water. The calculation gave a revised viscosity of 0.186 +/- 0.002 cSt, 25 degrees C, consistent with the above...

  18. Viscosity kernel of molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    The wave-vector dependent shear viscosities for butane and freely jointed chains have been determined. The transverse momentum density and stress autocorrelation functions have been determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics in both atomic and molecular hydrodynamic formalisms. The density......, temperature, and chain length dependencies of the reciprocal and real-space viscosity kernels are presented. We find that the density has a major effect on the shape of the kernel. The temperature range and chain lengths considered here have by contrast less impact on the overall normalized shape. Functional...... forms that fit the wave-vector-dependent kernel data over a large density and wave-vector range have also been tested. Finally, a structural normalization of the kernels in physical space is considered. Overall, the real-space viscosity kernel has a width of roughly 3–6 atomic diameters, which means...

  19. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Wiranata, A.; M. Prakash

    2009-01-01

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature ari...

  20. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Wiranata, A

    2009-01-01

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature arise from particles which are neither extremely nonrelativistic nor extremely relativistic. Numerical results for a model binary mixture are reported.

  1. Eddy viscosity and diffusivity modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard Smagorinsky subgrid scale model for large eddy simulation can be derived from turbulent eddy viscosity models by assuming that the unresolved scales exhibit a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The present work provides a general framework for developing eddy viscosity and corresponding subgrid models for flow problems in which Kolmogorov scaling cannot be assumed because additional physical mechanisms strongly modify the turbulence dynamics. Examples of such mechanisms include externally imposed time scales, compressibility, and intermittency. The general formalism is also applied to the turbulent thermal diffusivity. In special cases, this approach yields models that agree with those existing in the literature

  2. NO{sub 2} and CO nonattainment areas: a pragmatic approach to source reduction assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernuschi, S.; Giugliano, M.; Marzolo, F. [D.I.I.A.R. - Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Environmental Section

    1995-12-31

    Many Italian large conurbations have CO and NO{sub 2} air quality standards exceeded and, consequently, require control enforcement plans to attain and maintain regulations not respected. In planning the interventions to be undertaken a fundamental issue is represented by the relationships between active emission sources and air quality, commonly described through mathematical models for evaluating the expected effects of the different reduction scenarios. This approach, relatively feasible for slightly or non reactive pollutants like CO, becomes not as easy to be applied for secondary pollutants, like NO{sub 2}, mainly for the complex photo chemical reaction systems involved in their atmospheric presence and the consequent modeling difficulties related either to the description of the system itself than to the detail in input data required. A practicable alternative in this framework relies in the utilization of statistical models for deriving, through the empirical description of the relationships between the parameters of interest, the reduction levels required for complying with the standards. Following an approach already applied with useful results to the same area, present work reports on the development and application to Milan urban area of statistical models for describing the relationships between CO and NO{sub x} annual concentration averages and the corresponding air quality standard parameters (number of standard exceedances for CO and 98th percentile of hourly concentrations for NO{sub 2}). The models are utilised upstream to simple roll-back models for the assessment of the reduction in emissions strength required for attaining air quality standards for the area. (author)

  3. Rapid Exposure Assessment of Nationwide River Flood for Disaster Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Y.; Park, J.; Arifuzzaman, B.; Iwami, Y.; Amirul, Md.; Kondoh, A.

    2016-06-01

    considerably increased. For flood disaster risk reduction, it is important to identify and characterize flood area, locations (particularly lowland along rivers), and durations. For this purpose, flood mapping and monitoring are an imperative process and the fundamental part of risk management as well as emergency response. Our ultimate goal is to detect flood inundation areas over a nationwide scale despite limitations of optical and multispectral images, and to estimate flood risk in terms of affected people. We propose a methodological possibility to be used as a standard approach for nationwide rapid flood exposure assessment with the use of the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), a big contributor to progress in near-real-time flood mapping. The preliminary results in Bangladesh show that a propensity of flood risk change strongly depends on the temporal and spatial dynamics of exposure such as distributed population.

  4. Toxicity reduction in an industrial nitro-aromatic wastewater plant: an assessment and a proposed improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhao-Yang; Jiang, Bi-Cun; Li, Ai-Min; Guo, Hong-Yan; Sun, Shu-Guang; Chu, Li-Mei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the performance of a typical Chinese industrial nitro-aromatic wastewater project (operational capacity: 3,000 m(3)d(-1)) was evaluated using chemical properties and toxicity data. Additionally, the relationship between the removal of organic pollutants and toxicity reduction was investigated throughout the whole-process wastewater treatment. Current advanced treatment reduced the dissolved organic carbon by 40% compared with biologically treated wastewater effluent (BTWE), but the acute toxicity and early life-stage toxicity increased significantly. For instance, the acute toxicity of the current advanced treated wastewater was 450% greater than that of the untreated BTWE. With the aim of effectively decreasing the toxicity of the effluent, several efficient adsorption technologies were assessed and compared for further treatment of BTWE. Coagulation and/or oxidation coupled with activated carbon adsorption, hypercrosslinked resin adsorption, or MIEX(®) technology was helpful for improving chemical indices and reducing toxicity. Among these adsorption treatment technologies, hypercrosslinked resin adsorption was more effective at removing most of the toxicants than MIEX(®) technology, and it also had better regeneration efficiency and mechanical properties compared with activated carbon. Therefore, hypercrosslinked resin adsorption may be a promising technology for enhancing organic pollutant removal and toxicity reduction of BTWE from nitro-aromatic factories. PMID:22699348

  5. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  6. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  7. The Viscosity of Meson Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Dobado, A; Dobado, Antonio; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2003-01-01

    We report a calculation of the shear viscosity in a relativistic multicomponent meson gas as a function of temperature and chemical potentials. We approximately solve the Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation of kinetic theory, appropriate for a boson gas, with relativistic kinematics. Since at low temperatures the gas can be taken as mostly composed of pions, with a fraction of kaons and etas, we explore the region where binary elastic collisions with at least one pion are the dominant scattering processes. Our input meson scattering phase shifts are fits to the experimental data obtained from chiral perturbation theory and the Inverse Amplitude Method. Our results take the correct non-relativistic limit (viscosity proportional to the square root of the temperature), show a viscosity of order the cubed of the pion mass up to temperatures somewhat below that mass, and then a large increase due to kaons and etas. Our approximation may break down at even higher temperatures, where the viscosity follows a tempera...

  8. Bulk viscosity and deflationary universes

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Waga, I

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the conditions that make possible the description of entropy generation in the new inflationary model by means of a nearequilibrium process. We show that there are situations in which the bulk viscosity cannot describe particle production during the coherent field oscillations phase.

  9. Viscosity of black liquor project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrall, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The discussion of magnetic resonance in this report is confined to nuclides with a spin quantum number of 1/2. Included is a basic discussion of magnetic resonance; magnetic resonance relaxation and viscosity; and rhometers and viscometers. Many other effects are ignored for the sake of clarity.

  10. Effects of viscosity variations in temporal mixing layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present investigation is to assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv = vhigh/vlow, varying between 1 and 9, whereas the upper and lower streams are of equal density. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF), for which Rv = 1. The initial Reynolds number, based on the initial momentum thickness, δθ,0, is Reδθ,0 = 160 for the considered cases. The study focuses on the first stages of the temporal evolution of the mixing-layer. It is shown that in VVF (with respect to CVF): (i) the birth of turbulent fluctuations is accelerated; (ii) large-scale quantities, i.e. mean longitudinal velocity and momentum thickness, are affected by the viscosity variations, thus dispelling the myth that viscosity is a 'small-scale quantity that does not affect the large scales'; (iii) the velocity fluctuations are enhanced for VVF. In particular, the turbulent kinetic energy peaks earlier and is three times larger for VVF than CVF at the earliest stage of the mixing, and (iv) the transport equation for the turbulent kinetic energy is derived and favourably compared with simulations data.

  11. Definition of 1992 Technology Aircraft Noise Levels and the Methodology for Assessing Airplane Noise Impact of Component Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Henry A.; Martinez, Michael M.; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the methodology for assessing the impact of component noise reduction on total airplane system noise. The methodology is intended to be applied to the results of individual study elements of the NASA-Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program, which will address the development of noise reduction concepts for specific components. Program progress will be assessed in terms of noise reduction achieved, relative to baseline levels representative of 1992 technology airplane/engine design and performance. In this report, the 1992 technology reference levels are defined for assessment models based on four airplane sizes - an average business jet and three commercial transports: a small twin, a medium sized twin, and a large quad. Study results indicate that component changes defined as program final goals for nacelle treatment and engine/airframe source noise reduction would achieve from 6-7 EPNdB reduction of total airplane noise at FAR 36 Stage 3 noise certification conditions for all of the airplane noise assessment models.

  12. Constructing post-carbon institutions: Assessing EU carbon reduction efforts through an institutional risk governance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines three different governance approaches the European Union (EU) and Member States (MS) are relying on to reach a low carbon economy by 2050. Current governance literature explains the operational methods of the EU's new governance approach to reduce carbon emissions. However, the literature neglects to account for the perceived risks that inhibit the roll-out of new low carbon technology. This article, through a novel approach, uses a grounded theoretical framework to reframe traditional risk literature and provides a connection to governance literature in order to assess the ability of EU governance mechanisms to reduce carbon emissions. The empirical research is based on responses from European energy stakeholders who participated in a Delphi method discussion and in semi-structured interviews; these identified three essential requirements for carbon emissions to be reduced to near zero by 2050: (1) an integrated European energy network, (2) carbon pricing and (3) demand reduction. These features correspond to institutionalized responses by the EU and MS: the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER); European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) and energy efficiency directives and policies integrated into existing MS institutions. The theoretical and empirical findings suggest that governance by facilitation (energy efficiency) fails to induce significant investment and new policy approaches and cannot be relied on to achieve requisite reductions in demand. Governance by negotiation (ACER) and governance by hierarchy (EU ETS) do reduce risks and may encourage the necessary technological uptake. The term ‘risk governance’ is used to explain the important role governance plays in reducing risks and advancing new technology and thereby lowering carbon emissions in the energy sector. - Highlights: ► This article assesses the role of EU institutions in reducing carbon emissions by 2050. ► Empirical research is based on Delphi

  13. Percutaneous vertebroplasty and bone cement leakage: clinical experience with a new high-viscosity bone cement and delivery system for vertebral augmentation in benign and malignant compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Zoarski, Gregg; Manca, Antonio; Masala, Salvatore; Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 +/- 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA was injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p < 0.05) in leakages and to evaluate the clinical outcome. PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications. PMID:18389186

  14. Assessment of methods for methyl iodide emission reduction and pest control using a simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lifang; Ashworth, Daniel J.; Šimunek, Jirka; Xuan, Richeng; Yates, Scott R.

    2013-02-01

    The increasing registration of the fumigant methyl iodide within the USA has led to more concerns about its toxicity to workers and bystanders. Emission mitigation strategies are needed to protect the public and environmental health while providing effective pest control. The effectiveness of various methods on emissions reduction and pest control was assessed using a process-based mathematical model in this study. Firstly, comparisons between the simulated and laboratory measured emission fluxes and cumulative emissions were made for methyl iodide (MeI) under four emission reduction treatments: 1) control, 2) using soil with high organic matter content (HOM), 3) being covered by virtually impermeable film (VIF), and 4) irrigating soil surface following fumigation (Irrigation). Then the model was extended to simulate a broader range of emission reduction strategies for MeI, including 5) being covered by high density polyethylene (HDPE), 6) increasing injection depth from 30 cm to 46 cm (Deep), 7) HDPE + Deep, 8) adding a reagent at soil surface (Reagent), 9) Reagent + Irrigation, and 10) Reagent + HDPE. Furthermore, the survivability of three types of soil-borne pests (citrus nematodes [Tylenchulus semipenetrans], barnyard seeds [Echinochloa crus-galli], fungi [Fusarium oxysporum]) was also estimated for each scenario. Overall, the trend of the measured emission fluxes as well as total emission were reasonably reproduced by the model for treatments 1 through 4. Based on the numerical simulation, the ranking of effectiveness in total emission reduction was VIF (82.4%) > Reagent + HDPE (73.2%) > Reagent + Irrigation (43.0%) > Reagent (23.5%) > Deep + HDPE (19.3%) > HOM (17.6%) > Deep (13.0%) > Irrigation (11.9%) > HDPE (5.8%). The order for pest control efficacy suggests, VIF had the highest pest control efficacy, followed by Deep + HDPE, Irrigation, Reagent + Irrigation, HDPE, Deep, Reagent + HDPE, Reagent, and HOM. Therefore, VIF is the optimal method disregarding

  15. Unilateral emission reductions of the EU and multilateral emission reductions of the developed countries. Assessing the impact on Finland with TIMES model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report assesses the impact of the unilateral greenhouse gas emission reductions proposed by the EU on the structure of European and Finnish energy systems with TIMES models. The two models used are techno-economical energy system models including an extensive description of technologies on energy production and consumption. The models derive the sectoral energy demand from given economic projections and calculate the optimal way of satisfying the energy demand through market equilibrium. The basis for EU wide calculations was the Common POLES-IMAGE economic scenarios which project a GDP growth of 2.4 % p.a. until 2020. A sensitivity analysis was conducted with a lower economic growth projection. The results indicated that a reduction of 20 % compared to 1990 emission levels by 2020 would lead to most reductions being conducted at the electricity sector. The consumption of coal in electricity generation would decrease considerably. In the long term some of the natural gas based production would incorporate carbon capture and storage (CCS), and the use of wind power would grow substantially. The value of carbon would lie at levels around 20 to 30 euro/t CO2 by 2020 were the reductions carried out without flexibility mechanisms. With a reduction target of -30 % by 2050, the value of carbon would rise to 40 . 50 euro/t CO2 by 2050, and nearly to 100 euro/t CO2 with a target of -60 % in 2050. The calculations on Finland were based on economic projections by the Ministry of Finance and the Government Institute of Economic Research. The scenarios asses the optimal way of reducing Finnish emissions with a range of prices for emission rights between 20 and 50 euro/t CO2. The sectors not included in the emission trading scheme were assumed to conduct reductions with costs up to the value of emission rights. The use of coal was reduced after 2010, accompanied by an increase in the use of natural gas. The utilization of bioenergy increases considerable in the total energy

  16. Viscosity of gums in vitro and their ability to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia in normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Brenelli

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in vitro with three viscous polysaccharides (guar gum, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC of similar initial viscosity submitted to conditions that mimic events occurring in the stomach and duodenum, and their viscosity in these situations was compared to their actions on postprandial hyperglycemia in normal human subjects. Guar gum showed greater viscosity than the other gums during acidification and/or alkalinization and also showed larger effects on plasma glucose levels (35% reduction in maximum rise in plasma glucose and on the total area under the curve of plasma glucose (control: 20,314 ± 1007 mg dl-1 180 min-1 vs guar gum: 18,277 ± 699 mg dl-1 180 min-1, P<0.01. Pectin, which showed a marked reduction in viscosity at 37oC and after events mimicking those that occur in the stomach and duodenum, did not have a significant effect on postprandial hyperglycemia. The performance of viscosity and the glycemia response to CMC were at an intermediate level between guar gum and pectin. In conclusion, these data suggest that temperature, the process of acidification, alkalinization and exposure to intestinal ions induce different viscosity changes in gums having similar initial viscosity, establishing a direct relationship between a minor decrease of gum viscosity in vitro and a reduction of postprandial hyperglycemia

  17. Low viscosity automatic transmission fluids with enhanced friction durability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenji Yatsunami; Samuel H. Tersigni; TANG Hong- zhi; Lee D. Saathoff; Christopher S. Cleveland; Mark Jones

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on the development of a new low viscosity automatic transmission fluid (ATF) with enhanced friction durability to meet the needs of new step type automatic transmissions. Recent high fuel prices encourage increased efficiency in the driveline, including the transmission. Reduction in fluid viscosity and wider use of slip control in torque con-verter clutches are two ways to practically improve fuel efficiency. Increased torque and more shifting is seen with a variety of new transmission hardware platforms, such as wet starting clutches, dual clutches and seven - or eight - speed ATs.This suggests the need for enhanced levels of friction durability from the ATF. The new challenge from this hardware for the ATF formulator lies in the need to simultaneously meet the wear, friction durability and torque capacity requirements at low viscosity in a cost- effective manner. This report introduced a new low viscosity fluid that represents a different commercial ATF formulation style. The new chemistry employs a low viscosity for increased fuel economy, while easily doubling the friction durability of current conven-tional ATFs and offering higher torque and better EP.

  18. Dairy-Based Emulsions: Viscosity Affects Fat Difference Thresholds and Sweetness Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Susann Zahn; Karin Hoppert; Franziska Ullrich; Harald Rohm

    2013-01-01

    In complex emulsions, viscosity or viscosity-associated sensory attributes such as creaminess are important for quality assessment and product differentiation. Two sets of emulsions with fat or locust bean gum content being varied at seven levels were developed; the two emulsions at each level had similar apparent viscosity. Additionally, sugar concentration was kept constant either with respect to total emulsion, or with respect to the aqueous phase. Series of two-alternative forced choice t...

  19. Confidence HIGH VISCOSITY BONE CEMENT SYSTEM AND POSTURAL REDUCTION IN TREATING ACUTE SEVERE OSTEOPOROTIC VERTEBRAL COMPRESSION FRACTURES%Confidence高黏度骨水泥椎体成形系统结合体位复位治疗急性重度骨质疏松性椎体压缩骨折

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 王群波; 余雨; 杜维; 邵高海

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨应用Confidence高黏度骨水泥椎体成形系统结合体位复位治疗急性重度骨质疏松性椎体压缩骨折(osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture,OVCF)的临床效果.方法 回顾分析2004年6月-2009年6月采用Confidence高黏度骨水泥及其椎体成形系统结合体位复何治疗34例急性重度OVCF患者的临床资料.男14例,女20例;年龄62~88岁,平均72.6岁.均为单椎体骨折.损伤节段:T114例,T1210例,L115例,L24例,L31例.骨密度测定T值均≤-2.5,提示骨质疏松.伤后至入院时间2~72 h.术前先对压缩椎体行腰椎过伸位复位7~14 d,术中采用单侧穿刺,经椎弓根入路,每个椎体注射骨水泥2~6 mL,平均3.2 mL.结果 术中3例(8.8%)椎体出现不同程度骨水泥渗漏,其中2例椎体渗漏全椎间隙,1例椎体渗漏至椎旁软组织;均无临床症状,末行处理.患者均无肺栓塞、感染和神经损伤等并发症发生.34例均获随访,随访时间12~38个月,平均18.5个月.术后31例术前疼痛症状完全缓解,3例部分缓解;未见伤椎再骨折、骨与骨水泥界面松动及相邻椎体骨折发生.术后3 d及未次随访时伤椎前中柱椎体高度、后凸Cobb角及疼痛视觉模拟评分(VAS)均较术前显著改善(P0.05).结论 Confidence高黏度骨水泥椎体成形系统具有瞬间高黏度、可注射时间长、定向可控注射等优点,降低了骨水泥渗漏风险,术前结合体何复位治疗急性重度OVCF疗效较好.%Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Confidence high viscosity bone cement system and postural reduction in treating acute severe osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF).Methods Between June 2004 and June 2009, 34 patients with acute severe OVCF were treated with Confidence high viscosity bone cement system and postural reduction.There were 14 males and 20 females with an average age of 72.6 years (range, 62-88 years).All patients had single thoracolumbar fracture, including 4

  20. Viscosity measurement using microcantilever sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.; Koroleva, Anastasia; Pavelka, Miroslav; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Wang, W.; Ch.

    Danvers: I E E E Computer Society, 2014 - (Bilof, R.), s. 315-319 ISBN 978-1-4799-6666-0. ISSN 1063-6900. [ISOT 2014 : International Symposium on Optomechatronic Technologies. Seattle, Washington (US), 05.11.2014-07.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12042 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : forced vibration of microcantilever * viscosity sensor * bend loss of optical fiber Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  1. Dynamical viscosity of nucleating bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Alamoudi, S M; Boyanovsky, D; Aragão de Carvalho, C; Fraga, E S; Jorás, S E; Takakura, F I

    1999-01-01

    We study the viscosity corrections to the growth rate of nucleating bubbles in a first order phase transition in scalar field theory. We obtain the non-equilibrium equation of motion of the coordinate that describes small departures from the critical bubble and extract the growth rate consistently in weak coupling and in the thin wall limit. Viscosity effects arise from the interaction of this coordinate with the stable quantum and thermal fluctuations around a critical bubble. In the case of 1+1 dimensions we provide an estimate for the growth rate that depends on the details of the free energy functional. In 3+1 dimensions we recognize robust features that are a direct consequence of the thin wall approximation and give the leading viscosity corrections.These are long-wavelength hydrodynamic fluctuations that describe surface waves, quasi-Goldstone modes which are related to ripples on interfaces in phase ordered Ising-like systems. We discuss the applicability of our results to describe the growth rate of ...

  2. Viscosity Index Improvers and Thickeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, R. L.; Kinker, B. G.

    The viscosity index of an oil or an oil formulation is an important physical parameter. Viscosity index improvers, VIIs, are comprised of five main classes of polymers: polymethylmethacrylates (PMAs), olefin copolymers (OCPs), hydrogenated poly(styrene-co-butadiene or isoprene) (HSD/SIP/HRIs), esterified polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (SPEs) and a combination of PMA/OCP systems. The chemistry, manufacture, dispersancy and utility of each class are described. The comparative functions, properties, thickening ability, dispersancy and degradation of VIIs are discussed. Permanent and temporary shear thinning of VII-thickened formulations are described and compared. The end-use performance and choice of VI improvers is discussed in terms of low- and high-temperature viscosities, journal bearing oil film thickness, fuel economy, oil consumption, high-temperature pumping efficiency and deposit control. Discussion of future developments concludes that VI improvers will evolve to meet new challenges of increased thermal-oxidative degradation from increased engine operating temperatures, different base stocks of either synthetic base oils or vegetable oil-based, together with alcohol- or vegetable oil-based fuels. VI improvers must also evolve to deal with higher levels of fuel dilution and new types of sludge and also enhanced low-temperature requirements.

  3. Effect of viscosity on learned satiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Hogenkamp, P.S.; Gosses, A.M.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, C.de

    2009-01-01

    A higher viscosity of a food leads to a longer orosensory stimulation. This may facilitate the learned association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. In the current study we investigated the effect of viscosity on learned satiation. In two intervention groups a low viscosity (LV) yo

  4. Assessing the impact of harm reduction programs on law enforcement in Southeast Asia: a description of a regional research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Nick; Moore, Tim; Crofts, Nick

    2012-01-01

    For over 15 years the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) has been a leading donor for harm reduction projects in Southeast Asia. The recent AusAID-supported harm reduction projects of greatest significance have included the Asia Regional HIV/AIDS Project (AHRP), from 2002 until 2007,1 and the HIV/AIDS Asia Regional Program (HAARP), from 2007 until 2015.2 Both projects included in their design specific strategies for engaging with law enforcement agencies at country level. The main focus of these strategies has been to develop law enforcement harm reduction policy and curriculum, and the design and implementation of specific harm reduction training for law enforcement officers.In July 2008, the Australian Development Research Awards (ADRA) funded the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of Melbourne to establish a research project created to assess the influence of harm reduction programs on the policy and operational practices of law enforcement agencies in Southeast Asia, known as the LEHRN Project (Law Enforcement, Harm Reduction, Nossal Institute Project). The ADRA is a unique grant research mechanism that specifically funds development research to improve the understanding and informed decision making of the implementation of Australian aid effectiveness.While the need to engage law enforcement when establishing harm reduction programs was well documented, little was known about the impact or influence of harm reduction programs on policy and practices of law enforcement agencies. The LEHRN Project provided the opportunity to assess the impact of harm reduction programs on law enforcement in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Vietnam, Cambodia and Lao PDR. PMID:22769050

  5. Assessing the impact of harm reduction programs on law enforcement in Southeast Asia: a description of a regional research methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Nick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For over 15 years the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID has been a leading donor for harm reduction projects in Southeast Asia. The recent AusAID-supported harm reduction projects of greatest significance have included the Asia Regional HIV/AIDS Project (AHRP, from 2002 until 2007,1 and the HIV/AIDS Asia Regional Program (HAARP, from 2007 until 2015.2 Both projects included in their design specific strategies for engaging with law enforcement agencies at country level. The main focus of these strategies has been to develop law enforcement harm reduction policy and curriculum, and the design and implementation of specific harm reduction training for law enforcement officers. In July 2008, the Australian Development Research Awards (ADRA funded the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of Melbourne to establish a research project created to assess the influence of harm reduction programs on the policy and operational practices of law enforcement agencies in Southeast Asia, known as the LEHRN Project (Law Enforcement, Harm Reduction, Nossal Institute Project. The ADRA is a unique grant research mechanism that specifically funds development research to improve the understanding and informed decision making of the implementation of Australian aid effectiveness. While the need to engage law enforcement when establishing harm reduction programs was well documented, little was known about the impact or influence of harm reduction programs on policy and practices of law enforcement agencies. The LEHRN Project provided the opportunity to assess the impact of harm reduction programs on law enforcement in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Vietnam, Cambodia and Lao PDR.

  6. Assessment of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Oxidation-Reduction Potential Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Stagos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP and capacity ORP (cORP oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress.

  7. Assessing relationships among life-cycle environmental impacts with dimension reduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ester; Lozano, Sebastián; Moreira, M Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a trend in many countries towards more environmentally benign products and processes. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a quantitative analysis tool developed and utilized for the evaluation of environmental impacts occurring throughout the entire life-cycle of a product, process or activity. LCA requires a large amount of data in its different phases and can also generate large amounts of results which may be hard to interpret. In order to uncover and visualize the structure of large multidimensional data sets, Multivariate Analysis techniques can help. Hence, in this paper, a methodology using Principal Component Analysis and Multi-Dimensional Scaling is proposed and illustrated by means of two case studies. The first case study evaluates the operation of several wastewater treatment plants. The second case study deals with the environmental evaluation of the cultivation, processing and consumption of mussels. In both case studies, the redundancy present in the data allowed a dimensionality reduction from seven and ten to two dimensions, with a small loss of information. Plotting the environmental impact data in these two dimensions can help visualize, interpret and communicate them. PMID:20042268

  8. Vulnerability assessments, identity and spatial scale challenges in disaster-risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Carr

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches to vulnerability assessment for disaster-risk reduction (DRR commonly apply generalised, a priori determinants of vulnerability to particular hazards in particular places. Although they may allow for policy-level legibility at high levels of spatial scale, these approaches suffer from attribution problems that become more acute as the level of analysis is localised and the population under investigation experiences greater vulnerability. In this article, we locate the source of this problem in a spatial scale mismatch between the essentialist framings of identity behind these generalised determinants of vulnerability and the intersectional, situational character of identity in the places where DRR interventions are designed and implemented. Using the Livelihoods as Intimate Government (LIG approach to identify and understand different vulnerabilities to flooding in a community in southern Zambia, we empirically demonstrate how essentialist framings of identity produce this mismatch. Further, we illustrate a means of operationalising intersectional, situational framings of identity to achieve greater and more productive understandings of hazard vulnerability than available through the application of general determinants of vulnerability to specific places and cases.

  9. Landslides in Nicaragua - Mapping, Inventory, Hazard Assessment, Vulnerability Reduction, and Forecasting Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dévoli, G.; Strauch, W.; Álvarez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Kjekstad, O.

    2009-04-01

    access, manage, update and distribute in a short time to all sectors and users; and finally, the need of a comprehensive understanding of landslide processes. Many efforts have been made in the last 10 years to gain a more comprehensive and predictive understanding of landslide processes in Nicaragua. Since 1998, landslide inventory GIS based maps have been produced in different areas of the country, as part of international and multidisciplinary development projects. Landslide susceptibility and hazard maps are available now at INETEŔs Website for all municipalities of the country. The insights on landslide hazard have been transmitted to governmental agencies, local authorities, NGÓs, international agencies to be used in measures for risk reduction. A massive application example was the integration of hazard assessment studies in a large house building program in Nicaragua. Hazards of landslides, and other dangerous phenomena, were evaluated in more than 90 house building projects, each with 50 - 200 houses to be build, sited mainly in rural areas of the country. For more than 7000 families, this program could finally assure that their new houses were build in safe areas. Attempts have been made to develop a strategy for early warning of landslides in Nicaragua. First approaches relied on precipitation gauges with satellite based telemetry which were installed in some Nicaraguan volcanoes where lahars occur frequently. The occurrence of lahars in certain gullies could be detected by seismic stations. A software system gave acoustic alarm at INETEŔs Monitoring Centre when certain trigger levels of the accumulated precipitation were reached. The monitoring and early warning for all areas under risk would have required many rain gauges. A new concept is tested which uses near real time precipitation estimates from NOAA meteorological satellite data. A software system sends out alarm messages if strong or long lasting rains are observed over certain landslide "hot spots

  10. Vietnam : Managing Public Expenditure for Poverty Reduction and Growth, Public Expenditure Review and Integrated Fiduciary Assessment, Volume 2, Sectoral Issues

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This Public Expenditure Review and Integrated Fiduciary Assessment (PER-FA) reviews and assesses the contribution that public expenditure has made to poverty reduction, and growth in Vietnam in recent years, and, identifies priorities and actions for strengthening that contribution over the coming years, through better resource allocation, and better public expenditure management. Fiscal trends have been positive, both in terms of revenue collection and expenditure outturns, resulting in a su...

  11. Assessment of the Eye Lens Dose Reduction by Bismuth Shields in Rando Phantom Undergoing CT of the Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to assess the dose reduction of eye lens and availability of bismuth garments resulting from the use of radioprotective bismuth garments to shield the eyes of patients undergoing head CT. Rando phantom and TLDs were used to determine the amount of dose reduction by bismuth shielding of the eye in the following simulated CT scans : (a) scanning of the head including orbits, (b) scanning of the whole head, and (c) angled scanning of the head excluding orbits. The average dose reduction of eye lens was 43.2%, 36.0% and 1.4% for the three CT scans listed above. Significant reduction in the eye lens dose was achieved by using superficial orbital bismuth shielding during head CT scans. However, bismuth shields should not be used for the patients when their eyes are excluded from the primarily exposed region.

  12. IFP/Dialogue : social dialogue and the poverty reduction strategy paper (PRSP) process in Cambodia: an assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Graeme J.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of ILO technical assistance in strengthening social dialogue and integrating decent work into the poverty reduction process in Cambodia. Assesses the current participatory process among the social partners and proposes strategies for the promotion of decent work, improving working conditions, skills development and social protection.

  13. Viscosity mixing rules for binary systems containing one ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Mohammed; Altamash, Tausif; Salavera, Daniel; Coronas, Alberto; Rebelo, Luis P N; Canongia Lopes, Jose N

    2013-06-24

    In this work the applicability of four of the most commonly used viscosity mixing rules to [ionic liquid (IL)+molecular solvent (MS)] systems is assessed. More than one hundred (IL+MS) binary mixtures were selected from the literature to test the viscosity mixing rules proposed by 1) Hind (Hi), 2) Grunberg and Nissan (G-N), 3) Herric (He) and 4) Katti and Chaudhri (K-C). The analyses were performed by estimating the average (absolute or relative) deviations, AADs and ARDs, between the available experimental data and the predicted ideal mixture viscosity values obtained by means of each rule. The interaction terms corresponding to the adjustable parameters inherent to each rule were also calculated and their trends discussed. PMID:23650138

  14. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of moderately dense gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, W. A.; Kestin, J.; Mason, E. A.; Sandler, S. I.

    1972-01-01

    Derivation of a simple, semitheoretical expression for the initial density dependence of the viscosity and thermal conductivity of gaseous mixtures in terms of the appropriate properties of the pure components and of their interaction quantities. The derivation is based on Enskog's theory of dense gases and yields an equation in which the composition dependence of the linear factor in the density expansion is explicit. The interaction quantities are directly related to those of the mixture extrapolated to zero density and to a universal function valid for all gases. The reliability of the formulation is assessed with respect to the viscosity of several binary mixtures. It is found that the calculated viscosities of binary mixtures agree with the experimental data with a precision which is comparable to that of the most precise measurements.

  15. On the viscosity stratification in temporal mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaila, Luminita; Taguelmimt, Noureddine; Hadjadj, Abdellah; Turbulence Team

    2015-11-01

    We assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. The two streams are density-matched, but the slow fluid is Rv times more viscous than the rapid stream. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv varying between 1 and 9. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with that of the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF). The velocity fluctuations occur earlier and are more enhanced for VVF. In particular, the kinetic energy peaks earlier and is up to three times larger for VVF than for CVF at the earliest stages of the flow. Over the first stages of the flow, the temporal growth rate of the fluctuations kinetic energy is exponential, in full agreement with linear stability theory. The transport equation for the fluctuations kinetic energy is favourably compared with simulations data. The enhanced kinetic energy for VVF is mainly due to an increased production at the interface between the two fluids, in tight correlation with enlarged values of mean velocity gradient at the inflection point of the mean velocity profile. The transport equations of the one-and two-point kinetic energy show that self-preservation cannot be complete in variable-viscosity flows. ANR is acknowledged for financial support.

  16. Extension of Radiative Viscosity to Superfluid Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PI Chun-Mei; YANG Shu-Hua; ZHENG Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The radiative viscosity of superfluid npe matter is studied and it is found that to the lowest order of δμ/T,the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of its normal matter.As one of the most important transport coefficients,the bulk viscosities of simple npe matter,of hyperon matter and even of quark matter,both in normal and superfluid states,have been extensively studied,[1-18] for more detail see Ref.[19].%The radiative viscosity of superfluid npe matter is studied and it is found that to the lowest order of δμ/T, the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of its normal matter.

  17. Assessment of IFAD/FGN poverty reduction programme among farm households in Ondo State of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakayode Segun B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Household poverty, especially among the farm families which are the highest population in Nigeria is still a major issue of discourse among policy makers and analysts. This study assesses the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the Federal Government of Nigeria (IFAD/FGN poverty reduction programme among farm households in Ondo State, Nigeria. The study employed a multi-stage sampling procedure. A total of 60 beneficiaries and 60 non-beneficiaries were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed using a combination of descriptive statistics and Foster, Greer and Thorbecke poverty measure. The study shows that poverty incidence, depth and severity among the respondents were lower among IFAD/FGN beneficiaries than among the non-beneficiaries. Poverty incidence for beneficiaries was (0.66 against (0.79 for non-beneficiaries. This implies that about 66% and 79% of beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries were poor respectively. The poverty depth was (0.16 for beneficiaries compared to (0.24 for non-beneficiaries. The severity of poverty was mild among the beneficiaries (0.017 while it was severe among the non-beneficiaries (0.072. However, the study showed that the poverty measures (incidence, depth and severity of beneficiaries were lower compared with non-beneficiaries. Poverty related indices were still noticeable among the beneficiaries with poverty incidence of 66%, depth of 10% and severity of 1.7%. This implies that only 34% of the beneficiaries could be said to be non-poor compared with about 20% of the non-beneficiaries. This study recommends that IFAD/FGN project effort should be intensified at reducing poverty rates in the study areas using other measures such as income diversification and establishment of small scale agro-industries. More funds should also be made available for such programme and the programme should be extended to other states and rural areas of the country.

  18. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A RECIPROCATING ENGINE RETROFITTED WITH NONSELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION. VOLUME 2. DATA SUPPLEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two-volume report describes results from testing a rich-burn reciprocating internal combustion engine retrofitted with a nonselective catalytic reduction system for NOx reduction. A comprehensive test program was performed to characterize catalyst inlet and outlet organic and...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A RECIPROCATING ENGINE RETROFITTED WITH NONSELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two-volume report describes results from testing a rich-burn reciprocating internal combustion engine retrofitted with a nonselective catalytic reduction system for NOx reduction. A comprehensive test program was performed to characterize catalyst inlet and outlet organic and...

  1. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Viscosity and dispersion state of magnetic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the viscosity behavior of a magnetic suspension in which magnetic particles are dispersed in a mixture of polyacrylic liquids. The size of magnetite particles is nearly 300 nm and the volume fraction of the magnetic particles is in the range of 0.003-0.03. The particle concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity yields the intrinsic viscosity [η], which varies from 25.6 at 5 s-1 to 5.1 at 400 s-1. The yield stress and the infinite shear viscosity of the suspension increase non-linearly as the particle concentration φ increases. We examine the effect of process conditions such as milling time and amount of dispersant on the viscosity behavior of the suspension. As milling time elapses, yield stress and low shear viscosity decrease and then reach constant values while the infinite shear viscosity remains constant. When oleic acid is added as a dispersant, the yield stress and low shear viscosity of the suspension show minimum values as the amount of oleic acid increases. These results agree with experimental results of sedimentation tests, which enable us to estimate the aggregate size of magnetic suspension. The yield stress and the low shear viscosity of the magnetic suspension are found to be useful in evaluating the dispersion state of the magnetic suspension. - Highlights: → Viscosity behavior of magnetic suspensions in which nanomagnetic particles are discrete in polyacrylic liquid. → Particle concentration and shear dependence of suspension viscosity examined. → Low shear properties found to be sensitive to formation of particle aggregates. → Viscosity behavior due to particle aggregation agrees with dispersion stability measured by sedimentation experiment. → Viscosity actions of magnetic delay found to be quite correct and useful in evaluating discrete state of magnetic particles.

  3. A dynamic model for assessing the effects of management strategies on the reduction of construction and demolition waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    built confidence in the model so that it can be used for quantitative analysis, but also assessed and compared the effect of three designed policy scenarios on C and D waste reduction. One major contribution of this study is the development of a dynamic model for evaluating C and D waste reduction strategies under various scenarios, so that best management strategies could be identified before being implemented in practice.

  4. Gamma radiation effects on the viscosity of green banana flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banana (Musa sp) is a tropical fruits with great acceptability among consumers and produced in Brazil in a large scale. Bananas are not being as exploited as they could be in prepared food, and research could stimulate greater interest from industry. The viscosity characteristics and a product consistency can determine its acceptance by the consumer. Particularly the starch obtained from green banana had been studied from the nutritional point of view since the concept of Resistant Starch was introduced. Powder RS with high content of amylose was included in an approved food list with alleged functional properties in Brazilian legislation. Ionizing radiation can be used as a public health intervention measure for the control of food-borne diseases. Radiation is also a very convenient tool for polymer materials modification through degradation, grafting and crosslinking. In this work the influence of ionizing radiation on the rheological behavior of green banana pulp was investigated. Samples of green banana pulp flour were irradiated in a 60Co Gammacell 220 (AECL) with doses of 0 kGy,1 kGy, 3 kGy, 5 kGy and 10 kGy in glass recipients. After irradiation 3% and 5% aqueous dilution were prepared and viscosity measurements performed in a Brooksfield, model DVIII viscometer using spindle SC4-18 and SC4-31. There was a reduction of the initial viscosity of the samples as a consequence of radiation processing, being the reduction inversely proportional to the flour concentration. The polysaccharide content of the banana starch seems to be degraded by radiation in solid state as shown by the reduction of viscosity as a function of radiation dose. (author)

  5. On the viscosity of natural hyper-saline solutions and its importance: The Dead Sea brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Shandalov, Semion; Lensky, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the density, temperature and viscosity of hypersaline solutions, both natural and synthetic, is explored. An empirical equation of the density-viscosity relationship as a function of temperature was developed for the Dead Sea brine and its dilutions. The viscosity levels of the Dead Sea brine (density of 1.24 ṡ 103 kg/m3; viscosity of 3.6 mPa s at 20 °C) and of the more extremely saline natural brine (density of 1.37 ṡ 103 kg/m3) were found to be ∼3 and ∼10 times greater than that of fresh water, respectively. The combined effect of the above changes in viscosity and density on the hydraulic conductivity is reduction by a factor of 3-7. The chemical composition significantly affects the viscosity of brines with similar densities, whereby solutions with a higher Mg/Na ratio have higher viscosity. This explains the extremely high viscosity of the Dead Sea and related Mg-rich brines in comparison with the much lower values of NaCl and KCl brines with similar density. Possible impacts of the results include reduced settling velocity of grains in hypersaline viscous brines and changing hydraulic dynamics at the freshwater-saltwater and the vicinity of sinkholes.

  6. A new assessment of global mean sea level from altimeters highlights a reduction of global trend from 2005 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ablain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new error budget assessment of the global Mean Sea Level (MSL determined by TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason-1 altimeter satellites between January 1993 and June 2008 is presented. We discuss all potential errors affecting the calculation of the global MSL rate. We also compare altimetry-based sea level with tide gauge measurements over the altimetric period. This allows us to provide a realistic error budget of the MSL rise measured by satellite altimetry. These new calculations highlight a reduction in the rate of sea level rise since 2005, by ~2 mm/yr. This represents a 60% reduction compared to the 3.3 mm/yr sea level rise (glacial isostatic adjustment correction applied measured between 1993 and 2005. Since November 2005, MSL is accurately measured by a single satellite, Jason-1. However the error analysis performed here indicates that the recent reduction in MSL rate is real.

  7. FACTORS ON VISCOSITY STABILITY OF MOLD FLUXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Y.Zhu; C.J.Liu; M.F.Jiang; Z.D.Yang

    2004-01-01

    Viscosity stability indexes of mold flux at high temperature and low temperature have been introduced,and the effects of flux compositions on viscosity stability indexes have been studied.Two mold fluxes have been developed by analyzing the effects of flux viscosity stability on the process and the condition of continuous casting slab of medium carbon steel.The results show that the fluxes are suitable for the process.

  8. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  9. Hall viscosity from effective field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolis, Alberto; Son, Dam Thanh

    2011-01-01

    For two-dimensional non-dissipative fluids with broken parity, we show via effective field theory methods that the infrared dynamics generically exhibit Hall viscosity--a conservative form of viscosity compatible with two-dimensional isotropy. The equality between the Hall viscosity coefficient and the ground state's intrinsic angular momentum density follows straightforwardly from their descending from the same Lagrangian term of the low-energy effective action. We show that for such fluids ...

  10. Viscosity in Modified Gravity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shownthat, based on a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found forquantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions mayincorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition inthe cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided. 

  11. VISCOSITY MODELING OF CONVENTIONAL KRAFT COOKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGBOYAN; GOPALA.KRISHNAGOPALAN

    2004-01-01

    Static and dynamic models were studied for bothsoftwood and hardwood viscosity loss during Kraftpulping process. G-factor and initial EA charge in thestyle of Hatton equation can predicate final pulpviscosity. Dynamic models generated by effectivealkaline (EA) and temperature profile informationcan be used to predicate pulp viscosity at any timeduring pulping process. Viscosity online real-timeprediction is made possible by this model through anonline NIR sensor, which has been well calibrated tomeasure black liquor EA and temperature.

  12. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, Katherine [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The viscosities of both aqueous and cyanate ester monomer (BECy) based suspensions of alumina nanoparticle were studied. The applications for these suspensions are different: aqueous suspensions of alumina nanoparticles are used in the production of technical ceramics made by slip casting or tape casting, and the BECy based suspensions are being developed for use in an injection-type composite repair resin. In the case of aqueous suspensions, it is advantageous to achieve a high solids content with low viscosity in order to produce a high quality product. The addition of a dispersant is useful so that higher solids content suspensions can be used with lower viscosities. For BECy suspensions, the addition of nanoparticles to the BECy resin is expected to enhance the mechanical properties of the cured composite. The addition of saccharides to aqueous suspensions leads to viscosity reduction. Through DSC measurements it was found that the saccharide molecules formed a solution with water and this resulted in lowering the melting temperature of the free water according to classic freezing point depression. Saccharides also lowered the melting temperature of the bound water, but this followed a different rule. The shear thinning and melting behaviors of the suspensions were used to develop a model based on fractal-type agglomeration. It is believed that the structure of the particle flocs in these suspensions changes with the addition of saccharides which leads to the resultant viscosity decrease. The viscosity of the BECy suspensions increased with solids content, and the viscosity increase was greater than predicted by the classical Einstein equation for dilute suspensions. Instead, the Mooney equation fits the viscosity behavior well from 0-20 vol% solids. The viscosity reduction achieved at high particle loadings by the addition of benzoic acid was also investigated by NMR. It appears that the benzoic acid interacts with the surface of the alumina particle which may

  13. The effects of viscosity on circumplanetary disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Fu Bu; Hsien Shang; Feng Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disks residing in the vicinity of protoplanets are investigated through two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with the shearing sheet model.We find that viscosity can considerably affect properties of the circumplanetary disk when the mass of the protoplanet Mp (<) 33 M(⊙),where M(⊙) is the Earth's mass.However,effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disk are negligibly small when the mass of the protoplanet Mp(>) 33 M(⊙).We find that when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙),viscosity can markedly disrupt the spiral structure of the gas around the planet and smoothly distribute the gas,which weakens the torques exerted on the protoplanet.Thus,viscosity can slow the migration speed of a protoplanet.After including viscosity,the size of the circumplanetary disk can be decreased by a factor of (>) 20%.Viscosity helps to transport gas into the circumplanetary disk from the differentially rotating circumstellar disk.The mass of the circumplanetary disk can be increased by a factor of 50% after viscosity is taken into account when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙).Effects of viscosity on the formation of planets and satellites are briefly discussed.

  14. VISCOSITY MODELING OF CONVENTIONAL KRAFT COOKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGBO YAN; GOPAL A. KRISHNAGOPALAN

    2004-01-01

    Static and dynamic models were studied for both softwood and hardwood viscosity loss during Kraft pulping process. G-factor and initial EA charge in the style of Hatton equation can predicate final pulp viscosity. Dynamic models generated by effective alkaline (EA) and temperature profile information can be used to predicate pulp viscosity at any time during pulping process. Viscosity online real-time prediction is made possible by this model through an online NIR sensor, which has been well calibrated to measure black liquor EA and temperature.

  15. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  16. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  17. Holographic viscosity of fundamental matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, David; Myers, Robert C; Thomson, Rowan M

    2007-03-01

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(Nc) gauge theory with a small number of flavors Nfblack hole background. By considering the backreaction of the branes, we demonstrate that, to leading order in Nf/Nc, the viscosity to entropy ratio in these theories saturates the conjectured universal bound eta/s> or =1/4pi. Given the known results for the entropy density, the contribution of the fundamental matter eta fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta fund approximately lambda NcNfT3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential. PMID:17358523

  18. Techno-economic assessment of VOC-emission reduction methods. Hiilivetypaeaestoejen rajoittamisen tekniset ja taloudelliset edelytykset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroueh, U. (Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland). Kemian Lab.)

    1990-09-15

    The aim of the study is to evaluate technical and economical feasibility of process modifications and add-on control techniques for the reduction of VOC-emissions in our country. The activities concerned are solvent use, refineries and gasoline marketing. The previous part of the study 'Reduction of the emissions of solvent using industries' is published in VTT Research notes series. It deals with the add-on control technologies available and the measures applicable for the reduction of VOC-emissions from painting, printing, other surface coating and pharmaceutical industries. In this part the potential methods available for the reduction of VOC-emissions from other solvent using operations, refineries and distribution of gasoline are described and evaluated. Further the investment and operation costs of traditional add-on control methods as well as the costs of VOC abatement of major source categories concerned are estimated. The reduction efficiency of the control techniques available is also discussed. The reduction of solvent use or the prevention of volatilisation through process modifications is in most cases technically and economically most feasible abatement method. Further development of solventless and low solvent paints, inks, coatings, degreasers and cleaners is an essential precondition of wide substitution of solvent products. The vapor recovery technology can besides present applications be used for the treatment of VOC-emissions from gasoline marketing terminals and service stations. Incineration of volatile organic compounds is a relatively expensive control method. The field of application is wide including industrial processes in which product substitution, process changes or recovery are not feasible for emission reduction.

  19. Democratic Republic of the Congo; Joint Staff Assessment of the Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Preparation Status Report

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    The attached Joint Staff Assessment (JSA) of the Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (I-PRSP) Preparation Status Report for the Democratic Republic of the Congo reviews progress with respect to the implementation of the PRSP. The report appropriately points to the continuing progress in the implementation of the I-PRSP, especially the restoration of peace, the strengthening of governance, and the improvement in economic management for pro-poor growth. Progress in the production of monthl...

  20. Assessment of the GHG Reduction Potential from Energy Crops Using a Combined LCA and Biogeochemical Process Models: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Jiang; Mengmeng Hao; Jingying Fu; Qiao Wang; Yaohuan Huang; Xinyu Fu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA), as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by comb...

  1. Assessment of In-Situ Reductive Dechlorination Using Compound-Specific Stable Isotopes, Functional-Gene Pcr, and Geochemical Data

    OpenAIRE

    Carreón-Diazconti, Concepción; Santamaría, Johanna; Berkompas, Justin; Field, James A.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic analysis and molecular-based bioassay methods were used in conjunction with geochemical data to assess intrinsic reductive dechlorination processes for a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, Arizona. Groundwater samples were obtained from monitoring wells within a contaminant plume comprising tetrachloroethene and its metabolites trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, and ethene, as well as compounds associated with free-phase diesel present at the site....

  2. Outcome assessment of a triangular clinic as a harm reduction intervention in Rajaee-Shahr Prison, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Asl, Rahim Taghizadeh; Eshrati, Babak; Dell Colleen Anne; Taylor, Kelli; Afshar, Parviz; Kamali, Mohammad; Mirzazadeh, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among incarcerated injection drug users (IDU) is a health epidemic in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Triangular clinics (TCs) were established in prisons as a harm reduction measure to decrease the risk of HIV transmission and other blood-borne infections. The objective of this study was to assess the immediate outcomes of one TC among male IDUs in Iran’s Rajaee-Shahr prison. Methods This study was conducted in two stages betwee...

  3. Assessing “Dangerous Climate Change”: Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Juan A Añel; Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Paul J Hearty; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; Rockstrom, Johan; Rohling, Eelco J.; Sachs, Jeffrey; Smith, Pete

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of similar to 500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere a...

  4. Effect of temperature on rotational viscosity in magnetic nano fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R

    2012-10-01

    Flow behavior of magnetic nano fluids with simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature is important for its application for cooling devices such as transformer, loud speakers, electronic cooling and for its efficiency in targeted drug delivery and hyperthermia treatment. Using a specially designed horizontal capillary viscometer, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids are studied. In both these case the temperature-dependent rotational viscosity decreases, but follows a quite different mechanism. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, the reduction in rotational viscosity is due to the temperature dependence of magnetization. Curie temperature ((T)(c)) and pyromagnetic coefficient are extracted from the study. A fluid with low T(c) and high pyromagnetic coefficient is useful for thermo-sensitive cooling devices and magnetic hyperthermia. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, reduction in rotational viscosity is due to removal of physisorbed secondary surfactant on the particle because of thermal and frictional effects. This can be a good analogy for removal of drug from the magnetic particles in the case of targeted drug delivery. PMID:23096152

  5. Assessment of Soft Vane and Metal Foam Engine Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hughes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Two innovative fan-noise reduction concepts developed by NASA are presented - soft vanes and over-the-rotor metal foam liners. Design methodologies are described for each concept. Soft vanes are outlet guide vanes with internal, resonant chambers that communicate with the exterior aeroacoustic environment via a porous surface. They provide acoustic absorption via viscous losses generated by interaction of unsteady flows with the internal solid structure. Over-the-rotor metal foam liners installed at or near the fan rotor axial plane provide rotor noise absorption. Both concepts also provide pressure-release surfaces that potentially inhibit noise generation. Several configurations for both concepts are evaluated with a normal incidence tube, and the results are used to guide designs for implementation in two NASA fan rigs. For soft vanes, approximately 1 to 2 dB of broadband inlet and aft-radiated fan noise reduction is achieved. For over-the-rotor metal foam liners, up to 3 dB of fan noise reduction is measured in the low-speed fan rig, but minimal reduction is measured in the high-speed fan rig. These metal foam liner results are compared with a static engine test, in which inlet sound power level reductions up to 5 dB were measured. Brief plans for further development are also provided.

  6. Development of NaY zeolite derived from biomass and environmental assessment of carbon dioxide reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Worathanakul Patcharin; Tobarameekul Patchaya

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of greenhouse gases. The carbon dioxide caused by the industry activities and impact to the global warming. The objectives of this research were to synthesize NaY zeolite from bagasse ash as silica source and loaded with different weight percentage of Cu(II) for carbon dioxide reduction. The carbon footprint of Cu/Y zeolite for carbon dioxide reduction was calculated. The synthesized NaY zeolite from bagasse ash can be easily formed at Si/Al ratio of 0.75 with the additi...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A RECIPROCATING ENGINE RETROFITTED WITH SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION. VOLUME 2. DATA SUPPLEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of comprehensive emission measurements and 15-day continuous emission monitoring for a 1,500 kW (2000 hp) gas-fired, four-stroke turbocharged reciprocating engine equipped with an ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction system for NOx control.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF A RECIPROCATING ENGINE RETROFITTED WITH SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of comprehensive emission measurements and 15-day continuous emission monitoring for a 1,500 kW (2000 hp) gas-fired, four-stroke turbocharged reciprocating engine equipped with an ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction system for NOx control.

  9. Assessment of reduction in perception of nuclear risk related to perception of environmental risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a bibliographic research accomplished to evaluate the matter of reduction in risk perception, on people in general, that nuclear energy can show, for generation of electric power, face to perception of risk associated to environmental questions, as the global warming, from greenhouse effect, addressing the matter to the relevance of public acceptance for the development of new technologies. (author)

  10. 76 FR 59678 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Marshfield Reduction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... Marshfield Reduction Project would consist of the following facilities: One new compressor building housing an approximately 6,300-hp gas turbine driving a centrifugal compressor unit; An 8,400 gallon...,300-horsepower (hp) compressor station and appurtenant facilities on its existing 24-inch-...

  11. Greenhouse gas emission reduction potential assessment in the Kazakhstan non-energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on greenhouse gases emission from Kazakhstan non-energy sector are cited. Possible variants of the emission reduction from animal breeding, in production of rice and wheat are considered. Possibility of methane utilization from coal mines and its getting from rubbish heaps are described. (author)

  12. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent vis

  13. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  14. The Friction Theory for Viscosity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    In this work the one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) general models have been extended to the viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. It is demonstrated that these simple models, which take advantage of the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of cubic equations of state...... such as the SRK, PR and PRSV, can provide accurate viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. In the case of light reservoir oils, whose properties are close to those of normal alkanes, the one-parameter f-theory general models can predict the viscosity of these fluids with good accuracy....... Yet, in the case when experimental information is available a more accurate modeling can be obtained by means of a simple tuning procedure. A tuned f-theory general model can deliver highly accurate viscosity modeling above the saturation pressure and good prediction of the liquid-phase viscosity at...

  15. Plasma Viscosity : A Risk Factor In Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puniyani R. R

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrheological study on hypertension was done at Indian Institute of Technology Hospital, Bombay. Male population in the age groups of 35 to 60 years was screened for hypertension from February 1986 to February 1987. Out of 340 subjects examined, 44 hypertensive cases were found, who were investigated for blood viscosity profile and were compared with 45 controls. The parameters studied were plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity, red cell aggregation, red cell deformability and haematocrit W.H.O. criteria of hypertension (HT was strictly adhered to (B.P. above 160/95 mm of Hg. When compared to control group, plasma viscosity and whole blood viscosity were elevated in freshly detected and uncontrolled hypertensives. Red cell aggregation and deformability were significantly altered in chronic hypertensives than in normal, but haematocrit was not affected in any group.

  16. Assessment of the GHG reduction potential from energy crops using a combined LCA and biogeochemical process models: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Wang, Qiao; Huang, Yaohuan; Fu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA), as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by combining LCA with ecosystem/biogeochemical process models. LCA presents a general framework for evaluating the energy consumption and GHG emission from energy crop planting, yield acquisition, production, product use, and postprocessing. Meanwhile, ecosystem/biogeochemical process models are adopted to simulate the fluxes and storage of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen in the soil-plant (energy crops) soil continuum. Although clear progress has been made in recent years, some problems still exist in current studies and should be addressed. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art method for estimating GHG emission reduction through developing energy crops and introduces in detail a new approach for assessing GHG emission reduction by combining LCA with biogeochemical process models. The main achievements of this study along with the problems in current studies are described and discussed. PMID:25045736

  17. Determination of viscosity-average molecular weight of chitosan using intrinsic viscosity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of molecular weight by intrinsic viscosity measurement is a simple method for characterization of chitosan. To study the effect of radiation on molecular weight, chitosan was first irradiated using electron beam at different doses prior to measurement. Different concentrations of chitosan were prepared and measurement was done at room temperature. The flow time data was used to calculate the intrinsic viscosity by extrapolating the reduced viscosity to zero concentration. The value of intrinsic viscosity was then recalculated into the viscosity-average molecular weight using Mark-Houwink equation. (Author)

  18. Extracting shear viscosity of the Quark Gluon Plasma in the presence of bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the most remarkable features of the Quark Gluon Plasma is its nearly perfect fluidity behavior indicated by the small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio obtained from fitting relativistic viscous hydrodynamics flow harmonics to experimental data. In recent years, bulk viscosity has also been considered in the context of event-by-event relativistic hydrodynamics and it has been found to have a non-trivial interplay with shear viscosity. In this paper some of the issues are discussed that require further work when extracting the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in the presence of a non-zero bulk viscosity.

  19. Assessment of geothermal energy as a power source for US aluminum reduction plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enderlin, W.I.; Blahnik, D.E.; Davis, A.E.; Jacobson, J.J.; Schilling, A.H.; Weakley, S.A.

    1980-02-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using hydrothermal resources as a primary power source for both existing and future aluminum reduction plants in the United States is explored. Applicable hydrothermal resources that should be considered by the aluminum industry for this purpose were identified and evaluated. This work also identified the major institutional parameters to be considered in developing geothermal energy resources for aluminum industry use. Based on the findings of this study, it appears technically and economically feasible to power existing aluminum reduction plants in the Pacific Northwest using electricity generated at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah. It may also be feasible to power existing plants located on the Gulf Coast from Roosevelt Hot Springs, depending on the cost of transmitting the power.

  20. Green's functions at zero viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin-type propagator representations are written for solutions to Navier-Stokes and related equations, for arbitrary dimension D and arbitrary source geometry. In the limit of very small viscosity, velocity/vorticity solutions are given in terms of Cauchy position coordinates q of a particle advected by the velocity flow v, using a set of coupled equations for q and v. For localized point vortices in two dimensions, the vectors q become the time-dependent position coordinates of interacting vortices, and our equations reduce to those of the familiar, coupled vortex problem. The formalism is, however, able to discuss three-dimensional vortex motion, discrete or continuous, including the effects of vortex stretching. The mathematical structure of vortex stretching in a D-dimensional fluid without boundaries is conveniently described in terms of an SU(D) representation of these equations. Several simple examples are given in two dimensions, to anchor the method in the context of previously known, exact solutions. In three dimensions, vortex stretching effects are approximated using a previous strong coupling technique of particle physics, enabling one to build a crude model of the intermittent growth of enstrophy, which may signal the onset of turbulence. For isotropic turbulence, the possibility of a singularity in the inviscid enstrophy at a finite time is related to the behavior of a single function characterizing the intermittency

  1. Green's functions at zero viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin-type propagator representations are written for solutions to Navier--Stokes and related equations, for arbitrary dimension D and arbitrary source geometry. In the limit of very small viscosity, velocity/vorticity solutions are given in terms of Cauchy position coordinates q of a particle advected by the velocity flow v, using a set of coupled equations for q and v. For localized point vortices in two dimensions, the vectors q become the time-dependent position coordinates of interacting vortices, and our equations reduce to those of the familiar, coupled vortex problem. The formalism is, however, able to discuss three-dimensional vortex motion, discrete or continuous, including the effects of vortex stretching. The mathematical structure of vortex stretching in a D-dimensional fluid without boundaries is conveniently described in terms of an SU(D) representation of these equations. Several simple examples are given in two dimensions, to anchor the method in the context of previously known, exact solutions. In three dimensions, vortex stretching effects are approximated using a previous ''strong coupling'' technique of particle physics, enabling one to build a crude model of the intermittent growth of enstrophy, which may signal the onset of turbulence. For isotropic turbulence, the possibility of a singularity in the inviscid enstrophy at a finite time is related to the behavior of a single function characterizing the intermittency

  2. Use of the event tree to assess the risk reduction obtained from rockfall protection devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Peila

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents and discusses a procedure for the evaluation of the collective risk that can affect a road subjected to rockfalls, with and without protection measures, by means of the event tree analysis. This tool is useful to show designers whether the rockfall protection structures are located in the correct positions, whether they are the correct technological choice and what level of reduction of risk can be obtained. Different design options can therefore be compared on the same bases.

  3. Assessing the potential of utilisation and storage strategies for post-combustion CO2 emissions reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Katy; Styring, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The emissions reduction potential of three carbon dioxide handling strategies for post-combustion capture is considered. These are carbon capture and sequestration/storage (CCS), enhanced hydrocarbon recovery (EHR), and carbon dioxide utilization (CDU) to produce synthetic oil. This is performed using common and comparable boundary conditions including net CO2 sequestered based on equivalent boundary conditions. This is achieved using a “cradle to grave approach” where the final destination a...

  4. Assessing the potential of utilisation and storage strategies for post-combustion CO2 emissions reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Peter eStyring; Katy eArmstrong

    2015-01-01

    The emissions reduction potential of three carbon dioxide handling strategies for post-combustion capture are considered. These are carbon capture and sequestration/storage (CCS), enhanced hydrocarbon recovery (EHR) and carbon dioxide utilization (CDU) to produce synthetic oil. This is performed using common and comparable boundary conditions including net CO2 sequestered based on equivalent boundary conditions. This is achieved using a 'cradle to grave approach' where the final destination a...

  5. Assessment on F/W electrical cutting for reduction of electromagnetic force on the blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For mitigating the electromagnetic (EM) force acting on the first wall (F/W) during plasma disruption, effects of toroidally electrical cutting slits on copper heat sink of F/W have been investigated by EM analysis of the blanket module designed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The analytical studies include 1) effects of F/W material and its thickness on eddy current reduction, and 2) effects of number of toroidal cutting slits on copper heat sink and of gap length of the slit on the eddy current reduction in the copper heat sink. The following conclusions were obtained and the effectiveness of toroidal cutting of copper heat sink was clarified by a series of analyses; a)A change of F/W material from copper alloy (DSCu) to SS316 decreases the eddy current and electromagnetic force on the F/W at plasma disruption. In the case of SS316, reduction effect is remarkable in the range of the thickness less than 50mm. b)Toroidal cutting on F/W DSCu region can reduce total eddy current acting on the F/W. By increasing number of toroidal slits with 1mm gap length up to 17 (corresponding to maximum limit), about 60% of the eddy current in the F/W runs away through the SS316 support plate located at the behind of copper alloy heat sink. (author)

  6. A framework for assessing risk reduction due to DNAPL mass removal from low permeability soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, R.A. [R. Allan Freeze Engineering, Inc., White Rock, British Columbia (Canada); McWhorter, D.B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Many emerging remediation technologies are designed to remove contaminant mass from source zones at DNAPL sites in response to regulatory requirements. There is often concern in the regulated community as to whether mass removal actually reduces risk, or whether the small risk reductions achieved warrant the large costs incurred. This paper sets out a framework for quantifying the degree to which risk is reduced as mass is removed from shallow, saturated, low-permeability, dual-porosity, DNAPL source zones. Risk is defined in terms of meeting an alternate concentration level (ACL) at a compliance well in an aquifer underlying the source zone. The ACL is back-calculated from a carcinogenic health-risk characterization at a downstream water-supply well. Source-zone mass-removal efficiencies are heavily dependent on the distribution of mass between media (fractures, matrix) and phases (dissolved, sorbed, free product). Due to the uncertainties in currently-available technology performance data, the scope of the paper is limited to developing a framework for generic technologies rather than making risk-reduction calculations for specific technologies. Despite the qualitative nature of the exercise, results imply that very high mass-removal efficiencies are required to achieve significant long-term risk reduction with technology, applications of finite duration. 17 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF A WIND TURBINE INTELLIGENT CONTROLLER FOR ENHANCED ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed the enhanced energy production which is possible when variable-speed wind turbines are electronically controlled by an intelligent controller for efficiency optimization and performance improvement. The control system consists of three fuzzy- logic controllers...

  8. Assessment of the bacteria reduction in the infected root canal irradiated with diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High success rates are achieved in conventional endodontic treatment of vital pulp teeth. However, in cases of non-vital pulp, a decrease in the rate of success occurs due to difficulties in achieving a complete disinfection of the root canals system. Some bacteria, such as Enterococcus faecalis, are frequently found in cases of endodontic treatment failure due to their high resistance to the conventional endodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a high power diode laser irradiation in bacterial reduction of contaminated canals associated with dressing compose by calcium hydroxide paste propylene glycol and camphorated paramonochlorophenol. Eighty-two root canals were infected in vitro with Enterococcus faecalis in a concentration of 1x108 CFU/ml. Specimens were high intensity irradiated with a diode laser model Opus 10, at a wavelength of 830 nm. Two different parameters were employed in continuous mode: 3 W and 2,5 W with a 360 μm optical fiber at an angle of approximately 5 degrees respect to the dentine surface during 5 seconds, in 4 applications, with 20 seconds intervals among them. After these proceedings specimens were vortexed in peptone water and dilutions performed. Aliquots of the dilution were plated on m-Enterococcus agar, incubated, and the Colonies Forming Units (CFU) of ali groups was counted. The results showed a significant reduction of bacteria on ali groups after laser irradiation. A high reduction rate was achieved: 98.5% immediately after the laser irradiation; 48 hours after, the reduction was of 96,73% and, finally, a 100% reduction was achieved through the combination of laser irradiation and a long lasting dressing of calcium hydroxide paste, propylene glycol and camphorated paramonochlorophenol. High rates of bacteria reduction were achieved using the parameter of 3 W in continuous mode with the power of 2,9473 KW/cm2. The temperature was monitored with a K-pipe thermocouple placed at the periapical

  9. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2003-05-01

    The USA deposits of heavy oils and tar sands contain significant energy reserves. Thermal methods, particularly steam drive and steam soak, are used to recover heavy oils and bitumen. Thermal methods rely on several displacement mechanisms to recover oil, but the most important is the reduction of crude viscosity with increasing temperature. The main objective of this research is to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes. First, we reviewed critically the existing literature choosing the most promising models for viscosity determination. Then, we modified an existing viscosity correlation, based on the corresponding states principle in order to fit more than two thousand commercial viscosity data. We collected data for compositional and black oil samples (absence of compositional data). The data were screened for inconsistencies resulting from experimental error. A procedure based on the monotonic increase or decrease of key variables was implemented to carry out the screening process. The modified equation was used to calculate the viscosity of several oil samples where compositional data were available. Finally, a simple procedure was proposed to calculate black oil viscosity from common experimental information such as, boiling point, API gravity and molecular weight.

  10. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers at moderate concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Lipnikov [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gyrya, V [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.; Aronson, I [ANL; Berlyand, L [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there have been a number of experimental studies suggesting that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled bacteria can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  11. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  12. Seismic Vulnerability Assessment Waste Characterization Reduction and Repackaging Building, TA-50-69

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the seismic structural analyses completed on the Waste Characterization Reduction and Repackaging (WCRR) Building in support of ongoing safety analyses. WCRR is designated as TA-50-69 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The facility has been evaluated against Department of Energy (DOE) seismic criteria for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Performance Category II (PC 2). The seismic capacities of two subsystems within the WCRR building, the material handling glove box and the lift rack immediately adjacent to the Glove Box are also documented, and the results are presented

  13. Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, A.F.; Miller, M

    1997-01-01

    The study focused on the emission reduction and fuel economy benefits of the application of hybrid/electric powertrain technology to tight-duty vehicles (mid-size and compact passenger cars). The approach taken was to calculate the exhaust emissions (gm/mi) energy use (Wh/mi and mpg) for a wide range of vehicle designs (steel and light-weight materials), engines, energy storage devices, control strategies, and driving cycles using two vehicle simulation programs (SIMPLEV and AVTE). The full f...

  14. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Chang-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model including boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  15. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Fang; Wang, De-Yu; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model including boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  16. Assessments of total hip replacements before and after revision surgery with use of computed tomography with metal artifact reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic assessment of revision total hip replacements suffers from the inability to provide adequate information regarding bone stock loss. Even CT, with its transaxial orientation, is limited because of metal artifacts. Three metal artifact reduction techniques are available for CT: material-dependent imaging, planar reformation of image data, and missing projection data replacement. These techniques were used to evaluate preoperatively seven patients with revision total hip replacements, and postoperatively eight patients with primary total hip replacements. Despite significant artifacts on the routine transaxial images, the metal artifact-reduced images were of sufficient quality to provide pertinent clinical information in all cases

  17. [ULTRASONIC ASSESSMENT OF DIAPHRAGM CONDITION OF THE PATIENTS, WHO PASSED THE SELECTION FOR LUNG VOLUME REDUCTION SURGERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunkov, S D; Varlamov, V V; Gichkin, A Yu; Perley, V E; Chernyi, S M; Romanikhin, A I; Syrovnev, V A; Agishev, A S; Akopov, A L

    2015-01-01

    The article showed the results of ultrasonic assessment of topographic and functional diaphragm indices in patients with severe diffuse emphysema. They passed the selection for lung volume reduction surgery. The comparison of diaphragm indices was presented in patients with diffuse emphysema and control group of healthy volunteers. Dynamics of diaphragm condition was studied after surgical treatment. There wasn't noted any statistical difference of diaphragm topographic indices as compared with the control group. There wasn't shown a correlation between respiratory function indices and functional diaphragm indices, but it was noted a positive tendency in characteristics during quiet breathing. PMID:26983252

  18. Assessment of patient dose reduction by bismuth shielding in CT using measurements, GEANT4 and MCNPX simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M; Costa, F; Figueira, C; Madeira, P; Teles, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    This work reports on the use of two different Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX) for assessing the dose reduction using bismuth shields in computer tomography (CT) procedures in order to protect radiosensitive organs such as eye lens, thyroid and breast. Measurements were performed using head and body PMMA phantoms and an ionisation chamber placed in five different positions of the phantom. Simulations were performed to estimate Computed Tomography Dose Index values using GEANT4 and MCNPX. The relative differences between measurements and simulations were eye lens, 39 % for thyroid and 45 % for breast shields). PMID:25813483

  19. Assessment of current techniques for reduction of indoor radon concentration in existing and new houses in European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon control technologies aim at the reduction of indoor radon concentrations in existing buildings and in new construction through remedial and preventive measures. In recent years, rising ecological awareness and rising energy costs have stimulated the development of low energy and passive houses to save energy. This report contains the analysis and assessment of current techniques and technologies used to achieve the reduction of indoor radon concentrations in existing and new houses with regard to the reduction efficiency and potential impact on energy consumption (qualitative analysis). A questionnaire was prepared and sent to all RADPAR partners in 14 different countries in order to gather national information about the current remediation and prevention techniques. Responses with variable amounts of information were obtained. Based on the questionnaire responses, the status of radon remediation and prevention in each country was assessed, in addition to the reduction efficiency and potential impact on energy consumption of the current remediation and prevention techniques. The number of dwellings with an elevated indoor radon concentration typically ranges from tens of thousands to a million. The percentage of these houses already remediated varies from zero to 15%. Preventive measures in new construction have been taken from a small number of houses to over half a million houses. The research data on the current situation, the number of houses with preventive measures and the efficiency of these measures is currently still quite inadequate. Assessment of the techniques and also the surveys aiming at exploring the impact of remedial and preventive measures is greatly needed in order to promote the work at the national level. The most efficient remediation method is the active sub-slab depressurization (SSD) and the radon well, for which the reduction in the radon concentration is typically 70 - 95%. Other methods, such as sealing entry routes and improving

  20. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  1. Bulk Viscosity in Holographic Lifshitz Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent.

  2. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Hoyos; Bom Soo Kim; Yaron Oz

    2014-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical ...

  3. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent

  4. Bulk viscosity of hot and dense hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bulk viscosity of hot and dense hadrons has been estimated within the framework of hadronic resonance gas model. We observe that the bulk viscosity to entropy ratio increases faster with temperature for higher μB. The magnitude of ζ is more at high μB. This results will have crucial importance for fire-ball produced at low energy nuclear collisions (FAIR, NICA). We note that the bulk to shear viscosity ratio remains above the bound set by AdS/CFT

  5. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  6. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures: Mass dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model. (author)

  7. Application of a simple phantom in assessing the effects of dose reduction on image quality in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Firstly, to evaluate a commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert by comparing exposure measurements on the phantom with those of actual patients and, secondly, to assess the value of the phantom for image quality and dose optimisation. Methods: In the first part of the study entrance surface doses (ESD), Beam transmission (BT), and optical density (OD) were obtained for 77 chest radiography patients and compared with measurements made from exposures of the phantom using the respective patient exposure factors from chest examination. Differences were assessed with a student t-test, while the Pearson's linear correlation coefficient was used to test for any linear relationship. The second part assessed the applicability of the phantom to image quality studies by investigating the effect, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions made from gelatine, of reducing patient dose below current dose levels. Clarity of linear objects of different dimensions was also studied. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (Dref) was assessed from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from Dref. Results: Results show that, with the exception of entrance doses and beam transmission through the diaphragm (P > 0.05), differences in OD and beam transmission between patients and phantom were statistically significant (P ref produced significant changes in both clarity and detectability. Conclusion: Within limits posed by the observed differences, the phantom can be applied to image quality studies in diagnostic radiology.

  8. Assessment of the importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium for the terrestrial nitrogen cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütting, T.; Boeckx, P.; Müller, C.; Klemedtsson, L.

    2011-07-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle contains two different processes of dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction, denitrification and dissimilatory NO3- reduction to ammonium (DNRA). While there is general agreement that the denitrification process takes place in many soils, the occurrence and importance of DNRA is generally not considered. Two approaches have been used to investigate DNRA in soil, (1) microbiological techniques to identify soil microorganisms capable of DNRA and (2) 15N tracing to elucidate the occurrence of DNRA and to quantify gross DNRA rates. There is evidence that many soil bacteria and fungi have the ability to perform DNRA. Redox status and C/NO3- ratio have been identified as the most important factors regulating DNRA in soil. 15N tracing studies have shown that gross DNRA rates can be a significant or even a dominant NO3- consumption process in some ecosystems. Moreover, a link between heterotrophic nitrification and DNRA provides an alternative pathway of ammonium (NH4+) production to mineralisation. Numerical 15N tracing models are particularly useful when investigating DNRA in the context of other N cycling processes. The results of correlation and regression analyses show that highest gross DNRA rates can be expected in soils with high organic matter content in humid regions, while its relative importance is higher in temperate climates. With this review we summarise the importance and current knowledge of this often overlooked NO3- consumption process within the terrestrial N cycle. We strongly encourage considering DNRA as a relevant process in future soil N cycling investigations.

  9. Rules of thumb for assessing reductive dechlorination pathways of PCDDs in specific systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a theoretical validation and proposition of the reductive dechlorination pathways for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congeners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level for all PCDDs and Mulliken atomic charges on chlorine atoms were adopted as the probe of the dechlorination reaction activity. The experimentally substantiated dechlorination pathways of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,2,3,4-TCDD) and its daughter products in the presence of zero-valent zinc were validated and the complete pathway of dechlorination of octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) was proposed. The proposed pathways were found to be consistent with anaerobic biotransformation of several PCDD congeners. Four rules of thumb arrived from this study include (1) the chlorine atoms in the longitudinal (1,4,6,9) positions are removed in preference to the chlorine atoms on lateral (2,3,7,8) positions; (2) the chlorine atom that has more neighboring chlorine atoms at ortho-, meta- and para-positions is to be eliminated; (3) reductive dechlorination prefers to take place on the benzene ring having more chlorine substitutions; and (4) a chlorine atom on the side of the longitudinal symmetry axis containing more chlorine atoms is preferentially eliminated. These rules of thumb can be conveniently used for rapidly predicting the major dechlorination pathway for a given PCDD in specific systems.

  10. The extension of radiative viscosity to superfluid matter

    OpenAIRE

    Pi, Chun-Mei; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The radiative viscosity of superfluid $npe$ matter is studied, and it is found that to the lowest order of $\\delta \\mu/T$ the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of the normal matter.

  11. Reduction of referral to assessment time for an older adults community mental health team

    OpenAIRE

    Sin Fai Lam, Chun Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggested that waiting times within the older adults community mental health team (OA CMHT) had been increasing over time. An assessment and evaluation was indicated to ensure best quality care was provided for patients. A comparison was made between waiting times in January to December 2011 compared with August 2013 to July 2014. In 2011 the mean number of days until initial assessment from the point of referral was 12 days for routine cases, and 3.6 days for urgent cases....

  12. The Use of Assessment Center Technology for the Prevention and Reduction of Professional Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalnova I.A.,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamism of professional activity, increasing workload and working time shortage, high social responsibility for results and other factors increase the probability of formation of burnout in government employees. This actualizes the search for new forms and methods of professional qualification of government employees based on an assessment of their psychological qualities. We discuss the problem of professional and personal burnout in Rosreestr employees, reveal the symptoms of this syndrome. As a tool for preventing and reducing the negative impact of professional deformation in Rosreestr workers, we propose the use of assessment center technology successfully tested in the international practice and requiring adaptation to Russian realities.

  13. Assessing the uncertainties of climate policies and mitigation measures. Viewpoints on biofuel production, grid electricity consumption and differentiation of emission reduction commitments

    OpenAIRE

    Soimakallio, Sampo

    2012-01-01

    Ambitious climate change mitigation requires the implementation of effective and equitable climate policy and GHG emission reduction measures. The objective of this study was to explore the significance of the uncertainties related to GHG emission reduction measures and policies by providing viewpoints on biofuels production, grid electricity consumption and differentiation of emission reduction commitments between countries and country groups. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and macro-level scen...

  14. Reduction of referral to assessment time for an older adults community mental health team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin Fai Lam, Chun Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggested that waiting times within the older adults community mental health team (OA CMHT) had been increasing over time. An assessment and evaluation was indicated to ensure best quality care was provided for patients. A comparison was made between waiting times in January to December 2011 compared with August 2013 to July 2014. In 2011 the mean number of days until initial assessment from the point of referral was 12 days for routine cases, and 3.6 days for urgent cases. The re-audit showed the number of days increased to 15.89 days for routine cases, and 9.81 days for urgent cases. Contributory factors were reviewed, and it was felt that to address this problem, a duty worker role was necessary. The role of the duty worker was divided into triaging and allocating work. The triaging process was to ensure all urgent cases were highlighted early and acted upon. The duty worker's role was also to gather sufficient information from the referrer, to reduce the risks of inadequate knowledge delaying assessment. In addition, the allocating process required the duty worker to designate a clinician in charge of the case upon receipt of referral. This ensured that clinicians were able to offer the earliest possible appointment slot for the initial assessment, and thus reduce waiting times. Following implementation, findings from September 2014 to February 2015 showed an improvement in average waiting times, as well as an improvement in the percentage of assessments reviewed within previously set standards. For routine reviews, the mean time until assessment was 10.68 days. For urgent reviews, the mean time until initial assessment was 6.8 days. However, it was noted that majority of urgent reviews were still not being reviewed in time. The outcomes of this study demonstrated an improvement of both waiting times, and percentage of patients being seen within set standards following a single intervention. In the current climate of cost efficiency savings

  15. A Novel Method for Assessing Rainfall Extremes from GCMs and RCMs using Areal Reduction Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, F.; Li, J.; Evans, J. P.; Sharma, A.

    2013-12-01

    There is considerable uncertainty in future projections of rainfall extremes which affects flood risk planning. One of the reasons for this uncertainty is the significant biases in both General Circulation Model (GCM) and Regional Climate Model (RCM) simulations of these events. Generally these biases mean that future extreme rainfalls are estimated using a delta-change approach where the observed rainfalls are scaled by the percentage change in the RCM current to future estimates. One aspect that has not received much attention is how spatial patterns of extreme rainfall may change and whether these patterns are represented by GCMs and RCMs with more accuracy than the magnitude of the extreme rainfall totals. Areal reduction factors (ARFs) are a useful tool for considering the spatial patterns of extreme rainfalls. ARFs account for the spatial heterogeneity of storm events by quantifying the required reduction in a point rainfall estimate to give an equivalent area averaged rainfall estimate. The required reduction has been found to be dependent on location, watershed area and size of the rainfall event. This study has investigated the scaling of point to grid rainfall for extreme rainfall events as modelled by a number of GCMs and for dynamically downscaled GCM simulations over south-east Australia from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. ARFs are proposed as a novel way of evaluating both the GCM and RCM simulations. For the GCMs, the ARFs provide guidance on the models that best represent the modulation of point rainfalls expected over watershed areas as large as individual GCM cells. The advantage of this approach is that information on the scaling of extreme value distributions with increasing spatial scales can be used to correct the bias in the GCM simulations. For the WRF downscaled results, reanalysis driven simulations show that the representation of observed ARF relationships is quite acceptable. Future changes in ARFs can therefore be

  16. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  17. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer

  18. The VIMOS Integral Field Unit: data reduction methods and quality assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Zanichelli, A; Scodeggio, M; Franzetti, P; Rizzo, D; MacCagni, D; Merighi, R; Picat, J P; Lefèvre, O; Foucaud, S; Bottini, D; Le Brun, V; Scaramella, R; Tresse, L; Vettolani, G; Adami, C; Arnaboldi, M; Arnouts, S; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Cappi, A; Charlot, S; Ciliegi, P; Contini, T; Gavignaud, I; Guzzo, L; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; McCracken, H J; Marano, B; Marinoni, C; Mathez, G; Mazure, A; Meneux, B; Paltani, S; Pellò, R; Pollo, A; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Zamorani, G; Zucca, E

    2005-01-01

    With new generation spectrographs integral field spectroscopy is becoming a widely used observational technique. The Integral Field Unit of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph on the ESO-VLT allows to sample a field as large as 54" x 54" covered by 6400 fibers coupled with micro-lenses. We are presenting here the methods of the data processing software developed to extract the astrophysical signal of faint sources from the VIMOS IFU observations. We focus on the treatment of the fiber-to-fiber relative transmission and the sky subtraction, and the dedicated tasks we have built to address the peculiarities and unprecedented complexity of the dataset. We review the automated process we have developed under the VIPGI data organization and reduction environment (Scodeggio et al. 2005), along with the quality control performed to validate the process. The VIPGI-IFU data processing environment is available to the scientific community to process VIMOS-IFU data since November 2003.

  19. An Assessment of Errors and Their Reduction in Terrestrial Laser Scanner Measurements in Marmorean Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernandez, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The need for accurate documentation for the preservation of cultural heritage has prompted the use of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) in this discipline. Its study in the heritage context has been focused on opaque surfaces with lambertian reflectance, while translucent and anisotropic materials remain a major challenge. The use of TLS for the mentioned materials is subject to significant distortion in measure due to the optical properties under the laser stimulation. The distortion makes the measurement by range not suitable for digital modelling in a wide range of cases. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and discuss the deficiencies and their resulting errors in marmorean surfaces documentation using TLS based on time-of-flight and phase-shift. Also proposed in this paper is the reduction of error in depth measurement by adjustment of the incidence laser beam. The analysis is conducted by controlled experiments.

  20. Health Technology Assessment of pathogen reduction technologies applied to plasma for clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Americo; Berrino, Alexandra; Casini, Marina; Codella, Paola; Facco, Giuseppina; Fiore, Alessandra; Marano, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Marco; Midolo, Emanuela; Minacori, Roberta; Refolo, Pietro; Romano, Federica; Ruggeri, Matteo; Sacchini, Dario; Spagnolo, Antonio G.; Urbina, Irene; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Although existing clinical evidence shows that the transfusion of blood components is becoming increasingly safe, the risk of transmission of known and unknown pathogens, new pathogens or re-emerging pathogens still persists. Pathogen reduction technologies may offer a new approach to increase blood safety. The study is the output of collaboration between the Italian National Blood Centre and the Post-Graduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. A large, multidisciplinary team was created and divided into six groups, each of which addressed one or more HTA domains. Plasma treated with amotosalen + UV light, riboflavin + UV light, methylene blue or a solvent/detergent process was compared to fresh-frozen plasma with regards to current use, technical features, effectiveness, safety, economic and organisational impact, and ethical, social and legal implications. The available evidence is not sufficient to state which of the techniques compared is superior in terms of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. Evidence on efficacy is only available for the solvent/detergent method, which proved to be non-inferior to untreated fresh-frozen plasma in the treatment of a wide range of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. With regards to safety, the solvent/detergent technique apparently has the most favourable risk-benefit profile. Further research is needed to provide a comprehensive overview of the cost-effectiveness profile of the different pathogen-reduction techniques. The wide heterogeneity of results and the lack of comparative evidence are reasons why more comparative studies need to be performed. PMID:27403740

  1. Health Technology Assessment of pathogen reduction technologies applied to plasma for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Americo; Berrino, Alexandra; Casini, Marina; Codella, Paola; Facco, Giuseppina; Fiore, Alessandra; Marano, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Marco; Midolo, Emanuela; Minacori, Roberta; Refolo, Pietro; Romano, Federica; Ruggeri, Matteo; Sacchini, Dario; Spagnolo, Antonio G; Urbina, Irene; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M

    2016-07-01

    Although existing clinical evidence shows that the transfusion of blood components is becoming increasingly safe, the risk of transmission of known and unknown pathogens, new pathogens or re-emerging pathogens still persists. Pathogen reduction technologies may offer a new approach to increase blood safety. The study is the output of collaboration between the Italian National Blood Centre and the Post-Graduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. A large, multidisciplinary team was created and divided into six groups, each of which addressed one or more HTA domains.Plasma treated with amotosalen + UV light, riboflavin + UV light, methylene blue or a solvent/detergent process was compared to fresh-frozen plasma with regards to current use, technical features, effectiveness, safety, economic and organisational impact, and ethical, social and legal implications. The available evidence is not sufficient to state which of the techniques compared is superior in terms of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. Evidence on efficacy is only available for the solvent/detergent method, which proved to be non-inferior to untreated fresh-frozen plasma in the treatment of a wide range of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. With regards to safety, the solvent/detergent technique apparently has the most favourable risk-benefit profile. Further research is needed to provide a comprehensive overview of the cost-effectiveness profile of the different pathogen-reduction techniques. The wide heterogeneity of results and the lack of comparative evidence are reasons why more comparative studies need to be performed. PMID:27403740

  2. Hydrophilicity and the viscosity of interfacial water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Matthew P; Houston, J E; Zhu, X-Y

    2007-05-01

    We measure the viscosity of nanometer-thick water films at the interface with an amorphous silica surface. We obtain viscosity values from three different measurements: friction force in a water meniscus formed between an oxide-terminated W tip and the silica surface under ambient conditions; similar measurements for these interfaces under water; and the repulsive "drainage" force as the two surfaces approach at various speeds in water. In all three cases, we obtain effective viscosities that are approximately 10(6) times greater than that of bulk water for nanometer-scale interfacial separations. This enhanced viscosity is not observed when we degrade the hydrophilicity of the surface by terminating it with -H or -CH3. In view of recent results from other interfaces, we conclude that the criterion for the formation of a viscous interphase is the degree of hydrophilicity of the interfacial pair. PMID:17408290

  3. Viscosity and confinement in magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    An alternative to the Braginskii decomposition is proposed, one rooted in treating the viscosity as a scalar quantity in a coordinate-free representation. With appropriate application to the rate-of-shear tensor, one may solve the neoclassical force density equations for its undetermined velocity dependence, as well as the radial and poloidal profiles mentioned in [R. W. Johnson, Phys. Plasmas, under review], using an improved poloidal expansion. The pseudoplastic behavior of magnetized plasma is again obtained, and the high viscosity solution is determined to be physical. A clear relationship between confinement mode and viscosity is observed, indicating a physical origin for transport barriers, pedestals, and other phenomena. The gyroviscous contribution is found to be an effect on the order of one one-thousandth of one percent of the dominant collisional viscosity.

  4. Shear viscosity in magnetized neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Ofengeim, D D

    2015-01-01

    The electron shear viscosity due to Coulomb scattering of degenerate electrons by atomic nuclei throughout a magnetized neutron star crust is calculated. The theory is based on the shear viscosity coefficient calculated neglecting magnetic fields but taking into account gaseous, liquid and solid states of atomic nuclei, multiphonon scattering processes, and finite sizes of the nuclei albeit neglecting the effects of electron band structure. The effects of strong magnetic fields are included in the relaxation time approximation with the effective electron relaxation time taken from the field-free theory. The viscosity in a magnetized matter is described by five shear viscosity coefficients. They are calculated and their dependence on the magnetic field and other parameters of dense matter is analyzed. Possible applications and open problems are outlined.

  5. Extensional viscosity of microfibrillated cellulose suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Tobias; Rigdahl, Mikael; Stading, Mats; Levenstam Bragd, Emma

    2014-02-15

    The extensional properties of micro fibrillated cellulose (MFC)-suspensions at different fibril concentrations and with different amounts of added sodium chloride were evaluated. The MFC-suspensions were obtained by diluting a stock solution consisting of 0.95 wt.% cellulose with either deionized water or sodium chloride solution, giving a series of different concentrations and sodium chloride contents. The extensional viscosities of the suspensions were measured utilizing contraction flow geometry. Here the specimens were forced through a hyperbolic nozzle and the required pressure drop over the nozzle was measured. The extensional viscosity exhibited an extensional-thinning behaviour over the extensional strain rates used. Furthermore the extensional viscosity decreased with decreasing concentration of the suspensions, in similarities with the shear properties of the specimens. For the suspensions containing sodium chloride, the extensional viscosity appeared to increase when the concentration of sodium chloride was increased. But excessive amounts of added sodium chloride promoted an agglomeration of the suspensions. PMID:24507298

  6. Fire risk reduction through a community-based risk assessment: reflections from Makola Market, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteng-Ababio, Martin; Sarpong, Akwasi Owusu

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the level of vulnerability to the hazard of fire that exists in Makola Market in Accra, Ghana, and assesses how this threat can be reduced through a community-based risk assessment. It examines the perceptions of both market-stall occupants and primary stakeholders regarding the hazard of fire, and analyses the availability of local assets (coping strategies) with which to address the challenge. Through an evaluation of past instances of fire, as well as in-depth key stakeholder interviews, field visits, and observations, the study produces a detailed hazard map of the market. It goes on to recommend that policymakers consider short-to-long-term interventions to reduce the degree of risk. By foregrounding the essence of holistic and integrated planning, the paper calls for the incorporation of disaster mitigation measures in the overall urban planning process and for the strict enforcement of relevant building and fire safety codes by responsible public agencies. PMID:25581394

  7. Application of CITYgreen model in benefit assessment of Nanjing urban green space in carbon fixation and runoff reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analytical framework and calculation principles of the CITY green model to assess the benefits of urban green spaces in terms of carbon fixation and runoff reduction,an approach was made to obtain appropriate parameters for this model to calculate the ecological benefits of different urban land use types in the main city of Nanjing.The results indicate that carbon fixation benefits received by the main city of Nanjing is 5%-60% of that by natural forests on a per unit area basis.The ecological value of carbon fixation and runoff reduction of the Nanjing urban green space was about 177 million RMB in total.The ecological benefits of different land use types were in the order of green area > public facilities > residential areas > roads and squares > industrial areas > municipal utilities.This research can provide references for city planning and urban green space establishment and facilitate the popularization of quantitative assessment of ecological benefits of green spaces in Chinese cities.

  8. Assessment of farmer’s perception on soil quality deteriorating and crop yield reduction in Sudan Savannah of Sub-Saharan Africa by 2020

    OpenAIRE

    USMAN, Suleiman; Noma, Samaila-S.; Abdullahi, Makai; Adamu, Aminu

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of farmer’s perception on soil quality deteriorating and crop yield reduction has been carried out in the Sudan Savannah(SS)of Kebbi State Nigeria with specific objective to provide a report on soil quality deterioration and crop yield reduction using IPCC climate change impact report on Africa by 2020. The assessment was made using face-to-face-verbal-interview. The interview was divided into four rounds according to four questions. Absolutely, it is reported that some farmers hav...

  9. Lift force due to odd (Hall) viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Kogan, E

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of flow past an infinite cylinder at right angle to its axis at low Reynolds number when the fluid is characterised by broken time-reversal invariance, and hence by odd viscosity in addition to the normal even one. We solve the Oseen approximation to Navier-Stokes equation and calculate the lift force which appears due to the odd viscosity.

  10. Viscosity effect in Landau's hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bose-Einstein distribution is used to investigate Landau's hydrodynamical model with viscosity. In case the viscosity dependence on the temperature is T3, the correction to the multiplicity behaves like I/E and is found to be negligible for the pp data. A discussion is presented on a possibility of reconciling E1/2 and logE dependence of the multiplicity law. (orig.)

  11. Viscosity of Liquid Perfluoroalkanes and Perfluoroalkylalkane Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado, Pedro; Laginhas, Carlos M. C.; Lewis, J. Ben; McCabe, Clare; Martins, Luís F. G.; Filipe, Eduardo J. M.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a systematic study of the thermophysical properties of two important classes of fluorinated organic compounds (perfluoroalkanes and perfluoroalkylalkanes), viscosity measurements of four n-perfluoroalkanes and five perfluoroalkylalkanes have been carried out at atmospheric pressure and over a wide range of temperatures (278–353 K). From the experimental results the contribution to the viscosity from the CF2 and CF3 groups as a function of temperature have been estimated. Similarly,...

  12. Validation of an integrative methodology to assess and monitor reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in contaminated aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia-Estelle eTarnawski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation of tetra-and trichloroethene-contaminated aquifers is frequently hampered due to incomplete dechlorination to the more toxic dichloroethene (DCE and vinyl chloride (VC, indicating insufficient knowledge about the biological mechanisms related to aquifer functioning. A methodology based on the joint analysis of geochemical and microbiological datasets was developed to assess the presence of the biochemical potential for complete reductive dechlorination to harmless ethene and to explain the reasons for which degradation often stalls at the more toxic intermediates. This methodology is composed of three successive steps, with i the acquisition of geochemical data including chlorinated ethenes, ii the detailed analysis of the bacterial community structures as well as the biochemical potential for complete dechlorination using microcosms and molecular detection of organohalide-respiring bacteria and key reductive dehalogenases, and iii a statistical Multiple Factor Analysis combining the above mentioned abiotic and biotic variables in a functional modelling of the contaminated aquifer. The methodology was validated by analyzing two chlorinated ethenes-contaminated sites. Results from the first site showed that the full biochemical potential for ethene production was present in situ. However, redox potential was overall too high and locally manganese reduction out-competed chlorinated ethenes reduction, explaining the reasons for the local accumulation of DCE and VC to a lesser extent. The second contaminated aquifer was under bioremediation by successive cheese whey injections. Analysis demonstrated that cheese whey additions led to increasingly reduced redox conditions and that hampered reductive dechlorination was not due to competition with other anaerobic respiration processes. Complete reductive dechlorination to ethene was preferentially occurring under methanogenic conditions. DCE and VC accumulation was probably induced first

  13. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  14. STUDY OF THE VISCOSITY OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS THROUGH THE RAPID VISCOSITY ANALYZER (RVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura P. Alves

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine viscosity curves prepared from whey protein concentrates (WPCs by the rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA and determine the optimal heat treatment time in order to obtain the maximum viscosity solutions at this stage. The WPCs produced from whey samples initially subjected to thermal treatment and microfiltration presented composition compatible with the international standards, with a significant difference (p<0.05 for fat concentration. Viscographic profiles indicated that WPCs produced from microfiltered whey had higher viscosities than those subjected to heat treatment. In addition, 10 min was determined to be the optimal length of time for heat treatment in order to maximise WPCs viscosity. These results indicate that WPC production can be designed for different food applications. Finally, a rapid viscosity analyzer was demonstrated to be an appropriate tool to study the application of whey proteins in food systems.

  15. High-Temperature Viscosity Of Commercial Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R; See, Clem A; Lam, Oanh P; Minister, Kevin B

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity was measured for six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Viscosity data were obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900°C and 1550°C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa∙s to 750 Pa∙s. Arrhenius coefficients were calculated for individual glasses and linear models were applied to relate them to the mass fractions of 11 major components (SiO2, CaO, Na2O, Al2O3, B2O3, BaO, SrO, K2O, MgO, PbO, and ZrO2) and 12 minor components (Fe2O3, ZnO, Li2O, TiO2, CeO2, F, Sb2O3, Cr2O3, As2O3, MnO2, SO3, and Co3O4). The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100°C to 1550°C and viscosity range from 10 to 400 Pas.

  16. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments — A framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian, E-mail: jcr@geus.dk [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Auken, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bamberg, Charlotte A. [City of Aarhus (Denmark); Christensen, Britt S.B. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Clausen, Thomas [DHI, Hørsholm (Denmark); Dalgaard, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Effersø, Flemming [SkyTEM Aps, Beder (Denmark); Ernstsen, Vibeke [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Gertz, Flemming [Knowledge Center for Agriculture, Skejby (Denmark); Hansen, Anne Lausten [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); He, Xin [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Jacobsen, Brian H. [Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jensen, Karsten Høgh [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Koch, Julian [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Nilsson, Bertel [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Petersen, Christian [City of Odder (Denmark); De Schepper, Guillaume [Université Laval, Québec (Canada); Schamper, Cyril [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); and others

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  17. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments — A framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  18. Assessing the potential of utilisation and storage strategies for post-combustion CO2 emissions reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eStyring

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The emissions reduction potential of three carbon dioxide handling strategies for post-combustion capture are considered. These are carbon capture and sequestration/storage (CCS, enhanced hydrocarbon recovery (EHR and carbon dioxide utilization (CDU to produce synthetic oil. This is performed using common and comparable boundary conditions including net CO2 sequestered based on equivalent boundary conditions. This is achieved using a 'cradle to grave approach' where the final destination and fate of any product is considered. The input boundary is pure CO2 that has been produced using a post-combustion capture process as this is common between all processes. The output boundary is the emissions resulting from any product produced with the assumption that the majority of the oil will go to combustion processes. We also consider the 'cradle to gate' approach where the ultimate fate of the oil is not considered as this is a boundary condition often applied to EHR processes. Results show that while CCS can make an impact on CO2 emissions, CDU will have a comparable effect whilst generating income while EHR will ultimately increase net emissions. The global capacity for CDU is also compared against CCS using data based on current and planned CCS projects. Analysis shows that current CDU represent a greater volume of capture than CCS processes and that this gap is likely to remain well beyond 2020 which is the limit of the CCS projects in the database.

  19. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  20. Comparative assessment and essential analysis on new international GHG emission reduction proposals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Dongmei; Wang Can; Lv Xuedu; Huang Shanfeng

    2009-01-01

    Since Kyoto Protocol came into force on February 16,2005,the endeavor by international society to combat the climate change has stepped into a new milestone.The greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement mechanisms in Kyoto Protocol have served a remarkable functian but also been questioned during the practices of past three years about its environmental effectiveness.A lot of new international GHG emission reduction proposals are proposed from many new aspects,some of which especially impose pressure on developing countries.So it is of great importance to research on these new proposals in time for negotiation beyond Kyoto and institution of Chinese relevant climate polieies.As this paper focuses on the way of commitment distribution of mechanisms,the mechanisms here are categorized in one of two types:those distribute commitment based on countries and those based on sectors.Some of the typical mechanisms are selected to be analyzed comparatively,especially about their influence on developing countries.

  1. Tobacco alkaloids reduction by casings added/enzymatic hydrolysis treatments assessed through PLSR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shunshun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Song, Shiqing; Hayat, Khizar; Eric, Karangwa; Majeed, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Based on encouraged development of potential reduced-exposure products (PREPs) by the US Institute of Medicine, casings (glucose and peptides) added treatments (CAT) and enzymatic (protease and xylanase) hydrolysis treatments (EHT) were developed to study their effect on alkaloids reduction in tobacco and cigarette mainstream smoke (MS) and further investigate the correlation between sensory attributes and alkaloids. Results showed that the developed treatments reduced nicotine by 14.5% and 24.4% in tobacco and cigarette MS, respectively, indicating that both CAT and EHT are potentially effective for developing lower-risk cigarettes. Sensory and electronic nose analysis confirmed the significant influence of treatments on sensory and cigarette MS components. PLSR analysis demonstrated that tobacco alkaloids were positively correlated to the off-taste, irritation and impact attributes, and negatively correlated to the aroma and softness attributes. Additionally, nicotine and anabasine from tobacco leaves positively contributed to the impact attribute, while they negatively contributed to the aroma attribute (P<0.05). Meanwhile, most alkaloids in cigarette MS positively contributed to the impact and irritation attributes (P<0.05). Hence, this study paved a way to better understand the correlation between tobacco alkaloids and sensory attributes. PMID:26739812

  2. Incorporating HIV/AIDS Considerations into Vulnerability Assessments for Disaster Risk Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon van Riet

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper briefly highlights the link between HIV/AIDS and vulnerability, the latter being a focus point of DRR. In particular it investigates in which ways HIV/AIDS contributes to the vulnerability (for the purposes of this discussion defined as the susceptibility of households to the negative effects of certain natural hazards, brought on by the interplay between various political, economic, social and environmental factors of households. Secondly, the paper investigates the possible measurement of HIV/AIDS in general vulnerability assessments used for the purposes of DRR, by evaluating the merit of certain indicators often used to target humanitarian aid.

  3. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of seismic risk reduction options in oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated probabilistic methodology for cost-efficiency estimation of different sort of seismic risk management measures are introduced by adding Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) module to an integrated seismic risk assessment model. An oil refinery in Iran has been selected for case study and cost-efficiency of software and hardware mitigation measures are evaluated. The results have shown that: (1) software mitigation measures have more benefit than hardware ones, (2) considering indirect loss in CBA lead to more benefit-cost ratio and (3) although increase of discount ratio decreases the benefit-cost ratio, the arrangement of mitigation measures from benefit-cost viewpoint are constant. (authors)

  4. The influence of oxidative damage on viscosity of seminal fluid in infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Birsen; Onaran, Ilhan; Kiziler, Ali Riza; Alici, Bulent; Akyolcu, Mehmet Can

    2008-01-01

    Increased oxidative damage has been suggested to play an important role in the viscosity changes of blood. However, changes in levels of oxidative damage products in semen and their relationship to seminal fluid viscosity are unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate whether oxidative damage was associated with seminal plasma viscosity in infertile subjects. The levels of malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyls were measured in sperm and seminal plasma from 102 individuals, including 60 infertile patients. Seminal fluid viscosity and semen viscosity were studied by use of capillary viscometer and glass pipettes, respectively. Significantly higher levels of oxidative stress and damage markers were found in subfertile subjects compared with the control subjects. The seminal fluid viscosities of patients were found to be significantly higher, although all of the control and patient subjects had normal viscoelasticity when semen samples were assessed according to World Health Organization guidelines. From Pearson correlation analysis, there were significant positive correlations between seminal fluid viscosity and seminal malondialdehyde and carbonyl levels in infertile males (r = .676, P < .01; r = .276, P < .05, respectively). Our results suggest that increased oxidative damage might be a factor for hyperviscosity of seminal plasma in infertile males. PMID:17673435

  5. Emissions reduction potential from CO2 capture: A life-cycle assessment of a Brazilian coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an effective technology for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from large-scale fossil fuel use. Nonetheless, it is not yet commercially viable on a large scale, and its inclusion into countries' energy planning agendas depends on realistic assessments of its emission reduction benefits. The use of CCS leads to energy penalties resulting from direct consumption of additional energy, and results in indirect CO2 equivalent emissions outside plant boundaries, due to both energy consumption and leakages. Accounting for these emissions allows for an evaluation of the mitigation benefits of CCS. This study performs a life-cycle assessment (LCA), with and without CCS, for a coal-fired power plant located in Brazil. Findings show that when indirect emissions are taken into account, a plant which captures 90% of its CO2 will have its CO2 equivalent emissions capture potential, based on a global warming potential metric with a 100-year time horizon, reduced to 72%. The advantage of the use of carbon capture towards climate change mitigation is reduced mainly as a result of an increase in CH4 emissions, significant in the coal-mining stage, an effect which is only taken into account when a LCA is performed. - Highlights: • A life-cycle assessment for a coal-fired power plant was performed. • Two cases are compared, with and without CO2 capture. • 90% capture potential is reduced to 72% due to indirect emissions. • LCA brings out relative importance of CH4 emissions in coal mining stage. • Implications for emission reduction and climate change mitigation policies

  6. Risk Reduction through Use of External Technical Reviews, Technology Readiness Assessments and Technical Risk Ratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: - Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; - External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and - Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks. (authors)

  7. RISK REDUCTION THROUGH USE OF EXTERNAL TECHNICAL REVIEWS, TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNICAL RISK RATINGS - 9174

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. A large majority of these wastes and facilities are 'one-of-a-kind' and unique to DOE. Many of the programs to treat these wastes have been 'first-of-a-kind' and unprecedented in scope and complexity. This has meant that many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition these wastes were not yet developed or required significant re-engineering to be adapted for DOE-EM's needs. The DOE-EM program believes strongly in reducing the technical risk of its projects and has initiated several efforts to reduce those risks: (1) Technology Readiness Assessments to reduce the risks of deployment of new technologies; (2) External Technical Reviews as one of several steps to ensure the timely resolution of engineering and technology issues; and (3) Technical Risk Ratings as a means to monitor and communicate information about technical risks. This paper will present examples of how Technology Readiness Assessments, External Technical Reviews, and Technical Risk Ratings are being used by DOE-EM to reduce technical risks

  8. Methods Used in Internal Industry Clinical Trials to Assess Tobacco Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Vaughan W.; Kreslake, Jennifer M.; O’Connor, Richard J.; Cummings, K. Michael; Parascandola, Mark; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Shields, Peter G.; Connolly, Gregory N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Methods to assess reduced exposure products should include those which aid in determining likely patterns of human use and exposure. Tobacco industry clinical trial methods may provide insight into strategies to assess potential reduced exposure products (PREPs) for public health purposes. Internal tobacco industry documents detailing human clinical research with PREPs were examined to document major research strategies used and identify potentially fruitful methods not currently used in the mainstream arena. Methods Primary data were obtained from records of research conducted internally by tobacco companies and affiliated researchers, and included manuscript drafts, presentations, protocols, and instruments relating to internal clinical trials of human tobacco use and exposure. Results Tobacco industry clinical research has focused on reduced exposure products, most notably Premier, Accord and Eclipse. The most widely used strategy observed was switching studies, and details of study designs and protocols favored by the industry are described. Key measures include biomarkers of exposure (e.g. cotinine, CO and specific carcinogens), and acute health effects such as physical health and fitness. Conclusions Tobacco industry clinical research has used relatively standard switching study methods, but with a broad set of measures. Clinical switching studies have been conducted by the industry primarily to support existing claims or to develop new claims. Knowledge of prior industry activity can guide and inform future public health research efforts. While industry clinical trial methods are comparable to current mainstream methods, limited information about the validity of outcome measures used limit their viability for immediate adoption in mainstream science. PMID:19959673

  9. STABILITAS DAN VISKOSITAS PRODUK EMULSI Virgin Coconut Oil-MADU [The Stability and Viscosity of Virgin Coconut Oil-Honey Emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Feti Fatimah1)*; Johnly Rorong1); Sanusi Gugule2)

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop an alternative energy drink from VCO and honey. The objective of the study was to find out the relationship between VCO and honey concentration, viscosity and emulsion stability. The viscosity was measured by viscometer and the diameter of emulsion droplet was measured from microscopic images. The results showed that the increases of VCO and honey concentration corresponds to the increase of viscosity, and the reduction of emulsion droplet diameter sizes. F...

  10. Geodetic and geophysical results from a Taiwan airborne gravity survey: Data reduction and accuracy assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Hsiao, Yu-Shen; Shih, Hsuan-Chang; Yang, Ming; Chen, Kwo-Hwa; Forsberg, Rene; Olesen, Arne V.

    2007-04-01

    An airborne gravity survey was conducted over Taiwan using a LaCoste and Romberg (LCR) System II air-sea gravimeter with gravity and global positioning system (GPS) data sampled at 1 Hz. The aircraft trajectories were determined using a GPS network kinematic adjustment relative to eight GPS tracking stations. Long-wavelength errors in position are reduced when doing numerical differentiations for velocity and acceleration. A procedure for computing resolvable wavelength of error-free airborne gravimetry is derived. The accuracy requirements of position, velocity, and accelerations for a 1-mgal accuracy in gravity anomaly are derived. GPS will fulfill these requirements except for vertical acceleration. An iterative Gaussian filter is used to reduce errors in vertical acceleration. A compromising filter width for noise reduction and gravity detail is 150 s. The airborne gravity anomalies are compared with surface values, and large differences are found over high mountains where the gravity field is rough and surface data density is low. The root mean square (RMS) crossover differences before and after a bias-only adjustment are 4.92 and 2.88 mgal, the latter corresponding to a 2-mgal standard error in gravity anomaly. Repeatability analyses at two survey lines suggest that GPS is the dominating factor affecting the repeatability. Fourier transform and least-squares collocation are used for downward continuation, and the latter produces a better result. Two geoid models are computed, one using airborne and surface gravity data and the other using surface data only, and the former yields a better agreement with the GPS-derived geoidal heights. Bouguer anomalies derived from airborne gravity by a rigorous numerical integration reveal important tectonic features.

  11. Assessment of Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation policy integration in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli-Sihvola, K.; Väätäinen-Chimpuku, S.

    2015-12-01

    Integration of Disaster Risk Management (DRM) and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) policies, their implementation measures and the contribution of these to development has been gaining attention recently. Due to the shared objectives of CCA and particularly Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), a component of DRM, their integration provides many benefits. At the implementation level, DRR and CCA are usually integrated. Policy integration, however, is often lacking. This study presents a novel analysis of the policy integration of DRR and CCA by 1) suggesting a definition for their integration at a general and further at horizontal and vertical levels, 2) using an analysis framework for policy integration cycle, which separates the policy formulation and implementation processes, and 3) applying these to a case study in Zambia. Moreover, the study identifies the key gaps in the integration process, obtains an understanding of identified key factors for creating an enabling environment for the integration, and provides recommendations for further progress. The study is based on a document analysis of the relevant DRM, climate change (CC), agriculture, forestry, water management and meteorology policy documents and Acts, and 21 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders. Horizontal integration has occurred both ways, as the revised DRM policy draft has incorporated CCA, and the new CC policy draft has incorporated DRR. This is not necessarily an optimal strategy and unless carefully implemented, it may create pressure on institutional structures and duplication of efforts in the implementation. Much less vertical integration takes place, and where it does, no guidance on how potential goal conflicts with sectorial and development objectives ought to be handled. The objectives of the instruments show convergence. At the programme stage, the measures are fully integrated as they can be classified as robust CCA measures, providing benefits in the current and future

  12. INTEGRATION OF THE MODELS OF ANNAGNPS AND REMM TO ASSESS RIPARIAN BUFFER SYSTEM FOR SEDIMENT REDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongping YUAN; Ronald BINGNER; Randall WILLIAMS; Richard LOWRANCE; David BOSCH; Joe SHERIDAN

    2007-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Annualized Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution model (AnnAGNPS) is used to help evaluate a watershed response to agricultural management practices to control water quality. However, AnnAGNPS version 3.5 does not contain features to estimate the effect of a riparian buffer (RB) system on water quality. The Riparian Ecosystem Management Model (REMM) is used to simulate the impact of riparian buffer systems on water quality. However, frequently the lack of measured upland loadings that are required by REMM simulation limits the application of REMM. To address this data gap, a study was conducted to integrate AnnAGNPS with REMM for RB system simulation. AnnAGNPS was used to simulate water and sediment loadings from an upland field into a three-zone RB system at the Gibbs Farm located in the Georgia coastal plain. These AnnAGNPS outputs were used as the inputs to REMM. REMM was used to simulate water and sediment movement along the riparian buffers. The AnnAGNPS simulated amount of annual runoff at the edge of the field was close to observed amounts (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.92). It is believed that a substantial portion of sand was removed from the runoff one meter into the grass buffer where the samplers were located; therefore, sand was excluded from the AnnAGNPS simulation for comparison with observed sediment. Excluding sand, the AnnAGNPS predicted amount of annual sediment matches the observed amount fairly well (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.46). In addition, based on evaluating the percent reduction of sediment at each zonal interface, the AnnAGNPS/REMM model well simulated the function of the RB system to reduce sediment.

  13. Assessment of GHG emission reduction pathways in a society without carbon capture and nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every possible technology is pursued in order to achieve strict radiative forcing targets. Nuclear energy and Carbon Capture Storage (CCS) are regarded as important mitigation options. However, harsh criticisms have been directed at Japanese nuclear energy policy after the Fukushima nuclear accident, and the Japanese government will be required to re-evaluate not only its energy policy, but also the GHG reduction target itself. Like nuclear energy, CCS might not be regarded as a suitable option for GHG mitigation because its long-term safety has not been revealed. In this paper we analyze the energy policy response to an absence of nuclear energy and CCS, especially focusing on Japan, China and India. We find that the appropriate energy strategies against the unproven technologies differ between regions due to the uneven pre-existing nuclear energy, CCS potential and renewable energy potential, and the resource endowments and the levels of economic development. We also find that the strict mitigation target can be achieved even if nuclear energy and CCS are not available. In such a case, however, significant enhancement of renewable energy is needed, as well as particular fossil fuel alternatives based on region-specific availabilities and costs. - Highlights: ► We used a recursive-dynamic CGE model in which many advanced technologies are considered. ► We simulated radiative forcing targets assuming no availability of nuclear and CCS. ► The appropriate energy strategies against the unproven technologies differ between regions. ► The significant enhancement of renewable energy is needed, as well as particular fossil fuel alternatives.

  14. Assessing the impact of primary measures for NOx reduction on the thermal power plant steam boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European normatives prescribe content of 200 mg/Nm3 NOx for pulverized coal combusting power plants. In order to reduce content of NOx in Serbian thermal power plant (TPP) 'Kostolac B' it's necessary to implement particular measures until 2016. The mathematical model of lignite combustion in the steam boiler furnace is defined and applied to analyze the possibility of implementing certain primary measures for reducing nitrogen oxides and their effects on the steam boiler operation. This model includes processes in the coal-fired furnace and defines radiating reactive two-phase turbulent flow. The model of turbulent flow also contains sub-model of fuel and thermal NOx formation and destruction. This complex mathematical model is related to thermal and aerodynamic calculations of the steam boiler within a unified calculation system in order to analyze the steam boiler overall work. This system provides calculations with a number of influential parameters. The steam boiler calculations for unit 1 (350 MWe) of TPP 'Kostolac B' are implemented for existing and modified combustion system in order to achieve effective, reliable and ecological facility work. The paper presents the influence analysis of large number of parameters on the steam boiler operation with an accepted concept of primary measures. Presented system of calculations is verified against measurements in TPP 'Kostolac B'. - Highlights: • Modern steam boilers need to operate according to ecological standards. • Possibility of applying some of the primary measures of NOx reduction. • Conventional calculations have no possibility to estimate sub-stoichiometric combustion. • Develop a new method of connecting the calculations. • Analysis shows the most favorable operation boiler regime (efficiency and ecology)

  15. On the similarity of variable viscosity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voivenel, L.; Danaila, L.; Varea, E.; Renou, B.; Cazalens, M.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent mixing is ubiquitous in both nature and industrial applications. Most of them concern different fluids, therefore with variable physical properties (density and/or viscosity). The focus here is on variable viscosity flows and mixing, involving density-matched fluids. The issue is whether or not these flows may be self-similar, or self-preserving. The importance of this question stands on the predictability of these flows; self-similar dynamical systems are easier tractable from an analytical viewpoint. More specifically, self-similar analysis is applied to the scale-by-scale energy transport equations, which represent the transport of energy at each scale and each point of the flow. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are developed for inhomogeneous and anisotropic flows, in which the viscosity varies as a result of heterogeneous mixture or temperature variations. Additional terms are highlighted, accounting for the viscosity gradients, or fluctuations. These terms are present at both small and large scales, thus rectifying the common belief that viscosity is a small-scale quantity. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are then adapted for the particular case of a round jet evolving in a more viscous host fluid. It is further shown that the condition of self-preservation is not necessarily satisfied in variable-viscosity jets. Indeed, the jet momentum conservation, as well as the constancy of the Reynolds number in the central region of the jet, cannot be satisfied simultaneously. This points to the necessity of considering less stringent conditions (with respect to classical, single-fluid jets) when analytically tackling these flows and reinforces the idea that viscosity variations must be accounted for when modelling these flows.

  16. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  17. A probabilistic risk assessment of Mound's Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A probabilistic risk assessment was made on the TERF process in order to establish its expected degree of reliability and to locate places in the system which could be improved by revision of the equipment or the operating procedures. The equipment design of the TERF was evaluated using a fault tree study. The probability of human failures was then evaluated by adding their probabilistic effects to the fault tree and then reevaluating it. It was found that (1) the TERF system is expected to be very reliable, with an annual expected downtime of only 2.35 hours, (2) the expected downtime comes almost entirely from process equipment failure rather than human errors, and (3) that certain equipment changes could be made that increased the system reliability. These equipment changes included: (1) making provision for blocking off certain automatic control values with more reliable manual valves to facilitate their repair and (2) making the two sources of power to the TERF totally independent of each other. 6 refs

  18. Assessing urban potential flooding risk and identifying effective risk-reduction measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherqui, Frédéric; Belmeziti, Ali; Granger, Damien; Sourdril, Antoine; Le Gauffre, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    Flood protection is one of the traditional functions of any drainage system, and it remains a major issue in many cities because of economic and health impact. Heavy rain flooding has been well studied and existing simulation software can be used to predict and improve level of protection. However, simulating minor flooding remains highly complex, due to the numerous possible causes related to operational deficiencies or negligent behaviour. According to the literature, causes of blockages vary widely from one case to another: it is impossible to provide utility managers with effective recommendations on how to improve the level of protection. It is therefore vital to analyse each context in order to define an appropriate strategy. Here we propose a method to represent and assess the flooding risk, using GIS and data gathered during operation and maintenance. Our method also identifies potential management responses. The approach proposed aims to provide decision makers with clear and comprehensible information. Our method has been successfully applied to the Urban Community of Bordeaux (France) on 4895 interventions related to flooding recorded during the 2009-2011 period. Results have shown the relative importance of different issues, such as human behaviour (grease, etc.) or operational deficiencies (roots, etc.), and lead to identify corrective and proactive. This study also confirms that blockages are not always directly due to the network itself and its deterioration. Many causes depend on environmental and operating conditions on the network and often require collaboration between municipal departments in charge of roads, green spaces, etc. PMID:25682359

  19. Making poverty reduction irreversible: development implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Steve

    2006-07-15

    Development is achieved through growing and managing the 'portfolio of assets' available to a household or a nation. Soils, water, plants and animals often make up the biggest chunk of poor people's assets. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) has taken stock of these environmental assets worldwide. It reveals that fully sixty percent are being degraded – with poor people disproportionately suffering the consequences such as shortage of clean water, floods and droughts. Yet the MA also identified instances of effective asset management – proven 'Response Options' that deserve scaling up. This briefing note identifies the major developmental implications of the MA, and calls for action in four areas: Information – getting information on environmental assets and hazards to the heart of development planning; Institutional reform – encouraging ecosystem management by poor people and local organisations, and enabling better oversight by national authorities; International cooperation – increasing aid and benchmarking it against just how far off-track we are on MDG7 (the 'environmental sustainability' goal); Investment vehicles and budgets – to support long-term environmental management in key environmentally-sensitive sectors. Action on these is so urgently required that we can no longer avoid asking what it will cost. We propose 'Millennium Ecosystem Budgets', globally and nationally.

  20. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    China’s annual cement production (i.e., 1,868 Mt) in 2010 accounted for nearly half of the world’s annual cement production in the same year. We identified and analyzed 23 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the cement industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model, the cumulative cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Chinese cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh, and the total technical electricity saving potential is 279 TWh. The CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 144 Mt CO2 and the CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 161 Mt CO2. The fuel CSC model for the cement industry suggests cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 4,326 PJ which is equivalent to the total technical potential with associated CO2 emission reductions of 406 Mt CO2. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. We also developed a scenario in which instead of only implementing the international technologies in 2010-2030, we implement both international and Chinese domestic technologies during the analysis period and calculate the saving and cost of conserved energy accordingly. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Chinese cement industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  1. The Effects of Anisotropic Viscosity on Turbulence and Heat Transport in the Intracluster Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Parrish, Ian J; Quataert, Eliot; Sharma, Prateek

    2012-01-01

    In the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters, heat and momentum are transported almost entirely along (but not across) magnetic field lines. We perform the first fully self-consistent Braginskii-MHD simulations of galaxy clusters including both of these effects. Specifically, we perform local and global simulations of the magnetothermal instability (MTI) and the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) and assess the effects of viscosity on their saturation and astrophysical implications. We find that viscosity has only a modest effect on the saturation of the MTI. As in previous calculations, we find that the MTI can generate nearly sonic turbulent velocities in the outer parts of galaxy clusters, although viscosity somewhat suppresses the magnetic field amplification. At smaller radii in cool-core clusters, viscosity can decrease the linear growth rates of the HBI. However, it has less of an effect on the HBI's nonlinear saturation, in part because three-dimensional interchange motions (magnetic f...

  2. The importance of health co-benefits in macroeconomic assessments of UK Greenhouse Gas emission reduction strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Keogh-Brown, Marcus R.; Smith, Richard D.;

    2013-01-01

    We employ a single-country dynamically-recursive Computable General Equilibrium model to make health-focussed macroeconomic assessments of three contingent UK Greenhouse Gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, designed to achieve 2030 emission targets as suggested by the UK Committee on Climate Change...... are included; our household energy efficiency strategy is likely to breakeven only over the long term after the investment programme has ceased (beyond our 20 year time horizon). We conclude that UK policy makers will, most likely, have to adopt elements which involve initial net societal costs in order...... to achieve future emission targets and longer-term benefits from GHG reduction. Cost-effectiveness of GHG strategies is likely to require technological mitigation interventions and/or demand-constraining interventions with important health co-benefits and other efficiency-enhancing policies that promote...

  3. Assessing 'Dangerous Climate Change': Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Demotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Hearty, Paul J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; Rockstrum, Johan; Rohling, Eelco J.; Sachs, Jeffrey; Smith, Pete; Steffen, Conrad; VanSusteren, Lise; VonShuckmann, Karina; Zachos, James C.

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of approx.500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of approx.1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2 C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4 C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  4. Co-benefits from CO{sub 2}-emission reduction measurements in Shanxi, China - a first assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunan, Kristin; Fang, Jinghua; Li, Guanghai; Seip, Hans Martin; Vennemo, Haakon

    2000-05-01

    The largest local and regional air pollution problems are usually found in countries without emission reduction obligations in the Kyoto protocol. Thus, in many Chinese cities the concentrations of SO{sub 2} and particulates in the air by far exceed the WHO air quality guidelines. This report analyses a set of CO{sub 2}-reducing abatement options related to coal consumption in Shanxi, China. The costs and potential for abatement are investigated for different economic sectors and the entailed emission reductions are estimated in terms of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and particles. The present population-weighted exposure level for particles and SO{sub 2} is estimated and the reduced population exposure resulting from the abatement measures is assessed. Exposure-response functions from Chinese and international epidemiology are used to indicate the health effects of applying the measures. An economic evaluation of the reduced health effect is made by applying unit prices of health impacts based on the damage cost approach. The present agricultural crop loss due to enhanced levels of surface ozone are estimated. It is found that the CO{sub 2}-reducing abatement options in Shanxi are profitable in a socioeconomic sense. But there is a certain lack of synergy between the options with respect to their effectiveness in meeting local, regional and global environmental concerns.

  5. Assessing “Dangerous Climate Change”: Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Hearty, Paul J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; Rockstrom, Johan; Rohling, Eelco J.; Sachs, Jeffrey; Smith, Pete; Steffen, Konrad; Van Susteren, Lise; von Schuckmann, Karina; Zachos, James C.

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth’s measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today’s young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur “slow” feedbacks and eventual warming of 3–4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth’s energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels. PMID:24312568

  6. Assessing "dangerous climate change": required reduction of carbon emissions to protect young people, future generations and nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hansen

    Full Text Available We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  7. Effects of a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage on blood viscosity after dehydration in healthy adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Cui-qing; CHEN Yan-bo; CHEN Zhi-min; ZHANG Lan-tao

    2010-01-01

    Background The consumption of carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages (CEs) has been known to be more effective than plain water for recovery from dehydration. This phenomenon suggests that the ingestion of CEs after dehydration is better than water for maintaining body fluid and plasma volume, and for the recovery from hemoconcentration and high blood viscosity as well. High blood viscosity causes infarction and other cardiovascular events. In this study, CE was compared with water and tea for the ability to reduce increased blood viscosity after dehydration.Methods A crossover random control study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of three beverages for rehydration and decreasing of blood viscosity. Following exercise-induced dehydration of 2.2% of body weight in a permanent warm environment, 10 male subjects rested in a thermoneutral environment for 3 hours (rehydration period,REP). The subjects ingested test beverages equal to their body weight loss during the first 20 minutes in REP. Blood and urine samples were obtained throughout the experiments to assess the rehydration effect.rate was significantly greater for CE ((77.0+3.9)%) than water ((61.2±3.4)%) and tea ((60.5±3.7)%) for 3 hours of rest in REP.Conclusions The recovery from high blood viscosity induced by dehydration was higher with CE consumption than with water or tea. These results suggest that CE is useful for normalizing increased blood viscosity due to exercise-induced dehydration.

  8. Viscosity of confined inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfang; Todd, B D; Travis, Karl P

    2004-12-01

    We use the nonlocal linear hydrodynamic constitutive model, proposed by Evans and Morriss [Statistical Mechanics of Nonequilibrium Liquids (Academic, London, 1990)], for computing an effective spatially dependent shear viscosity of inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids. The model is applied to a simple atomic fluid undergoing planar Poiseuille flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. We compare the spatially dependent viscosity with a local generalization of Newton's law of viscosity and the Navier-Stokes viscosity, both of which are known to suffer extreme inaccuracies for highly inhomogeneous systems. The nonlocal constitutive model calculates effective position dependent viscosities that are free from the notorious singularities experienced by applying the commonly used local constitutive model. It is simple, general, and has widespread applicability in nanofluidics where experimental measurement of position dependent transport coefficients is currently inaccessible. In principle the method can be used to predict approximate flow profiles of any arbitrary inhomogeneous system. We demonstrate this by predicting the flow profile for a simple fluid undergoing planar Couette flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. PMID:15549963

  9. High temperature viscosity measurement system and viscosity of a common dielectric liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncer, Enis

    2013-01-01

    A device to measure viscosity of dielectric oils was developed. The device is an inset to an autoclave system where the temperature and the pressure could be controlled. The device is capable of measuring viscosities up to 400C and 5000psi, which are the limits of our autoclave at the moment.

  10. Viscosity correlations for Gulf of Mexico crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrosky, G.E. Jr.; Farshad, F.F. [Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In 1984, Sutton and Farshad evaluated the accuracy of several published viscosity correlations for application in the Gulf of Mexico. A total of 31 different crude oil systems from the Louisiana and Texas gulf coast were used in their analysis. The errors encountered were rather high for dead and saturated oil viscosity. New empirical viscosity correlations for estimating dead oil, saturated oil and undersaturated oil viscosities have been developed as a function of commonly available field data. Results show that these viscosities can be predicted with average absolute errors ranging from 2.91% for undersaturated oil viscosity to 14.47% for saturated oil viscosity.

  11. Assessing the effort sharing for greenhouse gas emission reductions in ambitious global climate scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekholm, T.; Soimakallio, S.; Hoehne, N.; Moltmann, S.; Syri, S.

    2008-11-15

    To reinforce the long-term commitment to climate change mitigation, the post-2012 climate policy framework is aimed to be completed by 2009. The new agreement needs to include a wider participation of parties, and therefore needs to address the effort sharing of countries. The mitigation capabilities and the responsibilities of countries do however vary significantly. This can, in principle, be overcome with a cap-and-trade system, with which the question of equity is addressed trough the allocation of emission allowances. A number of effort sharing schemes have been proposed. Effort sharing however suffers from a fundamental trade-off between detail and transparency on how the emission allocations are calculated. This study addresses this problem by comparing and combining the results from a transparent but simplified effort sharing model EVOC, and a detailed and due to its complexity seemingly non-transparent ETSAP-TIAM energy system model. The aim of the study is to evaluate the goodness of the initial effort sharing, particularly in terms of mitigation costs experienced by different regions in the scenarios. Based on the long-term energy-climate scenarios crafted with the TIAM model, we assess the resulting consequences in emission profiles and the energy system, concentrating especially on regional mitigation costs and emission trading. Two cases of market failures in emission trading are also considered. Finally we compare the mitigation potentials between the two models and estimate the effect of EVOC recalibration on the national emission allowances. The results of the study underline particularly the importance of detailed and reliable assumptions for the mitigation potentials of different countries in the effort sharing process. (orig.)

  12. Hyperventilation-induced reduction in cerebral blood flow: Assessment by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of positron emission tomography (PET) has been well documented as a relatively noninvasive method of measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF), both globally and regionally. The utility of readily detecting alterations in CBF is apparent, particularly when applied to the evaluation of therapeutic interventions thought to influence CBF. We report the effects of hypocapnia, an experimental condition of known cerebral vasoconstriction, in ten normal volunteers. Subjects had brain blood flow evaluated utilizing H215O as the positron emitter before and after approximately five minutes of hyperventilation. Baseline CBF was measured as a mean +/- SD of 61.2 +/- 16.3 mL/min/100 g of tissue. Mean baseline arterial blood gas values were PaO2 107.4 +/- 14 mm Hg, PaCO2 37.7 +/- 0.89 mm Hg, and pH 7.39 (calculated from mean [H+]). Post hyperventilation, global CBF was measured as 31.1 +/- 10.8 mL/min/100 g. Mean arterial blood gas values were PaO2 141.7 +/- 21 mm Hg, PaCO2 19.7 +/- 5 mm Hg, and pH 7.63 (calculated from mean [H+]). CBF decreased by a mean of 49.5 +/- 11 percent. Data analysis using the Student's t-test showed a significant change over baseline in PaCO2 (p less than 0.001) and CBF (p less than 0.001), in the hyperventilated state. Correlations were noted between the decrease in CBF and change in PaCO2 (r = 0.81) as well as between hyperventilation PaCO2 and the change in CBF (r = 0.97). We conclude that, as measured by PET, CBF decreases significantly during a state of artificial hyperventilation to a degree consistent with results seen using other methods. PET appears to be a valuable tool in the assessment of interventions that could influence CBF

  13. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  14. Correlating the structure and in vitro digestion viscosities of different pectin fibers to in vivo human satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Kirstyn; Wright, Amanda J; Goff, H Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a simulated in vitro digestion on the viscosity of orange juice with added high methoxyl (HM), low methoxyl (LM), and low methoxyl amidated (LMA) pectins were examined in conjunction with a human satiety study with healthy men (n=10) and women (n=15). Orange juice solutions were formulated to be either low (0.039±0.007 Pa s) or high viscosity (0.14±0.035 Pa s). The apparent viscosities after an in vitro digestion simulating the gastric and small intestinal phases in the presence of hydrolytic enzymes and bile salts were recorded at 10 and 50 s⁻¹. The viscosity induced by LM pectin increased considerably after the gastric phase whereas samples with all pectin types showed considerable reductions in viscosity, compared to initial apparent viscosity, after the small intestinal phase. For satiety testing, the orange juice solutions were consumed with a standardized breakfast meal after a 12 h overnight fast. Self-reported visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements of Hunger, Fullness, Satisfaction and Prospective Food Intake were obtained at fasting, after consumption of the breakfast and for the subsequent 3 h. The LM low and high viscosity pectin beverages were associated with the greatest effects on subjective ratings of satiety. The HM low and high viscosity pectin beverages had lower but significant effects on satiety, while LMA pectin had no effect. There was not a strong correlation between apparent viscosity of in vitro digested beverages and in vivo satiety scores. Thus, in this study, fiber-induced satiety could not be fully explained by digestate viscosity alone although gastric-phase viscosity may have played a significant role. PMID:25336324

  15. Assessment of the potential impact of a reminder system on the reduction of diagnostic errors: a quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Paul M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized decision support systems (DSS have mainly focused on improving clinicians' diagnostic accuracy in unusual and challenging cases. However, since diagnostic omission errors may predominantly result from incomplete workup in routine clinical practice, the provision of appropriate patient- and context-specific reminders may result in greater impact on patient safety. In this experimental study, a mix of easy and difficult simulated cases were used to assess the impact of a novel diagnostic reminder system (ISABEL on the quality of clinical decisions made by various grades of clinicians during acute assessment. Methods Subjects of different grades (consultants, registrars, senior house officers and medical students, assessed a balanced set of 24 simulated cases on a trial website. Subjects recorded their clinical decisions for the cases (differential diagnosis, test-ordering and treatment, before and after system consultation. A panel of two pediatric consultants independently provided gold standard responses for each case, against which subjects' quality of decisions was measured. The primary outcome measure was change in the count of diagnostic errors of omission (DEO. A more sensitive assessment of the system's impact was achieved using specific quality scores; additional consultation time resulting from DSS use was also calculated. Results 76 subjects (18 consultants, 24 registrars, 19 senior house officers and 15 students completed a total of 751 case episodes. The mean count of DEO fell from 5.5 to 5.0 across all subjects (repeated measures ANOVA, p Conclusion The provision of patient- and context-specific reminders has the potential to reduce diagnostic omissions across all subject grades for a range of cases. This study suggests a promising role for the use of future reminder-based DSS in the reduction of diagnostic error.

  16. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity reducing process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuhong, Huang; Willats, William George Tycho; Lange, Lene;

    2015-01-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during...... the viscosity reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP), which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta) and Canna edulis Ker....... The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-D-galactan and 1,5-α-L-arabinan....

  17. Trend methods for the assessment of effectiveness of reduction measures in the water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, S.; Kuhbier, P. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Statistik und Oekonometrie

    2001-11-01

    Riverine inputs are highly depending substance-specifically on flow rate and other climatic factors. In order to prevent that climatic influences deteriorate the trend detectability, an appropriate adjustment of the measurement data is necessary. Subject of the research project is therefore a concept for the adjustment and trend analysis of these input data. The basic concept for adjustment and trend analysis of riverine inputs is as follows: After providing monthly or biweekly data, monthly or biweekly adjusted loads are calculated with an adjustment procedure based on a dynamically specified concentration-flow function. Then the annual adjusted load is obtained by averaging the monthly or biweekly adjusted data. In the next step a trend analysis of the annual adjusted load is performed, using the LOESS smoother or the test of Mann-Kendall. Finally a power analysis is performed in order to assess the trend sensitivity of the method. Nine adjustment methods were tested at seven parameters (NO{sub 3}-N, NH{sub 4}-N, P{sub total}, PO{sub 4}-P, Cd, Pb and suspended matter) measured biweekly in the Rhine River (Lobith) and monthly in the Ems River (Herbrum). (orig.) [German] Flussfrachten sind in hohem Masse - je nach Substanz - von der Durchflussrate und anderen klimatischen Faktoren abhaengig, und um zu verhindern, dass klimatische Einfluesse die Nachweisbarkeit von zeitlichen Trends in diesen Eintragsdaten verschlechtern, ist eine Adjustierung der Messdaten erforderlich. Gegenstand des Vorhabens ist daher ein Konzept fuer die Adjustierung und Trendanalyse dieser Eintragsdaten. Das Konzept ist wie folgt strukturiert: Auf der Basis monatlicher oder vierzehntaegiger Messdaten werden monatliche bzw. vierzehntaegige adjustierte Frachten unter Verwendung einer dynamisch angepassten Konzentrations-Durchfluss-Funktion berechnet. Die adjustierte Jahresfracht ergibt sich dann mittels Durchschnittsbildung aus den monatlichen bzw. vierzehntaegigen adjustierten Frachten. Auf

  18. The Friction Theory for Viscosity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    In this work the one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) general models have been extended to the viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. It is demonstrated that these simple models, which take advantage of the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of cubic equations of state...... such as the SRK, PR and PRSV, can provide accurate viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. In the case of light reservoir oils, whose properties are close to those of normal alkanes, the one-parameter f-theory general models can predict the viscosity of these fluids with good accuracy. Yet...... below the saturation pressure. In addition, a tuned f-theory general model delivers accurate modeling of different kinds of light and heavy oils. Thus, the simplicity and stability of the f-theory general models make them a powerful tool for applications such as reservoir simulations, between others. (C...

  19. Hall viscosity from effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    For two-dimensional non-dissipative fluids with broken parity, we show via effective field theory methods that the infrared dynamics generically exhibit Hall viscosity--a conservative form of viscosity compatible with two-dimensional isotropy. The equality between the Hall viscosity coefficient and the ground state's intrinsic angular momentum density follows straightforwardly from their descending from the same Lagrangian term of the low-energy effective action. We show that for such fluids sound waves are not purely longitudinal, but acquire an elliptical polarization, with transverse-to-longitudinal aspect ratio proportional to frequency. Our analysis is fully relativistic, thus providing a natural description of (2+1) dimensional relativistic fluids with broken parity.

  20. Viscosity jump in Earth's mid-mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Maxwell L; Lekić, Vedran; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-12-11

    The viscosity structure of Earth's deep mantle affects the thermal evolution of Earth, the ascent of mantle plumes, settling of subducted oceanic lithosphere, and the mixing of compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Based on a reanalysis of the long-wavelength nonhydrostatic geoid, we infer viscous layering of the mantle using a method that allows us to avoid a priori assumptions about its variation with depth. We detect an increase in viscosity at 800- to 1200-kilometers depth, far greater than the depth of the mineral phase transformations that define the mantle transition zone. The viscosity increase is coincident in depth with regions where seismic tomography has imaged slab stagnation, plume deflection, and changes in large-scale structure and offers a simple explanation of these phenomena. PMID:26659053

  1. Viscosity of a dusty plasma liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of our experimental study of the flow of a dusty plasma liquid produced by macroparticles in an argon plasma. The dependences of shear viscosity for such a liquid on the magnitude of the external force inducing the dusty plasma liquid flow and on the plasma-generating gas pressure are analyzed. We have established that the viscosity of a dusty plasma medium decreases with increasing shear stress in it, while the viscosity of such a liquid increases with buffer gas pressure. The flow of a dusty plasma liquid under the action of an external force has been found to resemble the plastic deformation of a Bingham body. We suggest that the formation of crystal-like dusty plasma clusters in a 'liquid' phase can be responsible for the non-Newtonian behavior of the dusty plasma liquid flow

  2. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  3. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  4. Orbitally Shaken Bioreactors - Viscosity effects on flow characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Ducci, A.; Weheliye, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Phase resolved PIV measurements were carried out to assess the flow dynamics occurring in orbitally shaken bioreactors of cylindrical geometry when working fluids of increasing viscosity are considered. Study of the phase-resolved flow characteristics allowed to built a Re-Fr map, where four quadrants associated to di fferent flow regimes are identifi ed: in-phase toroidal vortex (low Fr, high Re), out-of-phase precessional vortex (high Fr, high Re), in-phase single vortex (low Fr, low Re), o...

  5. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame.

  6. Entropy viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    A new class of high-order numerical methods for approximating nonlinear conservation laws is described (entropy viscosity method). The novelty is that a nonlinear viscosity based on the local size of an entropy production is added to the numerical discretization at hand. This new approach does not use any flux or slope limiters, applies to equations or systems supplemented with one or more entropy inequalities and does not depend on the mesh type and polynomial approximation. Various benchmark problems are solved with finite elements, spectral elements and Fourier series to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Rare Gas Viscosities: A Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Arthur M.

    2002-02-01

    The viscosities, h, of the rare gases and SF6 are determined in a physical chemistry laboratory experiment using the evacuation method, which is based on Poiseuille's equation. Students become aware that h does not vary monotonically with row number (or atomic mass) and confirm this behavior on the basis of the kinetic theory expression for h. They find that the collision diameters of the gases, s, which are obtained from h values, increase monotonically with molar mass, as expected. Students can show that values of s obtained from gas viscosities agree reasonably well with ab initio calculations of atomic (molecular) diameters using Gaussian 98W.

  8. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics. (orig.)

  9. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides

  10. Shear viscosity of a hadronic gas mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Itakura, Kazunori; Morimatsu, Osamu; Otomo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    We discuss in detail the shear viscosity coefficient eta and the viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s of a hadronic gas comprised of pions and nucleons. In particular, we study the effects of baryon chemical potential on eta and eta/s. We solve the relativistic quantum Boltzmann equations with binary collisions (pi pi, pi N, and NN) for a state slightly deviated from thermal equilibrium at temperature T and baryon chemical potential mu. The use of phenomenological amplitudes in the collis...

  11. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, A. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Lambiase, G. [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica E.R. Caianiello, Fisciano (Italy); INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics. (orig.)

  12. Combining IPPC and emission trading: An assessment of energy efficiency and CO2 reduction potentials in the Austrian paper industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of an innovative project partnership E.V.A. - the Austrian Energy Agency accompanied the Austrian paper industry for the last 2.5 years in developing a branch specific climate change strategy. Within the scope of this project an assessment of the energy efficiency status of the branch was carried out as well as an evaluation of still realisable energy savings and CO2 reduction potentials. The paper presents the methodology applied, which combines a top down approach (benchmarking and best practice) with a bottom up approach (on-site interviews and energy audits), supported by a huge data collection process. Within the benchmarking process all Austrian paper industry installations affected by the EU emission trading directive were benchmarked against their respective IPPC/BAT values. Furthermore an extensive list of best practice examples derived from existing or ongoing studies was compared with the energy efficiency measures already carried out by the companies ('early actions'). These theory-oriented findings were complemented by several on-site interviews with the respective energy managers as well as by detailed energy audits carried out by a consulting company, covering in total more than 80% of the Austrian paper industry's CO2 emissions. The paper concludes with the main results of the project, presenting the pros and cons of working with IPPC documents and BAT values in terms of energy efficiency assessments. Recommendations are presented on how to improve the allocation exercise for the next emission trading period from 2008 to 2012

  13. The pendulum test as a tool to evaluate passive knee stiffness and viscosity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinci Maria

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pendulum test of Wartenberg is a technique commonly used to measure passive knee motion with the aim to assess spasticity. We used this test to evaluate changes of the knee angular displacement, passive stiffness and viscosity in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Stiffness and viscosity represent passive resistances to joint motion associated with the structural properties of the joint tissue and of the muscular-tendon complex. Stiffness can be considered an intrinsic property of the tissues to resist deformation, while viscosity is related to cohesive forces between adjacent layers of tissues. Both parameters may influence the joint range of motion affecting angular displacement. Methods Nine women with rheumatoid arthritis were compared with a group of healthy women. With the subject half-lying, the relaxed knee was dropped from near-full extension and the characteristics of the ensuring damped unsustained knee oscillation evaluated. The kinematics of leg oscillations was recorded using ultrasonic markers (Zebris CMS HS 10 and the kinetic data were calculated from kinematic and anthropometric measures. Results Knee stiffness significantly increased (p 2 = 0.68 and first flexion (R2 = 0.78. Using a multivariate regression, we found that increasing stiffness was the main factor for the reduction of flexion and extension motions. Conclusion We showed that the Wartenberg test can be considered a practical tool to measure mechanical changes of knee caused by rheumatoid arthritis. This novel application of Wartenberg test could be useful to follow up the effects of pharmacological and rehabilitative interventions in this disease.

  14. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William G; Lange, Lene; Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Salmeán, Armando A; Pedersen, Henriette L; Busk, Peter Kamp; Zhao, Hai

    2016-03-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-d-galactan and 1,5-α-l-arabinan. PMID:25757626

  15. SOME ASPECTS OF THE REACTIVITY OF PULP INTENDED FOR HIGH-VISCOSITY VISCOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ostberg,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for this study was to reduce the consumption of C2S when preparing high-viscosity viscose by pre-treating two softwood pulps with enzymes prior to the viscose stages. Reactivity was evaluated in two ways, Fock´s test of the pulp and the gamma number of the viscose solution prior to regeneration. Whilst the reactivity of a pulp that had been subjected to enzyme pretreatment increased according to Fock´s test, it did not increase according to the gamma number. This unexpected difference between the two reactivity tests was investigated. It was concluded that Fock´s test measures the extent to which C2S reacts with a pulp sample during a standardized test, whereas the gamma number measures the resulting degree of xanthate substitution on the cellulose backbone. The gamma number was judged to be the more relevant of the two tests, since it reflects the dissolution ability of a pulp in the viscose preparation. A higher gamma number also means that the coagulation time in the spinning process is prolonged; this is beneficial, as it can be used to increase the tenacity of the viscose fibres. Measuring the reactivity according to Fock´s test, on the contrary, provides more dubious results, as the test has no undisputed correlation to the viscose preparation process.

  16. The pathogen reduction treatment of platelets with S-59 HCl (Amotosalen) plus ultraviolet A light: genotoxicity profile and hazard assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Raymond R; Gatehouse, David; Kirkland, David; Speit, Günter

    2007-06-15

    Despite restrictive donor criteria and screening procedures, infections resulting from the transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelet products continue to occur. Pathogen reduction technologies targeting nucleic acids have been developed. However, concerns about the safety of these procedures exist; the main concern being the possible mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of the pathogen-inactivated preparation in the recipient. This report reviews the genotoxicity profile of the S-59 (Amotosalen) plus long wavelength ultraviolet light (UVA) pathogen reduction technology, and assesses the mutagenic and carcinogenic hazards in recipients of treated platelets. S-59, a synthetic heterocyclic psoralen, non-covalently intercalates into the nucleic acids of pathogens and forms crosslinks when UVA photoactivated. Before clinical use, the levels of residual S-59 and free photoproducts are greatly reduced using a 'compound adsorption device' (CAD). In vitro, S-59 is mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium and mouse lymphoma L5178Y TK(+/-) cells, and is clastogenic in CHO cells. There is reduced activity (Salmonella, CHO cells) or no activity (mouse lymphoma cells) with metabolic activation (S9 mix). When tested up to toxic dose levels, S-59 was negative in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay and the rat hepatocyte unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) test. Based on comparative studies conducted with S-59 plus UVA-treated platelets (up to 25 times without CAD), any genotoxic effects can be attributed to residual S-59. Considering (1) the known genotoxic mechanism of action for S-59, (2) the negative in vivo studies for S-59 at multiples >40,000x over clinical peak plasma levels, and (3) the fact that the positive in vitro genotoxicity effects for the end product seem due to residual S-59, any mutagenic hazard to a recipient of S-59 plus UVA-treated platelets is negligible and there is no concern about a carcinogenic potential as a consequence of a mutagenic activity. This

  17. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  18. Viscose and Terylene Market Witnesses Positive Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua xiaowei; Guoyun

    2010-01-01

    @@ Viscose and terylene staple fiber market is very hot as prices rise this year. The main reason for the positive market activity is that cotton prices hay increased rapidly. But, there is a worry that the appreciation of the yuan, to gether with the rate hike will squeeze profit margins of the industry.

  19. Commensurability Effects in Viscosity of Nanoconfined Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Peeters, Francois M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Geim, Andre K

    2016-03-22

    The rate of water flow through hydrophobic nanocapillaries is greatly enhanced as compared to that expected from macroscopic hydrodynamics. This phenomenon is usually described in terms of a relatively large slip length, which is in turn defined by such microscopic properties as the friction between water and capillary surfaces and the viscosity of water. We show that the viscosity of water and, therefore, its flow rate are profoundly affected by the layered structure of confined water if the capillary size becomes less than 2 nm. To this end, we study the structure and dynamics of water confined between two parallel graphene layers using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the shear viscosity is not only greatly enhanced for subnanometer capillaries, but also exhibits large oscillations that originate from commensurability between the capillary size and the size of water molecules. Such oscillating behavior of viscosity and, consequently, the slip length should be taken into account in designing and studying graphene-based and similar membranes for desalination and filtration. PMID:26882095

  20. Shear Viscosity of Turbulent Chiral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Das, Amita; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the difference between the chemical potentials of left-handed and right-handed particles in a parity violating (chiral) plasma can lead to an instability. We show that the chiral instability may drive turbulent transport. Further we estimate the anomalous viscosity of chiral plasma arising from the enhanced collisionality due to turbulence.

  1. On the measurement of magnetic viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, C. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Efthimiadis, K.G., E-mail: kge@auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2012-08-15

    This work is an investigation of the experimental method used for measuring the magnetic viscosity in a hard ferromagnetic material, i.e. the recording of the magnetization under constant applied field and temperature, after the material has been magnetically saturated. It investigates how the experimental results are affected by the initial conditions of the method (saturation field, field change rate and field oscillation prior to its stabilization), and by minor variations of field and temperature during the recording. Based on the arising conclusions and the use of a more complex fitting function of measurements, the accuracy and repeatability of experimental results is improved. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic viscosity is affected by initial measurement conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Minor field deviations prior to its stabilization cause large changes in viscosity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Viscosity is strongly dependent on the field change rate from saturation to the measurement field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small changes in field and temperature during the experiment can lead to false measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Errors in measurements can be eliminated through the use of a proper fitting function.

  2. Pressure viscosity coefficient of vegetable oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) pressure viscosity coefficient (PVC) of ten vegetable oils from commodity and new crops, and two petroleum-based oils, polyalphaolefin (PAO) and hexadecane, were investigated. PVC was measured using three different methods: the So and Klaus (S-K) procedure from oil visco...

  3. Weak Dynamic Programming Principle for Viscosity Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, Bruno; Touzi, Nizar

    2011-01-01

    We prove a weak version of the dynamic programming principle for standard stochastic control problems and mixed control-stopping problems, which avoids the technical difficulties related to the measurable selection argument. In the Markov case, our result is tailor-maid for the derivation of the dynamic programming equation in the sense of viscosity solutions.

  4. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation

  5. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  6. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application

  7. Viscosity in a Lepton-Photon Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Husdal, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We look at viscosity production in a universe consisting purely of leptons and photons. This is quite close to what the Universe actually look like when the temperature was between $10^{10}$ K and $10^{12}$ K ($1$ -- $100$ MeV). By taking the strong force and the hadronic particles out of the equation, we can examine how the viscous forces behave with all the 12 leptons present. By this we study how shear- and (more interestingly) bulk viscosity is affected during periods with particle annihilation. We use the theory given by Hoogeveen et. al. from 1986, replicate their 9-particle results and expanded it to include the muon and tau particles as well. This will impact the bulk viscosity immensely for high temperatures. We will show that during the beginning of the lepton era, when the temperature is around 100 MeV, the bulk viscosity will be roughly 100 million times larger with muons included in the model compared to a model without.

  8. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  9. The high-frequency viscosity of dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruif, C. G.; Woutersen, A. T. J. M.; Mellema, J.

    1992-09-01

    Several theories for the high-frequency viscosity of hard sphere dispersions are discussed and compared with experimental results. The theories based on a virial expansion are known to be valid for low volume fractions only. We show that the most satisfactory description is given by Beenakker's multipole expansion theory.

  10. From Stopping to Viscosity in Nuclear Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Danielewicz, P.; Barker, B.; Shi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Data on stopping in intermediate-energy central heavy-ion collisions are analyzed following transport theory based on the Boltzmann equation. In consequence, values of nuclear shear viscosity are inferred. The inferred values are significantly larger than obtained for free nucleon dispersion relations and free nucleon-nucleon cross sections.

  11. Pressure dependence of polysulphone melt viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Polášková, M.; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Cape Town : Southern African Society of Rheology, 2006, S2. [SASOR 2006: Southern African Conference on Rheology /1./. Cape Town (ZA), 24.08.2006-27.08.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : polymer melt * pressure dependent viscosity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  12. Electro fluid dynamic viscosity rheometer oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.В. Древецький

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  The block diagram is given and the principle of work of the dynamic viscosity of oil products viscosimeter on the basis of symmetric hydraulic bridge with by electrofluid converters and microprocessor system of an equilibration is described. The condition of the hydraulic bridge balance is received and results of computer modelling of the viscosimeter are presented.

  13. Conditions of viscosity measurement for detecting irradiated peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscosity of gelatinized suspensions of black and white peppers decreased depending upon dose. The viscosity was influenced by gelatinization and viscosity measurement conditions. The difference between unirradiated pepper and an irradiated one was larger at a higher pH and temperature for gelatinization. A viscosity parameter normalized with the starch content of pepper sample and the viscosity of a 5% suspension of corn starch could get rid of the influence of the conditions for viscosity measurement such as type of viscometer, shear rate and temperature. (author)

  14. Cost assessment and ecological effectiveness of nutrient reduction options for mitigating Phaeocystis colony blooms in the Southern North Sea: an integrated modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelot, Christiane; Thieu, Vincent; Polard, Audrey; Garnier, Josette; Billen, Gilles; Hecq, Walter; Gypens, Nathalie

    2011-05-01

    Nutrient reduction measures have been already taken by wealthier countries to decrease nutrient loads to coastal waters, in most cases however, prior to having properly assessed their ecological effectiveness and their economic costs. In this paper we describe an original integrated impact assessment methodology to estimate the direct cost and the ecological performance of realistic nutrient reduction options to be applied in the Southern North Sea watershed to decrease eutrophication, visible as Phaeocystis blooms and foam deposits on the beaches. The mathematical tool couples the idealized biogeochemical GIS-based model of the river system (SENEQUE-RIVERSTRAHLER) implemented in the Eastern Channel/Southern North Sea watershed to the biogeochemical MIRO model describing Phaeocystis blooms in the marine domain. Model simulations explore how nutrient reduction options regarding diffuse and/or point sources in the watershed would affect the Phaeocystis colony spreading in the coastal area. The reference and prospective simulations are performed for the year 2000 characterized by mean meteorological conditions, and nutrient reduction scenarios include and compare upgrading of wastewater treatment plants and changes in agricultural practices including an idealized shift towards organic farming. A direct cost assessment is performed for each realistic nutrient reduction scenario. Further the reduction obtained for Phaeocystis blooms is assessed by comparison with ecological indicators (bloom magnitude and duration) and the cost for reducing foam events on the beaches is estimated. Uncertainty brought by the added effect of meteorological conditions (rainfall) on coastal eutrophication is discussed. It is concluded that the reduction obtained by implementing realistic environmental measures on the short-term is costly and insufficient to restore well-balanced nutrient conditions in the coastal area while the replacement of conventional agriculture by organic farming

  15. Assessment of China's energy-saving and emission-reduction accomplishments and opportunities during the 11th Five Year Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1980 to 2002, China experienced a 5% average annual reduction in energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). With a dramatic reversal of this historic relationship, energy intensity increased 5% per year during 2002-2005. China's 11th Five Year Plan (FYP) set a target of reducing energy intensity by 20% by 2010. This paper assesses selected policies and programs that China has instituted to fulfill the national goal, finding that China made substantial progress and many of the energy-efficiency programs appear to be on track to meet - or in some cases exceed - their energy-saving targets. Most of the Ten Key Projects, the Top-1000 Program, and the Small Plant Closure Program will meet or surpass the 11th FYP savings goals. China's appliance standards and labeling program has become very robust. China has greatly enhanced its enforcement of new building energy standards but energy-efficiency programs for buildings retrofits, as well as the goal of adjusting China's economic structure, are failing. It is important to maintain and strengthen the existing energy-saving policies and programs that are successful while revising programs or adding new policy mechanisms to improve the programs that are not on track to achieve the stated goals. - Research highlights: → This paper assesses selected national energy efficiency policies and programs China. → The policies were established to fulfill the 11th Five Year Plan energy efficiency improvement goal. → Many of the programs appear to be on track to meet or exceed their energy-saving targets. → For the 12th Five Year Plan, it is important to maintain and strengthen energy-saving policies. → Recommendations are made for revising or adding programs based on international experience.

  16. Numerical studies of thermal convection with temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity at extreme viscosity contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleque, Tania S.; Fowler, A. C.; Howell, P. D.; Vynnycky, M.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by convection of planetary mantles, we consider a mathematical model for Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a basally heated layer of a fluid whose viscosity depends strongly on temperature and pressure, defined in an Arrhenius form. The model is solved numerically for extremely large viscosity variations across a unit aspect ratio cell, and steady solutions for temperature, isotherms, and streamlines are obtained. To improve the efficiency of numerical computation, we introduce a modified viscosity law with a low temperature cutoff. We demonstrate that this simplification results in markedly improved numerical convergence without compromising accuracy. Continued numerical experiments suggest that narrow cells are preferred at extreme viscosity contrasts, and this conclusion is supported by a linear stability analysis.

  17. Evaluation of negative viscosity as upper extremity training for stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Felix C.; Patton, James L.

    2016-01-01

    With stroke survivors (n=30) as the test population, we investigated how upper extremity training with negative viscosity affects coordination in unassisted conditions. Using a planar force-feedback device, subjects performed exploratory movements within an environment that simulated 1) negative viscosity added to elbow and shoulder joints 2) augmented inertia to the upper and lower arm combined with negative viscosity, or 3) a null force field (control). After training, we evaluated each subject’s ability to perform circular movements in the null field. Negative viscosity training resulted in greater within-day reductions in error compared with the combined field training. Negative viscosity promoted greater distributions of accelerations during free exploration, especially in the sagittal axis, while combined field training diminished overall activity. Both force field training groups exhibited next day retention, while this was not observed for the control group. The improvement in performance suggests that greater range of kinematic experiences contribute to learning, even despite novel force field environments. These findings provide support for the use of movement amplifying environments for upper extremity rehabilitation, allowing greater access to training while maintaining user engagement. PMID:22275710

  18. Vietnam : Managing Public Expenditure for Poverty Reduction and Growth, Public Expenditure Review and Integrated Fiduciary Assessment, Volume 1, Cross Sectoral Issues

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This Public Expenditure Review and Integrated Fiduciary Assessment (PER-FA) reviews and assesses the contribution that public expenditure has made to poverty reduction, and growth in Vietnam in recent years, and, identifies priorities and actions for strengthening that contribution over the coming years, through better resource allocation, and better public expenditure management. Fiscal trends have been positive, both in terms of revenue collection and expenditure outturns, resulting in a su...

  19. Viscose kink and drift-kink modes in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intristic kink modes in a tokamak are theoretically investigated taking account of longitudinal viscosity of ions and electrons and drift effect. It is marked that dispersion equation of investigated modes coinsides in form with that for ballooning modes. It is shown that five types of intrinsic kink instability may be distinguished in disregard of viscosity and drift effects. Effect of stabilizing quasiideal viscose kink and viscose resistive kink modes by finite Larmuir ion radius is investigated. A branch of viscose reclosure mode which instability is due to electron viscosity is pointed out. A series of other viscose and drift-kink tokamak modes is considered. Both general disperse equations of the above-mentioned kink instability varieties, taking account of viscose and drift ones, and disperse equations of separate branches are presented

  20. Plasma Viscosity with Mass Transport in Spherical ICF Implosion Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vold, Erik L; Ortega, Mario I; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrange hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduc...

  1. Magnetic effect in viscosity of magnetorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, H. A.; Gonzalez, E.; Restrepo, J.; Parra, C. A.; Ortiz, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the study of viscosity is presented for a magnetorheological fluid made from iron oxides micrometre, under an external magnetic field. The material was characterized by magnetic loops in a vibrating sample magnetometer and its crystal structure by X-ray diffraction. The results show that saturation magnetization and coercive field have dependence with the powder size. The material has different crystal structure which lattice parameters were determined by Rietveld refinement. The viscosity of the magnetorheological fluid was measured by a viscometer with rotational symmetry with and without external field. This result evidence a dependency on the size, percentage iron oxide and the applied magnetic field, it is due to the hydrodynamic volume of iron oxide interacts with the external magnetic field, increasing the flow resistance.

  2. Intrinsic viscosity of model starburst dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrodynamic radii (Rη) calculated from intrinsic viscosities of poly(amido amide) (PAMAM) starburst dendrimers increasing generation number. This would seem to support a structure with strongly stretched tiers, which is relatively hollow near the core, and with most end groups near the surface. However, a computer simulation due to Lescanec and Muthukumar supports a more folded structure with higher density near the core and with end groups dispersed throughout the molecule. Here we calculate the hydrodynamic radii of the Lescanec-Muthukumar model using intrinsic viscosity formulas developed by Zimm and Fixman. The Lescanec-Muthukumar starbursts with relatively stiff spacers have hydrodynamic radii in good agreement with the experimental PAMAM radii, in spite of their folded structure. The hydrodynamic radius is sensitive both to the molecular size and to the density. As the number of generations increases, the molecules become more dense and the hydrodynamic radius increases more rapidly than the radius of gyration. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang

    2014-11-01

    After a brief review of the history of viscosity from classical to quantal fluids, a discussion of how the shear viscosity of a finite hot nucleus is calculated directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of the nucleus is given in this paper. The ratio / with s being the entropy volume density, is extracted from the experimental systematic of GDR in copper, tin and lead isotopes at finite temperature . These empirical results are compared with the results predicted by several independent models, as well as with almost model-independent estimations. Based on these results, it is concluded that the ratio / in medium and heavy nuclei decreases with increasing to reach (1.3−4)$×\\hbar/(4 k_B)$ at = 5 MeV, which is almost the same as that obtained for quark-gluon plasma at > 170 MeV.

  4. Low temperature viscosity in elongated ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, T.; Pérez-Madrid, A.; Rubí, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the relaxation and transport properties of a ferrofluid in an elongational flow. These properties are influenced by the bistable nature of the potential energy. Bistability comes from the irrotational character of the flow together with the symmetry of the dipoles. Additionally, the presence of a constant magnetic field destroys the symmetry of the potential energy magnetizing the system. We have shown that at a moderate temperature, compared to the height of the energy barrier, the viscosity decreases with respect to the value it would have if the potential were stable. This phenomenon is known as the "negative viscosity" effect. Thermal motion induces jumps of the magnetic moment between the two stable states of the system leading to the aforementioned lowered dissipation effect.

  5. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz;

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly with...

  6. An acoustic transmission sensor for the longitudinal viscosity of fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Physical fluid parameters like viscosity, mass density and sound velocity can be determined utilizing ultrasonic sensors. We introduce the concept of a recently devised transmission based sensor utilizing pressure waves to determine the longitudinal viscosity, bulk viscosity, and second coefficient of viscosity of a sample fluid in a test chamber. A model is presented which allows determining these parameters from measurement values by means of a fit. The setup is particularly suited for liqu...

  7. A Viscosity Adaptive Lattice Boltzmann Method

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis describes the development and validation of a viscosity adaption method for the numerical simulation of non-Newtonian fluids on the basis of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), as well as the development and verification of the related software bundle SAM-Lattice. By now, Lattice Boltzmann Methods are established as an alternative approach to classical computational fluid dynamics methods. The LBM has been shown to be an accurate and efficient tool for the numerical...

  8. Viscoelastic-electromagnetism and Hall viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Hirono, Yuji(Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan); Kimura, Taro; MINAMI, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a kind of electromagnetism, which we call viscoelastic-electromagnetism, to investigate viscoelastic transport phenomena. It is shown that Cartan's formalism of general relativity is essential for viscoelastic theory, and then the corresponding electric and magnetic fields are regarded as a velocity gradient and a Burgers vector density, respectively. As an application of this formalism, the Streda formula for the Hall viscosity is obtained.

  9. Singularities in droplet pinching without viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J

    1997-01-01

    A model for the pinching of an inviscid liquid column, originally developed by Lee, is considered. We find that Lee's model has a singularity in the curvature at a finite thread radius, and therefore does not describe breakup. However, the observed steepening of the profile corresponds to experiments with fluids at low viscosity. The singularity has similarity form, which we compute analytically. The result agrees well with numerical simulations of Lee's model.

  10. Liquid mixture viscosities correlation with rational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Stevanović Anđela B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper twenty two selected rational correlation models for liquid mixture viscosities of organic compounds were tested on 219 binary sets of experimental data taken from literature. The binary sets contained 3675 experimental data points for 70 different compounds. The Dimitrov-Kamenski X, Dimitrov-Kamenski XII, and Dimitrov-Kamenski XIII models demonstrated the best correlative characteristics for binary mixtures with overall absolute average deviation less then 2%. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172063

  11. Diffusion, Viscosity, and Thermodynamics in Liquid Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    This thesis aims at an overall improvement of the diffusion coefficient predictions. For this reason the theoretical determination of diffusion, viscosity, and thermodynamics in liquid systems is discussed. Furthermore, the experimental determination of diffusion coefficients is also part of this work. All investigations presented are carried out for organic binary liquid mixtures. Diffusion coefficient data of 9 highly nonideal binary mixtures are reported over the whole concentration range ...

  12. Elasticity, viscosity, and deformation of orbital fat

    OpenAIRE

    Schoemaker, Ivo; Hoefnagel, Pepijn; Mastenbroek, Tom; Kolff, Cornelis; Schutte, Sander; van der Helm, Frans; Picken, Stephen; Gerritsen, Anton; Wielopolski, Piotr; Spekreijse, Henk; Simonsz, Huib

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. For development of a finite element analysis model of orbital mechanics, it was necessary to determine the material properties of orbital fat and its degree of deformation in eye rotation. METHODS. Elasticity and viscosity of orbital fat of eight orbits of four calves and two orbits of one rhesus monkey were measured with a parallel-plate rheometer. The degree of deformation of orbital fat was studied in two human subjects by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) through the o...

  13. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E

    2011-07-19

    The viscosity of blood has long been used as an indicator in the understanding and treatment of disease, and the advent of modern viscometers allows its measurement with ever-improving clinical convenience. However, these advances have not been matched by theoretical developments that can yield a quantitative understanding of blood's microrheology and its possible connection to relevant biomolecules (e.g., fibrinogen). Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and two different red blood cell models, we accurately predict the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly represent cell-cell interactions and identify the types and sizes of reversible rouleaux structures that yield a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates. We also present the first quantitative estimates of the magnitude of adhesive forces between red cells. In addition, our simulations support the hypothesis, previously deduced from experiments, of yield stress as an indicator of cell aggregation. This non-Newtonian behavior is analyzed and related to the suspension's microstructure, deformation, and dynamics of single red blood cells. The most complex cell dynamics occurs in the intermediate shear rate regime, where individual cells experience severe deformation and transient folded conformations. The generality of these cell models together with single-cell measurements points to the future prediction of blood-viscosity anomalies and the corresponding microstructures associated with various diseases (e.g., malaria, AIDS, and diabetes mellitus). The models can easily be adapted to tune the properties of a much wider class of complex fluids including capsule and vesicle suspensions. PMID:21730178

  14. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    OpenAIRE

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    The viscosity of blood has long been used as an indicator in the understanding and treatment of disease, and the advent of modern viscometers allows its measurement with ever-improving clinical convenience. However, these advances have not been matched by theoretical developments that can yield a quantitative understanding of blood’s microrheology and its possible connection to relevant biomolecules (e.g., fibrinogen). Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and two different red blood cell m...

  15. Magnetic viscosity studies in hard magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic viscosity behavior has been studied in several hard magnets with different magnetization reversal mechanisms including barium ferrite powders, Cu-Mn-Al, ferrite magnets, Nd-Fe-B, and SmCo5, Sm2(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr)17. The measurements were made with a vibrating sample magnetometer for times up to 60 s and a SQUID magnetometer for longer times in the range of 60--2300 s. For most of the samples the magnetization was found to vary logarithmically with time. The field and temperature dependence of the magnetic viscosity coefficient S was studied. Here, S was found to vary with the applied field and it usually peaked around the coercive field Hc. The measured values of Smax at 10 K range from 0.004 to 1.853 emu/g for Cu-Mn-Al and Sm2(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr)17, respectively. The magnetic viscosity coefficient was used together with the magnetic susceptibility to determine the activation volume

  16. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  17. Shear viscosity of a hadronic gas mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Itakura, Kazunori; Otomo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    We discuss in detail the shear viscosity coefficient eta and the viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s of a hadronic gas comprised of pions and nucleons. In particular, we study the effects of baryon chemical potential on eta and eta/s. We solve the relativistic quantum Boltzmann equations with binary collisions (pi pi, pi N, and NN) for a state slightly deviated from thermal equilibrium at temperature T and baryon chemical potential mu. The use of phenomenological amplitudes in the collision terms, which are constructed to reproduce experimental data, greatly helps to extend the validity region in the T-mu plane. The total viscosity coefficient eta(T,mu)=eta^pi + eta^N increases as a function of T and mu, indirectly reflecting energy dependences of binary cross sections. The increase in mu direction is due to enhancement of the nucleon contribution eta^N while the pion contribution eta^pi diminishes with increasing mu. On the other hand, due to rapid growth of entropy density, the ratio eta/s becomes a de...

  18. ON THE EDDY VISCOSITY MODEL OF PERIODIC TURBULENT SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新军; 罗纪生; 周恒

    2003-01-01

    Physical argument shows that eddy viscosity is essentially different from molecular viscosity. By direct numerical simulation, it was shown that for periodic turbulent flows, there is phase difference between Reynolds stress and rate of strain. This finding posed great challenge to turbulence modeling, because most turbulence modeling, which use the idea of eddy viscosity, do not take this effect into account.

  19. Viscosity solution of linear regulator quadratic for degenerate diffusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied a linear regulator quadratic control problem for degenerate Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB equation. We showed the existence of viscosity properties and established a unique viscosity solution of the degenerate HJB equation associated with this problem by the technique of viscosity solutions.

  20. The Impact of Homogeneous Versus Heterogeneous Emphysema on Dynamic Hyperinflation in Patients With Severe COPD Assessed for Lung Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutou, Afroditi K; Zoumot, Zaid; Nair, Arjun; Davey, Claire; Hansell, David M; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Polkey, Michael I; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) is a pathophysiologic hallmark of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of emphysema distribution on DH during a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) in patients with severe COPD. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data among severe COPD patients who underwent thoracic high-resolution computed tomography, full lung function measurements and maximal CPET with inspiratory manouvers as assessment for a lung volume reduction procedure. ΔIC was calculated by subtracting the end-exercise inspiratory capacity (eIC) from resting IC (rIC) and expressed as a percentage of rIC (ΔIC%). Emphysema quantification was conducted at 3 predefined levels using the syngo PULMO-CT (Siemens AG); a difference >25% between best and worse slice was defined as heterogeneous emphysema. Fifty patients with heterogeneous (62.7% male; 60.9 ± 7.5 years old; FEV1% = 32.4 ± 11.4) and 14 with homogeneous emphysema (61.5% male; 62.5 ± 5.9 years old; FEV1% = 28.1 ± 10.3) fulfilled the enrolment criteria. The groups were matched for all baseline variables. ΔIC% was significantly higher in homogeneous emphysema (39.8% ± 9.8% vs.31.2% ± 13%, p = 0.031), while no other CPET parameter differed between the groups. Upper lobe predominance of emphysema correlated positively with peak oxygen pulse, peak oxygen uptake and peak respiratory rate, and negatively with ΔIC%. Homogeneous emphysema is associated with more DH during maximum exercise in COPD patients. PMID:26398112

  1. Reduction of acidification from electricity. Generating industries in Taiwan by Life Cycle Assessment and Monte Carlo optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a rather common tool for reducing environmental impacts while striving for cleaner processes. This method yields reliable information when input data is sufficient; however, in uncertain systems Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used as a means to compensate for insufficient data. The MC optimization model was constructed from environmental emissions, process parameters and operation constraints. The results of MC optimization allow for the prediction of environmental performance and the opportunity for environmental improvement. The case study presented here focuses on the acidification improvement regarding uncertain emissions and on the available operation of Taiwan's power plants. The boundary definitions of LCA were established for generation, fuel refining and mining. The model was constructed according to objective functional minimization of acidification potential, base loading, fuel cost and generation mix constraints. Scenario simulations are given the different variation of fuel cost ratios for Taiwan. The simulation results indicate that fuel cost was the most important parameter influencing the acidification potential for seven types of fired power. Owing to the low operational loading, coal-fired power is the best alternative for improving acidification. The optimal scenario for acidification improvement occurred at 15% of the fuel cost. The impact decreased from 1.39 to 1.24 kg SO2-eq./MWh. This reduction benefit was about 10.5% lower than the reference year. Regarding eco-efficiency at an optimum scenario level of 5%, the eco-efficiency value was - 12.4 $US/kg SO2-eq. Considering the environmental and economical impacts, results indicated that the ratio of coal-fired steam turbine should be reduced. (author)

  2. Utilisation of respirometry to assess organic matter reduction of effluents from the Camaçari industrial complex (BA, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A. Oliveira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The treatment efficiency of industrial effluents, after biological treatment by activated sludge in aeration tanks (AT, was assessed through the utilisation of respirometry tests at the Cetrel's-wastewater treatment plant (WTP. Samples of the equalised effluent (EE, prior to treatment, and of the treated effluent (TE, after treatment, were analysed. Twenty bioassays batch were carried out to AT (AT-2, AT-3 and AT-4. Each test consisted of: a basic test, a basic test with peptone added, a test using EE and a test using TE. The data showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05 in the respiration activity between the aeration tanks. Regarding the specific oxygen uptake rate there was a mean reduction of 70.8% between the tests performed with EE and TE. The results demonstratd that respirometry tests could successfully assess the efficiency of the activated sludge process and, therefore, be adopted as tool for the monitoring from the WTP.Este trabalho avaliou, através de ensaios de respirometria, a eficiência do tratamento de efluentes industriais, após tratamento por lodo ativado em tanques de aeração (TA. Foram analisadas amostras do efluente equalisado (EE, antes do tratamento, e do efluente tratado (ET. Vinte baterias de ensaios foram realizadas com cada um dos TA (TA-2, TA-3 e TA-4. Cada bateria consistiu de um ensaio básico, contendo apenas o licor misto, um ensaio com adição de peptona, um ensaio com o EE e um com o ET. Não houve diferença estatística significativa (p>0,05 na atividade respiratória dos TA. Quanto à taxa de consumo de oxigênio específica houve uma redução média de 70,8% entre os ensaios realizados com EE e ET. Os ensaios de respirometria determinaram com eficiência o nível de tratamento através de lodo ativado, e deve ser adotado no monitoramento dos efluentes da estação de tratamento de efluentes do Pólo Industrial de Camaçari.

  3. Assessment of probabilistic areal reduction factors of precipitations for the entire French territory with gridded rainfall data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchier, Catherine; Maire, Alexis; Arnaud, Patrick; Cantet, Philippe; Odry, Jean

    2016-04-01

    The starting point of our study was the availability of maps of rainfall quantiles available for the entire French mainland territory at the spatial resolution of 1 km². These maps display the rainfall amounts estimated for different rainfall durations (from 15 minutes to 72 hours) and different return periods (from 2 years up to 1 000 years). They are provided by a regionalized stochastic hourly point rainfall generator, the SHYREG method which was previously developed by Irstea (Arnaud et al., 2007; Cantet and Arnaud, 2014). Being calibrated independently on numerous raingauges data (with an average density across the country of 1 raingauge per 200 km²), this method suffers from a limitation common to point-process rainfall generators: it can only reproduce point rainfall patterns and has no capacity to generate rainfall fields. It can't hence provide areal rainfall quantiles, the estimation of the latter being however needed for the construction of design rainfall or for the diagnostic of observed events. One means of bridging this gap between our local rainfall quantiles and areal rainfall quantiles is given by the concept of probabilistic areal reduction factors of rainfall (ARF) as defined by Omolayo (1993). This concept enables to estimate areal rainfall of a particular frequency within a certain amount of time from point rainfalls of the same frequency and duration. Assessing such ARF for the whole French territory is of particular interest since it should allow us to compute areal rainfall quantiles, and eventually watershed rainfall quantiles, by using the already available grids of statistical point rainfall of the SHYREG method. Our purpose was then to assess these ARF thanks to long time-series of spatial rainfall data. We have used two sets of rainfall fields: i) hourly rainfall fields from a 10-year reference database of Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) over France (Tabary et al., 2012), ii) daily rainfall fields resulting from a 53-year

  4. Regional groundwater flow in the Atikokan research area : spatially variable density and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In modelling the regional groundwater flow at the Atikokan Research Area (ARA), it was anticipated that fluid viscosity might vary significantly as a function of total dissolved solids (TDS) because pore fluids range from fresh through brackish and saline waters to brines. An empirical fluid viscosity-solute concentration equation adopted from Robinson and Stokes was modified and used to estimate viscosity from field-observed TDS. A molecular weight of 53.65 g and a temperature dependent Di coefficient of 0.1223 were estimated from groundwater chemistry data and used in the viscosity calculations. The calculated viscosities fell in the expected range in comparison with experimental values derived for sodium chloride solutions. Results of initial groundwater flow simulations in the ARA using the MOTIF finite-element code were found to be inconsistent with expectations. Employing hypothetical 'unit basin' models and accounting for concentration in the viscosity equation yielded results that are consistent with expected buoyancy effects. The influence of solute concentration must be considered in calculating both fluid density and viscosity for accurate simulation of variable density flow in an environment like the ARA. Simulations of groundwater flow for the ARA suggest that both flow directions and magnitudes should be simultaneously considered during model calibration. Simulations were also performed to assess the effects of varying the vertical boundary conditions, and to test the hypothesis that deep flow in the ARA may be regionally continuous and isolated from shallow -local systems. Hydrostatic-pressure boundary conditions. based on a fluid density distribution, were specified to allow horizontal inflow and outflow at the vertical boundaries which modified the flow pattern only in their proximities, and no continuous regional flow system was produced. Groundwater flow in the ARA may be analyzed with no-flow vertical boundary conditions. (author). 28 refs., 7

  5. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

  6. The pendulum test as a tool to evaluate passive knee stiffness and viscosity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Vinci Maria; Garozzo Rosaria; Sgarlata Rosaria; Casabona Antonino; Valle Maria S; Cioni Matteo

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The pendulum test of Wartenberg is a technique commonly used to measure passive knee motion with the aim to assess spasticity. We used this test to evaluate changes of the knee angular displacement, passive stiffness and viscosity in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Stiffness and viscosity represent passive resistances to joint motion associated with the structural properties of the joint tissue and of the muscular-tendon complex. Stiffness can be considered an intrinsic pro...

  7. Non-Newtonian viscosity wedge in film formation of EHL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUOF.; WONGP.L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the action of viscosity wedge in the oil film formation ofEHL at opposite sliding and zero entrainment. Using solvers developed for Newtonian and Eyringfluids, the film formation behavior originating from viscosity wedge is investigated. The numericalsimulation displays that lubricant film formation induced by viscosity wedge is different from that bythe well-known geometrical wedge with entrainment in classic EHL. The numerical analyses showthat at high opposite sliding speed the viscosity wedge acts as a leading role in film formation, thenon-Newtonian effects can have a pronounced influence on action of the viscosity wedge.

  8. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF VISCOSITY OF Al-Si ALLOY MELTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R. Geng; R. Wang; Z.X. Yang; J.H. Chen; C.J. Sun; Y. Wang

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the viscosity and temperature of Al-Si alloy melts was investigated.The viscosity of three different types of Al-Si alloy melts was measured. It was showed that the relationship between the viscosity and temperature of hypoeutectic Al-5% Si and eutectic Al12.5%Si alloy melts is approximately exponential except for some special zones, but that of the hypereutectic melt is different. The paper discussed the correlation of the viscosity and atomic density, which is thought that the viscosity corresponds to the atomic density to some extent.

  9. The Role of Viscosity in TATB Hot Spot Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E; Zepeda-Ruis, L; Howard, W M; Najjar, F; Reaugh, J E

    2011-08-02

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  10. Effect "negative viscosity" as possible mechanism of ozone hole are formed above Antarctica at last quarter of XX century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrey, Nagurny

    2010-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms of the ozone hole formation over Antarctica can be a meridional transport of ozone deficit by the mesoscale vortexes generated by perturbations in the stratospheric circumpolar vortex. This transport can occur against the global ozone gradient in the polar stratosphere. An assessment of the value and sign of the macro-turbulent exchange coefficient provides understanding of the intensity and direction of large-scale vortex diffusion in the framework of the equations of heat, moisture and momentum transfer. The local viscosity can be negative at this since the turbulent viscosity, heat conductivity and diffusion coefficients characterize already not the physical properties of fluids and gases but the statistical properties of their turbulent motions. According to the definition of Viktor Starr (1968), "negative viscosity" leads to the impulse transfer against a zonal gradient. So, the small-scale energy passes to zonal energy and in the equations of transfer of the conservative properties of the atmosphere (temperature, humidity, ozone, etc.), the transfer can be against the average zonal gradient. To estimate macro-turbulent exchange coefficients, we shall use a procedure, which is similar by structure to the procedure, which is used for reduction of the non-linear Burger's equation to the linear equation of heat conductivity. Whereas in 1980, one mainly observes the positive values of meridional turbulent exchange coefficient, but to 1988 and especially in 2003, these values within the stratospheric vortex are predominantly negative. The growth of the negative value of the meridional transfer coefficient simultaneously with the increased area and the "depth" of the ozone hole allow us to interpret the development of the ozone hole in terms of the mechanism of "negative" viscosity, responsible for transfer of kinetic energy by smaller-scale vortexes towards large-scale perturbations enhancing thus the intensity of the stratospheric

  11. A qualitative assessment of stakeholder perceptions and socio-cultural influences on the acceptability of harm reduction programs in Tijuana, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magis-Rodriguez Carlos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mexico-U.S. border region is experiencing rising rates of blood-borne infections among injection drug users (IDUs, emphasizing the need for harm reduction interventions. Methods We assessed the religious and cultural factors affecting the acceptability and feasibility of three harm reduction interventions – Needle exchange programs (NEPs, syringe vending machines, and safer injection facilities (SIFs – in Tijuana, Mexico. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 community stakeholders to explore cultural and societal-related themes. Results Themes that emerged included Tijuana's location as a border city, family values, and culture as a mediator of social stigma and empathy towards IDUs. Perception of low levels of both awareness and socio-cultural readiness for harm reduction interventions was noted. Religious culture emerged as a theme, highlighting the important role religious leaders play in determining community responses to harm reduction and rehabilitation strategies for IDUs. The influence of religious culture on stakeholders' opinions concerning harm reduction interventions was evidenced by discussions of family and social values, stigma, and resulting policies. Conclusion Religion and politics were described as both a perceived benefit and deterrent, highlighting the need to further explore the overall influences of culture on the acceptability and implementation of harm reduction programs for drug users.

  12. Physical methods for measuring the viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for measuring the viscosity coefficients of the best known type of anisotropic fluid, nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), are reviewed. The hydrodynamic Leslie - Ericksen - Parodi theory is described in brief, which predicts five independent viscosity coefficients for a NLC. The feature that distinguishes NLCs from isotropic liquids is the rotational viscosity, due to energy dissipation caused by NLC reorientation. The shear flow method, methods based on ultrasonic wave propagation and absorption in an anisotropic medium, and the rotating magnetic field technique are described in detail, as well as methods that involve analyzing the Freedericksz transition dynamics (LC reorientation in an electric or magnetic field) and those using light scattering from the thermal fluctuations of the NLC director. In each case, the accuracy of the method is evaluated, its complexity assessed, and the amount of material needed for measurement estimated. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Physical methods for measuring the viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, Viktor V [Central R and D ' Cometa' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-03-31

    Methods for measuring the viscosity coefficients of the best known type of anisotropic fluid, nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), are reviewed. The hydrodynamic Leslie - Ericksen - Parodi theory is described in brief, which predicts five independent viscosity coefficients for a NLC. The feature that distinguishes NLCs from isotropic liquids is the rotational viscosity, due to energy dissipation caused by NLC reorientation. The shear flow method, methods based on ultrasonic wave propagation and absorption in an anisotropic medium, and the rotating magnetic field technique are described in detail, as well as methods that involve analyzing the Freedericksz transition dynamics (LC reorientation in an electric or magnetic field) and those using light scattering from the thermal fluctuations of the NLC director. In each case, the accuracy of the method is evaluated, its complexity assessed, and the amount of material needed for measurement estimated. (reviews of topical problems)

  14. Automation of a high-speed imaging setup for differential viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the automation of a setup previously used to assess the viscosity of pleural effusion samples and discriminate between transudates and exudates, an important first step in clinical diagnostics. The presented automation includes the design, testing, and characterization of a vacuum-actuated loading station that handles the 2 mm glass spheres used as sensors, as well as the engineering of electronic Printed Circuit Board (PCB) incorporating a microcontroller and their synchronization with a commercial high-speed camera operating at 10 000 fps. The hereby work therefore focuses on the instrumentation-related automation efforts as the general method and clinical application have been reported earlier [Hurth et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 034701 (2011)]. In addition, we validate the performance of the automated setup with the calibration for viscosity measurements using water/glycerol standard solutions and the determination of the viscosity of an “unknown” solution of hydroxyethyl cellulose

  15. Comparative analysis of CFD models for jetting fluidized beds: Effect of particle-phase viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Pei; Kai Zhang; Gang Xu; Yongping Yang; Dongsheng Wen

    2012-01-01

    Under the Eulerian-Eulerian framework of simulating gas-solid two-phase flow,the accuracy of the hydrodynamic prediction is strongly affected by the selection of rheology of the particulate phase,for which a detailed assessment is still absent.Using a jetting fluidized bed as an example,this work investigates the influence of solid theology on the hydrodynamic behavior by employing different particle-phase viscosity models.Both constant particle-phase viscosity model (CVM) with different viscosity values and a simple two-fluid model without particle-phase viscosity (NVM) are incorporated into the classical twofluid model and compared with the experimental measurements.Qualitative and quantitative results show that the jet penetration depth,jet frequency and averaged bed pressure drop are not a strong function of the particle-phase viscosity.Compared to CVM,the NVM exhibits better predictions on the jet behaviors,which is more suitable for investigating the hydrodynamics of gas-solid fluidized bed with a central jet.

  16. Electron treatment of wood pulp for the viscose process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron processing is currently being evaluated by several viscose producers for integration into their process. The viscose industry converts dissolving wood pulp into products such as staple fibre, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. These materials are used in the clothing, drapery, hygiene, automobile, food, and packaging industries. Viscose producers are facing increasingly high production costs and stringent environmental regulations that have forced some plants to close. Electron treatment of wood pulp can significantly reduce the amounts of chemicals used for producing viscose and the production of hazardous pollutants. Acsion Industries has worked with companies worldwide to demonstrate the benefits of using electron treated pulp for producing viscose (rayon). This paper describes the viscose process, the benefits of using electron treatment in the viscose process, and Acsion's efforts in developing this technology. (author)

  17. Foaminess and viscosity effects in heavy oil flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshmakhy, Ahmed; Maini, Brij [University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of conventional oil reservoirs and the increasing energy demand, the exploitation of unconventional hydrocarbon resources is increasing. However, the rheology of heavy oil is still not well understood; foamy oil viscosity is believed to be lower than oil viscosity, which is counter-intuitive since continuous phase viscosity is supposed to be lower than that of dispersion. The aim of this paper is to provide a better understanding of foamy oil viscosity. Experiments were conducted using a slim tube filled with sand and oil viscosity was measured for different flow rates, foaminess and gas volume fractions. Results showed that the foaming agent has a low impact on the apparent viscosity of foamy oil and that the apparent viscosity of foamy oils was significantly higher than that of the oil. This paper provided a better understanding of the rheology of foamy oils.

  18. Studies on Microbial Degradation of Natural Rubber Using Dilute Solution Viscosity Measurement and Weight Loss Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    G. N. Onyeagoro; E. G. Ohaeri; U. J. Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of molecular weight of rubber polymers for easy absorption of compounding ingredients is critical in every rubber compounding operation. Yet, rubber mastication which is the current practice of achieving this is expensive, requiring high energy and equipment cost. To address this problem, microbial degradation of natural rubber (NR) and waste rubber tire (WRT) by Nocardia sp. strain 385A was studied using dilute solution viscosity measurement and weight loss methods. Solutions of NR...

  19. Effective density and viscosity of a suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents results of a series of experiments on the settling velocity of spheres in two-component solid--liquid suspensions. Both sedimenting and fluidized suspensions are considered. Particular emphasis has been given to the effective values of the density and viscosity of the mixture which allow us to describe slow settling of a test sphere using the Francis modification of the Stokes formula for the settling of a single sphere in a Newtonian fluid with wall effects. Our experimental results show that values of the effective density and viscosity are close to the average density of the mixture and to the viscosity of the mixture predicted by a correlation suggested by Thomas when the test particles are of the same size as the suspended particles, or larger, but not too much smaller. The signature of the failure of the concept of effective fluid properties is traced to an increase of the variance of the experimental results and is not associated merely with a different than average value of the density; in particular, none of our results are well described by the use of the fluid density in the expression for the buoyant force. We also studied the settling of spheres in fluidized suspensions at high Reynolds numbers. The Barnea and Mizrahi model for the expansion of uniformly fluidized beds was modified in two different ways to describe the settling of particles in the fluidized suspensions. It is not possible to describe the modified drag laws with an effective Newtonian theory if for no other reason than the effective densities which enter into buoyancy are not in principle those which control inertia. The modified drag law is in agreement with experiments in sedimentation columns. Coarse agreement between the predicted and measured drag is found in the fluidized suspension even when the test and the fluidized particles are the same size

  20. An instrument to assess quality of life in relation to nutrition: item generation, item reduction and initial validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akl Elie A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is arguable that modification of diet, given its potential for positive health outcomes, should be widely advocated and adopted. However, food intake, as a basic human need, and its modification may be accompanied by sensations of both pleasure and despondency and may consequently affect to quality of life (QoL. Thus, the feasibility and success of dietary changes will depend, at least partly, on whether potential negative influences on QoL can be avoided. This is of particular importance in the context of dietary intervention studies and in the development of new food products to improve health and well being. Instruments to measure the impact of nutrition on quality of life in the general population, however, are few and far between. Therefore, the aim of this project was to develop an instrument for measuring QoL related to nutrition in the general population. Methods and results We recruited participants from the general population and followed standard methodology for quality of life instrument development (identification of population, item selection, n = 24; item reduction, n = 81; item presentation, n = 12; pretesting of questionnaire and initial validation, n = 2576; construct validation n = 128; and test-retest reliability n = 20. Of 187 initial items, 29 were selected for final presentation. Factor analysis revealed an instrument with 5 domains. The instrument demonstrated good cross-sectional divergent and convergent construct validity when correlated with scores of the 8 domains of the SF-36 (ranging from -0.078 to 0.562, 19 out of 40 tested correlations were statistically significant and 24 correlations were predicted correctly and good test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients from 0.71 for symptoms to 0.90. Conclusions We developed and validated an instrument with 29 items across 5 domains to assess quality of life related to nutrition and other aspects of food intake. The instrument

  1. An assessment of the impact of the JSY cash transfer program on maternal mortality reduction in Madhya Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Indian Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY program is a demand-side program in which the state pays women a cash incentive to deliver in an institution, with the aim of reducing maternal mortality. The JSY has had 54 million beneficiaries since inception 7 years ago. Although a number of studies have demonstrated the effect of JSY on coverage, few have examined the direct impact of the program on maternal mortality. Objective: To study the impact of JSY on maternal mortality in Madhya Pradesh (MP, one of India's largest provinces. Design: By synthesizing data from various sources, district-level maternal mortality ratios (MMR from 2005 to 2010 were estimated using a Bayesian spatio-temporal model. Based on these, a mixed effects multilevel regression model was applied to assess the impact of JSY. Specifically, the association between JSY intensity, as reflected by 1 proportion of JSY-supported institutional deliveries, 2 total annual JSY expenditure, and 3 MMR, was examined. Results: The proportion of all institutional deliveries increased from 23.9% in 2005 to 55.9% in 2010 province-wide. The proportion of JSY-supported institutional deliveries rose from 14% (2005 to 80% (2010. MMR declines in the districts varied from 2 to 35% over this period. Despite the marked increase in JSY-supported delivery, our multilevel models did not detect a significant association between JSY-supported delivery proportions and changes in MMR in the districts. The results from the analysis examining the association between MMR and JSY expenditure are similar. Conclusions: Our analysis was unable to detect an association between maternal mortality reduction and the JSY in MP. The high proportion of institutional delivery under the program does not seem to have converted to lower mortality outcomes. The lack of significant impact could be related to supply-side constraints. Demand-side programs like JSY will have a limited effect if the supply side is unable

  2. Peak and average rectified EMG measures: which method of data reduction should be used for assessing core training exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, A E; Thompson, K G; French, D N; Hodgson, D; Spears, I R

    2011-02-01

    Core strengthening and stability exercises are fundamental for any conditioning training program. Although surface electromyography (sEMG) is used to quantify muscle activity there is a lack of research using this method to investigate the core musculature and core stability. Two types of data reduction are commonly used for sEMG; peak and average rectified EMG methods. Peak EMG has been infrequently reported in the literature with regard to the assessment of core training while even fewer studies have incorporated average rectified EMG data (ARV). The aim of the study was to establish the repeatability of peak and average rectified EMG data during core training exercises and their interrelationship. Ten male highly trained athletes (inter-subject repeatability group; age, 18 ± 1.2 years; height, 176.5 ± 3.2 cm; body mass, 71 ± 4.5 kg) and one female highly trained athlete (intra-subject repeatability group; age; 27 years old; height; 180 cm; weight; 53 kg) performed five maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and five core exercises, chosen to represent a range of movement and muscle recruitment patterns. Peak EMG and ARV EMG were calculated for eight core muscles (rectus abdominis, RA; external oblique, EO; internal oblique, IO; multifidis, MF; latissimus dorsi, LD; longissimus, LG; gluteus maximus, GM; rectus femoris, RF) using sEMG. Average coefficient of variation (CV%) for peak EMG across all the exercises and muscles was 45%. This is in comparison to 35% for the ARV method, which was found to be a significant difference (P0.70; RA, EO, MF, GM, LG) between peak and ARV EMG suggesting, that for these core muscles, the two methods provide a similar evaluation of muscle activity. However, for other muscles (IO, RF, LD) the relationship was found to range from poor to moderate (R=0.10-0.70). The relationship between peak and ARV EMG was also affected by exercise type. Dynamic low and high-threshold exercises and asymmetrical low-threshold exercises

  3. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  4. On the measurement of magnetic viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, C.; Efthimiadis, K. G.

    2012-08-01

    This work is an investigation of the experimental method used for measuring the magnetic viscosity in a hard ferromagnetic material, i.e. the recording of the magnetization under constant applied field and temperature, after the material has been magnetically saturated. It investigates how the experimental results are affected by the initial conditions of the method (saturation field, field change rate and field oscillation prior to its stabilization), and by minor variations of field and temperature during the recording. Based on the arising conclusions and the use of a more complex fitting function of measurements, the accuracy and repeatability of experimental results is improved.

  5. Efficiency model of pumping low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the current research situation of pump efficiency, especially in pumping low viscosity fluids. Then we propose a simple and widely used efficiency model for the pump which just depends on the suction, discharge and leakage resistance coefficient. An experimental test rig is setup. After evaluating the efficiency of the pump in different conditions, it is found that the performance is quite different when pumping different medium. A phenomenon has been observed which results of the appearance of the BEP (best efficiency point), and our efficiency model can explain these testing phenomena very well

  6. Correlation of the liquid mixture viscosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Stevanović Anđela B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper forty two selected correlation models for liquid mixture viscosities of organic compounds were tested on 219 binary and 41 ternary sets of experimental data taken from literature. The binary sets contained 3675 experimental data points for 70 different compounds. The ternary sets contained 2879 experimental data points for 29 different compounds. The Heric I, Heric-Brewer II, and Krishnan-Laddha models demonstrated the best correlative characteristics for binary mixtures (overall absolute average deviation < 2%. The Heric I, Heric-Brewer II, Krishnan-Laddha and Heric II models demonstrated the best correlative characteristics for ternary mixtures (overall absolute average deviation < 3%.

  7. Post-2012 climate regime. How industrial and developing nations can help to reduce emissions - assessing emission trends, reduction potentials, incentive systems and negotiation options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duscha, Vicki; Graichen, Jakob; Healy, Sean; Schleich, Joachim; Schumacher, Katja [Oeko-Institut e.V., Berlin (Germany); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    This report analyses the emissions reduction targets submitted under the Copenhagen Accord by developed and developing countries in matters of four key questions: - Do the pledges add up to the emission reductions required necessary by science? - What are the costs associated with meeting the given targets? - Are the proposed emission reduction efforts of Annex I parties comparable? - What would comparable efforts look like taking country-specific socio-economic indicators into account? Secondary to these questions this report explores the economic and environmental implications of the submitted pledges and NAMAs. Furthermore, we analyze and assess the comparability of efforts of Annex I mitigation pledges compared to a range of socio-economic indicators that may provide a basis for a ''fair'' effort sharing agreement to achieve a given target. (orig.)

  8. Solvent viscosity dependence for enzymatic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sitnitsky, A E

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for relationship of solvent viscosity with reaction rate constant at enzyme action is suggested. It is based on fluctuations of electric field in enzyme active site produced by thermally equilibrium rocking (cranckshaft motion) of the rigid plane (in which the dipole moment $\\approx 3.6 D$ lies) of a favourably located and oriented peptide group (or may be a few of them). Thus the rocking of the plane leads to fluctuations of the electric field of the dipole moment. These fluctuations can interact with the reaction coordinate because the latter in its turn has transition dipole moment due to separation of charges at movement of the reacting system along it. The rocking of the plane of the peptide group is sensitive to the microviscosity of its environment in protein interior and the latter is a function of the solvent viscosity. Thus we obtain an additional factor of interrelationship for these characteristics with the reaction rate constant. We argue that due to the properties of the cranckshaft ...

  9. Multiresolution schemes for conservation laws with viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents multiresolution schemes for the efficient numerical solution of one-dimensional conservation laws with viscosity. The method, originally developed by A, Harten (Commun. Pure Appl. Math., to appear) for hyperbolic conservation laws, computes the cell average multiresolution representation of the solution which provides much information about the solution's regularity. As a consequence, the possibly expensive ENO (essentially nonoscillatory) reconstruction as well as numerous flux computations are performed only near discontinuities, and thereby the numerical solution procedure becomes considerably more efficient. The multiresolution scheme is also expected to open-quotes followclose quotes possibly unsteady irregularities from one time step to the next. When viscosity is added, predicting the location of the irregularity becomes a problem of estimating the change in shock thickness. To this end, we derive shock width estimates for our 1D prototype equations, which, when combined with the stability restriction of the numerical scheme, provide a reliable mechanism for enlarging the original multiresolution stencil. The numerical experiments for scalar conservation laws indicate the feasibility of multiresolution schemes for the viscous case as well

  10. The intrinsic viscosity of linear DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2011-12-01

    We measured the intrinsic viscosity of very small synthetic DNA molecules, of 20-395 base pairs, and incorporated them in a nearly complete picture for the whole span of molecular weights reported in the literature to date. A major transition is observed at M approximately 2 × 10(6) . It is found that in the range of approximately 7 × 10(3) ≤ M ≤ 2 × 10(6) , the intrinsic viscosity scales as [η] approximately M(1.05) , suggesting that short DNA chains are not as rigid as generally thought. The corresponding scaling for the range of 2 × 10(6) ≤ M ≤ 8 × 10(10) is [η] approximately M(0.69) . A comparison of our results with existing equations, for much narrower data distributions, is made, and the agreement is very satisfactory considering the huge range of data analyzed here. Experimental concerns such as the effect of ionic strength, polydispersity, temperature, and shear rate are discussed in detail. Some issues concerning the Huggins coefficient, polymer chain stiffness, and the relationship between the Mark-Houwink constants K, α are also presented; it is found that log K = 1.156 - 6.19α. PMID:21638275

  11. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A. [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pan, Wenxiao [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Caswell, Bruce [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Gompper, Gerhard [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Karniadakis, George E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  12. Viscosity, entropy and the viscosity to entropy density ratio; how perfect is a nucleonic fluid?

    CERN Document Server

    Mekjian, Aram Z

    2010-01-01

    The viscosity of hadronic matter is studied using a classical evaluation of the scattering angle and a quantum mechanical discussion based on phase shifts from a potential. Semi classical limits of the quantum theory are presented. A hard sphere and an attractive square well potential step are each considered as well as the combined effects of both. The lowest classical value of the viscosity for an attractive potential is shown to be a hard sphere limit. The high wave number-short wavelength limits of the quantum result have scaling laws associated with it for both the viscosity and entropy. These scaling laws are similar to the Fraunhoher diffraction increase for the hard sphere geometric cross section. Specific examples for nuclear collisions are given. The importance of the nuclear tensor force and hard core is mentioned. The viscosity (eta), entropy density (s) and eta/s ratio are calculated for a gas of dilute neutrons in the unitary limit of large scattering length. Away from the unitary limit, the rat...

  13. Study of magnetic fourier components effect on ion viscosity in Tohoku University Heliac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neo-classical theories explain that the non-linearity of the viscosity plays the important role in the bifurcation phenomena of the L-H transition observed in large tokamaks and stellarators. In the Tohoku University Heliac (TU-Heliac), a helical axis stellarator, the effects of the viscosity maxima on the improved mode transition has been investigated by electrode biasing experiments using a hot cathode made of LaB6. The driving force J x B for a plasma poloidal rotation was externally controlled and the poloidal viscosity was successfully estimated from the driving force. It was experimentally confirmed that the local maxima in the viscosity play the key role in the L-H transition. One of further extended works is to clarify the effect of magnetic Fourier components on the neo-classical viscosity. The minimization of helical ripples allows the reduction of viscosity, which is expected to bring good accessibilities to the improved confinement modes. It is also important to find out the effect of low mode rational surfaces or magnetic islands on the viscosity, because magnetic islands, which have low poloidal mode numbers and locate along a plasma periphery, have the possibility to become a control knob on a radial electric field and a radial particle flux. In a heliac device toroidal ripples, helical ripples and bumpiness can be changeable by selecting ratios of coil currents, even though these flexibilities are not independent each other. The hot cathode biasing above-mentioned can be one of the useful methods for the evaluation of viscosities in the particular magnetic configurations. In TU-Heliac the viscosities in various magnetic configurations were evaluated experimentally by the hot cathode biasing method. The toroidal ripples, the helical ripples and the bumpiness were changed in the range of about 30, 20 and 80% respectively by shifting the magnetic axis under the fixed rotational transform profile. The preliminary experimental results showed that the

  14. Changes in the viscosity of hyaluronic acid after exposure to a myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, M.S.; Green, S.P.; Lowther, D.A.

    1989-04-01

    Both purified hyaluronic acid (HA) and bovine synovial fluid react with OCI-, the major oxidant produced by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system, resulting in a decrease in their specific viscosity. This reaction is inhibited in the presence of excess methionine. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ alone decreases the viscosity of HA, presumably by the Fenton reaction, in the absence (but not in the presence) of the iron chelator, diethyltriaminepentacetic acid (DETAPAC). In the presence of DETAPAC, incubation of HA with the complete MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system lowered the viscosity of HA. Analysis of 3H-HA exposed to OCI- by gel filtration chromatography indicated that cleavage of HA occurred only at higher OCI- concentrations. We suggest that the reduction in viscosity of HA by the MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system may be due to a combination of oxidative cleavage and changes in the conformation of the molecule. We speculate that the changes in the molecular size of rheumatoid synovial fluid HA may be due to the action of the neutrophil MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system.

  15. Changes in the viscosity of hyaluronic acid after exposure to a myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both purified hyaluronic acid (HA) and bovine synovial fluid react with OCI-, the major oxidant produced by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2/CI- system, resulting in a decrease in their specific viscosity. This reaction is inhibited in the presence of excess methionine. H2O2 alone decreases the viscosity of HA, presumably by the Fenton reaction, in the absence (but not in the presence) of the iron chelator, diethyltriaminepentacetic acid (DETAPAC). In the presence of DETAPAC, incubation of HA with the complete MPO/H2O2/CI- system lowered the viscosity of HA. Analysis of 3H-HA exposed to OCI- by gel filtration chromatography indicated that cleavage of HA occurred only at higher OCI- concentrations. We suggest that the reduction in viscosity of HA by the MPO/H2O2/CI- system may be due to a combination of oxidative cleavage and changes in the conformation of the molecule. We speculate that the changes in the molecular size of rheumatoid synovial fluid HA may be due to the action of the neutrophil MPO/H2O2/CI- system

  16. Results of the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement International Space Station Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William; Antar, Basil

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of FMVM is to measure the rate of coalescence of two highly viscous liquid drops and correlate the results with the liquid viscosity and surface tension. The experiment takes advantage of the low gravitational free floating conditions in space to permit the unconstrained coalescence of two nearly spherical drops. The merging of the drops is accomplished by deploying them from a syringe and suspending them on Nomex threads followed by the astronaut s manipulation of one of the drops toward a stationary droplet till contact is achieved. Coalescence and merging occurs due to shape relaxation and reduction of surface energy, being resisted by the viscous drag within the liquid. Experiments were conducted onboard the International Space Station in July of 2004 and subsequently in May of 2005. The coalescence was recorded on video and down-linked near real-time. When the coefficient of surface tension for the liquid is known, the increase in contact radius can be used to determine the coefficient of viscosity for that liquid. The viscosity is determined by fitting the experimental speed to theoretically calculated contact radius speed for the same experimental parameters. Recent fluid dynamical numerical simulations of the coalescence process will be presented. The results are important for a better understanding of the coalescence process. The experiment is also relevant to liquid phase sintering, free form in-situ fabrication, and as a potential new method for measuring the viscosity of viscous glass formers at low shear rates.

  17. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berteau C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cecile Berteau,1 Orchidée Filipe-Santos,1 Tao Wang,2 Humberto E Rojas,2 Corinne Granger,1 Florence Schwarzenbach1 1Becton-Dickinson Medical Pharmaceutical Systems, Le Pont de Claix, France; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Aim: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC injection pain tolerance. Methods: The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s. All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain. The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results: Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003. Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm than medium (VAS =16.6 mm or low (VAS =22.1 mm viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002. Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89. Slow (0.02 mL/s or fast (0.30 mL/s injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79. In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High

  18. Assessing the impact of harm reduction programs on law enforcement in Southeast Asia: a description of a regional research methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson Nick; Moore Tim; Crofts Nick

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For over 15 years the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) has been a leading donor for harm reduction projects in Southeast Asia. The recent AusAID-supported harm reduction projects of greatest significance have included the Asia Regional HIV/AIDS Project (AHRP), from 2002 until 2007,1 and the HIV/AIDS Asia Regional Program (HAARP), from 2007 until 2015.2 Both projects included in their design specific strategies for engaging with law enforcement agencies at coun...

  19. EFFECT OF ADSORPTION ON THE VISCOSITY OF DILUTE POLYMER SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-shi Cheng; Yu-fang Shao; Ming-zhu Liu; Rong-qing Lu

    1999-01-01

    Careful measurements of the dilute solution viscosities of polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol in water were carried out. The reduced viscosities of both polymer solutions plot upward curves at extremely dilute concentration levels similar to the phenomena observed for many polymer solutions in the early 1950's. Upon observation of the changes of the flow times of pure water in and the wall surface wettability of the viscometer after measuring solution viscosity, a view was formed that the observed viscosity abnormality at extremely dilute concentration regions is solely due to the effect of adsorption of polymer chains onto the wall surface of viscometer. A theory of adsorption effect based on the Langmuir isotherms was proposed and a mathematical analysis for data treatment was performed. The theory could adequately describe the existing viscosity data. It seems necessary to correct the viscosity result of dilute polymer solutions measured by glass capillary viscometer by taking into account the effect of adsorption in all cases.

  20. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  1. The Effects of Temperature Related Viscosity on Cosmological Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jiaxin

    2014-01-01

    Bulk viscosity has been intrinsically existing in the observational cosmos evolution with various effects for different cosmological evolution stages endowed with complicated cosmic media. Normally in the idealized "standard cosmology" the physical viscosity effect is often negligent in some extent by assumptions, except for galaxies formation and evolution or the like astro-physics phenomena. Actually we have not fully understood the physical origin and effects of cosmic viscosity, including its practical functions for the universe evolution in reality. In this present article we extend the concept of temperature related viscosity from classical statistical physics to observational cosmology, especially we examine the cosmological effects with possibility of the existence for two kinds of viscosity forms, which are described by the Chapman's relation and Sutherland's formula respectively. With that the unified dark fluid model and also a modification of standard model with viscosity which is named as $\\Lambd...

  2. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity : implementation and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Cha, Seung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity--only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds $\\sim$$10^2$. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been ...

  3. Does seminal fluid viscosity influence sperm chromatin integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, K; Padwal, V; Balaiah, D

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to investigate whether viscosity alters sperm chromatin integrity. Semen samples were obtained from 269 men attending the infertility clinic. The viscosity was measured quantitatively by needle and syringe method and the viscosity ratio was calculated against distilled water. The chromatin integrity was evaluated by in vitro decondensation test using 1% SDS and 6 mM EDTA. According to the viscosity ratios the samples were divided into 2 groups: I, normal (ratio 9, n = 30) viscosity. Chromatin integrity was significantly lower in the group with higher viscosity. Significant decrease in sperm count and motility were seen in group II as compared to group I. Thus, hyperviscosity of seminal fluid alters the sperm chromatin integrity. PMID:11028927

  4. Isomorphic Viscosity Equation of State for Binary Fluid Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnejad, Hassan; Cheshmpak, Hashem; Jamali, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the simple binary mixtures in the vicinity of critical line has a universal character and can be mapped from pure components using the isomorphism hypothesis. Consequently, based upon the principle of isomorphism, critical phenomena and similarity between P-ρ-T and T-η-(viscosity)-P relationships, the viscosity model has been developed adopting two cubic, Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) and Peng-Robinson (PR), equations of state (EsoS) for predicting the viscosity of the binary mixtures. This procedure has been applied to the methane-butane mixture and predicted its viscosity data. Reasonable agreement with the experimental data has been observed. In conclusion, we have shown that the isomorphism principle in conjunction with the mapped viscosity EoS suggests a reliable model for calculating the viscosity of mixture of hydrocarbons over a wide pressure range up to 35 MPa within the stated experimental errors. PMID:26680701

  5. Assessing the effect of humic acid redox state on organic pollutant sorption by combined electrochemical reduction and sorption experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschbacher, Michael; Brunner, Sibyl H; Schwarzenbach, René P; Sander, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Natural Organic Matter (NOM) is a major sorbent for organic pollutants in soils and sediments. While sorption under oxic conditions has been well investigated, possible changes in the sorption capacity of a given NOM induced by reduction have not yet been studied. Reduction of quinones to hydroquinones, the major redox active moieties in NOM, increases the number of H-donor moieties and thus may affect sorption. This work compares the sorption of four nonionic organic pollutants of different polarities (naphthalene, acetophenone, quinoline, and 2-naphthol), and of the organocation paraquat to unreduced and electrochemically reduced Leonardite Humic Acid (LHA). The redox states of reduced and unreduced LHA in all sorption experiments were stable, as demonstrated by a spectrophotometric 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol reduction assay. The sorption isotherms of the nonionic pollutants were highly linear, while paraquat sorption was strongly concentration dependent. LHA reduction did not result in significant changes in the sorption of all tested compounds, not even of the cationic paraquat at pH 7, 9, and 11. This work provides the first evidence that changes in NOM redox state do not largely affect organic pollutant sorption, suggesting that current sorption models are applicable both to unreduced and to reduced soil and sediment NOM. PMID:22372874

  6. Reduction in language testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimova, Slobodanka; Jensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This study represents an initial exploration of raters' comments and actual realisations of form reductions in L2 test speech performances. Performances of three L2 speakers were selected as case studies and illustrations of how reductions are evaluated by the raters. The analysis is based on audio....../video recorded speech samples and written reports produced by two experienced raters after testing. Our findings suggest that reduction or reduction-like pronunciation features are found in tested L2 speech, but whenever raters identify and comment on such reductions, they tend to assess reductions negatively...

  7. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  8. Blood viscosity during coagulation at different shear rates

    OpenAIRE

    Ranucci, Marco; Laddomada, Tommaso; Ranucci, Matteo; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract During the coagulation process, blood changes from a liquid to a solid gel phase. These changes are reflected by changes in blood viscosity; however, blood viscosity at different shear rates (SR) has not been previously explored during the coagulation process. In this study, we investigated the viscosity changes of whole blood in 10 subjects with a normal coagulation profile, using a cone‐on‐plate viscosimeter. For each subject, three consecutive measurements were performed, at a SR ...

  9. Viscosity, thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number of nanoparticle suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buxuan; ZHOU Leping; PENG Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    Using our reported experimental data of effective thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and viscosity for CuO nanoparticle suspensions, the corresponding thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number are calculated. With the hard sphere model and considering effects of particle clustering and surface adsorption, the increase of viscosity for nanoparticle suspension observed is explained. It is shown that the effective thermal conductivity will be strongly affected by the formation and correlated spatial distribution of nanoparticle clusters when compared to viscosity in hosting liquid.

  10. Extracting the bulk viscosity of the quark–gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the implications of a nonzero bulk viscosity coefficient on the azimuthal momentum anisotropy of ultracentral relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. We find that, with IP-Glasma initial conditions, a finite bulk viscosity coefficient leads to a better description of the flow harmonics in ultracentral collisions. We then extract optimal values of bulk and shear viscosity coefficients that provide the best agreement with flow harmonic coefficients data in this centrality class

  11. Effect of rouleaux size of erythrocyte on blood viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the rouleaux size dependence of viscosity in concentrated red blood cell suspension is derived analytically, by using reversible kinetic equation of coagulation, to reveal the effect of erythrocyte aggregation on the blood viscosity. In the limit of dilute concentration and low shear rate, the result does not reduce to Casson's equation. In the end we argue Murata's result on the shear rate dependence of viscosity. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs

  12. Viscosity Prediction of Hydrocarbon Mixtures Based on the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    The application and capability of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity predictions of hydrocarbon fluids is further illustrated by predicting the viscosity of binary and ternary liquid mixtures composed of n-alkanes ranging from n-pentane to n-decane for wide ranges of temperature and from...... low to high pressures. In the f-theory viscosity predictions the SRK and the PRSV EOS have respectively been used. Further, a comparison with the widely used LBC viscosity model shows that better results are obtained with the f-theory models. The obtained AAD% is within or close to the experimental...

  13. Heat Transfer Analysis for Peristaltic Mechanism in Variable Viscosity Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Hayat; F.M.Abbasi; Awatif A.Hendi

    2011-01-01

    An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold. Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative study between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.%@@ An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold.Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative stuity between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.

  14. Rotational and spin viscosities of water: Application to nanofluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Bruus, Henrik; Todd, B.D.;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the rotational viscosity and the two spin viscosities for liquid water using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Water is modeled via the flexible SPC/Fw model where the Coulomb interactions are calculated via the Wolf method which enables the long simulation times required....... We find that the rotational viscosity is independent of the temperature in the range from 284 to 319 K. The two spin viscosities, on the other hand, decrease with increasing temperature and are found to be two orders of magnitude larger than that estimated by Bonthuis et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103...

  15. On Eling-Oz formula for the holographic bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Recently Eling and Oz [1] proposed a simple formula for the bulk viscosity of holographic plasma. They argued that the formula is valid in the high temperature (near-conformal) regime, but is expected to break down at low temperatures. We point out that the formula is in perfect agreement with the previous computations of the bulk viscosity of the cascading plasma [2,3], as well as with the previous computations of the bulk viscosity of N=2^* plasma [4,5]. In the latter case it correctly reproduces the critical behaviour of the bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the critical point with the vanishing speed of sound.

  16. Determination of viscosity in recirculating fluidized bed using radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioactive tracer for measuring viscosity is proposed. The methodology relates the terminal velocity of a radioactive sphere in interior of fluid with the viscosity, which can be a fluidized bed or total flow of solids. The arrangement is composed by two γ detectors placed externally and along the bed. Both detectors are coupled by amplifier to electronic clock. The drop time of sphere between two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity is calculated from mathematical correlations of terminal velocity of the sphere. (M.C.K.)

  17. Observation of parallel viscosity in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damping of the toroidal velocity owing to parallel viscosity is observed in the plasma with a tangential neutral beam injection in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron device. Toroidal velocity profile is dominated by the perpendicular viscosity when magnetic field modulation is weak near axis. However, the parallel viscosity is found to be dominant when the modulation is strong enough and to increase in proportion to the square of the modulation of magnetic field. The absolute values of the viscosity agree with the neoclassical prediction within a factor of three. (author)

  18. Experimental Viscosity Measurements for Copper Oxide Nanoparticle Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊明; 李泽梁; 王补宣

    2002-01-01

    The viscosity of water with copper oxide nanoparticle suspensions was measured using capillary viscometers. The mass fractions of copper oxide nanoparticles in the experiment, w, varied between 0.02 and 0.10, and the temperature range was 30℃ to 80℃. The experimental results show that the temperature was the major factor affecting the viscosity of the nanoparticle suspensions, while the effect of the mass fraction on the viscosity was not so obvious as that of the temperature for the mass fractions chosen in the experiment. The effect of the capillary tube size on the viscosity was also found to be relatively important at higher mass fractions.

  19. Applicability of viscosity measurement to the detection of irradiated peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starch is degraded by ionising radiation, resulting in a decrease in viscosity. The viscosities of black and white peppers which contain large amounts of starch are reduced by irradiation so, therefore, viscosity measurement has been proposed as a method to detect the irradiation treatment of these food products. Although detection of irradiated spices by thermoluminescence measurement has been established, it is useful to establish the viscosity measuring technique for detecting irradiated peppers, as this method is carried out widely in the laboratories of food controlling authorities and food processing companies. (author)

  20. Non-Newtonian viscosity in magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    The particle and momentum balance equations can be solved on concentric circular flux surfaces to determine the effective viscous drag present in a magnetized tokamak plasma in the low aspect ratio limit. An analysis is developed utilizing the first-order Fourier expansion of the poloidal variation of quantities on the flux surface akin to that by Stacey and Sigmar [Phys. Fluids, 28, 9 (1985)]. Expressions to determine the poloidal variations of density, poloidal velocity, toroidal velocity, radial electric field, poloidal electric field, and other radial profiles are presented in a multi-species setting. Using as input experimental data for the flux surface averaged profiles of density, temperature, toroidal current, toroidal momentum injection, and the poloidal and toroidal rotations of at least one species of ion, one may solve the equations numerically for the remaining profiles. The resultant effective viscosities are compared to those predicted by Stacey and Sigmar and Shaing, et al., [Nuclear Fusion, 2...

  1. Holographic bulk viscosity: GPR vs EO

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex; Kiritsis, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Recently Eling and Oz (EO) proposed a formula for the holographic bulk viscosity, in arXiv:1103.1657, derived from the null horizon focusing equation. This formula seems different from that obtained earlier by Gubser, Pufu and Rocha (GPR) in arXiv:0806.0407 calculated from the IR limit of the two-point function of the trace of the stress tensor. The two were shown to agree only for some simple scaling cases. We point out that the two formulae agree in two non-trivial holographic theories describing RG flows. The first is the strongly coupled N=2* gauge theory plasma. The second is the semi-phenomenological model of Improved Holographic QCD.

  2. Transition to turbulence through decline of viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Volokh, K Y

    2008-01-01

    Experiments (Mullin and Kreswell, 2005) show that transition to turbulence can start at Reynolds numbers lower than it is predicted by the linear stability analysis - the subcritical transition to turbulence. To explain these observations qualitatively we suggest that the onset of subcritical instability is related to decline of viscosity of the fluid: friction between fluid layers fails with the increase of the velocity gradient. To describe the declinie of friction theoretically we relax the the assumption of the stability of the fluid material and introduce a constant of fluid strength. Particularly, we enhance the Navier-Stokes model with a failure description by introducing the fluid strength in the constitutive equation for the viscous stress. The clasical model is obtained from the enhanced one when strength goes to infinity. We use the modified Navier-Stokes model to analyze the Couette flow between two parallel plates and find that the lateral perturbations can destabilize the flow and the critical R...

  3. Universe Models with Negative Bulk Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Brevik, Iver

    2013-01-01

    The concept of negative temperatures has occasionally been used in connection with quantum systems. A recent example of this sort is reported in the paper of S. Braun et al. [Science 339,52 (2013)], where an attractively interacting ensemble of ultracold atoms is investigated experimentally and found to correspond to a negative-temperature system since the entropy decreases with increasing energy at the high end of the energy spectrum. As the authors suggest, it would be of interest to investigate whether a suitable generalization of standard cosmological theory could be helpful, in order to elucidate the observed accelerated expansion of the universe usually explained in terms of a positive tensile stress (negative pressure). In the present note we take up this basic idea and investigate a generalization of the standard viscous cosmological theory, not by admitting negative temperatures but instead by letting the bulk viscosity take negative values. Evidently, such an approach breaks standard thermodynamics,...

  4. Hydrodynamics of spacetime and vacuum viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eling, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    It has recently been shown that the Einstein equation can be derived by demanding a non-equilibrium entropy balance law dS = δQ/T+diS hold for all local acceleration horizons through each point in spacetime. The entropy change dS is proportional to the change in horizon area while δQ and T are the energy flux across the horizon and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerating observer just inside the horizon. The internal entropy production term diS is proportional to the squared shear of the horizon and the ratio of the proportionality constant to the area entropy density is hbar/4π. Here we will show that this derivation can be reformulated in the language of hydrodynamics. We postulate that the vacuum thermal state in the Rindler wedge of spacetime obeys the holographic principle. Hydrodynamic perturbations of this state exist and are manifested in the dynamics of a stretched horizon fluid at the horizon boundary. Using the equations of hydrodynamics we derive the entropy balance law and show the Einstein equation is a consequence of vacuum hydrodynamics. This result implies that hbar/4π is the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the local vacuum thermal state. The value hbar/4π has attracted much attention as the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio for all gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual. It has also been conjectured as the universal lower bound on the ratio. We argue that our picture of the vacuum thermal state is consistent with the physics of the gauge/gravity dualities and then consider possible applications to open questions.

  5. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  6. The peak in anomalous magnetic viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous magnetic viscosity, where the magnetization as a function of time exhibits non-monotonic behaviour, being seen to increase, reach a peak, and then decrease, is observed on recoil lines in bulk amorphous ferromagnets, for certain magnetic prehistories. A simple geometrical approach based on the motion of the state line on the Preisach plane gives a theoretical framework for interpreting non-monotonic behaviour and explains the origin of the peak. This approach gives an expression for the time taken to reach the peak as a function of the applied (or holding) field. The theory is applied to experimental data for bulk amorphous ferromagnet alloys of composition Nd60−xFe30Al10Dyx, x = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4, and it gives a reasonable description of the observed behaviour. The role played by other key magnetic parameters, such as the intrinsic coercivity and fluctuation field, is also discussed. When the non-monotonic behaviour of the magnetization of a number of alloys is viewed in the context of the model, features of universal behaviour emerge, that are independent of alloy composition. - Highlights: • Development of a simple geometrical model based on the Preisach model which gives a complete explanation of the peak in the magnetic viscosity. • Geometrical approach is extended by considering equations that govern the motion of the state line. • The model is used to deduce the relationship between the holding field and the time it takes to reach the peak. • The model is tested with experimental results for a range of Nd–Fe–Al–Dy bulk amorphous ferromagnets. • There is good agreement between the model and the experimental data

  7. Cosmic String Universes Embedded with Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koijam Manihar Singh; Kangujam Priyokumar Singh

    2011-01-01

    We study string cosmological models with attached particles in LRS BI type space time.The dynamical and physical properties of such universes are studied,and the possibility that during the evolution of the universe the strings disappear,leaving only the particles,is also discussed.It is found that bulk viscosity plays a large role in the evolution of the universe.In these models we find critical instances of when there was a “Bounce”.The studied models are found to be of an inflationary type,and since a desirable feature of a meaningful string cosmological model is the presence of an inflationary epoch in the very early stages of evolution,our models can be thought of as realistic universes.The origin of the universe and the early stages of formation are still interesting areas of research.The concept of string theory was developed to describe the events of the early stages of the evolution of the universe.The universe can be described as a collection of extended (non point) objects.Thus,“string dust” cosmology will provide us with a model to investigate the properties related to this fact.%We study string cosmological models with attached particles in LRS BI type space time. The dynamical and physical properties of such universes are studied, and the possibility that during the evolution of the universe the strings disappear, leaving only the particles, is also discussed. It is found that bulk viscosity plays a large role in the evolution of the universe. In these models we find critical instances of when there was a "Bounce". The studied models are found to be of an inflationary type, and since a desirable feature of a meaningful string cosmological model is the presence of an inflationary epoch in the very early stages of evolution, our models can be thought of as realistic universes.

  8. Hydrodynamics of spacetime and vacuum viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has recently been shown that the Einstein equation can be derived by demanding a non-equilibrium entropy balance law dS = δQ/T+diS hold for all local acceleration horizons through each point in spacetime. The entropy change dS is proportional to the change in horizon area while δQ and T are the energy flux across the horizon and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerating observer just inside the horizon. The internal entropy production term diS is proportional to the squared shear of the horizon and the ratio of the proportionality constant to the area entropy density is h-bar /4π. Here we will show that this derivation can be reformulated in the language of hydrodynamics. We postulate that the vacuum thermal state in the Rindler wedge of spacetime obeys the holographic principle. Hydrodynamic perturbations of this state exist and are manifested in the dynamics of a stretched horizon fluid at the horizon boundary. Using the equations of hydrodynamics we derive the entropy balance law and show the Einstein equation is a consequence of vacuum hydrodynamics. This result implies that h-bar /4π is the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the local vacuum thermal state. The value h-bar /4π has attracted much attention as the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio for all gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual. It has also been conjectured as the universal lower bound on the ratio. We argue that our picture of the vacuum thermal state is consistent with the physics of the gauge/gravity dualities and then consider possible applications to open questions.

  9. Studies on Microbial Degradation of Natural Rubber Using Dilute Solution Viscosity Measurement and Weight Loss Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Onyeagoro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of molecular weight of rubber polymers for easy absorption of compounding ingredients is critical in every rubber compounding operation. Yet, rubber mastication which is the current practice of achieving this is expensive, requiring high energy and equipment cost. To address this problem, microbial degradation of natural rubber (NR and waste rubber tire (WRT by Nocardia sp. strain 385A was studied using dilute solution viscosity measurement and weight loss methods. Solutions of NR and WRT in toluene were inoculated with the microbes (Nocardia sp. strain 385A and kept in incubator. Incubation period varied between 0 to 10 weeks. The results obtained show that NR and WRT were mineralized and degraded by the microbes. Intrinsic viscosity values of both NR and WRT decreased with increasing period of incubation, indicating that degradation increases with increase in the incubation period. For the incubation periods investigated, WRT produced higher intrinsic viscosity values than NR due to the inhibitory effect of additives present in WRT to microbial degradation. Equivalent reduction in molecular weight obtained by rubber mastication technique was achieved by microbial degradation after 10 weeks incubation period. Rubber degrading bacteria can be useful for the disposal of discarded rubber products.

  10. Assessment of thermal load reduction due to the application of simple passive techniques in a house office building at the south of Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of possible reduction of heating and cooling requirements of 300 m2 house-office building has been presented in this paper, when simple Thermal Passive Techniques (TPT) have been applied to building's construction in Sebha city at the Libyan south. The known software for dynamic simulation (TRNSYS) has been used as an environment of digital experimentation for this study. A prototype represents the building has been constructed with the help of the available model of single thermal zone of TRNSYS (Type 19). The built-in ASHREA Transfer Function Method within this model has been used to calculate the heat flux through building's materials. Primarily, the thermal load on building's construction without TPTs has been evaluated under weather conditions of a Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) of Sebha city. Then, the building has been equipped with simple TPTs (such as the control of building materials, insulation, shading, infiltration and ventilation with windows resizing). This building was subjected to the same weather conditions and again the thermal load has been evaluated in order to report the percentage of reduction of thermal load. The simulation has been conducted successfully, where good assessment of reduction of annual heating and cooling demands in the building has been obtained. It is proved that, about (46%) of annual heating load and (48%) of annual cooling load can be reduced if suitable simple TPTs were incorporated in buildings.(Author)

  11. The Wild Wild West: A Framework to Integrate mHealth Software Applications and Wearables to Support Physical Activity Assessment, Counseling and Interventions for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobelo, Felipe; Kelli, Heval M; Tejedor, Sheri Chernetsky; Pratt, Michael; McConnell, Michael V; Martin, Seth S; Welk, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) interventions constitute a critical component of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction programs. Objective mobile health (mHealth) software applications (apps) and wearable activity monitors (WAMs) can advance both assessment and integration of PA counseling in clinical settings and support community-based PA interventions. The use of mHealth technology for CVD risk reduction is promising, but integration into routine clinical care and population health management has proven challenging. The increasing diversity of available technologies and the lack of a comprehensive guiding framework are key barriers for standardizing data collection and integration. This paper reviews the validity, utility and feasibility of implementing mHealth technology in clinical settings and proposes an organizational framework to support PA assessment, counseling and referrals to community resources for CVD risk reduction interventions. This integration framework can be adapted to different clinical population needs. It should also be refined as technologies and regulations advance under an evolving health care system landscape in the United States and globally. PMID:26923067

  12. Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn

    2005-06-01

    Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

  13. Viscosity of iodinated contrast agents during renal excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Modern iodinated non-ionic contrast agents (CAs) can be classified based on their molecular structure into monomeric and dimeric CAs and have at comparable iodine concentrations a different viscosity and osmolality. During their renal excretion, CAs are concentrated in the renal tubuli which might enhance the viscosity difference between monomeric and dimeric CAs. The viscosity of a CA might have an underestimated importance for renal safety, as suggested by recent publications. In this study, we investigated the viscosities of CAs at the concentrations expected to be present in renal tubules. This concentration process was simulated in vitro using dialysis. Furthermore, we investigated urine viscosity and urine flow in rodents after administration of several non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. Materials and methods: To estimate the viscosity of the CAs in vivo, we performed an in vitro dialysis of monomeric and dimeric CAs at various physiological osmolalities of the renal tubulus (290, 400, 500, 700 and 1000 mOsm/kg H2O). Following the dialysis, the iodine concentrations and the viscosities of the CAs were determined. Furthermore, to investigate the concentration process in vivo, we measured the urine viscosity and the urine flow in Han Wister rats after the administration of Iopromide, Iohexol, Ioversol, Iomeprol, Iodixanol, and Iosimenol at comparable iodine concentrations. As a control, saline was injected at the same volume. Results: In vitro dialysis of the dimeric CA increased the iodine concentration and strongly increased the viscosity at all tested osmolalities. In contrast, for the monomeric agents an increase in concentration and viscosity was observed only at 700 as well 1000 mOsm/kg H2O but to a lesser extent. In summary, dialysis strongly enhanced the viscosity differences between the non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. The administration of dimeric CAs leads to a strong increase in urine viscosity; this was not observed for the

  14. Rheology and tribology of lubricants with polymeric viscosity modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak, LotfizadehDehkordi

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) theory has been used to model the lubrication state of antifriction machine elements, where initial viscosity and pressure viscosity coefficients are essential parameters in film thickness modeling. Since the pressures of lubricants in the contact zone can be very high, it is important to know the rheological properties of lubricants in these pressure and temperature regimes. The characteristics of viscosity behavior as a function of pressure are also essential for a universal definition of the pressure viscosity coefficient in order to estimate film thickness in an EHL regime. In this study, viscosities and pressure-viscosity coefficients of ten commercial engine and gear oils and seventeen laboratory-produced oil/polymer viscosity modifiers (VM) additives are measured up to 1.3 GPa at 40, 75 and 100 °C. For the first time, a sharp increase in the viscosity and piezoviscous factor is observed in both mineral-based and synthetic-based oils with different VMs. Analysis of the experimental results indicates that sharp increase in viscosity observed in these experiments are believed to arise from physical changes in the VMs, that is liquid-solid phase transition. Evidence is offered that polymer properties such as molecular weight, concentration and structure influence the onset of the phase transitions. A modified Yasutomi model, which normally describes the pressure dependence of the viscosity of lubricants very well, fails to predict the viscosity of the specimens above the onset of sharp increase in viscosity. A design of experiment (DOE) analysis using Design-Expert software indicates that pressure and temperature are the most critical parameters in the viscosity variation. Tribological tests demonstrate that wear in the contact, zone occurs at temperatures and stresses that coincides with the VM phase transitions in both commercial and laboratory synthesized oil/VMs. Tribological results also indicate that the onset of the

  15. Viscosity of iodinated contrast agents during renal excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Jost@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lengsfeld, Philipp, E-mail: Philipp.Lengsfeld@bayer.com [Global Medical Affairs Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lenhard, Diana C., E-mail: Diana.Lenhard@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus, E-mail: Hubertus.Pietsch@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Huetter, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.Huetter@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Sieber, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Sieber@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: Modern iodinated non-ionic contrast agents (CAs) can be classified based on their molecular structure into monomeric and dimeric CAs and have at comparable iodine concentrations a different viscosity and osmolality. During their renal excretion, CAs are concentrated in the renal tubuli which might enhance the viscosity difference between monomeric and dimeric CAs. The viscosity of a CA might have an underestimated importance for renal safety, as suggested by recent publications. In this study, we investigated the viscosities of CAs at the concentrations expected to be present in renal tubules. This concentration process was simulated in vitro using dialysis. Furthermore, we investigated urine viscosity and urine flow in rodents after administration of several non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. Materials and methods: To estimate the viscosity of the CAs in vivo, we performed an in vitro dialysis of monomeric and dimeric CAs at various physiological osmolalities of the renal tubulus (290, 400, 500, 700 and 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O). Following the dialysis, the iodine concentrations and the viscosities of the CAs were determined. Furthermore, to investigate the concentration process in vivo, we measured the urine viscosity and the urine flow in Han Wister rats after the administration of Iopromide, Iohexol, Ioversol, Iomeprol, Iodixanol, and Iosimenol at comparable iodine concentrations. As a control, saline was injected at the same volume. Results: In vitro dialysis of the dimeric CA increased the iodine concentration and strongly increased the viscosity at all tested osmolalities. In contrast, for the monomeric agents an increase in concentration and viscosity was observed only at 700 as well 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O but to a lesser extent. In summary, dialysis strongly enhanced the viscosity differences between the non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. The administration of dimeric CAs leads to a strong increase in urine viscosity; this was not observed for

  16. Viscosity measurements of epoxy resin filled with ferrite powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stabik

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this work was to determine influence of fillers on viscosity, especially of six mixtures that contain different amount of ferrite powder. It was made in order to find out an effect of introduced ferrite powder on epoxy resin processing conditions and parameters. Additionally viscosity of pure epoxy resin was determined for reference purposes. The influence of temperature on composites viscosity was also examined.Design/methodology/approach: Viscosity of mixtures based on epoxy resin that contain ferrite powders and pure epoxy resin using Hoeppler viscometer was measured. Procedures of viscosity measurements were performed for three temperatures and for three filler contents.Findings: Higher temperature of measurement resulted in lower values of viscosity while higher quantity of ferrite powder increased viscosity of mixtures. There was no difference between results of viscosity that were obtained for barium ferrite and strontium ferrite.Research limitations/implications: The main problem of this work was limitations of research method. Mixtures before measurement had to be put to the vacuum venting in order to remove air bubbles that were introduced through mixing. Also an amount of powder introduced into the matrix was limited because for higher contents it was not possible to pour mixtures into glass pipe of measurement device.Practical implications: Applied method allowed to determine the influence of temperature, kind and quantity of filler on viscosity. Viscosity is the main factor defining processing parameters in many processing technologies.Originality/value: Results of viscosity for searched composites are not known up till now. Achieved results are planned in order to use them in future works of authors on polymeric magnetic composites.

  17. On the Correlation Between Free Volume and Viscosity of Polysulphone Melt Viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Polášková, M.; Pivokonský, Radek; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Copenhagen : Hexagon Holding ApS, 2007, s. 1-8. ISBN 87-89753-56-9. [PPS07 EA: Europe/Africa Regional Meeting 2007. Gothenburg (SE), 28.08.2007-30.08.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB208100702 Grant ostatní: GA MPO(CZ) 2A-1TP1/126 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Free volume * viscosity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  18. Effect of ion viscosity on dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a nonextensive magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear features of dust ion-acoustic shock waves (DIASWs) in a magnetoplasma containing cold positive ions, nonextensive electrons, and immobile negatively charged dust grains taking into account the cold ion kinematic viscosity are investigated. The reductive perturbation technique is used to derive a Zakharov-Kuznetsov-Burgers (ZK-Burgers). It is found that the fundamental properties of the DIASWs are significantly modified by the different system parameters such as the nonextensive parameter, the ion gyrofrequency, the dust concentration, the viscosity parameter, and the direction cosines. Also, the polarities (positive and negative shocks) of the potential are found to exist in the plasma under consideration. The implications of our results may be used in understanding the acoustic shock waves propagation in laboratory and space plasmas.

  19. Economic and environmental perspective by 2030 and economic assessments of different scenarios of reduction of greenhouse gas in Europe - Seureco-Erasme working document Nr. 1/11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report a study which aimed at precisely assessing for France and Europe the economic consequences on growth and employment of the implementation of the European Climate Plan which must be implemented in 2013, and at providing elements of reflection for the Committee '2020-2050 Trajectories' for the study of the cost-efficiency trajectories of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in compliance with the 'factor 5' objective by 2050. After a presentation of the European econometric model (NEMESIS), this report describes the elaborated reference scenario. The obtained results for Europe and France show that the 2008 crisis has largely invalidated the initial objectives of the European climate Plan, that the objectives (EU-ETS excluded) are achieved spontaneously in many countries, and that the -30 pc objective only implies a 7.5 pc reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020

  20. New low-viscosity overlay medium for viral plaque assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garten Wolfgang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plaque assays in cell culture monolayers under solid or semisolid overlay media are commonly used for quantification of viruses and antiviral substances. To overcome the pitfalls of known overlays, we tested suspensions of microcrystalline cellulose Avicel RC/CL™ as overlay media in the plaque and plaque-inhibition assay of influenza viruses. Results Significantly larger plaques were formed under Avicel-containing media, as compared to agar and methylcellulose (MC overlay media. The plaque size increased with decreasing Avicel concentration, but even very diluted Avicel overlays (0.3% ensured formation of localized plaques. Due to their low viscosity, Avicel overlays were easier to use than methylcellulose overlays, especially in the 96-well culture plates. Furthermore, Avicel overlay could be applied without prior removal of the virus inoculum thus facilitating the assay and reducing chances of cross-contamination. Using neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir carboxylate, we demonstrated applicability of the Avicel-based plaque reduction assay for testing of antiviral substances. Conclusion Plaque assay under Avicel-containing overlay media is easier, faster and more sensitive than assays under agar- and methylcellulose overlays. The assay can be readily performed in a 96-well plate format and seems particularly suitable for high-throughput virus titrations, serological studies and experiments on viral drug sensitivity. It may also facilitate work with highly pathogenic agents performed under hampered conditions of bio-safety labs.

  1. Georgia-Pacific Palatka Plant Uses Thermal Pinch Analysis and Evaluates Water Reduction in Plant-Wide Energy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes the methods and results used in a plant-wide assessment at a Georgia-Pacific paper mill in Palatka, FL. Assessment personnel recommended several projects, which, if implemented, have the potential to save the plant more than 729,000 MMBtu per year and $2.9 million per year. In addition, the plant could reduce water use by 2,100 gallons per minute.

  2. The importance of health co-benefits in macroeconomic assessments of UK Greenhouse Gas emission reduction strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Keogh-Brown, Marcus R; Richard D. Smith; Chalabi, Zaid; Dangour, Alan D.; Davies, Mike,; Edwards, Phil; Garnett, Tara; Givoni, Moshe; Griffiths, Ulla; Hamilton, Ian; Jarrett, James; Roberts, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul; Woodcock, James

    2013-01-01

    We employ a single-country dynamically-recursive Computable General Equilibrium model to make health-focussed macroeconomic assessments of three contingent UK Greenhouse Gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, designed to achieve 2030 emission targets as suggested by the UK Committee on Climate Change. In contrast to previous assessment studies, our main focus is on health co-benefits additional to those from reduced local air pollution. We employ a conservative cost-effectiveness methodology with a...

  3. Impact of biofluid viscosity on size and sedimentation efficiency of the isolated microvesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles are nano-sized lipid vesicles released by all cells in vivo and in vitro. They are released physiologically under normal conditions but their rate of release is higher under pathological conditions such as tumors. Once released they end up in the systemic circulation and have been found and characterized in all biofluids such as plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, breast milk, ascites, and urine. Microvesicles represent the status of the donor cell they are released from and they are currently under intense investigation as a potential source for disease biomarkers. Currently, the gold standard for isolating microvesicles is ultracentrifugation, although alternative techniques such as affinity purification have been explored. Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to a deforming force by either shear or tensile stress. The different chemical and molecular compositions of biofluids have an effect on its viscosity and this could affect movements of the particles inside the fluid. In this manuscript we addressed the issue of whether viscosity has an effect on sedimentation efficiency of microvesicles using ultracentrifugation. We used different biofluids and spiked them with polystyrene beads and assessed their recovery using the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. We demonstrate that MVs recovery inversely correlates with viscosity and as a result, sample dilutions should be considered prior to ultracentifugation when processing any biofluids.

  4. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole;

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  5. Bianchi-Type Ⅱ String Cosmological Models with Bulk Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    The locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi-type Ⅱ string cosmological models with bulk viscosity are obtained, where an equation of state, p = kλ, and a relation between metric potentials, R = ASn, are adopted. The physical features of the models are also discussed. In special cases the model reduces to the string models without viscosity that was previously given in the literatures.

  6. On-line measurement of food viscosity during flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Sarah Louise; Friis, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time.......Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time....

  7. Nonlinear Eddy Viscosity Models applied to Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan;

    2013-01-01

    The linear k−ε eddy viscosity model and modified versions of two existing nonlinear eddy viscosity models are applied to single wind turbine wake simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes code. Results are compared with field wake measurements. The nonlinear models give better results...

  8. Homeostasis of plasma membrane viscosity in fluctuating temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Shvedunova, Maria; Thomson, Adrian J W; Evans, Nicola H; Penfield, Steven; Runions, John; McWatters, Harriet G

    2011-10-01

    Temperature has a direct effect at the cellular level on an organism. For instance, in the case of biomembranes, cooling causes lipids to lose entropy and pack closely together. Reducing temperature should, in the absence of other factors, increase the viscosity of a lipid membrane. We have investigated the effect of temperature variation on plasma membrane (PM) viscosity. We used dispersion tracking of photoactivated green fluorescent protein (GFP) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in wild-type and desaturase mutant Arabidopsis thaliana plants along with membrane lipid saturation analysis to monitor the effect of temperature and membrane lipid composition on PM viscosity. Plasma membrane viscosity in A. thaliana is negatively correlated with ambient temperature only under constant-temperature conditions. In the more natural environment of temperature cycles, plants actively manage PM viscosity to counteract the direct effects of temperature. Plasma membrane viscosity is regulated by altering the proportion of desaturated fatty acids. In cold conditions, cell membranes accumulate desaturated fatty acids, which decreases membrane viscosity and vice versa. Moreover, we show that control of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FAD2)-dependent lipid desaturation is essential for this homeostasis of membrane viscosity. Finally, a lack of FAD2 function results in aberrant temperature responses. PMID:21762166

  9. A Riemann problem with small viscosity and dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyunnapara Thomas Joseph

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove existence of global solutions to a hyperbolic system in elastodynamics, with small viscosity and dispersion terms and derive estimates uniform in the viscosity-dispersion parameters. By passing to the limit, we prove the existence of solution the Riemann problem for the hyperbolic system with arbitrary Riemann data.

  10. Sound damping in ferrofluids: Magnetically enhanced compressional viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Hanns Walter; Jiang, Yimin; Liu, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The damping of sound waves in magnetized ferrofluids is investigated and shown to be considerably higher than in the non-magnetized case. This fact may be interpreted as a field-enhanced, effective compressional viscosity -- in analogy to the ubiquitous field-enhanced shear viscosity that is known to be the reason for many unusual behavior of ferrofluids under shear.

  11. Collaborative study of viscosity measurement of black and white peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscosity measurement has been reported to be a promising method for detecting irradiated peppers. Based on the results of previous studies, a protocol for determining the parameter values for detecting irradiated peppers by viscosity measurement was prepared and a collaborative study conducted to examine the usefulness of the viscometric method. (author)

  12. Post glacial rebounds measure the viscosity of the lithosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, J

    2003-01-01

    The observed higher uplift rates before the end of deglaciation requires the existence of a low viscosity channel or layer. The uplifts observed after the end of deglaciation does not show any contribution from this low viscosity channel and a homogeneous viscosity model fits very well to the observed uplift. Most of the researchers therefore prefer the homogeneous model and suggest that the higher uplift rate before the end of deglaciation is the result of elastic contamination. It has been shown that the elastic deformation of the lithosphere is far too small to be responsible for the observed extra uplift; therefore, the homogeneous viscosity model should be discredited. The homogeneous viscosity of the postglacial period and the high uplift rate of the late glacial period can be explained with a model which has an upper layer determining the homogeneous viscosity and the layer below it which has a low viscosity. The contribution to the uplift of this low viscosity layer is indistinguishable from an instan...

  13. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Backer; C.P. Lowe; H.C.J. Hoefsloot; P.D. Iedema

    2005-01-01

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to noi

  14. Critical exponent for the viscosity of four binary liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    The viscosity of the following binary mixtures was measured near their consolute points: (1) methanol + cyclohexane, (2) isobutyric acid + water, (3) nitroethane + 3-methylpentane, and (4) 2-butoxyethanol + water. It is shown that the multiplicative hypothesis is valid for these mixtures. It is also found that the concentration closest to critical has the largest viscosity enhancement.

  15. Turbulent viscosity variability in self-propelled body wake model

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovin, K; Golbraikh, E; Soloviev, A

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of turbulent viscosity variability on the properties of self-propelled body wake model. In addition to the already known integrals of motion obtained with constant turbulent viscosity, we obtain new ones. The presence of new integrals of motion leads, in particular, to changes in the behavior of the width and profile of the wake leading to its conservation.

  16. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  17. Pretreatment with xylanase and its significance in hemicellulose removal from mixed hardwood kraft pulp as a process step for viscose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Bhardwaj, Nishi K; Sharma, Jitender

    2016-07-10

    The upturn of viscose fiber market has triggered an augmented dissolving pulp usage over the last decade. Dissolving pulp is feasible to obtain from kraft pulp after two essential steps including hemicellulose removal and subsequent pulp activation. Prerequisite of conversion being hemicellulose reduction can be gently done by using xylanase treatment prior to alkali extraction. Herein, the significance of xylanase treatment and the optimum xylanase dose required in conjunction with subsequent alkali extraction was investigated. An increase in xylanase dose prior to alkali extraction had no significant effect on pentosans while the Fock reactivity and viscosity both improved at the dose of 50AXU/g. Also, alkali extraction without xylanase pretreatment resulted in decreased Fock reactivity, alpha cellulose, brightness and viscosity of paper grade pulp. A moderate dose of xylanase prior to alkali extraction can thus be used to facilitate the hemicellulose removal while simultaneously protecting the native structure of cellulose. PMID:27106156

  18. Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) as a means to include environmental knowledge in decision making in the case of an aluminium reduction plant in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Merrild

    2011-01-01

    The purpose and means of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) can vary depending on the case investigated and interests of actors involved. Based on the objective for the SEA of a proposed aluminium reduction plant (ARP) in Greenland, this paper evaluates the SEA’s effectiveness in securing...... environmental knowledge in a decision-making process. It is concluded that the SEA secured inclusion of environmental knowledge in three out of four key decision arenas, which determined the direction and outcome of the process. The results from the SEA did not oppose the recommendations based on the economic...

  19. Viscosity Prediction of Natural Gas Using the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2002-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity modeling, a procedure is introduced for predicting the viscosity of hydrocarbon mixtures rich in one component, which is the case for natural gases. In this procedure, the mixture friction coefficients are estimated with mixing...... rules based on the values of the pure component friction coefficients. Since natural gases contain mainly methane, two f-theory models are combined, where the friction coefficients of methane are estimated by a seven-constant f-theory model directly fitted to methane viscosities, and the friction...... coefficients of the other components are estimated by the one-parameter general f-theory model. The viscosity predictions are performed with the SRK, the PR, and the PRSV equations of state, respectively. For recently measured viscosities of natural gases, the resultant AAD (0.5 to 0.8%) is in excellent...

  20. Compressibilities and viscosities of reference, vegetable, and synthetic gear lubricants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Lugo, Luis; Fernández, Josefa

    2014-01-01

    knowledge of their thermophysical properties such as their viscosity or density, among others. Regarding this issue, in this work, we have carried out density measurements between 278.15 and 398.15 K and pressures up to 120 MPa and calculated the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity.......06%. Dowson and Higginson and Zhu and Wen equations of state do not predict well the isothermal compressibilities, with AAD % being around 45% for both equations. Moreover, the viscosities were measured in the temperature range from 278.15 to 373.15 K at atmospheric pressure for these oils, and the viscosity...... index was also determined. New formulated oils present the highest viscosity indexes and the lowest viscosity data at low temperatures; therefore, they become the most suitable for machinery cold start. © 2014 American Chemical Society....

  1. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  2. Solvent isotope effect on viscosity of polystyrene-benzene solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration and temperature dependencies of viscosity and density of solutions of nearly monodisperse samples (Mw/Mn w) ranging from 4x103 to 4x105 between 293-313 K. Isotope H/D substitution in benzene causes visible changes in viscosity and density of solutions, however, its influence on intrinsic viscosities and Huggins constants, derived from the concentration dependences of viscosity, is negligible. No isotope effects on the exponents in the power low relationship have been detected. The viscosities of the solutions have been also correlated with the densities. The apparent close-packed volumes are practically constant for all solutions and seem to be determined by the properties of the solvent. The deuterium substitution visibly affects the close-packed volumes - they decrease by approximately 13%, both in pure solvent and in solutions. (author)

  3. Differential Geometrically Consistent Artificial Viscosity in Comoving Curvilinear Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Höller, Harald; Dorfi, Ernst; Benger, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Context. High-resolution numerical methods have been developed for nonlinear, discontinuous problems as they appear in simulations of astrophysical objects. One of the strategies applied is the concept of artificial viscosity. Aims. Grid-based numerical simulations ideally utilize problem-oriented grids in order to minimize the necessary number of cells at a given (desired) spatial resolution. We want to propose a modified tensor of artificial viscosity which is employable for generally comoving, curvilinear grids. Methods. We study a differential geometrically consistent artificial viscosity analytically and visualize a comparison of our result to previous implementations by applying it to a simple self-similar velocity field. We give a general introduction to artificial viscosity first and motivate its application in numerical analysis. Then we present how a tensor of artificial viscosity has to be designed when going beyond common static Eulerian or Lagrangian comoving rectangular grids. Results. We find t...

  4. Quantitative characterization of the viscosity of a microemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Huang, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The viscosity of the three-component microemulsion water/decane/AOT has been measured as a function of temperature and droplet volume fraction. At temperatures well below the phase-separation temperature the viscosity is described by treating the droplets as hard spheres suspended in decane. Upon approaching the two-phase region from low temperature, there is a large (as much as a factor of four) smooth increase of the viscosity which may be related to the percolation-like transition observed in the electrical conductivity. This increase in viscosity is not completely consistent with either a naive electroviscous model or a simple clustering model. The divergence of the viscosity near the critical point (39 C) is superimposed upon the smooth increase. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the critical divergence are similar to that seen near the critical points of binary liquid mixtures.

  5. Shear viscosity relaxation of a critical binary liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, Ralph; Kaatze, Udo

    2003-07-01

    Two series of diffusion coefficients D are reported for the triethylamine-water binary critical mixture. One has been obtained from quasielastic light scattering measurements, the other one has been derived from broadband ultrasonic spectra, yielding the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations, and shear viscosity data. Using high frequency shear impedance spectrometry in the range 20-130 MHz, relaxations in the background part of the viscosity, resulting in viscoelastic mixture properties, have been found. Both series of D data agree either if a half-attenuation frequency distinctly smaller than the theoretical value Omega(1/2)=2.1 is used in the Bhattacharjee-Ferrell scaling function or if the viscosity extrapolated from the shear impedance measurements to low frequencies is applied to the Kawasaki-Ferrell relation. This extrapolated viscosity is smaller than the static shear viscosity measured with capillary viscosimeters. PMID:12935130

  6. Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity are simulated. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of the scalar field. • An identity for the Stanton number is derived and analyzed. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of scalar transfer rate. • Modification of turbulent flow field leads to an enhanced scalar transfer rate. - Abstract: Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over isothermally heated walls were performed, and the influence of the wall-heating on the thermal boundary layers was investigated. The DNS adopt an empirical relation for the temperature-dependent viscosity of water. The Prandtl number therefore changes with temperature, while the Péclet number is constant. Two wall temperatures (Tw = 70 °C and 99 °C) were considered relative to T∞ = 30 °C, and a reference simulation of TBL with constant viscosity was also performed for comparison. In the variable viscosity flow, the mean and variance of the scalar, when normalized by the friction temperature deficit, decrease relative to the constant viscosity flow. A relation for the mean scalar which takes into account the variable viscosity is proposed. Appropriate scalings for the scalar fluctuations and the scalar flux are also introduced, and are shown to be applicable for both variable and constant viscosity flows. Due to the modification of the near-wall turbulence, the Stanton number and the Reynolds analogy factor are augmented by 10% and 44%, respectively, in the variable viscosity flow. An identity for the Stanton number is derived and shows that the mean wall-normal velocity and wall-normal scalar flux cause the increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, the augmented near-wall velocity fluctuations lead to an increase of the wall-normal scalar flux, which contributes favorably to the enhanced heat transfer at the wall

  7. A biodynamic microsystem for fluids viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to model, design and fabricate a biodynamic analysis microsystem required for determination of various molecular transport properties of the biological fluids. In order to achieve this, a lab-on-a-chip device was fabricated. The microfluidic system developed satisfies the objectives for the study of microcirculation and characterization of cell rheological properties, functions and behaviour. The measurement principle of the viscosity of biological fluids is based on the detection of the rotation of a polysilicon gear-wheels system. The gear-wheels have external diameters of 250 μm, 200 μm, 160 μm and 3 μm thickness. The micromachining process combines the undercut and refill technique with pin-joint bearing permitting the fabrication of bushings that were used to elevate the rotor away from the silicon surface. The testing of the microfluidic dynamic system was performed using electromagnetic micropumps and magnetic controllers. Each device was fabricated by silicon micromachining technology and tested to obtain the specific characteristics

  8. Effects of Metal Ions on Viscosity of Aqueous Sodium Carboxylmethylcellulose Solution and Development of Dropping Ball Method on Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Set, Seng; Ford, David; Kita, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    This research revealed that metal ions with different charges could significantly affect the viscosity of aqueous sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) solution. On the basis of an Ostwald viscometer, an improvised apparatus using a dropping ball for examining the viscosity of liquids/solutions has been developed. The results indicate that the…

  9. Assessing the potential impact of the CO2 performance ladder on the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.G.; Blok, K.

    2013-01-01

    Green public procurement is often promoted as a tool to reduce energy use and CO2 emissions in the supply chains of public entities. However, only a limited number of studies has quantitatively assessed the environmental impacts of green public procurement schemes. The aim of this paper was to asses

  10. Training image analysis for model error assessment and dimension reduction in Bayesian-MCMC solutions to inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, C.; Irving, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bayesian solutions to inverse problems in near-surface geophysics and hydrology have gained increasing popularity as a means of estimating not only subsurface model parameters, but also their corresponding uncertainties that can be used in probabilistic forecasting and risk analysis. In particular, Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo (MCMC) methods have attracted much recent attention as a means of statistically sampling from the Bayesian posterior distribution. In this regard, two approaches are commonly used to improve the computational tractability of the Bayesian-MCMC approach: (i) Forward models involving a simplification of the underlying physics are employed, which offer a significant reduction in the time required to calculate data, but generally at the expense of model accuracy, and (ii) the model parameter space is represented using a limited set of spatially correlated basis functions as opposed to a more intuitive high-dimensional pixel-based parameterization. It has become well understood that model inaccuracies resulting from (i) can lead to posterior parameter distributions that are highly biased and overly confident. Further, when performing model reduction as described in (ii), it is not clear how the prior distribution for the basis weights should be defined because simple (e.g., Gaussian or uniform) priors that may be suitable for a pixel-based parameterization may result in a strong prior bias when used for the weights. To address the issue of model error resulting from known forward model approximations, we generate a set of error training realizations and analyze them with principal component analysis (PCA) in order to generate a sparse basis. The latter is used in the MCMC inversion to remove the main model-error component from the residuals. To improve issues related to prior bias when performing model reduction, we also use a training realization approach, but this time models are simulated from the prior distribution and analyzed using independent

  11. Civil helicopter noise assessment study Boeing-Vertol model 347. [recommendations for reduction of helicopter noise levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterkeuser, E. G.; Sternfeld, H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to forecast the noise restrictions which may be imposed on civil transport helicopters in the 1975-1985 time period. Certification and community acceptance criteria were predicted. A 50 passenger tandem rotor helicopter based on the Boeing-Vertol Model 347 was studied to determine the noise reductions required, and the means of achieving them. Some of the important study recommendations are: (1) certification limits should be equivalent to 95 EPNdb at data points located at 500 feet to each side of the touchdown/takeoff point, and 1000 feet from this point directly under the approach and departure flight path. (2) community acceptance should be measured as Equivalent Noise Level (Leq), based on dBA, with separate limits for day and night operations, and (3) in order to comply with the above guidelines, the Model 347 helicopter will require studies and tests leading to several modifications.

  12. Technology priorities for transport in Asia: assessment of economy-wide CO2 emissions reduction for Lebanon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhar, Subash; Marpaung, Charles O. P.

    2015-01-01

    mitigations actions (NAMA) given their strong contribution for development and therefore a methodology based on in-put out-put decomposition analysis is proposed for analysing economy wide CO2 emissions reductions. The methodology has been applied for the transport sector of Lebanon where alternative fuels......,improvement to cars (private and taxis) and buses for public transport were prioritized by stakeholders. The economy-wide CO2 emission reduce by 2,269 thousand tons by 2020 if the prioritized technologies are implemented in Lebanon. Fuel mix effect and structural effect would reduce CO2 emission by 2......,611 thousand tons, while the final demand effect would increase the CO2 emission by 342 thousand tons....

  13. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Melanie; Garcia-Encina, Pedro A.; Munoz, Raul [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Stams, Alfons J.M. [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Lab. of Microbiology; Rosa, Francisco de la [Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2011-05-15

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and 0, respectively) were chosen as model organic pollutants. In the absence of external oxygen supply, microalgal photosynthesis was not capable of supporting a significant methane and methanol biodegradation due to their high oxygen demands per carbon unit, while glucose was fully oxidized by photosynthetic oxygenation. When bicarbonate was added, removal efficiencies of 37 {+-} 4% (20 days), 65 {+-} 4% (11 days) and 100% (2 days) were recorded for CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}OH and C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6}, respectively due to the additional oxygen generated from photosynthetic bicarbonate assimilation. The use of NO{sub 3}{sup -} instead of NH{sub 4}{sup +} as nitrogen source (N oxidation-reduction state of +5 vs. -3) resulted in an increase in CH4 degradation from 0 to 33 {+-} 3% in the absence of bicarbonate and from 37 {+-} 4% to 100% in the presence of bicarbonate, likely due to a decrease in the stoichiometric oxygen requirements and the higher photosynthetic oxygen production. Hypothetically, the CORS of the substrates might affect the CORS of the microalgal biomass composition (higher lipid content). However, the total lipid content of the algal-bacterial biomass was 19 {+-} 7% in the absence and 16 {+-} 2% in the presence of bicarbonate. (orig.)

  14. Assessing sulfate reduction and methane cycling in a high salinity pore water system in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Downer, R.; Coffin, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Pore waters extracted from 18 piston cores obtained on and near a salt-cored bathymetric high in Keathley Canyon lease block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico contain elevated concentrations of chloride (up to 838 mM) and have pore water chemical concentration profiles that exhibit extensive departures (concavity) from steady-state (linear) diffusive equilibrium with depth. Minimum ??13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) values of -55.9??? to -64.8??? at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) strongly suggest active anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) throughout the study region. However, the nonlinear pore water chemistry-depth profiles make it impossible to determine the vertical extent of active AOM or the potential role of alternate sulfate reduction pathways. Here we utilize the conservative (non-reactive) nature of dissolved chloride to differentiate the effects of biogeochemical activity (e.g., AOM and/or organoclastic sulfate reduction) relative to physical mixing in high salinity Keathley Canyon sediments. In most cases, the DIC and sulfate concentrations in pore waters are consistent with a conservative mixing model that uses chloride concentrations at the seafloor and the SMT as endmembers. Conservative mixing of pore water constituents implies that an undetermined physical process is primarily responsible for the nonlinearity of the pore water-depth profiles. In limited cases where the sulfate and DIC concentrations deviated from conservative mixing between the seafloor and SMT, the ??13C-DIC mixing diagrams suggest that the excess DIC is produced from a 13C-depleted source that could only be accounted for by microbial methane, the dominant form of methane identified during this study. We conclude that AOM is the most prevalent sink for sulfate and that it occurs primarily at the SMT at this Keathley Canyon site.

  15. Root uptake and reduction of hexavalent chromium by aquatic macrophytes as assessed by high-resolution X-ray emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Martin, Neiva; Stutz, Guillermo; Tirao, German; Palácio, Soraya M; Rizzutto, Márcia A; Módenes, Aparecido N; Silva, Fernando G; Szymanski, Nayara; Kroumov, Alexander D

    2009-09-01

    Aquatic macrophytes Salvinia auriculata, Pistia stratiotes and Eichhornia crassipes were chosen to investigate the Cr(VI) reduced by root-based biosorption in a chromium uptake experiment, using a high-resolution XRF technique. These plants were grown in hydroponics medium supplied with non-toxic Cr concentrations during a 27-day metal uptake experiment. The high-resolution Cr-Kbeta fluorescence spectra for dried root tissues and Cr reference material (100% Cr, Cr(2)O(3), and CrO(3)) were measured using an XRF spectrometer. For all species of aquatic plant treated with Cr(VI), the energy of the Cr-Kbeta(2,5) line was shifted around 8 eV below the same spectral line identified for the Cr(VI) reference, but it was also near to the line identified for the Cr(III) reference. Moreover, there was a lack of the strong Cr-Kbeta'' line assigned to the Cr(VI) reference material within the Cr(VI)-treated plant spectra, suggesting the reduction of Cr(VI) for other less toxic oxidation states of Cr. As all Cr-Kbeta spectra of root tissue species were compared, the peak energies and lineshape patterns of the Cr-Kbeta(2,5) line are coincident for the same aquatic plant species, when they were treated with Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Based on the experimental evidence, the Cr(VI) reduction process has happened during metal biosorption by these plants. PMID:19595427

  16. An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, or cogeneration systems, generated electrical/mechanical and thermal energy simultaneously, recovering much of the energy normally lost in separate generation. This recovered energy can be used for heating or cooling purposes, eliminating the need for a separate boiler. Significant reductions in energy, criteria pollutants, and carbon emissions can be achieved from the improved efficiency of fuel use. Generating electricity on or near the point of use also avoids transmission and distribution losses and defers expansion of the electricity transmission grid. Several recent developments make dramatic expansion of CHP a cost-effective possibility over the next decade. First, advances in technologies such as combustion turbines, steam turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells. and heat-recovery equipment have decreased the cost and improved the performance of CHP systems. Second, a significant portion of the nation's boiler stock will need to be replaced in the next decade, creating an opportunity to upgrade this equipment with clean and efficient CHP systems. Third, environmental policies, including addressing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, have created pressures to find cleaner and more efficient means of using energy. Finally, electric power market restructuring is creating new opportunities for innovations in power generation and smaller-scale distributed systems such as CHP. The integrated analysis suggests that there is enormous potential for the installation of cost-effective CHP in the industrial, district energy, and buildings sectors. The projected additional capacity by 2010 is 73 GW with corresponding energy savings of 2.6 quadrillion Btus, carbon emissions reductions of 74 million metric tons, 1.4 million tons of avoided SO2 emissions, and 0.6 million tons of avoided NOx emissions. The authors estimate that this new CHP would require cumulative capital investments of roughly $47 billion over ten years

  17. Densities, viscosities, and isobaric heat capacities of the system (1-butanol + cyclohexane) at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The densities of cyclohexane and its mixtures with 1-butanol were measured. • The excess molar volumes were calculated and correlated. • The viscosities were measured at atmospheric pressure. • The isobaric heat capacities were measured at p = (0.1 to 25) MPa at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K. • A positive deviation from the ideal behavior is observed. - Abstract: The cyclohexane and the system of 1-butanol + cyclohexane have been characterized using densities, viscosities and isobaric heat capacities measurements. For that, the densities were measured in a high-pressure vibrating tube densimeter at five temperatures from (293.15 to 333.15) K and pressures up to 100 MPa. The measurements were correlated with the empirical Tamman–Tait equation. Moreover, the isobaric heat capacities of the binary system were measured in a high-pressure automated flow calorimeter at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K and pressures up to 25 MPa for pure cyclohexane and in admixture with 1-butanol. The excess molar heat capacities were assessed for the mixture and a positive deviation from the ideality was obtained, except for a small part in the region rich in alkanol. The viscosity measurements were carried out, at the calorimeter conditions, for correcting the experimental values of isobaric heat capacities due to friction along the tube. The viscosity was measured at atmospheric pressure in a Stabinger Anton Paar SVM 3000 viscometer in the temperature range of (293.15 to 333.15) K for cyclohexane and the mixtures. At high pressure, the viscosities were estimated using Lucas method

  18. How the choice of data reduction can strongly influence uncertainty assessment: A re-analysis of Mn-bath experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mn-bath technique is widely used, especially by standardization laboratories, for the absolute determination of neutron emission rates. Understanding the limitations of the technique, and in particular the total measurement uncertainty, is crucial if quality results, fit for purpose, are to be reported. In this work, we show that the way in which the acquired data is analyzed can strongly influence the uncertainty assessment. We take a carefully performed set of Mn-bath measurements from the literature as our example and show that the same data when reanalyzed can be used to justify an uncertainty smaller by about an order of magnitude than was originally reported. This finding should caution all those involved in radiation measurements to critically assess their approach to data analysis and to perform a careful uncertainty analysis taking into account possible alternatives.

  19. Performance Evaluation of Image Fusion for Impulse Noise Reduction in Digital Images Using an Image Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M PremKumar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Image fusion is the process of combining two or more images into a single image while retaining the important features of each image. Multiple image fusion is an important technique used in military, remote sensing and medical applications. In this paper, Image Fusion based on local area variance is used to combine the de-noised images from two different filtering algorithms, Vector Median Filter (VMF and Spatial Median Filter (SMF. The performance of the Image Fusion is evaluated by using a new non-reference image quality assessment; Gradient based Image Quality Index (GIQI, to estimate how well the important information in the source images is represented by the fused image. Experimental results show that GIQI is better in non-reference image fusion performance assessment than universal image quality index (UIQI.

  20. Reduction of NO emissions in a turbojet combustor by direct water/steam injection: numerical and experimental assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Benini, Ernesto; Pandolfo, Sergio; Zoppellari, Serena

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Numerical and experimental investigations are conducted to assess the benefits and drawbacks of both water (mist) and steam direct injection within the combustion chamber of a 200N static thrust turbojet. For this purpose, a three-dimensional CFD model of the combustion process is implemented where pollutant emissions are calculated; in parallel, a test campaign on the turbojet at sea level static conditions is carried out. In both cases the refrigerant flow is injected di...

  1. Assessing the uncertainties of climate policies and mitigation measures. Viewpoints on biofuel production, grid electricity consumption and differentiation of emission reduction commitments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soimakallio, S.

    2012-08-15

    Ambitious climate change mitigation requires the implementation of effective and equitable climate policy and GHG emission reduction measures. The objective of this study was to explore the significance of the uncertainties related to GHG emission reduction measures and policies by providing viewpoints on biofuels production, grid electricity consumption and differentiation of emission reduction commitments between countries and country groups. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and macro-level scenario analysis through top-down and bottom-up modelling and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) were used as methods. The uncertainties were propagated in a statistical way through parameter variation, scenario analysis and stochastic modelling. This study showed that, in determining GHG emissions at product or process level, there are significant uncertainties due to parameters such as nitrous oxide emissions from soil, soil carbon changes and emissions from electricity production; and due to methodological choices related to the spatial and temporal system boundary setting and selection of allocation methods. Furthermore, the uncertainties due to modelling may be of central importance. For example, when accounting for biomass-based carbon emissions to and sequestration from the atmosphere, consideration of the temporal dimension is critical. The outcomes in differentiation of GHG emission reduction commitments between countries and country groups are critically influenced by the quality of data and criteria applied. In both LCA and effort sharing, the major issues are equitable attribution of emissions and emission allowances on the one hand and capturing consequences of measures and policies on the other. As LCA and system level top-down and bottom-up modelling results are increasingly used to justify various decisions by different stakeholders such as policy-makers and consumers, harmonization of practices, transparency and the handling of uncertainties related to

  2. Assessing the uncertainties of climate policies and mitigation measures. Viewpoints on biofuel production, grid electricity consumption and differentiation of emission reduction commitments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soimakallio, S.

    2012-11-01

    Ambitious climate change mitigation requires the implementation of effective and equitable climate policy and GHG emission reduction measures. The objective of this study was to explore the significance of the uncertainties related to GHG emission reduction measures and policies by providing viewpoints on biofuels production, grid electricity consumption and differentiation of emission reduction commitments between countries and country groups. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and macro-level scenario analysis through top-down and bottom-up modelling and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) were used as methods. The uncertainties were propagated in a statistical way through parameter variation, scenario analysis and stochastic modelling. This study showed that, in determining GHG emissions at product or process level, there are significant uncertainties due to parameters such as nitrous oxide emissions from soil, soil carbon changes and emissions from electricity production; and due to methodological choices related to the spatial and temporal system boundary setting and selection of allocation methods. Furthermore, the uncertainties due to modelling may be of central importance. For example, when accounting for biomass-based carbon emissions to and sequestration from the atmosphere, consideration of the temporal dimension is critical. The outcomes in differentiation of GHG emission reduction commitments between countries and country groups are critically influenced by the quality of data and criteria applied. In both LCA and effort sharing, the major issues are equitable attribution of emissions and emission allowances on the one hand and capturing consequences of measures and policies on the other. As LCA and system level top-down and bottom-up modelling results are increasingly used to justify various decisions by different stakeholders such as policy-makers and consumers, harmonization of practices, transparency and the handling of uncertainties related to

  3. Microscopic theory of intrinsic shear and bulk viscosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic theory of intrinsic shear and bulk viscosities of solutions is given for a model of particles that interact with hard-sphere cores and weak long-range attraction. The approximation considered (the velocity chaos assumption of the Enskog theory) can be expected to yield quantitatively useful values for viscosities of the model solute-solvent system when the solute particles are not much larger than the solvent particles. Under solute-solvent mixing conditions of constant pressure and temperature, it is found that the intrinsic viscosities of a hard-sphere solute in a hard-sphere solvent can be positive or negative, depending upon size and mass ratios; for solute and solvent particles whose mass ratio equals their volume ratio, the intrinsic shear and bulk viscosities are always positive for solute particles larger than solvent particles: in the opposite case, the intrinsic shear viscosity is always negative while the intrinsic bulk viscosity is for the most part negative, becoming positive again when the solute particle is sufficiently small. For solute particles smaller than solvent particles, this result is sensitive to change in mass ratio. The addition of solvent-solvent attraction is found to lower the intrinsic viscosities substantially; the addition of solute-solvent attraction raises it. Detailed quantitative analysis of these effects is given

  4. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity: implementation and tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Wood, Matt A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well-known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity-only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds ˜102. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been simulated to check the smoothed dynamic viscosity, and the result agrees well with the analytic solution. In order to compare the standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and GodunovSPH, the two layers test has been performed again with a density contrast. GodunovSPH shows less dispersion than the standard SPH, but there is no significant difference in the results. The results of the viscous ring evolution has also been presented as well, and the numerical results agrees with the analytic solution.

  5. Measurement of viscosity, density, and gas solubility of refrigerant blends in selected synthetic lubricants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

    1995-05-15

    The lubricants tested in this project were chosen based on the results of liquid/liquid miscibility tests. EMKARATE RL32S and Emery 2968A were selected. The Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) viscosity reduction and gas fractionation of each was measured with three different refrigerant blends: (1) R-404A; (2) R-507; and (3) R-407C. In addition, the four single refrigerants that make up the blends, HFC-32, HFC-125, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a, were also measured. Lubricants found to have the lowest liquid/liquid miscibilities had nearly equal viscosity reduction profiles as did the more miscible lubricants. Analytical methodology consisted of maintaining equally both the composition of the head space vapor above the lubricant/refrigerant mixture, and the composition of the liquid blend refrigerant. Blends with large temperature glides were re-evaluated in order to test the concept of head space quality and a vented piston hydraulic cylinder assembly was developed to perform this task. Fluid property data, above critical temperature and pressure conditions, is presented for the two lubricants with HFC-32, HFC-125, HFC-143a refrigerants. This research shows that the lubricant EMKARATE RL32S, which had the lowest (poorest) liquid/liquid miscibilities with the selected refrigerants, also had nearly equal viscosity reduction profiles to the more miscible Emery 2968A lubricant. The analytical methodology consisted of maintaining the composition of the refrigerant gas above the lubricant to be equal in composition to that of the pure liquid refrigerant blend being introduced into the lubricant. Refrigerant blends with large temperature glides were re-evaluated in order to validate the concept of the importance of the composition of the gas over the lubricant. To do perform this task, a special vented piston hydraulic cylinder assembly was developed. Fluid property data is also presented for HFC-32, HFC-125, and HFC-143a above the critical temperature and pressure of each.

  6. Assessment of the dose reduction potential of a model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm using a task-based performance metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Different computed tomography (CT) reconstruction techniques offer different image quality attributes of resolution and noise, challenging the ability to compare their dose reduction potential against each other. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the task-based imaging performance of CT systems to enable the assessment of the dose performance of a model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to that of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and a filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Methods: The ACR CT phantom (model 464) was imaged across a wide range of mA setting on a 64-slice CT scanner (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Waukesha, WI). Based on previous work, the resolution was evaluated in terms of a task-based modulation transfer function (MTF) using a circular-edge technique and images from the contrast inserts located in the ACR phantom. Noise performance was assessed in terms of the noise-power spectrum (NPS) measured from the uniform section of the phantom. The task-based MTF and NPS were combined with a task function to yield a task-based estimate of imaging performance, the detectability index (d′). The detectability index was computed as a function of dose for two imaging tasks corresponding to the detection of a relatively small and a relatively large feature (1.5 and 25 mm, respectively). The performance of MBIR in terms of the d′ was compared with that of ASIR and FBP to assess its dose reduction potential. Results: Results indicated that MBIR exhibits a variability spatial resolution with respect to object contrast and noise while significantly reducing image noise. The NPS measurements for MBIR indicated a noise texture with a low-pass quality compared to the typical midpass noise found in FBP-based CT images. At comparable dose, the d′ for MBIR was higher than those of FBP and ASIR by at least 61% and 19% for the small feature and the large feature tasks, respectively. Compared to FBP and ASIR, MBIR

  7. Assessment of the dose reduction potential of a model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm using a task-based performance metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Richard, Samuel [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Different computed tomography (CT) reconstruction techniques offer different image quality attributes of resolution and noise, challenging the ability to compare their dose reduction potential against each other. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the task-based imaging performance of CT systems to enable the assessment of the dose performance of a model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to that of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and a filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Methods: The ACR CT phantom (model 464) was imaged across a wide range of mA setting on a 64-slice CT scanner (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Waukesha, WI). Based on previous work, the resolution was evaluated in terms of a task-based modulation transfer function (MTF) using a circular-edge technique and images from the contrast inserts located in the ACR phantom. Noise performance was assessed in terms of the noise-power spectrum (NPS) measured from the uniform section of the phantom. The task-based MTF and NPS were combined with a task function to yield a task-based estimate of imaging performance, the detectability index (d′). The detectability index was computed as a function of dose for two imaging tasks corresponding to the detection of a relatively small and a relatively large feature (1.5 and 25 mm, respectively). The performance of MBIR in terms of the d′ was compared with that of ASIR and FBP to assess its dose reduction potential. Results: Results indicated that MBIR exhibits a variability spatial resolution with respect to object contrast and noise while significantly reducing image noise. The NPS measurements for MBIR indicated a noise texture with a low-pass quality compared to the typical midpass noise found in FBP-based CT images. At comparable dose, the d′ for MBIR was higher than those of FBP and ASIR by at least 61% and 19% for the small feature and the large feature tasks, respectively. Compared to FBP and ASIR, MBIR

  8. Surface tension, densities and viscosities of some CaO-Al2O3 slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metallurgical concepts with regard to the structures and properties of calcium aluminate melts have been based upon analogies within ternary CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 systems. In this work the results of surface tension, density and viscosity of some calcium aluminate slags, in the temperature range of 1500 to 1600 degree centigrade are presented and the results are discussed based upon recent structural characterisation results of crystalline aluminates. The compositional range investigated was from 45 to 53 weight-% alumina. The results indicate a reduction in density as the molar ratio CaO-Al2O3 decreases. Surface tension falls on increasing either the molar ratio CaO-Al2O3 or temperature. Conversely, viscosity increases with increasing molar ratio CaO-Al2O3 and decreasing temperature. The compositional dependence of both surface tension and viscosity data may be associated with the presence of some aluminium ions in octahedral co-ordination, and a concept of surface behaviour is proposed which involves surface activity of aluminate anions containing aluminium ions in a reduced valence state, such as Al''2+. (Author) 21 refs

  9. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  10. Elongational viscosity of multiarm (Pom-Pom) polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Almdal, Kristoffer;

    2006-01-01

    -Pom was estimated to have 2.5 arms on average, while the estimate is 3.3 for the asymmetric star. The molar mass of each arm is about 27 kg/mol. The melts were characterized in the linear viscoelastic regime and in non-linear elongational rheometry. The transient elongational viscosity for the Pom...... corresponds well with an estimate of the maximum stretchability of the backbone. Time-strain separability was not observed for the 'Asymmetric star' molecule at the elongation rates investigated. The transient elongational viscosity for the 'Pom-Pom' molecule went through a reproducible maximum in the...... viscosity at the highest elongational rate....

  11. Viscosity of Liquid Fayalite up to 9 GPa

    OpenAIRE

    Spice, Holly; Sanloup, Chrystèle; Cochain, Benjamin; de Grouchy, Charlotte; Kono, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    International audience The viscosity of liquid fayalite (Fe 2 SiO 4) was determined up to 9.2 GPa and 1850 • C using in situ falling sphere viscometry and X-ray radiography imaging. The viscosity of liquid fayalite was found to decrease with pressure, reducing by a factor of 2.5 between ambient pressure and 9.2 GPa. The results are in contrast with previous studies on depolymerised silicate melts which found viscosity to increase with pressure. In accordance with recent in situ structural ...

  12. Low Viscosity Highly Concentrated Injectable Nonaqueous Suspensions of Lysozyme Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Maria A.; Engstrom, Joshua D.; Ludher, Baltej S.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of concentrated protein and peptide solutions, in the range of 100–400 mg/mL, is often not possible with a 25- to 27-gauge needle, as the viscosity can be well above 50 cP. Apparent viscosities below this limit are reported for suspensions of milled lysozyme microparticles up to nearly 400 mg/mL in benzyl benzoate or benzyl benzoate mixtures with safflower oils through a syringe with a 25- to 27-gauge needle at room temperature. These apparent viscosities were confirmed...

  13. Theoretical evaluation of bulk viscosity: Expression for relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein Mohammad Zaheri, Ali; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K.

    2007-10-01

    A theoretical calculation of bulk viscosity has been carried out by deriving an expression for the relaxation time which appears in the formula for bulk viscosity derived by Okumura and Yonezawa. The expression involved a pair distribution function and interaction potential. Numerical results have been obtained over a wide range of densities and temperatures for Lennard-Jones fluids. It is found that our results provide a good description of bulk viscosity as has been judged by comparing the results with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics results. In addition, our results demonstrate the importance of the multiparticle correlation function.

  14. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di-Lun; Müller, Berndt

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) at weak coupling and N = 4 super Yang-Mills plasma (SYMP) at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon-parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  15. Viscosity of Liquid Crystal Mixtures in the Presence of Electroconvection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Tomoyuki; Satou, Yuki; Goto, Yoshitomo; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Orihara, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the viscosity of nematic liquid crystal mixtures of p-methoxybenzylidene-p'-n-butylaniline (MBBA) and p-ethoxybenzylidene-p'-cyanoaniline (EBCA) in the presence of electroconvection under an ac electric field with 60 Hz. Although the viscosity of the mixtures with negative dielectric anisotropy shows a characteristic decrease in the high-voltage regime, that with positive dielectric anisotropy shows a monotonic increase as the applied voltage is increased. The experimental results suggest that the decrease in viscosity observed only for the mixtures with negative dielectric anisotropy is attributed to the negative contribution of electric stress caused by the anisotropic director distribution of the turbulent state.

  16. Numerical solutions of Williamson fluid with pressure dependent viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Zehra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we have examined the flow of Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with pressure dependent viscosity. The governing equations of motion for Williamson fluid model under the effects of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are modeled and then solved numerically by the shooting method with Runge Kutta Fehlberg for two types of geometries i.e., (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. Four different cases for pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are assumed and the physical features of pertinent parameters are discussed through graphs.

  17. Astronaut Mike Fincke Conducts Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  18. Results of comparative assessment of US and foreign nuclear power plant dose experience and dose reduction programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to determine how collective dose equivalents at US nuclear power plants compare to those of other technically advanced countries, and to evaluate factors that contribute to the differences. Fifty Health Physicists and nuclear engineers from 10 countries met at BNL May 29 - June 1, 1984 to exchange information and hold discussions on ''Historical Dose Experience and Dose Reduction (ALARA) at Nuclear Power Plants''. Results of evaluation of data from this meeting and other data from recent publications are summarized. Based on data evaluated to date it is clear that US plants have higher collective dose equivalents per reactor and per MW-yr generated than most other countries. Factors which contribute to low doses include: 1) minimization of cobalt in primary system components exposed to water, 2) careful control of primary system oxygen and pH, 3) good primary system water purity to minimize corrosion product formation, 4) careful plant design, layout and component segregation and shielding, 5) management interest and commitment, 6) minimum number of workers and in-depth worker training, 7) use of special tools, and 8) plant standardization

  19. Assessment of the image contrast improvement and dose reduction in mammography with synchrotron radiation compared to standard units

    CERN Document Server

    Moeckli, R; Fiedler, S; Pachoud, M; Hessler, C; Meuli, R; Valley, J F

    2001-01-01

    An objective method was used to evaluate image quality and dose in mammography with synchrotron radiation and to compare them to standard units. It was performed systematically in the energy range of interest for mammography through the evaluation of the contrast and the measurement of the mean glandular dose. Synchrotron radiation measurements were performed at the ESRF and a slit was placed between the test object and the screen-film system in order to reduce scatter. The conventional films were obtained on mammography units with an anti-scatter grid. In a recent paper, it was shown that the use of synchrotron radiation leads to a noticeable improvement of the image quality-dose relationship (Moeckli et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 45(12)3509). The reason of that enhancement is partly due to the monochromaticity of the synchrotron beam and partly due to the use of a slit instead of a grid. The dose reduction with synchrotron radiation can be attributed to a better X-ray total transmission of the slit and the contra...

  20. Machine Learning Based Dimensionality Reduction Facilitates Ligand Diffusion Paths Assessment: A Case of Cytochrome P450cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzewski, J; Nowak, W

    2016-04-12

    In this work we propose an application of a nonlinear dimensionality reduction method to represent the high-dimensional configuration space of the ligand-protein dissociation process in a manner facilitating interpretation. Rugged ligand expulsion paths are mapped into 2-dimensional space. The mapping retains the main structural changes occurring during the dissociation. The topological similarity of the reduced paths may be easily studied using the Fréchet distances, and we show that this measure facilitates machine learning classification of the diffusion pathways. Further, low-dimensional configuration space allows for identification of residues active in transport during the ligand diffusion from a protein. The utility of this approach is illustrated by examination of the configuration space of cytochrome P450cam involved in expulsing camphor by means of enhanced all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The expulsion trajectories are sampled and constructed on-the-fly during molecular dynamics simulations using the recently developed memetic algorithms [ Rydzewski, J.; Nowak, W. J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 ( 12 ), 124101 ]. We show that the memetic algorithms are effective for enforcing the ligand diffusion and cavity exploration in the P450cam-camphor complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that machine learning techniques are helpful in inspecting ligand diffusion landscapes and provide useful tools to examine structural changes accompanying rare events. PMID:26989997

  1. Development of a community-wide cardiovascular risk reduction assessment tool for small rural employers in upstate New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, Ron Z; Liss-Levinson, Rivka C; Goodman, Nanette; Kennedy, James X

    2009-04-01

    Employers are implementing workplace health promotion programs that address modifiable health risk factors such as overweight and obesity, smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, physical inactivity, poor diet, and high stress. Research with large employers has found that these programs can improve workers' health and decrease the costs associated with medical care, absenteeism, and presenteeism. Despite their promise, health promotion programs are not widely embraced by small businesses, especially those in rural communities. This article reviews the barriers encountered by small and rural businesses in implementing health promotion programs. We describe an approach developed in cooperation with the New York State Department of Health's Healthy Heart Program and the Cayuga Community Health Network to engage small businesses in health promotion. We review the development and implementation of an assessment tool created to evaluate current workplace health promotion programs, policies, and practices targeting cardiovascular disease among small, rural employers in upstate New York. Potential benefits of the assessment tool are discussed, and the instrument is made available for the public. PMID:19289008

  2. Viscosity of LiF–NaF–KF eutectic and effect of cerium trifluoride and uranium tetrafluoride additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Kinematic viscosity of the 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (mol%) is measured. • Method of torsional oscillations damping of a cylinder filled with the melt is used. • Found that the kinematic viscosity of this eutectic has some deviations from the exponential law, that may be explained by the existence of clusters in the melt. • Addition of CeF3 or UF4 significantly increased the liquidus temperature of eutectic. • Addition of CeF3 and UF4 decreased the viscosity of the eutectic at low temperatures. - Abstract: Kinematic viscosity of the 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (mol%) has been measured in the temperature range 727–1144 K by the method of torsional oscillations damping of a cylinder with the liquid under study. Found that the kinematic viscosity of this eutectic has some deviations from the exponential law, that may be explained by the existence of clusters in the melt. The volume fraction of the clusters in the eutectic as a function of its temperature was estimated. The kinematic viscosity of the 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (in mol%) with additions of (1) 5 and 10 mol% CeF3 as well as (2) 20 mol% UF4 and 10 mol% CeF3 was also measured. It is experimentally proved that the addition of 5 mol% CeF3 significantly reduces the viscosity at low temperatures and slightly increases it – at high temperatures. Reduction of viscosity at low temperatures can be explained by the fact that the molecules of CeF3 destroy clusters. Additions of 20 mol% UF4 also decreased kinematic viscosity of the molten salt mixture compared to pure 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (in mol%). Note, that all additions used significantly increased the liquidus temperature of the molten salt mixture. Particularly, additions of 20 mol% UF4 without and with 10 mol% CeF3 increased the liquidus temperature up to 923 and 1023 K, respectively

  3. Viscosity of LiF–NaF–KF eutectic and effect of cerium trifluoride and uranium tetrafluoride additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzlyakov, Alexander; Ignatiev, Victor, E-mail: Ignatev_VV@nrcki.ru; Abalin, Sergei

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Kinematic viscosity of the 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (mol%) is measured. • Method of torsional oscillations damping of a cylinder filled with the melt is used. • Found that the kinematic viscosity of this eutectic has some deviations from the exponential law, that may be explained by the existence of clusters in the melt. • Addition of CeF{sub 3} or UF{sub 4} significantly increased the liquidus temperature of eutectic. • Addition of CeF{sub 3} and UF{sub 4} decreased the viscosity of the eutectic at low temperatures. - Abstract: Kinematic viscosity of the 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (mol%) has been measured in the temperature range 727–1144 K by the method of torsional oscillations damping of a cylinder with the liquid under study. Found that the kinematic viscosity of this eutectic has some deviations from the exponential law, that may be explained by the existence of clusters in the melt. The volume fraction of the clusters in the eutectic as a function of its temperature was estimated. The kinematic viscosity of the 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (in mol%) with additions of (1) 5 and 10 mol% CeF{sub 3} as well as (2) 20 mol% UF{sub 4} and 10 mol% CeF{sub 3} was also measured. It is experimentally proved that the addition of 5 mol% CeF{sub 3} significantly reduces the viscosity at low temperatures and slightly increases it – at high temperatures. Reduction of viscosity at low temperatures can be explained by the fact that the molecules of CeF{sub 3} destroy clusters. Additions of 20 mol% UF{sub 4} also decreased kinematic viscosity of the molten salt mixture compared to pure 46.5LiF–11.5NaF–42KF eutectic (in mol%). Note, that all additions used significantly increased the liquidus temperature of the molten salt mixture. Particularly, additions of 20 mol% UF{sub 4} without and with 10 mol% CeF{sub 3} increased the liquidus temperature up to 923 and 1023 K, respectively.

  4. The assessment of the waste management plan to decommissioning of Cernavoda NPP for environmental impact reduction - 59358

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the radioactive wastes generated in Romania, are due to nuclear activities related to power generation at Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant NPP Unit 1 and Unit 2. It is provided to construct 2 new Units, in the next period. In Romania, the Nuclear Agency and Radioactive Waste - AN and DR, has established the strategy on low and intermediate level waste disposal and has as objective the commissioning of Final Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Waste - DFDSMA, until 2019. This facility, is in the responsibility of AN and DR. On the other hand, wastes arising from Cernavoda NPP must be treated, in order to achieve the acceptance criteria of DFDSMA. Corresponding Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant - RWTP is in the responsibility of Cernavoda NPP. The main requirement for the RWTP is the necessity to achieve the treatment and conditioning of radioactive wastes that arise both, from NPP operation and from future decommissioning activities of the nuclear facilities, such as to comply with the acceptance criteria of DFDSMA. According to existing requirements, it is necessary to elaborate a Decommissioning Plan, in order to obtain the authorization for construction of the new units. The Decommissioning Plan of Cernavoda NPP will imply the development of a Waste Management Plan, based on existing waste treatment technologies. Taking into account that, the radioactive waste management represents about 43%, comparative with decommissioning activities, which represents only about 35% from total budget of decommissioning, of a CANDU 6 NPP Unit, the paper will present the methodology developed, in order to obtain the optimum Waste Management Plan, taking into account the reduction of environmental impact. (authors)

  5. A viscosity model for the (NaF + AlF{sub 3} + CaF{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robelin, Christian, E-mail: christian.robelin@polymtl.c [Centre for Research in Computational Thermochemistry (CRCT), Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succursale ' Downtown' , Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3A7 (Canada); Chartrand, Patrice [Centre for Research in Computational Thermochemistry (CRCT), Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succursale ' Downtown' , Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: A model for the viscosity of multicomponent inorganic molten salts or liquid alloys. Description of the viscosity model for the NaF-AlF3-CaF2-Al2O3 base electrolyte. The model is linked to the previously developed thermodynamic and density models - Abstract: A model has been developed for the viscosity of multicomponent inorganic molten salts or liquid alloys. Over the past several years, through critical evaluation of all available thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data, we have developed a quantitative thermodynamic description of multicomponent molten salt systems and liquid alloys using the Modified Quasichemical Model in the Quadruplet (or Pair) Approximation for short-range ordering. The viscosity is modelled using an Eyring equation with molar activation energy for viscous flow expanded as a first-order polynomial in the quadruplet (or pair) mole fractions. The quadruplets (or pairs) may be regarded as structural units and can be calculated from the thermodynamic model. In the present article, the viscosity model is applied to the (NaF + AlF{sub 3} + CaF{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) electrolyte. All available viscosity data were collected and critically evaluated, and optimized model parameters have been found. This new model can be used with Gibbs free energy minimization software, to calculate the viscosity of cryolite-based melts used for the electro-reduction of alumina in Hall-Heroult cells. The viscosity model described in the present paper has not yet been tested on molten salts whose viscosity can increase by more than one order of magnitude.

  6. Measurement of viscosity as a means to identify irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of viscosity is a simple method to identify previous irradiation of some kinds of spices and foods, at least in combination with other methods. A possible change of the soaking capacity was examined up to a storage period of 18 months after irradiation of black pepper, white pepper, cinnamon, ginger and onion powder with a radiation dose of 10 kGy each. After irradiation, either increased or decreased viscosity values were measured; the results showed, also after the 18-months-storage period, considerable differences of the viscosity behaviour in non-irradiated and irradiated samples. The time of storage had no effect to the individual viscosity values, so that this method could also be applied to the examined spices after a longer storage period. (orig.) With 51 figs., 25 tabs

  7. Density and viscosity modeling and characterization of heavy oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Creek, J

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity and density are key properties for the evaluation, simulation, and development of petroleum reservoirs. Previously, the friction theory (f-theory) was shown to be capable of delivering simple and accurate viscosity models for petroleum reservoir fluids with molecular weights up to similar...... to 200 g/mol and viscosities up to similar to 10 mPa s, under usual reservoir conditions. As a basis, the f-theory approach requires a compositional characterization procedure that is used in conjunction with a van der Waals type of equation of state (EOS). This is achieved using simple cubic EOSs......, which are widely used within the oil industry. Further work also established the basis for extending the approach to heavy oils. Thus, in this work, the extended f-theory approach is further discussed with the study and modeling of a wider set of representative heavy reservoir fluids with viscosities up...

  8. Viscosity of aluminum under shock-loading conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xiao-Juan; Liu Fu-Sheng; Zhang Ming-Jian; Sun Yan-Yun

    2011-01-01

    A reliable data treatment method is critical for viscosity measurements using the disturbance amplitude damping method of shock waves. In this paper the finite difference method is used to obtain the numerical solutions for the disturbance amplitude damping behaviour of the sinusoidal shock front in a flyer-impact experiment. The disturbance amplitude damping curves are used to depict the numerical solutions of viscous flow. By fitting the experimental data to the numerical solutions of different viscosities, we find that the effective shear viscosity coefficients of shocked aluminum at pressures of 42, 78 and 101 GPa are (1500±100) Pa. s, (2800±100) Pa. s and (3500±100) Pa. s respectively. It is clear that the shear viscosity of aluminum increases with an increase in shock pressure, so aluminum does not melt below a shock pressure of 101 GPa. This conclusion is consistent with the sound velocity measurement.

  9. Birkhoff's theorem and viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei

    2009-01-01

    We obtain a partial generalization of Birkhoff's theorem of invariant curve to higher dimesional case in the context of viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations,or weak KAM theory.This is a new approach after Herman's proof.

  10. Crystallization and viscosity of heavy metal fluoride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shear viscosity data for a glassforming ZrF/sub 4/-BaF/sub 3/-AlF/sub 3/ composition covering the range from the highly fluid melt down to the glass transition (10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 13/ P) have been collected from five sources. The viscosity temperature dependence is highly non-Arrhenius and cannot be described by three parameter expressions such as the Fulcher equation. The four parameter Cohen-Grest equation, however, does give a good fit to the data, possibly allowing interpolation in the range of intermediate viscosity important for fiber drawing where data is currently lacking. The viscosity data are compared with crystallization temperatures obtained by DSC during heating and cooling at 10K/min

  11. What do we know about the viscosity of QCD matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Steffen A. [Department of Physics Duke University Durham, NC 27708-0305 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    This article provides an overview over the current state of knowledge regarding the viscosity of QCD matter and on its extraction via ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider.

  12. Determination of the viscosity by spherical drop using nuclear tecniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements of the drop limit velocity of a Sphere in a fluid using a radiotracer method are analyzed. The dynamic process involved was observed, identifying the density and viscosity of the fluid. (E.G.)

  13. Mechanism of sulfide effect on viscosity of HPAM polymer solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康万利; 周阳; 王志伟; 孟令伟; 刘述忍; 白宝君

    2008-01-01

    The effect of sulfide on HPAM solution viscosity was studied using BROOKFIELD DV-II viscometer,and the interaction mechanism was discussed.The HPAM solution viscosity was investigated through fully reducing sulfide by the addition of hydrogen peroxide oxidation,and the mechanism of increasing polymer viscosity was investigated.The experimental results also show that there is a critical concentration of 15 mg/L.Below it,the loss rate of HPAM solution viscosity increases more rapidly,but becomes slowly above the critical concentration.A theoretical guidance for oilfields to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water by eliminating sulfide,and it is also importance to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water and save fresh water.

  14. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  15. Expanded fluid based viscosity correlation : diluted heavy oil case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarranton, H.; Satyro, M.A.; Schoeggl, F. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The viscosity of pure hydrocarbons has been correlated using a simple function involving fluid density, low pressure gas viscosity and pressure. The correlation was developed based on measured densities from the NIST database. The correlation has been refit to use densities predicted from the Advanced Peng-Robinson equation of state. The usefulness of the correlation was shown for pure hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes, branched alkanes, alkenes, cyclics and aromatics as well as binary mixtures of pure hydrocarbons. This presentation included a case study on the viscosity of heavy oil diluted with solvent. The newly proposed, simple and quick method for calculating liquid and vapour viscosities was found to be suitable for incorporation into process and reservoir simulators. tabs., figs.

  16. Measurements of fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay X.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 μl of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized Newtonian fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. It also yields dynamical viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids at moderate shear rates. The device is easy to assemble and it allows for the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Therefore, the technique is particularly useful in characterizing biological fluids such as solutions of proteins, DNA, and polymers frequently used in biomaterial applications.

  17. Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

  18. Influence of viscosity and the adiabatic index on planetary migration

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsch, B; Kley, W

    2013-01-01

    The strength and direction of migration of low mass embedded planets depends on the disk's thermodynamic state, where the internal dissipation is balanced by radiative transport, and the migration can be directed outwards, a process which extends the lifetime of growing embryos. Very important parameters determining the structure of disks, and hence the direction of migration, are the viscosity and the adiabatic index. In this paper we investigate the influence of different viscosity prescriptions (alpha-type and constant) and adiabatic indices on disk structures and how this affects the migration rate of planets embedded in such disks. We perform 3D numerical simulations of accretion disks with embedded planets. We use the explicit/implicit hydrodynamical code NIRVANA that includes full tensor viscosity and radiation transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation, as well as a proper equation of state for molecular hydrogen. The migration of embedded 20Earthmass planets is studied. Low-viscosity disks...

  19. Partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) for the assessment of cardiac perfusion in dynamic phase-correlated CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Haberland, Ulrike; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Henkestrasse. 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Cardiac CT achieves its high temporal resolution by lowering the scan range from 2{pi} to {pi} plus fan angle (partial scan). This, however, introduces CT-value variations, depending on the angular position of the {pi} range. These partial scan artifacts are of the order of a few HU and prevent the quantitative evaluation of perfusion measurements. The authors present the new algorithm partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) that corrects a dynamic phase-correlated scan without a priori information. Methods: In general, a full scan does not suffer from partial scan artifacts since all projections in [0, 2{pi}] contribute to the data. To maintain the optimum temporal resolution and the phase correlation, PSAR creates an artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF} by projectionwise averaging a set of neighboring partial scans p{sub n}{sup P} from the same perfusion examination (typically N{approx_equal}30 phase-correlated partial scans distributed over 20 s and n=1,...,N). Corresponding to the angular range of each partial scan, the authors extract virtual partial scans p{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF}. A standard reconstruction yields the corresponding images f{sub n}{sup P}, f{sub n}{sup AF}, and f{sub n}{sup V}. Subtracting the virtual partial scan image f{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan image f{sub n}{sup AF} yields an artifact image that can be used to correct the original partial scan image: f{sub n}{sup C}=f{sub n}{sup P}-f{sub n}{sup V}+f{sub n}{sup AF}, where f{sub n}{sup C} is the corrected image. Results: The authors evaluated the effects of scattered radiation on the partial scan artifacts using simulated and measured water phantoms and found a strong correlation. The PSAR algorithm has been validated with a simulated semianthropomorphic heart phantom and with measurements of a dynamic biological perfusion phantom. For the stationary phantoms, real full scans have been performed to provide theoretical reference

  20. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength of...... the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....