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Sample records for assess viscosity reduction

  1. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work

  2. Experimental study on viscosity reduction for residual oil by ultrasonic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xintong; Zhou, Cuihong; Suo, Quanyu; Zhang, Lanting; Wang, Shihan

    2018-03-01

    Because of characteristics of large density, high viscosity and poor mobility, the processing and transportation of residual oil are difficult and challenging, viscosity reduction of residual oil is of great significance. In this paper, the effects of different placement forms of ultrasonic transducers on the sound pressure distribution of ultrasonic inside a cubic container have been simulated, the characteristics of oil bath heating and ultrasonic viscosity reduction were compared, viscosity reduction rule of residual oil was experimentally analyzed by utilizing Response Surface Method under conditions of changing ultrasonic exposure time, power and action mode, the mechanism of viscosity reduction was studied by applying Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, the viscosity retentivity experiment was carried out at last. Experiments were conducted using two kinds of residual oil, and results show that ultrasonic effect on the viscosity reduction of residual oil is significant, the higher viscosity of residual oil, the better effect of ultrasonic, ultrasonic power and exposure time are the significant factors affecting the viscosity reduction rate of residual oil. The maximum viscosity reduction rate is obtained under condition of ultrasonic power is 900W, exposure time is 14min and action mode of exposure time is 2s and interrupting time is 2s, viscosity reduction rate reaching up to 63.95%. The infrared spectroscopy results show that light component in residual oil increased. The viscosity retentivity experiment results show that the viscosity reduction effect remains very well. This paper can provide data reference for the application of ultrasonic in the field of viscosity reduction for residual oil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing bitumen and heavy oil viscosity in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larter, S.; Adams, J.; Jiang, D.; Snowdon, L.; Bennett, B.; Gates, I. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Gushor Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Log-based techniques for evaluating the in-situ viscosity of oil rely on dead oil viscosity measurements are conducted in laboratories. However, bitumen viscosity is impacted by water; sediment and gas loads; emulsion formation; and shear properties. This abstract discussed a method of assessing the in-situ viscosity of bitumen and heavy oils. The method was designed to simulate the viscosity of heavy oil fluid flow in process conditions. Measured appropriate dead oil viscosity was combined with estimates of solution gas content using mixing rules in order to establish in-situ live oil viscosity estimates. The method takes into account solid and water loads, procedures for correction of viscosity for core storage artifacts, and the impact of variable bitumen saturation pressures through oil columns on live oil reconstruction algorithms.

  4. Field study of heavy oil viscosity reduction for production transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, J.; Annichiariccom, G.; Montanez, M. [Ecopetrol S.A. (Venezuela); Faust, M.; Weathers, T. [Nalco Energy Services (Colombia); Parra, R. [Nalco de Colombia Ltda. (Colombia)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, production and transportation are expensive processes requiring complex equipment and procedures. The main issue with heavy crude oil is its high viscosity. A method using naphtha injection was developed to dilute the fluids and aid in water separation, but this method is expensive and raises safety issues. To reduce naphtha consumption, Ecopetrol and Nalco Energy Services developed a new dispersion technology. This paper presents this technology and the results of its field trial in the Chichimene oil field. Key production indicators were monitored to determine how effective the emulsion method was in enhancing production. Results showed no negative effect on the separation facility or oil and water quality while reducing by 75% the injection of diluent. This paper presents a dispersion technology which successfully reduced the need for naphtha and thus reduced production costs.

  5. Application and mechanism of ultrasonic static mixer in heavy oil viscosity reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chunwei; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jianbin; Sun, Xiaoping; Chen, Wenyi; An, Huiyong; Duo, Yili; Pei, Mingyuan

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, heavy oil viscosity reduction in Daqing oil field was investigated by using an ultrasonic static mixer. The influence of the ultrasonic power on the viscosity reduction rate was investigated and the optimal technological conditions were determined for the ultrasonic treatment. The mechanism for ultrasonic viscosity reduction was analyzed. The flow characteristics of heavy oil in the mixer under the effect of cavitation were investigated using numerical modeling, and energy consumptions were calculated during the ultrasonic treatment and vis-breaking processes. The experimental results indicated that the ultrasonic power made the largest impact on the viscosity reduction rate, followed by the reaction time and temperature. The highest viscosity reduction rate was 57.34%. Vacuole was migrated from the axis to the wall along the fluid, accelerating the two-phase transmission and enhancing the radial flow of the fluid, which significantly improved the ultrasonic viscosity reduction. Compared to the vis-breaking process, the energy consumption of ultrasonic treatment process was 43.03% lower when dealing with the same quality heavy oil. The optimal process conditions were found to be as follows: ultrasonic power of 1.8kW, reaction time of 45min and reaction temperature of 360°C. The dissociation of the molecules of heavy oil after ultrasonication has been checked. After being kept at room temperature 12days, some light components were produced by the cavitation cracking, so the viscosity of the residual oil could not return to that of the original residual oil, which meant that the "cage effect" was not reformed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodegradation of asphalt by Garciaella petrolearia TERIG02 for viscosity reduction of heavy oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Meeta; Cheema, Simrita; Sarma, Priyangshu Manab; Mandal, Ajoy Kumar; Lal, Banwari

    2012-02-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon is an important energy resource, but it is difficult to exploit due to the presence of dominated heavy constituents such as asphaltenes. In this study, viscosity reduction of Jodhpur heavy oil (2,637 cP at 50°C) has been carried out by the biodegradation of asphalt using a bacterial strain TERIG02. TERIG02 was isolated from sea buried oil pipeline known as Mumbai Uran trunk line (MUT) located on western coast of India and identified as Garciaella petrolearia by 16S rRNA full gene sequencing. TERIG02 showed 42% viscosity reduction when asphalt along with molasses was used as a sole carbon source compared to only asphalt (37%). The viscosity reduction by asphaltene degradation has been structurally characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). This strain also shows an additional preference to degrade toxic asphalt and aromatics compounds first unlike the other known strains. All these characteristics makes TERIG02 a potential candidate for enhanced oil recovery and a solution to degrading toxic aromatic compounds.

  7. Experimental study of Iranian heavy crude oil viscosity reduction by diluting with heptane, methanol, toluene, gas condensate and naphtha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Saeedi Dehaghani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high viscosity of heavy crude oils, production from these reservoirs is a demanding task. To tackle this problem, reducing oil viscosity is a promising approach. There are various methods to reduce viscosity of heavy oil: heating, diluting, emulsification, and core annular flow. In this study, dilution approach was employed, using industrial solvents and gas condensate. The viscosity of two Iranian heavy crude oils was measured by mixing with solvents at different temperatures. Dilution of both oil samples with toluene and heptane, resulted in viscosity reduction. However, their effect became less significant at higher concentrations of diluent. Because of forming hydrogen bonds, adding methanol to heavy crude oil resulted in higher viscosity. By adding condensate, viscosity of each sample reduced. Gas condensate had a greater impact on heavier oil; however, at higher temperatures its effect was reduced. Diluting with naphtha decreased heavy oil viscosity in the same way as n-heptane and toluene. Besides experimental investigation, different viscosity models were evaluated for prediction of heavy oil/solvent viscosity. It was recognized that Lederer' model is the best one.

  8. Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enpeng

    topic. Dr. Tao with his group at Temple University, using his electro or magnetic rheological viscosity theory has developed a new technology, which utilizes electric or magnetic fields to change the rheology of complex fluids to reduce the viscosity, while keeping the temperature unchanged. After we successfully reduced the viscosity of crude oil with field and investigated the microstructure changing in various crude oil samples with SANS, we have continued to reduce the viscosity of heavy crude oil, bunker diesel, ultra low sulfur diesel, bio-diesel and crude oil and ultra low temperature with electric field treatment. Our research group developed the viscosity electrorheology theory and investigated flow rate with laboratory and field pipeline. But we never visualize this aggregation. The small angle neutron scattering experiment has confirmed the theoretical prediction that a strong electric field induces the suspended nano-particles inside crude oil to aggregate into short chains along the field direction. This aggregation breaks the symmetry, making the viscosity anisotropic: along the field direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced. The experiment enables us to determine the induced chain size and shape, verifies that the electric field works for all kinds of crude oils, paraffin-based, asphalt-based, and mix-based. The basic physics of such field induced viscosity reduction is applicable to all kinds of suspensions.

  9. A process for reduction in viscosity of coffee extract by enzymatic hydrolysis of mannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Prakram Singh; Sharma, Prince; Puri, Neena; Gupta, Naveen

    2014-07-01

    Mannan is the main polysaccharide component of coffee extract and is responsible for its high viscosity, which in turn negatively affects the technological processing involved in making instant coffee. In our study, we isolated mannan from coffee beans and extract of commercial coffee and it was enzymatically hydrolyzed using alkali-thermostable mannanase obtained from Bacillus nealsonii PN-11. As mannan is found to be more soluble under alkaline conditions, an alkali-thermostable mannanase is well suited for its hydrolysis. The process of enzymatic hydrolysis was optimized by response surface methodology. Under the following optimized conditions viz enzyme dose of 11.50 U mannanase g(-1) coffee extract, temperature of 44.50 °C and time of 35.80 min, significant twofold decrease in viscosity (50 mPas to 26.00 ± 1.56 mPas) was achieved. The application of this process in large-scale industrial production of coffee will help in reduction of energy consumption used during freeze-drying. It will also make technological processing involved in making coffee more economical.

  10. Effects of nano-sized metals on viscosity reduction of heavy oil/bitumen during thermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamedi Shokrfu, Y.; Babadagli, T. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The efficiency of heavy oil and bitumen recovery methods can be increased by improving energy transfer to the oil for increased viscosity reduction. Studies have shown that micron-sized metal particles improve the efficiency of ex situ processes such as coal liquefaction and pyrolysis. This study investigated the mechanics of additional viscosity reduction using nano-sized metals during thermal applications. Experiments were conducted to investigate the exothermic chemical reactions and thermal conductivity of iron, nickel and copper particles. The viscosity of oil samples mixed with the particles was measured, and the tests were repeated at different temperatures. The effect of the metal particles on heat transfer enhancement was also investigated. The studies showed that the metal nanoparticles significantly improved heavy oil and bitumen recovery rates. However, the percentage of the viscosity reduction and the optimum concentration of metal nanoparticles was highly dependent on the oil sample composition and the metal type. Different types of metals reduced heavy oil and bitumen viscosity with different series of exothermic reactions. The thermal conductivity of the metal must also be considered. Further studies are need to determine reactions when the nanoparticles are introduced into reservoirs. 24 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  11. Friction Reduction Tested for a Downsized Diesel Engine with Low-Viscosity Lubricants Including a Novel Polyalkylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Sander

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing pressure to reduce emissions, friction reduction is always an up-to-date topic in the automotive industry. Among the various possibilities to reduce mechanical friction, the usage of a low-viscosity lubricant in the engine is one of the most effective and most economic options. Therefore, lubricants of continuously lower viscosity are being developed and offered on the market that promise to reduce engine friction while avoiding deleterious mixed lubrication and wear. In this work, a 1.6 L downsized Diesel engine is used on a highly accurate engine friction test-rig to determine the potential for friction reduction using low viscosity lubricants under realistic operating conditions including high engine loads. In particular, two hydrocarbon-based lubricants, 0W30 and 0W20, are investigated as well as a novel experimental lubricant, which is based on a polyalkylene glycol base stock. Total engine friction is measured for all three lubricants, which show a general 5% advantage for the 0W20 in comparison to the 0W30 lubricant. The polyalkylene glycol-based lubricant, however, shows strongly reduced friction losses, which are about 25% smaller than for the 0W20 lubricant. As the 0W20 and the polyalkylene glycol-based lubricant have the same HTHS-viscosity , the findings contradict the common understanding that the HTHS-viscosity is the dominant driver related to the friction losses.

  12. Revisiting the assessment of semen viscosity and its relationship to leucocytospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, M; du Plessis, S S; Menkveld, R

    2014-10-01

    With infertility challenges posing an obstacle to many couples, the extension of variables to assess male fertility is an important line of research. At the Reproductive Biology Unit where the study was undertaken, a considerable proportion of male patient's seeking fertility assessment presented with hyperviscous semen samples and elevated concentrations of leucocytes. Despite viscosity being included as part of a routine spermiogram, it raises a considerable amount of concern as it is assessed semiquantitatively. The study was undertaken to evaluate the quantification of semen viscosity in centipoise (cP) and to investigate whether a correlation exists between hyperviscosity and leucocytospermia. A total of 200 semen samples were assessed from a sample cohort of two population groups: 162 male patients undergoing fertility assessment and 38 volunteer donors. Semen viscosity was determined by measuring the filling time of a capillary-loaded Leja chamber and quantifying the viscosity in cP. Leucocytes were identified histochemically with a leucocyte peroxidase test. The viscosity when quantified in cP was significantly higher in the peroxidase positive sample group (9.01 ± 0.49 vs. 7.39 ± 0.23 cP; P viscosity may possibly help to identify, diagnose and treat patients suffering from leucocytospermia to ultimately enhance their fertility potential. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Varying properties of in situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation based on assessed viscosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2014-03-04

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A viscosity of one or more zones of the hydrocarbon layer is assessed. The heating rates in the zones are varied based on the assessed viscosities. The heating rate in a first zone of the formation is greater than the heating rate in a second zone of the formation if the viscosity in the first zone is greater than the viscosity in the second zone. Fluids are produced from the formation through the production wells.

  14. Optimization of reaction conditions for enzymatic viscosity reduction and hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan in an industrial ethanol fermentation residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.R.; Pedersen, S.; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2006-01-01

    This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished...... of enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of arabinoxylan, beta-glucan, and cellulose. In designed response surface experiments, the optimal enzyme reaction conditions with respect to pH and temperature of the vinasse, the vinasse supernatant (mainly soluble material), and the vinasse sediment (mainly insoluble...

  15. Prediction of the viscosity reduction due to dissolved CO2 of and an elementary approach in the supercritical CO2 assisted continuous particle production of a polyester resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, Sameer P.; Nieborg, Vincent H. J.; Picchioni, Francesco; Janssen, L. P. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The dissolution of CO2 in a polymer causes plasticization of the polymer and hence, its viscosity is reduced. A model based on the free volume theory has been used for a polyester resin, which shows a considerable reduction in the viscosity due to dissolved M. Therefore, superctitical CO2 has been

  16. Energy-saving direct ethanol production from viscosity reduction mash of sweet potato at very high gravity (VHG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liang; Chen, Qian; Jin, Yanlin; Xue, Huilin; Guan, Jiafa; Wang, Zhongyan; Zhao, Hai

    2010-12-15

    Sweet potato is an important dietary and economic material in China (accounting for 85% of global production in 2005) and Southeast Asia. The limitation of using root and tuber of sweet potato mash at high solids content is attributed to its high viscous nature. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different viscosity reduction factors and found optimal parameters via a surface response design. The optimal xylanase enzyme dose, pretreatment time and temperature were 1.56 AGU/g, 87.6 min and 44.1 C, respectively. Using pretreatment sweet potato mash on the optimized condition, the final viscosity 498.1 cp and ethanol yield of 135.1 g/kg was obtained by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which was equivalent to 90.7% of the theoretical yield. (author)

  17. Viscosity Reduction and Upgrading of Athabasca Oilsands Bitumen by Natural Zeolite Cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Abu S.M. Junaid; Wei Wang; Christopher Street; Moshfiqur Rahman; Matt Gersbach; Sarah Zhou; William McCaffrey; Steven M. Kuznicki

    2010-01-01

    Oilsands bitumen is an extremely important source of energy for North America. However, due to the presence of large molecules such as asphaltenes, the density and viscosity of the bitumen recovered from these sands are much higher than those of conventional crude oil. As a result the extracted bitumen has to be diluted with expensive solvents, or thermochemically upgraded in large, capital-intensive conventional upgrading facilities prior to pipeline transport. This stud...

  18. Viscosity reduction of isotonic solutions of the photosensitizer TPCS2aby cyclodextrin complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovsen, Marianne Lilletvedt; Tho, Ingunn; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth

    2018-02-01

    Meso-tetraphenyl chlorin disulphonate (TPCS 2a ) is a photosensitizer (PS) particularly developed and patented for use in the technology of photochemical internalization (PCI) against cancer. TPCS 2a is known to aggregate in aqueous media even at low concentrations (≥0.1 µM) and to form a high-viscosity network at clinically relevant concentrations (mM). The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of two hydroxypropylated cyclodextrin derivatives of beta and gamma type, respectively i.e. HPβCD and HPγCD, on the aggregation and solubilization of TPCS 2a in isotonic solutions. Samples containing micromolar concentrations of TPCS 2a were studied spectrophotometrically, while samples containing a clinical relevant concentration (10 mM = 9 mg/ml) of TPCS 2a were evaluated by dynamic viscosity measurements. HPβCD was determined to be a more suitable solubilizer of TPCS 2a than HPγCD in aqueous media both in the absence and presence of salt. The complexation stoichiometry between TPCS 2a /HPβCD at micromolar to millimolar concentrations of TPCS 2a was determined to be 1:3 and 1:2 in the absence and presence of isotonic NaCl, respectively. The network of TPCS 2a (10 mM) was broken down in the presence of 3% w/v (= 20 mM) HPβCD, i.e. a 1:2 molar ratio between TPCS 2a and the cyclodextrin. Formation of the inclusion complex resulted in low viscosity samples both in water and in the presence of isotonic NaCl or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 25 °C and 37 °C.

  19. Measured Deformation Enhancement in Western Greenland Shows the Importance of Viscosity Reduction for Elevated Melt Season Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, N. T.; Humphrey, N. F.; Harper, J. T.; Meierbachtol, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that much of the bed on the Western Margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is hydrologically isolated during the melt season, making it necessary to understand how ice dynamics regulates basal flow between active and inactive regions of the bed. We present measurements of englacial shear strain rates collected by tilt sensors embedded in a boreholes approximately 670 m deep during the 2015 melt season at a field site on the Western Margin of the GrIS. The measurements demonstrate that shear strain rates during the melt season can increase by a factor of three. The increase in shear strain rates and deformation velocity is well correlated to the surface and basal sliding velocity measured at the field site. Coincident with the enhanced deformation, the effective stress calculated from the surficial strain rate tensor increases from approximately 70-160 kPa. During this period each stress component shows a high degree of variability. The magnitude and range of the effective stress is in agreement with the change in the effective stress necessary to produce the elevated strain rates observed englacially. This result demonstrates that spatially variable flow at the onset of the melt season can result in a significant decrease in the effective ice viscosity. The decrease in the effective ice viscosity is sufficient to increase the deformation velocity from approximately 20 to 40 ma-1. The increase in the deformation velocity is well correlated to the observed increase in basal sliding suggesting that ice softening may be an important mechanism to enhance basal flow in isolated regions of the bed. For a glacier on a hard bed, the rate of basal sliding is controlled by the rate at which the basal ice can deform around bedrock obstacles. In this context, a reduction in the effective viscosity can enhance the basal sliding velocity without a basal friction reduction through local changes in basal water pressure or water storage.

  20. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications.

  1. Odd Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Avron, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    When time reversal is broken the viscosity tensor can have a non vanishing odd part. In two dimensions, and only then, such odd viscosity is compatible with isotropy. Elementary and basic features of odd viscosity are examined by considering solutions of the wave and Navier-Stokes equations for hypothetical fluids where the stress is dominated by odd viscosity.

  2. Preparation of molybdenum-doped akaganeite nano-rods and their catalytic effect on the viscosity reduction of extra heavy crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Wang, Xiaodong; Pan, Hui; Li, Qiuye; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2018-01-01

    Molybdenum-doped akaganeite nano-rods were prepared by one step facile synthesis. The formation of akaganeite depends on the molar ratio of hexaammonium molybdate to ferric chloride hexahydrate. The nano-rods have an average particle size of ca. 30 nm and disperse uniformly. As a catalyst, the nano-rods can effectively increase the viscosity reduction rate of Shengli Oilfield extra heavy crude oil (175000 mPa s at 50 °C), especially combined with tetralin (a hydrogen donor). The results of SARA analysis, elemental analysis, and 1H NMR spectra indicate that the increase of light component caused by the denitrification and desulfuration of the catalyst plus tetralin as well as the loosening of heavy component molecules can be responsible for the viscosity reduction of the heavy oil.

  3. Dimethyl Ether (DME) Assessment of Viscosity Using the New Volatile Fuel Viscometer (VFVM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Sorenson, Spencer C; Jakobsen, J.

    2001-01-01

    . It was established, in earlier work, that the wear in the pumps is substantial even if the lubricity of DME is raised to a believed acceptable level using anti-wear additives. An influence of the viscosity on the wear in the pumps was suspected. The problem, up to now, was that the viscosity of DME has only been...... estimated or calculated but never actually measured. In the present work a volatile fuel viscometer (VFVM) was developed. It is of the capillary type and it was designed to handle DME, neat or additised. The kinematic and dynamic viscosities of pure DME were measured at 0.185 cSt and 0.122 cP at 25 o......C respectively. The VFVM established that low concentrations of additives do not affect the viscosity of DME significantly. This is the case even when the additive has a high viscosity or is solid at ambient temperature. The viscosity of DME blends can reach that of diesel oil but only when the additive...

  4. Assessment of passive knee stiffness and viscosity in individuals with spinal cord injury using pendulum test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joghtaei, Mahmoud; Arab, Amir Massoud; Hashemi-Nasl, Hamed; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Tokhi, Mohammad Osman

    2015-03-01

    Stiffness and viscosity represent passive resistances to joint motion related with the structural properties of the joint tissue and of the musculotendinous complex. Both parameters can be affected in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to measure passive knee stiffness and viscosity in patients with SCI with paraplegia and healthy subjects using Wartenberg pendulum test. Non-experimental, cross-sectional, case-control design. An outpatient physical therapy clinic, University of social welfare and Rehabilitation Science, Iran. A sample of convenience sample of 30 subjects participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: individuals with paraplegic SCI (n = 15, age: 34.60 ± 9.18 years) and 15 able-bodied individuals as control group (n = 15, age: 30.66 ± 11.13 years). Not applicable. Passive pendulum test of Wartenberg was used to measure passive viscous-elastic parameters of the knee (stiffness, viscosity) in all subjects. Statistical analysis (independent t-test) revealed significant difference in the joint stiffness between healthy subjects and those with paraplegic SCI (P = 0.01). However, no significant difference was found in the viscosity between two groups (P = 0.17). Except for first peak flexion angle, all other displacement kinematic parameters exhibited no statistically significant difference between normal subjects and subjects with SCI. Patients with SCI have significantly greater joint stiffness compared to able-bodied subjects.

  5. Assessing the Impact of Charge Variants on Stability and Viscosity of a High Concentration Antibody Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, Shantanu V; Fernandez, Jason E; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Kravets, Yana; Yang, William C; Feng, Pamela; Liu, Suli; Zang, Li; Capili, Allan D; Estey, Tia B; Gupta, Kapil

    2017-12-01

    Characterizing molecular charge variants or isoforms is essential for understanding safety, potency, and bioavailability of antibody therapeutics. However, there is little information on how they influence stability and viscosity-properties governing immunogenicity and delivery. To bridge this gap, we studied antibody stability as a function of charge variant content generated via bioreactor process. We were able to systematically vary acidic variant levels as a function of bioreactor harvest time. Importantly, we do not observe any impact on aggregation behavior of a formulated antibody at high protein concentration as a function of acidic variant level. Furthermore, we confirm that acidic variants enriched using fractionation do not influence viscosity, colloidal or conformational stability. Interestingly, variants with the most acidic isoelectric points contribute disproportionately to formulation color. We discuss our findings in context of antibody manufacturing processes that may yield increased charge variant content. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Viscosity Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Camilli, Fabio; Prados, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Viscosity solution is a notion of weak solution for a class of partial differential equations of Hamilton-Jacobi type. The range of applications of the notions of viscosity solution and Hamilton-Jacobi equations is enormous, including common class of partial differential equations such as evolutive problems and problems with boundary conditions, equations arising in optimal control theory, differential games, second-order equations arising in stochastic optimal control...

  7. The effect of glycosaminoglycan enzymes and proteases on the viscosity of alpaca seminal plasma and sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw-Young, C M; Stuart, C; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2013-05-01

    In order to advance the development of cryopreservation and other assisted reproductive technologies in camelids it is necessary to eliminate the viscous component of the seminal plasma without impairing sperm function. It has been postulated that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or proteoglycans are responsible for this viscosity. This study investigated the effect of the GAG enzymes hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and keratanase and the proteases papain and proteinase K on seminal plasma viscosity and sperm function in order to aid identification of the cause of seminal plasma viscosity and propose methods for the reduction of viscosity. Sperm motility, DNA integrity, acrosome integrity and viability were assessed during 2h incubation. All enzymes reduced seminal plasma viscosity compared to control (Palpaca seminal plasma viscosity. Papain treatment of alpaca semen may be a suitable technique for reduction of seminal plasma viscosity prior to sperm cryopreservation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  9. Clinical and SEM assessment of ART high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants after 8-13 years in 4 teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencken, J E; Wolke, J

    2010-01-01

    Resin composite sealants are retained longer than low-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants. Nevertheless, a systematic review showed that there is no evidence that resin composite sealants are superior to low-viscosity glass-ionomers in preventing dentine carious lesion development. This case study aimed to investigate reasons for this. 4 teeth were sealed with 2 brands of high-viscosity glass-ionomer according to the ART technique in 2 children aged 10 and 11.5 years, having a low caries-risk status, and followed clinically for between 8 and 13 years. At the final year, impressions were taken for SEM images that were assessed by two evaluators. Pits and fissures that were clinically diagnosed as free of sealant material appeared to contain remnants of high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealant material in the deeper parts of pits and fissures, on SEM images of 3 teeth. This study confirms the likelihood that remnants of high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealant material are retained and block the deeper parts of pits and fissures even after the sealant appears to have disappeared clinically, exercising their carious lesion preventive effect.

  10. Portfolio Assessment: Production and Reduction of Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvortrup, Ane; Keiding, Tina Bering

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the education system has witnessed a shift from summative, product-oriented assessment towards formative, process-oriented assessment. Among the different learning and assessment initiatives introduced in the slipstream of this paradigmatic turn, the portfolio seems to have become one of the most popular. By redescribing…

  11. Portfolio assessment: Production and reduction of complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, Ane; Keiding, Tina Bering

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the education system has witnessed a shift from summative, product-oriented assessment towards formative, process-oriented assessment. Among the different learning and assessment initiatives introduced in the slipstream of this paradigmatic turn, the portfolio seems......, produces particular conditions for the stimulation and observation of learning, thus increasing the complexity of observation of learning....... to have become one of the most popular. By re-describing the portfolio from a systems theoretical point of view, this article discusses established expectations of the portfolio in relation to transparency in learning, reflexivity and self-assessment. It shows that the majority of the literature deals...

  12. Characterization of asphaltene molecular structures by cracking under hydrogenation conditions and prediction of the viscosity reduction from visbreaking of heavy oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda Velasquez, Rosa Imelda

    yield of distillates. Thermal cracking of asphaltenes in heavy oils and bitumens can dramatically reduce viscosity, enabling pipeline transportation with less solvent addition. The viscosities of the products from visbreaking reactions of two different heavy oils were modeled with lumped kinetics based on boiling point pseudo-components, and with the estimation of their individual fluid properties. The model was tuned with experimental viscosity data, and provided estimations of viscosities at different temperatures with absolute average deviations lower than 31%.

  13. Objective Integrated Assessment of Functional Outcomes in Reduction Mammaplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Ilaria; Malovini, Alberto; Faga, Angela; Toffola, Elena Dalla

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of our study was an objective integrated assessment of the functional outcomes of reduction mammaplasty. Methods: The study involved 17 women undergoing reduction mammaplasty from March 2009 to June 2011. Each patient was assessed before surgery and 2 months postoperatively with the original association of 4 subjective and objective assessment methods: a physiatric clinical examination, the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, the Berg Balance Scale, and a static force platform analysis. Results: All of the tests proved multiple statistically significant associated outcomes demonstrating a significant improvement in the functional status following reduction mammaplasty. Surgical correction of breast hypertrophy could achieve both spinal pain relief and recovery of performance status in everyday life tasks, owing to a muscular postural functional rearrangement with a consistent antigravity muscle activity sparing. Pain reduction in turn could reduce the antalgic stiffness and improved the spinal range of motion. In our sample, the improvement of the spinal range of motion in flexion matched a similar improvement in extension. Recovery of a more favorable postural pattern with reduction of the anterior imbalance was demonstrated by the static force stabilometry. Therefore, postoperatively, all of our patients narrowed the gap between the actual body barycenter and the ideal one. The static force platform assessment also consistently confirmed the effectiveness of an accurate clinical examination of functional impairment from breast hypertrophy. Conclusions: The static force platform assessment might help the clinician to support the diagnosis of functional impairment from a breast hypertrophy with objectively based data. PMID:25289256

  14. Assessing the impact of electrolyte conductivity and viscosity on the reactor cost and pressure drop of redox-active polymer flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Vinay A.; Schuh, Jonathon K.; Montoto, Elena C.; Pavan Nemani, V.; Qian, Shaoyi; Nagarjuna, Gavvalapalli; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Smith, Kyle C.

    2017-09-01

    Redox-active small molecules, used traditionally in redox flow batteries (RFBs), are susceptible to crossover and require expensive ion exchange membranes (IEMs) to achieve long lifetimes. Redox-active polymer (RAP) solutions show promise as candidate electrolytes to mitigate crossover through size-exclusion, enabling the use of porous separators instead of IEMs. Here, poly(vinylbenzyl ethyl viologen) is studied as a surrogate RAP for RFBs. For oxidized RAPs, ionic conductivity varies weakly between 1.6 and 2.1 S m-1 for RAP concentrations of 0.13-1.27 mol kg-1 (monomeric repeat unit per kg solvent) and 0.32 mol kg-1 LiBF4 with a minor increase upon reduction. In contrast, viscosity varies between 1.8 and 184.0 mPa s over the same concentration range with weakly shear-thinning rheology independent of oxidation state. Techno-economic analysis is used to quantify reactor cost as a function of electrolyte transport properties for RAP concentrations of 0.13-1.27 mol kg-1, assuming a hypothetical 3V cell and facile kinetics. Among these concentrations, reactor cost is minimized over a current density range of 600-1000 A m-2 with minimum reactor cost between 11-17 per kWh, and pumping pressures below 10 kPa. The predicted low reactor cost of RAP RFBs is enabled by sustained ionic mobility in spite of the high viscosity of concentrated RAP solutions.

  15. Integrated assessment of climate change with reductions of methane emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amstel, van A.R.

    2005-01-01

    We have been living in the anthropocene era since about 1950, and evidence of human influence on the natural ecosystems and climate is mounting. Reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are needed to reduce the effects of climate change in the future. In an integrated assessment with the IMAGE model

  16. Thermodynamic assessment of the oxygen reduction activity in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    In the conventional theoretical approach, oxygen reduction reaction activities are assessed through a volcano plot using activity descriptors. The volcano plot relies on several approximations, e.g. the reaction kinetics are commonly overlooked and the interaction of hydrophilic intermediates wit...

  17. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R; Huang, K

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ~1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells' normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of the Eating Assessment Tool and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test for clinical evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofes, L; Arreola, V; Mukherjee, R; Clavé, P

    2014-01-01

    Background Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is an underdiagnosed digestive disorder that causes severe nutritional and respiratory complications. Our aim was to determine the accuracy of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test (V-VST) for clinical evaluation of OD. Methods We studied 120 patients with swallowing difficulties and 14 healthy subjects. OD was evaluated by the 10-item screening questionnaire EAT-10 and the bedside method V-VST, videofluoroscopy (VFS) being the reference standard. The V-VST is an effort test that uses boluses of different volumes and viscosities to identify clinical signs of impaired efficacy (impaired labial seal, piecemeal deglutition, and residue) and impaired safety of swallow (cough, voice changes, and oxygen desaturation ≥3%). Discriminating ability was assessed by the AUC of the ROC curve and sensitivity and specificity values. Key Results According to VFS, prevalence of OD was 87%, 75.6% with impaired efficacy and 80.9% with impaired safety of swallow including 17.6% aspirations. The EAT-10 showed a ROC AUC of 0.89 for OD with an optimal cut-off at 2 (0.89 sensitivity and 0.82 specificity). The V-VST showed 0.94 sensitivity and 0.88 specificity for OD, 0.79 sensitivity and 0.75 specificity for impaired efficacy, 0.87 sensitivity and 0.81 specificity for impaired safety, and 0.91 sensitivity and 0.28 specificity for aspirations. Conclusions & Inferences Clinical methods for screening (EAT-10) and assessment (V-VST) of OD offer excellent psychometric proprieties that allow adequate management of OD. Their universal application among at-risk populations will improve the identification of patients with OD at risk for malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. PMID:24909661

  19. Viscosity and Solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  20. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  1. Waiting for Disasters: A Risk Reduction Assessment of Technological Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovins, Jane; Winningham, Sam

    2010-05-01

    This session provides a risk reduction/mitigation assessment of natural hazards causation of technological disasters and possible solution. People use technology in an attempt to not only control their environment but nature itself in order to make them feel safe and productive. Most strategies for managing hazards followed a traditional planning model i.e. study the problem, identify and implement a solution, and move on to the next problem. This approach is often viewed as static model and risk reduction is more of an upward, positive, linear trend. However, technological disasters do not allow risk reduction action to neatly fit this upward, positive, linear trend with actual or potential threats to the environment and society. There are different types of technological disasters, including industrial accidents; pipeline ruptures; accidents at power, water and heat supply systems and other lines of communication; sudden collapse of buildings and mines; air crashes; shipwrecks; automobile and railway accidents to name a few. Natural factors can play an essential role in triggering or magnifying technological disasters. They can result from the direct destruction of given technical objects by a hazardous natural process such as the destruction of an atomic power plant or chemical plant due to an earthquake. Other examples would include the destruction of communications or infrastructure systems by heavy snowfalls, strong winds, avalanches. Events in the past ten years clearly demonstrate that natural disasters and the technological disasters that accompany them are not problems that can be solved in isolation and risk reduction can play an important part. Risk reduction was designed to head off the continuing rising financial and structural tolls from disasters. All Hazard Risk Reduction planning was supposed to include not only natural, but technological, and human-made disasters as well. The subsequent disaster risk reduction (DRR) indicators were to provide the

  2. Assessment of volume reduction effect after lung lobectomy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Junichi; Sano, Fumiho; Hayashi, Masataro; Kobayashi, Taiga; Kunihiro, Yoshie; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-07-01

    Lung lobectomy results in an unexpected improvement of the remaining lung function in some patients with moderate-to-severe emphysema. Because the lung function is the main limiting factor for therapeutic decision making in patients with lung cancer, it may be advantageous to identify patients who may benefit from the volume reduction effect, particularly those with a poor functional reserve. We measured the regional distribution of the emphysematous lung and normal lung using quantitative computed tomography in 84 patients undergoing lung lobectomy for cancer between January 2010 and December 2012. The volume reduction effect was diagnosed using a combination of radiologic and spirometric parameters. Eight patients (10%) were favorably affected by the volume reduction effect. The forced expiratory volume in one second increased postoperatively in these eight patients, whereas the forced vital capacity was unchanged, thus resulting in an improvement of the airflow obstruction postoperatively. This improvement was not due to a compensatory expansion of the remaining lung but was associated with a relative decrease in the forced end-expiratory lung volume. According to a multivariate analysis, airflow obstruction and the forced end-expiratory lung volume were independent predictors of the volume reduction effect. A combined assessment using spirometry and quantitative computed tomography helped to characterize the respiratory dynamics underlying the volume reduction effect, thus leading to the identification of novel predictors of a volume reduction effect after lobectomy for cancer. Verification of our results by a large-scale prospective study may help to extend the indications for lobectomy in patients with oncologically resectable lung cancer who have a marginal pulmonary function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Study on viscosity modification of human and formula milk for infants with dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Bartha de Mattos Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: to analyze the modification of the viscosity of human milk and infant formula. Methods: three studies were performed to assess the viscosity and effect of time on infant formula with a thickener, at concentrations of 2, 3, and 5%, as well as raw and pasteurized human milk at concentrations of 2, 3, 5, and 7% at 37ºC, for 60 minutes. Rice cereal was used as a thickening agent. The viscosity was evaluated using a Ford Cup-type viscometer, and the samples were analyzed at 20-minute intervals. Significant differences were assessed using the ANOVA test. Results: no significant differences in viscosity were observed over time in concentrations of 2, 3, and 5%. There was a difference in the viscosity between human milk and infant formula, in concentrations of 2% and 5%, 2% and 7%, 3% and 5%, and 3% and 7%, independently of the time intervals evaluated. Conclusion: the findings of this study demonstrate the need for different concentrations of the thickening agent for human milk and infant formula. Rice cereal is a suitable therapeutic option for newborns presented with dysphagia in concentrations of 2, 3, 5, and 7%, due to its effect on the viscosity and flow reduction, provided that the feeding time is considered.

  4. Tidal viscosity of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroimsky, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Efroimsky, 2017), we derived an expression for the tidal dissipation rate in a homogeneous near-spherical Maxwell body librating in longitude. Now, by equating this expression to the outgoing energy flux due to the vapour plumes, we estimate the mean tidal viscosity of Enceladus, under the assumption that the Enceladean mantle behaviour is Maxwell. This method yields a value of 0.24 × 1014 Pa s for the mean tidal viscosity, which is very close to the viscosity of ice near the melting point.

  5. Clinical and SEM assessment of ART high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants after 8-13 years in 4 teeth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Resin composite sealants are retained longer than low-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants. Nevertheless, a systematic review showed that there is no evidence that resin composite sealants are superior to low-viscosity glass-ionomers in preventing dentine carious lesion development. This

  6. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  7. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-09-19

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

  8. Imaging aerosol viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Francis; Athanasiadis, Thanos; Botchway, Stan; Davdison, Nicholas; Fitzgerald, Clare; Gallimore, Peter; Hosny, Neveen; Kalberer, Markus; Kuimova, Marina; Vysniauskas, Aurimas; Ward, Andy

    2017-04-01

    Organic aerosol particles play major roles in atmospheric chemistry, climate, and public health. Aerosol particle viscosity is important since it can determine the ability of chemical species such as oxidants, organics or water to diffuse into the particle bulk. Recent measurements indicate that OA may be present in highly viscous states; however, diffusion rates of small molecules such as water appear not to be limited by these high viscosities. We have developed a technique for measuring viscosity that allows for the imaging of aerosol viscosity in micron sized aerosols through use of fluorescence lifetime imaging of viscosity sensitive dyes which are also known as 'molecular rotors'. These rotors can be introduced into laboratory generated aerosol by adding minute quantities of the rotor to aerosol precursor prior to aerosolization. Real world aerosols can also be studied by doping them in situ with the rotors. The doping is achieved through generation of ultrafine aerosol particles that contain the rotors; the ultrafine aerosol particles deliver the rotors to the aerosol of interest via impaction and coagulation. This work has been conducted both on aerosols deposited on microscope coverslips and on particles that are levitated in their true aerosol phase through the use of a bespoke optical trap developed at the Central Laser Facility. The technique allows for the direct observation of kinetic barriers caused by high viscosity and low diffusivity in aerosol particles. The technique is non-destructive thereby allowing for multiple experiments to be carried out on the same sample. It can dynamically quantify and track viscosity changes during atmospherically relevant processes such oxidation and hygroscopic growth (1). This presentation will focus on the oxidation of aerosol particles composed of unsaturated and saturated organic species. It will discuss how the type of oxidant, oxidation rate and the composition of the oxidized products affect the time

  9. FY09 assessment of mercury reduction at SNL/NM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2010-02-01

    This assessment takes the result of the FY08 performance target baseline of mercury at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico, and records the steps taken in FY09 to collect additional data, encourage the voluntary reduction of mercury, and measure success. Elemental (metallic) mercury and all of its compounds are toxic, and exposure to excessive levels can permanently damage or fatally injure the brain and kidneys. Elemental mercury can also be absorbed through the skin and cause allergic reactions. Ingestion of inorganic mercury compounds can cause severe renal and gastrointestinal damage. Organic compounds of mercury such as methyl mercury, created when elemental mercury enters the environment, are considered the most toxic forms of the element. Exposures to very small amounts of these compounds can result in devastating neurological damage and death.1 SNL/NM is required to report annually on the site wide inventory of mercury for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program, as the site's inventory is excess of the ten pound reportable threshold quantity. In the fiscal year 2008 (FY08) Pollution Prevention Program Plan, Section 5.3 Reduction of Environmental Releases, a performance target stated was to establish a baseline of mercury, its principle uses, and annual quantity or inventory. This was accomplished on July 29, 2008 by recording the current status of mercury in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

  10. METHODOLOGY OF SYSTEM APPROACHE TO SEISMIC RISK ASSESSMENT AND REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Abakarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Ensuring of urban areas seismic safety is a task which do not require delay. But it cannot be solved by separate parts. It is essential that all components of the seismic hazard must be grouped together in one problem based on the system approach. In the present paper is presented not only the main flowchart of systems approach to ensuring the territory seismic safety but also the flowcharts of components of each main unit. They cover the whole package of measures for a full assessment of territory seismic hazard, seismic risk and its reduction.The proposed methodology can be carried out for design and implementation of regional territory seismic safety programs. 

  11. Assessment of metal artifact reduction methods in pelvic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Mehranian, Abolfazl [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Ailianou, Angeliki; Becker, Minerva [Division of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) produces images with improved quality potentially leading to confident and reliable clinical diagnosis and therapy planning. In this work, the authors evaluate the performance of five MAR techniques for the assessment of computed tomography images of patients with hip prostheses. Methods: Five MAR algorithms were evaluated using simulation and clinical studies. The algorithms included one-dimensional linear interpolation (LI) of the corrupted projection bins in the sinogram, two-dimensional interpolation (2D), a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) technique, a metal deletion technique, and a maximum a posteriori completion (MAPC) approach. The algorithms were applied to ten simulated datasets as well as 30 clinical studies of patients with metallic hip implants. Qualitative evaluations were performed by two blinded experienced radiologists who ranked overall artifact severity and pelvic organ recognition for each algorithm by assigning scores from zero to five (zero indicating totally obscured organs with no structures identifiable and five indicating recognition with high confidence). Results: Simulation studies revealed that 2D, NMAR, and MAPC techniques performed almost equally well in all regions. LI falls behind the other approaches in terms of reducing dark streaking artifacts as well as preserving unaffected regions (p < 0.05). Visual assessment of clinical datasets revealed the superiority of NMAR and MAPC in the evaluated pelvic organs and in terms of overall image quality. Conclusions: Overall, all methods, except LI, performed equally well in artifact-free regions. Considering both clinical and simulation studies, 2D, NMAR, and MAPC seem to outperform the other techniques.

  12. "Understanding" cosmological bulk viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Zimdahl, Winfried

    1996-01-01

    A universe consisting of two interacting perfect fluids with the same 4-velocity is considered. A heuristic mean free time argument is used to show that the system as a whole cannot be perfect as well but neccessarily implies a nonvanishing bulk viscosity. A new formula for the latter is derived and compared with corresponding results of radiative hydrodynamics.

  13. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  14. Progressive Commercial Cigarette Yield Reduction: Biochemical Exposure and Behavioral Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L.; Dains, Katherine M.; Hall, Sharon M.; Stewart, Susan; Wilson, Margaret; Dempsey, Delia; Jacob, Peyton

    2009-01-01

    Background Mandated reduction of exposure to nicotine and other cigarette toxins has been proposed as a possible national regulatory strategy. However, tapering using lower yield commercial cigarettes may not be effective in reducing nicotine or tar exposure due to compensatory smoking behavior. We examined the effects of gradual reduction of nicotine yield in commercial cigarettes on smoking behavior, with an assessment of nicotine intake and exposure to tobacco smoke toxins. Methods This 10-week longitudinal study of 20 smokers involved smoking the usual brand followed by different brands with progressively lower machine-determined yields, ranging from 0.9 to 0.1 mg nicotine, each smoked for 1 week. Subjects were followed for 4 weeks after returning to smoking the usual brand (or quitting). Smoking behaviors, biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure, and cardiovascular effects were measured. Findings Cotinine and other biomarkers of smoke exposure remained unchanged comparing the usual brand with the 0.4 mg nicotine brands. A 30% to 40% decrease in nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carcinogen exposure comparing 0.1 mg nicotine cigarettes with baseline was observed. Self-efficacy was significantly increased and dependence decreased after tapering. Implications We confirm prior cross-sectional population and experimental studies showing complete compensation for cigarettes down to the 0.4 mg nicotine range. Nicotine and tobacco toxin exposure were substantially reduced while smoking 0.1 mg nicotine cigarettes. Our data suggest that the degree of nicotine dependence of smokers may be lowered with progressive yield tapering. Gradual tapering of smokers from regular to ultralow nicotine yield commercial cigarettes might facilitate smoking cessation and warrants future research. PMID:19258480

  15. ASTARTE: Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M. A.; Yalciner, A. C.; Canals, M.

    2014-12-01

    enhancement of the Tsunami Warning System in the NEAM region in terms of monitoring, early warning and forecast, governance and resilience. This work is funded by project ASTARTE - Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe. Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013.6.4-3 ENV.2013.6.4-3)

  16. Reduction of inequalities in health: assessing evidence-based tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea Beverley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reduction of health inequalities is a focus of many national and international health organisations. The need for pragmatic evidence-based approaches has led to the development of a number of evidence-based equity initiatives. This paper describes a new program that focuses upon evidence- based tools, which are useful for policy initiatives that reduce inequities. Methods This paper is based on a presentation that was given at the "Regional Consultation on Policy Tools: Equity in Population Health Reports," held in Toronto, Canada in June 2002. Results Five assessment tools were presented. 1. A database of systematic reviews on the effects of educational, legal, social, and health interventions to reduce unfair inequalities is being established through the Cochrane and Campbell Collaborations. 2 Decision aids and shared decision making can be facilitated in disadvantaged groups by 'health coaches' to help people become better decision makers, negotiators, and navigators of the health system; a pilot study in Chile has provided proof of this concept. 3. The CIET Cycle: Combining adapted cluster survey techniques with qualitative methods, CIET's population based applications support evidence-based decision making at local and national levels. The CIET map generates maps directly from survey or routine institutional data, to be used as evidence-based decisions aids. Complex data can be displayed attractively, providing an important tool for studying and comparing health indicators among and between different populations. 4. The Ottawa Equity Gauge is applying the Global Equity Gauge Alliance framework to an industrialised country setting. 5 The Needs-Based Health Assessment Toolkit, established to assemble information on which clinical and health policy decisions can be based, is being expanded to ensure a focus on distribution and average health indicators. Conclusion Evidence-based planning tools have much to offer the

  17. Skyrmions and Hall viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the contribution of magnetic Skyrmions to the Hall viscosity and propose a simple way to identify it in experiments. The topological Skyrmion charge density has a distinct signature in the electric Hall conductivity that is identified in existing experimental data. In an electrically neutral system, the Skyrmion charge density is directly related to the thermal Hall conductivity. These results are direct consequences of the field theory Ward identities, which relate various physica...

  18. Early dissipation and viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Bozek, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    We consider dissipative phenomena due to the relaxation of an initial anisotropic local pressure in the fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both for the Bjorken boost-invariant case and for the azimuthally symmetric radial expansion with boost-invariance. The resulting increase of the entropy can be counterbalanced by a suitable retuning of the initial temperature. An increase of the transverse collective flow is observed. The influence of the shear viscosity on the longitu...

  19. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  20. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  1. Influence of Functional Groups on the Viscosity of Organic Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfuss, Nicholas E; Petters, Markus D

    2017-01-03

    Organic aerosols can exist in highly viscous or glassy phase states. A viscosity database for organic compounds with atmospherically relevant functional groups is compiled and analyzed to quantify the influence of number and location of functional groups on viscosity. For weakly functionalized compounds the trend in viscosity sensitivity to functional group addition is carboxylic acid (COOH) ≈ hydroxyl (OH) > nitrate (ONO2) > carbonyl (CO) ≈ ester (COO) > methylene (CH2). Sensitivities to group addition increase with greater levels of prior functionalization and decreasing temperature. For carboxylic acids a sharp increase in sensitivity is likely present already at the second addition at room temperature. Ring structures increase viscosity relative to linear structures. Sensitivities are correlated with analogously derived sensitivities of vapor pressure reduction. This may be exploited in the future to predict viscosity in numerical models by piggybacking on schemes that track the evolution of organic aerosol volatility with age.

  2. The relationship between plasma viscosity and Body Mass Index in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma viscosity is one of the most important rheological parameters for assessing the health status of an individual. It is influenced by diseases with alteration in plasma protein composition and previous studies have shown that the viscosity of plasma is affected by various factors which includes body weight, fibrinogen ...

  3. Electricity production from biogas in Serbia: Assessment of emissions reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Slobodan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas represents a promising source for the production of clean energy. The objective of this paper was to quantify the potential for the reduction of emissions to the environment during the production of electricity from biogas in comparison with environmental effects of the production of the same amount of electricity from fossil resources (coal from Kolubara basin and natural gas. Basis for comparison of environmental impacts in this work was the annual production of electricity in biogas plants of the total capacity of 80 MW. This study has shown that the annual production of electricity from biogas power plants of 80 MW results in: substitution of up to 840 kt of coal from Kolubara basin and 123.2 million m3 of natural gas; reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases in the range of 491.16 kt - 604.97 kt CO2-eq, depending on the energy efficiency of the process of electricity production from biogas; reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases up to 92.37 kt CO2-eq compared to the use of natural gas for electricity generation.

  4. An assessment of psychological noise reduction by landscape plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Bao, Zhi Yi; Zhu, Zhu Jun

    2011-04-01

    The emphasis in the term 'Green Transportation' is on the word 'green'. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire) with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG). Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants' actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene) were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects' emotional processing, which we term 'psychological noise reduction'.

  5. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves....... The experiments show a significant increase in extensional viscosity with increasing pressure....

  6. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  7. The viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    and NOx traps are installed. The most significant problem encountered when engines are fuelled with DME is that the injection equipment breaks down prematurely due to extensive wear. This tribology issue can be explained by the very low lubricity and viscosity of DME. Recently, laboratory methods have...... appeared capable of measuring these properties of DME. The development of this is rendered difficult because DME has to be pressurised to remain in the liquid state and it dissolves most of the commercially available elastomers. This paper deals fundamentally with the measurement of the viscosity of DME...... and extends the discussion to the difficulty of viscosity establishing of very thin fluids. The main issue here is that it is not easy to calibrate the viscometers in the very low viscosity range corresponding to about one-fifth of that of water. The result is that the low viscosity is measured at high...

  8. Capillary waves with surface viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Denner, Fabian; Morgan, Neal; van Wachem, Berend; Dini, Daniele

    2017-11-01

    Experiments over the last 50 years have suggested a correlation between the surface (shear) viscosity and the stability of a foam or emulsion. With recent techniques allowing more accurate measurements of the elusive surface viscosity, we examine this link theoretically using small-amplitude capillary waves in the presence of the Marangoni effect and surface viscosity modelled via the Boussinesq-Scriven model. The surface viscosity effect is found to contribute a damping effect on the amplitude of the capillary wave with subtle differences to the effect of the convective-diffusive Marangoni transport. The general wave dispersion is augmented to take into account the Marangoni and surface viscosity effects, and a first-order correction to the critical damping wavelength is derived. The authors acknowledge the financial support of the Shell University Technology Centre for fuels and lubricants.

  9. Viscosity of endodontic irrigants: Influence of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of temperature on the viscosity of different endodontic irrigants. Materials and Methods: The measurements of viscosity of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride, aqueous solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX and 0.2% cetrimide, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA at different temperatures (22°C, 30°C, 40°C, 50°C and 60°C were obtained using Mohr balance and Ostwald viscometer. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used for the statistical analysis. (α = 0.05. Results: No significant differences were recorded at each temperature among 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride and aqueous solution of 0.2% CHX and 0.2% cetrimide. 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA showed the higher values. Viscosity statistically decreased with increasing temperature. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA are significantly viscous at room temperature and their viscosity reduces with elevating temperature.

  10. Control of the Fluid Viscosity in a Mock Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boës, Stefan; Ochsner, Gregor; Amacher, Raffael; Petrou, Anastasios; Meboldt, Mirko; Schmid Daners, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    A mock circulation allows the in vitro investigation, development, and testing of ventricular assist devices. An aqueous-glycerol solution is commonly used to mimic the viscosity of blood. Due to evaporation and temperature changes, the viscosity of the solution drifts from its initial value and therefore, deviates substantially from the targeted viscosity of blood. Additionally, the solution needs to be exchanged to account for changing viscosities when mimicking different hematocrits. This article presents a method to control the viscosity in a mock circulation. This method makes use of the relationship between temperature and viscosity of aqueous-glycerol solutions and employs the automatic control of the viscosity of the fluid. To that end, an existing mock circulation was extended with an industrial viscometer, temperature probes, and a heating nozzle band. The results obtained with different fluid viscosities show that a viscosity controller is vital for repeatable experimental conditions on mock circulations. With a mixture ratio of 49 mass percent of aqueous-glycerol solution, the controller can mimic a viscosity range corresponding to a hematocrit between 29 and 42% in a temperature range of 30-42°C. The control response has no overshoot and the settling time is 8.4 min for a viscosity step of 0.3 cP, equivalent to a hematocrit step of 3.6%. Two rotary blood pumps that are in clinical use are tested at different viscosities. At a flow rate of 5 L/min, both show a deviation of roughly 15 and 10% in motor current for high rotor speeds. The influence of different viscosities on the measured head pressure is negligible. Viscosity control for a mock circulation thus plays an important role for assessing the required motor current of ventricular assist devices. For the investigation of the power consumption of rotary blood pumps and the development of flow estimators where the motor current is a model input, an integrated viscosity controller is a valuable

  11. An Assessment of Psychological Noise Reduction by Landscape Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The emphasis in the term ‘Green Transportation’ is on the word ‘green’. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG. Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants’ actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects’ emotional processing, which we term ‘psychological noise reduction’.

  12. An Assessment of Psychological Noise Reduction by Landscape Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Bao, Zhi Yi; Zhu, Zhu Jun

    2011-01-01

    The emphasis in the term ‘Green Transportation’ is on the word ‘green’. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire) with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG). Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants’ actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene) were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects’ emotional processing, which we term ‘psychological noise reduction’. PMID:21695027

  13. Assessment and reduction of diaphragmatic tension during hiatal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Daniel Davila; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Wilshire, Candice L; Baik, Peter U; Aye, Ralph W

    2015-04-01

    During hiatal hernia repair there are two vectors of tension: axial and radial. An optimal repair minimizes the tension along these vectors. Radial tension is not easily recognized. There are no simple maneuvers like measuring length that facilitate assessment of radial tension. The aims of this project were to: (1) establish a simple intraoperative method to evaluate baseline tension of the diaphragmatic hiatal muscle closure; and, (2) assess if tension is reduced by relaxing maneuvers and if so, to what degree. Diaphragmatic characteristics and tension were assessed during hiatal hernia repair with a tension gage. We compared tension measured after hiatal dissection and after relaxing maneuvers were performed. Sixty-four patients (29 M:35F) underwent laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair. Baseline hiatal width was 2.84 cm and tension 13.6 dag. There was a positive correlation between hiatal width and tension (r = 0.55) but the strength of association was low (r (2) = 0.31). Four different hiatal shapes (slit, teardrop, "D", and oval) were identified and appear to influence tension and the need for relaxing incision. Tension was reduced by 35.8 % after a left pleurotomy (12 patients); by 46.2 % after a right crural relaxing incision (15 patients); and by 56.1 % if both maneuvers were performed (6 patients). Tension on the diaphragmatic hiatus can be measured with a novel device. There was a limited correlation with width of the hiatal opening. Relaxing maneuvers such as a left pleurotomy or a right crural relaxing incision reduced tension. Longer term follow-up will determine whether outcomes are improved by quantifying and reducing radial tension.

  14. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  15. Reinventing Design Principles for Developing Low-Viscosity Carbon Dioxide-Binding Organic Liquids for Flue Gas Clean Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Deepika; Koech, Phillip K; Heldebrant, David J; Cantu, David C; Zheng, Feng; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger

    2017-02-08

    Anthropogenic CO2 emissions from point sources (e.g., coal fired-power plants) account for the majority of the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Water-lean solvent systems such as CO2 -binding organic liquids (CO2 BOLs) are being developed to reduce the energy requirement for CO2 capture. Many water-lean solvents such as CO2 BOLs are currently limited by the high viscosities of concentrated electrolyte solvents, thus many of these solvents have yet to move toward commercialization. Conventional standard trial-and-error approaches for viscosity reduction, while effective, are time consuming and economically expensive. We rethink the metrics and design principles of low-viscosity CO2 -capture solvents using a combined synthesis and computational modeling approach. We critically study the effects of viscosity reducing factors such as orientation of hydrogen bonding, introduction of higher degrees of freedom, and cation or anion charge solvation, and assess whether or how each factor affects viscosity of CO2 BOL CO2 capture solvents. Ultimately, we found that hydrogen bond orientation and strength is the predominant factor influencing the viscosity in CO2 BOL solvents. With this knowledge, a new CO2 BOL variant, 1-MEIPADM-2-BOL, was synthesized and tested, resulting in a solvent that is approximately 60 % less viscous at 25 mol % CO2 loading than our base compound 1-IPADM-2-BOL. The insights gained from the current study redefine the fundamental concepts and understanding of what influences viscosity in concentrated organic CO2 -capture solvents. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Development of a Questionnaire to Assess University Students' Intentions to Use Behavioral Alcohol-Reduction Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Erin E.; Hoffmann, Erica; Rosenberg, Harold; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Young, Kathleen M.; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Kraus, Shane W.; Bannon, Erin E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of a new self-report questionnaire designed to assess college students' intentions to employ 31 specific alcohol-reduction strategies. Method: Students attending a large public university were recruited to complete alcohol-reduction, drinking history, and personality questionnaires online.…

  17. Transit investments for greenhouse gas and energy reduction program : second assessment report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This report is the second assessment of the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administrations Transit Investments for : Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) Program. The TIGGER Program provides capital funds to transit age...

  18. Variation of the apparent viscosity of thickened drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Mark; Hanson, Ben; Smith, Christina H

    2011-01-01

    In dysphagia care, thickening powders are widely added to drinks to slow their flow speed by increasing their viscosity. Current practice relies on subjective evaluation of viscosity using verbal descriptors. Several brands of thickener are available, with differences in constituent ingredients and instructions for use. Some thickened fluids have previously been shown to exhibit time-varying non-Newtonian flow behaviour, which may complicate attempts at subjective viscosity judgement. The aims were to quantify the apparent viscosity over time produced by thickeners having a range of constituent ingredients, and to relate the results to clinical practice. A comparative evaluation of currently available thickener products, including two which have recently been reformulated, was performed. Their subjective compliance to the National Descriptors standards was assessed, and their apparent viscosity was measured using a rheometer at shear rates representative of situations from slow tipping in a beaker (0.1 s⁻¹) to a fast swallow (100 s⁻¹). Testing was performed repeatedly up to 3 h from mixing. When mixed with water, it was found that most products compared well with subjective National Descriptors at three thickness levels. The fluids were all highly non-Newtonian; their apparent viscosity was strongly dependent on the rate of testing, typically decreasing by a factor of almost 100 as shear rate increased. All fluids showed some change in viscosity with time from mixing; this varied between products from -34% to 37% in the tests. This magnitude was less than the difference between thickness levels specified by the National Descriptors. The apparent viscosity of thickened fluids depends strongly on the shear rate at which it is examined. This inherent behaviour is likely to hinder subjective evaluation of viscosity. If quantitative measures of viscosity are required (for example, for standardization purposes), they must therefore be qualified with information of

  19. Viscosity of particle laden films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timounay, Yousra; Rouyer, Florence

    2017-06-01

    We perform retraction experiments on soap films where large particles bridge the two interfaces. Local velocities are measured by PIV during the unstationnary regime. The velocity variation in time and space can be described by a continuous fluid model from which effective viscosity (shear and dilatational) of particulate films is measured. The 2D effective viscosity of particulate films η2D increases with particle surface fraction ϕ: at low ϕ, it tends to the interfacial dilatational viscosity of the liquid/air interfaces and it diverges at the critical particle surface fraction ϕc ≃ 0.84. Experimental data agree with classical viscosity laws of hard spheres suspensions adapted to the 2D geometry, assuming viscous dissipation resulting from the squeeze of the liquid/air interfaces between the particles. Finally, we show that the observed viscous dissipation in particulate films has to be considered to describe the edge velocity during a retraction experiment at large particle coverage.

  20. The influence of tongue strength on oral viscosity discrimination acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M

    2017-12-27

    The ability to generate tongue pressures is widely considered to be critical for liquid bolus propulsion in swallowing. It has been proposed that the application of tongue pressure may also serve the function of collecting sensory information regarding bolus viscosity (resistance to flow). In this study, we explored the impact of age-related reductions in tongue strength on oral viscosity discrimination acuity. The experiment employed a triangle test discrimination protocol with an array of xanthan-gum thickened liquids in the mildly to moderately thick consistency range. A sample of 346 healthy volunteers was recruited, with age ranging from 12 to 86 (164 men, 182 women). On average, participants were able to detect a 0.29-fold increase in xanthan-gum concentration, corresponding to a 0.5-fold increase in viscosity at 50/s. Despite having significantly reduced tongue strength on maximum isometric tongue-palate pressure tasks, and regardless of sex, older participants in this study showed no reductions in viscosity discrimination acuity. In this article, the relationship between tongue strength and the ability to discriminate small differences in liquid viscosity during oral processing is explored. Given that tongue strength declines with age in healthy adults and is also reduced in individuals with dysphagia, it is interesting to determine whether reduced tongue strength might contribute to difficulties in evaluating liquid viscosity during the oral stage of swallowing. Using an array of mildly to moderately thick xanthan-gum thickened liquids, this experiment failed to find any evidence that reductions in tongue strength influence oral viscosity discrimination acuity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Influence of Febrile Neutropenia Period on Plasma Viscosity at Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Tek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, chemotherapy, and infections all together make changes in blood rheology and may affect the defense mechanisms by changing the thrombocyte function and endothelial cell. We have examined changes of blood rheology on plasma viscosity to put on probable following criteria for starting the treatment of febrile neutropenia immediately. A total of 27 postchemotherapy patients (16 males and 11 females with febrile neutropenia diagnosed according to international guidelines have been included into the study. The plasma viscosity of the patients whose febrile neutropenia has been successfully treated was also measured to assess the impact of the duration of neutropenia on viscosity. The plasma viscosities of the patients were significantly higher during neutropenic episode than in nonneutropenic state ( except for alkaline phosphatase. All study parameters, particularly acute phase reactants, were statistically similar during both states. In the correlation of analysis with study parameters and stages, significant correlation was not observed between plasma viscosity alteration and leukocyte-neutrophil alteration, also other study parameters. We have demonstrated significantly elevated plasma viscosity in our patients during febrile neutropenic episode. Despite normal values of various parameters known to trigger plasma viscosity, particularly fibrinogen, it can be easily argued that the main mechanism may be the endothelial injury during infectious process and immune response mediated microcirculatory blood flow alterations.

  2. Imaging viscosity of intragranular mucin matrix in cystic fibrosis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Sebastian; Ponomarchuk, Olga; Castillo, Marlius; Rebik, Jonathan; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Dzyuba, Sergei V; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Fudala, Rafal

    2017-12-01

    Abnormalities of mucus viscosity play a critical role in the pathogenesis of several respiratory diseases, including cystic fibrosis. Currently, there are no approaches to assess the rheological properties of mucin granule matrices in live cells. This is the first example of the use of a molecular rotor, a BODIPY dye, to quantitatively visualize the viscosity of intragranular mucin matrices in a large population of individual granules in differentiated primary bronchial epithelial cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

  3. Human capability in the perception of extensional and shear viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhihong; Chen, Jianshe; Holmes, Melvin

    2017-10-01

    Shear and extensional deformation are two basic rheological phenomena which occur commonly in our daily life. Because of the very different nature of the two deformations, fluid materials may exhibit significant differences in their responses to shear and extensional forces. This work investigated the human perception of shear and extensional viscosity and tested the hypothesis that human have different discriminatory sensation mechanisms including scaling to the two deformations. A series of fluid samples were prepared using two common food thickeners, guar gum and sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC-Na). The shear and extensional flow behavior of these fluids were assessed using shear and extensional rheometers and in addition two separate sensory analysis sessions were organized to assess human sensitivity in perceiving the two viscosities. Magnitude estimation was used in the first session to assess human sensitivity in the perception of the shear and extensional viscosities and just-noticeable-difference (JND) assessment was used for the second session to identify the typical threshold of viscosity discrimination. For the participants considered, it was found that the perception of both shear and extensional viscosity follow a power law relationship i.e. Steven's law. It was also observed that the human has a greater discriminatory capacity in perceiving extensional viscosity. JND analysis showed that the human threshold in detecting shear viscosity difference was 9.33%, but only 6.20% for extensional viscosity. Shear and extensional deformation are two basic rheological properties which occur during food manipulation, mastication, deglutition executed during oral consumption and also in the processing and packaging of foods. Fluid resistance against shear and extensional deformation differ widely and whilst this has been confirmed theoretically and experimentally, a clear understanding of human perception of these properties will have beneficial returns to

  4. Titin Based Viscosity in Ventricular Physiology: An Integrative Investigation of PEVK-Actin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Charles S; Methawasin, Methajit; Nelson, O Lynne; Radke, Michael H; Hidalgo, Carlos G; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    Viscosity is proposed to modulate diastolic function, but only limited understanding of the source(s) of viscosity exists. In-vitro experiments have shown that the proline-glutamic acid-valine-lysine (PEVK) rich element of titin interacts with actin, causing a viscous force in the sarcomere. It is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to viscosity in-vivo. We tested the hypothesis that PEVK-actin interaction causes cardiac viscosity and is important in-vivo via an integrative physiological study on a unique PEVK-knockout (KO) model. Both skinned cardiomyocytes and papillary muscle fibers were isolated from wildtype (WT) and PEVK KO mice and passive viscosity was examined using stretch-hold-release and sinusoidal analysis. Viscosity was reduced by ~60% in KO myocytes and ~50% in muscle fibers at room temperature. The PEVK-actin interaction was not modulated by temperature or diastolic calcium, but was increased by lattice compression. Stretch-hold and sinusoidal frequency protocols on intact isolated mouse hearts showed a smaller, 30–40% reduction in viscosity, possibly due to actomyosin interactions, and showed that microtubules did not contribute to viscosity. Transmitral Doppler echocardiography similarly revealed a 40% decrease in LV chamber viscosity in the PEVK KO in-vivo. This integrative study is the first to quantify the influence of a specific molecular (PEVK-actin) viscosity in-vivo and shows that PEVK-actin interactions are an important physiological source of viscosity. PMID:21708170

  5. Comparison of Parallel Viscosity with Neoclassical Theory

    OpenAIRE

    K., Ida; N., Nakajima

    1996-01-01

    Toroidal rotation profiles are measured with charge exchange spectroscopy for the plasma heated with tangential NBI in CHS heliotron/torsatron device to estimate parallel viscosity. The parallel viscosity derived from the toroidal rotation velocity shows good agreement with the neoclassical parallel viscosity plus the perpendicular viscosity. (mu_perp =2m^2 /s).

  6. The effect of gasses on the viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    media, but their effect on DME viscosity is unknown. Argon (Ar), nitrogen (NA carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen (H-2) and propane (C3H8) have been investigated at pressure levels of 12-15 bar. A Cannon-Manning semi-micro capillary glass viscometer, size 25, enclosed in a cylindrical pressure container......, of glass, submerged completely in a constant temperature bath, has been used. A distinct reduction of efflux times was found only for the gas, CO2. The reduction in efflux time was about 9%. The kinematic viscosity of pure DME was determined to be: 0.188 +/- 0.001 cSt, 25 degrees C. A previously reported...... viscosity of pure DME has been corrected for the surface tension effect. Viscosity determination was initially based on a direct comparison of efflux times of DME with that of distilled water. The calculation gave a revised viscosity of 0.186 +/- 0.002 cSt, 25 degrees C, consistent with the above...

  7. Viscosity kernel of molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The wave-vector dependent shear viscosities for butane and freely jointed chains have been determined. The transverse momentum density and stress autocorrelation functions have been determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics in both atomic and molecular hydrodynamic formalisms. The density......, temperature, and chain length dependencies of the reciprocal and real-space viscosity kernels are presented. We find that the density has a major effect on the shape of the kernel. The temperature range and chain lengths considered here have by contrast less impact on the overall normalized shape. Functional...... forms that fit the wave-vector-dependent kernel data over a large density and wave-vector range have also been tested. Finally, a structural normalization of the kernels in physical space is considered. Overall, the real-space viscosity kernel has a width of roughly 3–6 atomic diameters, which means...

  8. Viscosity Control Experiment Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Heidi E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, Paul Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Turbulent mix has been invoked to explain many results in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density (HED) physics, such as reduced yield in capsule implosions. Many ICF capsule implosions exhibit interfacial instabilities seeded by the drive shock, but it is not clear that fully developed turbulence results from this. Many simulations use turbulent mix models to help match simulation results to data, but this is not appropriate if turbulence is not present. It would be useful to have an experiment where turbulent mixing could be turned on or off by design. The use of high-Z dopants to modify viscosity and the resulting influence on turbulence is considered here. A complicating factor is that the plasma in some implosions can become strongly coupled, which makes the Spitzer expression for viscosity invalid. We first consider equations that cover a broad parameter space in temperature and density to address regimes for various experimental applications. Next, a previous shock-tube and other ICF experiments that investigate viscosity or use doping to examine the effects on yield are reviewed. How viscosity and dopants play a role in capsule yield depends on the region and process under consideration. Experiments and simulations have been performed to study the effects of viscosity on both the hot spot and the fuel/ablator mix. Increases in yield have been seen for some designs, but not all. We then discuss the effect of adding krypton dopant to the gas region of a typical OMEGA and a 2-shock NIF implosion to determine approximately the effect of adding dopant on the computed Reynolds number. Recommendations for a path forward for possible experiments using high-Z dopants to affect viscosity and turbulence are made.

  9. Saliva viscosity as a potential risk factor for oral malodor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Takeuchi, Susumu; Takehara, Sachiko; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether saliva viscosity, measured by a viscometer, was a predictor of oral malodor. The subjects were 617 patients who visited an oral malodor clinic. The organoleptic test (OT) was used for diagnosis of oral malodor. An oral examination assessed the numbers of teeth present and decayed teeth as well as the presence or absence of dentures. Further, periodontal pocket depths (PD), gingival bleeding, dental plaque and tongue coating were investigated. Unstimulated saliva were collected for 5 min. Saliva viscosity was measured with a viscometer. Logistic regression analysis with oral malodor status by OT as a dependent variable was performed. Possible confounders including age, gender, number of teeth present, number of decayed teeth, number of teeth with PD ≥ 4 mm, number of teeth with bleeding on probing, presence or absence of dentures, plaque index, area of tongue coating, saliva flow rate, saliva pH and saliva viscosity were used as independent variables. Saliva viscosity (p = 0.047) along with the number of teeth with PD ≥4 mm (p = 0.001), plaque index (p = 0.037) and area of tongue coating (p viscosity (OR = 1.10) were more likely to have oral malodor compared to those with lower values. The results suggested that high saliva viscosity could be a potential risk factor for oral malodor.

  10. Comparison the clinical outcomes and complications of high-viscosity versus low-viscosity in osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhao; Wang, Wei; Gao, Wen-Shan; Gao, Fei; Wang, Hui; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes and complications of high viscosity and low viscosity bone cement percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF).From September 2009 to September 2015, 100 patients with OVCF were randomly divided into 2 groups: group H, using high viscosity cement (n = 50) or group L, using low viscosity cement (n = 50). The clinical outcomes were assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), kyphosis Cobb angle, vertebral height, and complications.Significant improvements in the VAS, ODI, kyphosis Cobb angle, and vertebral height were noted in both groups, and the VAS score in the H group showed greater benefit than in the L group. Cement leakage was observed less in group H. Postoperative assessment using computed tomography identified cement leakage in 27 of 98 (27.6%) vertebrae in group H and in 63 of 86 (73.3%) vertebrae in group L (P = .025).Compared with PVP using low viscosity bone cement, PVP using high viscosity bone cement can provide the same clinical outcomes with fewer complications and is recommended for routine clinical use.

  11. A comparison of high viscosity bone cement and low viscosity bone cement vertebroplasty for severe osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Jingcheng; Feng, Xinmin; Tao, Yuping; Yang, Jiandong; Wang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Shengfei; Cai, Jun; Huang, Jijun

    2015-02-01

    To compare the clinical outcome and complications of high viscosity and low viscosity poly-methyl methacrylate bone cement PVP for severe OVCFs. From December 2010 to December 2012, 32 patients with severe OVCFs were randomly assigned to either group H using high viscosity cement (n=14) or group L using low viscosity cement (n=18). The clinical outcomes were assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 General Health Survey (SF-36), kyphosis Cobb's angle, vertebral height, and complications. Significant improvement in the VAS, ODI, SF-36 scores, kyphosis Cobb's angle, and vertebral height were noted in both the groups, and there were no significant differences between the two groups. Cement leakage was seen less in group H. Postoperative assessment using computed tomography identified cement leakage in 5 of 17 (29.4%) vertebrae in group H and in 15 of 22 (68.2%) vertebrae in group L (P=0.025). The PVP using high viscosity bone cement can provide the same clinical outcome and fewer complications compared with PVP using low viscosity bone cement. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Intra-articular distal radius fractures: arthroscopic assessment of radiographically assisted reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C C; Haraszti, C J; McGillivary, G R; Gutow, A P

    2001-11-01

    The optimal means of assessing articular displacement during closed reduction of distal radius fractures is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo accuracy of fluoroscopy (C-arm) and plain radiographs (XR) in measuring articular step-off and gap and to determine if postreduction arthroscopy can identify malreduced intra-articular fractures that would benefit from reduction. Fifteen intra-articular distal radius fractures underwent closed manipulation and percutaneous pinning. Reduction was assessed sequentially by C-arm, XR, and wrist arthroscopy. The width of gapping between articular surface fragments was underestimated to a statistically significant degree by both C-arm and XR. The magnitude of articular step-off measured with arthroscopy was not statistically different than that measured radiographically. In 5 (33%) cases, the optimal reduction obtained using C-arm and XR was found to have an articular displacement of >1mm by adjunctive arthroscopy. Complete reduction and pinning was performed with satisfactory results. These results suggest that adjunctive arthroscopy may detect residual gapping of the articular surface that is not seen by C-arm or XR. Residual displacement noted by adjunctive arthroscopy may prompt another reduction effort and result in an improved articular alignment of intra-articular distal radius fractures.

  13. Viscosity in hot mix construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-11-01

    Viscosity, one of the oldest known and tested properties of Asphalt, yet one of the least studied is recently being given the attention it so rightfully deserves. Numerous engineers did recognize the importance of this property to the extent that sev...

  14. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  15. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... We discuss the role of nuclear viscosity in hindering the fission of heavy nuclei as observed in the experimental measurements of GDR -ray spectra from the fissioning nuclei. We review a set of experiments carried out and reported by us previously [see Dioszegi et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 024613 (2000); ...

  16. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is in exact conformity with all the previous measurements [7,10–13]. The CASCADE calculations (solid lines in figure 1) used in this first level of analysis do not include any viscosity or temperature-dependent nuclear level density parameter a. The γ and particle decay are calculated using the standard prescriptions as ...

  17. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Eckhard, E-mail: eckhard.vogel@uni-rostock.de [Institut für Chemie, Universität Rostock, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Span, Roland [Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Sebastian [Fachgebiet Technische Thermodynamik, Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρ{sub c} and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = T{sub c}/T (ρ{sub c}—critical density and T{sub c}—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  18. The Automatic Assessment and Reduction of Noise Using Edge Pattern Analysis in Nonlinear Image Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Woodells, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2004-01-01

    Noise is the primary visibility limit in the process of non-linear image enhancement, and is no longer a statistically stable additive noise in the post-enhancement image. Therefore novel approaches are needed to both assess and reduce spatially variable noise at this stage in overall image processing. Here we will examine the use of edge pattern analysis both for automatic assessment of spatially variable noise and as a foundation for new noise reduction methods.

  19. Automatic Assessment and Reduction of Noise using Edge Pattern Analysis in Non-Linear Image Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2004-01-01

    Noise is the primary visibility limit in the process of non-linear image enhancement, and is no longer a statistically stable additive noise in the post-enhancement image. Therefore novel approaches are needed to both assess and reduce spatially variable noise at this stage in overall image processing. Here we will examine the use of edge pattern analysis both for automatic assessment of spatially variable noise and as a foundation for new noise reduction methods.

  20. The influence of magnetic fields on crude oils viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Jose L.; Bombard, Antonio J. F. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itajuba, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas. Lab. de Reologia

    2009-07-01

    The crystallization of paraffin causes serious problems in the process of transportation of petroleum. This phenomenon increases the crude oil viscosity and implies an organic resin accumulation on pipeline wall, resulting in a reduced flux area or totally blocked pipes. One of the most challenging tasks for pipeline maintenance is solving this problem at low cost. Therefore, a method that inhibits the crystallization of paraffin and reduces the viscosity of crude oil could have many useful applications within the petroleum industry. Recent studies showed that magnetic fields reduce the Wax Appearance Temperature (WAT) and the viscosity of paraffin-based crude oil. For better understanding of this discovery, a series of tests was performed. This paper will show the influence of a DC magnetic field on rheological proprieties of three crude oils with different paraffin concentrations: a crude oil sample with 11 % p/p of paraffin concentration (sample 1); a crude oil sample with 6 % p/p of paraffin concentration (sample 2); a mixture of paraffin plus light crude oil with a total of 11 % p/p of paraffin concentration. These samples were placed in an electromagnet that generates a magnetic field of 1.3 Tesla. The samples' temperatures were conditioned around their Wax Appearance Temperature (WAT), and they were exposed to the field. As the viscosity of crude oil is very sensitive to the changes in temperature, it was ensured that the temperature has remained constant throughout the process. The sample 1 revealed a considerable reduction of viscosity: its original viscosity was 66 cP before magnetic field exposure, after that its viscosity was reduced to 39 cP. The other samples showed the same viscosity, before and after the magnetic field exposure. Since the samples 1 and 3 have the same paraffin concentrations, the viscosity reduction is not due only to the presence of paraffin; there must be other factors responsible for the interaction of sample 1 with the

  1. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  2. Impact assessment of the carbon reduction strategy for transport, low carbon transport : a greener future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This is an impact assessment for the Carbon Reduction Strategy for Transport (DfT, 2009), Low Carbon Transport: A Greener Future, which is part of the UK Governments wider UK Low Carbon Transition Plan (DECC, 2009), Britains path to ta...

  3. Flood warnings, flood disaster assessments, and flood hazard reduction: the roles of orbital remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakenridge, G. R.; Anderson, E.; Nghiem, S. V.; Caquard, S.; Shabaneh, T. B.

    2003-01-01

    Orbital remote sensing of the Earth is now poised to make three fundamental contributions towards reducing the detrimental effects of extreme floods. Effective Flood warning requires frequent radar observation of the Earth's surface through cloud cover. In contrast, both optical and radar wavelengths will increasingly be used for disaster assessment and hazard reduction.

  4. Observer assessment of femoral neck radiographs after reduction and dynamic hip screw fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heetveld, Martin J.; Raaymakers, Ernst L. F. B.; van Walsum, Ariaan D. P.; Barei, David P.; Steller, E. Philip

    2005-01-01

    It is not known how the described methods of reduction and dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation of displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures translate into proper assessment of the postoperative radiographs. At teaching or evaluation sessions in daily practice, frequent discussion arises about

  5. ICT supporting the assessment, explanation, and reduction possibilities of severity of violence experienced by secondary pupils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton

    2012-01-01

    Mooij, T. (2012, 19 September). ICT supporting the assessment, explanation, and reduction possibilities of severity of violence experienced by secondary pupils. Presentation at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ (ECER) of the ‘European Educational Research Association’ (EERA), Cádiz,

  6. Assessing the potential impact of the CO2 performance ladder on CO2 emission reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelis Blok; dr. Martijn Rietbergen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to assess the potential impact of the CO2 Performance Ladder on CO2 emission reduction. The CO2 Performance Ladder is a new green procurement scheme that has been adopted by several public authorities in the Netherlands; it is a staged certification scheme for energy and

  7. Biopolymer solution viscosity stabilization-polymer degradation and antioxidant use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, S.L.

    1983-12-01

    Dilute solutions of polymers used to provide mobility control for EOR often lose viscosity, especially at higher temperatures. This loss of viscosity with time brings into question the feasibility of using polymers as mobility control agents. A literature study of the many possible reaction mechanisms indicated that oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions involving free radicals probably caused polymer degradation and concomitant viscosity loss. A preliminary search for antioxidants known to retard free-radical reactions located several types and positive synergistic formulations that significantly retarded biopolymer solution viscosity loss during accelerated tests at high temperature. The most effective type formulation found contained (1) a radical transfer agent; (2) a sacrificial, easily oxidizable alcohol; (3) a compatible oxygen scavenger; and (4) sufficient brine concentration. Samples prepared with this technology have not lost viscosity after 1-year storage at 207/sup 0/F (97/sup 0/C). A high-surface-area effect (so-called ''wall effect''), known to retard radical propagation, was also found to operate in the presence of sandpacks; this should be beneficial in porous media. The variables and beneficial antioxidant formulations identified in this study allow tentative conclusions and recommendations regarding biopolymer mixing and handling procedures prior to injection.

  8. No effect on the short-term of a decrease in blood viscosity on insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnasso, Agostino; Cacia, Michele; Cortese, Claudio; Succurro, Elena; Andreozzi, Francesco; Carallo, Claudio; Irace, Concetta

    2018-01-01

    Blood viscosity (BV) might influence glucose delivery to peripheral tissues and play an important role in insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. However, the exact relationship between BV and insulin resistance is not yet clear. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of the acute reduction in BV on insulin resistance, in healthy male subjects. Fifteen healthy male blood donors have been studied before and 48 hours after blood donation. Blood and plasma viscosity have been measured at 37°C with a cone-plate viscometer. Insulin resistance has been evaluated by euglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamp in eight subjects, and by iHOMA2 Index in further seven subjects. Blood viscosity was markedly reduced after blood donation (BV225 (cP) 4.53 ± 0.59 vs. 4.18 ± 0.31, p < 0.05). Insulin resistance was unchanged: MFFM clamp: 5.6 ± 4.5vs. 4.4 ± 2.2 and iHOMA2 Index 1.2 ± 0.6 vs. 1.2 ± 0.5, before vs. after respectively, p = NS. Blood pressure and lipids were unchanged after blood donation. The present results demonstrate that acute reduction of BV in healthy male subjects does not change the insulin resistance, measured using both euglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamp and iHOMA2 Index. Further intervention studies are needed to assess the effect that the reduction in BV can have in subjects with insulin resistance.

  9. Shear viscosity of the quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Ohnishi, Hiromasa; Fukutome, Takahiko

    2007-01-01

    We discuss shear viscosity of the quark matter by using Kubo formula. The shear viscosity is calculated in the framework of the quasi-particle RPA for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We obtain a formula that the shear viscosity is expressed by the quadratic form of the quark spectral function in the chiral symmetric phase. The magnitude of the shear viscosity is discussed assuming the Breit-Wigner type for the spectral function.

  10. Density and viscosity of lipids under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a lack of data for the viscosity of lipids under pressure. The current report is a part of the effort to fill this gap. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses of vegetable oil (HOSuO) were investigated. Pressure–viscosity coefficients (PVC) of HOSuO at different tem...

  11. Effect of viscosity on learned satiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Hogenkamp, P.S.; Gosses, A.M.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, C.de

    2009-01-01

    A higher viscosity of a food leads to a longer orosensory stimulation. This may facilitate the learned association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. In the current study we investigated the effect of viscosity on learned satiation. In two intervention groups a low viscosity (LV)

  12. Mechanism of viscosity modification in multigrade oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, W.R.

    1976-09-01

    Multigrade motor oil viscosity modifiers such as acrylates, polyisobutylene, and olefin copolymers were examined to compare the basic physical properties of these polymers. Results of viscosity measurements and hydrodynamic volume changes are tabulated and discussed. Discussions are also included on temporary viscosity losses in polymer solutions. (JRD)

  13. Activity assessment has little impact on caries parameters reduction in epidemiological surveys with preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Chaiana; Ardenghi, Thiago M; Guedes, Renata S; Ekstrand, Kim R; Braga, Mariana M; Mendes, Fausto M

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the magnitude of the reduction in caries parameters after inclusion of dental caries activity assessment, in an epidemiological survey of preschool children, involving cavitated and noncavitated caries lesions. The survey was carried out in Santa Maria, Brazil, during the National Children's Vaccination Day, and 639 children aged between 12 months and 59 months were included. Fifteen examiners assessed the children based on the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) and additional lesion activity assessment criteria. The mean of decayed surfaces (d-s), the mean of decayed teeth (d-t), caries prevalence, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, initially by classifying all lesions using the various thresholds defined by the ICDAS. Caries activity status was then evaluated, and inactive lesions were classified as sound in a secondary analysis; subsequently, the same caries parameters, at the same thresholds, were recalculated. The reduction in caries parameters and the number of children requiring assessment to change their classification from decayed to sound (number needed to be assessed) were also calculated. The majority of lesions were classified as active, mainly at cavitated thresholds. When activity was considered, values of all caries parameters decreased. This decrease was more evident at noncavitated thresholds. The number of children requiring assessment to change their classification from decayed to sound was impact on the d-s, d-t and prevalence of dental caries considering both noncavitated and cavitated lesions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, A. G.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Grygoriev, U. V.; Plujko, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Shear viscosity η is calculated for the nuclear matter described as a system of interacting nucleons with the van der Waals (VDW) equation of state. The Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation is solved in terms of the plane waves of the collective overdamped motion. In the frequent-collision regime, the shear viscosity depends on the particle-number density n through the mean-field parameter a , which describes attractive forces in the VDW equation. In the temperature region T =15 -40 MeV, a ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density s is smaller than 1 at the nucleon number density n =(0.5 -1.5 ) n0 , where n0=0.16 fm-3 is the particle density of equilibrium nuclear matter at zero temperature. A minimum of the η /s ratio takes place somewhere in a vicinity of the critical point of the VDW system. Large values of η /s ≫1 are, however, found in both the low-density, n ≪n0 , and high-density, n >2 n0 , regions. This makes the ideal hydrodynamic approach inapplicable for these densities.

  15. Nonlocal viscosity kernel of mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben; Hansen, J. S.; Todd, B. D.

    2012-02-01

    In this Brief Report we investigate the multiscale hydrodynamical response of a liquid as a function of mixture composition. This is done via a series of molecular dynamics simulations in which the wave-vector-dependent viscosity kernel is computed for three mixtures, each with 7-15 different compositions. We observe that the viscosity kernel is dependent on composition for simple atomic mixtures for all the wave vectors studied here; however, for a molecular mixture the kernel is independent of composition for large wave vectors. The deviation from ideal mixing is also studied. Here it is shown that the Lorentz-Berthelot interaction rule follows ideal mixing surprisingly well for a large range of wave vectors, whereas for both the Kob-Andersen and molecular mixtures large deviations are found. Furthermore, for the molecular system the deviation is wave-vector dependent such that there exists a characteristic correlation length scale at which the ideal mixing goes from underestimating to overestimating the viscosity.

  16. Poverty reduction Approaches in Kenya: Assessing the Usefulness of the Right Based Approach in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wambua Leonard Munyao, Ph.D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available While billions of dollars have been spent in development projects in least developed countries, poverty continues to increase. This study proposes human-rights based approach to poverty eradication. To this end, the study seeks to assess the key determinants of use of rights- based approaches to poverty reduction and it’s usefulness in Kenya with special reference to NGOs in Kibera. The study further high lights some of the basic skills of implementing the rights based approach to poverty reduction. The attempts to establish the proportion of NGOs applying rights based approach to poverty reduction in Kibera Division as well. The review of relevant literature has been undertaken and a field study done. The study is informed by a qualitative human rights framework.

  17. Effective viscosity of actively swimming algae suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewoldt, Randy; Caretta, Lucas; Chengala, Anwar; Sheng, Jian

    2010-11-01

    Suspensions of actively swimming microorganisms exhibit an effective viscosity which may depend on volume fraction, cell shape, and the nature of locomotion (e.g. "pushers" vs. "pullers"). Here we report experimental measurements of shear viscosity for suspensions of unicellular green algae (Dunaliella primolecta, a biflagellated "puller"). We use a cone-and-plate rheometer to measure the dynamic shear viscosity for both motile and non-motile suspensions of D. primolecta. Viscosity increases with concentration for both cases, but the active suspensions of "pullers" have a comparatively lower effective viscosity than passive suspensions. This observation contrasts recently proposed theories which predict that "pullers" should instead have a higher viscosity than non-motile suspensions. Additionally, we observe shear-induced migration of active suspensions and consider its impact on the resulting effective shear viscosity.

  18. Effects of viscosity on power and hand injection of iso-osmolar iodinated contrast media through thin catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, James J; Hogstrom, Barry; Malinak, Jiri; Ikei, Nobuhiro

    2016-05-01

    It can be challenging to achieve adequate vessel opacification during percutaneous coronary interventions when using thin catheters, hand injection, and iso-osmolar contrast media (CM) such as iodixanol (Visipaque™). To explore these limitations and the possibility to overcome them with iosimenol, a novel CM. Three X-ray contrast media with different concentrations were used in this study. A series of in vitro experiments established the relationship between injection pressure and flow rate in angiography catheters under various conditions. The experiments were conducted with power and hand injections and included a double-blind evaluation of user perception. By using hand injection, it was generally not possible to reach a maximum injection pressure exceeding 50 psi. The time within which volunteers were able to complete the injections, the area under the pressure-time curve (AUC), and assessment of ease of injection all were in favor of iosimenol compared with iodixanol, especially when using the 4F thin catheter. Within the pressure ranges tested, the power injections demonstrated that the amount of iodine delivered at a fixed pressure was strongly related to viscosity but unrelated to iodine concentration. There are substantial limitations to the amount of iodine that can be delivered through thin catheters by hand injection when iso-osmolar CM with high viscosity is used. The only viable solution, besides increasing the injection pressure, is to use a CM with lower viscosity, since the cost of increasing the concentration, in terms of increased viscosity and consequent reduction in flow, is too high. Iosimenol, an iso-osmolar CM with lower viscosity than iodixanol might therefore be a better alternative when thinner catheters are preferred, especially when the radial artery is used as the access site. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  19. Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

  20. Association between blood viscosity and common carotid artery elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolino, Cesare; Irace, Concetta; Carallo, Claudio; De Franceschi, Maria Serena; Scavelli, Faustina; Della Valle, Elisabetta; Gnasso, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Elastic properties of the vessel wall are associated with atherosclerosis and major cardiovascular events. Several physiological and pathological conditions can affect arterial elasticity, but few studies have considered the role of hemorheological parameters. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between hemorheological parameters and vascular stiffness in the carotid artery district. One hundred and two individuals were enrolled. Blood and plasma viscosity were measured by a cone-plate viscometer (Wells-Brookfield DV-III, Stoughton, U.S.A.). Echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries was performed in order to calculate elastic indexes (strain, β-stiffness index and distensibility). The association between hemorheological parameters and carotid elasticity indexes was assessed by simple and multiple regression analyses. In simple correlation analysis, only blood viscosity was directly associated with β-stiffness index (r = 0.20, p = 0.05) and inversely with strain (r =-0.26, p = 0.01) and distensibility (r =-0.34, p = 0.001). After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, blood viscosity, but not plasma viscosity or hematocrit, was independently associated carotid arterial measures, together with age, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The results of the present study demonstrate a strong association between blood viscosity and common carotid elasticity indexes.

  1. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Automated Magnetic and Gravity Quality Assessment and Data Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, J. J.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Arko, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    With its global capability and diverse array of sensors, the academic research fleet is an integral component of ocean exploration. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) Program provides a central shore-side gateway for underway data from the U.S. academic research fleet. In addition to ensuring preservation and documentation of routine underway data, R2R is also developing automated quality assessment (QA) tools for a variety of underway data types. Routine post-cruise QA will enable prompt feedback to shipboard operators and to provide the science community with sufficient background information for data analysis. Based on community feedback, R2R will perform data reduction to generate enhanced data products for select data types including gravity and magnetics. In the development of these tools, R2R seeks input from the scientific community, engaging specialists for each data type and requesting feedback from operators and scientists to deliver the most relevant and useful metadata. Development of data acquisition best practices that are being assembled within the community for some data types will also be important components of R2R QA development. Protocols for gravity and magnetics QA will include the development of guidelines for minimal and optimal metadata for each data type that will enable data reduction and optimize data re-use. Metadata including instrument specifications, navigational offsets, and calibration information will be important inputs for both data reduction and QA. Data reduction will include merging these geophysical data types with high-quality R2R-generated navigation data products, cleaning the data and applying instrument corrections. Automated routines that are being developed will then be used to assess data quality, ultimately producing a Quality Assessment Certificate (QAC) that will provide the science community with quality information in an easily accessible and understandable format. We present progress to date and invite

  2. Life cycle assessment of the selective catalytic reduction; Oekobilanzierung des selektiven katalytischen Reduktionsverfahrens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzaga-Castellanos, L.; Kayser, G.; Markert, B. [Lehrstuhl Umweltverfahrenstechnik, Internationales Hochschulinstitut Zittau (Germany); Neufert, R. [Siemens AG, Bereich Energieerzeugung (KWU), Keramik- und Porzellanwerk Redwitz, Bereich Katalysatoren (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the overall reduction of the environmental impact by the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) determined by a investigation of the life cycle assessment of SCR systems for power plants. The overall reduction of the environmental impact by the use of SCR was determined under consideration of the total product life cycle from manufacture of the starting materials through catalyst production and use in the power plant to processing for recycling. Following clear specification of the overall system limits and definition of the goals for the analysis to be performed, the inventory analyses were determined for the individual process steps and in summary for the overall process cycle/sequence under consideration of basic SCR application variants in the power plant. The inventory analysis was used to generate the impact assessment and improvement assessment. This work was performed using the concept given by Braunschweig, A., and Mueller-Wenk, R. [5]. Other tools of environmental management of products and processes used were the methods of process cycle/sequence analysis, process input-output analysis and cumulative energy consumption or expenditure [14]. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Ermittlung der Brutto-Umweltbelastung durch Einsatz des selektiven katalytischen Reduktionsverfahrens (selective catalytic reduction, SCR) unter Beruecksichtigung des gesamten Produktlebenszyklus von der Herstellung der Vorprodukte ueber die Produktion der Katalysatoren und den Einsatz im Kraftwerk bis zur Aufbereitung zur Wiederverwertung wurde das Instrumentarium Oekobilanz angewandt. Nach einer eindeutigen Festlegung der gesamten Systemgrenzen und Definition der Ziele fuer die durchzufuehrende Analyse wurden die Sachbilanzen fuer die einzelnen Prozessschritte und zusammenfassend die Sachbilanz fuer die gesamte Prozesskette unter Beruecksichtigung grundsaetzlicher Anwendungsvarianten des SCR-Verfahrens im Kraftwerk erstellt. Auf der Sachbilanz aufbauend erfolgte die

  3. A comparative study of high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty vs. low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty for treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Yang; Peng, Hao; Tan, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Mi; Zheng, Xian-Nian; Chen, Fang-Zhou; Li, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The clinical effects of two different methods-high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) were investigated. From June 2010 to August 2013, 98 cases of OVCFs were included in our study. Forty-six patients underwent high-viscosity PVP and 52 patients underwent low-viscosity PKP. The occurrence of cement leakage was observed. Pain relief and functional activity were evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), respectively. Restoration of the vertebral body height and angle of kyphosis were assessed by comparing preoperative and postoperative measurements of the anterior heights, middle heights and the kyphotic angle of the fractured vertebra. Nine out of the 54 vertebra bodies and 11 out of the 60 vertebra bodies were observed to have cement leakage in the high-viscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP groups, respectively. The rate of cement leakage, correction of anterior vertebral height and kyphotic angles showed no significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05). Low-viscosity PKP had significant advantage in terms of the restoration of middle vertebral height as compared with the high-viscosity PVP (Pviscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP have similar clinical effects in terms of the rate of cement leakage, restoration of the anterior vertebral body height, changes of kyphotic angles, functional activity, and pain relief. Low-viscosity PKP is better than high-viscosity PVP in restoring the height of the middle vertebra.

  4. Shear viscosity in an anisotropic unitary Fermi gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Rickmoy; Sharma, Rishi; Trivedi, Sandip P.

    2017-11-01

    We consider a system consisting of a strongly interacting, ultracold unitary Fermi gas under harmonic confinement. Our analysis suggests the possibility of experimentally studying, in this system, an anisotropic shear viscosity tensor driven by the anisotropy in the trapping potential. In particular, we suggest that this experimental setup could mimic some features of anisotropic geometries that have recently been studied for strongly coupled field theories which have a dual gravitational description. Results using the AdS/CFT (anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence) in these theories show that in systems with a background linear potential, certain viscosity components can be made much smaller than the entropy density, parametrically violating the bound proposed by Kovtun, Son, and Starinets (KSS). This intuition, along with results from a Boltzmann analysis that we perform, suggests that a violation of the KSS bound can perhaps occur in the unitary Fermi gas system when it is subjected to a suitable anisotropic trapping potential which may be approximated to be linear in a suitable range of parameters. We give a concrete proposal for an experimental setup where an anisotropic shear viscosity tensor may arise. In such situations, it may also be possible to observe a reduction in the spin-1 component of the shear viscosity from its lowest value observed so far in ultracold Fermi gases. In extreme anisotropic situations, the reduction may be enough to reduce the shear viscosity to entropy ratio below the proposed KSS bound, although this regime is difficult to analyze in a theoretically controlled manner.

  5. Viscosity threshold that allows safe swallow in elderly with post-stroke dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Peña

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the viscosity threshold that allows safe swallowing in older adults with post-stroke dysphagia. Method: Cross-sectional analytical study. 6 patients over 60 years old with dysphagia participated. Were given six viscosities (50mPa s, 110mPa s, 170mPa s, 230mPa s, 290mPa s and 350mPa s made from no carbonated water and a corn starch-based thickener. Swallowing safety signs (wet voice, cough and oxygen saturation were assessed in each viscosity by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES. Viscosities’ performances in swallowing safety signs were compared in order to know which viscosity would be the safest. Results: 100% of swallowing safety signs did not appear in any viscosity assessed. Conclusions: It is not possible to determine the viscosity threshold that allows safe swallowing in patients with post-stroke dysphagia in the viscosities assessed. We discuss about multiple factors that had had affect our results: size sample, use of FEES to assess low viscosities, and viscosities’ intervals used.

  6. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Uncertainty assessment of spatially distributed nitrate reduction potential in groundwater using multiple geological realizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A. L.; Gunderman, D.; He, X.; Refsgaard, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    Spatially distributed nitrate reduction potential in groundwater was estimated for the clay till dominated Norsminde fjord catchment in Denmark using the distributed hydrological model MIKE SHE. The nitrate transport was simulated using particle tracking and nitrate was assumed to be instantaneously reduced at the redox interface. Spatially distributed depths of the redox interface were estimated based on the spatial patterns in groundwater recharge and sediment redox capacity. Uncertainty of the estimated nitrate reduction due to geological uncertainty was assessed using multiple geological realizations. The geological realizations were generated using the geostatistical software TProGS and either conditioned based on borehole data only or soft conditioned based on both borehole data and geophysical data. Finally an upscaling of the predicted nitrate reduction was done in order to evaluate the change in uncertainty with increasing scale. The study showed that the uncertainty (one standard deviation) of the estimated nitrate reduction potential (in percentage of nitrate input) on the original 100 m model scale was 25% if only using borehole data and 19% if combining the borehole data with geophysical data. The uncertainty on the model predictions decreased with increasing aggregation scale. The decrease in uncertainty was most apparent the first 500 m, where after the uncertainty started to level off. This scale corresponded well to the mean length of the sand units within the clay till. It is concluded that using geophysical data in combination with borehole data in generation of geological realizations can help decrease uncertainty on the estimated nitrate reduction and that the predictive capability of distributed models is constrained by the spatial resolution of key data such as geology.

  8. Agricultural conservation planning framework: 1. Developing multipractice watershed planning scenarios and assessing nutrient reduction potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, M D; Porter, S A; Boomer, K M B; James, D E; Kostel, J A; Helmers, M J; Isenhart, T M; McLellan, E

    2015-05-01

    Spatial data on soils, land use, and topography, combined with knowledge of conservation effectiveness, can be used to identify alternatives to reduce nutrient discharge from small (hydrologic unit code [HUC]12) watersheds. Databases comprising soil attributes, agricultural land use, and light detection and ranging-derived elevation models were developed for two glaciated midwestern HUC12 watersheds: Iowa's Beaver Creek watershed has an older dissected landscape, and Lime Creek in Illinois is young and less dissected. Subsurface drainage is common in both watersheds. We identified locations for conservation practices, including in-field practices (grassed waterways), edge-of-field practices (nutrient-removal wetlands, saturated buffers), and drainage-water management, by applying terrain analyses, geographic criteria, and cross-classifications to field- and watershed-scale geographic data. Cover crops were randomly distributed to fields without geographic prioritization. A set of alternative planning scenarios was developed to represent a variety of extents of implementation among these practices. The scenarios were assessed for nutrient reduction potential using a spreadsheet approach to calculate the average nutrient-removal efficiency required among the practices included in each scenario to achieve a 40% NO-N reduction. Results were evaluated in the context of the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy, which reviewed nutrient-removal efficiencies of practices and established the 40% NO-N reduction as Iowa's target for Gulf of Mexico hypoxia mitigation by agriculture. In both test watersheds, planning scenarios that could potentially achieve the targeted NO-N reduction but remove Cover crops and nutrient removal wetlands were common to these scenarios. This approach provides an interim technology to assist local watershed planning and could provide planning scenarios to evaluate using watershed simulation models. A set of ArcGIS tools is being released to enable

  9. Transport Signatures of the Hall Viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacrétaz, Luca V; Gromov, Andrey

    2017-12-01

    Hall viscosity is a nondissipative response function describing momentum transport in two-dimensional systems with broken parity. It is quantized in the quantum Hall regime, and contains information about the topological order of the quantum Hall state. Hall viscosity can distinguish different quantum Hall states with identical Hall conductances, but different topological order. To date, an experimentally accessible signature of Hall viscosity is lacking. We exploit the fact that Hall viscosity contributes to charge transport at finite wavelengths, and can therefore be extracted from nonlocal resistance measurements in inhomogeneous charge flows. We explain how to determine the Hall viscosity from such a transport experiment. In particular, we show that the profile of the electrochemical potential close to contacts where current is injected is sensitive to the value of the Hall viscosity.

  10. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  11. Quantitative assessment of resilience of a water supply system under rainfall reduction due to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasinghe, Pradeep; Liu, An; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Barnes, Paul; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-09-01

    A water supply system can be impacted by rainfall reduction due to climate change, thereby reducing its supply potential. This highlights the need to understand the system resilience, which refers to the ability to maintain service under various pressures (or disruptions). Currently, the concept of resilience has not yet been widely applied in managing water supply systems. This paper proposed three technical resilience indictors to assess the resilience of a water supply system. A case study analysis was undertaken of the Water Grid system of Queensland State, Australia, to showcase how the proposed indicators can be applied to assess resilience. The research outcomes confirmed that the use of resilience indicators is capable of identifying critical conditions in relation to the water supply system operation, such as the maximum allowable rainfall reduction for the system to maintain its operation without failure. Additionally, resilience indicators also provided useful insight regarding the sensitivity of the water supply system to a changing rainfall pattern in the context of climate change, which represents the system's stability when experiencing pressure. The study outcomes will help in the quantitative assessment of resilience and provide improved guidance to system operators to enhance the efficiency and reliability of a water supply system.

  12. Assessment of self-efficacy to employ self-initiated pornography use-reduction strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Shane W; Rosenberg, Harold; Tompsett, Carolyn J

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated several psychometric properties of a newly developed questionnaire designed to assess individuals' self-efficacy (from 0% to 100%) to employ self-initiated cognitive-behavioral strategies intended to reduce the frequency and duration of their pornography use. Using a web-based data collection procedure, we recruited 1298 male users of pornography to complete questionnaires assessing hypersexuality, pornography use history, and general self-efficacy. Based on a principal component analysis and examination of inter-item correlations, we deleted 13 items from the initial pool of 21 strategies. The resulting 8-item questionnaire had excellent internal consistency reliability, and a moderate mean inter-item correlation considered indicative of unidimensionality. In support of criterion validity, self-efficacy to employ use-reduction strategies was significantly associated with the frequency with which participants used pornography, with scores on a measure of hypersexuality, and with the number of times one had attempted to cut back using pornography. In support of discriminant validity, we found that pornography use-reduction self-efficacy scores were not strongly correlated with general self-efficacy. Both researchers and clinicians could use this questionnaire to assess pornography users' confidence to employ self-initiated strategies intended to reduce the duration and frequency with which they use pornography. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Viscosity in Modified Gravity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shownthat, based on a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found forquantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions mayincorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition inthe cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided. 

  14. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  15. Gamma radiation effects on the viscosity of green banana flour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Vanessa B.; Inamura, Patricia Y.; Mastro, Nelida L. Del [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: vanessa.uehara@usp.br, e-mail: patyoko@yahoo.com, e-mail: nlmastro@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Banana (Musa sp) is a tropical fruits with great acceptability among consumers and produced in Brazil in a large scale. Bananas are not being as exploited as they could be in prepared food, and research could stimulate greater interest from industry. The viscosity characteristics and a product consistency can determine its acceptance by the consumer. Particularly the starch obtained from green banana had been studied from the nutritional point of view since the concept of Resistant Starch was introduced. Powder RS with high content of amylose was included in an approved food list with alleged functional properties in Brazilian legislation. Ionizing radiation can be used as a public health intervention measure for the control of food-borne diseases. Radiation is also a very convenient tool for polymer materials modification through degradation, grafting and crosslinking. In this work the influence of ionizing radiation on the rheological behavior of green banana pulp was investigated. Samples of green banana pulp flour were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co Gammacell 220 (AECL) with doses of 0 kGy,1 kGy, 3 kGy, 5 kGy and 10 kGy in glass recipients. After irradiation 3% and 5% aqueous dilution were prepared and viscosity measurements performed in a Brooksfield, model DVIII viscometer using spindle SC4-18 and SC4-31. There was a reduction of the initial viscosity of the samples as a consequence of radiation processing, being the reduction inversely proportional to the flour concentration. The polysaccharide content of the banana starch seems to be degraded by radiation in solid state as shown by the reduction of viscosity as a function of radiation dose. (author)

  16. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, Katherine [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The viscosities of both aqueous and cyanate ester monomer (BECy) based suspensions of alumina nanoparticle were studied. The applications for these suspensions are different: aqueous suspensions of alumina nanoparticles are used in the production of technical ceramics made by slip casting or tape casting, and the BECy based suspensions are being developed for use in an injection-type composite repair resin. In the case of aqueous suspensions, it is advantageous to achieve a high solids content with low viscosity in order to produce a high quality product. The addition of a dispersant is useful so that higher solids content suspensions can be used with lower viscosities. For BECy suspensions, the addition of nanoparticles to the BECy resin is expected to enhance the mechanical properties of the cured composite. The addition of saccharides to aqueous suspensions leads to viscosity reduction. Through DSC measurements it was found that the saccharide molecules formed a solution with water and this resulted in lowering the melting temperature of the free water according to classic freezing point depression. Saccharides also lowered the melting temperature of the bound water, but this followed a different rule. The shear thinning and melting behaviors of the suspensions were used to develop a model based on fractal-type agglomeration. It is believed that the structure of the particle flocs in these suspensions changes with the addition of saccharides which leads to the resultant viscosity decrease. The viscosity of the BECy suspensions increased with solids content, and the viscosity increase was greater than predicted by the classical Einstein equation for dilute suspensions. Instead, the Mooney equation fits the viscosity behavior well from 0-20 vol% solids. The viscosity reduction achieved at high particle loadings by the addition of benzoic acid was also investigated by NMR. It appears that the benzoic acid interacts with the surface of the alumina particle which may

  17. The Effectof Temperature on the Dynmaic Viscosity of Acetone Sunflower-Seed Oil Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    TOPALLAR, Hüseyin; BAYRAK, Yüksel

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acetone on the dynamic viscosity of sunflower-seed oil was studied under a dynamic heating regime at temeparuters ranging from 25oC to 50oC at 5oC intervals. Acetone dramatically reduced the viscosity of sunflower-seed oil. The reduction of viscosity was far less with further addition of acetone. A linear relationship was found between the density of sunflower-seed oil and temperature. The influence of a solvent on the density of the sunflower-seed oil/acetone solution can be ac...

  18. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  19. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  20. Dental health assessed more than 10 years after interproximal enamel reduction of mandibular anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, Björn U; Nyøygaard, Lise; Mobarak, Karim

    2007-02-01

    We investigated whether interdental enamel reduction using fine diamond disks with air cooling, followed by polishing, leads to iatrogenic damage or reduced interradicular distances. Our subjects were 61 consecutive patients who had received mesiodistal enamel reduction of all 6 mandibular anterior teeth more than 10 years previously. Dental caries, bleeding on probing, probing depths, and gingival recessions were assessed with standard techniques. Incisor irregularities and tooth width/thickness ratios were measured on models, and the patients were asked about any increased tooth sensitivity. The reference group comprised 16 students. No new caries lesions were detected. Three mature adults had some minor labial gingival recessions. There was no evidence of root pathology. The distance between the roots of the mandibular incisors was statistically significantly greater in the patients who had received stripping than in those who had not; 59 of 61 patients reported no increased sensitivity to temperature variations. The overall irregularity index at follow-up was only 0.67 (SD, 0.64). Interdental enamel reduction according to this protocol did not result in iatrogenic damage. Dental caries, gingival problems, or alveolar bone loss did not increase, and the distances between the roots of the teeth in the mandibular anterior region were not reduced. The overall incisor irregularity at the follow-up examination was small.

  1. Dental health assessed after interproximal enamel reduction: caries risk in posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, Björn U; Minster, Line; Ogaard, Bjørn; Birkhed, Dowen

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether careful interdental enamel reduction (using extrafine diamond disks with air cooling, followed by contouring with triangular diamond burs and polishing) leads to increased caries risk in premolars and first molars. Our subjects were 43 consecutive patients from 19 to 71 years of age who had received mesiodistal enamel reduction of anterior and posterior teeth 4 to 6 years previously. Dental caries were assessed on standardized bite-wing radiographs according to a 5-grade scale and with a fine-tip explorer catch. The incidence of interproximal caries was compared between reproximated and unground contralateral surfaces in the same patient. Patients were asked about their toothbrushing habits, use of dental floss and toothpicks, and regular fluoride supplementation after the orthodontic appliances were removed. The overall clinical impression generally showed healthy dentitions with excellent occlusion. Only 7 (2.5%) new caries lesions (all grade 1) were found among 278 reproximated mesial or distal surfaces, in 3 patients. Among 84 contralateral unground reference tooth surfaces, 2 lesions (2.4%) were seen. On nonpaired premolars and molars that had not been ground, 23 surfaces had to be referred for caries treatment (grade 3 or occlusal caries). Eleven of these occurred in 1 patient. None of the 43 patients reported increased sensitivity to temperature variations. Interdental enamel reduction with this protocol did not result in increased caries risk in posterior teeth. We found no evidence that proper mesiodistal enamel reduction within recognized limits and in appropriate situations will cause harm to the teeth and supporting structures. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. VISCOSITY TEST OF VEHICLE ENGINE OILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Prasetyowati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the value of the kinematic viscosity lubricants motorcycle that has been used at various temperatures and the use of distance. This study also aims to remedy mengtahui how the value of the kinematic viscosity of the lubricant car that has been used in a wide range of temperature variation and distance usage. Viscosity liquid, in this case is the lubricants, can be determined using the Redwood viscometer By using Redwood viscometer, can be measured flow time required by 50 ml of the sample at a constant temperature. Time measurement result is known as the Redwood's sec or conventional viscosity. Conventional viscosity can be determined from the kinematic viscosity values. For motorcycle lubricant viscosity measured at a temperature of 30ͦ C, 50ͦ C, 65ͦ C and 100ͦ C, with the use of distance variation 0 Km, 5 Km, 10 Km, 15 Km and 20 Km. For car lubricant viscosity measured at a temperature of 30ͦ C, 50ͦ C, 65ͦ C and 100ͦ C, with variations in the use of distance 0 km, 1000 km, 5000 km, and 10000 Km. Motorcycle lubricant viscosity values at a temperature of 100ͦ C is 9.54 m2 / s (new lubricant, 1.15 m2 / s (use 5 Km, 5.86 m2 / s (use of 10 Km, 8.02 m2 / s (use of 15 Km, and 9.11 m2 / s (use of 20 Km. Lubricant viscosity values at a temperature of 1000C car is 6.73 m 2 / s (new lubricant, 7.89 m2 / s (use 1,000 km, 6.0 m2 / s (use 5000 Km, and 7.55 m2 / s (use 10000 Km.   Keywords: viscosity, oil, temperature

  3. Assessment of fat-mass loss during weight reduction in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelholm, G M; Sievänen, H T; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W D; Westerterp, K R

    1997-08-01

    Methods for assessing body fat mass (FM) loss were compared in 32 obese (body mass index [BMI], 29 to 41 kg/m2) premenopausal women before and after a weight loss of 13.0 +/- 3.4 kg (mean +/- SD). A four-component (4C) model was used as the criterion. The other methods were as follows: three-component models (body density with total body water [3W] or bone minerals [3M]), underwater weighing, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ([DXA] XR-26, software 2.5.2; Norland, Ft Atkinson, WI), bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) with an obese-specific equation [Segal et al), skinfolds (Durnin and Womersley), and an equation with BMI (Deurenberg et al). The 3W model (bias +/- SD, 0.5 +/- 0.4 kg), XR-26 (0.6 +/- 2.1 kg), and BMI equation (-0.3 +/- 2.1 kg) gave practically unbiased mean estimations of fat loss. All other methods underestimated fat loss by at least 1.6 kg (range of bias, -2.7 to -1.6 kg). The small bias (0.7 +/- 1.0 kg) between underwater weighing and model 4C before weight reduction indicates that the two-component assumptions were valid in premenopausal, weight-stable obese women. However, particularly the water fraction of the fat-free body component (4C model) was increased after weight reduction (before, 72.9% +/- 1.4%; after, 75.7% +/- 2.2%), making both underwater weighing and the 3M model uncertain for assessment of body composition changes. A general tendency for overestimating FM was seen before and more clearly after weight reduction. However, most methods underestimated fat loss, apparently because of unexpected changes in hydration of the fat-free body component.

  4. Factors affecting the viscosity of sodium hypochlorite and their effect on irrigant flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukiet, F; Soler, T; Guivarch, M; Camps, J; Tassery, H; Cuisinier, F; Candoni, N

    2013-10-01

    To assess the influence of concentration, temperature and surfactant addition to a sodium hypochlorite solution on its dynamic viscosity and to calculate the corresponding Reynolds number to determine the corresponding flow regimen. The dynamic viscosity of the irrigant was assessed using a rotational viscometer. Sodium hypochlorite with concentrations ranging from 0.6% to 9.6% was tested at 37 and 22 °C. A wide range of concentrations of three different surfactants was mixed in 2.4% sodium hypochlorite for viscosity measurements. The Reynolds number was calculated under each condition. Data were analysed using two-way anova. There was a significant influence of sodium hypochlorite concentration (P viscosity: the latter significantly increased with sodium hypochlorite concentration and decreased with temperature. A significant influence of surfactant concentration on dynamic viscosity (P viscosity increased with sodium hypochlorite and surfactant concentration but decreased with temperature. Under clinical conditions, all viscosities measured led to laminar flow. The transition between laminar and turbulent flow may be reached by modifying different parameters at the same time: increasing flow rate and temperature whilst decreasing irrigant viscosity by adding surfactants with a high value of critical micellar concentration. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. TRACI 2.0 - The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRACI 2.0, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts 2.0, has been expanded and developed for sustainability metrics, life cycle impact assessment, industrial ecology, and process design impact assessment for developing increasingly sustainable products, processes, facilities, companies, and communities. TRACI 2.0 allows the quantification of stressors that have potential effects, including ozone depletion, global warming, acidification, eutrophication, tropospheric ozone (smog) formation, human health criteria-related effects, human health cancer, human health noncancer, ecotoxicity, and fossil fuel depletion effects. Research is on going to quantify the use of land and water in a future version of TRACI. The original version of TRACI released in August 2002, has been used in many prestigious applications including: the US Green Building Council’s LEED Certification, the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s BEES (Building for Environment and Economic Sustainability) which is used by US EPA for Environmentally Preferable Purchasing, the US Marine Corps’ EKAT (Environmental Knowledge and Assessment Tool) for military and non-military uses, and within numerous college curriculums in engineering and design departments. To inform the public.

  6. VISCOSITY OF CONCENTRATED POTATO-STARCH PASTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMMERS, G; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1994-01-01

    A new viscosity equation for the description of the viscosity of concentrated aqueous starch pastes is proposed: eta(app) = Ke([Bmstarch+(C/T)-DW+(n-1)ln gamma]) with: m(starch) = mass fraction starch in paste, T = temperature, W = amount of work performed on the starch, n = power-law index, K =

  7. Haptic Discrimination and Matching of Viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Vrijling, A.C.L.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    In three experiments, viscosity perception of liquids using the sense of touch was studied. The first two were discrimination experiments in which Weber fractions were determined for a number of viscosities spanning the range of what is encountered in daily life, and for two ways of perceiving

  8. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-09

    Oct 9, 2014 ... After a brief review of the history of viscosity from classical to quantal fluids, a discussion of how the shear viscosity of a finite hot nucleus is calculated directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of the nucleus is given in this paper. The ratio / with s being the entropy volume ...

  9. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  10. Viscosity of Common Seed and Vegetable Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wes Fountain, C.; Jennings, Jeanne; McKie, Cheryl K.; Oakman, Patrice; Fetterolf, Monty L.

    1997-02-01

    Viscosity experiments using Ostwald-type gravity flow viscometers are not new to the physical chemistry laboratory. Several physical chemistry laboratory texts (1 - 3) contain at least one experiment studying polymer solutions or other well-defined systems. Several recently published articles (4 - 8) indicated the continued interest in using viscosity measurements in the teaching lab to illustrate molecular interpretation of bulk phenomena. Most of these discussions and teaching experiments are designed around an extensive theory of viscous flow and models of molecular shape that allow a full data interpretation to be attempted. This approach to viscosity experiments may not be appropriate for all teaching situations (e.g., high schools, general chemistry labs, and nonmajor physical chemistry labs). A viscosity experiment is presented here that is designed around common seed and vegetable oils. With the importance of viscosity to foodstuffs (9) and the importance of fatty acids to nutrition (10), an experiment using these common, recognizable oils has broad appeal.

  11. Odd viscosity in chiral active fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debarghya; Souslov, Anton; Abanov, Alexander G; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2017-11-17

    We study the hydrodynamics of fluids composed of self-spinning objects such as chiral grains or colloidal particles subject to torques. These chiral active fluids break both parity and time-reversal symmetries in their non-equilibrium steady states. As a result, the constitutive relations of chiral active media display a dissipationless linear-response coefficient called odd (or equivalently, Hall) viscosity. This odd viscosity does not lead to energy dissipation, but gives rise to a flow perpendicular to applied pressure. We show how odd viscosity arises from non-linear equations of hydrodynamics with rotational degrees of freedom, once linearized around a non-equilibrium steady state characterized by large spinning speeds. Next, we explore odd viscosity in compressible fluids and suggest how our findings can be tested in the context of shock propagation experiments. Finally, we show how odd viscosity in weakly compressible chiral active fluids can lead to density and pressure excess within vortex cores.

  12. The Friction Theory for Viscosity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    In this work the one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) general models have been extended to the viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. It is demonstrated that these simple models, which take advantage of the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of cubic equations of state...... such as the SRK, PR and PRSV, can provide accurate viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. In the case of light reservoir oils, whose properties are close to those of normal alkanes, the one-parameter f-theory general models can predict the viscosity of these fluids with good accuracy. Yet......, in the case when experimental information is available a more accurate modeling can be obtained by means of a simple tuning procedure. A tuned f-theory general model can deliver highly accurate viscosity modeling above the saturation pressure and good prediction of the liquid-phase viscosity at pressures...

  13. Plasma viscosity elevations with simulated weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. G.; Convertino, V. A.; Goldwater, D.; Ferguson, E. W.; Schoomaker, E. B.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothesis correlating an increase in blood viscosity during bed rest to a decrease in aerobic capacity during simulated weightlessness is tested. Eight human subjects were studied on the sixth day of bed rest during two consecutive 10-d bed rest periods separated by a 14-d recovery interval designed to simulate the flight-layover schedule of Shuttle astronauts. Plasma viscosity and volume were measured, together with maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). An increase in hematocrit, plasma protein, and fibrinogen concentrations was found, contributing to an elevation in plasma viscosity. VO2max decreased significantly in the first, but not the second bed rest cycle, and though many individuals exhibited a decrease in plasma volume and aerobic capacity coupled with elevated plasma viscosity, correlations between these variables were lacking. It is concluded that the decrease in VO2max observed following simulated weightlessness cannot be attributed to alterations in muscle blood flow resulting from increased blood viscosity.

  14. Formulation strategy towards minimizing viscosity mediated negative food effect on disintegration and dissolution of immediate release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Kamran; Langguth, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Food induced viscosity can delay disintegration and subsequent release of API from solid dosage form which may lead to severe reduction in the bioavailability of BCS type III compounds. Formulations of such tablets need to be optimized in view of this postprandial viscosity factor. In this study, three super disintegrants, croscarmellose sodium (CCS), cross-linked polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (CPD), and sodium starch glycolate (SSG) were assessed for their efficiency under simulated fed state. Tablets containing these disintegrants were compressed at 10 and 30 KN, while taking lactose as a soluble filler. In addition to other compendial tests, disintegration force of these formulations was measured by texture analysis. Comparison of parameters derived from force - time curves revealed a direct relation of maximum disintegration force (F max ) and disintegration force development rate (DFDR) with compressional force in fasted state, whereas an inverse relationship of F max and DFDR with compressional force was observed in fed state. The gelling tendency of disintegrants influenced the rate of release of API in simulated fed and fasted states when compressional force was changed. These observations recommend the evaluation of formulations in simulated fed state, in the development stage, with an objective of minimizing the negative impact of food induced viscosity on disintegration. Use of disintegrants that act without gelling or can counteract the effect of gelling is recommended for tablet formulations with reduced disintegration time (DT) and mean dissolution time (MDT) in fed state, respectively.

  15. The viscosity measurement of molten rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybár Pavol

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the viscosity measurtement of molten rocks. The reason of such investigation was due to the solving of SC No. 95/135/059 LITHO-JET. Technology of thermic rock melting for trenching of tenous vertical works. One task in the scope of above investigation was to experimentally verify the properties of melts of various types of works. An important moment in the trenching of tenuous vertical works by rock melting is the ability of melt to penetrate into the rock cracks. From this point of view an important physical property of molten rock is its viscosity. There are various methods how to measure viscosity but for the continuous measurements just some of them are suitable. The most suitable is rotary viscosimeter because it is simple in its construction, it allows to measure the viscosity as a function of temperature, concentration of wide class of sub stances with different rheologic properties. Hence, it allows to measure structural viscosity of the chemical reaction systems. The viscosity of molten nefelitic basanite as the function of temperature is studied in this paper. Viscosity of the nefelinitic basanite taken at locality Konrádovce was measured using rotary viscosimeter HAAKE ROTOVISKO. Eperimental conditions shown, that rising of the temperature vs. viscosity is in reverse order. Measurement is realised in scale 1370-1550°C. Under 1370°C was sample very viscous and measurement was impossible. Viscosity is the function of the temperature, pressure and gas components of rock.Though the viscosity measurements was carried out at atmospheric pressure, what does not fully conform real condition during trenching, it is still possible to express the effect of pressure. Other conditions, which take effect of viscosityof molten rocks in nature conditions will be subject of future investigation.

  16. The effects of iron treatment on viscosity in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlemez, Semiha; Tunaoğlu, Fatma Sedef; Göktaş, Tayfun; Çelik, Bülent; Erbaş, Deniz; Koçak, Ülker; Kula, Serdar; Oğuz, Ayşe Deniz

    2017-01-01

    This study was planned to determine the effects of iron treatment in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease. A total of 39 patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease including 20 (51%) females, 19 (49%) males and whose mean age was 9.9 ± 6.2 years, average weight was 33 ± 18.4 kg were evaluated. Patients were categorized into two groups as having iron deficiency and no iron deficiency with respect to their ferritin levels. 4 mg/kg/day iron treatment with two valences was applied to the groups with iron deficiency for 3 months. Clinical and laboratory findings of both groups were assessed at the outset and 3 months later and viscosity measurements were carried out. Iron deficiency was identified in 21 (53.8%) out of 39 patients. Average Hb and Hct values following 3-month iron treatment increased from 14.8 ± 2.4 g/dl to 16.0 ± 2.0 (P = 0.003) and from %45.8 ± 7.5 to %47.6 ± 7.2 (P = 0.052), respectively. Average viscosity value, however, was 5.6 ± 1.0 cP, it reduced to 5.5 ± 1.0 cP value by demonstrating very little reduction (P = 0.741). Nevertheless, O2 sat value increased from 71.7 to 75% and complaints such as headache, visual blurriness, having frequent sinusitis decreased. It was observed that iron treatment increased Hb and Hct levels in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease without raising viscosity and it ensured improvement in clinical symptoms.

  17. Health impact assessment of a reduction in ambient PM(2.5) levels in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldo, Elena; Linares, Cristina; Lumbreras, Julio; Borge, Rafael; Narros, Adolfo; García-Pérez, Javier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Ramis, Rebeca; Pollán, Marina; Moreno, Teresa; Karanasiou, Angeliki; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2011-02-01

    Health effects linked to exposure to high air pollutant levels have been described in depth, and many recent epidemiologic studies have also consistently reported positive associations between exposure to air pollutants at low concentrations (particularly PM(2.5)) and adverse health outcomes. To estimate the number of avoidable deaths associated with reducing PM(2.5) levels in Spain. For exposure assessment, we used the US Environmental Protection Agency's Community Multiscale Air Quality model to simulate air pollution levels with a spatial resolution of 18×18 km(2). Two different scenarios were compared, namely, a baseline 2004 scenario based on Spain's National Emissions Inventory and a projected 2011 scenario in which a reduction in PM(2.5) was estimated on the basis of the benefits that might be attained if specific air quality policies were implemented. Using an 18×18 km(2) grid, air pollution data were estimated for the entire Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic Islands, Ceuta and Melilla. For these strata, crude all-cause mortality rates (ICD-10: A00-Y98) were then calculated for the over-30 and 25-74 age groups, taking into account the 2004 population figures corresponding to these same age groups, selected in accordance with the concentration-response functions (Pope CA 3rd, Burnett RT, Thun MJ, Calle EE, Krewski D, Ito K et al. Lung cancer, cardiopulmonary mortality, and long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution. JAMA 2002; 287:1132-41; Laden F, Schwartz J, Speizer FE, Dockery DW. Reduction in fine particulate air pollution and mortality: extended follow-up of the Harvard Six Cities study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2006; 173:667-72.). Health impacts were assessed using the Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP). Air quality improvement was defined as an average annual reduction of 0.7 μg/m(3) in PM(2.5) levels. Using long-term health impact assessment analysis, we estimated that 1720 (673-2760) all-cause deaths (6 per 100

  18. Measuring membrane rigidity and viscosity: New methods, and new insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are remarkable materials: flexible, two-dimensional fluids whose physical properties guide cellular function. Bending rigidity and viscosity are two of the key mechanical parameters that characterize membranes. Both, however, are challenging to measure. I describe improvements in experimental techniques to quantify the bending modulus and the two-dimensional viscosity of lipid membranes. First, I show that using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM, also known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy) to image the thermal fluctuations of freely suspended giant lipid vesicles enables straightforward measurements of membrane rigidity, and also provides insights into changes in rigidity induced by cargo trafficking proteins. Second, I show that tracking both the rotational and translational diffusion of membrane-anchored tracer particles allows quantification of membrane viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer sizes, due presumably to a wide variety of couplings to the membrane. I also provide an example of protein-mediated changes in lipid viscosity.

  19. Effect of CaO/ SiO2 ratio on viscosity and structure of slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Řeháčková

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is experimental determination of temperature dependences of viscosity of the molten CaO – Al2O3 - SiO2 system and assessment of impact of CaO/SiO2 ratio on viscosity and structure of this system. Experimental measurements of viscosity were performed with use of the high-temperature viscometer Anton Paar FRS 1 600. Viscosity was measured in a rotational mode during heating at the rate of 3,3 °C/min in the temperature interval from 1 673 to 1 873 K. Viscosity in the molten oxide system is determined by the internal structure. Exact clarification of the change of structure of the oxide system caused by the increased content of CaO was performed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  20. NO{sub 2} and CO nonattainment areas: a pragmatic approach to source reduction assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernuschi, S.; Giugliano, M.; Marzolo, F. [D.I.I.A.R. - Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy). Environmental Section

    1995-12-31

    Many Italian large conurbations have CO and NO{sub 2} air quality standards exceeded and, consequently, require control enforcement plans to attain and maintain regulations not respected. In planning the interventions to be undertaken a fundamental issue is represented by the relationships between active emission sources and air quality, commonly described through mathematical models for evaluating the expected effects of the different reduction scenarios. This approach, relatively feasible for slightly or non reactive pollutants like CO, becomes not as easy to be applied for secondary pollutants, like NO{sub 2}, mainly for the complex photo chemical reaction systems involved in their atmospheric presence and the consequent modeling difficulties related either to the description of the system itself than to the detail in input data required. A practicable alternative in this framework relies in the utilization of statistical models for deriving, through the empirical description of the relationships between the parameters of interest, the reduction levels required for complying with the standards. Following an approach already applied with useful results to the same area, present work reports on the development and application to Milan urban area of statistical models for describing the relationships between CO and NO{sub x} annual concentration averages and the corresponding air quality standard parameters (number of standard exceedances for CO and 98th percentile of hourly concentrations for NO{sub 2}). The models are utilised upstream to simple roll-back models for the assessment of the reduction in emissions strength required for attaining air quality standards for the area. (author)

  1. Assessing the potential of spectral induced polarization to detect in situ changes in iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, C. L.; Price, A.; Sharma, S.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The near surface geophysical technique Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP), provides promise as an effective method measuring in situ biofilm formation/development. Yet, potential mechanisms responsible for observed shifts in SIP response due to biofilm are not clearly understood. In order to address possible mechanisms we assessed the influence of Shewanella oneidensis (MR1) cell density (colony forming units; CFU), biofilm production (Bradford assay) and iron reduction metabolism (colorimetric assay) on SIP response. Laboratory measurements were collected over three months on columns packed with either iron-coated or iron-free sands and amended with artificial ground water and acetate in order to stimulate biofilm production and microbial iron reduction. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to confirm the presence of S. oneidensis cells and biofilm. Our results suggest that during early/initial stage (75 days) of column incubation, SIP measurements revealed that phase and imaginary conductivity responses decreased as the concentration of reduced iron decreased below 2.0 mM. In contrast, we observed only a moderate increase in phase and imaginary conductivity ( 30%) within iron-free columns as a result of increases in S. oneidensis cells (CFU 1.5 x 1011) and biofilm production (7.0 mg ml-1). SEM analysis confirmed the presence of biofilm and cells within both iron-coated and iron-free columns. We hypothesize that the production of microbial metabolic byproducts is a potential mechanism explaining large phase shits observed in previous studies ( 50 mrads) rather than the conductivity of cells or biofilm. Our findings provide support for the following: i) ratio of cells to biofilm production only moderately influences both phase and imaginary conductivity response and ii) largest phase and imaginary conductivity response resulted from microbial metabolism (i.e. iron reduction) and potentially biofilm trapping of conductive materials (i

  2. Computed tomography assessment of pharmacological lung volume reduction induced by bronchodilators in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Naoya; Muro, Shigeo; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Susumu; Kiyokawa, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Tamaki; Kudo, Megumi; Kinose, Daisuke; Kubo, Takeshi; Hoshino, Yuma; Ogawa, Emiko; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki

    2012-08-01

    Pharmacological lung volume reduction in COPD is an important goal in treatment with long-acting bronchodilators because in addition to airflow limitation, lung hyperinflation considerably affects COPD symptoms. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) simultaneously provides structural information about airway dimensions, emphysematous changes, and lung volumes, some of which are difficult to be evaluated by pulmonary function. Here, we evaluated changes in CT parameters and pulmonary function in 30 patients with COPD who underwent CT scans before and one year after starting tiotropium treatment and in 12 patients with COPD who were not treated with long-acting bronchodilators. Baseline pulmonary function and CT parameters did not differ between the two groups. One-year tiotropium therapy improved physiological-indices including residual volume (RV) and ratio of RV to total lung capacity (RV/TLC) (-235 mL, p = 0.005, and -2.9%, p = 0.0001, respectively), and CT-indices including wall area percent (WA%) and inner luminal area in right upper lobe apical and lower lobe basal segmental bronchi (-1.59%, p = 0.01, 2.27 mm(2), p = 0.0005; and -1.33%, p = 0.0008, 3.42 mm(2), p volume (LAV) and total lung volume (CT-TLV) (-92 mL, p = 0.0003, and -211 mL, p = 0.002, respectively). Changes in LAV, CT-TLV, RV, and RV/TLC were significantly greater in the tiotropium, than the non-bronchodilator group. The tiotropium-induced reduction in LAV correlated with the decrease in RV (ρ = 0.45, p = 0.01). Our findings not only indicate the value of the comprehensive CT measurements in assessing the effects of bronchodilators, including pharmacological lung volume reduction, but also further understanding of the structural changes underlying physiological improvements induced by bronchodilators.

  3. Einstein viscosity with fluid elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, Jonas; Yang, Mengfei; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2018-01-01

    We give the first correction to the suspension viscosity due to fluid elasticity for a dilute suspension of spheres in a viscoelastic medium. Our perturbation theory is valid to O (ϕ Wi2) in the particle volume fraction ϕ and the Weissenberg number Wi =γ ˙λ , where γ ˙ is the typical magnitude of the suspension velocity gradient, and λ is the relaxation time of the viscoelastic fluid. For shear flow we find that the suspension shear-thickens due to elastic stretching in strain "hot spots" near the particle, despite the fact that the stress inside the particles decreases relative to the Newtonian case. We thus argue that it is crucial to correctly model the extensional rheology of the suspending medium to predict the shear rheology of the suspension. For uniaxial extensional flow we correct existing results at O (ϕ Wi ) , and find dramatic strain-rate thickening at O (ϕ Wi2) . We validate our theory with fully resolved numerical simulations.

  4. Assessing social vulnerability to drought in South Africa: Policy implication for drought risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiso Muyambo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to assess and identify social vulnerability of communal farmers to drought in the O.R. Tambo district in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa using a survey data and social vulnerability index (SoVI. Eleven social vulnerability indicators were identified using Bogardi, Birkman and Cardona conceptual framework. The result found that an SoVI estimated for O.R. Tambo district was very high with a Likert scale of 5 for cultural values and practices, security or safety, social networks, social dependence, preparedness strategies and psychological stress attributed for the high value of social vulnerability to drought. Indigenous knowledge and education had an SoVI value of 2, which was of low vulnerability, contributing positively to resilience to drought. The study also found that government involvement in drought risk reduction is limited; as a result, the study recommends that a national, provincial and district municipalities policy on drought risk reduction and mitigation should be developed.

  5. Resource reduction in pediatric chest pain: Standardized clinical assessment and management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, Susan F; McLaughlin, Sarah R; Graham, Dionne A; Friedman, Kevin G; Fulton, David R

    2018-01-01

    Using a Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) for pediatric patients presenting to clinic with chest pain, we evaluated the cost impact associated with implementation of the care algorithm. Prior to introduction of the SCAMP, we analyzed charges for 406 patients with chest pain, seen in 2009, and predicted 21% reduction of overall charges had the SCAMP methodology been used. The SCAMP recommended an echocardiogram for history, examination, or ECG findings suggestive of a cardiac etiology for chest pain. Resource utilization was reviewed for 1517 patients (7-21 years) enrolled in the SCAMP from July 2010 to April 2014. Compared to the 2009 historic cohort, patients evaluated by the SCAMP had higher rates of exertional chest pain (45% vs 37%) and positive family history (5% vs 1%). The SCAMP cohort had fewer abnormal physical examination findings (1% vs 6%) and abnormal electrocardiograms (3% vs 5%). Echocardiogram use increased in the SCAMP cohort compared to the 2009 historic cohort (45% vs 41%), whereas all other ancillary testing was reduced: exercise stress testing (4% SCAMP vs 28% historic), Holter (4% vs 7%), event monitors (3% vs 10%), and MRI (1% vs 2%). Total charges were reduced by 22% ($822 625) by use of the Chest Pain SCAMP, despite a higher percentage of patients for whom echocardiogram was recommended compared to the historic cohort. The Chest Pain SCAMP effectively streamlines cardiac testing and reduces resource utilization. Further reductions can be made by algorithm refinement regarding echocardiograms for exertional symptoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tiffaney Miller

    2017-01-01

    Research results have shown that more than half of aviation, aerospace and aeronautics mishaps incidents are attributed to human error. As a part of Safety within space exploration ground processing operations, the identification and/or classification of underlying contributors and causes of human error must be identified, in order to manage human error. This research provides a framework and methodology using the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), as an analysis tool to identify contributing factors, their impact on human error events, and predict the Human Error probabilities (HEPs) of future occurrences. This research methodology was applied (retrospectively) to six (6) NASA ground processing operations scenarios and thirty (30) years of Launch Vehicle related mishap data. This modifiable framework can be used and followed by other space and similar complex operations.

  7. Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tiffaney Miller

    2017-01-01

    Research results have shown that more than half of aviation, aerospace and aeronautics mishaps incidents are attributed to human error. As a part of Quality within space exploration ground processing operations, the identification and or classification of underlying contributors and causes of human error must be identified, in order to manage human error.This presentation will provide a framework and methodology using the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), as an analysis tool to identify contributing factors, their impact on human error events, and predict the Human Error probabilities (HEPs) of future occurrences. This research methodology was applied (retrospectively) to six (6) NASA ground processing operations scenarios and thirty (30) years of Launch Vehicle related mishap data. This modifiable framework can be used and followed by other space and similar complex operations.

  8. RAPID EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT OF NATIONWIDE RIVER FLOOD FOR DISASTER RISK REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kwak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available considerably increased. For flood disaster risk reduction, it is important to identify and characterize flood area, locations (particularly lowland along rivers, and durations. For this purpose, flood mapping and monitoring are an imperative process and the fundamental part of risk management as well as emergency response. Our ultimate goal is to detect flood inundation areas over a nationwide scale despite limitations of optical and multispectral images, and to estimate flood risk in terms of affected people. We propose a methodological possibility to be used as a standard approach for nationwide rapid flood exposure assessment with the use of the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS, a big contributor to progress in near-real-time flood mapping. The preliminary results in Bangladesh show that a propensity of flood risk change strongly depends on the temporal and spatial dynamics of exposure such as distributed population.

  9. Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tiffaney Miller

    2017-01-01

    Research results have shown that more than half of aviation, aerospace and aeronautics mishaps/incidents are attributed to human error. As a part of Safety within space exploration ground processing operations, the identification and/or classification of underlying contributors and causes of human error must be identified, in order to manage human error. This research provides a framework and methodology using the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), as an analysis tool to identify contributing factors, their impact on human error events, and predict the Human Error probabilities (HEPs) of future occurrences. This research methodology was applied (retrospectively) to six (6) NASA ground processing operations scenarios and thirty (30) years of Launch Vehicle related mishap data. This modifiable framework can be used and followed by other space and similar complex operations.

  10. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers at moderate concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Lipnikov [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gyrya, V [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.; Aronson, I [ANL; Berlyand, L [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there have been a number of experimental studies suggesting that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled bacteria can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  11. Assessment of methods for methyl iodide emission reduction and pest control using a simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lifang; Ashworth, Daniel J.; Šimunek, Jirka; Xuan, Richeng; Yates, Scott R.

    2013-02-01

    The increasing registration of the fumigant methyl iodide within the USA has led to more concerns about its toxicity to workers and bystanders. Emission mitigation strategies are needed to protect the public and environmental health while providing effective pest control. The effectiveness of various methods on emissions reduction and pest control was assessed using a process-based mathematical model in this study. Firstly, comparisons between the simulated and laboratory measured emission fluxes and cumulative emissions were made for methyl iodide (MeI) under four emission reduction treatments: 1) control, 2) using soil with high organic matter content (HOM), 3) being covered by virtually impermeable film (VIF), and 4) irrigating soil surface following fumigation (Irrigation). Then the model was extended to simulate a broader range of emission reduction strategies for MeI, including 5) being covered by high density polyethylene (HDPE), 6) increasing injection depth from 30 cm to 46 cm (Deep), 7) HDPE + Deep, 8) adding a reagent at soil surface (Reagent), 9) Reagent + Irrigation, and 10) Reagent + HDPE. Furthermore, the survivability of three types of soil-borne pests (citrus nematodes [Tylenchulus semipenetrans], barnyard seeds [Echinochloa crus-galli], fungi [Fusarium oxysporum]) was also estimated for each scenario. Overall, the trend of the measured emission fluxes as well as total emission were reasonably reproduced by the model for treatments 1 through 4. Based on the numerical simulation, the ranking of effectiveness in total emission reduction was VIF (82.4%) > Reagent + HDPE (73.2%) > Reagent + Irrigation (43.0%) > Reagent (23.5%) > Deep + HDPE (19.3%) > HOM (17.6%) > Deep (13.0%) > Irrigation (11.9%) > HDPE (5.8%). The order for pest control efficacy suggests, VIF had the highest pest control efficacy, followed by Deep + HDPE, Irrigation, Reagent + Irrigation, HDPE, Deep, Reagent + HDPE, Reagent, and HOM. Therefore, VIF is the optimal method disregarding

  12. Comparative evaluation of aqueous humor viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyshia; Carter, Renee; Tully, Thomas; Negulescu, Ioan; Storey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate aqueous humor viscosity in the raptor, dog, cat, and horse, with a primary focus on the barred owl (Strix varia). Twenty-six raptors, ten dogs, three cats, and one horse. Animals were euthanized for reasons unrelated to this study. Immediately, after horizontal and vertical corneal dimensions were measured, and anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to quantify anterior chamber volume and obtain aqueous humor samples for viscosity analysis. Dynamic aqueous humor viscosity was measured using a dynamic shear rheometer (AR 1000 TA Instruments, New Castle, DE, USA) at 20 °C. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, unpaired t-tests, and Tukey's test to evaluate the mean ± standard deviation for corneal diameter, anterior chamber volume, and aqueous humor viscosity amongst groups and calculation of Spearman's coefficient for correlation analyses. The mean aqueous humor viscosity in the barred owl was 14.1 centipoise (cP) ± 9, cat 4.4 cP ± 0.2, and dog 2.9 cP ± 1.3. The aqueous humor viscosity for the horse was 1 cP. Of the animals evaluated in this study, the raptor aqueous humor was the most viscous. The aqueous humor of the barred owl is significantly more viscous than the dog (P humor viscosity of the raptor, dog, cat, and horse can be successfully determined using a dynamic shear rheometer. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. Reinventing Design Principles for Developing Low-Viscosity Carbon Dioxide-Binding Organic Liquids for Flue Gas Clean Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-01-11

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emission from point sources, such as coal fired-power plants, account for the majority of the green houses gasses in the atmosphere. Capture, storage and utilization are required to mitigate adverse environmental effects. Aqueous amine-based CO2 capture solvents are currently considered the industry standard, but deployment to market is limited by their high regeneration energy demand. In that context, energy efficient and less-viscous water-lean transformational solvent systems known as CO2 Binding Organic Liquids (CO2BOLs) are being developed in our group to advance this technology to commercialization. Herein, we present a logical design approach based on fundamental concepts of organic chemistry and computer simulations aimed at lowering solvent viscosity. Conceptually, viscosity reduction would be achieved by systemmatic methods such as introduction of steric hindrance on the anion to minimize the intermolecular cation-anion interactions, fine tuning the electronics, hydrogen bonding orientation and strength, and charge solvation. Conventional standard trial-and-error approaches while effective, are time consuming and economically expensive. Herein, we rethink the metrics and design principles of low-viscosity CO2 capture solvents using a combined synthesis and computational modeling approach. We critically study the impacts of modyfying factors such as as orientation of hydrogen bonding, introduction of higher degrees of freedom and cation or anion charge solvation and assess if or how each factor impacts viscosity of CO2BOL CO2 capture solvents. Ultimately, we found that hydrogen bond orientation and strength is predominantly influencing the viscosity in CO2BOL solvents. With this knowledge, a new 1-MEIPADM-2-BOL CO2BOL variant was synthesized and tested, resulting in a solvent that is approximately 60% less viscous at 25 mol

  14. The extension of radiative viscosity to superfluid matter

    OpenAIRE

    Pi, Chun-Mei; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The radiative viscosity of superfluid $npe$ matter is studied, and it is found that to the lowest order of $\\delta \\mu/T$ the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of the normal matter.

  15. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures Mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, R

    2002-01-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model.

  16. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  17. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J. [Advanced Materials Lab, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India – 620015 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  18. Laboratory Tests for Dispersive Soil Viscosity Determining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter-Martirosyan, Z. G.; Ter-Martirosyan, A. Z.; Sobolev, E. S.

    2017-11-01

    There are several widespread methods for soil viscosity determining now. The standard shear test device and torsion test apparatus are the most commonly used installations to do that. However, the application of them has a number of disadvantages. Therefore, the specialists of Moscow State University of Civil Engineering proposed a new device to determine the disperse soil viscosity on the basis of a stabilometer with the B-type camera (viscosimeter). The paper considers the construction of a viscosimeter and the technique for determining soil viscosity inside this tool as well as some experimental verification results of its work.

  19. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on Rheological Properties of some Viscosity Modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. Chandra Sekhara; Ramadevi, K.; Sirisha, K.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodextrins are a group of novel excipients, extensively used in the present pharmaceutical industry. Sometimes they show significant interactions with other conventional additives used in the formulation of dosage forms. The effect of β-cyclodextrin on the rheological properties of aqueous solutions of some selected viscosity modifiers was studied in the present work. β-cyclodextrin showed two different types of effects on the rheology of the selected polymers. In case of natural polymers like xanthan gum and guar gum, enhanced apparent viscosity was found and in case of semi-synthetic polymers like sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and methyl cellulose, reduction in apparent viscosity was found. β-cyclodextrin was included at 0.5, 1 and 2% w/v concentrations into the polymeric solutions. These findings are useful in the adjustment of concentrations of viscosity modifiers during the formulation of physically stable disperse systems. PMID:25593389

  20. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Fang Zou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model in-cluding boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  1. Viscosity undulations in the lower mantle: The dynamical role of iron spin transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, J. F.; Morra, G.; Yuen, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    A proper determination of the lower-mantle viscosity profile is fundamental to understanding Earth geodynamics. Based on results coming from different sources, several models have been proposed to constrain the variations of viscosity as a function of pressure, stress and temperature. While some models have proposed a relatively modest viscosity variation across the lower mantle, others have proposed variations of several orders of magnitude. Here, we have determined the viscosity of ferropericlase, a major mantle mineral, and explored the role of the iron high-to-low spin transition. Viscosity was described within the elastic strain energy model, in which the activation parameters are obtained from the bulk and shear wave velocities. Those velocities were computed combining first principles total energy calculations and the quasi-harmonic approximation. As a result of a strong elasticity softening across the spin transition, there is a large reduction in the activation free energies of the materials creep properties, leading to viscosity undulations. These results suggest that the variations of the viscosity across the lower mantle, resulting from geoid inversion and postglacial rebound studies, may be caused by the iron spin transition in mantle minerals. Implications of the undulated lower mantle viscosity profile exist for both, down- and up-wellings in the mantle. We find that a viscosity profile characterized by an activation free energy of G* (z0) ˜ 300- 400 kJ /mol based on diffusion creep and dilation factor δ = 0.5 better fits the observed high velocity layer at mid mantle depths, which can be explained by the stagnation and mixing of mantle material. Our model also accounts for the growth of mantle plume heads up to the size necessary to explain the Large Igneous Provinces that characterize the start of most plume tracks.

  2. Assessment of a Salt Reduction Intervention on Adult Population Salt Intake in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Arti; Trieu, Kathy; Santos, Joseph Alvin; Sukhu, Arleen; Schultz, Jimaima; Wate, Jillian; Bell, Colin; Moodie, Marj; Snowdon, Wendy; Ma, Gary; Rogers, Kris; Webster, Jacqui

    2017-12-12

    Reducing population salt intake is a global public health priority due to the potential to save lives and reduce the burden on the healthcare system through decreased blood pressure. This implementation science research project set out to measure salt consumption patterns and to assess the impact of a complex, multi-faceted intervention to reduce population salt intake in Fiji between 2012 and 2016. The intervention combined initiatives to engage food businesses to reduce salt in foods and meals with targeted consumer behavior change programs. There were 169 participants at baseline (response rate 28.2%) and 272 at 20 months (response rate 22.4%). The mean salt intake from 24-h urine samples was estimated to be 11.7 grams per day (g/d) at baseline and 10.3 g/d after 20 months (difference: -1.4 g/day, 95% CI -3.1 to 0.3, p = 0.115). Sub-analysis showed a statistically significant reduction in female salt intake in the Central Division but no differential impact in relation to age or ethnicity. Whilst the low response rate means it is not possible to draw firm conclusions about these changes, the population salt intake in Fiji, at 10.3 g/day, is still twice the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommended maximum intake. This project also assessed iodine intake levels in women of child-bearing age and found that they were within recommended guidelines. Existing policies and programs to reduce salt intake and prevent iodine deficiency need to be maintained or strengthened. Monitoring to assess changes in salt intake and to ensure that iodine levels remain adequate should be built into future surveys.

  3. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  4. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Su

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM.

  5. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  6. Study on viscosity modification of human and formula milk for infants with dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    de ALMEIDA, Mariangela Bartha de Mattos; Gomes Júnior, Saint Clair; Silva, Jonas Borges da; Silva, Danielle Aparecida da; Moreira,Maria Elisabeth Lopes

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: to analyze the modification of the viscosity of human milk and infant formula. Methods: three studies were performed to assess the viscosity and effect of time on infant formula with a thickener, at concentrations of 2, 3, and 5%, as well as raw and pasteurized human milk at concentrations of 2, 3, 5, and 7% at 37ºC, for 60 minutes. Rice cereal was used as a thickening agent. The viscosity was evaluated using a Ford Cup-type viscometer, and the samples were analyzed at 20-...

  7. Intrinsic viscosity of actively swimming microalgae suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewoldt, Randy; Caretta, Lucas; Chengala, Anwar; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Suspensions of actively swimming microorganisms exhibit an effective viscosity which may depend on volume fraction, cell shape, and the nature of locomotion (e.g. ``pushers'' vs. ``pullers''). Although several dilute-regime theories have been offered for active suspensions, no experimental study to our knowledge has been able to resolve the dilute-regime intrinsic viscosity of actively swimming microorganism suspensions. Here we use a cone-and-plate rheometer to experimentally measure the dynamic shear viscosity for motile and non-motile suspensions of unicellular green algae (Dunaliella primolecta, a biflagellated ``puller''). The low viscosity biological samples require careful experimental protocols to avoid settling and flow-induced migration, and to minimize precision error. With these protocols in place we can distinguish the intrinsic viscosity which we show is higher for the motile ``puller'' swimmers compared to the immobilized counterparts. This observation is consistent with recently proposed dilute-regime theories which predict that ``pullers'' should have a higher viscosity than non-motile suspensions.

  8. Viscosity Analysis of Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solutions: Role of Size, Electroviscous Effect and Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2016-01-01

    Increased solution viscosity results in difficulties in manufacturing and delivery of therapeutic protein formulations, increasing both the time and production costs, and leading to patient inconvenience. The solution viscosity is affected by the molecular properties of both the solute and the solvent. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of size, charge and protein-protein interactions on the viscosity of Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig(TM)) protein solutions. The effect of size of the protein molecule on solution viscosity was investigated by measuring intrinsic viscosity and excluded volume calculations for monoclonal antibody (mAb) and DVD-Ig(TM) protein solutions. The role of the electrostatic charge resulting in electroviscous effects for DVD-Ig(TM) protein was assessed by measuring zeta potential. Light scattering measurements were performed to detect protein-protein interactions affecting solution viscosity. DVD-Ig(TM) protein exhibited significantly higher viscosity compared to mAb. Intrinsic viscosity and excluded volume calculations indicated that the size of the molecule affects viscosity significantly at higher concentrations, while the effect was minimal at intermediate concentrations. Electroviscous contribution to the viscosity of DVD-Ig(TM) protein varied depending on the presence or absence of ions in the solution. In buffered solutions, negative k D and B 2 values indicated the presence of attractive interactions which resulted in high viscosity for DVD-Ig(TM) protein at certain pH and ionic strength conditions. Results show that more than one factor contributes to the increased viscosity of DVD-Ig(TM) protein and interplay of these factors modulates the overall viscosity behavior of the solution, especially at higher concentrations.

  9. Effect of ionic surfactants on bauxite residues suspensions viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, M; Nguyen, T; Frost, Ray

    2007-03-15

    Measurement of the rheological property of bauxite residue sample received from an Australian alumina refinery, treated with a number of cationic and anionic surfactant in laboratory has been carried out using a Brookfield viscometer for the assessment of the effect of surfactants on the residue viscosity. Sodium laurate, prepared with an excess of sodium hydroxide, was found to be effective while direct addition of anionic surfactants (lauric acid and sodium laureth sulphate) and cationic (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide) produce only moderate effect on the red mud suspension apparent viscosity at 65 degrees C. The experimental data appear to confirm the crucial role of the cation sodium in the process of adsorption of anionic surfactants on the flocculated red mud particles.

  10. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  11. Scaling laws for implicit viscosities in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierwisch Claas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH is a particle-based method which solves continuum equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. A periodic fluidic system under homogeneous shear is studied using SPH in the present work. The total pressure of the system and the shear stress contributions from the SPH interaction terms for pressure and viscosity as well as the contribution caused by velocity fluctuations are analyzed. It is found that the pressure and the shear stress contributions obey certain scaling laws depending on physical properties of the system such as compressibility, viscosity and shear rate as well as the spatial resolution. Some of the identified relations resemble scaling laws for the rheology of dense granular flows. These findings render an assessment of the convergence with respect to the spatial resolution of SPH simulations possible. Furthermore, the similarities between numerical SPH particles and physical grains in dense flow provide a deeper understanding of the nature of the SPH method.

  12. Scaling laws for implicit viscosities in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierwisch, Claas; Polfer, Pit

    2017-06-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a particle-based method which solves continuum equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. A periodic fluidic system under homogeneous shear is studied using SPH in the present work. The total pressure of the system and the shear stress contributions from the SPH interaction terms for pressure and viscosity as well as the contribution caused by velocity fluctuations are analyzed. It is found that the pressure and the shear stress contributions obey certain scaling laws depending on physical properties of the system such as compressibility, viscosity and shear rate as well as the spatial resolution. Some of the identified relations resemble scaling laws for the rheology of dense granular flows. These findings render an assessment of the convergence with respect to the spatial resolution of SPH simulations possible. Furthermore, the similarities between numerical SPH particles and physical grains in dense flow provide a deeper understanding of the nature of the SPH method.

  13. Vulnerability assessments, identity and spatial scale challenges in disaster-risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Carr

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches to vulnerability assessment for disaster-risk reduction (DRR commonly apply generalised, a priori determinants of vulnerability to particular hazards in particular places. Although they may allow for policy-level legibility at high levels of spatial scale, these approaches suffer from attribution problems that become more acute as the level of analysis is localised and the population under investigation experiences greater vulnerability. In this article, we locate the source of this problem in a spatial scale mismatch between the essentialist framings of identity behind these generalised determinants of vulnerability and the intersectional, situational character of identity in the places where DRR interventions are designed and implemented. Using the Livelihoods as Intimate Government (LIG approach to identify and understand different vulnerabilities to flooding in a community in southern Zambia, we empirically demonstrate how essentialist framings of identity produce this mismatch. Further, we illustrate a means of operationalising intersectional, situational framings of identity to achieve greater and more productive understandings of hazard vulnerability than available through the application of general determinants of vulnerability to specific places and cases.

  14. Assessing the impact of harm reduction programs on law enforcement in Southeast Asia: a description of a regional research methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Nick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For over 15 years the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID has been a leading donor for harm reduction projects in Southeast Asia. The recent AusAID-supported harm reduction projects of greatest significance have included the Asia Regional HIV/AIDS Project (AHRP, from 2002 until 2007,1 and the HIV/AIDS Asia Regional Program (HAARP, from 2007 until 2015.2 Both projects included in their design specific strategies for engaging with law enforcement agencies at country level. The main focus of these strategies has been to develop law enforcement harm reduction policy and curriculum, and the design and implementation of specific harm reduction training for law enforcement officers. In July 2008, the Australian Development Research Awards (ADRA funded the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of Melbourne to establish a research project created to assess the influence of harm reduction programs on the policy and operational practices of law enforcement agencies in Southeast Asia, known as the LEHRN Project (Law Enforcement, Harm Reduction, Nossal Institute Project. The ADRA is a unique grant research mechanism that specifically funds development research to improve the understanding and informed decision making of the implementation of Australian aid effectiveness. While the need to engage law enforcement when establishing harm reduction programs was well documented, little was known about the impact or influence of harm reduction programs on policy and practices of law enforcement agencies. The LEHRN Project provided the opportunity to assess the impact of harm reduction programs on law enforcement in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Vietnam, Cambodia and Lao PDR.

  15. Effects of hematocrit and red blood cell-independent viscosity on canine thromboelastographic tracings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Aimee C; Guillaumin, Julien; Cooper, Edward S; Couto, C Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    It is well established that hematocrit (Hct) influences whole blood thromboelastography (TEG) tracings. Previous studies showed hypercoagulable TEG tracings in anemic patients despite clinical expectations that anemia often prolongs bleeding. TEG is a viscoelastic assessment of clot kinetics, and Hct is the main determinant of whole blood viscosity. TEG changes in anemia may be an in vitro artifact due to Hct effect on blood viscosity rather than true in vivo changes in hemostasis. The effect of changes in whole blood viscosity on TEG independent of Hct is not well understood. Twenty-one blood samples from seven dogs were manipulated to produce one of three Hct conditions (45, 20, and 10%). Each was tested in two situations: viscosity adjusted to normal by adding alginate (ALG) or dilution with equal volume of saline (SAL). Both samples were analyzed with TEG simultaneously. Twenty percent Hct plus ALG and 10% Hct plus ALG were significantly more viscous than their SAL counterparts (p=0.0156). Ten percent Hct plus SAL, 20% Hct plus SAL, and 45% Hct plus SAL all had different viscosities (p=0.006). Twenty percent Hct plus SAL and 10% Hct plus SAL had significantly shorter K and higher angle, MA, and G compared to their ALG counterparts as well as 45% Hct plus SAL (pviscosity showed hypocoagulable tracings, whereas SAL samples with low Hct, low viscosity showed hypercoagulable tracings. TEG variables are influenced by whole blood viscosity altered with ALG, independently of Hct. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Dairy-Based Emulsions: Viscosity Affects Fat Difference Thresholds and Sweetness Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Susann; Hoppert, Karin; Ullrich, Franziska; Rohm, Harald

    2013-11-27

    In complex emulsions, viscosity or viscosity-associated sensory attributes such as creaminess are important for quality assessment and product differentiation. Two sets of emulsions with fat or locust bean gum content being varied at seven levels were developed; the two emulsions at each level had similar apparent viscosity. Additionally, sugar concentration was kept constant either with respect to total emulsion, or with respect to the aqueous phase. Series of two-alternative forced choice tests were performed with one constant stimulus, and just noticeable differences were calculated using probability regression. The results show that, when viscosity was not compensated, it was easy for the subjects to (a) distinguish emulsions with different fat content when the fat content was addressed in the question, and to (b) distinguish emulsions with different fat or locust bean gum content when creaminess was addressed. For the latter descriptor, it is of minor importance whether viscosity is altered by fat content or a thickener. Weber fractions that were calculated for viscosity were approximately 0.20. The quantitative effects of viscosity on sweetness, however, depend on how product rheology was modified.

  17. Dairy-Based Emulsions: Viscosity Affects Fat Difference Thresholds and Sweetness Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Zahn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In complex emulsions, viscosity or viscosity-associated sensory attributes such as creaminess are important for quality assessment and product differentiation. Two sets of emulsions with fat or locust bean gum content being varied at seven levels were developed; the two emulsions at each level had similar apparent viscosity. Additionally, sugar concentration was kept constant either with respect to total emulsion, or with respect to the aqueous phase. Series of two-alternative forced choice tests were performed with one constant stimulus, and just noticeable differences were calculated using probability regression. The results show that, when viscosity was not compensated, it was easy for the subjects to (a distinguish emulsions with different fat content when the fat content was addressed in the question, and to (b distinguish emulsions with different fat or locust bean gum content when creaminess was addressed. For the latter descriptor, it is of minor importance whether viscosity is altered by fat content or a thickener. Weber fractions that were calculated for viscosity were approximately 0.20. The quantitative effects of viscosity on sweetness, however, depend on how product rheology was modified.

  18. [Viscosity changes in thickened water due to the addition of highly prescribed drugs in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, N; de Pourcq, J T; Cardona, D; Martín-Venegas, R; Gich, I; Cardenete, J; Mangues, M A

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is a swallowing disorder with a high incidence in the geriatric patient related with an increased risk for undernutrition and pneumonia due to bronchial aspiration. In this condition, it is usual to add commercial thickeners in liquids, as well as the addition of drugs in this mixture to improve their administration. However, there are no studies regarding the possible change in viscosity produced by their addition. To assess the change in viscosity of water thickened with commercial products by adding the drugs frequently used in elderly patients. Samples of water mixed with the commercial thickener Resource (modified corn starch) or Nutilis (modified corn starch, maltodextrin, and gums: tara, xhantan, and guar) to achieve an intermediate consistence as "honey". The viscosity of these samples was measured as well as for similar samples to which one of the following drugs was added: galantamine, rivastigmin, ciprofloxacin, cholecalciferol, memantine, fosfomycin, calcium, and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. In the samples with Resource thickener we observed decreased viscosity by adding galantamine, memantine, fosfomycin or calcium, and increased viscosity with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The viscosity of the samples with Nutilis® decreased with galantamine, rivastigmine, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, fosfomycin and calcium. The viscosity of water with commercial thickeners may be affected by some drugs or their preservatives, which may influence the swallowing capability. It is recommended to perform further in vitro and in vivo studies in order to adjust these formulations if necessary.

  19. Landslides in Nicaragua - Mapping, Inventory, Hazard Assessment, Vulnerability Reduction, and Forecasting Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dévoli, G.; Strauch, W.; Álvarez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Kjekstad, O.

    2009-04-01

    access, manage, update and distribute in a short time to all sectors and users; and finally, the need of a comprehensive understanding of landslide processes. Many efforts have been made in the last 10 years to gain a more comprehensive and predictive understanding of landslide processes in Nicaragua. Since 1998, landslide inventory GIS based maps have been produced in different areas of the country, as part of international and multidisciplinary development projects. Landslide susceptibility and hazard maps are available now at INETEŔs Website for all municipalities of the country. The insights on landslide hazard have been transmitted to governmental agencies, local authorities, NGÓs, international agencies to be used in measures for risk reduction. A massive application example was the integration of hazard assessment studies in a large house building program in Nicaragua. Hazards of landslides, and other dangerous phenomena, were evaluated in more than 90 house building projects, each with 50 - 200 houses to be build, sited mainly in rural areas of the country. For more than 7000 families, this program could finally assure that their new houses were build in safe areas. Attempts have been made to develop a strategy for early warning of landslides in Nicaragua. First approaches relied on precipitation gauges with satellite based telemetry which were installed in some Nicaraguan volcanoes where lahars occur frequently. The occurrence of lahars in certain gullies could be detected by seismic stations. A software system gave acoustic alarm at INETEŔs Monitoring Centre when certain trigger levels of the accumulated precipitation were reached. The monitoring and early warning for all areas under risk would have required many rain gauges. A new concept is tested which uses near real time precipitation estimates from NOAA meteorological satellite data. A software system sends out alarm messages if strong or long lasting rains are observed over certain landslide "hot spots

  20. Modified Thermoresponsive Hyperbranched Polymers for Improved Viscosity and Enhanced Lubricity of Engine Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosimbescu, Lelia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, Joshua W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bays, John Timothy [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qu, Jun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); West, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The manuscript captures the chronological succession of the molecular design progression through multiple architectures and topologies of the polymeric viscosity index improvers and their rheology bench test performance. Tribology testing was also performed on selected analogs and their friction and wear was evaluated. Finally, a top performing polymer was selected for engine testing, scaled-up, and its rheological performance in a complete formulation was assessed. The engine performance of the viscosity index improver was examined against an industry-established baseline.

  1. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  2. A practical approach to assess depression risk and to guide risk reduction strategies in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Osvaldo P; Alfonso, Helman; Pirkis, Jane; Kerse, Ngaire; Sim, Moira; Flicker, Leon; Snowdon, John; Draper, Brian; Byrne, Gerard; Goldney, Robert; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Stocks, Nigel; Scazufca, Marcia; Huisman, Martijn; Araya, Ricardo; Pfaff, Jon

    2011-03-01

    Many factors have been associated with the onset and maintenance of depressive symptoms in later life, although this knowledge is yet to be translated into significant health gains for the population. This study gathered information about common modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for depression with the aim of developing a practical probabilistic model of depression that can be used to guide risk reduction strategies. A cross-sectional study was undertaken of 20,677 community-dwelling Australians aged 60 years or over in contact with their general practitioner during the preceding 12 months. Prevalent depression (minor or major) according to the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) assessment was the main outcome of interest. Other measured exposures included self-reported age, gender, education, loss of mother or father before age 15 years, physical or sexual abuse before age 15 years, marital status, financial stress, social support, smoking and alcohol use, physical activity, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and prevalent cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases and cancer. The mean age of participants was 71.7 ± 7.6 years and 57.9% were women. Depression was present in 1665 (8.0%) of our subjects. Multivariate logistic regression showed depression was independently associated with age older than 75 years, childhood adverse experiences, adverse lifestyle practices (smoking, risk alcohol use, physical inactivity), intermediate health hazards (obesity, diabetes and hypertension), comorbid medical conditions (clinical history of coronary heart disease, stroke, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema or cancers), and social or financial strain. We stratified the exposures to build a matrix that showed that the probability of depression increased progressively with the accumulation of risk factors, from less than 3% for those with no adverse factors to more than 80% for people reporting the maximum number of risk factors. Our

  3. Effect of ingredient particle sizes and dietary viscosity on digestion and faecal waste of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, Tu; Hien, T.T.T.; Bosma, R.H.; Heinsbroek, L.T.N.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Schrama, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    The ingredients' particle size and dietary viscosity may alter digestion, performance and faecal waste management of fish. This study aimed to assess the effect of grinding screen sizes of feed ingredients and dietary viscosity on digestibility, faecal waste and performance of striped catfish

  4. Lack of age-related increase in carotid artery wall viscosity in cardiorespiratory fit men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kenta; Gando, Yuko; Tanimoto, Michiya; Murakami, Haruka; Ohmori, Yumi; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Tabata, Izumi; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2013-12-01

    Age-related arterial stiffening and reduction of arterial elasticity are attenuated in individuals with high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. Viscosity is another mechanical characteristic of the arterial wall; however, the effects of age and cardiorespiratory fitness have not been determined. We examined the associations among age, cardiorespiratory fitness and carotid arterial wall viscosity. A total of 111 healthy men, aged 25-39 years (young) and 40-64 years (middle-aged), were divided into either cardiorespiratory fit or unfit groups on the basis of peak oxygen uptake. The common carotid artery was measured noninvasively by tonometry and automatic tracking of B-mode images to obtain instantaneous pressure and diameter hysteresis loops, and we calculated the effective compliance, isobaric compliance and viscosity index. In the middle-aged men, the viscosity index was larger in the unfit group than in the fit group (2533 vs. 2018 mmHg·s/mm, respectively: Pviscosity index was increased with advancing age, but these parameters were unaffected by cardiorespiratory fitness level. These results suggest that the wall viscosity in the central artery is increased with advancing age and that the age-associated increase in wall viscosity may be attenuated in cardiorespiratory fit men.

  5. MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY ASSESSMENT FOR DWPF ALTERNATE REDUCTANT FLOWSHEET OPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.

    2011-07-08

    Glycolic acid and sugar are being considered as potential candidates to substitute for much of the formic acid currently being added to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed as a reductant. A series of small-scale melter tests were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) in January 2011 to collect necessary data for the assessment of the impact of these alternate reductants on the melter off-gas flammability. The DM10 melter with a 0.021 m{sup 2} melt surface area was run with three different feeds which were prepared at SRNL based on; (1) the baseline formic/nitric acid flowsheet, (2) glycolic/formic/nitric acid flowsheet, and (3) sugar/formic/nitric acid flowsheet - these feeds will be called the baseline, glycolic, and sugar flowsheet feeds, respectively, hereafter. The actual addition of sugar to the sugar flowsheet feed was made at VSL before it was fed to the melter. For each feed, the DM10 was run under both bubbled (with argon) and non-bubbled conditions at varying melter vapor space temperatures. The goal was to lower its vapor space temperature from nominal 500 C to less than 300 C at 50 C increments and maintain steady state at each temperature at least for one hour, preferentially for two hours, while collecting off-gas data including CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} concentrations. Just a few hours into the first test with the baseline feed, it was discovered that the DM10 vapor space temperature would not readily fall below 350 C simply by ramping up the feed rate as the test plan called for. To overcome this, ambient air was introduced directly into the vapor space through a dilution air damper in addition to the natural air inleakage occurring at the operating melter pressure of -1 inch H{sub 2}O. A detailed description of the DM10 run along with all the data taken is given in the report issued by VSL. The SRNL personnel have analyzed the DM10 data and identified 25 steady state periods lasting from 32 to 92 minutes for all

  6. Are overall adiposity and abdominal adiposity separate or redundant determinants of blood viscosity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Raynaud de Mauverger, Eric; Brun, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In line with recent literature showing that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are independently associated with the risk of death, we recently reported that body mass index (BMI) and waist-to hip ratio (WHR) were independent predictors of blood viscosity, related to different determinants of viscosity (for BMI: plasma viscosity and red cell aggregation; for WHR: hematocrit). Since this report was challenged by a study showing that abdominal adiposity (as measured with waist circumference WC and not WHR) is the only independent determinant of viscosity, we re-assessed on our previous database correlations among viscosity factors, BMI, WHR and WC. Blood viscosity was correlated to BMI (r = 0.155 p = 0.004), WHR (r = 0.364; p = 0.027) and WC (r = 0.094; p = 0.05). Hematocrit was correlated to WHR (r = 0.524) but neither to BMI (r =-0.021) nor waist circumference (r = 0.053). WC was correlated with plasma viscosity (r = 0.154; p = 0.002) while WHR was not (r =-0.0102 NS). A stepwise regression analysis selected two determinants of whole blood viscosity at high shear rate: BMI (p = 0.0167) and WC (p = 0.0003) excluding WHR. Therefore, in this sample, abdominal fatness expressed by WC and whole body adiposity remain independent determinants of blood viscosity. WHR and WC have not the same meaning, WC measuring the size of abdominal fat while WHR measuring the shape of body distribution regardless the degree of fat excess. Interestingly, hematocrit is rather related to shape (even within a normal range of body size) than the extent of abdominal fatness, and is not related to whole body adiposity.

  7. Correlating the structure and in vitro digestion viscosities of different pectin fibers to in vivo human satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Kirstyn; Wright, Amanda J; Goff, H Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a simulated in vitro digestion on the viscosity of orange juice with added high methoxyl (HM), low methoxyl (LM), and low methoxyl amidated (LMA) pectins were examined in conjunction with a human satiety study with healthy men (n=10) and women (n=15). Orange juice solutions were formulated to be either low (0.039±0.007 Pa s) or high viscosity (0.14±0.035 Pa s). The apparent viscosities after an in vitro digestion simulating the gastric and small intestinal phases in the presence of hydrolytic enzymes and bile salts were recorded at 10 and 50 s⁻¹. The viscosity induced by LM pectin increased considerably after the gastric phase whereas samples with all pectin types showed considerable reductions in viscosity, compared to initial apparent viscosity, after the small intestinal phase. For satiety testing, the orange juice solutions were consumed with a standardized breakfast meal after a 12 h overnight fast. Self-reported visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements of Hunger, Fullness, Satisfaction and Prospective Food Intake were obtained at fasting, after consumption of the breakfast and for the subsequent 3 h. The LM low and high viscosity pectin beverages were associated with the greatest effects on subjective ratings of satiety. The HM low and high viscosity pectin beverages had lower but significant effects on satiety, while LMA pectin had no effect. There was not a strong correlation between apparent viscosity of in vitro digested beverages and in vivo satiety scores. Thus, in this study, fiber-induced satiety could not be fully explained by digestate viscosity alone although gastric-phase viscosity may have played a significant role.

  8. Measuring Lipid Membrane Viscosity Using Rotational and Translational Probe Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormel, Tristan T.; Kurihara, Sarah Q.; Brennan, M. Kathleen; Wozniak, Matthew C.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-05-01

    The two-dimensional fluidity of lipid bilayers enables the motion of membrane-bound macromolecules and is therefore crucial to biological function. Microrheological methods that measure fluid viscosity via the translational diffusion of tracer particles are challenging to apply and interpret for membranes, due to uncertainty about the local environment of the tracers. Here, we demonstrate a new technique in which determination of both the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of membrane-linked particles enables quantification of viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer radii, presumably due to a variable number of lipids linked to each tracer particle. Furthermore, we show for the first time that a protein involved in generating membrane curvature, the vesicle trafficking protein Sar1p, dramatically increases membrane viscosity. Using the rheological method presented here, therefore, we are able to reveal a class of previously unknown couplings between protein activity and membrane mechanics.

  9. Resource utilization and costs in the Candesartan in Heart failure : Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM) programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, JJV; Andersson, FL; Stewart, S; Svensson, K; Solal, AC; Dietz, R; Vanhaecke, J; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Ostergren, J; Granger, CB; Yusuf, S; Pfeffer, MA; Swedberg, K

    Aims More treatments are needed to improve clinical outcomes in chronic heart failure (HF). It is, however, important that treatments for a condition as common as HF are affordable. We have carried out a prospective economic analysis of the Candesartan in Heart failure: Assessment of Reduction in

  10. A dynamic model for assessing the effects of management strategies on the reduction of construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongping; Chini, Abdol R; Lu, Yujie; Shen, Liyin

    2012-03-01

    During the past few decades, construction and demolition (C&D) waste has received increasing attention from construction practitioners and researchers worldwide. A plethora of research regarding C&D waste management has been published in various academic journals. However, it has been determined that existing studies with respect to C&D waste reduction are mainly carried out from a static perspective, without considering the dynamic and interdependent nature of the whole waste reduction system. This might lead to misunderstanding about the actual effect of implementing any waste reduction strategies. Therefore, this research proposes a model that can serve as a decision support tool for projecting C&D waste reduction in line with the waste management situation of a given construction project, and more importantly, as a platform for simulating effects of various management strategies on C&D waste reduction. The research is conducted using system dynamics methodology, which is a systematic approach that deals with the complexity - interrelationships and dynamics - of any social, economic and managerial system. The dynamic model integrates major variables that affect C&D waste reduction. In this paper, seven causal loop diagrams that can deepen understanding about the feedback relationships underlying C&D waste reduction system are firstly presented. Then a stock-flow diagram is formulated by using software for system dynamics modeling. Finally, a case study is used to illustrate the validation and application of the proposed model. Results of the case study not only built confidence in the model so that it can be used for quantitative analysis, but also assessed and compared the effect of three designed policy scenarios on C&D waste reduction. One major contribution of this study is the development of a dynamic model for evaluating C&D waste reduction strategies under various scenarios, so that best management strategies could be identified before being implemented

  11. The shear viscosity in anisotropic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Sachin [Department of Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Samanta, Rickmoy; Trivedi, Sandip P. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2015-10-06

    We construct anisotropic black brane solutions and analyse the behaviour of some of their metric perturbations. These solutions correspond to field theory duals in which rotational symmetry is broken due an externally applied, spatially constant, force. We find, in several examples, that when the anisotropy is sufficiently big compared to the temperature, some components of the viscosity tensor can become very small in units of the entropy density, parametrically violating the KSS bound. We obtain an expression relating these components of the viscosity, in units of the entropy density, to a ratio of metric components at the horizon of the black brane. This relation is generally valid, as long as the forcing function is translationally invariant, and it directly connects the parametric violation of the bound to the anisotropy in the metric at the horizon. Our results suggest the possibility that such small components of the viscosity tensor might also arise in anisotropic strongly coupled fluids found in nature.

  12. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  13. On Coulomb and Viscosity damped single-degree-of-freedom vibrating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, J.; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2016-01-01

    Attention on friction damping mechanisms could be of interest for vibration reduction, and appears therefore to be desirable. Presentations of textbook analyses on mechanical vibration of a viscosity damped single degree system [mass, spring and eventually damping] are numerous. Often they begin...

  14. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  15. Assessments of Bubble Dynamics Model and Influential Parameters in Microbubble Drag Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skudarnov, P. V; Lin, C. X

    2006-01-01

    .... The effects of mixture density variation, free stream turbulence intensity, free stream velocity, and surface roughness on the microbubble drag reduction were studied using a single phase model based...

  16. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com; Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com; Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India); Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  17. Entropy viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    A new class of high-order numerical methods for approximating nonlinear conservation laws is described (entropy viscosity method). The novelty is that a nonlinear viscosity based on the local size of an entropy production is added to the numerical discretization at hand. This new approach does not use any flux or slope limiters, applies to equations or systems supplemented with one or more entropy inequalities and does not depend on the mesh type and polynomial approximation. Various benchmark problems are solved with finite elements, spectral elements and Fourier series to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, A. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Lambiase, G. [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica E.R. Caianiello, Fisciano (Italy); INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics. (orig.)

  19. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  20. The environmental sustainability ? assessment of regional priorities for air pollution reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Voytsekhovska, V. V.; Butzbach, O.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of reducing air pollution as key element of environmental sustainability by regional criteria was considered. The basic study approach is taken, according to which the quantitative analysis methods were used to define the relation between air pollution reduction and the relative reduction volume of its negative impact on the region's inhabitants. The result proved that the product of two indicators ? the concentration of air pollution and population density in the territory det...

  1. In-silico prediction of concentration-dependent viscosity curves for monoclonal antibody solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Li, Li; Broulidakis, Matthew P; Luksha, Nicholas G; Burns, Christopher T; Singh, Satish K; Kumar, Sandeep

    2017-04-01

    Early stage developability assessments of monoclonal antibody (mAb) candidates can help reduce risks and costs associated with their product development. Forecasting viscosity of highly concentrated mAb solutions is an important aspect of such developability assessments. Reliable predictions of concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors for mAb solutions in platform formulations can help screen or optimize drug candidates for flexible manufacturing and drug delivery options. Here, we present a computational method to predict concentration-dependent viscosity curves for mAbs solely from their sequence-structural attributes. This method was developed using experimental data on 16 different mAbs whose concentration-dependent viscosity curves were experimentally obtained under standardized conditions. Each concentration-dependent viscosity curve was fitted with a straight line, via logarithmic manipulations, and the values for intercept and slope were obtained. Intercept, which relates to antibody diffusivity, was found to be nearly constant. In contrast, slope, the rate of increase in solution viscosity with solute concentration, varied significantly across different mAbs, demonstrating the importance of intermolecular interactions toward viscosity. Next, several molecular descriptors for electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the 16 mAbs derived using their full-length homology models were examined for potential correlations with the slope. An equation consisting of hydrophobic surface area of full-length antibody and charges on VH, VL, and hinge regions was found to be capable of predicting the concentration-dependent viscosity curves of the antibody solutions. Availability of this computational tool may facilitate material-free high-throughput screening of antibody candidates during early stages of drug discovery and development.

  2. Assessment of Soft Vane and Metal Foam Engine Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hughes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Two innovative fan-noise reduction concepts developed by NASA are presented - soft vanes and over-the-rotor metal foam liners. Design methodologies are described for each concept. Soft vanes are outlet guide vanes with internal, resonant chambers that communicate with the exterior aeroacoustic environment via a porous surface. They provide acoustic absorption via viscous losses generated by interaction of unsteady flows with the internal solid structure. Over-the-rotor metal foam liners installed at or near the fan rotor axial plane provide rotor noise absorption. Both concepts also provide pressure-release surfaces that potentially inhibit noise generation. Several configurations for both concepts are evaluated with a normal incidence tube, and the results are used to guide designs for implementation in two NASA fan rigs. For soft vanes, approximately 1 to 2 dB of broadband inlet and aft-radiated fan noise reduction is achieved. For over-the-rotor metal foam liners, up to 3 dB of fan noise reduction is measured in the low-speed fan rig, but minimal reduction is measured in the high-speed fan rig. These metal foam liner results are compared with a static engine test, in which inlet sound power level reductions up to 5 dB were measured. Brief plans for further development are also provided.

  3. Viscosity for anisotropic Reissner-Nordström black branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Soumangsu; Samanta, Rickmoy

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of shear viscosity in the presence of small anisotropy and a finite chemical potential. First, we construct an anisotropic Reissner Nordström black brane in five dimensions in a simple Einstein-Maxwell theory with a small linear dilaton. This solution is characterized by three mass scales: anisotropy ρ , temperature T , and chemical potential μ . We find this solution up to second order in the dilaton anisotropy parameter ρ . This black brane solution corresponds to an anisotropic phase where the anisotropy is small compared to the temperature and chemical potential. We find that in this anisotropic phase, some components of the anisotropic shear viscosity tensor, which are spin one with respect to the residual symmetry after breaking rotational invariance, violates the KSS bound (η/s ≥1/4 π ) proposed by Kovtun, Son, and Starinets. We identify the regions of the parameter space where these violations are significant. We carry out a similar analysis in four dimensions and find a similar violation of the KSS bound for the spin one components to demonstrate the generality of the result. Our results are particularly relevant in the context of strongly coupled systems found in nature. We also provide an intuitive understanding of the results using dimensional reduction and a Boltzmann calculation in a weakly coupled version of a similar system. The Boltzmann analysis performed in a system of weakly interacting particles in a linear potential also shows that components of the viscosity tensor may be reduced. It is intriguing that the Boltzmann analysis also predicts the corrections to be negative and that too in a manner similar to the anisotropic strongly coupled theories with smooth gravity duals.

  4. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C., E-mail: cliu@pppl.gov [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bhattacharjee, A. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  5. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  6. Effect of Viscosity on Liquid Curtain Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Francis, Lorraine; Carvalho, Marcio; Dow Chemical Company Collaboration; PUC Rio Collaboration; University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on the stability of Newtonian liquid curtains was explored by high-speed visualization. Glycerol/water solutions with viscosity ranging from 19.1 to 210 mPa.s were used as coating liquids. The experimental set-up used a slide die delivery and steel tube edge guides. The velocity along curtain at different positions was measured by tracking small particles at different flow conditions. The measurements revealed that away from edge guides, velocity is well described by free fall effect. However, close to edge guides, liquid moves slower, revealing formation of a viscous boundary layer. The size of boundary layer and velocity near edge guides are strong function of viscosity. The critical condition was determined by examining flow rate below which curtain broke. Curtain failure was initiated by growth of a hole within liquid curtain, close to edge guides. Visualization results showed that the hole forms in a circular shape then becomes elliptical as it grows faster in vertical direction compared to horizontal direction. As viscosity rises, minimum flow rate for destabilization of curtain increased, indicating connection between interaction with edge guides and curtain stability. We would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Dow Chemical Company.

  7. Shear viscosity of an ordering latex suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vorst, A.M.; van der Vorst, B.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Aelmans, N.J.J.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    The shear viscosity of a latex which is ordered at rest is studied as a function of the shear rate and volume fraction. At low shear rates and for moderate to high volume fractions, the flow curves show dynamic yield behavior which disappears below a volume fraction of 8%. At high shear rates, the

  8. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  9. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  10. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William G; Lange, Lene; Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Salmeán, Armando A; Pedersen, Henriette L; Busk, Peter Kamp; Zhao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-d-galactan and 1,5-α-l-arabinan. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Assessing effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of concurrency reduction for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, E A; Brandeau, M L; Igeme, T K; Bendavid, E

    2011-10-01

    We estimated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of changes in concurrent sexual partnerships in reducing the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Using data from Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, we estimated country-specific concurrency behaviour from sexual behaviour survey data on the number of partners in the past 12 months, and we developed a network model to compare the impact of three behaviour changes on the HIV epidemic: (1) changes in concurrent partnership patterns to strict monogamy; (2) partnership reduction among those with the greatest number of partners; and (3) partnership reduction among all individuals. We estimated the number of new HIV infections over 10 years and the cost per infection averted. Given our assumptions and model structure, we find that reducing concurrency among high-risk individuals averts the most infections and increasing monogamy the least (11.7% versus 8.7% reduction in new infections, on average, for a 10% reduction in concurrent partnerships). A campaign that costs US$1 per person annually is likely cost-saving if it reduces concurrency by 9% on average, given our baseline estimates of concurrency. In sensitivity analysis, the rank ordering of behaviour change scenarios was unaffected by potential over-estimation of concurrency, though the number of infections averted decreased and the cost per HIV infection averted increased. Concurrency reduction programmes may be effective and cost-effective in reducing HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa if they can achieve even modest impacts at similar costs to past mass media campaigns in the region. Reduced concurrency among high-risk individuals appears to be most effective in reducing HIV incidence, but concurrency reduction in other risk groups may yield nearly as much benefit.

  12. Measuring the Viscosity of the Escherichia coli Plasma Membrane Using Molecular Rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Jacek T; Thompson, Alexander J; Dent, Michael R; Brooks, Nicholas J; Michiels, Jan; Hofkens, Johan; Kuimova, Marina K

    2016-10-04

    The viscosity is a highly important parameter within the cell membrane, affecting the diffusion of small molecules and, hence, controlling the rates of intracellular reactions. There is significant interest in the direct, quantitative assessment of membrane viscosity. Here we report the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of the molecular rotor BODIPY C10 in the membranes of live Escherichia coli bacteria to permit direct quantification of the viscosity. Using this approach, we investigated the viscosity in live E. coli cells, spheroplasts, and liposomes made from E. coli membrane extracts. For live cells and spheroplasts, the viscosity was measured at both room temperature (23°C) and the E. coli growth temperature (37°C), while the membrane extract liposomes were studied over a range of measurement temperatures (5-40°C). At 37°C, we recorded a membrane viscosity in live E. coli cells of 950 cP, which is considerably higher than that previously observed in other live cell membranes (e.g., eukaryotic cells, membranes of Bacillus vegetative cells). Interestingly, this indicates that E. coli cells exhibit a high degree of lipid ordering within their liquid-phase plasma membranes. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of ethanol, dry extract and reducing sugars on density and viscosity of Brazilian red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Flávia S P P; de Castilhos, Maurício B M; Telis, Vânia R N; Telis-Romero, Javier

    2015-05-01

    Density and viscosity are properties that exert great influence on the body of wines. The present work aimed to evaluate the influence of the alcoholic content, dry extract, and reducing sugar content on density and viscosity of commercial dry red wines at different temperatures. The rheological assays were carried out on a controlled stress rheometer, using concentric cylinder geometry at seven temperatures (2, 8, 14, 16, 18, 20 and 26 °C). Wine viscosity decreased with increasing temperature and density was directly related to the wine alcohol content, whereas viscosity was closely linked to the dry extract. Reducing sugars did not influence viscosity or density. Wines produced from Italian grapes were presented as full-bodied with higher values for density and viscosity, which was linked to the higher alcohol content and dry extract, respectively. The results highlighted the major effects of certain physicochemical properties on the physical properties of wines, which in turn is important for guiding sensory assessments. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Assessment of metal artifact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsa, A.; Ibrahim, N.; Hassan, B.; Syriopoulos, K.; van der Stelt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were

  15. Assessment of the isodesmic method in the calculation of standard reduction potential of copper complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Diego; Alí-Torres, Jorge

    2017-09-21

    Molecular phenomena involving electron transfer and reduction/oxidation processes are of the utmost importance in chemistry. However, accurate computational calculations of standard reduction potentials (SRPs) for transition metal complexes are still challenging. For this reason, some computational strategies have been proposed in order to overcome the main limitations in SRP calculations for copper complexes. However, these strategies are limited to particular coordination spheres and do not represent a general methodology. In this work, we present standard reduction potential calculations for copper complexes in aqueous solution covering a wide range of coordination spheres. These calculations were performed using the M06-2X density functional, and by employing the direct and isodesmic approaches. Result analysis reveals that values obtained with the use of the isodesmic method are in better agreement with experimental values than those obtained from the direct method (mean unsigned error 0.39 V with the direct and 0.08 V with the isodesmic method). This approach provides values with errors comparable to the experimental uncertainty due to the proper cancellation of computational errors. These results strongly suggest the isodesmic approach as an adequate methodology for the calculation of SRPs for copper complexes with diverse coordination spheres. Graphical Abstract Comparison between direct and isodesmic methods in the calculation of standard reduction potentials for copper complexes using DFT methods.

  16. Human sperm swimming in a high viscosity mucus analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Smith, David J; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2018-02-17

    Remarkably, mammalian sperm maintain a substantive proportion of their progressive swimming speed within highly viscous fluids, including those of the female reproductive tract. Here, we analyse the digital microscopy of a human sperm swimming in a highly viscous, weakly elastic mucus analogue. We exploit principal component analysis to simplify its flagellar beat pattern, from which boundary element calculations are used to determine the time-dependent flow field around the sperm cell. The sperm flow field is further approximated in terms of regularized point forces, and estimates of the mechanical power consumption are determined, for comparison with analogous low viscosity media studies. This highlights extensive differences in the structure of the flows surrounding human sperm in different media, indicating how the cell-cell and cell-boundary hydrodynamic interactions significantly differ with the physical microenvironment. The regularized point force decomposition also provides cell-level information that may ultimately be incorporated into sperm population models. We further observe indications that the core feature in explaining the effectiveness of sperm swimming in high viscosity media is the loss of cell yawing, which is related with a greater density of regularized point force singularities along the axis of symmetry of the flagellar beat to represent the flow field. In turn this implicates a reduction of the wavelength of the distal beat pattern - and hence dynamical wavelength selection of the flagellar beat - as the dominant feature governing the effectiveness of sperm swimming in highly viscous media. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effects of engine oil viscosity and composition on fuel efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clevenger, J.E.; Carlson, D.C.; Kleiser, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A 2.3l engine dynamometer test procedure that measures the effects of engine oils on fuel efficiency has been developed that a) generally agrees with the ASTM five-car test, b) has good test repeatability and c) is capable of detecting small differences among test oils with high statistical confidence. Factors in a lubricant affecting fuel efficiency such as SAE viscosity grade, VI improver, detergent-inhibitor (DI) package and friction modifier selection were investigated in the 2.3l engine dynamometer test. A general trend of improved fuel efficiency was found with reduction in single-grade and multigrade oil viscosity. VI improver selection was found to have a significant effect on the fuel efficiency of multigrade oils. In some cases the difference in fuel efficiency among multigrade oils containing different VI improvers was about the same as the gain in fuel efficiency from reducing SAE grade from an SAE 10w-40 to an SAE 5w-30. Results show that by careful selection of the VI improver and DI package it is possible to formulate multigrade oils that exceed the requirements of the current ASTM energy-conserving engine oil classification.

  18. The pendulum test as a tool to evaluate passive knee stiffness and viscosity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinci Maria

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pendulum test of Wartenberg is a technique commonly used to measure passive knee motion with the aim to assess spasticity. We used this test to evaluate changes of the knee angular displacement, passive stiffness and viscosity in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Stiffness and viscosity represent passive resistances to joint motion associated with the structural properties of the joint tissue and of the muscular-tendon complex. Stiffness can be considered an intrinsic property of the tissues to resist deformation, while viscosity is related to cohesive forces between adjacent layers of tissues. Both parameters may influence the joint range of motion affecting angular displacement. Methods Nine women with rheumatoid arthritis were compared with a group of healthy women. With the subject half-lying, the relaxed knee was dropped from near-full extension and the characteristics of the ensuring damped unsustained knee oscillation evaluated. The kinematics of leg oscillations was recorded using ultrasonic markers (Zebris CMS HS 10 and the kinetic data were calculated from kinematic and anthropometric measures. Results Knee stiffness significantly increased (p 2 = 0.68 and first flexion (R2 = 0.78. Using a multivariate regression, we found that increasing stiffness was the main factor for the reduction of flexion and extension motions. Conclusion We showed that the Wartenberg test can be considered a practical tool to measure mechanical changes of knee caused by rheumatoid arthritis. This novel application of Wartenberg test could be useful to follow up the effects of pharmacological and rehabilitative interventions in this disease.

  19. Association of Plasma Viscosity with Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Obesity: As an old marker, a new insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltem, Ercan; Dildar, Konukoglu; Tijen, Yeşim Erdem

    2007-04-01

    Although obesity is related with cardiovascular disease, the exact mechanism of the relationship is not fully understood. We aim to examine the relationship between plasma viscosity and obesity as a cardiovascular disease risk factor in obese and non-obese groups. We recruited 75 obese subjects who were admitted to the Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty. Plasma viscosity and lipid profile were measured and atherogenic index was calculated as atherogenic risk factors. Plasma viscosity, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels and atherogenic index were significantly increased in obese group compared to non-obese group for each. Plasma viscosity was weakly correlated with total cholesterol and atherogenic index only in the obese group. Plasma viscosity, an early atherosclerotic risk factor, might be helpful in the assessment of cardiovascular risk in obese subjects.

  20. Effect of Ratio of Visco-Elastic Material Viscosity to Fluid Viscosity on Stability of Flexible Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANBUKUMAR, S.; KUMAR, MUNENDRA

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, a flexible pipe has been considered to study the effect of ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity on the stability of flexible laminar pipe flow with axi-symmetric disturbances. The effect of thickness of visco-elastic material on the stability of flexible pipe flow with outer rigid shroud has also been studied. The stability curves are drawn for various values of the ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity. It is observed that stability of flow is increasing by decreasing the ratio of visco-elastic material viscosity to fluid viscosity.

  1. Significant reduction in hospital-acquired thrombosis: impact of national risk assessment and real-time feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowswell, Huw Raymond; Nokes, Timothy J C

    2017-01-01

    Since 2010, National Health Service hospitals in England have been incentivised to risk assess for Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) in all adult patients admitted, using a national tool. We studied the impact of this, together with local real-time reporting of VTE events to senior clinicians, on cases of hospital-acquired thrombosis (HAT) diagnosed, since 2010. This was an observational cohort study reviewing all cases of VTE diagnosed between January 2010 and December 2016 in a single teaching hospital. These were matched against the number of patients admitted to produce crude incidence rates per thousand admissions. Similarly, all cases associated with inadequate thromboprophylaxis (TP) measures were documented over the same period. By the end of 2010, with 70% compliance with VTE risk assessment, improving to 90% (the national target) early in 2011, there were 217 HAT events from 103 845 admissions. In 2016, there were 176 HAT events from 119 128 admissions, being a significant reduction, relative risk (RR) 0.718 (95% CI 0.589 to 0.875; p=0.001). In 2010, there were 50 of 217 HAT events associated with inadequate TP, falling to 7 of 176 in 2016, also a significant reduction, RR 0.140 (95% CI 0.065 to 0.300; p=0.0001). National guidance on VTE prevention and mandatory risk assessment linked to local real-time reporting of VTE events are associated with significant reductions both in total HAT events and those associated with inadequate TP.

  2. Assessment of the Wavelet Transform for Noise Reduction in Simulated PET Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Shalchian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An efficient method of tomographic imaging in nuclear medicine is positron emission tomography (PET. Compared to SPECT, PET has the advantages of higher levels of sensitivity, spatial resolution and more accurate quantification. However, high noise levels in the image limit its diagnostic utility. Noise removal in nuclear medicine is traditionally based on Fourier decomposition of images. This method is based on frequency components, irrespective of the spatial location of the noise or signal. The wavelet transform presents a solution by providing information on the frequency content while retaining spatial information. This alleviates the shortcoming of the Fourier transform and thus, wavelet transform has been extensively used for noise reduction, edge detection and compression. Materials and Methods: In this research, we used the SimSET software to simulate PET images of the NCAT phantom. The images were acquired using 250 million counts in a 128×128 matrix. For the reference image, we acquired an image with high counts (6 billion. Then, we reconstructed these images using our own software developed in MATLAB. After image reconstruction, a 250 million counts image (noisy image and a reference image were normalized and then root-mean-square error (RMSE was used to compare the images. Next, we wrote and applied de-noising programs. These programs were based on using 54 different wavelets and 4 methods. De-noised images were compared with the reference image using RMSE. Results: Our results indicate that the Stationary Wavelet Transform and Global Thresholding are more efficient at noise reduction compared to the other methods that we investigated. Discussion: The wavelet transform is a useful method for de-noising of simulated PET images. Noise reduction using this transform and loss of high-frequency information are simultaneous with each other. It seems that we should attend to the mutual agreement between noise reduction and

  3. Use of the event tree to assess the risk reduction obtained from rockfall protection devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Peila

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents and discusses a procedure for the evaluation of the collective risk that can affect a road subjected to rockfalls, with and without protection measures, by means of the event tree analysis. This tool is useful to show designers whether the rockfall protection structures are located in the correct positions, whether they are the correct technological choice and what level of reduction of risk can be obtained. Different design options can therefore be compared on the same bases.

  4. Assessment of Current and Future Air Pollutant Emission Reduction Technologies for Marine Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    exhaust gases, fuel oxidation catalysis , and other diesel engine enhancements. 4. Identify innovative technologies that may find applications in...injector into the exhaust stream. The injected urea is distributed throughout the exhaust stream in a mixing pipe before reaching the reactor (SCR), where...the catalytic reduction takes place. The reactor houses the catalyst elements, soot blowing outlets, and NOx monitoring equipment. The catalyst

  5. Mechanism of viscosity effect on magnetic island rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailovskii, A.B.; Konovalov, S.V. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov Sq., 1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pustovitov, V.D. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Tsypin, V.S. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, SP (Brazil)

    2000-04-01

    It is shown that plasma viscosity does not influence the magnetic island rotation directly. Nevertheless, it leads to nonstationarity of the plasma velocity. This nonstationarity is the reason of the viscosity effect on island rotation. (author)

  6. Plasma Viscosity with Mass Transport in Spherical ICF Implosion Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vold, Erik L; Ortega, Mario I; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrange hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduc...

  7. Radiation dose reduction: comparative assessment of publication volume between interventional and diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Henzler, Thomas; Gaba, Ron C; Morelli, John N

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantify and compare awareness regarding radiation dose reduction within the interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology communities. Abstracts accepted to the annual meetings of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed using the search terms "interventional/computed tomography" and "radiation dose/radiation dose reduction." A PubMed query using the above-mentioned search terms for the years of 2005-2015 was performed. Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 14 520 abstracts (mean, 660±297 abstracts) and 80 614 abstracts (mean, 3664±1025 abstracts) were presented at interventional and diagnostic radiology meetings, respectively. Significantly fewer abstracts related to radiation dose were presented at the interventional radiology meetings compared with the diagnostic radiology meetings (162 abstracts [1% of total] vs. 2706 [3% of total]; P radiology abstracts (range, 6-27) and 246±105 diagnostic radiology abstracts (range, 112-389) pertaining to radiation dose were presented at each meeting. The PubMed query revealed an average of 124±39 publications (range, 79-187) and 1205±307 publications (range, 829-1672) related to interventional and diagnostic radiology dose reduction per year, respectively (P radiology community over the past 10 years has not mirrored the increased volume seen within diagnostic radiology, suggesting that increased education and discussion about this topic may be warranted.

  8. Condition Assessment of PCI Bridge Girder a Result of The Reduction Prestressing Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suangga Made

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PCI bridge girders is known and widely used for many construction e.g.: bridge, wharf, flyover, and other application. PC Bridge girders have two types: Pre - tensioned girders and post - tensioned girders. In pre tensioned girders, prestressing in carried out first then after that the fresh concrete poured. The prestressing process in only carried off after the concrete has sufficient strength. In this study, analysis was conducted for PCI bridge girder with span is 40 meters. Based on the data geometry bridge dimension girder, material girder, and material strands cable, it will be analyzed to calculate the natural frequencies and moment capacity using finite element program (Midas/Civil program. So it can be estimated how much the percentage reduction prestress force on the bridge until PCI bridge structure collapses. From the calculation, it found that the pattern comparison between reduction prestressing force and natural frequency are linear. These results are also similar for natural frequency versus moment capacity.PCI bridge will collapse when the reduction prestreesing force of 45 % to 50 % from the total loss of prestressing.

  9. A framework for assessing risk reduction due to DNAPL mass removal from low permeability soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, R.A. [R. Allan Freeze Engineering, Inc., White Rock, British Columbia (Canada); McWhorter, D.B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Many emerging remediation technologies are designed to remove contaminant mass from source zones at DNAPL sites in response to regulatory requirements. There is often concern in the regulated community as to whether mass removal actually reduces risk, or whether the small risk reductions achieved warrant the large costs incurred. This paper sets out a framework for quantifying the degree to which risk is reduced as mass is removed from shallow, saturated, low-permeability, dual-porosity, DNAPL source zones. Risk is defined in terms of meeting an alternate concentration level (ACL) at a compliance well in an aquifer underlying the source zone. The ACL is back-calculated from a carcinogenic health-risk characterization at a downstream water-supply well. Source-zone mass-removal efficiencies are heavily dependent on the distribution of mass between media (fractures, matrix) and phases (dissolved, sorbed, free product). Due to the uncertainties in currently-available technology performance data, the scope of the paper is limited to developing a framework for generic technologies rather than making risk-reduction calculations for specific technologies. Despite the qualitative nature of the exercise, results imply that very high mass-removal efficiencies are required to achieve significant long-term risk reduction with technology, applications of finite duration. 17 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Assessment of seismic response reduction factor for moment resisting RC frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishanth, M.; Visuvasam, J.; Simon, J.; Packiaraj, J. S.

    2017-11-01

    The response reduction factor or response modification factor (R) plays an important role in the non-linear response of the moment resisting reinforced concrete (RC) frames. Implementing this factor in the design, accounts for the non-linear response of a structure. The study emphasizes on evaluating the actual values of the response reduction factor for moment resisting RC frames. The estimation of this factor is carried out by performing a detailed non-linear static pushover analysis of 2D framed structures of both ductile and ordinary moment resisting frames.Different parameters considered for the study includes variation of height of the structure, the zone factor and considering the effect of geometric non-linearity of the structure in the analysis. The results indicate that the values of R as given by the codes are of higher degree. From the analysis, arelationship between R-T-Z has been studied. It is found that the values of over-strength, ductility and response reduction factors are highly affected by seismic zones and time period of the structure.

  11. Condition Assessment of PCI Bridge Girder a Result of The Reduction Prestressing Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suangga, Made; Hidayat, Irpan; Lutter, Bobby

    2014-03-01

    PCI bridge girders is known and widely used for many construction e.g.: bridge, wharf, flyover, and other application. PC Bridge girders have two types: Pre - tensioned girders and post - tensioned girders. In pre tensioned girders, prestressing in carried out first then after that the fresh concrete poured. The prestressing process in only carried off after the concrete has sufficient strength. In this study, analysis was conducted for PCI bridge girder with span is 40 meters. Based on the data geometry bridge dimension girder, material girder, and material strands cable, it will be analyzed to calculate the natural frequencies and moment capacity using finite element program (Midas/Civil program). So it can be estimated how much the percentage reduction prestress force on the bridge until PCI bridge structure collapses. From the calculation, it found that the pattern comparison between reduction prestressing force and natural frequency are linear. These results are also similar for natural frequency versus moment capacity.PCI bridge will collapse when the reduction prestreesing force of 45 % to 50 % from the total loss of prestressing.

  12. Assessing the feasibility of harm reduction services for MSM: the late night breakfast buffet study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellogg Timothy A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the leveling off in new HIV infections among men who have sex with men (MSM in San Francisco, new evidence suggests that many recent HIV infections are linked with the use of Methamphetamine (MA. Among anonymous HIV testers in San Francisco, HIV incidence among MA users was 6.3% compared to 2.1% among non-MA users. Of particular concern for prevention programs are frequent users and HIV positive men who use MA. These MSM pose a particular challenge to HIV prevention efforts due to the need to reach them during very late night hours. Methods The purpose of the Late Night Breakfast Buffet (LNBB was to determine the feasibility and uptake of harm reduction services by a late night population of MSM. The "buffet" of services included: needle exchange, harm reduction information, oral HIV testing, and urine based sexually transmitted infection (STI testing accompanied by counseling and consent procedures. The study had two components: harm reduction outreach and a behavioral survey. For 4 months during 2004, we provided van-based harm reduction services in three neighborhoods in San Francisco from 1 – 5 a.m. for anyone out late at night. We also administered a behavioral risk and service utilization survey among MSM. Results We exchanged 2000 needles in 233 needle exchange visits, distributed 4500 condoms/lubricants and provided 21 HIV tests and 12 STI tests. Fifty-five MSM enrolled in the study component. The study population of MSM was characterized by low levels of income and education whose ages ranged from 18 – 55. Seventy-eight percent used MA in the last 3 months; almost 25% used MA every day in the same time frame. Of the 65% who ever injected, 97% injected MA and 13% injected it several times a day. MA and alcohol were strong influences in the majority of unprotected sexual encounters among both HIV negative and HIV positive MSM. Conclusion We reached a disenfranchised population of MA-using MSM who are at

  13. Temperature dependence effect of viscosity on ultrathin lubricant film melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V.Khomenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the melting of an ultrathin lubricant film under friction between atomically flat surfaces at temperature dependencies of viscosity described by Vogel-Fulcher relationship and by power expression, which are observed experimentally. It is shown that the critical temperature exists in both cases the exceeding of which leads to the melting of lubricant and, as a result, the sliding mode of friction sets in. The values of characteristic parameters of lubricant are defined, which are needed for friction reduction. In the systems, where the Vogel-Fulcher dependence is fulfilled, it is possible to choose the parameters at which the melting of lubricant takes place even at zero temperature of friction surfaces. The deformational defect of the shear modulus is taken into account in describing the lubricant melting according to the mechanism of the first-order transition.

  14. Neonatal Facial Coding System for Assessing Postoperative Pain in Infants: Item Reduction is Valid and Feasible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.W.B.; Koot, H.M.; Grunau, R.E.; Boer, J. de; Druenen, M.J. van; Tibboel, D.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1) evaluate the validity of the Neonatal Facial Coding System (NFCS) for assessment of postoperative pain and (2) explore whether the number of NFCS facial actions could be reduced for assessing postoperative pain. Design: Prospective, observational

  15. Reductions in Long-Term Suspensions Following Adoption of the Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Dewey G.; Gregory, Anne; Fan, Xitao

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the adoption of the Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines in 23 high schools. After training, school administrators and other staff members demonstrated substantial increases in knowledge of threat assessment principles and decreased commitment to zero tolerance approaches. Schools using the…

  16. Pendulum Underwater - An Approach for Quantifying Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leme, José Costa; Oliveira, Agostinho

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the experiment presented in this paper is to quantify the viscosity of a liquid. Viscous effects are important in the flow of fluids in pipes, in the bloodstream, in the lubrication of engine parts, and in many other situations. In the present paper, the authors explore the oscillations of a physical pendulum in the form of a long and lightweight wire that carries a ball at its lower end, which is totally immersed in water, so as to determine the water viscosity. The system used represents a viscous damped pendulum and we tried different theoretical models to describe it. The experimental part of the present paper is based on a very simple and low-cost image capturing apparatus that can easily be replicated in a physics classroom. Data on the pendulum's amplitude as a function of time were acquired using digital video analysis with the open source software Tracker.

  17. Bulk and shear viscosity in Hagedorn fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A.; Wahba, M. [Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), MTI University, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-11-15

    Assuming that the Hagedorn fluid composed of known particles and resonances with masses m <2 GeV obeys the first-order theory (Eckart) of relativistic fluid, we discuss the transport properties of QCD confined phase. Based on the relativistic kinetic theory formulated under the relaxation time approximation, expressions for bulk and shear viscosity in thermal medium of hadron resonances are derived. The relaxation time in the Hagedorn dynamical fluid exclusively takes into account the decay and eventually van der Waals processes. We comment on the in-medium thermal effects on bulk and shear viscosity and averaged relaxation time with and without the excluded-volume approach. As an application of these results, we suggest the dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and the cosmological models, which require thermo- and hydro-dynamics equations of state. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Caldera resurgence driven by magma viscosity contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetto, Federico; Acocella, Valerio; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-11-24

    Calderas are impressive volcanic depressions commonly produced by major eruptions. Equally impressive is the uplift of the caldera floor that may follow, dubbed caldera resurgence, resulting from magma accumulation and accompanied by minor eruptions. Why magma accumulates, driving resurgence instead of feeding large eruptions, is one of the least understood processes in volcanology. Here we use thermal and experimental models to define the conditions promoting resurgence. Thermal modelling suggests that a magma reservoir develops a growing transition zone with relatively low viscosity contrast with respect to any newly injected magma. Experiments show that this viscosity contrast provides a rheological barrier, impeding the propagation through dikes of the new injected magma, which stagnates and promotes resurgence. In explaining resurgence and its related features, we provide the theoretical background to account for the transition from magma eruption to accumulation, which is essential not only to develop resurgence, but also large magma reservoirs.

  19. The use of Microarrays to Elucidate Biomarkers for use in Site Assessment and Monitoring of Reductive Dechlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, A. S.; Edwards, E. A.

    2009-05-01

    Background and Objectives: Chlorinated solvents are prevalent groundwater contaminants that often exist as DNAPLs, and as such serve as long-term sources of contamination. Bioaugmentation with Dehalococcoides- containing mixed cultures is an effective remediation strategy that can significantly increase DNAPL dissolution rates and thus mass flux, or can be used in conjunction with other physical and chemical remediation technologies to constrain the remaining DNAPL mass. Molecular biological tools are being used to assess the need for, and to monitor the progress of, bioaugmentation. Unfortunately, the current tools have limitations and provide an incomplete picture of the reductively dechlorinating bacterial community. To overcome these limitations and more accurately assess, predict, monitor and manage reductive dechlorination processes at contaminated sites, our research is focused on identifying novel reductive dechlorination biomarker genes and developing tools that improve our understanding of target gene presence, abundance, and expression, and thus, contaminant detoxification. Methods. To accomplish this, microarrays were used to investigate transcription within the Dehalococcoides- containing microbial community KB1. A 19,200 feature Shotgun Metagenome Microarray was created by amplifying and spotting random DNA fragments from a KB1 clone library, as well as 100 known reductive dehalogenase genes. In initial experiments the microarrays were used to investigate differential gene expression during dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes. Statistical analysis indicated differential expression of about 500 spots which were then sequenced. Subsequently, all of the spots on the microarray were sequenced. Differential expression was also verified using reverse transcriptase -quantitative PCR. Results: The KB1 Shotgun Metagenome Microarrays were used to identify genes within the community which are functionally important during dechlorination. Dehalococcoides

  20. Viscosity solution of linear regulator quadratic for degenerate diffusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied a linear regulator quadratic control problem for degenerate Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB equation. We showed the existence of viscosity properties and established a unique viscosity solution of the degenerate HJB equation associated with this problem by the technique of viscosity solutions.

  1. On the scaling of entropy viscosity in high order methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kornelus, Adeline; Appelö, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we outline the entropy viscosity method and discuss how the choice of scaling influences the size of viscosity for a simple shock problem. We present examples to illustrate the performance of the entropy viscosity method under two distinct scalings.

  2. Effect of urea formaldehyde viscosity on urea formaldehyde and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The melting point, refractive index, density and formaldehyde emission were found to increase with increase in UF viscosity while the dry time, moisture uptake and elongation at break were found to decrease with increase in viscosity. UF viscosity below 10.82 mPa.s was found to produce UF/UP copolymer composite which ...

  3. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    The viscosity of blood has long been used as an indicator in the understanding and treatment of disease, and the advent of modern viscometers allows its measurement with ever-improving clinical convenience. However, these advances have not been matched by theoretical developments that can yield a quantitative understanding of blood’s microrheology and its possible connection to relevant biomolecules (e.g., fibrinogen). Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and two different red blood cell models, we accurately predict the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly represent cell–cell interactions and identify the types and sizes of reversible rouleaux structures that yield a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates. We also present the first quantitative estimates of the magnitude of adhesive forces between red cells. In addition, our simulations support the hypothesis, previously deduced from experiments, of yield stress as an indicator of cell aggregation. This non-Newtonian behavior is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation, and dynamics of single red blood cells. The most complex cell dynamics occurs in the intermediate shear rate regime, where individual cells experience severe deformation and transient folded conformations. The generality of these cell models together with single-cell measurements points to the future prediction of blood-viscosity anomalies and the corresponding microstructures associated with various diseases (e.g., malaria, AIDS, and diabetes mellitus). The models can easily be adapted to tune the properties of a much wider class of complex fluids including capsule and vesicle suspensions. PMID:21730178

  4. Economic assessment of greenhouse gas reduction through low-grade waste heat recovery using organic Rankine cycle (ORC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imran, Muhammad; Park, Byung Sik; Kim, Hyouck Ju; Usman, Muhammad [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Hyun [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Low-grade waste heat recovery technologies reduce the environmental impact of fossil fuels and improve overall efficiency. This paper presents the economic assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction through waste heat recovery using organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The ORC engine is one of the mature low temperature heat engines. The low boiling temperature of organic working fluid enables ORC to recover low-temperature waste heat. The recovered waste heat is utilized to produce electricity and hot water. The GHG emissions for equivalent power and hot water from three fossil fuels-coal, natural gas, and diesel oil-are estimated using the fuel analysis approach and corresponding emission factors. The relative decrease in GHG emission is calculated using fossil fuels as the base case. The total cost of the ORC system is used to analyze the GHG reduction cost for each of the considered fossil fuels. A sensitivity analysis is also conducted to investigate the effect of the key parameter of the ORC system on the cost of GHG reduction. Throughout the 20-year life cycle of the ORC plant, the GHG reduction cost for R245fa is 0.02 $/kg to 0.04 $/kg and that for pentane is 0.04 $/kg to 0.05 $/kg. The working fluid, evaporation pressure, and pinch point temperature difference considerably affect the GHG emission.

  5. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  6. Wound dressing based on nonwoven viscose fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Okeil, A; Sheta, A M; Amr, A; Ali, Marwa A

    2012-09-01

    Nonwoven viscose fabric was treated with chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) using pad-dry method, using different concentrations of chitosan and PVA. Increasing the amount of PVA leads to increasing of air permeability. Water permeability increased by increasing the amount of PVA to 2 ml (10% solution) then decreased by any increase of the quantity of PVA solution. Roughness increased with increasing the amount of 10% PVA solution. It is shown that roughness, water and air permeability increased with increasing the chitosan concentration. Antibacterial properties was increased with increasing PVA/or chitosan concentration. The chitosan/PVA treated nonwoven viscose fabric was immersed in a solution of Ag nanoparticles. The chitosan/PVA/Ag nanoparticles treated nonwoven fabrics were used as wound dressings on French white Bouscat rabbits, with age ranged from 1 to 2 years. A complete healing was achieved using wound dressing consists of nonwoven viscose fabric treated with chitosan/PVA/Ag nanoparticles after 21 days. The histopathological examination confirmed the complete re-epithelialization and averagely thick epidermis formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of an ICA-based noise reduction method for multi-channel auditory evoked potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadizoghi, Siavash; Bell, Steven; Simpson, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work a new independent component analysis (ICA) based method for noise reduction in evoked potentials is evaluated on for auditory late responses (ALR) captured with a 63-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) from 10 normal-hearing subjects. The performance of the new method is compared with a single channel alternative in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR), the number of channels with an SNR above an empirically derived statistical critical value and an estimate of hearing threshold. The results show that the multichannel signal processing method can significantly enhance the quality of the signal and also detected hearing thresholds significantly lower than with the single channel alternative.

  8. Assessment of the GHG reduction potential from energy crops using a combined LCA and biogeochemical process models: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Wang, Qiao; Huang, Yaohuan; Fu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose for developing biofuel is to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, but the comprehensive environmental impact of such fuels is not clear. Life cycle analysis (LCA), as a complete comprehensive analysis method, has been widely used in bioenergy assessment studies. Great efforts have been directed toward establishing an efficient method for comprehensively estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction potential from the large-scale cultivation of energy plants by combining LCA with ecosystem/biogeochemical process models. LCA presents a general framework for evaluating the energy consumption and GHG emission from energy crop planting, yield acquisition, production, product use, and postprocessing. Meanwhile, ecosystem/biogeochemical process models are adopted to simulate the fluxes and storage of energy, water, carbon, and nitrogen in the soil-plant (energy crops) soil continuum. Although clear progress has been made in recent years, some problems still exist in current studies and should be addressed. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art method for estimating GHG emission reduction through developing energy crops and introduces in detail a new approach for assessing GHG emission reduction by combining LCA with biogeochemical process models. The main achievements of this study along with the problems in current studies are described and discussed.

  9. Reduction of stroke assessment time for visually guided reaching task on KINARM exoskeleton robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, S M; Dukelow, S P; Glasgow, J I; Scott, S H; Mousavi, P

    2014-01-01

    Robotic technologies provide objective, highly reliable tools for assessment of brain function following stroke. KINARM is an exoskeleton device that quantifies sensorimotor brain function using a visually guided reaching task among many other behavioral tasks. As further tasks are developed to more broadly assess different aspects of behavior using the robot, techniques and approaches are required to reduce the time it takes to complete each task. The present study investigates how the value of robot-measured parameters changes under alternative schemes that significantly reduce assessment time compared to the current assessment protocol for the visually guided reaching task. Results of the study are validated by addressing an important diagnostic question using an SVM classifier, showing that the alternative schemes provide nearly identical performance in terms of classification sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

  10. Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge hazardous fuel reduction project : Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment (EA) documents the results of a study of the potential environmental impacts of actions proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  11. ASSESSMENT OF A WIND TURBINE INTELLIGENT CONTROLLER FOR ENHANCED ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed the enhanced energy production which is possible when variable-speed wind turbines are electronically controlled by an intelligent controller for efficiency optimization and performance improvement. The control system consists of three fuzzy- logic controllers...

  12. Assessment of spinal movement reduction by thoraco-lumbar-sacral orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, P J; Bos, R P; Derksen, J C; de Vries, J

    2000-01-01

    Bracing is a common modality in treating spinal fractures. Its objective is to reduce spinal movements and to stabilize the fracture. Until now, factual insight into the movement-reducing properties of Thoraco-Lumbar-Sacral Orthoses (TLSOs) has been missing. Two common TLSOs (e.g., Jewett and Voigt-Bähler) were tested for their movement-reducing properties in two small groups of healthy subjects. In the first study, maximal gross spinal movements, with and without a TLSO, were measured by means of a Portable Posture Registration Set (PPRS) in three different planes. In the second study, maximal segmental vertebral movements in the regions T10 to L4 were measured via X-rays. With few notable exceptions, wearing a TLSO, as measured by the PPRS and X-ray techniques, significantly reduced the segmental as well as gross spinal movements. However, the amount of movement reduction varied greatly from subject-to-subject and was sometimes small. Unfortunately, data are lacking on the amount of movement reduction that is clinically relevant.

  13. Assessment of Alternative Scenarios for CO2 Reduction Potential in the Residential Building Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sun Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The South Korean government announced its goals of reducing the country’s CO2 emissions by up to 30% below the business as usual (BAU projections by 2020 in 2009 and 37% below BAU projections by 2030 in 2015. This paper explores the potential energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions offered by residential building energy efficiency policies and plans in South Korea. The current and future energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the residential building were estimated using an energy–environment model from 2010 to 2030. The business as usual scenario is based on the energy consumption characteristic of residential buildings using the trends related to socio-economic prospects and the number of dwellings. The alternative scenarios took into account energy efficiency for new residential buildings (scenario I, refurbishment of existing residential buildings (scenario II, use of highly efficient boilers (scenario III, and use of a solar thermal energy system (scenario IV. The results show that energy consumption in the residential building sector will increase by 33% between 2007 and 2030 in the BAU scenario. Maximum reduction in CO2 emissions in the residential building sector of South Korea was observed by 2030 in scenario I. In each alternative scenario analysis, CO2 emissions were 12.9% lower than in the business as usual scenario by the year 2030.

  14. Rules of thumb for assessing reductive dechlorination pathways of PCDDs in specific systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gui-Ning; Dang, Zhi; Fennell, Donna E; Huang, Weilin; Li, Zhong; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2010-05-15

    This paper reports a theoretical validation and proposition of the reductive dechlorination pathways for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congeners. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level for all PCDDs and Mulliken atomic charges on chlorine atoms were adopted as the probe of the dechlorination reaction activity. The experimentally substantiated dechlorination pathways of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,2,3,4-TCDD) and its daughter products in the presence of zero-valent zinc were validated and the complete pathway of dechlorination of octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) was proposed. The proposed pathways were found to be consistent with anaerobic biotransformation of several PCDD congeners. Four rules of thumb arrived from this study include (1) the chlorine atoms in the longitudinal (1,4,6,9) positions are removed in preference to the chlorine atoms on lateral (2,3,7,8) positions; (2) the chlorine atom that has more neighboring chlorine atoms at ortho-, meta- and para-positions is to be eliminated; (3) reductive dechlorination prefers to take place on the benzene ring having more chlorine substitutions; and (4) a chlorine atom on the side of the longitudinal symmetry axis containing more chlorine atoms is preferentially eliminated. These rules of thumb can be conveniently used for rapidly predicting the major dechlorination pathway for a given PCDD in specific systems. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of potential carbon dioxide reductions due to biomass-coal cofiring in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A L; Rhodes, J S; Keith, D W

    2003-11-15

    Cofiring biomass with coal in existing power plants offers a relatively inexpensive and efficient option for increasing near-term biomass energy utilization. Potential benefits include reduced emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur, and nitrogen oxides and development of biomass energy markets. To understand the economics of this strategy, we develop a model to calculate electricity and pollutant mitigation costs with explicit characterization of uncertainty in fuel and technology costs and variability in fuel properties. The model is first used to evaluate the plant-level economics of cofiring as a function of biomass cost. It is then integrated with state-specific coal consumption and biomass supply estimates to develop national supply curves for cofire electricity and carbon mitigation. A delivered cost of biomass below 15 dollars per ton is required for cofire to be competitive with existing coal-based generation. Except at low biomass prices (less than 15 dollars per ton), cofiring is unlikely to be competitive for NOx or SOx control, but it can provide comparatively inexpensive control of CO2 emissions: we estimate that emissions reductions of 100 Mt-CO2/year (a 5% reduction in electric-sector emissions) can be achieved at 25 +/- 20 dollars/tC. The 2-3 year time horizon for deployment--compared with 10-20 years for other CO2 mitigation options--makes cofiring particularly attractive.

  16. Viscosity and flow-rate of three high-energy, high-fibre enteral nutrition formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Augustench, P; Salas-Salvadó, J

    2009-01-01

    There have been few studies evaluating how the viscosity of the enteral nutrition formulas determine the time of nutritional administration by gravity and whether viscosity causes tubes to become obstructed. To assess how long it takes for three polymeric, hypercaloric and fibre-rich enteral nutrition formulas marketed in Europe to pass through different nasointestinal tubes by gravity and whether these formulas obstruct the tubes. We evaluated the in vitro viscosity of the three formulas using a rotational viscometer and by calculating how long these formulas took to pass by free fall through the equipment and different calibre tubes. We also assessed the possible obstruction of the tubes or the equipment after the three formulas had been administered, simulating the administration conditions in clinical practice (1,500 ml over 24 h). The administration time by gravity of 500 ml of each of the formulas studied was closely related to the viscosity determined in vitro of each of the formulas used. The larger the internal diameter of the tube, the shorter the emptying time by gravity or free fall. The possibility of tube obstruction was higher in the case of the two more viscous formulas. The viscosity of the enteral nutrition formulas should be included in the labelling of the product. This information would assist the clinician to make decisions about the kind of formula to be used with different types and calibres of tube.

  17. Influence of blood lipids on plasma and blood viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irace, Concetta; Carallo, Claudio; Scavelli, Faustina; Esposito, Teresa; De Franceschi, Maria Serena; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between hyperlipidemia and blood and plasma viscosity is not completely clear. While increasing viscosity is often reported with increasing blood lipids, lipid-lowering treatments are often unable to normalize the viscosity values. Aim of this study is to try to clarify the relationship between blood lipids and viscosity. Apparently healthy subjects were enrolled (n = 410). Smokers, diabetics, obese, and hypertriglyceridemic (above 400 mg/dl) were excluded. Blood (at shear rate 225/s) and plasma viscosity were measured at 37°C. Erythrocyte rigidity (Tk) was calculated according to Dintenfass. Blood lipids and glucose were measured by routine methods. Hyperlipidemic subjects (n = 315) had higher values of plasma viscosity (1.44 ± 0.13 vs. 1.40 ± 0.12 cP, p = 0.007), and blood viscosity (4.51 ± 0.54 vs. 4.35 ± 0.55 cP, p = 0.013), compared to normolipidemic subjects (n = 95). In simple correlation analysis, plasma viscosity was directly associated with LDL cholesterol, and inversely with Tk and HDL cholesterol. In multiple regression analysis the association with LDL and HDL was strengthened, though these two variables as a whole accounted for only 5% (adjusted R2) of the variability of plasma viscosity. Blood viscosity was significantly associated with haematocrit, plasma viscosity, Tk and all considered variables but age in simple correlation analysis, but only with haematocrit, plasma viscosity and Tk in multiple regression analysis. LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol influence plasma viscosity, but not blood viscosity. Triglycerides up to values of 400 mg/dl do not seem to have important effects, at least in apparently healthy subjects and at the shear rates used in the present study. The contribution of LDL and HDL cholesterol to plasma viscosity seems however quite limited.

  18. Assessment of patient dose reduction by bismuth shielding in CT using measurements, GEANT4 and MCNPX simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M; Costa, F; Figueira, C; Madeira, P; Teles, P; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    This work reports on the use of two different Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX) for assessing the dose reduction using bismuth shields in computer tomography (CT) procedures in order to protect radiosensitive organs such as eye lens, thyroid and breast. Measurements were performed using head and body PMMA phantoms and an ionisation chamber placed in five different positions of the phantom. Simulations were performed to estimate Computed Tomography Dose Index values using GEANT4 and MCNPX. The relative differences between measurements and simulations were bismuth shielding ranges from 2 to 45 %, depending on the position of the bismuth shield. The percentage of dose reduction was more significant for the area covered by the bismuth shielding (36 % for eye lens, 39 % for thyroid and 45 % for breast shields). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Measurement of viscosity of liquids using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statsenko, Anna; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2017-11-01

    We propose a method for measuring viscosities of unknown liquids by using optical tweezers combined with optical microscopy. We trapped 1- μm particles in water-glycerin mixtures and analyzed the dependence of the motion on viscosity. Based on our calibration with various water-glycerin mixtures, we propose a method for determination of viscosities of unknown liquids with high accuracy. We discuss how the method can be applied to measure the viscosity of liquids that are available only in small quantities. This non-invasive method of studying viscosities could be especially applicable in investigations of biological samples.

  20. Viscosity as related to dietary fiber: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeman, Cheryl L; Fahey, George C

    2006-01-01

    Viscosity is a physicochemical property associated with dietary fibers, particularly soluble dietary fibers. Viscous dietary fibers thicken when mixed with fluids and include polysaccharides such as gums, pectins, psyllium, and beta-glucans. Although insoluble fiber particles may affect viscosity measurement, viscosity is not an issue regards insoluble dietary fibers. Viscous fibers have been credited for beneficial physiological responses in human, animal, and animal-alternative in vitro models. The following article provides a review of viscosity as related to dietary fiber including definitions and instrumentation, factors affecting viscosity of solutions, and effects of viscous polysaccharides on glycemic response, blood lipid attenuation, intestinal enzymatic activity, digestibility, and laxation.

  1. Geodetic and geophysical results from a Taiwan airborne gravity survey: Data reduction and accuracy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C.W.; Hsiao, Y.S.; Shih, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    [ 1] An airborne gravity survey was conducted over Taiwan using a LaCoste and Romberg (LCR) System II air-sea gravimeter with gravity and global positioning system (GPS) data sampled at 1 Hz. The aircraft trajectories were determined using a GPS network kinematic adjustment relative to eight GPS......-mgal accuracy in gravity anomaly are derived. GPS will fulfill these requirements except for vertical acceleration. An iterative Gaussian filter is used to reduce errors in vertical acceleration. A compromising filter width for noise reduction and gravity detail is 150 s. The airborne gravity anomalies...... are compared with surface values, and large differences are found over high mountains where the gravity field is rough and surface data density is low. The root mean square (RMS) crossover differences before and after a bias-only adjustment are 4.92 and 2.88 mgal, the latter corresponding to a 2-mgal standard...

  2. The Use of Assessment Center Technology for the Prevention and Reduction of Professional Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalnova I.A.,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamism of professional activity, increasing workload and working time shortage, high social responsibility for results and other factors increase the probability of formation of burnout in government employees. This actualizes the search for new forms and methods of professional qualification of government employees based on an assessment of their psychological qualities. We discuss the problem of professional and personal burnout in Rosreestr employees, reveal the symptoms of this syndrome. As a tool for preventing and reducing the negative impact of professional deformation in Rosreestr workers, we propose the use of assessment center technology successfully tested in the international practice and requiring adaptation to Russian realities.

  3. Imaging tumor microscopic viscosity in vivo using molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimolina, Lyubov’ E.; Izquierdo, Maria Angeles; López-Duarte, Ismael; Bull, James A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Klapshina, Larisa G.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2017-01-01

    The microscopic viscosity plays an essential role in cellular biophysics by controlling the rates of diffusion and bimolecular reactions within the cell interior. While several approaches have emerged that have allowed the measurement of viscosity and diffusion on a single cell level in vitro, the in vivo viscosity monitoring has not yet been realized. Here we report the use of fluorescent molecular rotors in combination with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to image microscopic viscosity in vivo, both on a single cell level and in connecting tissues of subcutaneous tumors in mice. We find that viscosities recorded from single tumor cells in vivo correlate well with the in vitro values from the same cancer cell line. Importantly, our new method allows both imaging and dynamic monitoring of viscosity changes in real time in live animals and thus it is particularly suitable for diagnostics and monitoring of the progress of treatments that might be accompanied by changes in microscopic viscosity. PMID:28134273

  4. Reduction in Cheating Following a Forensic Investigation on a Statewide Summative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined indicators of cheating on a statewide summative assessment for grades 3--8 over a 4-year period. Between year 2 and year 3 of this study, the state launched an aggressive, highly publicized investigation into cheating by educators. The basis of the investigation was an erasure analysis. The current study found that the number…

  5. Assessing University Students' Self-Efficacy to Employ Alcohol-Related Harm Reduction Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Harold; Bonar, Erin E.; Hoffmann, Erica; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Young, Kathleen M.; Kraus, Shane W.; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Bannon, Erin E.; Pavlick, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Develop and evaluate key psychometric properties of a self-report questionnaire specifically designed to assess student drinkers' self-confidence to employ a variety of strategies intended to reduce unhealthy consequences of high-risk drinking. Methods: Four hundred ninety-eight participants rated their confidence (from "not at all…

  6. Final Report for the Restart of the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Gregory Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or Laboratory) Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) required for restart of the Technical Area (TA) 50 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) for remediated nitrate salt (RNS) waste operations was performed in compliance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities, and LANL procedure FSD-115-001, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart LANL Nuclear Facilities, Activities, and Operations.

  7. Application of a simple phantom in assessing the effects of dose reduction on image quality in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbe, N.O. [Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, AB25 2ZD, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nneoyiegbe@yahoo.com; Heaton, B.; Sharp, P.F. [Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, AB25 2ZD, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Firstly, to evaluate a commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert by comparing exposure measurements on the phantom with those of actual patients and, secondly, to assess the value of the phantom for image quality and dose optimisation. Methods: In the first part of the study entrance surface doses (ESD), Beam transmission (BT), and optical density (OD) were obtained for 77 chest radiography patients and compared with measurements made from exposures of the phantom using the respective patient exposure factors from chest examination. Differences were assessed with a student t-test, while the Pearson's linear correlation coefficient was used to test for any linear relationship. The second part assessed the applicability of the phantom to image quality studies by investigating the effect, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions made from gelatine, of reducing patient dose below current dose levels. Clarity of linear objects of different dimensions was also studied. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (D{sub ref}) was assessed from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from D{sub ref}. Results: Results show that, with the exception of entrance doses and beam transmission through the diaphragm (P > 0.05), differences in OD and beam transmission between patients and phantom were statistically significant (P < 0.05). A Pearson's correlation test showed good positive correlation in ESD (r = 0.9) and beam transmission (r = 0.8) for all regions and a weaker positive correlation (r = 0.3) for OD in all areas. In both cases the correlation was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Extending dose reduction by between 41 and 65% below D{sub ref} produced significant changes in both clarity and detectability. Conclusion: Within limits posed by the observed differences, the

  8. The effect of ilmenite viscosity on the dynamics and evolution of an overturned lunar cumulate mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Dygert, Nick; Liang, Yan; Parmentier, E. M.

    2017-07-01

    Lunar cumulate mantle overturn and the subsequent upwelling of overturned mantle cumulates provide a potential framework for understanding the first-order thermochemical evolution of the Moon. Upwelling of ilmenite-bearing cumulates (IBCs) after the overturn has a dominant influence on the dynamics and long-term thermal evolution of the lunar mantle. An important parameter determining the stability and convective behavior of the IBC is its viscosity, which was recently constrained through rock deformation experiments. To examine the effect of IBC viscosity on the upwelling of overturned lunar cumulate mantle, here we conduct three-dimensional mantle convection models with an evolving core superposed by an IBC-rich layer, which resulted from mantle overturn after magma ocean solidification. Our modeling shows that a reduction of mantle viscosity by 1 order of magnitude, due to the presence of ilmenite, can dramatically change convective planform and long-term lunar mantle evolution. Our model results suggest a relatively stable partially molten IBC layer that has surrounded the lunar core to the present day.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThe Moon's mantle is locally ilmenite rich. Previous models exploring the convective evolution of the lunar mantle did not consider the effects of ilmenite viscosity. Recent rock deformation experiments demonstrate that Fe-Ti oxide (ilmenite) is a low viscosity phase compared to olivine and other silicate minerals. Our modeling shows that ilmenite changes the lunar mantle plume process. An ilmenite-rich layer around the lunar core would be highly stable throughout geologic time, consistent with a partially molten, low viscosity layer around the core inferred from seismic attenuation and tidal dissipation.

  9. Impact of gas injection on the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of waste activated sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobade, Veena; Baudez, Jean Christophe; Evans, Geoffery; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2017-05-01

    Gas injection is known to play a major role on the particle size of the sludge, the oxygen transfer rate, as well as the mixing efficiency of membrane bioreactors and aeration basins in the waste water treatment plants. The rheological characteristics of sludge are closely related to the particle size of the sludge floc. However, particle size of sludge floc depends partly on the shear induced in the sludge and partly on physico-chemical nature of the sludge. The objective of this work is to determine the impact of gas injection on both the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of sludge. The apparent viscosity of sludge was investigated by two methods: in-situ and after sparging. Viscosity curves obtained by in-situ measurement showed that the apparent viscosity decreases significantly from 4000 Pa s to 10 Pa s at low shear rate range (below 10 s-1) with an increase in gas flow rate (0.5LPM to 3LPM); however the after sparging flow curve analysis showed that the reduction in apparent viscosity throughout the shear rate range is negligible to be displayed. Torque and displacement data at low shear rate range revealed that the obtained lower apparent viscosity in the in-situ method is not the material characteristics, but the slippage effect due to a preferred location of the bubbles close to the bob, causing an inconsistent decrease of torque and increase of displacement at low shear rate range. In linear viscoelastic regime, the elastic and viscous modulus of sludge was reduced by 33% & 25%, respectively, due to gas injection because of induced shear. The amount of induced shear measured through two different tests (creep and time sweep) were the same. The impact of this induced shear on sludge structure was also verified by microscopic images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An experimental assessment of resistance reduction and wake modification of a KVLCC model by using outer-layer vertical blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Hyun An

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experimental investigation has been made of the applicability of outer-layer vertical blades to real ship model. After first devised by Hutchins and Choi (2003, the outer-layer vertical blades demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing total drag of flat plate (Park et al., 2011 with maximum drag reduction of 9.6%. With a view to assessing the effect in the flow around a ship, the arrays of outer-layer vertical blades have been installed onto the side bottom and flat bottom of a 300k KVLCC model. A series of towing tank test has been carried out to investigate resistance (CTM reduction efficiency and improvement of stern wake distribution with varying geometric parameters of the blades array. The installation of vertical blades led to the CTM reduction of 2.15∼2.76% near the service speed. The nominal wake fraction was affected marginally by the blades array and the axial velocity distribution tended to be more uniform by the blades array.

  11. An experimental assessment of resistance reduction and wake modification of a kvlcc model by using outer-layer vertical blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Nam Hyun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experimental investigation has been made of the applicability of outer-layer vertical blades to real ship model. After first devised by Hutchins and Choi (2003, the outer-layer vertical blades demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing total drag of flat plate (Park et al., 2011 with maximum drag reduction of 9.6%. With a view to assessing the effect in the flow around a ship, the arrays of outer-layer vertical blades have been installed onto the side bottom and flat bottom of a 300k KVLCC model. A series of towing tank test has been carried out to investigate resistance (CTM reduction efficiency and improvement of stern wake distribution with varying geometric parameters of the blades array. The installation of vertical blades led to the CTM reduction of 2.15~2.76% near the service speed. The nominal wake fraction was affected marginally by the blades array and the axial velocity distribution tended to be more uniform by the blades array.

  12. Disasters and development: Part 3: Assessing trade-offs in investing in vulnerability reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Rob S; DuFrane, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This lesson describes how a government decides whether and how much it should spend on vulnerability reduction. There are techniques and methods by which decision-makers compare development alternatives. The differences between the risk that a potentially catastrophic event will occur and uncertainty are described, with uncertainty providing greater difficulty in economic analyses. There is a range of methods for identifying the complex mix of competing costs and benefits associated with any restructuring of investment priorities to accomplish disaster mitigation. The possibilities are described in terms of the opportunity costs and present value. Impact and consequent losses include: (1) direct monetary effects; (2) indirect monetary effects; (3) direct, non-monetary effects; (4) indirect, non-monetary effects; and (5) loss of non-renewable natural resources. The difficulties in assigning values to these effects are described, as well as the means of judging the cost-effectiveness of such interventions. An advantage of screening projects using a framework of analytical methods is that it can assist in focusing on a variety of possible outcomes and make the factors influencing these outcomes quite explicit.

  13. Assessment of effects of ultrasound therapy on reduction of pain in gonarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanović, Edina; Tanović, Haris; Karalić, Lamija

    2014-02-01

    To examine the effects of sonotherapy on the activities of daily living or as well as the reduction of pain in gonarthrosis. A retrospective- prospective clinical study included 63 patients, 47 to 86 years old with a verified diagnosis of gonarthrosis. Subjects were divided into two groups. The first group included 26 patients treated with kinesitherapy in combination with electrotherapy; the second group included 37 patients treated with kinesitherapy combined with sonotherapy. The age, sex, activities of daily living by Barthel Index and the intensity of pain by visual pain scale (VAS) was analyzed at admission and discharge of the patients. Both groups were matched for age, sex, and Barthel index values at admission and discharge. There was no statically significant difference between the groups according to demogrfphic characteristics. Visual pain scale at admission was almost identical in both groups; VAS at discharge waa lower in the group treated with kinesiotherapy and sonotherapy. Visual pain scale at discharge was lower in both groups than at admission, but without statisticay difference (p more than 0.05). Sonotherapy and electrotherapy improved the activities of patien's' lives. Both types of therapy, in combination with kinesitherapy, led to a decrease of pain in patients with gonarthrosis.

  14. Assessing the potential of utilisation and storage strategies for post-combustion CO2 emissions reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eStyring

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The emissions reduction potential of three carbon dioxide handling strategies for post-combustion capture are considered. These are carbon capture and sequestration/storage (CCS, enhanced hydrocarbon recovery (EHR and carbon dioxide utilization (CDU to produce synthetic oil. This is performed using common and comparable boundary conditions including net CO2 sequestered based on equivalent boundary conditions. This is achieved using a 'cradle to grave approach' where the final destination and fate of any product is considered. The input boundary is pure CO2 that has been produced using a post-combustion capture process as this is common between all processes. The output boundary is the emissions resulting from any product produced with the assumption that the majority of the oil will go to combustion processes. We also consider the 'cradle to gate' approach where the ultimate fate of the oil is not considered as this is a boundary condition often applied to EHR processes. Results show that while CCS can make an impact on CO2 emissions, CDU will have a comparable effect whilst generating income while EHR will ultimately increase net emissions. The global capacity for CDU is also compared against CCS using data based on current and planned CCS projects. Analysis shows that current CDU represent a greater volume of capture than CCS processes and that this gap is likely to remain well beyond 2020 which is the limit of the CCS projects in the database.

  15. Assessing the reduction in infant mortality rates in Malawi over the 1990-2010 decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Imelda K; Kalipeni, Ezekiel; Jusrut, Poonam; Iwelunmor, Juliet I

    2017-06-01

    One of the key objectives of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) was to improve the lives of infants and children, particularly the reduction of high infant and childhood mortality rates throughout the developing world. This paper examines the experiences of Malawi in tackling the problem of high infant and childhood mortality over recent decades, 1990-2010. We highlight the strategies that were used in Malawi which led to Malawi's stellar performance in achieving the targets set by the MDGs with reference to infant and childhood mortality. The data for the analysis were obtained from Demographic and Health Surveys and from the various censuses the country has conducted. Regression analysis using district as the unit of observation reveals several important factors that have led to the commendable declines in infant mortality. Significant factors included immunisation of infants as well as increasing levels of female education and the availability of skilled birth attendants. What Malawi's case demonstrates is that given a correct mix of strategies, even a poor country such as Malawi can meet some of the lofty targets set by the MDGs.

  16. Atrial Fibrillation In Heart Failure: New Directions In Diagnosis, Risk Assessment And Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Richard J A; Cowie, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure and atrial fibrillation are common conditions which frequently co-exist. In patients with established systolic and diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, mortality and reduces quality of life. Recent advances in implantable device technology have improved the detection of atrial fibrillation and reduced the time to intervention. Rate control remains the mainstay of treatment to improve symptoms in patients with heart failure. Currently evidence does not suggest that the routing use of a rhythm control strategy is beneficial, other than improving symptoms in patients resistant to or intolerant of rate control medications. Atrial fibrillation ablation in heart failure is safe and may be effective in maintaining sinus rhythm. Patients with AF and heart failure have more severe strokes and require longer hospital admissions. Warfarin has traditionally been the drug of choice to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with AF and heart failure, although it use is no longer recommended in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm. Newer oral anticoagulants offer improved stroke prevention in patients with heart failure albeit at a higher drug cost. Alternative methods of stroke reduction such as left atrial appendage occlusion are emerging, although evidence for their benefit in patients with heart failure has not yet been published.

  17. Vulnerability studies and integrated assessments for hazard risk reduction in Pittsburgh, PA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, K.

    2013-12-01

    Today's environmental problems stretch beyond the bounds of most academic disciplines, and thus solutions require an interdisciplinary approach. For instance, the scientific consensus is changes in the frequency and severity of many types of extreme weather events are increasing (IPCC 2012). Yet despite our efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, we continue to experience severe weather events such as Superstorm Sandy, record heat and blizzards, and droughts. These natural hazards, combined with increased vulnerability and exposure, result in longer-lasting disruptions to critical infrastructure and business continuity throughout the world. In order to protect both our lives and the economy, we must think beyond the bounds of any one discipline to include an integrated assessment of relevant work. In the wake of recent events, New York City, Washington, DC, Chicago, and a myriad of other cities have turned to their academic powerhouses for assistance in better understanding their vulnerabilities. This talk will share a case study of the state of integrated assessments and vulnerability studies of energy, transportation, water, real estate, and other main sectors in Pittsburgh, PA. Then the talk will use integrated assessment models and other vulnerability studies to create coordinated sets of climate projections for use by the many public agencies and private-sector organizations in the region.

  18. Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Reduce Drag without the Crisis in High Viscosity Liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2016-09-08

    The drag coefficient CD of a solid smooth sphere moving in a fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re∼3×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at a lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as ∼600 to 105. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length can fit the observed drag reduction and wake shape. © 2016 American Physical Society.

  19. Colour and viscosity of egg yolk after addition of beetroot to feed for laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Kopřiva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The colour and viscosity of egg yolk are among major indicators assessed by consumers and food technology. This study attempts to evaluate the colour and viscosity of yolk in laying hens’ eggs after the addition of dried beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. esculenta var. rubra at the amount of 1% and 2% per feeding dose (in July and August 2012. The experiment was performed on 24 hens that were divided into three groups of 8 laying hens. The preparatory phase lasted one week (standard diet, followed by four weeks during which experimental layers received a diet enriched with beetroot. Then, all layers were fed a mixture without beetroot for the following four weeks. Eggs were collected during the whole period of 8 weeks. In total, 30 eggs from each group were subjected to analysis. The colour of eggs was determined using spectrophotometry, by the Colour-guide sphere spex portable colorimeter. The results showed a significant (P ab did not show a significant difference (P < 0.05 between the control and experimental groups. The egg yolk viscosity was lower in experimental groups compared to the control group but the difference was not significant. The addition of dried beetroot at the amount of 1 and 2% per feeding dose had no effect on colour and viscosity. This paper supported the null hypothesis that the addition of dried beetroot to the feeding dose at the amount of 1% and 2% has no effect on the colour and viscosity of egg yolk.

  20. An alternative eddy-viscosity representation and its implication to turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakirlic, Suad; Jovanovic, Jovan; Basara, Branislav

    2013-11-01

    Large majority of turbulence models in the RANS framework (it holds also in the case of the LES method) is based on the eddy-viscosity rationale. The principle task of modeling the Reynolds stress tensor reduces to modeling the eddy-viscosity, representing, according to Boussinesq (1877), the ``coefficient of proportionality'' between the Reynolds stress and mean rate of strain tensors. In the present contribution an extended formulation based on the least square approach applied to the Boussinesq's correlation is presented. Furthermore, a Taylor-microscale-based formulation is derived originating from the equilibrium assumption related to the equality between the production and dissipation rates of kinetic energy of turbulence. Finally, an expression is proposed reflecting the Reynolds stress anisotropy influence on the eddy-viscosity damping by approaching the solid wall as well as including an appropriate length-scale switch accounting for the viscosity effects through inclusion of the Kolmogorov scales blended with those of the energy-containing eddies. The latter formulation is successfully applied in the framework of an instability-sensitive Reynolds stress model of turbulence. The afore-mentioned eddy-viscosity definitions are comparatively assessed in a series of wall-bounded flow configurations (including separation) in a Reynolds number range.

  1. Effect of saliva viscosity on the co-aggregation between oral streptococci and Actinomyces naeslundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Katsuhiro; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-06-01

    The co-aggregation of oral bacteria leads to their clearance from the oral cavity. Poor oral hygiene and high saliva viscosity are common amongst the elderly; thus, they frequently suffer from pneumonia caused by the aspiration of oral microorganisms. To examine the direct effect of saliva viscosity on the co-aggregation of oral streptococci with actinomyces. Fifteen oral streptococcal and a single actinomyces strain were used. Co-aggregation was assessed by a visual assay in phosphate buffer and a spectrophotometric assay in the same buffer containing 0-60% glycerol or whole saliva. Nine oral streptococci co-aggregated with Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC12104 in the visual assay and were subsequently used for the spectrophotometric analysis. All tested strains displayed a decrease in co-aggregation with increasing amounts of glycerol in the buffer. The co-aggregation of Streptococcus oralis with A. naeslundii recovered to baseline level following the removal of glycerol. The per cent co-aggregation of S. oralis with A. naeslundii was significantly correlated with the viscosity in unstimulated and stimulated whole saliva samples (correlation coefficients: -0.52 and -0.48, respectively). This study suggests that saliva viscosity affects the co-aggregation of oral streptococci with actinomyces and that bacterial co-aggregation decreases with increasing saliva viscosity. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Effect of Polyvinyl Siloxane Viscosity on Accuracy of Dental Implant Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghahremanloo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of dental implant impressions obtained by a combination of different impression techniques and viscosities of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS.Materials and Methods: Four parallel fixtures were placed between mental foramina in a master model of lower dental arch. Three different viscosities (putty/light body, medium body/light body, and monophase: heavy body and direct and indirect techniques (six groups were used, and seven impressions were obtained from each group (n=42. To measure the accuracy of impressions, drift, horizontal, and vertical angles of the implants, as well as the hex rotation of the implants in casts were evaluated using a digitizer device (1μm accuracy, in comparison with master arch. Data were analyzed using five-factor two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test.Results: The accuracy of impressions was assessed and the results showed that direct technique was not significantly different from indirect technique (P>0.05. Also, there were no significant differences between the mentioned viscosities except for the horizontal angle (P=0.006.Conclusions: Viscosity of impression materials is of high significance for the accuracy of dental impressions.Keywords: Dental Materials; Dental Implants; Dental Impression Technique; Viscosity; Vinyl Polysiloxane; Dimensional Measurement Accuracy

  3. Validation of an integrative methodology to assess and monitor reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in contaminated aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia-Estelle eTarnawski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation of tetra-and trichloroethene-contaminated aquifers is frequently hampered due to incomplete dechlorination to the more toxic dichloroethene (DCE and vinyl chloride (VC, indicating insufficient knowledge about the biological mechanisms related to aquifer functioning. A methodology based on the joint analysis of geochemical and microbiological datasets was developed to assess the presence of the biochemical potential for complete reductive dechlorination to harmless ethene and to explain the reasons for which degradation often stalls at the more toxic intermediates. This methodology is composed of three successive steps, with i the acquisition of geochemical data including chlorinated ethenes, ii the detailed analysis of the bacterial community structures as well as the biochemical potential for complete dechlorination using microcosms and molecular detection of organohalide-respiring bacteria and key reductive dehalogenases, and iii a statistical Multiple Factor Analysis combining the above mentioned abiotic and biotic variables in a functional modelling of the contaminated aquifer. The methodology was validated by analyzing two chlorinated ethenes-contaminated sites. Results from the first site showed that the full biochemical potential for ethene production was present in situ. However, redox potential was overall too high and locally manganese reduction out-competed chlorinated ethenes reduction, explaining the reasons for the local accumulation of DCE and VC to a lesser extent. The second contaminated aquifer was under bioremediation by successive cheese whey injections. Analysis demonstrated that cheese whey additions led to increasingly reduced redox conditions and that hampered reductive dechlorination was not due to competition with other anaerobic respiration processes. Complete reductive dechlorination to ethene was preferentially occurring under methanogenic conditions. DCE and VC accumulation was probably induced first

  4. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physician and physiologist, who studied non-turbulent flow of liquids through pipes, such as blood flow in capillaries and veins: 1 P = 0.1 Pa s = 1 g/(cm s), 1 cP = 1 mPa s. = 0.001 Pa s. The values of viscosity are different for various substances: 0.02 cP for air at 18. ◦. C, 1 cP for water at 20. ◦. C, 2000–10000 cP for honey, ...

  6. The importance of health co-benefits in macroeconomic assessments of UK Greenhouse Gas emission reduction strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Keogh-Brown, Marcus R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a single-country dynamically-recursive Computable General Equilibrium model to make health-focussed macroeconomic assessments of three contingent UK Greenhouse Gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, designed to achieve 2030 emission targets as suggested by the UK Committee on Climate Change....... In contrast to previous assessment studies, our main focus is on health co-benefits additional to those from reduced local air pollution. We employ a conservative cost-effectiveness methodology with a zero net cost threshold. Our urban transport strategy (with cleaner vehicles and increased active travel......) brings important health co-benefits and is likely to be strongly cost-effective; our food and agriculture strategy (based on abatement technologies and reduction in livestock production) brings worthwhile health co-benefits, but is unlikely to eliminate net costs unless new technological measures...

  7. When Are Qualitative Testing Results Sufficient To Predict a Reduction in Illnesses in a Microbiological Food Safety Risk Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Eric D; Williams, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    Process models that include the myriad pathways that pathogen-contaminated food may traverse before consumption and the dose-response function to relate exposure to likelihood of illness may represent a "gold standard" for quantitative microbial risk assessment. Nevertheless, simplifications that rely on measuring the change in contamination occurrence of a raw food at the end of production may provide reasonable approximations of the effects measured by a process model. In this study, we parameterized three process models representing different product-pathogen pairs (i.e., chicken-Salmonella, chicken-Campylobacter, and beef-E. coli O157:H7) to compare with predictions based on qualitative testing of the raw product before consideration of mixing, partitioning, growth, attenuation, or dose-response processes. The results reveal that reductions in prevalence generated from qualitative testing of raw finished product usually underestimate the reduction in likelihood of illness for a population of consumers. Qualitative microbial testing results depend on the test's limit of detection. The negative bias is greater for limits of detection that are closer to the center of the contamination distribution and becomes less as the limit of detection is moved further into the right tail of the distribution. Nevertheless, a positive bias can result when the limit of detection refers to very high contamination levels. Changes in these high levels translate to larger consumed doses for which the slope of the dose-response function is smaller compared with the larger slope associated with smaller doses. Consequently, in these cases, a proportional reduction in prevalence of contamination results in a less than proportional reduction in probability of illness. The magnitudes of the biases are generally less for nonscalar (versus scalar) adjustments to the distribution.

  8. Assessment of the potential REDD+ as a new international support measure for GHG reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Ahn, J.; Kim, H.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the Paris Agreement, the mechanism for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries (REDD+) has high potential to simultaneously contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through forest conservation and poverty alleviation. Some of 162 Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted by 189 countries representing approximately 98.8% of global GHG emissions include not only unconditional mitigation goals but also conditional goals based on the condition of the provision of international support such as finance, technology transfer and capacity building. Considering REDD+ as one of the main mechanisms to support such work, this study selected ten countries from among Korea's 24 ODA priority partners, taking into consideration their conditional INDC targets alongside sectoral quantified targets such as land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF). The ten selected countries are Indonesia, Cambodia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Senegal, Colombia, Peru and Paraguay. Of these countries, most REDD+ projects have been conducted in Indonesia mainly due to the fact that 85% of the country's total GHG emissions are caused by forest conversion and peatland degradation. Therefore, GHG reduction rates and associated projected costs of the Indonesia's REDD+ projects were analyzed in order to offer guidance on the potential of REDD+ to contribute to other INDCs' conditional goals. The result showed that about 0.9 t CO2 ha-1 could be reduced at a cost of USD 23 per year. Applying this estimation to the Cambodian case, which has submitted a conditional INDC target of increasing its forest coverage by 60% (currently 57%) by 2030, suggests that financial support of USD 12.8 million would reduce CO2 emissions by about 5.1 million tones by increasing forest coverage. As there is currently no consideration of LULUCF in Cambodia's INDC, this result represents the opportunity for an additional contribution to

  9. Assessment of Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation policy integration in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli-Sihvola, K.; Väätäinen-Chimpuku, S.

    2015-12-01

    Integration of Disaster Risk Management (DRM) and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) policies, their implementation measures and the contribution of these to development has been gaining attention recently. Due to the shared objectives of CCA and particularly Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), a component of DRM, their integration provides many benefits. At the implementation level, DRR and CCA are usually integrated. Policy integration, however, is often lacking. This study presents a novel analysis of the policy integration of DRR and CCA by 1) suggesting a definition for their integration at a general and further at horizontal and vertical levels, 2) using an analysis framework for policy integration cycle, which separates the policy formulation and implementation processes, and 3) applying these to a case study in Zambia. Moreover, the study identifies the key gaps in the integration process, obtains an understanding of identified key factors for creating an enabling environment for the integration, and provides recommendations for further progress. The study is based on a document analysis of the relevant DRM, climate change (CC), agriculture, forestry, water management and meteorology policy documents and Acts, and 21 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders. Horizontal integration has occurred both ways, as the revised DRM policy draft has incorporated CCA, and the new CC policy draft has incorporated DRR. This is not necessarily an optimal strategy and unless carefully implemented, it may create pressure on institutional structures and duplication of efforts in the implementation. Much less vertical integration takes place, and where it does, no guidance on how potential goal conflicts with sectorial and development objectives ought to be handled. The objectives of the instruments show convergence. At the programme stage, the measures are fully integrated as they can be classified as robust CCA measures, providing benefits in the current and future

  10. The effect of shear thinning viscosity on the performance of low Reynolds number swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenit, R.; Godinez, F.; Belleville, C.; Lauga, E.

    2012-11-01

    In addidion to viscoelastic effects, biological fluids can also show shear-thinning viscosity as part of their non Newtonian behavior. To assess the effect of a varying viscosity with shear rate on the performance of swimming, we conducted experiments using two types of magnetically driven swimmers. We consider oscillating flexible tail and rotating rigid coil devices to test this effect. We prepared carbopol-based inelastic shear-thinning fluids with different values of the thinning coefficient, n, and an equivalent Newtonian liquid for comparisons. The motion was filmed and the swimming velocity was measured via digital image processing. We found that the swimming efficiency changes in an important manner if the fluid does not have constant viscosity. We will present and discuss our preliminary results. To our knowledge, this effect has not been addressed in the specialized literature to date.

  11. Impaired viscosity of gastric secretion and its mucin content as potential contributing factors to the development of chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Combs, Juan; Garcia, Cesar J; Majewski, Marek; Wallner, Grzegorz; Sarosiek, Jerzy

    2014-11-01

    The alimentary tract mucosa continuously releases mucus-rich secretion. Mucin, the major component of mucus, determines its viscosity and provides lubrication for the luminal content of indigestible food particles. To measure mucin secretion rate and its viscosity in patients with chronic constipation (CC) and in asymptomatic volunteers. Nineteen patients with symptoms of CC and 19 controls were included in the study. Mucin secretion and viscosity were assessed in aspirated gastric juice in basal conditions and after stimulation with pentagastrin (1 h each). Mucin content was tested by PAS methodology. Viscosity was measured using cone/plate digital viscometer. Mucin secretion rates in basal and stimulated conditions in controls were 65 and 42 % higher than in patients with CC (P viscosity in controls was 48 % higher than in CC (P Viscosity in pentagastrin-stimulated conditions in controls was 71 % higher than in CC (P viscosity of gastric secretion in patients with CC may result from the lower rate of mucin secretion and may also diminish lubrication within the alimentary tract. (3) This may potentially set the stage for the development of symptoms related to chronic constipation and open a new therapeutic avenue for this patient population.

  12. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, pviscosity (pviscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (pviscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical study and ex vivo assessment of HIFU treatment time reduction through optimization of focal point trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisey, A.; Yon, S.; Pechoux, T.; Letort, V.; Lafitte, P.

    2017-03-01

    Treatment time reduction is a key issue to expand the use of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery, especially for benign pathologies. This study aims at quantitatively assessing the potential reduction of the treatment time arising from moving the focal point during long pulses. In this context, the optimization of the focal point trajectory is crucial to achieve a uniform thermal dose repartition and avoid boiling. At first, a numerical optimization algorithm was used to generate efficient trajectories. Thermal conduction was simulated in 3D with a finite difference code and damages to the tissue were modeled using the thermal dose formula. Given an initial trajectory, the thermal dose field was first computed, then, making use of Pontryagin's maximum principle, the trajectory was iteratively refined. Several initial trajectories were tested. Then, an ex vivo study was conducted in order to validate the efficicency of the resulting optimized strategies. Single pulses were performed at 3MHz on fresh veal liver samples with an Echopulse and the size of each unitary lesion was assessed by cutting each sample along three orthogonal planes and measuring the dimension of the whitened area based on photographs. We propose a promising approach to significantly shorten HIFU treatment time: the numerical optimization algorithm was shown to provide a reliable insight on trajectories that can improve treatment strategies. The model must now be improved in order to take in vivo conditions into account and extensively validated.

  14. Methods used in internal industry clinical trials to assess tobacco risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Vaughan W; Kreslake, Jennifer M; O'Connor, Richard J; Cummings, K Michael; Parascandola, Mark; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Shields, Peter G; Connolly, Gregory N

    2009-12-01

    Methods to assess reduced exposure products should include those that aid in determining likely patterns of human use and exposure. Tobacco industry clinical trial methods may provide insight into strategies to assess potential reduced exposure products (PREP) for public health purposes. Internal tobacco industry documents detailing human clinical research with PREPs were examined to document major research strategies used and identify potentially fruitful methods not currently used in the mainstream arena. Primary data were obtained from records of research conducted internally by tobacco companies and affiliated researchers, and included manuscript drafts, presentations, protocols, and instruments relating to internal clinical trials of human tobacco use and exposure. Tobacco industry clinical research has focused on reduced exposure products, most notably Premier, Accord, and Eclipse. The most widely used strategy observed is switching studies, and details of study designs and protocols favored by the industry are described. Key measures include biomarkers of exposure (e.g., cotinine, CO, and specific carcinogens) and acute health effects such as physical health and fitness. Tobacco industry clinical research has used relatively standard switching study methods, but with a broad set of measures. Clinical switching studies have been conducted by the industry primarily to support existing claims or to develop new claims. Knowledge of prior industry activity can guide and inform future public health research efforts. Although industry clinical trial methods are comparable with current mainstream methods, limited information about the validity of outcome measures used limits their viability for immediate adoption in mainstream science.

  15. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments — A framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian, E-mail: jcr@geus.dk [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Auken, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bamberg, Charlotte A. [City of Aarhus (Denmark); Christensen, Britt S.B. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Clausen, Thomas [DHI, Hørsholm (Denmark); Dalgaard, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Effersø, Flemming [SkyTEM Aps, Beder (Denmark); Ernstsen, Vibeke [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Gertz, Flemming [Knowledge Center for Agriculture, Skejby (Denmark); Hansen, Anne Lausten [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); He, Xin [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Jacobsen, Brian H. [Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jensen, Karsten Høgh [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Koch, Julian [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Nilsson, Bertel [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Petersen, Christian [City of Odder (Denmark); De Schepper, Guillaume [Université Laval, Québec (Canada); Schamper, Cyril [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); and others

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  16. The effect of viscosity, friction, and sonication on the morphology and metabolite production from Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Hasan, Hanan; Harith, Hanis H; Abbas, Ali

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of viscosity, friction, and sonication on the morphology and the production of lovastatin, (+)-geodin, and sulochrin by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542. Sodium alginate and gelatine were used to protect the fungal pellet from mechanical force by increasing the media viscosity. Sodium alginate stimulated the production of lovastatin by up to 329.0% and sulochrin by 128.7%, with inhibitory effect on (+)-geodin production at all concentrations used. However, the use of gelatine to increase viscosity significantly suppressed lovastatin, (+)-geodin, and sulochrin's production (maximum reduction at day 9 of 42.7, 60.8, and 68.3%, respectively), which indicated that the types of chemical play a major role in metabolite production. Higher viscosity increased both pellet biomass and size in all conditions. Friction significantly increased (+)-geodin's titre by 1527.5%, lovastatin by 511.1%, and sulochrin by 784.4% while reducing pellet biomass and size. Conversely, sonication produced disperse filamentous morphology with significantly lower metabolites. Sodium alginate-induced lovastatin and sulochrin production suggest that these metabolites are not affected by viscosity; rather, their production is affected by the specific action of certain chemicals. In contrast, low viscosity adversely affected (+)-geodin's production, while pellet disintegration can cause a significant production of (+)-geodin.

  17. Association among low whole blood viscosity, haematocrit, haemoglobin and diabetic retinopathy in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irace, C; Scarinci, F; Scorcia, V; Bruzzichessi, D; Fiorentino, R; Randazzo, G; Scorcia, G; Gnasso, A

    2011-01-01

    Haemorheological variables influence endothelial function through the release of several factors. Clinical studies have described an association among blood viscosity, haematocrit, haemoglobin and macro-angiopathy. Few data are reported about the association between haemorheological variables and micro-angiopathy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between these variables and retinopathy in subjects with type 2 diabetes. 111 men, 79 postmenopausal women, and 95 healthy age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Haematocrit and haemoglobin were measured by standard methods. Blood viscosity was calculated according to the formula (0.12× haematocrit)+(0.17× (plasma proteins-2.07)). Subjects were grouped according to the presence or absence of diabetic retinopathy, while the severity of retinopathy was classified according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. Haemoglobin, haematocrit and whole blood viscosity were significantly lower in subjects with retinopathy compared to subjects without retinopathy in both sexes. These variables significantly decreased with increasing severity of retinopathy. A multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed the independent inverse association among viscosity, haematocrit, haemoglobin and retinopathy (p<0.01). Results demonstrate the association among low viscosity, haemoglobin, haematocrit and diabetic retinopathy. The mechanisms responsible for this association can be hypothesised. Reduced haemoglobin might cause direct organ damage. Low blood viscosity, through the reduction of shear stress, might inhibit the anti-atherogenic functions of endothelial cells.

  18. Assessing views about gun violence reduction policy: a look at type of violence and expected effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Susan B

    2015-10-01

    Public opinion polling about gun policy is routinely conducted and often disregarded. The purpose of this research is to explore ways in which surveys can be made more useful to policy makers, researchers, and the general public. A stratified random sample of 1000 undergraduates at a private, urban university was recruited for an online survey about proposed gun policies. A total of 51.7% answered the questions analyzed herein. Including but going beyond typical assessments of agreement, the survey elicited respondent evaluations of the effectiveness of seven gun policies under two randomly assigned conditions: the type of gun violence (e.g., homicide, suicide, violent crime) and its magnitude. Participants were asked to estimate the effectiveness of each policy, including the possibility of making things worse. Participants indicated strong support for all policies and expected each to be effective with one exception - a policy designed to increase the number of guns on the scene, that is, putting armed police in schools. Persons who did not support other policies, on average, did not expect them to make things worse. Telling participants about the scope of the violence did not but the type of gun violence did affect effectiveness ratings. Asking about expected effectiveness of (vs. general support for) a policy might identify some optimism: Even people who don't support a policy sometimes think it will be effective. Findings suggest that surveys about the effectiveness of gun violence policies likely assess views that exclude suicide, the most common form of gun-related mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Smeed's law and expected road fatality reduction: An assessment of the Italian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persia, Luca; Gigli, Roberto; Usami, Davide Shingo

    2015-12-01

    Smeed's law defines the functional relationship existing between the fatality rate and the motorization rate.While focusing on the Italian case and based on the Smeed's law, the study assesses the possibility for Italy of reaching the target of halving the number of road fatalities by 2020, in light of the evolving socioeconomic situation. A Smeed's model has been calibrated based on the recorded Italian data. The evolution of the two indicators, fatality and motorization rates, has been estimated using the predictions of the main parameters (population, fleet size and fatalities). Those trends have been compared with the natural decreasing trend derived from the Smeed's law. Nine scenarios have been developed showing the relationship between the fatality rate and the motorization rate. In case of a limited increase (logistic regression) of the vehicle fleet and according to the estimated evolution of the population, the path defined by motorization and fatality rate is very steep, diverging from the estimated confidence interval of the Smeed's model. In these scenarios the motorization rate is almost constant during the decade. In the actual economic context, a limited development of the vehicle fleet is more plausible. In these conditions the target achievement of halving the number of fatalities in Italy may occur only in case of a structural break (i.e., the introduction of highly effective road safety policies). Practical application: The proposed tools can be used both to evaluate retrospectively the effectiveness of road safety improvements and to assess if a relevant effort is needed to reach the established road safety targets.

  20. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using the Grad's method we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with $\\eta/s$ obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.3$(with $\\eta/s\\approx 0.18$) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.01$. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on $\\eta/s$, except when employing a small $\\alpha_s$. On the other hand, we demonstrate th...

  1. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using Grad’s method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with η/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling αs ∼ 0.3 (with η/s ≈ 0.18) and is a factor of 2–3 larger at a small coupling αs ∼ 0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on η/s, except when employing a small αs . On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small αs , the gluon syst...

  2. Solvent viscosity dependence for enzymatic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sitnitsky, A E

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for relationship of solvent viscosity with reaction rate constant at enzyme action is suggested. It is based on fluctuations of electric field in enzyme active site produced by thermally equilibrium rocking (cranckshaft motion) of the rigid plane (in which the dipole moment $\\approx 3.6 D$ lies) of a favourably located and oriented peptide group (or may be a few of them). Thus the rocking of the plane leads to fluctuations of the electric field of the dipole moment. These fluctuations can interact with the reaction coordinate because the latter in its turn has transition dipole moment due to separation of charges at movement of the reacting system along it. The rocking of the plane of the peptide group is sensitive to the microviscosity of its environment in protein interior and the latter is a function of the solvent viscosity. Thus we obtain an additional factor of interrelationship for these characteristics with the reaction rate constant. We argue that due to the properties of the cranckshaft ...

  3. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A. [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pan, Wenxiao [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Caswell, Bruce [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Gompper, Gerhard [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Karniadakis, George E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  4. Textural perception of liquid emulsions: Role of oil content, oil viscosity and emulsion viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aken, van G.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Wijk, de R.A.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes a study on the in-mouth textural perception of thickened liquid oil-in-water emulsions. The variables studied are oil content, oil viscosity, and the concentration of polysaccharide thickener. Gum arabic was chosen as the thickener because of the nearly Newtonian behavior of its

  5. The importance of health co-benefits in macroeconomic assessments of UK Greenhouse Gas emission reduction strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Keogh-Brown, Marcus R; Smith, Richard D; Chalabi, Zaid; Dangour, Alan D; Davies, Mike; Edwards, Phil; Garnett, Tara; Givoni, Moshe; Griffiths, Ulla; Hamilton, Ian; Jarrett, James; Roberts, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul; Woodcock, James; Haines, Andy

    We employ a single-country dynamically-recursive Computable General Equilibrium model to make health-focussed macroeconomic assessments of three contingent UK Greenhouse Gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, designed to achieve 2030 emission targets as suggested by the UK Committee on Climate Change. In contrast to previous assessment studies, our main focus is on health co-benefits additional to those from reduced local air pollution. We employ a conservative cost-effectiveness methodology with a zero net cost threshold. Our urban transport strategy (with cleaner vehicles and increased active travel) brings important health co-benefits and is likely to be strongly cost-effective; our food and agriculture strategy (based on abatement technologies and reduction in livestock production) brings worthwhile health co-benefits, but is unlikely to eliminate net costs unless new technological measures are included; our household energy efficiency strategy is likely to breakeven only over the long term after the investment programme has ceased (beyond our 20 year time horizon). We conclude that UK policy makers will, most likely, have to adopt elements which involve initial net societal costs in order to achieve future emission targets and longer-term benefits from GHG reduction. Cost-effectiveness of GHG strategies is likely to require technological mitigation interventions and/or demand-constraining interventions with important health co-benefits and other efficiency-enhancing policies that promote internalization of externalities. Health co-benefits can play a crucial role in bringing down net costs, but our results also suggest the need for adopting holistic assessment methodologies which give proper consideration to welfare-improving health co-benefits with potentially negative economic repercussions (such as increased longevity).

  6. Results of the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement International Space Station Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William; Antar, Basil

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of FMVM is to measure the rate of coalescence of two highly viscous liquid drops and correlate the results with the liquid viscosity and surface tension. The experiment takes advantage of the low gravitational free floating conditions in space to permit the unconstrained coalescence of two nearly spherical drops. The merging of the drops is accomplished by deploying them from a syringe and suspending them on Nomex threads followed by the astronaut s manipulation of one of the drops toward a stationary droplet till contact is achieved. Coalescence and merging occurs due to shape relaxation and reduction of surface energy, being resisted by the viscous drag within the liquid. Experiments were conducted onboard the International Space Station in July of 2004 and subsequently in May of 2005. The coalescence was recorded on video and down-linked near real-time. When the coefficient of surface tension for the liquid is known, the increase in contact radius can be used to determine the coefficient of viscosity for that liquid. The viscosity is determined by fitting the experimental speed to theoretically calculated contact radius speed for the same experimental parameters. Recent fluid dynamical numerical simulations of the coalescence process will be presented. The results are important for a better understanding of the coalescence process. The experiment is also relevant to liquid phase sintering, free form in-situ fabrication, and as a potential new method for measuring the viscosity of viscous glass formers at low shear rates.

  7. A Preliminary Study Of The Effect Of Some Pressurising Gasses On The Viscosity Of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    , of glass, has been used. No significant change of the efflux time was found for all the pressurising gasses, except for the gas CO2. A reduction of efflux times was found for the CO2 of about 9 %   0,6 %. The measurement accuracy for all these series was found for this very low viscosity fluid...... for DME but their effect on DME viscosity is unknown. Argon (Ar), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen (H2) and Propane (C3H8) have been investigated at pressure levels of 12 – 15 bars. A Cannon-Manning semi-micro capillary glass viscometer, size 25, enclosed in a cylindrical pressure container...... to be in the range 0,2 % up to more than 1 %. The previously reported viscosity of DME has been corrected for the surface tension effect. Viscosity determination was initially based on a direct comparison of efflux times of DME with efflux times of distilled water. Assuming an upper limit for the variation...

  8. Changes in the viscosity of hyaluronic acid after exposure to a myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, M.S.; Green, S.P.; Lowther, D.A.

    1989-04-01

    Both purified hyaluronic acid (HA) and bovine synovial fluid react with OCI-, the major oxidant produced by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system, resulting in a decrease in their specific viscosity. This reaction is inhibited in the presence of excess methionine. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ alone decreases the viscosity of HA, presumably by the Fenton reaction, in the absence (but not in the presence) of the iron chelator, diethyltriaminepentacetic acid (DETAPAC). In the presence of DETAPAC, incubation of HA with the complete MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system lowered the viscosity of HA. Analysis of 3H-HA exposed to OCI- by gel filtration chromatography indicated that cleavage of HA occurred only at higher OCI- concentrations. We suggest that the reduction in viscosity of HA by the MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system may be due to a combination of oxidative cleavage and changes in the conformation of the molecule. We speculate that the changes in the molecular size of rheumatoid synovial fluid HA may be due to the action of the neutrophil MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system.

  9. Can More Nanoparticles Induce Larger Viscosities of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Wormlike Micellar System (NEWMS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingwei; Zhang, Yue; Zou, Chenwei; Dai, Caili; Gao, Mingwei; Li, Yuyang; Lv, Wenjiao; Jiang, Jianfeng; Wu, Yining

    2017-09-18

    There have been many reports about the thickening ability of nanoparticles on the wormlike micelles in the recent years. Through the addition of nanoparticles, the viscosity of wormlike micelles can be increased. There still exists a doubt: can viscosity be increased further by adding more nanoparticles? To answer this issue, in this work, the effects of silica nanoparticles and temperature on the nanoparticles-enhanced wormlike micellar system (NEWMS) were studied. The typical wormlike micelles (wormlike micelles) are prepared by 50 mM cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and 60 mM sodium salicylate (NaSal). The rheological results show the increase of viscoelasticity in NEWMS by adding nanoparticles, with the increase of zero-shear viscosity and relaxation time. However, with the further increase of nanoparticles, an interesting phenomenon appears. The zero-shear viscosity and relaxation time reach the maximum and begin to decrease. The results show a slight increasing trend for the contour length of wormlike micelles by adding nanoparticles, while no obvious effect on the entanglement and mesh size. In addition, with the increase of temperature, remarkable reduction of contour length and relaxation time can be observed from the calculation. NEWMS constantly retain better viscoelasticity compared with conventional wormlike micelles without silica nanoparticles. According to the Arrhenius equation, the activation energy Ea shows the same increase trend of NEWMS. Finally, a mechanism is proposed to explain this interesting phenomenon.

  10. Extensional viscosity of copper nanowire suspensions in an aqueous polymer solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Amarin G; Jason, Naveen N; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Cheng, Wenlong; Prabhakar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-07

    Suspensions of copper nanowires are emerging as new electronic inks for next-generation flexible electronics. Using a novel surface acoustic wave driven extensional flow technique we are able to perform currently lacking analysis of these suspensions and their complex buffer. We observe extensional viscosities from 3 mPa s (1 mPa s shear viscosity) to 37.2 Pa s via changes in the suspension concentration, thus capturing low viscosities that have been historically very challenging to measure. These changes equate to an increase in the relative extensional viscosity of nearly 12,200 times at a volume fraction of just 0.027. We also find that interactions between the wires and the necessary polymer additive affect the rheology strongly. Polymer-induced elasticity shows a reduction as the buffer relaxation time falls from 819 to 59 μs above a critical particle concentration. The results and technique presented here should aid in the future formulation of these promising nanowire suspensions and their efficient application as inks and coatings.

  11. Laboratory Assessment of the Infiltration Capacity Reduction in Clogged Porous Mixture Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio C. Andrés-Valeri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Permeable pavements have been used widely across the world to manage urban stormwater. The hydrological behaviour of permeable surfaces is a complex process affected by many factors, such as rainfall intensity, rainfall duration, pavement geometrical conditions, and clogging level of the permeable surface, amongst others. This laboratory study was carried out to assess the influence of clogging level and rainfall intensity on the infiltration capacity of porous mixture surfaces used in Permeable Pavement Systems (PPS. Porous Concrete (PC and Porous Asphalt (PA mixtures with different air void contents (15%, 20%, and 25% were subject to different clogging scenarios by using varying sediment loads (0, 500, and 1000 g/m2. Permeability experiments were carried out for each clogging scenario through a new rainfall simulator specially developed, tailored, and calibrated for the laboratory simulation of a wide range of rainfall events. Permeability measurements were taken under all different scenarios as a result of the combination of the different rainfall events (50, 100, and 150 mm/h simulated over the specimens of porous mixtures and the sediment loads applied to them. The results showed that the PC mixtures tested perform better than the PA ones in terms of infiltration capacity, showing less potential for clogging and being more easily cleaned by the wash-off produced by the simulated rainfall events.

  12. Quantitative assessment of carbon sequestration reduction induced by disturbances in temperate Eurasian steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizhao; Ju, Weimin; Groisman, Pavel; Li, Jianlong; Propastin, Pavel; Xu, Xia; Zhou, Wei; Ruan, Honghua

    2017-11-01

    The temperate Eurasian steppe (TES) is a region where various environmental, social, and economic stresses converge. Multiple types of disturbance exist widely across the landscape, and heavily influence carbon cycling in this region. However, a current quantitative assessment of the impact of disturbances on carbon sequestration is largely lacking. In this study, we combined the boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS), the Shiyomi grazing model, and the global fire model (Glob-FIRM) to investigate the impact of the two major types of disturbance in the TES (i.e. domestic grazing and fire) on regional carbon sequestration. Model performance was validated using satellite data and field observations. Model outputs indicate that disturbance has a significant impact on carbon sequestration at a regional scale. The annual total carbon lost due to disturbances was 7.8 TgC yr‑1, accounting for 14.2% of the total net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Domestic grazing plays the dominant role in terrestrial carbon consumption, accounting for 95% of the total carbon lost from the two disturbances. Carbon losses from both disturbances significantly increased from 1999 to 2008 (R 2 = 0.82, P management of carbon sequestration in the vast grassland ecosystems.

  13. Making poverty reduction irreversible: development implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Steve

    2006-07-15

    Development is achieved through growing and managing the 'portfolio of assets' available to a household or a nation. Soils, water, plants and animals often make up the biggest chunk of poor people's assets. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) has taken stock of these environmental assets worldwide. It reveals that fully sixty percent are being degraded – with poor people disproportionately suffering the consequences such as shortage of clean water, floods and droughts. Yet the MA also identified instances of effective asset management – proven 'Response Options' that deserve scaling up. This briefing note identifies the major developmental implications of the MA, and calls for action in four areas: Information – getting information on environmental assets and hazards to the heart of development planning; Institutional reform – encouraging ecosystem management by poor people and local organisations, and enabling better oversight by national authorities; International cooperation – increasing aid and benchmarking it against just how far off-track we are on MDG7 (the 'environmental sustainability' goal); Investment vehicles and budgets – to support long-term environmental management in key environmentally-sensitive sectors. Action on these is so urgently required that we can no longer avoid asking what it will cost. We propose 'Millennium Ecosystem Budgets', globally and nationally.

  14. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  15. Viscosity Control of Protein Solution by Small Solutes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Taehun; Iwashita, Kazuki; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2017-12-12

    Viscosity of protein solution is one of the most troublesome issues for the high-concentration formulation of protein drugs. In this review, we summarize the practical methods that suppress the viscosity of protein solution using small molecular additives. The small amount of salts decreases the viscosity that results from electrostatic repulsion and attraction. The chaotrope suppresses the hydrophobic attraction and cluster formation, which can lower the solution viscosity. Arginine hydrochloride (ArgHCl) also suppresses the solution viscosity due to the hydrophobic and aromatic interactions between protein molecules. The small molecular additives are the simplest resolution of the high viscosity of protein solution as well as understanding of the primary cause in complex phenomena of protein interactions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Assessment and risk reduction of infectious pathogens on chiropractic treatment tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husbands Chris

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the presence of pathogenic microbes on chiropractic treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic. Additional aims were to test inexpensive disinfectants on tables that may kill microbes and suggest infection control measures for chiropractic offices, clinics and classrooms. The aim of the study was to assess the presence of pathogenic microbes on treatment tables in one outpatient teaching clinic and determine a simple behavioral model for infection control including table disinfection and accepted hand washing and sanitizing protocols. Methods 10 treatment tables were selected and sampled for possible microbial flora on face and hand pieces. Samples were cultured on MacConky's agar and mannitol salt agar, labeled and incubated for up to 48 hours. Confirmatory testing of microbes to determine if drug resistant flora were present was performed. Among tables tested, 5 were selected to test disinfectants. One-half of the face piece and 1 hand piece were treated with two different wipes and then post-tested for microbes. Results Pathogenic microbes were present on chiropractic treatment tables including methicillin-resistant Staph aureus. Simple disinfectants neutralized the pathogens. A rudimentary disinfection procedure and infection control measures are suggested based on the findings. Conclusion Pathogenic microbes may be present on chiropractic treatment tables and can be effectively killed with proper disinfecting. Hand washing/sanitizing is an important measure in infection control as is table disinfecting. Rudimentary behavioral changes to improve chiropractic clinic infection control are needed. More comprehensive behavioral models are needed. All teaching clinics and private chiropractic offices should adopt infection control practices including routine table disinfecting and hand sanitizing. Effective measures can be put in place at minimal costs. Accrediting bodies of chiropractic institutions

  17. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  18. Impact of Viscosity on Filling the Injection Mould Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satin Lukáš

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to look closer at the rheological properties of plastics and their impact on technology in the plastics processing industry. The paper focuses on the influence of viscosity of the material on filling the mould cavity. Four materials were tested with the settings of process parameters with different viscosity. Using simulation software of Moldex3D, we can see the effect of change in viscosity in the material to be filled.

  19. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, III, William R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-12-03

    India’s cement industry is the second largest in the world behind China with annual cement production of 168 Mt in 2010 which accounted for slightly greater than six percent of the world’s annual cement production in the same year. To produce that amount of cement, the industry consumed roughly 700 PJ of fuel and 14.7 TWh of electricity. We identified and analyzed 22 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the Indian cement industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model and compared to an electricity price forecast the cumulative cost-effective plant-level electricity savings potential for the Indian cement industry for 2010- 2030 is estimated to be 83 TWh, and the cumulative plant-level technical electricity saving potential is 89 TWh during the same period. The grid-level CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 82 Mt CO2 and the electric grid-level CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 88 Mt CO2. Compared to a fuel price forecast, an estimated cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 1,029 PJ with associated CO2 emission reduction of 97 Mt CO2 during 2010-2030 is possible. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Indian cement industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost over the next twenty years.

  20. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    China’s annual cement production (i.e., 1,868 Mt) in 2010 accounted for nearly half of the world’s annual cement production in the same year. We identified and analyzed 23 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the cement industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model, the cumulative cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Chinese cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh, and the total technical electricity saving potential is 279 TWh. The CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 144 Mt CO2 and the CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 161 Mt CO2. The fuel CSC model for the cement industry suggests cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 4,326 PJ which is equivalent to the total technical potential with associated CO2 emission reductions of 406 Mt CO2. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. We also developed a scenario in which instead of only implementing the international technologies in 2010-2030, we implement both international and Chinese domestic technologies during the analysis period and calculate the saving and cost of conserved energy accordingly. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Chinese cement industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  1. Trend methods for the assessment of effectiveness of reduction measures in the water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, S.; Kuhbier, P. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Statistik und Oekonometrie

    2001-11-01

    Riverine inputs are highly depending substance-specifically on flow rate and other climatic factors. In order to prevent that climatic influences deteriorate the trend detectability, an appropriate adjustment of the measurement data is necessary. Subject of the research project is therefore a concept for the adjustment and trend analysis of these input data. The basic concept for adjustment and trend analysis of riverine inputs is as follows: After providing monthly or biweekly data, monthly or biweekly adjusted loads are calculated with an adjustment procedure based on a dynamically specified concentration-flow function. Then the annual adjusted load is obtained by averaging the monthly or biweekly adjusted data. In the next step a trend analysis of the annual adjusted load is performed, using the LOESS smoother or the test of Mann-Kendall. Finally a power analysis is performed in order to assess the trend sensitivity of the method. Nine adjustment methods were tested at seven parameters (NO{sub 3}-N, NH{sub 4}-N, P{sub total}, PO{sub 4}-P, Cd, Pb and suspended matter) measured biweekly in the Rhine River (Lobith) and monthly in the Ems River (Herbrum). (orig.) [German] Flussfrachten sind in hohem Masse - je nach Substanz - von der Durchflussrate und anderen klimatischen Faktoren abhaengig, und um zu verhindern, dass klimatische Einfluesse die Nachweisbarkeit von zeitlichen Trends in diesen Eintragsdaten verschlechtern, ist eine Adjustierung der Messdaten erforderlich. Gegenstand des Vorhabens ist daher ein Konzept fuer die Adjustierung und Trendanalyse dieser Eintragsdaten. Das Konzept ist wie folgt strukturiert: Auf der Basis monatlicher oder vierzehntaegiger Messdaten werden monatliche bzw. vierzehntaegige adjustierte Frachten unter Verwendung einer dynamisch angepassten Konzentrations-Durchfluss-Funktion berechnet. Die adjustierte Jahresfracht ergibt sich dann mittels Durchschnittsbildung aus den monatlichen bzw. vierzehntaegigen adjustierten Frachten. Auf

  2. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berteau C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cecile Berteau,1 Orchidée Filipe-Santos,1 Tao Wang,2 Humberto E Rojas,2 Corinne Granger,1 Florence Schwarzenbach1 1Becton-Dickinson Medical Pharmaceutical Systems, Le Pont de Claix, France; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Aim: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC injection pain tolerance. Methods: The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s. All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain. The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results: Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003. Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm than medium (VAS =16.6 mm or low (VAS =22.1 mm viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002. Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89. Slow (0.02 mL/s or fast (0.30 mL/s injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79. In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High

  3. Effect of temperature on the viscosities of mixed micellar solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, C. Durga; Kumar, D. Sudheer; Sarma, G. V. S.; Ramesh, K. V.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of addition of Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the viscosities of Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micellar solution containingNaCl and Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micellar solution containingKBr at various temperatures are presented. The viscosity of SDS micellar solution is found to increase on addition of TX-100 at all temperatures (25 to 45 °C). However the increase in viscosity is large up to certain % of TX-100, after that the increase in viscosity is found to be small. Where as in CTAB micelles, at lower temperatures, the viscosity of micellar solution decreased up to certain composition of TX-100 and with further addition of TX-100 the viscosity got increaed. At higher temperatures viscosity of CTAB micellar solution increased on addition of TX-100. Depending on the nature of surfactant system and temperature, the viscosity of micellar solution may increase or decrease on addition of TX-100. The thermodynamic parameters for the viscous flow of micellar solutions in the presence of TX-100 are also determined. The effect of TX-100 on the viscosity and the activation enthalpy for viscous flow of anionic micelles is tremendously large as compared to cationic micelles. This is due to transition of micellar shape from rod to elongated rod or to sphere in the presence of added TX-100.

  4. Viscosity Prediction of Hydrocarbon Mixtures Based on the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    The application and capability of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity predictions of hydrocarbon fluids is further illustrated by predicting the viscosity of binary and ternary liquid mixtures composed of n-alkanes ranging from n-pentane to n-decane for wide ranges of temperature and from...... low to high pressures. In the f-theory viscosity predictions the SRK and the PRSV EOS have respectively been used. Further, a comparison with the widely used LBC viscosity model shows that better results are obtained with the f-theory models. The obtained AAD% is within or close to the experimental...

  5. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2003-01-01

    above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly......Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... with molar mass at fixed elongation rate....

  6. Fluorescence-based Broad Dynamic Range Viscosity Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Anatoliy; Graham, August E; Geddes, Chris D

    2014-03-01

    We introduce two new fluorescent viscosity probes, SYBR Green (SG) and PicoGreen (PG), that we have studied over a broad range of viscosity and in collagen solutions. In water, both dyes have low quantum yields and excited state lifetimes, while in viscous solvents or in complex with DNA both parameters dramatically (300-1000-fold) increase. We show that in log-log scale the dependence of the dyes' quantum yield vs. viscosity is linear, the slope of which is sensitive to temperature. Application of SG and PG, as a fluorescence-based broad dynamic range viscosity probes, to the life sciences is discussed.

  7. Viscosity of Heterogeneous Silicate Melts: A Non-Newtonian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuangzhuang; Blanpain, Bart; Guo, Muxing

    2017-12-01

    The recently published viscosity data of heterogeneous silicate melts with well-documented structure and experimental conditions are critically re-analyzed and tabulated. By using these data, a non-Newtonian viscosity model incorporating solid fraction, solid shape, and shear rate is proposed on the basis of the power-law equation. This model allows calculating the viscosity of the heterogeneous silicate melts with solid fraction up to 34 vol pct. The error between the calculated and measured data is evaluated to be 32 pct, which is acceptable considering the large error in viscosity measurement of the completely liquid silicate melt.

  8. Item reduction and psychometric validation of the Oily Skin Self Assessment Scale (OSSAS) and the Oily Skin Impact Scale (OSIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Robert; Clark, Marci; Harness, Jane; Bonner, Nicola; Scott, Jane; Draelos, Zoe; Rizer, Ronald; Yeh, Yating; Copley-Merriman, Kati

    2009-01-01

    Developed using focus groups, the Oily Skin Self Assessment Scale (OSSAS) and Oily Skin Impact Scale (OSIS) are patient-reported outcome measures of oily facial skin. The aim of this study was to finalize the item-scale structure of the instruments and perform psychometric validation in adults with self-reported oily facial skin. The OSSAS and OSIS were administered to 202 adult subjects with oily facial skin in the United States. A subgroup of 152 subjects returned, 4 to 10 days later, for test–retest reliability evaluation. Of the 202 participants, 72.8% were female; 64.4% had self-reported nonsevere acne. Item reduction resulted in a 14-item OSSAS with Sensation (five items), Tactile (four items) and Visual (four items) domains, a single blotting item, and an overall oiliness item. The OSIS was reduced to two three-item domains assessing Annoyance and Self-Image. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the construct validity of the final item-scale structures. The OSSAS and OSIS scales had acceptable item convergent validity (item-scale correlations >0.40) and floor and ceiling effects (oily skin severity (P oily skin (P oily facial skin), as assessments of self-reported oily facial skin severity and its emotional impact, respectively.

  9. Digital tomosynthesis with metal artifact reduction for assessing cementless hip arthroplasty: a diagnostic cohort study of 48 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hao; Yang, Dejin; Guo, Shengjie; Tang, Jing; Liu, Jian; Wang, Dacheng; Zhou, Yixin [Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Fourth Clinical College of Peking University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    For postoperative imaging assessment of cementless hip arthroplasty, radiography and computed tomography (CT) were restricted by overlapping structures and metal artifacts, respectively. A new tomosynthesis with metal artifact reduction (TMAR) is introduced by using metal extraction and ordered subset-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction. This study investigated the effectiveness of TMAR in assessing fixation stability of cementless hip arthroplasty components. We prospectively included 48 consecutive patients scheduled for revision hip arthroplasty in our hospital, with 41 femoral and 35 acetabular cementless components available for evaluation. All patients took the three examinations of radiography, CT, and TMAR preoperatively, with intraoperative mechanical tests, and absence or presence of osteointegration on retrieved prosthesis as reference standards. Three senior surgeons and four junior surgeons evaluated these images independently with uniform criteria. For TMAR, 82 % diagnoses on the femoral side and 84 % diagnoses on the acetabular side were accurate. The corresponding values were 44 and 67 % for radiography, and 39 % and 74 % for CT. Senior surgeons had significantly higher accuracy than junior surgeons by radiography (p < 0.05), but not by TMAR or CT. By minimizing metal artifacts in the bone-implant interface and clearly depicting peri-implant trabecular structures, the TMAR technique improved the diagnostic accuracy of assessing fixation stability of cementless hip arthroplasty, and shortened the learning curve of less experienced surgeons. Level II, diagnostic cohort study. (orig.)

  10. Assessing 'Dangerous Climate Change': Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Demotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Hearty, Paul J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; hide

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of approx.500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of approx.1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2 C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4 C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  11. Assessing "dangerous climate change": required reduction of carbon emissions to protect young people, future generations and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J; Hearty, Paul J; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; Rockstrom, Johan; Rohling, Eelco J; Sachs, Jeffrey; Smith, Pete; Steffen, Konrad; Van Susteren, Lise; von Schuckmann, Karina; Zachos, James C

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  12. Assessing "dangerous climate change": required reduction of carbon emissions to protect young people, future generations and nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hansen

    Full Text Available We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth's measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today's young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur "slow" feedbacks and eventual warming of 3-4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth's energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels.

  13. Assessing “Dangerous Climate Change”: Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Ackerman, Frank; Beerling, David J.; Hearty, Paul J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Hsu, Shi-Ling; Parmesan, Camille; Rockstrom, Johan; Rohling, Eelco J.; Sachs, Jeffrey; Smith, Pete; Steffen, Konrad; Van Susteren, Lise; von Schuckmann, Karina; Zachos, James C.

    2013-01-01

    We assess climate impacts of global warming using ongoing observations and paleoclimate data. We use Earth’s measured energy imbalance, paleoclimate data, and simple representations of the global carbon cycle and temperature to define emission reductions needed to stabilize climate and avoid potentially disastrous impacts on today’s young people, future generations, and nature. A cumulative industrial-era limit of ∼500 GtC fossil fuel emissions and 100 GtC storage in the biosphere and soil would keep climate close to the Holocene range to which humanity and other species are adapted. Cumulative emissions of ∼1000 GtC, sometimes associated with 2°C global warming, would spur “slow” feedbacks and eventual warming of 3–4°C with disastrous consequences. Rapid emissions reduction is required to restore Earth’s energy balance and avoid ocean heat uptake that would practically guarantee irreversible effects. Continuation of high fossil fuel emissions, given current knowledge of the consequences, would be an act of extraordinary witting intergenerational injustice. Responsible policymaking requires a rising price on carbon emissions that would preclude emissions from most remaining coal and unconventional fossil fuels and phase down emissions from conventional fossil fuels. PMID:24312568

  14. Co-benefits from CO{sub 2}-emission reduction measurements in Shanxi, China - a first assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aunan, Kristin; Fang, Jinghua; Li, Guanghai; Seip, Hans Martin; Vennemo, Haakon

    2000-05-01

    The largest local and regional air pollution problems are usually found in countries without emission reduction obligations in the Kyoto protocol. Thus, in many Chinese cities the concentrations of SO{sub 2} and particulates in the air by far exceed the WHO air quality guidelines. This report analyses a set of CO{sub 2}-reducing abatement options related to coal consumption in Shanxi, China. The costs and potential for abatement are investigated for different economic sectors and the entailed emission reductions are estimated in terms of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and particles. The present population-weighted exposure level for particles and SO{sub 2} is estimated and the reduced population exposure resulting from the abatement measures is assessed. Exposure-response functions from Chinese and international epidemiology are used to indicate the health effects of applying the measures. An economic evaluation of the reduced health effect is made by applying unit prices of health impacts based on the damage cost approach. The present agricultural crop loss due to enhanced levels of surface ozone are estimated. It is found that the CO{sub 2}-reducing abatement options in Shanxi are profitable in a socioeconomic sense. But there is a certain lack of synergy between the options with respect to their effectiveness in meeting local, regional and global environmental concerns.

  15. The Relation between Vaporization Enthalpies and Viscosities: Eyring's Theory Applied to Selected Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Paschek, Dietmar; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P; Ludwig, Ralf

    2017-05-19

    Key properties for the use of ionic liquids as electrolytes in batteries are low viscosities, low vapor pressure and high vaporization enthalpies. Whereas the measurement of transport properties is well established, the determination of vaporization enthalpies of these extremely low volatile compounds is still a challenge. At a first glance both properties seem to describe different thermophysical phenomena. However, eighty years ago Eyring suggested a theory which related viscosities and vaporization enthalpies to each other. The model is based on Eyring's theory of absolute reaction rates. Recent attempts to apply Eyring's theory to ionic liquids failed. The motivation of our study is to show that Eyring's theory works, if the assumptions specific for ionic liquids are fulfilled. For that purpose we measured the viscosities of three well selected protic ionic liquids (PILs) at different temperatures. The temperature dependences of viscosities were approximated by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamann (VFT) relation and extrapolated to the high-temperature regime up to 600 K. Then the VFT-data could be fitted to the Eyring-model. The values of vaporization enthalpies for the three selected PILs predicted by the Eyring model have been very close to the experimental values measured by well-established techniques. We conclude that the Eyring theory can be successfully applied to the chosen set of PILs, if the assumption that ionic pairs of the viscous flow in the liquid and the ionic pairs in the gas phase are similar is fulfilled. It was also noticed that proper transfer of energies can be only derived if the viscosities and the vaporization energies are known for temperatures close to the liquid-gas transition temperature. The idea to correlate easy measurable viscosities of ionic liquids with their vaporization enthalpies opens a new way for a reliable assessment of these thermodynamic properties for a broad range of ionic liquids. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

  16. Holographic bulk viscosity: GPR vs EO

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex; Kiritsis, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Recently Eling and Oz (EO) proposed a formula for the holographic bulk viscosity, in arXiv:1103.1657, derived from the null horizon focusing equation. This formula seems different from that obtained earlier by Gubser, Pufu and Rocha (GPR) in arXiv:0806.0407 calculated from the IR limit of the two-point function of the trace of the stress tensor. The two were shown to agree only for some simple scaling cases. We point out that the two formulae agree in two non-trivial holographic theories describing RG flows. The first is the strongly coupled N=2* gauge theory plasma. The second is the semi-phenomenological model of Improved Holographic QCD.

  17. The pressure reduction coefficient: A new parameter to assess aneurysmal blood stasis induced by flow diverters/disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascou, Gregory; Ferrara, Riccardo; Ambard, Dominique; Sanchez, Mathieu; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Jourdan, Franck; Costalat, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose Pore density (PD), surface metal coverage (SMC) and the number of wires are all different parameters which can influence the efficacy of a flow disruptor/diverter. Nevertheless, the relative importance of a parameter to induce intra-aneurysmal blood stasis is still poorly evaluated. Therefore, comparison between devices based on a unique value is not reliable. The aim of this study was to propose a new bench top parameter (the pressure reduction coefficient (PRC; ξ)) in order to assess the global haemodynamic effect of each flow diverter/disruptor to slow flow. Methods Eight devices were tested in vitro during three different flow conditions. For the eight devices, the PRC was computed at different volumetric flow rates to characterise flow reduction. Comparison was made with SMC, PD and the number of wires. Results The PRC obtained for flow disruptors was on average 1.5 times more efficient in reducing flow compared to flow diverters. PD (mm2) ranged from 24 to 38 for flow diverters and did not independently correlate with the PRC. The SMC of flow diverters ranged from 25% to 70%, and ranged from 20% to 100% for flow disruptors, without independent correlation to the PRC. The number of wires ranged from 48 to 96 for the flow diverters and did not correlate independently to the PRC. Conclusion There were no direct correlations between individual device characteristics and the PRC, suggesting a multifaceted and interrelating association of the overall design of each implant. Hence, the PRC could be used as a simple, reliable parameter to assess the overall capacity of flow disruptors/diverters to induce intra-aneurysmal blood stasis.

  18. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments--a framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A; Christensen, Britt S B; Clausen, Thomas; Dalgaard, Esben; Effersø, Flemming; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Gertz, Flemming; Hansen, Anne Lausten; He, Xin; Jacobsen, Brian H; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt; Koch, Julian; Nilsson, Bertel; Petersen, Christian; De Schepper, Guillaume; Schamper, Cyril; Sørensen, Kurt I; Therrien, Rene; Thirup, Christian; Viezzoli, Andrea

    2014-01-15

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30-50 m and 2m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  19. Outcome assessment of a triangular clinic as a harm reduction intervention in Rajaee-Shahr Prison, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asl, Rahim Taghizadeh; Eshrati, Babak; Dell, Colleen Anne; Taylor, Kelli; Afshar, Parviz; Kamali, Mohammad; Mirzazadeh, Ali

    2013-12-26

    Transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among incarcerated injection drug users (IDU) is a health epidemic in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Triangular clinics (TCs) were established in prisons as a harm reduction measure to decrease the risk of HIV transmission and other blood-borne infections. The objective of this study was to assess the immediate outcomes of one TC among male IDUs in Iran's Rajaee-Shahr prison. This study was conducted in two stages between 2003 and 2005. In the preparatory stage, focus group data was collected to update the prison's TC education and medical interventions and construct the self-report questionnaire. In stage two, 150 male IDUs were recruited in a closed cohort study design to assess the immediate outcome of the TC. Participants were measured at baseline and followed up to six months to measure their drug use, attitude toward and knowledge of high risk behaviours, serological conversion for HIV, HBV and HCV, and engagement in risky behaviors. The TC outcomes were determined through random urine analysis testing, a self-administered questionnaire and behaviour report cards, and viral infection testing. The findings of the urine analyses indicated a minimal yet consistent decrease in drug use over the six months. The pre and post- self-administered questionnaire data relayed a modest change in IDU risky behaviours associated with sexual practices; this was greater in comparison to the knowledge and attitude measures. It was determined that age may have a detrimental effect as may viral infections (HIV and HBV) on knowledge, attitude and behavior change. Both education and employment may have a protective effect. Data collected from the self-report behaviour cards similarly showed a modest reduction in high risk practices. At the six month follow-up, only one case became HIV positive, 9 HCV and 17 HBV. Considering that HIV is concentrated among Iranian prisoners who inject drugs at a high level, the results of this

  20. Towards a proportionality assessment of risk reduction measures aimed at restricting the use of persistent and bioaccumulative substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, Frans; Brouwer, Roy; Janssen, Martien; Verhoeven, Julia; Luttikhuizen, Cees

    2017-11-01

    International chemicals legislation aims at adequately controlling persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and substances of very high concern (SVHCs), such as persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) and very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB) substances, with a view to progressively substitute these substances with suitable less-hazardous alternatives. Using cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to assess the (dis)proportionality of measures to control such substances (collectively called "PBT" in the present paper) requires benchmarks. The present paper provides building blocks for possible benchmarks by looking at the cost-effectiveness estimates for regulatory measures that have been applied or considered for various PBT substances. These cost-effectiveness estimates vary widely, and the main factors possibly explaining this variation are discussed. The available cost estimates currently do not allow deriving a value for society's willingness to pay to reduce PBT presence, use, and emissions because decisions referring explicitly to these estimates are scarce. Roughly speaking, the available evidence suggests that measures costing less than €1000 per kilogram PBT use or emission reduction will usually not be rejected for reasons of disproportionate costs, whereas for measures with costs above €50 000 per kilogram PBT such a rejection is likely. More research is needed to strengthen the evidence base and further elaborate a systematic approach toward proportionality benchmarking. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:1100-1112. © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  1. Rye affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in Turkey poults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Tellez

    Full Text Available Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group. At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d. After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05 intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed

  2. Rye affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in Turkey poults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D; Kuttappan, Vivek A; Hargis, Billy M; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (pintestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  3. Sequential optimization and reliability assessment based on dimension reduction method for accurate and efficient reliability-based design optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chai; Lee, Ik Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    This study develops an efficient and accurate methodology for reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) by combining the most probable point (MPP)-based dimension reduction method (DRM) to enhance accuracy and the sequential optimization and reliability assessment (SORA) to enhance efficiency. In many researches, first-order reliability method (FORM) has been utilized for RBDO methods due to its efficiency and simplicity. However, it might not be accurate enough for highly nonlinear performance functions. Therefore, the MPP-based DRM is introduced for the accurate reliability assessment in this study. Even though the MPP-based DRM significantly improves the accuracy, additional computations for the moment-based integration are required. It is desirable to reduce the number of reliability analyses in the RBDO process. Since decoupled approaches such as SORA reduce necessary reliability analyses considerably, DRM-based SORA is proposed in this study for accurate and efficient RBDO. Furthermore, convex linearization is introduced to approximate inactive probabilistic constraints to additionally improve the efficiency. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method are verified through numerical examples.

  4. Joint carbon footprint assessment and data envelopment analysis for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo-Leiva, Ricardo; Angulo-Meza, Lidia; Iriarte, Alfredo; González-Araya, Marcela C

    2017-09-01

    Operations management tools are critical in the process of evaluating and implementing action towards a low carbon production. Currently, a sustainable production implies both an efficient resource use and the obligation to meet targets for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The carbon footprint (CF) tool allows estimating the overall amount of GHG emissions associated with a product or activity throughout its life cycle. In this paper, we propose a four-step method for a joint use of CF assessment and Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Following the eco-efficiency definition, which is the delivery of goods using fewer resources and with decreasing environmental impact, we use an output oriented DEA model to maximize production and reduce CF, taking into account simultaneously the economic and ecological perspectives. In another step, we stablish targets for the contributing CF factors in order to achieve CF reduction. The proposed method was applied to assess the eco-efficiency of five organic blueberry orchards throughout three growing seasons. The results show that this method is a practical tool for determining eco-efficiency and reducing GHG emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The kinematic viscosity influence on energetic cost of oil pipeline flow; Influencia da viscosidade cinematica sobre o custo energetico no escoamento de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, Kennedy F.M. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Paraiba (CEFET-PB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Torres, Euriclides G.; Lacerda, Ivonaldo de S.; Machado, Erica C.M.N. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In the petroleum pipelines flow the objective of the maximum production with the minor cost is desired, considering the techniques, operational and administrative restrictions. One of the biggest difficulties in the pipelines flow is related to increase of viscosity that the fluids produced can present and to the variations during the transport. In this study had been analyzed through computational simulations, using Smart Pumping software, the hydraulic behavior of the network and the operational cost with energy consumption, in function of the variation of the viscosity. Two scenes had been simulated, using a initial kinematic viscosity of 3,029x10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/s, that it was reduced gradually until the minimum limit of 10% of initial viscosity, remaining the too much constant the fluid properties. In scene 1 it was verified that the reduction of viscosity implied in the reduction of the energy cost in up to 14,53%, increase of the daily production in up to 3,88% and the reduction in the cost for m3 flowed off in up to 17,73%, without alterations in the operations. Scene 2 presented similar behavior to scene 1, however, had been necessary interventions to get operations that did not violate the restrictions. The results had ratified the interference of viscosity in the operations and the system petroleum flow costs. (author)

  6. Evaluation of Relative Blood Viscosity During Menstruation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ABSTRACT. The changes in blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, haematocrit and erythrocyte sedimentation rate before ... Blood samples were collected during two ..... Gynaecol., 91(7): 685–. 690. Logan, P. and Carolyn, C.(1997).Take Your. Choice. Counterbalance: Gendered. Perspectives on Writing and Language. Pp. 41.

  7. On-line measurement of food viscosity during flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Sarah Louise; Friis, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time.......Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time....

  8. Viscosity of liquids theory, estimation, experiment, and data

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanath, Dabir S; Prasad, Dasika HL; Dutt, Nidamarty VK; Rani, Kalipatnapu Y

    2007-01-01

    Single comprehensive book on viscosity of liquids, as opposed to most of the books in this area which are data books, i.e., a compilation of viscosity data from the literature, where the information is scattered and the description and analysis of the experimental methods and governing theory are not readily available in a single place.

  9. Nonlinear Eddy Viscosity Models applied to Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2013-01-01

    The linear k−ε eddy viscosity model and modified versions of two existing nonlinear eddy viscosity models are applied to single wind turbine wake simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes code. Results are compared with field wake measurements. The nonlinear models give better results...

  10. Effective viscosity of dispersions approached by a statistical continuum method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, J.; Willemse, M.W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the determination of the effective viscosity of disperse systems (emulsions, suspensions) is considered. On the basis of the formal solution of the equations governing creeping flow in a statistically homogeneous dispersion, the effective viscosity is expressed in a series expansion

  11. Relook on fitting of viscosity with undercooling of glassy liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present approach is on the modification of viscosity fitting of undercooled liquid as a function of undercooling. The method consists of finding analytical solution of three arbitrary constants of the Vogel–Fulcher–Tamman (VFT) equation by choosing three viscosity data at three critical temperatures for an undercooled ...

  12. Evaluation of Relative Blood Viscosity During Menstruation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The changes in blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, haematocrit and erythrocyte sedimentation rate before and during menstruation were evaluated. Forty (40) apparently healthy reproductive female subjects (between 15 and 28 years) and resident in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria were used for the study. The parameters ...

  13. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  14. Effect of viscosity on appetite and gastro-intestinal hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, N.; Mars, M.; Wijk, de R.A.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.; Holst, J.J.; Graaf, de C.

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that higher viscosity resulted in lower ad libitum intake and that eating rate is an important factor. In this study we aimed to explore the effect of viscosity on the gastro-intestinal hormones ghrelin, CCK-8 and GLP-1. Thirty-two subjects (22 ± 2 y, BMI 21.9 ± 2.2

  15. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collisional interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finotello, Giulia; Padding, J.T.; Deen, Niels G.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    A complete knowledge of the effect of droplet viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcomes is essential for industrial processes such as spray drying. When droplets with dispersed solids are dried, the apparent viscosity of the dispersed phase increases by many orders of magnitude, which

  16. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer, J.A.; Lowe, C.P.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Iedema, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to

  17. A Riemann problem with small viscosity and dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyunnapara Thomas Joseph

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove existence of global solutions to a hyperbolic system in elastodynamics, with small viscosity and dispersion terms and derive estimates uniform in the viscosity-dispersion parameters. By passing to the limit, we prove the existence of solution the Riemann problem for the hyperbolic system with arbitrary Riemann data.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of immiscible displacement process with large viscosity ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Parthib; Schaefer, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Immiscible displacement is a key physical mechanism involved in enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration processes. This multiphase flow phenomenon involves a complex interplay of viscous, capillary, inertial and wettability effects. The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is an accurate and efficient technique for modeling and simulating multiphase/multicomponent flows especially in complex flow configurations and media. In this presentation we present numerical simulation results of displacement process in thin long channels. The results are based on a new psuedo-potential multicomponent LB model with multiple relaxation time collision (MRT) model and explicit forcing scheme. We demonstrate that the proposed model is capable of accurately simulating the displacement process involving fluids with a wider range of viscosity ratios (>100) and which also leads to viscosity-independent interfacial tension and reduction of some important numerical artifacts.

  19. Bulk viscosity, interaction and the viability of phantom solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Leyva, Yoelsy

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a bulk viscosity model in the Eckart approach for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe. We have included radiation and dark energy, assumed as perfect fluids, and dark matter treated as an imperfect fluid having bulk viscosity. We also introduce an interaction term between the dark matter and dark energy components. Considering that the bulk viscosity is proportional to the dark matter energy density and imposing a complete cosmological dynamics, we find bounds on the bulk viscosity in order to reproduce a matter-dominated era (MDE). This constraint is independent of the interaction term. Some late time phantom solutions are mathematically possible. However, the constraint imposed by a MDE restricts the interaction parameter, in the phantom solutions, to a region consistent with a null value, eliminating the possibility of late time stable solutions with $w<-1$. From the different cases that we study, the only possible scenario, with bulk viscosity and interac...

  20. Viscosity Prediction of Natural Gas Using the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2002-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity modeling, a procedure is introduced for predicting the viscosity of hydrocarbon mixtures rich in one component, which is the case for natural gases. In this procedure, the mixture friction coefficients are estimated with mixing...... rules based on the values of the pure component friction coefficients. Since natural gases contain mainly methane, two f-theory models are combined, where the friction coefficients of methane are estimated by a seven-constant f-theory model directly fitted to methane viscosities, and the friction...... coefficients of the other components are estimated by the one-parameter general f-theory model. The viscosity predictions are performed with the SRK, the PR, and the PRSV equations of state, respectively. For recently measured viscosities of natural gases, the resultant AAD (0.5 to 0.8%) is in excellent...

  1. Study on lubricating oil characteristics using viscosity index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwanprateep, T.

    The objective of this research is to investigate the characteristics of lubricating oil sold in the market by using viscosity index. The lubricating oil of both single grade and multigrade of some trade names for gasoline engines and one without trade name are used in the test and the viscosity index is determined for each type. The test shows that every type of lubricating oil with trade name has viscosity index of more than 100, the highest standard value, and the multigrade oil has more viscosity index than the single grade oil. The oil without trade name has viscosity index rather low and therefore is not suitable for lubrication over a wide range of working temperature, such as in gasoline engines.

  2. Measurement and correlation of jet fuel viscosities at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schruben, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and procedures were developed to measure jet fuel viscosity for eight current and future jet fuels at temperatures from ambient to near -60 C by shear viscometry. Viscosity data showed good reproducibility even at temperatures a few degrees below the measured freezing point. The viscosity-temperature relationship could be correlated by two linear segments when plotted as a standard log-log type representation (ASTM D 341). At high temperatures, the viscosity-temperature slope is low. At low temperatures, where wax precipitation is significant, the slope is higher. The breakpoint between temperature regions is the filter flow temperature, a fuel characteristic approximated by the freezing point. A generalization of the representation for the eight experimental fuels provided a predictive correlation for low-temperature viscosity, considered sufficiently accurate for many design or performance calculations.

  3. Measuring Solution Viscosity and its Effect on Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe Salvador

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In proteins, some processes require conformational changes involving structural domain diffusion. Among these processes are protein folding, unfolding and enzyme catalysis. During catalysis some enzymes undergo large conformational changes as they progress through the catalytic cycle. According to Kramers theory, solvent viscosity results in friction against proteins in solution, and this should result in decreased motion, inhibiting catalysis in motile enzymes. Solution viscosity was increased by adding increasing concentrations of glycerol, sucrose and trehalose, resulting in a decrease in the reaction rate of the H+-ATPase from the plasma membrane of Kluyveromyces lactis. A direct correlation was found between viscosity (&eegr; and the inhibition of the maximum rate of catalysis (V max. The protocol used to measure viscosity by means of a falling ball type viscometer is described, together with the determination of enzyme kinetics and the application of Kramers’ equation to evaluate the effect of viscosity on the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the H+-ATPase.

  4. Bulk viscosity of spin-one color superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa' d, Basil A.

    2009-08-27

    The bulk viscosity of several quark matter phases is calculated. It is found that the effect of color superconductivity is not trivial, it may suppress, or enhance the bulk viscosity depending on the critical temperature and the temperature at which the bulk viscosity is calculated. Also, is it found that the effect of neutrino-emitting Urca processes cannot be neglected in the consideration of the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter. The results for the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter are used to calculate the r-mode instability window of quark stars with several possible phases. It is shown that each possible phase has a different structure for the r-mode instability window. (orig.)

  5. Integrated Solvent Design for CO2 Capture and Viscosity Tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantu Cantu, David; Malhotra, Deepika; Koech, Phillip K.; Heldebrant, David J.; Zheng, Feng; Freeman, Charles J.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2017-07-03

    We present novel design strategies for reduced viscosity single-component, water-lean CO2 capture organic solvent systems. Through molecular simulation, we identify the main molecular-level descriptor that influences bulk solvent viscosity. Upon loading, a zwitterionic structure forms with a small activation energy of ca 16 kJ/mol and a small stabilization of ca 6 kJ/mol. Viscosity increases exponentially with CO2 loading due to hydrogen-bonding between neighboring Zwitterions. We find that molecular structures that promote internal hydrogen bonding (within the same molecule) and suppress interactions with neighboring molecules have low viscosities. In addition, tuning the acid/base properties leads to a shift of the equilibrium toward a non-charged (acid) form that further reduces the viscosity. Based on the above structural criteria, a reduced order model is also presented that allows for the quick screening of large compound libraries and down selection of promising candidates for synthesis and testing.

  6. Effects of fluid viscosity on a moving sonoluminescing bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Mirheydari, Mona; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa

    2011-08-01

    Based on the quasi-adiabatic model, the parameters of the bubble interior for a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in water, adiponitrile, and N-methylformamide are calculated for various fluid viscosities. By using a complete form of the hydrodynamic force, the bubble trajectory is calculated for a moving single bubble sonoluminescence (m-SBSL). It is found that as the fluid viscosity increases, the unique circular path changes to an ellipsoidal and then linear form and along this incrementally increase of viscosity the light intensity increases. By using the Bremsstrahlung model to describe the bubble radiation, gradual increase of the viscosity results in brighter emissions. It is found that in fluids with higher viscosity the light intensity decreases as time passes.

  7. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, III, William R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-12-03

    India’s 2010 annual crude steel production was 68 Mt which accounted for nearly five percent of the world’s annual steel production in the same year. In 2007, roughly 1600 PJ were consumed by India’s iron and steel industry to produce 53 Mt of steel. We identified and analyzed 25 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the Indian iron and steel industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model and compared to an electricity price forecast the cumulative plant-level cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Indian iron and steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 66 TWh, and the cumulative plant-level technical electricity saving potential is only slightly greater than 66 TWh for the same period. The primary energy related CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 65 Mt CO2. Compared to a fuel price forecast, an estimated cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 768 PJ with associated CO2 emission reduction of 67 Mt CO2 during 2010-2030 is possible. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Indian iron and steel industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  8. [Effect of nitric oxide on viscosity of nerve cell membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul'ianova, N A; Maksimov, G V; Churin, A A; Rubin, A B

    2005-01-01

    The influence of nitric oxide on the microviscosity of nerve cell membranes was investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. Changes in membrane viscosity were estimated from the resonance Raman-spectra of carotenoids localized in the axon plasmatic membrane and membranes of subcellular vesicles (cytosomes). For the nerve fibre, the extracellular addition of nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (0.5 mM), caused an increase in the 1526 cm(-1) band relative half-width and the modification of 1160 cm-1 band structure. Moreover, sodium nitroprusside led to an increase in the I1526/I1160 ratio by 13% in 25 min and a decrease in this ratio by 10% in 50 min. In the case of cytosomes, sodium nitroprusside (0.5 mM) resulted in the reduction of the I1526/I1160 ratio by 8% in 25 and 50 min. It was shown that the neuron rhythmic activity correlated with the I1526/I1160 ratio and cytosome membrane microviscosity. We suppose that nitric oxide causes a conformational transition of carotenoids in the axon plasmatic membrane and the membranes of cytosomes. This process can be due to nitric oxide-induced changes of the membrane microviscosity or potential.

  9. The role of meal viscosity and oat β-glucan characteristics in human appetite control: a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Candida J; Chu, Yi-Fang; Johnson, William D; Martin, Corby K; Han, Hongmei; Bordenave, Nicolas; Shi, Yuhui; O'Shea, Marianne; Greenway, Frank L

    2014-05-28

    Foods that enhance satiety can help consumers to resist environmental cues to eat, and improve the nutritional quality of their diets. Viscosity generated by oat β-glucan, influences gastrointestinal mechanisms that mediate satiety. Differences in the source, processing treatments, and interactions with other constituents in the food matrix affect the amount, solubility, molecular weight, and structure of the β-glucan in products, which in turn influences the viscosity. This study examined the effect of two types of oatmeal and an oat-based ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEC) on appetite, and assessed differences in meal viscosity and β-glucan characteristics among the cereals. Forty-eight individuals were enrolled in a randomized crossover trial. Subjects consumed isocaloric breakfast meals containing instant oatmeal (IO), old-fashioned oatmeal (SO) or RTEC in random order at least a week apart. Each breakfast meal contained 218 kcal (150 kcal cereal, and 68 kcal milk) Visual analogue scales measuring appetite were completed before breakfast, and over four hours, following the meal. Starch digestion kinetics, meal viscosities, and β-glucan characteristics for each meal were determined. Appetite responses were analyzed by area under the curve. Mixed models were used to analyze response changes over time. IO increased fullness (p = 0.04), suppressed desire to eat (p = 0.01) and reduced prospective intake (p viscosity, and larger hydration spheres than the RTEC, and IO had greater viscosity after oral and initial gastric digestion (initial viscosity) than the RTEC. IO and SO improved appetite control over four hours compared to RTEC. Initial viscosity of oatmeal may be especially important for reducing appetite.

  10. Effects of Metal Ions on Viscosity of Aqueous Sodium Carboxylmethylcellulose Solution and Development of Dropping Ball Method on Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Set, Seng; Ford, David; Kita, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    This research revealed that metal ions with different charges could significantly affect the viscosity of aqueous sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) solution. On the basis of an Ostwald viscometer, an improvised apparatus using a dropping ball for examining the viscosity of liquids/solutions has been developed. The results indicate that the…

  11. Impact of biofluid viscosity on size and sedimentation efficiency of the isolated microvesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles are nano-sized lipid vesicles released by all cells in vivo and in vitro. They are released physiologically under normal conditions but their rate of release is higher under pathological conditions such as tumors. Once released they end up in the systemic circulation and have been found and characterized in all biofluids such as plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, breast milk, ascites, and urine. Microvesicles represent the status of the donor cell they are released from and they are currently under intense investigation as a potential source for disease biomarkers. Currently, the gold standard for isolating microvesicles is ultracentrifugation, although alternative techniques such as affinity purification have been explored. Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to a deforming force by either shear or tensile stress. The different chemical and molecular compositions of biofluids have an effect on its viscosity and this could affect movements of the particles inside the fluid. In this manuscript we addressed the issue of whether viscosity has an effect on sedimentation efficiency of microvesicles using ultracentrifugation. We used different biofluids and spiked them with polystyrene beads and assessed their recovery using the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. We demonstrate that MVs recovery inversely correlates with viscosity and as a result, sample dilutions should be considered prior to ultracentifugation when processing any biofluids.

  12. Measuring biotherapeutic viscosity and degradation on-chip with particle diffusometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, K N; Lee, D; Wereley, S T; Kinzer-Ursem, T L

    2017-11-21

    In the absence of efficient ways to test drug stability and efficacy, pharmaceuticals that have been stored outside of set temperature conditions are destroyed, often at great cost. This is especially problematic for biotherapeutics, which are highly sensitive to temperature fluctuations. Current platforms for assessing the stability of protein-based biotherapeutics in high throughput and in low volumes are unavailable outside of research and development laboratories and are not efficient for use in production, quality control, distribution, or clinical settings. In these alternative environments, microanalysis platforms could provide significant advantages for the characterization of biotherapeutic degradation. Here we present particle diffusometry (PD), a new technique to study degradation of biotherapeutic solutions. PD uses a simple microfluidic chip and microscope setup to calculate the Brownian motion of particles in a quiescent solution using a variation of particle image velocimetry (PIV) fundamentals. We show that PD can be used to measure the viscosity of protein solutions to discriminate native protein from degraded samples as well as to determine the change in viscosity as a function of therapeutic concentration. PD viscosity analysis is applied to two particularly important biotherapeutic preparations: insulin, a commonly used protein for diabetic patients, and monoclonal antibodies which are an emerging class of biotherapeutics used to treat a variety of diseases such as autoimmune disorders and cancer. PD-based characterization of solution viscosity is a new tool for biotherapeutic analysis, and owing to its easy setup could readily be implemented at key points of the pharmaceutical delivery chain and in clinical settings.

  13. An automated system for performing continuous viscosity versus temperature measurements of fluids using an Ostwald viscometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, L Y; Logan, E R; Gering, K L; Dahn, J R

    2017-09-01

    An automated system was developed to measure the viscosity of fluids as a function of temperature using image analysis tracking software. An Ostwald viscometer was placed in a three-wall dewar in which ethylene glycol was circulated using a thermal bath. The system collected continuous measurements during both heating and cooling cycles exhibiting no hysteresis. The use of video tracking analysis software greatly reduced the measurement errors associated with measuring the time required for the meniscus to pass through the markings on the viscometer. The stability of the system was assessed by performing 38 consecutive measurements of water at 42.50 ± 0.05 °C giving an average flow time of 87.7 ± 0.3 s. A device was also implemented to repeatedly deliver a constant volume of liquid of 11.00 ± 0.03 ml leading to an average error in the viscosity of 0.04%. As an application, the system was used to measure the viscosity of two Li-ion battery electrolyte solvents from approximately 10 to 40 °C with results showing excellent agreement with viscosity values calculated using Gering's Advanced Electrolyte Model (AEM).

  14. An automated system for performing continuous viscosity versus temperature measurements of fluids using an Ostwald viscometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, L. Y.; Logan, E. R.; Gering, K. L.; Dahn, J. R.

    2017-09-01

    An automated system was developed to measure the viscosity of fluids as a function of temperature using image analysis tracking software. An Ostwald viscometer was placed in a three-wall dewar in which ethylene glycol was circulated using a thermal bath. The system collected continuous measurements during both heating and cooling cycles exhibiting no hysteresis. The use of video tracking analysis software greatly reduced the measurement errors associated with measuring the time required for the meniscus to pass through the markings on the viscometer. The stability of the system was assessed by performing 38 consecutive measurements of water at 42.50 ± 0.05 °C giving an average flow time of 87.7 ± 0.3 s. A device was also implemented to repeatedly deliver a constant volume of liquid of 11.00 ± 0.03 ml leading to an average error in the viscosity of 0.04%. As an application, the system was used to measure the viscosity of two Li-ion battery electrolyte solvents from approximately 10 to 40 °C with results showing excellent agreement with viscosity values calculated using Gering's Advanced Electrolyte Model (AEM).

  15. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteau, Cecile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Wang, Tao; Rojas, Humberto E; Granger, Corinne; Schwarzenbach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Aim The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC) injection pain tolerance. Methods The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP) combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s). All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain). The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003). Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm) than medium (VAS =16.6 mm) or low (VAS =22.1 mm) viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002). Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89). Slow (0.02 mL/s) or fast (0.30 mL/s) injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79). In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High viscosity injections were shown to be the most tolerated, whereas injection volume and flow rates did not impact perceived pain. PMID:26635489

  16. Reduction in language testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimova, Slobodanka; Jensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    /video recorded speech samples and written reports produced by two experienced raters after testing. Our findings suggest that reduction or reduction-like pronunciation features are found in tested L2 speech, but whenever raters identify and comment on such reductions, they tend to assess reductions negatively...

  17. Pressure dependence of viscosity in supercooled water and a unified approach for thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lokendra P.; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The anomalous decrease of the viscosity of water with applied pressure has been known for over a century. It occurs concurrently with major structural changes: The second coordination shell around a molecule collapses onto the first shell. Viscosity is thus a macroscopic witness of the progressive breaking of the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network that makes water so peculiar. At low temperature, water at ambient pressure becomes more tetrahedral and the effect of pressure becomes stronger. However, surprisingly, no data are available for the viscosity of supercooled water under pressure, in which dramatic anomalies are expected based on interpolation between ambient pressure data for supercooled water and high pressure data for stable water. Here we report measurements with a time-of-flight viscometer down to 244K and up to 300MPa, revealing a reduction of viscosity by pressure by as much as 42%. Inspired by a previous attempt [Tanaka H (2000) J Chem Phys 112:799–809], we show that a remarkably simple extension of a two-state model [Holten V, Sengers JV, Anisimov MA (2014) J Phys Chem Ref Data 43:043101], initially developed to reproduce thermodynamic properties, is able to accurately describe dynamic properties (viscosity, self-diffusion coefficient, and rotational correlation time) as well. Our results support the idea that water is a mixture of a high density, “fragile” liquid, and a low density, “strong” liquid, the varying proportion of which explains the anomalies and fragile-to-strong crossover in water. PMID:28404733

  18. A Comparative Assessment of Postoperative Analgesic Efficacy of Lornoxicam versus Tramadol after Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Mandibular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankesh Dilip; Vsm, Ravisankar; Ksn, Siva Bharani; Km, Sudheesh; Tewathia, Nisha

    2017-09-01

    Pain after any surgical procedure is inevitable but can be controlled by administration of analgesics in most cases. Postoperative pain after surgical treatment of mandibular fractures can be treated by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioid analgesics. The purpose of this study is to critically compare the postoperative analgesic efficacy of small doses of intravenous TRAMADOL (opioid analgesic) versus LORNOXICAM (NSAID) in patients with mandibular trauma undergoing open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and to assess the presence of any adverse effects due to NSAID or opioid use. Forty adult ASA grade I-II patients with mandibular trauma, scheduled for ORIF under general anesthesia in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, were selected for the study. The patients were randomly assigned into a tramadol group (Group T) and a lornoxicam group (Group L) and were administered intravenous tramadol 50 mg and intravenous lornoxicam 8 mg, respectively, at specific postoperative intervals. Pain intensity was quantitatively assessed at the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th, and 24th postoperative hours using a visual analog scale of 10 cm. Adverse effects of the analgesics were also recorded and compared. Both the drugs resulted in a significant decrease in pain intensity from 2nd to 24th postoperative hours, but better pain control was observed in Group L at 24th postoperative hour. Only two patients experienced nausea and vomiting in Group T and one patient experienced gastric acidity in Group L. The comparative results clearly demonstrate that pain control by intravenous lornoxicam is significantly better than by intravenous tramadol at 24th postoperative hour after ORIF of mandibular trauma. Side effects produced by both the drugs were minor and had no apparent effect on the study results.

  19. Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR) as Treatment for Chronic Back Pain - an Observational Study with Assessment of Thalamocortical Dysrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Gmeiner, Sophia; Schultz, Claudia; Löwer, Marc; Kuhn, Klaus; Naranjo, José Raúl; Brenneisen, Christina; Hinterberger, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study of an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on a sample of low back pain patients was conducted in order to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the intervention as well as changes in an EEG pattern called thalamocortical dysrhythmia which is associated with chronic pain. 22 patients with chronic low back pain participated in an MBSR program. Effect sizes were measured for psychological functioning, pain severity, and quality of life. Furthermore, 4 parameters of the EEG power spectral density were assessed. Medium size effect sizes were found for health-related quality of life (EQ-5D, VAS, d = 0.43, p = 0.02; SF-12, psychological functioning, d = 0.50, p = 0.05), health-related life satisfaction (questions on life satisfaction d = 0.69, p = 0.01), depression (HADS, d = 0.48, p = 0.04, Brief Symptom Inventory d = 0.41, p = 0.04), and affective pain perception (pain perception scale d = 0.50, p = 0.04). The most relevant pain severity measurements improved in the range of d = 0.45-0.75 (p = 0.01-0.24). EEG analyses revealed no differences between the pre- and post-intervention. MBSR is a feasible intervention for patients with low back pain. They benefit from medium size effects which are comparable to similar behavioral interventions. Randomized controlled trials are needed in order to determine the specificity of these benefits. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  20. Hydrodynamic simulations of accretion flows with time-varying viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhishek; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2017-12-01

    X-ray outbursts of stellar-mass black hole candidates are believed to be due to a sudden rise in viscosity, which transports angular momentum efficiently and increases the accretion rates, causing higher X-ray flux. After the viscosity is reduced, the outburst subsides and the object returns back to the pre-outburst quiescence stage. In the absence of a satisfactory understanding of the physical mechanism leading to such a sharp time dependence of viscous processes, we perform numerical simulations where we include the rise and fall of a viscosity parameter at an outer injection grid, assumed to be located at the accumulation radius where matter from the companion is piled up before being released by enhanced viscosity. We use a power-law radial dependence of the viscosity parameter (α ˜ rɛ), but the exponent (ɛ) is allowed to vary with time to mimic a fast rise and decay of the viscosity parameter. Since X-ray spectra of a black hole candidate can be explained by a Keplerian disc component in the presence of a post-shock region of an advective flow, our goal here is also to understand whether the flow configurations required to explain the spectral states of an outbursting source could be obtained by a time-varying viscosity. We present the results of our simulations to prove that low-angular-momentum (sub-Keplerian) advective flows do form a Keplerian disc in the pre-shock region when the viscosity is enhanced, which disappears on a much longer time-scale after the viscosity is withdrawn. From the variation of the Keplerian disc inside an advective halo, we believe that our result, for the first time, is able to simulate the two-component advective flow dynamics during an entire X-ray outburst and explain the observed hysteresis effects in the hardness-intensity diagram.

  1. Kinematic viscosity of unstimulated whole saliva in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglio-Bonda, A; Pattarino, F; Foglio-Bonda, P L

    2014-10-01

    To analyze kinematic viscosity and pH of unstimulated whole saliva, evaluate possible variations after sampling, identify any gender differences and detect possible correlations between them. The sample consisted of sixty-four healthy young adults (37 females and 27 males, mean age 25.2 years). Saliva was collected using the spitting method at 11:00 am. Kinematic viscosity was determined with a capillary viscometer (ViscoClock, Schott-Geräte Mainz, Germany) equipped with a micro-Ubbelohde capillary. Viscosity and pH were measured at a temperature of 36 °C in a thermostatic bath. Viscosity and pH data were evaluated almost simultaneously at six different times after sampling in order to identify any variations due to aging. The data were statistically analyzed using Student's t test and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. In total sample kinematic viscosity was 1.40 cSt (SD = 0.39; RSD % = 27.81), in the male and female groups was 1.33 cSt (SD = 0.35, RSD% = 26.31) and 1.45 cSt (SD = 0.41, RSD % = 28.45) respectively; the difference was not statistically significant. Viscosity decreased exponentially as a function of time after sampling then reaching a plateau around 1.12 cSt, while the pH values increased linearly. There was a trend of pH to decrease while viscosity decreases. Kinematic viscometry could be a valid tool to evaluate salivary viscosity. Degradation of saliva after sampling affects viscosity and slightly pH. The use of capillary viscometer to evaluate salivary aging needs more improvements. Further studies are required to investigate and explain the effects of different techniques to reduce the film forming on the air/liquid interface during measurement.

  2. Cost assessment and ecological effectiveness of nutrient reduction options for mitigating Phaeocystis colony blooms in the Southern North Sea: an integrated modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelot, Christiane; Thieu, Vincent; Polard, Audrey; Garnier, Josette; Billen, Gilles; Hecq, Walter; Gypens, Nathalie

    2011-05-01

    Nutrient reduction measures have been already taken by wealthier countries to decrease nutrient loads to coastal waters, in most cases however, prior to having properly assessed their ecological effectiveness and their economic costs. In this paper we describe an original integrated impact assessment methodology to estimate the direct cost and the ecological performance of realistic nutrient reduction options to be applied in the Southern North Sea watershed to decrease eutrophication, visible as Phaeocystis blooms and foam deposits on the beaches. The mathematical tool couples the idealized biogeochemical GIS-based model of the river system (SENEQUE-RIVERSTRAHLER) implemented in the Eastern Channel/Southern North Sea watershed to the biogeochemical MIRO model describing Phaeocystis blooms in the marine domain. Model simulations explore how nutrient reduction options regarding diffuse and/or point sources in the watershed would affect the Phaeocystis colony spreading in the coastal area. The reference and prospective simulations are performed for the year 2000 characterized by mean meteorological conditions, and nutrient reduction scenarios include and compare upgrading of wastewater treatment plants and changes in agricultural practices including an idealized shift towards organic farming. A direct cost assessment is performed for each realistic nutrient reduction scenario. Further the reduction obtained for Phaeocystis blooms is assessed by comparison with ecological indicators (bloom magnitude and duration) and the cost for reducing foam events on the beaches is estimated. Uncertainty brought by the added effect of meteorological conditions (rainfall) on coastal eutrophication is discussed. It is concluded that the reduction obtained by implementing realistic environmental measures on the short-term is costly and insufficient to restore well-balanced nutrient conditions in the coastal area while the replacement of conventional agriculture by organic farming

  3. Assessment of probabilistic areal reduction factors of precipitations for the entire French territory with gridded rainfall data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchier, Catherine; Maire, Alexis; Arnaud, Patrick; Cantet, Philippe; Odry, Jean

    2016-04-01

    The starting point of our study was the availability of maps of rainfall quantiles available for the entire French mainland territory at the spatial resolution of 1 km². These maps display the rainfall amounts estimated for different rainfall durations (from 15 minutes to 72 hours) and different return periods (from 2 years up to 1 000 years). They are provided by a regionalized stochastic hourly point rainfall generator, the SHYREG method which was previously developed by Irstea (Arnaud et al., 2007; Cantet and Arnaud, 2014). Being calibrated independently on numerous raingauges data (with an average density across the country of 1 raingauge per 200 km²), this method suffers from a limitation common to point-process rainfall generators: it can only reproduce point rainfall patterns and has no capacity to generate rainfall fields. It can't hence provide areal rainfall quantiles, the estimation of the latter being however needed for the construction of design rainfall or for the diagnostic of observed events. One means of bridging this gap between our local rainfall quantiles and areal rainfall quantiles is given by the concept of probabilistic areal reduction factors of rainfall (ARF) as defined by Omolayo (1993). This concept enables to estimate areal rainfall of a particular frequency within a certain amount of time from point rainfalls of the same frequency and duration. Assessing such ARF for the whole French territory is of particular interest since it should allow us to compute areal rainfall quantiles, and eventually watershed rainfall quantiles, by using the already available grids of statistical point rainfall of the SHYREG method. Our purpose was then to assess these ARF thanks to long time-series of spatial rainfall data. We have used two sets of rainfall fields: i) hourly rainfall fields from a 10-year reference database of Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) over France (Tabary et al., 2012), ii) daily rainfall fields resulting from a 53-year

  4. Study on viscosity of conventional and polymer modified asphalt binders in steady and dynamic shear domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboo, Nikhil; Singh, Bhupendra; Kumar, Praveen; Vikram, Durgesh

    2017-07-01

    This study focuses on evaluating the flow behavior of conventional and polymer modified asphalt binders in steady- and dynamic-shear domain, for a temperature range of 20-70 °C, using a Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR). Steady-shear viscosity and frequency sweep tests were carried out on two conventional (VG 10 and VG 30) and two polymer (SBS and EVA) modified asphalt binders. Applicability of the Cox-Merz principle was evaluated and complex viscosity master curves were analyzed at five different reference temperatures. Cross model was used to simulate the complex viscosity master curves at different temperatures. It was found that asphalt binders exhibited shear-thinning behavior at all the test temperatures. The critical shear rate increased with increase in temperature and was found to be lowest for plastomeric modified asphalt binder. The Cox-Merz principle was found to be valid in the zero-shear viscosity (ZSV) domain and deviated at higher frequency/shear rate for all the binders. Results from the study indicated that the ratio of ZSV can be successfully used as shift factors for construction of master curves at different reference temperatures. Cross model was found to be suitable in simulating the complex viscosity master curves at all the test temperatures. Analysis of model parameters indicated that a strong relationship exists between ZSV and the critical shear rate. ZSV and critical shear rate varied exponentially with temperature. This relationship was used to propose a simple equation for assessing the shift factors for construction of master curves.

  5. Determining relative bulk viscosity of kilometre-scale crustal units using field observations and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robyn L.; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan R.

    2017-11-01

    Though the rheology of kilometre-scale polymineralic rock units is crucial for reliable large-scale, geotectonic models, this information is difficult to obtain. In geotectonic models, a layer is defined as an entity at the kilometre scale, even though it is heterogeneous at the millimetre to metre scale. Here, we use the shape characteristics of the boundaries between rock units to derive the relative bulk viscosity of those units at the kilometre scale. We examine the shape of a vertically oriented ultramafic, harzburgitic-lherzolitic unit, which developed a kilometre-scale pinch and swell structure at mid-crustal conditions ( 600 °C, 8.5 kbar), in the Anita Shear Zone, New Zealand. The ultramafic layer is embedded between a typical polymineralic paragneiss to the west, and a feldspar-quartz-hornblende orthogneiss, to the east. Notably, the boundaries on either side of the ultramafic layer give the ultramafics an asymmetric shape. Microstructural analysis shows that deformation was dominated by dislocation creep (n = 3). Based on the inferred rheological behaviour from the field, a series of numerical simulations are performed. Relative and absolute values are derived for bulk viscosity of the rock units by comparing boundary tortuosity difference measured on the field example and the numerical series. Our analysis shows that during deformation at mid-crustal conditions, paragneisses can be 30 times less viscous than an ultramafic unit, whereas orthogneisses have intermediate viscosity, 3 times greater than the paragneisses. If we assume a strain rate of 10- 14 s- 1 the ultramafic, orthogneiss and paragneiss have syn-deformational viscosities of 3 × 1022, 2.3 × 1021 and 9.4 × 1020 Pa s, respectively. Our study shows pinch and swell structures are useful as a gauge to assess relative bulk viscosity of rock units based on shape characteristics at the kilometre scale and in non-Newtonian flow regimes, even where heterogeneity occurs within the units at the

  6. Numerical solutions of Williamson fluid with pressure dependent viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Zehra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we have examined the flow of Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with pressure dependent viscosity. The governing equations of motion for Williamson fluid model under the effects of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are modeled and then solved numerically by the shooting method with Runge Kutta Fehlberg for two types of geometries i.e., (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. Four different cases for pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are assumed and the physical features of pertinent parameters are discussed through graphs.

  7. Elongational viscosity of multiarm (Pom-Pom) polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    -Pom was estimated to have 2.5 arms on average, while the estimate is 3.3 for the asymmetric star. The molar mass of each arm is about 27 kg/mol. The melts were characterized in the linear viscoelastic regime and in non-linear elongational rheometry. The transient elongational viscosity for the Pom-Pom molecule...... it corresponds well with an estimate of the maximum stretchability of the backbone. Time-strain separability was not observed for the 'Asymmetric star' molecule at the elongation rates investigated. The transient elongational viscosity for the 'Pom-Pom' molecule went through a reproducible maximum...... in the viscosity at the highest elongational rate....

  8. Structural Origin of Shear Viscosity of Liquid Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-25

    The relation between the microscopic structure and shear viscosity of liquid water was analyzed by calculating the cross-correlation between the shear stress and the two-body density using the molecular dynamics simulation. The slow viscoelastic relaxation that dominates the steady-state shear viscosity was ascribed to the destruction of the hydrogen-bonding network structure along the compression axis of the shear distortion, which resembles the structural change under isotropic hydrostatic compression. It means that the shear viscosity of liquid water reflects the anisotropic destruction-formation dynamics of the hydrogen-bonding network.

  9. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for water hammer analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new fast and efficient algorithm, Chebyshev super spectral viscosity (SSV method, is introduced to solve the water hammer equations. Compared with standard spectral method, the method's advantage essentially consists in adding a super spectral viscosity to the equations for the high wave numbers of the numerical solution. It can stabilize the numerical oscillation (Gibbs phenomenon and improve the computational efficiency while discontinuities appear in the solution. Results obtained from the Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method exhibit greater consistency with conventional water hammer calculations. It shows that this new numerical method offers an alternative way to investigate the behavior of the water hammer in propellant pipelines.

  10. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  11. High shear rate rheometry of low-viscosity liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Arthur S.

    1987-11-01

    A new instrument called LODGE STRESSMETER was developed to measure the shear elasticity and viscosity of general and multigrade oils at high shear rates. This will make possible the measurements of normal stress difference N1 for values of shear rate up to 5 x 10 to the 5th power is temperature of 150 C. New surprising data show (as yet unexplained) the the N1 contribution to the minimum oil film thickness could be as much as 75 percent of the contribution from viscosity. This raises hope for the use of oils with lower viscosity, leading to improved fuel economy and an increase in the range of motorized vehicles.

  12. Intrinsic viscosity of bead models for macromolecules and bioparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, L

    2001-10-01

    A new method based on the fractal dimension dependence of the hydrodynamic radius is proposed for calculation of the intrinsic viscosity of bead models. The method describes properly the viscosity increment except for elongated structures such as linear aggregates and ellipsoids. It is expected to be useful for very compact structures, for which the volume correction does not improve the results calculated by the modified Oseen tensor. The results obtained for the viscosity increment lie between the volume corrected ones and those determined by the cubic substitution procedure. They are close to the values recalculated from the falling velocities of the models analyzed.

  13. Effect of temperature and viscosity on swimming velocity of the copepod Acartia tonsa, brine shrimp Artemia salina and rotifer Brachionus plicatilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Madsen, C.V.; Riisgard, H.U.

    2008-01-01

    that the temperature-dependent viscosity of seawater is the key physical/mechanical factor that controls the beat frequency of water-pumping cilia in mussels and the swimming velocity in a ciliate. The present study on the swimming velocity of 3 zooplankton organisms, however, shows that the response of swimming...... velocity to a change in viscosity is different when due to a change in temperature or, at constant temperature, due to a manipulation of viscosity by addition of a high-molecular-weight polymer (polyvinyl pyrrolidone, PVP) to the ambient seawater. There is a biological effect (fraction of total reduction......) due to change in kinematic viscosity (v) be correlated in terms of a power law, V proportional to v(-m). The present data on swimming velocity of copepods, brine shrimps and rotifers show values of exponent m approximate to 1.5 to 3, with a trend of decreasing values for increasing size of species...

  14. The Effect of Viscosity on Performance of a Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Torabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal pump delivery head and flow rate drop effectively during the pumping of viscous fluids. Several methods and correlations have been developed to predict reduction rate in centrifugal pump performance when handling viscous fluids, but their results are not in very good agreement with each other. In this study, a common industrial low specific speed pump, which is extensively used in different applications, is studied. The entire pump, including impeller, volute, pipes, front and rear sidewall gaps, and balance holes, is simulated in Computational Fluid Dynamics and 3D full Navier Stokes equations are solved. CFD results are compared with experimental data such as pump performance curves, static pressure in casing, and disk friction loss. Dimensionless angular velocity and leakage rate are investigated in sidewall gap and efficiency variation due to viscosity is studied. The results demonstrate that the behavior of the fluid in sidewall gap is strictly sensitive to viscosity. Increasing viscosity improves the volumetric efficiency by reducing internal leakage through wear rings and balance holes, causing, however, a significant fall in the disk and overall efficiency. Results lead to some recommendations for designing centrifugal pumps which may be used in transferring viscous fluids.

  15. Green technology for durable finishing of viscose fibers via self-formation of AuNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Hossam E; El-Hawary, Nancy S; Ahmed, Hanan B

    2017-03-01

    Sensitivity of dyes' colors to the surrounding environment causes lower durability and stability of color, which reflects the importance of durable finishing treatment. Current technique offered antimicrobial/durable finishing of viscose fibers through direct formation of AuNPs inside fibers macromolecules without using any external agents. By using the reducing properties of cellulose in viscose, Au+3 was reduced to AuNPs and CHO/OH of cellulose subsequently were oxidized to COOH. For comparison, two different media were used; aqueous and alkaline. Increasing the reactivity and accessibility of cellulose macromolecules in alkali leaded to enlargement of the reduction process and more incorporation of AuNPs. Size of AuNPs inside fiber was recorded to be in range of 22-112nm and 14-100nm, in case of using aqueous and alkaline medium, respectively. Structure and properties of fibers were not changed by treatment according to XRD and ATR-FTIR data. The treated fibers were acquired durable violet color by the action of LSPR for AuNPs and darker color obtained using higher Au+3 concentration. The treated fibers exhibited good inhibition against different pathogenic microbes including bacteria and fungi. One-pot, quite simple, inexpensive, green and industrial viable are the significant advantages of the current technique for viscose finishing (pigmentation and antimicrobial action). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Rajratan, E-mail: basu@usna.edu; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James [Soft Matter and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, The United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  17. Faster in-plane switching and reduced rotational viscosity characteristics in a graphene-nematic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Kinnamon, Daniel; Skaggs, Nicole; Womack, James

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane switching (IPS) for a nematic liquid crystal (LC) was found to be considerably faster when the LC was doped with dilute concentrations of monolayer graphene flakes. Additional studies revealed that the presence of graphene reduced the rotational viscosity of the LC, permitting the nematic director to respond quicker in IPS mode on turning the electric field on. The studies were carried out with several graphene concentrations in the LC, and the experimental results coherently suggest that there exists an optimal concentration of graphene, allowing a reduction in the IPS response time and rotational viscosity in the LC. Above this optimal graphene concentration, the rotational viscosity was found to increase, and consequently, the LC no longer switched faster in IPS mode. The presence of graphene suspension was also found to decrease the LC's pretilt angle significantly due to the π-π electron stacking between the LC molecules and graphene flakes. To understand the π-π stacking interaction, the anchoring mechanism of the LC on a CVD grown monolayer graphene film on copper substrate was studied by reflected crossed polarized microscopy. Optical microphotographs revealed that the LC alignment direction depended on monolayer graphene's hexagonal crystal structure and its orientation.

  18. BENCHMARK SOLUTIONS FOR STOKES EQUATIONS WITH VARIABLE VISCOSITY IN CYLINDRICAL AND SPHERICAL COORDINATES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    I. V. Makeev; I. Y. Popov; I. V. Blinova

    2016-01-01

    .... We suggest exact particular solutions of Stokes and continuity equations with variable viscosity and density in spherical coordinates for the case of spherically symmetric viscosity and density distributions...

  19. Photovoltaic Impact Assessment of Smart Inverter Volt-VAR Control on Distribution System Conservation Voltage Reduction and Power Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Fei [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nagarajan, Adarsh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chakraborty, Sudipta [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baggu, Murali [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nguyen, Andu [SolarCity, San Mateo, CA (United States); Walinga, Sarah [SolarCity, San Mateo, CA (United States); McCarty, Michael [SolarCity, San Mateo, CA (United States); Bell, Frances [SolarCity, San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an impact assessment study of distributed photovoltaic (PV) with smart inverter Volt-VAR control on conservation voltage reduction (CVR) energy savings and distribution system power quality. CVR is a methodology of flattening and lowering a distribution system voltage profile in order to conserve energy. Traditional CVR relies on operating utility voltage regulators and switched capacitors. However, with the increased penetration of distributed PV systems, smart inverters provide the new opportunity to control local voltage and power factor by regulating the reactive power output, leading to a potential increase in CVR energy savings. This report proposes a methodology to implement CVR scheme by operating voltage regulators, capacitors, and autonomous smart inverter Volt-VAR control in order to achieve increased CVR benefit. Power quality is an important consideration when operating a distribution system, especially when implementing CVR. It is easy to measure the individual components that make up power quality, but a comprehensive method to incorporate all of these values into a single score has yet to be undertaken. As a result, this report proposes a power quality scoring mechanism to measure the relative power quality of distribution systems using a single number, which is aptly named the 'power quality score' (PQS). Both the CVR and PQS methodologies were applied to two distribution system models, one obtained from the Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) and another obtained from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). These two models were converted to the OpenDSS platform using previous model conversion tools that were developed by NREL. Multiple scenarios including various PV penetration levels and smart inverter densities were simulated to analyze the impact of smart inverter Volt-VAR support on CVR energy savings and feeder power quality. In order to analyze the CVR benefit and PQS, an annual simulation was conducted for each

  20. Assessment of isoniazid preventive therapy in the reduction of tuberculosis among ART patients in Arba Minch Hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abossie, Ashenafi; Yohanes, Tsegaye

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most frequent life-threatening opportunistic disease among people living with HIV and remains a leading cause of mortality, even among persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis have been recommended for the benefit of HIV/AIDS-infected individuals to prevent opportunistic infections. The aim of this study was to assess IPT prophylaxis in the reduction of TB among ART patients. The study was a hospital-based retrospective study. A total of 271 study participants' available information such as demographic data, the type of prophylaxis used, and TB/HIV coinfection status as well as other variables were collected from clinical laboratory and HIV care/ART follow-up clinic. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. TB-infected ART patients were higher among non-IPT group (37 [27.8%]) compared to IPT group (12 [8.7%]). The finding showed that IPT prophylaxis significantly reduces acquiring TB with the relative risk =0.31 (95% confidence interval =0.122, 0.49) in ART patients of this study site where the tuberculosis prevalence is prominent. ART had significant contribution for CD4 + T-cell lymphocyte count improvement in both IPT and non-IPT groups ( P ART patients than non-IPT group. This result highlights the use of IPT for the prevention of TB, especially for all ART patients. Other longitudinal studies are needed to observe the benefits and side effects of IPT prophylaxis in tuberculin skin test-positive individuals.

  1. Assessment of isoniazid preventive therapy in the reduction of tuberculosis among ART patients in Arba Minch Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abossie A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ashenafi Abossie, Tsegaye Yohanes Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia Background: Tuberculosis (TB is the most frequent life-threatening opportunistic disease among people living with HIV and remains a leading cause of mortality, even among persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis have been recommended for the benefit of HIV/AIDS-infected individuals to prevent opportunistic infections. The aim of this study was to assess IPT prophylaxis in the reduction of TB among ART patients. Methods: The study was a hospital-based retrospective study. A total of 271 study participants’ available information such as demographic data, the type of prophylaxis used, and TB/HIV coinfection status as well as other variables were collected from clinical laboratory and HIV care/ART follow-up clinic. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0. Results: TB-infected ART patients were higher among non-IPT group (37 [27.8%] compared to IPT group (12 [8.7%]. The finding showed that IPT prophylaxis significantly reduces acquiring TB with the relative risk =0.31 (95% confidence interval =0.122, 0.49 in ART patients of this study site where the tuberculosis prevalence is prominent. ART had significant contribution for CD4+ T-cell lymphocyte count improvement in both IPT and non-IPT groups (P<0.05 in this study. Conclusion: IPT had significant contributions to reduce the burden of TB in ART patients than non-IPT group. This result highlights the use of IPT for the prevention of TB, especially for all ART patients. Other longitudinal studies are needed to observe the benefits and side effects of IPT prophylaxis in tuberculin skin test-positive individuals. Keywords: IPT prophylaxis, ART patients, tuberculosis, CD4+ T-cell count, opportunistic disease

  2. Measuring viscosity with nonlinear self-excited microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouro, J.; Tiribilli, B.; Paoletti, P.

    2017-10-01

    A viscosity sensor based on the nonlinear behaviour of a microcantilever embedded in a self-excitation loop with an adjustable phase-shifter is proposed. The self-sustained oscillation frequencies of the cantilever are experimentally and theoretically investigated as functions of the fluid viscosity and of the imposed phase shift of the signal along the self-excitation loop. The sensor performance is validated experimentally using different water-glycerol solutions. In contrast to existing rheological sensors, the proposed platform can be tuned to work in two different modes: a high-sensitivity device whose oscillation frequency changes smoothly with the rheological properties of the fluid or a critical viscosity threshold detector, where, for small changes in fluid viscosity, there is a step change in oscillation frequency.

  3. PVT characterization and viscosity modeling and prediction of crude oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Eduardo Salvador P.; Dalberg, Anders; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    In previous works, the general, one-parameter friction theory (f-theory), models have been applied to the accurate viscosity modeling of reservoir fluids. As a base, the f-theory approach requires a compositional characterization procedure for the application of an equation of state (EOS), in most...... pressure, is also presented. The combination of the mass characterization scheme presented in this work and the f-theory, can also deliver accurate viscosity modeling results. Additionally, depending on how extensive the compositional characterization is, the approach,presented in this work may also...... deliver accurate viscosity predictions. The modeling approach presented in this work can deliver accurate viscosity and density modeling and prediction results over wide ranges of reservoir conditions, including the compositional changes induced by recovery processes such as gas injection....

  4. Poiseuille Flow of Fluid Whose Viscosity is Temperature Dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss a fluid flowing between two parallel plates. We assume a Poiseuille flow. Furthermore, we assume that the viscosity μ, depends on temperature T. We show that the velocity equation has two solutions. Graph features prominently in the presentation.

  5. Density and viscosity modeling and characterization of heavy oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Creek, J

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity and density are key properties for the evaluation, simulation, and development of petroleum reservoirs. Previously, the friction theory (f-theory) was shown to be capable of delivering simple and accurate viscosity models for petroleum reservoir fluids with molecular weights up to similar...... to 200 g/mol and viscosities up to similar to 10 mPa s, under usual reservoir conditions. As a basis, the f-theory approach requires a compositional characterization procedure that is used in conjunction with a van der Waals type of equation of state (EOS). This is achieved using simple cubic EOSs, which...... are widely used within the oil industry. Further work also established the basis for extending the approach to heavy oils. Thus, in this work, the extended f-theory approach is further discussed with the study and modeling of a wider set of representative heavy reservoir fluids with viscosities up...

  6. Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

  7. Rotational and spin viscosities of water: Application to nanofluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Bruus, Henrik; Todd, B.D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the rotational viscosity and the two spin viscosities for liquid water using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Water is modeled via the flexible SPC/Fw model where the Coulomb interactions are calculated via the Wolf method which enables the long simulation times required....... We find that the rotational viscosity is independent of the temperature in the range from 284 to 319 K. The two spin viscosities, on the other hand, decrease with increasing temperature and are found to be two orders of magnitude larger than that estimated by Bonthuis et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103...... geometries. The coupling also enables conversion of rotational electrical energy into fluid linear momentum and we find that in order to obtain measurable flow rates the electrical field strength must be in the order of 0.1 MV m(-1) and rotate with a frequency of more than 100 MHz....

  8. Quetol 651: Not just a low viscosity resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, E Ann

    2016-01-01

    Quetol 651, a low viscosity epoxy resin, is miscible with alcohols, acetone, and water. It is versatile and can be used as a single epoxide or mixed with other epoxides and anhydrides. The most important characteristic is that the addition of Quetol 651 to a formulation results in a lower viscosity embedding medium and allows for good detection of antigenic activity. Properly formulated and mixed resins containing Quetol 651 have excellent sectioning properties and good beam stability. The decrease in viscosity lends to lower specific gravity of the embedding medium and less interfering electron density between specimen elements resulting in better spatial resolution. New formulations and viscosity data are presented and compared to long used, embedding formulations and the extensive uses of Quetol 651 are reviewed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Viscosity Measurements and Correlation of the Squalane + CO2 Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomida, D.; Kumagai, A.; Yokoyama, C.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results for the viscosity of squalane + CO2 mixtures are reported. The viscosities were measured using a rolling ball viscometer. The experimental temperatures were 293.15, 313.15, 333.15, and 353.15 K, and pressures were 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 MPa. The CO2 mole fraction of the mixtures varied from 0 to 0.417. The experimental uncertainties in viscosity were estimated to be within ±3.0%. The viscosity of the mixtures decreased with an increase in the CO2 mole fraction. The experimental data were compared with predictions from the Grunberg-Nissan and McAllister equations, which correlated the experimental data with maximum deviations of 10 and 8.7%, respectively.

  10. Utilisation of respirometry to assess organic matter reduction of effluents from the Camaçari industrial complex (BA, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A. Oliveira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The treatment efficiency of industrial effluents, after biological treatment by activated sludge in aeration tanks (AT, was assessed through the utilisation of respirometry tests at the Cetrel's-wastewater treatment plant (WTP. Samples of the equalised effluent (EE, prior to treatment, and of the treated effluent (TE, after treatment, were analysed. Twenty bioassays batch were carried out to AT (AT-2, AT-3 and AT-4. Each test consisted of: a basic test, a basic test with peptone added, a test using EE and a test using TE. The data showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05 in the respiration activity between the aeration tanks. Regarding the specific oxygen uptake rate there was a mean reduction of 70.8% between the tests performed with EE and TE. The results demonstratd that respirometry tests could successfully assess the efficiency of the activated sludge process and, therefore, be adopted as tool for the monitoring from the WTP.Este trabalho avaliou, através de ensaios de respirometria, a eficiência do tratamento de efluentes industriais, após tratamento por lodo ativado em tanques de aeração (TA. Foram analisadas amostras do efluente equalisado (EE, antes do tratamento, e do efluente tratado (ET. Vinte baterias de ensaios foram realizadas com cada um dos TA (TA-2, TA-3 e TA-4. Cada bateria consistiu de um ensaio básico, contendo apenas o licor misto, um ensaio com adição de peptona, um ensaio com o EE e um com o ET. Não houve diferença estatística significativa (p>0,05 na atividade respiratória dos TA. Quanto à taxa de consumo de oxigênio específica houve uma redução média de 70,8% entre os ensaios realizados com EE e ET. Os ensaios de respirometria determinaram com eficiência o nível de tratamento através de lodo ativado, e deve ser adotado no monitoramento dos efluentes da estação de tratamento de efluentes do Pólo Industrial de Camaçari.

  11. Viscosity measurements of crystallizing andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Cimarelli, Corrado; deBiasi, Lea; Hanson, Jonathan B; Lavallée, Yan; Arzilli, Fabio; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-03-01

    Viscosity has been determined during isothermal crystallization of an andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador). Viscosity was continuously recorded using the concentric cylinder method and employing a Pt-sheathed alumina spindle at 1 bar and from 1400°C to subliquidus temperatures to track rheological changes during crystallization. The disposable spindle was not extracted from the sample but rather left in the sample during quenching thus preserving an undisturbed textural configuration of the crystals. The inspection of products quenched during the crystallization process reveals evidence for heterogeneous crystal nucleation at the spindle and near the crucible wall, as well as crystal alignment in the flow field. At the end of the crystallization, defined when viscosity is constant, plagioclase is homogeneously distributed throughout the crucible (with the single exception of experiment performed at the lowest temperature). In this experiments, the crystallization kinetics appear to be strongly affected by the stirring conditions of the viscosity determinations. A TTT (Time-Temperature-Transformation) diagram illustrating the crystallization "nose" for this andesite under stirring conditions and at ambient pressure has been constructed. We further note that at a given crystal content and distribution, the high aspect ratio of the acicular plagioclase yields a shear-thinning rheology at crystal contents as low as 13 vol %, and that the relative viscosity is higher than predicted from existing viscosity models. These viscosity experiments hold the potential for delivering insights into the relative influences of the cooling path, undercooling, and deformation on crystallization kinetics and resultant crystal morphologies, as well as their impact on magmatic viscosity.

  12. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for a fluidized bed model

    CERN Document Server

    Sarra, S A

    2003-01-01

    A Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method and operator splitting are used to solve a hyperbolic system of conservation laws with a source term modeling a fluidized bed. The fluidized bed displays a slugging behavior which corresponds to shocks in the solution. A modified Gegenbauer postprocessing procedure is used to obtain a solution which is free of oscillations caused by the Gibbs-Wilbraham phenomenon in the spectral viscosity solution. Conservation is maintained by working with unphysical negative particle concentrations.

  13. Comment on "Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity"

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 091301 (2105)] the cause of the acceleration of the present Universe has been identified with the shear viscosity of an imperfect relativistic fluid even in the absence of any bulk viscous contribution. The gist of this comment is that the shear viscosity, if anything, can only lead to an accelerated expansion over sufficiently small scales well inside the Hubble radius.

  14. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...... of the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  15. Convergence of a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Nazarov, Murtazo

    2013-02-01

    We present a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method to solve conservation laws. The Galerkin approximation is stabilized by only residual based artificial viscosity, without any least-squares, SUPG, or streamline diffusion terms. We prove convergence of the method, applied to a scalar conservation law in two space dimensions, toward an unique entropy solution for implicit time stepping schemes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Viscosity measurements of crystallizing andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; deBiasi, Lea; Hanson, Jonathan B.; Lavallée, Yan; Arzilli, Fabio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Viscosity has been determined during isothermal crystallization of an andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador). Viscosity was continuously recorded using the concentric cylinder method and employing a Pt‐sheathed alumina spindle at 1 bar and from 1400°C to subliquidus temperatures to track rheological changes during crystallization. The disposable spindle was not extracted from the sample but rather left in the sample during quenching thus preserving an undisturbed textural configuration of the crystals. The inspection of products quenched during the crystallization process reveals evidence for heterogeneous crystal nucleation at the spindle and near the crucible wall, as well as crystal alignment in the flow field. At the end of the crystallization, defined when viscosity is constant, plagioclase is homogeneously distributed throughout the crucible (with the single exception of experiment performed at the lowest temperature). In this experiments, the crystallization kinetics appear to be strongly affected by the stirring conditions of the viscosity determinations. A TTT (Time‐Temperature‐Transformation) diagram illustrating the crystallization “nose” for this andesite under stirring conditions and at ambient pressure has been constructed. We further note that at a given crystal content and distribution, the high aspect ratio of the acicular plagioclase yields a shear‐thinning rheology at crystal contents as low as 13 vol %, and that the relative viscosity is higher than predicted from existing viscosity models. These viscosity experiments hold the potential for delivering insights into the relative influences of the cooling path, undercooling, and deformation on crystallization kinetics and resultant crystal morphologies, as well as their impact on magmatic viscosity. PMID:27656114

  17. Effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Takashi, E-mail: t_yoshi@ees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Bai, Shi; Hirokawa, Aiki; Tanabe, Kazuhiro; Enpuku, Keiji

    2015-04-15

    We explored the effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid. Using a numerical simulation that accounts for both the Brownian and Néel processes, we clarified how the magnetization mechanism is affected by viscosity. When the excitation field varies much slower than the Brownian relaxation time, magnetization can be described by the Langevin function. On the other hand, for the case when the excitation field varies much faster than the Brownian relaxation time, but much slower than the Néel relaxation time, the easy axes of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) turn to some extent toward the direction of the excitation field in an equilibrium state. This alignment of the easy axes of MNPs caused by the AC field becomes more significant with the increase of the AC field strength. Consequently, the magnetization is different from the Langevin function even though Néel relaxation time is faster than time period of the external frequency. It is necessary to consider these results when we use harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid in a high-viscosity medium. - Highlights: • We explore the effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid. • We clarify how the magnetization mechanism is affected by the viscosity of the fluid. • The magnetization in a high-viscosity medium is different from a Langevin function. • We empirically express the alignment of easy axes of the MNPs caused by an AC field.

  18. Molecular clutch drives cell response to surface viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mark; Cantini, Marco; Reboud, Julien; Cooper, Jonathan M; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2018-02-06

    Cell response to matrix rigidity has been explained by the mechanical properties of the actin-talin-integrin-fibronectin clutch. Here the molecular clutch model is extended to account for cell interactions with purely viscous surfaces (i.e., without an elastic component). Supported lipid bilayers present an idealized and controllable system through which to study this concept. Using lipids of different diffusion coefficients, the mobility (i.e., surface viscosity) of the presented ligands (in this case RGD) was altered by an order of magnitude. Cell size and cytoskeletal organization were proportional to viscosity. Furthermore, there was a higher number of focal adhesions and a higher phosphorylation of FAK on less-mobile (more-viscous) surfaces. Actin retrograde flow, an indicator of the force exerted on surfaces, was also seen to be faster on more mobile surfaces. This has consequential effects on downstream molecules; the mechanosensitive YAP protein localized to the nucleus more on less-mobile (more-viscous) surfaces and differentiation of myoblast cells was enhanced on higher viscosity. This behavior was explained within the framework of the molecular clutch model, with lower viscosity leading to a low force loading rate, preventing the exposure of mechanosensitive proteins, and with a higher viscosity causing a higher force loading rate exposing these sites, activating downstream pathways. Consequently, the understanding of how viscosity (regardless of matrix stiffness) influences cell response adds a further tool to engineer materials that control cell behavior. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. Bulk viscosity of accretion disks around non rotating black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeen Moghaddas, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Keplerian, relativistic accretion disks around the non rotating black holes with the bulk viscosity. Many of authors studied the relativistic accretion disks around the black holes, but they ignored the bulk viscosity. We introduce a simple method to calculate the bulk in these disks. We use the simple form for the radial component of the four velocity in the Schwarzschild metric, then the other components of the four velocity and the components of the shear and the bulk tensor are calculated. Also all components of the bulk viscosity, the shear viscosity and stress tensor are calculated. It is seen that some components of the bulk tensor are comparable with the shear tensor. We calculate some of the thermodynamic quantities of the relativistic disks. Comparison of thermodynamic quantities shows that in some states influences of the bulk viscosity are important, especially in the inner radiuses. All calculations are done analytically and we do not use the boundary conditions. Finally, we find that in the relativistic disks around the black holes, the bulk viscosity is non-negligible in all the states.

  20. Measuring Lipid Membrane Viscosity Using Rotational and Translational Tracer Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormel, Tristan; Kurihara, Sarah; Reyer, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    The two-dimensional fluidity of lipid membranes enables the motion of membrane-bound macromolecules and is therefore crucial to biological function. However, current methods of measuring membrane viscosity rely on particular membrane lipid compositions or geometries, making the comparison of different measurements difficult. We address this with a new technique for measuring lipid membrane viscosity, in which determination of both the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of tracer particles enables quantification of viscosity as well as the effective size of the tracers. This technique is general, and can be applied to different model membrane systems to determine the effects of membrane composition and protein modulation. We present measurements of lipid membrane viscosity for two different lipids with phosphatidylcholine headgroups, finding a surprisingly wide distribution of effective tracer sizes, due presumably to a large variety of couplings to the membrane. We also compare the effective viscosity of two different structures - black lipid membranes and membrane multilayers - as well as changes in viscosity induced by peripheral protein binding.

  1. Relaxation-based viscosity mapping for magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkur, M; Muslu, Y; Saritas, E U

    2017-05-07

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has been shown to provide remarkable contrast for imaging applications such as angiography, stem cell tracking, and cancer imaging. Recently, there is growing interest in the functional imaging capabilities of MPI, where 'color MPI' techniques have explored separating different nanoparticles, which could potentially be used to distinguish nanoparticles in different states or environments. Viscosity mapping is a promising functional imaging application for MPI, as increased viscosity levels in vivo have been associated with numerous diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cancer. In this work, we propose a viscosity mapping technique for MPI through the estimation of the relaxation time constant of the nanoparticles. Importantly, the proposed time constant estimation scheme does not require any prior information regarding the nanoparticles. We validate this method with extensive experiments in an in-house magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) setup at four different frequencies (between 250 Hz and 10.8 kHz) and at three different field strengths (between 5 mT and 15 mT) for viscosities ranging between 0.89 mPa · s-15.33 mPa · s. Our results demonstrate the viscosity mapping ability of MPI in the biologically relevant viscosity range.

  2. Impact of aggregate formation on the viscosity of protein solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Lattuada, Marco; Yates, Andrew; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-07-21

    Gaining knowledge on the stability and viscosity of concentrated therapeutic protein solutions is of great relevance to the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, we borrow key concepts from colloid science to rationalize the impact of aggregate formation on the changes in viscosity of a concentrated monoclonal antibody solution. In particular, we monitor the kinetics of aggregate growth under thermal stress by static and dynamic light scattering, and we follow the rise in solution viscosity by measuring the diffusion coefficient of tracer nanoparticles with dynamic light scattering. Moreover, we characterize aggregate morphology in the frame of the fractal geometry. We show that the curves of the increase in viscosity with time monitored at three different protein concentrations collapse on one single master curve when the reaction profiles are normalized based on an effective volume fraction occupied by the aggregates, which depends on the aggregate size, concentration and morphology. Importantly, we find that the viscosity of an aggregate sample is lower than the viscosity of a monomeric sample of a similar occupied volume fraction due to the polydispersity of the aggregate distribution.

  3. The Effects of Fat Structures and Ice Cream Mix Viscosity on Physical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Julia; Hartel, Rich; Rankin, Scott

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate iciness perception and other sensory textural attributes of ice cream due to ice and fat structures and mix viscosity. Two studies were carried out varying processing conditions and mix formulation. In the 1st study, ice creams were collected at -3, -5, and -7.5 °C draw temperatures. These ice creams contained 0%, 0.1%, or 0.2% emulsifier, an 80:20 blend of mono- and diglycerides: polysorbate 80. In the 2nd study, ice creams were collected at -3 °C draw temperature and contained 0%, 0.2%, or 0.4% stabilizer, a blend of guar gum, locust bean gum, and carrageenan. Multiple linear regressions were used to determine relationships between ice crystal size, destabilized fat, and sensory iciness. In the ice and fat structure study, an inverse correlation was found between fat destabilization and sensory iciness. Ice creams with no difference in ice crystal size were perceived to be less icy with increasing amounts of destabilized fat. Destabilized fat correlated inversely with drip-through rate and sensory greasiness. In the ice cream mix viscosity study, an inverse correlation was found between mix viscosity and sensory iciness. Ice creams with no difference in ice crystal size were perceived to be less icy when formulated with higher mix viscosity. A positive correlation was found between mix viscosity and sensory greasiness. These results indicate that fat structures and mix viscosity have significant effects on ice cream microstructure and sensory texture including the reduction of iciness perception. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Workshop: Economic Valuation of Mortality Risk Reduction: Assessing the State of the Art for Policy Applications (2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This two-day workshop, co-sponsored by EPA's National Center for Environmental Economics and National Center for Environmental Research, was dedicated to exploring methods for valuing mortality risk reductions. There were six sessions held in total.

  5. A stress-strain lag Eddy viscosity model for unsteady mean flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revell, A.J. [University of Manchester, School of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: alistair.revell@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Benhamadouche, S. [University of Manchester, School of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); EDF-DER-LNH, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Craft, T. [University of Manchester, School of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Laurence, D. [University of Manchester, School of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); EDF-DER-LNH, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2006-10-15

    A new Eddy viscosity model is proposed to include stress-strain lag effects in the modelling of unsteady mean flows. A transport equation for the lag parameter, hereby denoted C {sub as}, is derived from a full Reynolds stress model (RSM), to be solved in conjunction with a standard two equation Eddy viscosity model (EVM). The performance of the new k-{epsilon}-C {sub as} model is assessed by applying it to the flow in a homogeneous irrotational cyclic strain; a channel flow driven by a pressure gradient oscillating around a non-zero mean, and a NACA0012 profile in deep stall. For the oscillating channel, results are compared with recent large Eddy simulations (LES) of the same flow and the addition of the lag parameter equation is shown to give improved results when compared to the standard EVM outside the near wall region.

  6. Assessment of reduction behavior of hematite iron ore pellets in coal fines for application in sponge ironmaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

    2009-07-01

    Studies on isothermal reduction kinetics (with F grade coal) in fired pellets of hematite iron ores, procured from four different mines of Orissa, were carried out in the temperature range of 850-1000C to provide information for the Indian sponge iron plants. The rate of reduction in all the fired iron ore pellets increased markedly with a rise of temperature up to 950C, and thereafter it decreased at 1000C. The rate was more intense in the first 30 minutes. All iron ores exhibited almost complete reduction in their pellets at temperatures of 900 and 950C in 2 hours' heating time duration, and the final product morphologies consisted of prominent cracks. The kinetic model equation 1-(1-a){sup 1/3}=kt was found to fit best to the experimental data, and the values of apparent activation energy were evaluated. Reductions of D. R. Pattnaik and M. G. Mohanty iron ore pellets were characterized by higher activation energies (183 and 150 kJ mol{sup -1}), indicating carbon gasification reaction to be the rate-controlling step. The results established lower values of activation energy (83 and 84 kJ mol{sup -1}) for the reduction of G. M. OMC Ltd. and Sakaruddin iron ore pellets, proposing their overall rates to be controlled by indirect reduction reactions.

  7. A qualitative assessment of stakeholder perceptions and socio-cultural influences on the acceptability of harm reduction programs in Tijuana, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magis-Rodriguez Carlos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mexico-U.S. border region is experiencing rising rates of blood-borne infections among injection drug users (IDUs, emphasizing the need for harm reduction interventions. Methods We assessed the religious and cultural factors affecting the acceptability and feasibility of three harm reduction interventions – Needle exchange programs (NEPs, syringe vending machines, and safer injection facilities (SIFs – in Tijuana, Mexico. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 community stakeholders to explore cultural and societal-related themes. Results Themes that emerged included Tijuana's location as a border city, family values, and culture as a mediator of social stigma and empathy towards IDUs. Perception of low levels of both awareness and socio-cultural readiness for harm reduction interventions was noted. Religious culture emerged as a theme, highlighting the important role religious leaders play in determining community responses to harm reduction and rehabilitation strategies for IDUs. The influence of religious culture on stakeholders' opinions concerning harm reduction interventions was evidenced by discussions of family and social values, stigma, and resulting policies. Conclusion Religion and politics were described as both a perceived benefit and deterrent, highlighting the need to further explore the overall influences of culture on the acceptability and implementation of harm reduction programs for drug users.

  8. Viscosity Relaxation in Molten HgZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Because of its narrow electronic band-gap, HgZnTe solid solutions have been proposed as effective detectors for infrared radiation. To produce the best single crystals of these materials for this application, knowledge of the phase diagram that governs the freezing of the liquid is essential. Besides the phase diagram, however, some information concerning the thermophysical properties of the melt, such as viscosity, density, specific heat, and enthalpy of mixing, can also be useful. Of these thermophysical properties, the viscosity is perhaps of the most interest scientifically. Measurements using the oscillating cup method have shown that the isothermal melt requires tens of hours of equilibration time before a steady value of the viscosity can be achieved. Over this equilibration time, which depends upon temperature, the viscosity can increase by as much as a factor of two before reaching a steady state. We suggest that this relaxation phenomenon may be due to a slight polymerization of Te atoms in the melt. To account for the time dependence of the viscosity in the HgZnTe melt, we propose that the liquid acts as a solvent that favors the formation of Te atom chains. We suggest that as the melt is cooled from a high temperature to the temperature for measurement of the viscosity, a free radical polymerization of Te atoms begins. To estimate this average molecular weight, we use a simple free radical polymerization mechanism, including a depolymerization step, to calculate the time dependence to the concentration of each Te polymer molecular weight fraction. From these molecular weight fractions, we compute the weight average molecular weight of the distribution. Using the semi-empirical relation between average molecular weight and viscosity, we obtain a formula for the time dependence of the viscosity of the melt. Upon examining this formula, we find that the viscosity achieves a steady value when a balance is achieved between the rate of formation of the chains

  9. Peak and average rectified EMG measures: which method of data reduction should be used for assessing core training exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, A E; Thompson, K G; French, D N; Hodgson, D; Spears, I R

    2011-02-01

    Core strengthening and stability exercises are fundamental for any conditioning training program. Although surface electromyography (sEMG) is used to quantify muscle activity there is a lack of research using this method to investigate the core musculature and core stability. Two types of data reduction are commonly used for sEMG; peak and average rectified EMG methods. Peak EMG has been infrequently reported in the literature with regard to the assessment of core training while even fewer studies have incorporated average rectified EMG data (ARV). The aim of the study was to establish the repeatability of peak and average rectified EMG data during core training exercises and their interrelationship. Ten male highly trained athletes (inter-subject repeatability group; age, 18 ± 1.2 years; height, 176.5 ± 3.2 cm; body mass, 71 ± 4.5 kg) and one female highly trained athlete (intra-subject repeatability group; age; 27 years old; height; 180 cm; weight; 53 kg) performed five maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and five core exercises, chosen to represent a range of movement and muscle recruitment patterns. Peak EMG and ARV EMG were calculated for eight core muscles (rectus abdominis, RA; external oblique, EO; internal oblique, IO; multifidis, MF; latissimus dorsi, LD; longissimus, LG; gluteus maximus, GM; rectus femoris, RF) using sEMG. Average coefficient of variation (CV%) for peak EMG across all the exercises and muscles was 45%. This is in comparison to 35% for the ARV method, which was found to be a significant difference (Pexercise. Analysis of the inter-subject and intra-subject CV% values suggest that these exercises and muscles are sufficiently repeatable using sEMG. Five muscles were highly correlated (R>0.70; RA, EO, MF, GM, LG) between peak and ARV EMG suggesting, that for these core muscles, the two methods provide a similar evaluation of muscle activity. However, for other muscles (IO, RF, LD) the relationship was found to range from poor

  10. An instrument to assess quality of life in relation to nutrition: item generation, item reduction and initial validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akl Elie A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is arguable that modification of diet, given its potential for positive health outcomes, should be widely advocated and adopted. However, food intake, as a basic human need, and its modification may be accompanied by sensations of both pleasure and despondency and may consequently affect to quality of life (QoL. Thus, the feasibility and success of dietary changes will depend, at least partly, on whether potential negative influences on QoL can be avoided. This is of particular importance in the context of dietary intervention studies and in the development of new food products to improve health and well being. Instruments to measure the impact of nutrition on quality of life in the general population, however, are few and far between. Therefore, the aim of this project was to develop an instrument for measuring QoL related to nutrition in the general population. Methods and results We recruited participants from the general population and followed standard methodology for quality of life instrument development (identification of population, item selection, n = 24; item reduction, n = 81; item presentation, n = 12; pretesting of questionnaire and initial validation, n = 2576; construct validation n = 128; and test-retest reliability n = 20. Of 187 initial items, 29 were selected for final presentation. Factor analysis revealed an instrument with 5 domains. The instrument demonstrated good cross-sectional divergent and convergent construct validity when correlated with scores of the 8 domains of the SF-36 (ranging from -0.078 to 0.562, 19 out of 40 tested correlations were statistically significant and 24 correlations were predicted correctly and good test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients from 0.71 for symptoms to 0.90. Conclusions We developed and validated an instrument with 29 items across 5 domains to assess quality of life related to nutrition and other aspects of food intake. The instrument

  11. An assessment of the impact of the JSY cash transfer program on maternal mortality reduction in Madhya Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Indian Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY program is a demand-side program in which the state pays women a cash incentive to deliver in an institution, with the aim of reducing maternal mortality. The JSY has had 54 million beneficiaries since inception 7 years ago. Although a number of studies have demonstrated the effect of JSY on coverage, few have examined the direct impact of the program on maternal mortality. Objective: To study the impact of JSY on maternal mortality in Madhya Pradesh (MP, one of India's largest provinces. Design: By synthesizing data from various sources, district-level maternal mortality ratios (MMR from 2005 to 2010 were estimated using a Bayesian spatio-temporal model. Based on these, a mixed effects multilevel regression model was applied to assess the impact of JSY. Specifically, the association between JSY intensity, as reflected by 1 proportion of JSY-supported institutional deliveries, 2 total annual JSY expenditure, and 3 MMR, was examined. Results: The proportion of all institutional deliveries increased from 23.9% in 2005 to 55.9% in 2010 province-wide. The proportion of JSY-supported institutional deliveries rose from 14% (2005 to 80% (2010. MMR declines in the districts varied from 2 to 35% over this period. Despite the marked increase in JSY-supported delivery, our multilevel models did not detect a significant association between JSY-supported delivery proportions and changes in MMR in the districts. The results from the analysis examining the association between MMR and JSY expenditure are similar. Conclusions: Our analysis was unable to detect an association between maternal mortality reduction and the JSY in MP. The high proportion of institutional delivery under the program does not seem to have converted to lower mortality outcomes. The lack of significant impact could be related to supply-side constraints. Demand-side programs like JSY will have a limited effect if the supply side is unable

  12. Demonstrating the Importance of Bubbles and Viscosity on Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, A.

    2005-12-01

    The behavior of bubbles (exsolved volatile from magma) and viscosity of magma are important parameters that influence volcanic eruptions. Exsolved volatiles increase the volume of magma and reduce its density so that magma has sufficient volume and buoyancy force to erupt. Volatiles exsolve through nucleation and growth by diffusion and bubbles can expand as pressure is reduced. The time scale of diffusion depends on the viscosity of surrounding magma, and the expansion time scale of a bubble is also depends on the viscosity of magma. These control the time scale for volume change. If bubbles segregate from magma and collapse, the magma might not able to expand sufficiently to erupt violently. Whether a bubble can segregate from the liquid part of magma is also depends on viscosity of magma. In this poster, I introduce a straightforward demonstration to show the importance of bubbles and viscosity of magma on volcanic eruptions. To make bubbles, I use baking soda (NaHCO3) and citric acid. Reaction between them generates carbon dioxide (CO2) to make bubbles. I make citric acid solution gel by using agar at the bottom of a transparent glass and pour baking soda disolved corn syrup on top of the agar. This situation is a model of basally heated magma chamber. When water disolved magma (baking soda disolved corn syrup) receives sufficient heat (citric acid) bubbles are generated. I can change viscosity of corn syrup by varying the concentration of water. This demonstration shows how viscosity controls the time scale of volume change of bubbly magma and the distribution of bubbles in the fluid. In addition it helps to understand the important physical processes in volcanic eruption: bubble nucleation, diffusion grows, expansion, and bubble driving convection. I will perform a live demonstration at the site of the poster.

  13. Intrinsic viscosity of polymers and biopolymers measured by microchip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinkee; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2005-11-15

    Intrinsic viscosity provides insight to molecular structure and interactions in solution. A new microchip method is described for fast and accurate measurements of viscosity and intrinsic viscosity of polymer and biopolymer solutions. Polymer samples are diluted with solvent in the microfluidic chip by imposing pressure gradients across the channel network. The concentration and flow dilutions of the polymer sample are calculated from the fluorescent signals recorded over a range of dilutions. The viscosities at various polymer dilutions are evaluated using mass and momentum balances in the pressure-driven microchannel flow. The technique is particularly important to many chemical, biological, and medical applications where sample is available in very small quantities. The intrinsic viscosity experiments were performed for three classes of polymer solutions: (a) poly(ethylene glycol), polymers with linear hydrocarbon chains; (b) bovine serum albumin, biopolymer chains with hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids, and (c) DNA fragments, biological macromolecules with double-stranded polymeric chains. The measured values of intrinsic viscosity agree remarkably well with the available data obtained using different methods. The data exhibit power law behavior for molecular weight as described by the Mark-Houwink-Sakurada equation. Experiments were performed to understand the effect of solvent quality and salt concentration on molecular conformations and the intrinsic viscosity of the polymers. This method offers a new way to study the conformational changes in proteins and DNA solutions in various buffer conditions such as pH, ionic strength, and surfactants. The effects of shear rate in the microchannel and mixing time on the accuracy and limitation of the measurement method are discussed.

  14. Determination of Viscosity Versus Pressure by Means of a Clearance Seal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Schmidt Hansen, Niels; Lund, Martin Thomas Overdahl

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the construction and testing of a simple, experimental tool setup that enables determination of the pressure–viscosity relationship for high viscosity oils. Comparing the determined pressure–viscosity relationship with a reference rheometer measuring the viscosity at ambient ...

  15. Post-2012 climate regime. How industrial and developing nations can help to reduce emissions - assessing emission trends, reduction potentials, incentive systems and negotiation options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duscha, Vicki; Graichen, Jakob; Healy, Sean; Schleich, Joachim; Schumacher, Katja [Oeko-Institut e.V., Berlin (Germany); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    This report analyses the emissions reduction targets submitted under the Copenhagen Accord by developed and developing countries in matters of four key questions: - Do the pledges add up to the emission reductions required necessary by science? - What are the costs associated with meeting the given targets? - Are the proposed emission reduction efforts of Annex I parties comparable? - What would comparable efforts look like taking country-specific socio-economic indicators into account? Secondary to these questions this report explores the economic and environmental implications of the submitted pledges and NAMAs. Furthermore, we analyze and assess the comparability of efforts of Annex I mitigation pledges compared to a range of socio-economic indicators that may provide a basis for a ''fair'' effort sharing agreement to achieve a given target. (orig.)

  16. Shear viscosity of shocked metals at mega-bar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    Viscosity of metals at high pressures and temperatures has been one of the most concerned problems in weapon physics and geophysics, e.g., the shear viscosity coefficients of substances in earth's mantle and earth's core at mega-bar pressures are needed for understanding the core mantle convection in deep earth. But the experimental data is very scarce because the conventional measurement methods can hardly be applied to such compression conditions [1]. In this talk, the principle of small-disturbance perturbation method [2] is re-investigated based on both the analytic solution and the numerical solution of the two-dimentional shock flow of sinusoidal distubance on front. In numerical solution, the real viscosity, which governs the flow behind the shock front and the perturbation damping feature, and the artificial viscosity, whick controls the numerical oscillation, separately treated. The relation between the viscosity of flow and the damping features of perturbation amplitude is quantitatively established for the loading situations of Sakharov's [3] and a flyer-impact situation with a finite disturbance. The later is the theoretical basis to develop a new experimental method, called the flyer-impact small-disturbance method [4]. In the flyer-impact small-disturbance method, the two-stage light-gas gun is used to launch a metal flyer. When the flyer directly impacts on the wedge-shaped sample with a sinusoidal surface, a two-dimensional shock flow of sinusoidal distubance on its front is generated. The amplitude of disturbance and its dependance with propagation distance is measured by use of an electric pin-array probe or a fibre-array probe. Correspondingly, the solution of the flow is given by numerically solving the hydrodynamic equations by the finite difference technique to find out the quantative correlations among the amplitude decay, the initial distribution of flow, the amplitude of initial disturbance, the shear viscosity of the flow, and the material

  17. Investigation of viscosity of whole hydrolyze sweetened condensed milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kalinina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Рaper is aimed at developing of low-lactose (hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk products technology for lactose intolerant people and for the whole population. Materials and methods: Rheological characteristics were determined on a Reotest device by the 2 nd method of viscometry Results and discussion. Reasonability of ß-galactosidase use for milk lactose hydrolyze during the production of canned products with sugar was proved in the previous works. This technology gives possibility to increase the quality of condensed canned foods, to reduce sugar concentration till 50 %, to increase dietary properties. Due to the reducing of saccharose mass part till 22 and 31 % the products had a liquid consistency that’s why was a necessity to increase the viscosity properties of condensed products. One of method to increase the product viscosity is inoculation of stabilization systems. Reasonability of the usage of stabilization system Bivicioc 1L was proved. The researches of viscosity determination in whole hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk were shown in the work. Relations of viscosity of whole hydrolyzed condensed milk to the deformation rate were presented. Conclusions Viscosity indices of experimental samples in the fresh produced products and during storage are determined and justified.

  18. Universality of the shear viscosity of alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, N.; Xu, H.; Wax, J.-F.

    2017-09-01

    The universality of the shear viscosity of alkali metals is studied up to high pressure. Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are used to calculate the stress autocorrelation function, which allows us to obtain the value of shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formula. Atomic interactions are computed from Fiolhais pseudopotential and are validated by comparison between pair distribution functions and mean-squared displacements obtained from classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The description of the interactions is accurate at least up to 12 GPa, 9.4 GPa, 6.6 GPa, and 3 GPa for Na, K, Rb, and Cs, respectively, and to a lesser extent up to 4.8 GPa for Li. A good agreement between simulation and experimental viscosity results along the liquid-gas coexistence curve is found. The viscosity appears to be a universal property over a wide range of the liquid phase of the phase diagram, between 0.85 and 1.5 times the ambient melting density and up to seven times the ambient melting temperature. Scaling laws are proposed following relations formulated in [Meyer, Xu, and Wax, Phys. Rev. B 93, 214203 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.214203] so that it is possible to predict the viscosity value of any alkali metal with an accuracy better than 10% over the corresponding density and temperature range.

  19. Bulk viscosity, interaction and the viability of phantom solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyva, Yoelsy; Sepulveda, Mirko [Universidad de Tarapaca, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Arica (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We study the dynamics of a bulk viscosity model in the Eckart approach for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe. We have included radiation and dark energy, assumed as perfect fluids, and dark matter treated as an imperfect fluid having bulk viscosity. We also introduce an interaction term between the dark matter and dark energy components. Considering that the bulk viscosity is proportional to the dark matter energy density and imposing a complete cosmological dynamics, we find bounds on the bulk viscosity in order to reproduce a matter-dominated era (MDE). This constraint is independent of the interaction term. Some late time phantom solutions are mathematically possible. However, the constraint imposed by a MDE restricts the interaction parameter, in the phantom solutions, to a region consistent with a null value, eliminating the possibility of late time stable solutions with w < -1. From the different cases that we study, the only possible scenario, with bulk viscosity and interaction term, belongs to the quintessence region. In the latter case, we find bounds on the interaction parameter compatible with latest observational data. (orig.)

  20. Dark goo: Bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gagnon, Jean-Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an "effective" pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local eq...

  1. Dynamic viscosity study of barley malt and chicory concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research is to find optimal conditions for dispersing and subsequent dehydration of liquid food environments in the nozzle spray drying chamber through the study of dynamic changes in viscosity according to temperature, velocities gradients and dry residue content. The objects of study were roasted chicory and malt barley concentrates with dry residue content of 20, 40, 60 and 80%. Research of dynamic viscosity were carried out at the measuring complex based on the rotational viscometer Rheotest II, analog-to-digital converter, module Laurent and a personal computer with a unique software that allows to record in real time (not only on a tape recorder, but also in the form of graphic files the behavior of the viscosity characteristics of concentrates. Registration of changes of dynamic viscosity was carried out at a shear rate gradient from 1,0 с -1 to 27,0 с -1 and the products temperature thermostating : 35, 55, 75˚ C. The research results are presented in the form of graphic dependences of effective viscosity on shear rate and flow curves (dependencies of shear stresses on the velocity gradient, which defined flow regimes, the optimal modes of dispersion concentrates into spray dryer chambers in obtaining of powdered semi-finished products and instanting were found: dry residue content - 40 %, concentrate temperature - 75 ˚C, velocity gradient in the air channel of the nozzle at least 20 c-1

  2. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collisional interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Giulia; Padding, Johan T.; Deen, Niels G.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2017-06-01

    A complete knowledge of the effect of droplet viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcomes is essential for industrial processes such as spray drying. When droplets with dispersed solids are dried, the apparent viscosity of the dispersed phase increases by many orders of magnitude, which drastically changes the outcome of a droplet-droplet collision. However, the effect of viscosity on the droplet collision regime boundaries demarcating coalescence and reflexive and stretching separation is still not entirely understood and a general model for collision outcome boundaries is not available. In this work, the effect of viscosity on the droplet-droplet collision outcome is studied using direct numerical simulations employing the volume of fluid method. The role of viscous energy dissipation is analysed in collisions of droplets with different sizes and different physical properties. From the simulations results, a general phenomenological model depending on the capillary number (Ca, accounting for viscosity), the impact parameter (B), the Weber number (We), and the size ratio (Δ) is proposed.

  3. Viscosity of diluted suspensions of vegetal particles in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szydłowska Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity and rheological behaviour of sewage as well as sludge are essential while designing apparatuses and operations employed in the sewage treatment process and its processing. With reference to these substances, the bio-suspensions samples of three size fractions ((i 150÷212 μm, (ii 106÷150 μm and (iii below106 μm of dry grass in water with solid volume fraction 8%, 10% and 11% were prepared. After twenty four hours prior to their preparation time, the suspension samples underwent rheometeric measurements with the use of a rotational rheometer with coaxial cylinders. On the basis of the obtained results, flow curves were plotted and described with both the power model and Herschel-Bulkley model. Moreover, the viscosity of the studied substances was determined that allowed to conclude that the studied bio-suspensions display features of viscoelastic fluids. The experimentally established viscosity was compared to the calculated one according to Manley and Manson equation, recommended in the literature. It occurred that the measured viscosity values substantially exceed the calculation viscosity values, even by 105 times. The observations suggest that it stems from water imbibition of fibrous vegetal particles, which causes their swelling and decreases the amount of liquid phase in the suspension.

  4. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: Irradiation and rheological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daar, Eman [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: e.daar@surrey.ac.uk; King, L.; Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thorpe, R.B. [Fluids and Systems Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), particular interest being shown herein in synovial fluid. The present study aims to investigate the degrading effects of X-ray radiation on HA at radiotherapy doses. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses on HA solutions have been made at different shear rates using various types of viscometer for different concentrations in the range 0.01-1% w/v of HA. The HA has been subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 to 20 Gy, the major emphasis being on doses below 5 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. Present results, for HA solutions in the concentration range 0.01% to 1% w/v, show reduced viscosity with dose over the range 0-4 Gy, the latter covering the dose regime of interest in fractionated radiotherapy. The work also shows agreement with previous Raman microspectrometry findings by others, the possible bond alterations being defined by comparison with available published data.

  5. Detection of Liposome Membrane Viscosity Perturbations with Ratiometric Molecular Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipper, Matthew E.; Dakanali, Marianna; Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Molecular rotors are a form of fluorescent intramolecular charge-transfer complexes that can undergo intramolecular twisting motion upon photoexcitation. Twisted-state formation leads to non-radiative relaxation that competes with fluorescence emission. In bulk solutions, these molecules exhibit a viscosity-dependent quantum yield. On the molecular scale, the fluorescence emission is a function of the local free volume, which in turn is related to the local microviscosity. Membrane viscosity, and the inverse; fluidity, are characteristic terms used to describe the ease of movement withing the membrane. Often, changes in membrane viscosity govern intracellular processes and are indicative of a disease state. Molecular rotors have been used to investigate viscosity changes in liposomes and cells, but accuracy is affected by local concentration gradients and sample optical properties. We have developed self-calibrating ratiometric molecular rotors to overcome this challenge and integrated the new molecules into a DLPC liposome model exposed to the membrane-fluidizing agent propanol. We show that the ratiometric emission intensity linearly decreases with the pentanol exposure and that the ratiometric intensity is widely independent of the total liposome concentration. Conversely, dye concentration inside liposomes influences the sensitivity of the system. We suggest that the new self-calibrating dyes can be used for real-time viscosity sensing in liposome systems with the advantages of lifetime measurements, but with low-cost steady-state instrumentation. PMID:21354253

  6. Probing large viscosities in glass-formers with nonequilibrium simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Robbins, Mark O.

    2017-07-01

    For decades, scientists have debated whether supercooled liquids stop flowing below a glass transition temperature Tg0 or whether motion continues to slow gradually down to zero temperature. Answering this question is challenging because human time scales set a limit on the largest measurable viscosity, and available data are equally well fit to models with opposite conclusions. Here, we use short simulations to determine the nonequilibrium shear response of a typical glass-former, squalane. Fits of the data to an Eyring model allow us to extrapolate predictions for the equilibrium Newtonian viscosity ηN over a range of pressures and temperatures that change ηN by 25 orders of magnitude. The results agree with the unusually large set of equilibrium and nonequilibrium experiments on squalane and extend them to higher ηN. Studies at different pressures and temperatures are inconsistent with a diverging viscosity at finite temperature. At all pressures, the predicted viscosity becomes Arrhenius with a single temperature-independent activation barrier at low temperatures and high viscosities (ηN>103 Pa ṡs). Possible experimental tests of our results are outlined.

  7. Predicting the apparent viscosity and yield stress of mixtures of primary, secondary and anaerobically digested sewage sludge: Simulating anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markis, Flora; Baudez, Jean-Christophe; Parthasarathy, Rajarathinam; Slatter, Paul; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2016-09-01

    Predicting the flow behaviour, most notably, the apparent viscosity and yield stress of sludge mixtures inside the anaerobic digester is essential because it helps optimize the mixing system in digesters. This paper investigates the rheology of sludge mixtures as a function of digested sludge volume fraction. Sludge mixtures exhibited non-Newtonian, shear thinning, yield stress behaviour. The apparent viscosity and yield stress of sludge mixtures prepared at the same total solids concentration was influenced by the interactions within the digested sludge and increased with the volume fraction of digested sludge - highlighted using shear compliance and shear modulus of sludge mixtures. However, when a thickened primary - secondary sludge mixture was mixed with dilute digested sludge, the apparent viscosity and yield stress decreased with increasing the volume fraction of digested sludge. This was caused by the dilution effect leading to a reduction in the hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic interactions when dilute digested sludge was added. Correlations were developed to predict the apparent viscosity and yield stress of the mixtures as a function of the digested sludge volume fraction and total solids concentration of the mixtures. The parameters of correlations can be estimated using pH of sludge. The shear and complex modulus were also modelled and they followed an exponential relationship with increasing digested sludge volume fraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Meta-Analysis of Free-Response Studies, 1992-2008: Assessing the Noise Reduction Model in Parapsychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Lance; Tressoldi, Patrizio E.; Di Risio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of meta-analyses on 3 types of free-response study: (a) ganzfeld (a technique that enhances a communication anomaly referred to as "psi"); (b) nonganzfeld noise reduction using alleged psi-enhancing techniques such as dream psi, meditation, relaxation, or hypnosis; and (c) standard free response (nonganzfeld, no noise…

  9. Assessing the influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state on organic pollutant biodegradation in algal-bacterial photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahr, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Rosa, de la F.; Garcia-Encina, P.; Munoz, R.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the carbon oxidation-reduction state (CORS) of organic pollutants on their biodegradation in enclosed algal-bacterial photobioreactors was evaluated using a consortium of enriched wild-type methanotrophic bacteria and microalgae. Methane, methanol and glucose (with CORS -4, -2 and

  10. A strategic assessment of crown fire hazard in Montana: potential effectiveness and costs of hazard reduction treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl E. Fiedler; Charles E. Keegan; Christopher W. Woodall; Todd A. Morgan

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of crown fire hazard are presented for existing forest conditions in Montana by density class, structural class, forest type, and landownership. Three hazard reduction treatments were evaluated for their effectiveness in treating historically fire-adapted forests (ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.), Douglas-fir (...

  11. Bouncing-to-Merging Transition in Drop Impact on Liquid Film: Role of Liquid Viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Saha, Abhishek; Law, Chung K; Sun, Chao

    2018-02-27

    When a drop impacts on a liquid surface, it can either bounce back or merge with the surface. The outcome affects many industrial processes, in which merging is preferred in spray coating to generate a uniform layer and bouncing is desired in internal combustion engines to prevent accumulation of the fuel drop on the wall. Thus, a good understanding of how to control the impact outcome is highly demanded to optimize the performance. For a given liquid, a regime diagram of bouncing and merging outcomes can be mapped in the space of Weber number (ratio of impact inertia and surface tension) versus film thickness. In addition, recognizing that the liquid viscosity is a fundamental fluid property that critically affects the impact outcome through viscous dissipation of the impact momentum, here we investigate liquids with a wide range of viscosity from 0.7 to 100 cSt, to assess its effect on the regime diagram. Results show that while the regime diagram maintains its general structure, the merging regime becomes smaller for more viscous liquids and the retraction merging regime disappears when the viscosity is very high. The viscous effects are modeled and subsequently the mathematical relations for the transition boundaries are proposed which agree well with the experiments. The new expressions account for all the liquid properties and impact conditions, thus providing a powerful tool to predict and manipulate the outcome when a drop impacts on a liquid film.

  12. Viscosity dependent dual-permeability modeling of liquid manure movement in layered, macroporous, tile drained soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Steven K.; Rudolph, David L.; Lapen, David R.; Ball Coelho, Bonnie R.

    2012-06-01

    A scarcity of information exists on how physical processes govern the movement of liquid manure, or other viscous fluids, through layered macroporous soils. To elucidate these complex flow and transport phenomena, a viscosity dependent, two-dimensional dual-permeability model that considers macropore anisotropy is employed to simulate field experiments where liquid swine manure (LSM) was applied to silt loam with both a soil crust and plowpan layer present. Using data from the field experiment as a benchmark, the model was used to predict nutrient (NH4-N and total P) breakthrough to tile drains; and to assess the influence of reduced permeability crust and plowpan layers, and fluid viscosity, on solute movement within 48 h of LSM application. Results demonstrate the importance of viscosity on flow and transport in macroporous soils. By increasing LSM viscosity, nutrient breakthrough to tile drains can be greatly reduced, and near surface nutrient retention can increase. The presence of a nonmacroporous soil crust layer can also lead to reduced nutrient concentrations in tile discharge by reducing pressure heads in the underlying A-horizon soil matrix, resulting in reduced macropore flow; whereas a low permeability plowpan layer at the base of the A horizon can increase pressure heads in the A-horizon soil matrix and lead to increased macropore flow. Multiple target point parameter sensitivity analysis revealed that relative parameter sensitivity can be a transient characteristic, and that hydraulic properties of the A and B horizon tend to exhibit their greatest influence over the respective early and late time solute breakthrough characteristics.

  13. From green buildings to green supply chains:an integrated input-output life cycle assessment and optimization framework for carbon footprint reduction policy making

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abdul Ghani, N. Muhammad Aslaam; Eğilmez, Gökhan; Küçükvar, Murat; S. Bhutta, M. Khurrum

    2017-01-01

    Purpose–ThepurposeofthispaperistofocusontracingGHGemissionsacrossthesupplychainindustries associated with the US residential, commercial and industrial building stock and provides optimized GHG reduction policy plans for sustainable development. Design/methodology/approach – A two-step hierarchical approach is developed. First, Economic Input-Output-based Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) is utilized to quantify the GHG emissions associated with the US residential, commercial and industrial bui...

  14. Experimental viscosity measurements of biodiesels at high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaschke C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The viscosity of biodiesels of soybean and rapeseed biodiesels blended with mineral diesel fuel were measured at pressures of up to 200 MPa. Using a falling sinker-type viscometer reproducible viscosity data were obtained based on the time taken for a sinker to descend a fixed distance down an enclosed tube under the influence of gravity. Measurements were taken using pressures which correspond to those of interest in automotive common rail diesel engines, and at temperatures of between 25ºC and 80ºC. In all cases, the viscosity of the biodiesel blends were found to increase exponentially for which the blends were noted as being more viscous than pure mineral fuels. A pressure-freezing effect was not observed for the blends.

  15. In situ viscosity measurements of albite melt under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Funakoshi, K I; Terasaki, H

    2002-01-01

    The viscosities of albite (NaAlSi sub 3 O sub 8) melt under high pressures have been measured using an x-ray radiography falling sphere method with synchrotron radiation. This method has enabled us to determine the precise sinking velocity directly. Recent experiments of albite melt showed the presence of a viscosity minimum around 5 GPa (Poe et al 1997 Science 276 1245, Mori et al 2000 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 175 87). We present the results for albite melt up to 5.2 GPa at 1600 and 1700 deg. C. The viscosity minimum is clearly observed to be around 4.5 GPa, and it might be explained not by the change of the compression mechanism in albite melt but by change of the phase itself.

  16. Measurement of Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Liquids Using a Microviscometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    The viscosity of normal alkanes, their mixtures, and true boiling point (TBP) fractions (C (sub 6) -C (sub 19)) of four North Sea petroleum reservoir fluids have been measured by use of an automatic rolling ball mixroviscometer at 20°C. The equipment is specially suited for samples of limited...... amount as only 120 to 2500 micro l. is required depending on the viscosity range. The densities of the fluids were also determined. The accuracy of these measurements is ascertained and compared with literature data on n-alkane mixtures. The data reported for reservoir fluids includes molecular weights...... as well as density. Finally, generalized viscosity correlations for the C (sub 6) to C (sub 19) fractions are discussed....

  17. Effect of viscosity on appetite and gastro-intestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zijlstra, Nicolien; Mars, Monica; de Wijk, René A

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that higher viscosity resulted in lower ad libitum intake and that eating rate is an important factor. In this study we aimed to explore the effect of viscosity on the gastro-intestinal hormones ghrelin, CCK-8 and GLP-1. Thirty-two subjects (22+/-2 y, BMI 21.9+/-2.2 kg...... than the liquid. There was a significant product effect for fullness (p 0.03), desire to eat (p 0.04), appetite something sweet (p 0.002) and prospective consumption (p 0.0009). We observed no clear effect of viscosity on gastro-intestinal hormones. Only for desacyl ghrelin there was a significant...

  18. Viscosity Measurement via Drop Coalescence: A Space Station Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antar, Basil; Ethridge, Edwin C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of using low gravity experimental data together with CFD simulations for measuring the viscosity of highly viscous liquids was recently validated on onboard the International Space Station (ISS). A series of microgravity tests were conducted for this purpose on the ISS in July, 2004 and in May of 2005. In these experiments two liquid drops were brought manually together until they touched and were allowed to coalesce under the action of the capillary force alone. The coalescence process was recorded photographically from which the contact radius speed of the merging drops was measured. The liquid viscosity was determined by fitting the measured data with accurate numerical simulation of the coalescence process. Several liquids were tested and for each liquid several drop diameters were employed. Experimental and numerical results will be presented in which the viscosity of several highly viscous liquids were determined using this technique.

  19. On the Role of Viscosity in the Eyring Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Lubbe, Anouk S; Bloemsma, Erik A; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-06-17

    Transition-state theory allows for the characterization of kinetic processes in terms of enthalpy and entropy of activation by using the Eyring equation. However, for reactions in solution, it fails to take the change of viscosity of solvents with temperature into account. A second-generation unidirectional rotary molecular motor was used as a probe to study the effects of temperature-dependent viscosity changes upon unimolecular thermal isomerization processes. By combining the free-volume model with transition-state theory, a modified version of the Eyring equation was derived, in which the rate is expressed in terms of both temperature and viscosity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Isotropic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadzyn, J.; Czechowski, G.; Lech, T.

    1999-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the shear viscosity measured for isotropic liquids belonging to the three homologous series: 4-(trans-4'-n-alkylcyclohexyl) isothiocyanatobenzenes (Cn H2n+1 CyHx Ph NCS; nCHBT, n=0-12), n-alkylcyanobiphenyls (CnH2n+1 Ph Ph CN; nCB, n=2-12) and 1,n-alkanediols (HO(CH2)nOH; 1,nAD, n=2-10) were analysed with the use of Arrhenius equation and its two modifications: Vogel--Fulcher and proposed in this paper. The extrapolation of the isothermal viscosity of 1,n-alkanediols (n=2-10) to n=1 leads to an interesting conclusion concerning the expected viscosity of methanediol, HOCH2OH, the compound strongly unstable in a pure state.

  1. Diffusivities and Viscosities of Poly(ethylene oxide) Oligomers †

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2010-10-14

    Diffusivities and viscosities of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) oligomer melts with 1 to 12 repeat units have been obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations using the TraPPE-UA force field. The simulations generated diffusion coefficients with high accuracy for all of the molar masses studied, but the statistical uncertainties in the viscosity calculations were significantly larger for longer chains. There is good agreement of the calculated viscosities and densities with available experimental data, and thus, the simulations can be used to bridge gaps in the data and for extrapolations with respect to chain length, temperature, and pressure. We explored the convergence characteristics of the Green-Kubo formulas for different chain lengths and propose minimal production times required for convergence of the transport properties. The chain-length dependence of the transport properties suggests that neither Rouse nor reptation models are applicable in the short-chain regime investigated. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. The viscosity window of the silicate glass foam production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    The production of silicate glass foam allows diverse resources and waste materials to be used in the production. Testing of such large palette of materials complicates and prolongs the optimisation process. Therefore, it is crucial to find a universal criterion for foaming silicate glass melts...... which can offer a practical starting point for the optimisation procedure. The melt viscosity might be the most important parameter for controlling the foaming process and the glass foam density. In this work, we attempt to define a viscosity range in which foaming of different glasses results...... in a maximum of foam expansion. The expansion maximum is obtained for different glasses (labware, E-glass, CRT panel, soda-lime-silica) by foaming with CaCO3 at isokom temperature and from literature data. In general, the viscosity window was found to be within 104–106 Pa s when foaming with MnO2 or metal...

  3. Bulk viscosity of low-temperature strongly interacting matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobado, Antonio [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J., E-mail: fllanes@fis.ucm.es [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres-Rincon, Juan M. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-03

    We study the bulk viscosity of a pion gas in unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory at low and moderate temperatures, below any phase transition to a quark-gluon plasma phase. We argue that inelastic processes are irrelevant and exponentially suppressed at low temperatures. Since the system falls out of chemical equilibrium upon expansion, a pion chemical potential must be introduced, so we extend the existing theories that include it. We control the zero modes of the collision operator and Landau's conditions of fit when solving the Boltzmann equation with the elastic collision kernel. The dependence of the bulk viscosity with temperature is reminiscent of the findings of Fernandez-Fraile and Gomez Nicola (2009) , while the numerical value is closer to that of Davesne (1996) . In the zero-temperature limit we correctly recover the vanishing viscosity associated to a non-relativistic monoatomic gas.

  4. Mapping microbubble viscosity using fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Mohamedi, Graciela; Rademeyer, Paul; Owen, Joshua; Wu, Yilei; Tang, Meng-Xing; Eckersley, Robert J.; Stride, Eleanor; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles are well established as highly effective contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. There remain, however, some significant challenges to fully realize the potential of microbubbles in advanced applications such as perfusion mapping, targeted drug delivery, and gene therapy. A key requirement is accurate characterization of the viscoelastic surface properties of the microbubbles, but methods for independent, nondestructive quantification and mapping of these properties are currently lacking. We present here a strategy for performing these measurements that uses a small fluorophore termed a “molecular rotor” embedded in the microbubble surface, whose fluorescence lifetime is directly related to the viscosity of its surroundings. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging to show that shell viscosities vary widely across the population of the microbubbles and are influenced by the shell composition and the manufacturing process. We also demonstrate that heterogeneous viscosity distributions exist within individual microbubble shells even with a single surfactant component. PMID:23690599

  5. Viscosity and not biological mechanisms often controls the effects of temperature on ciliary activity and swimming velocity of small aquatic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that temperature-dependent viscosity of the ambient water controls or strongly affects bio-mechanical activity such as beat frequency of water-pumping cilia in mussels and ascidians, swimming velocity of sperm cells, ciliates and small (micro- and meso-scale) aquatic...... organisms using cilia or small appendages for propulsion. Here we summarize results from the literature and from own studies on bio-mechanical activities in response to changing temperature or manipulated viscosity at constant temperature, both having the same change in kinematic viscosity. The survey...... is used to assess to what extent the response is purely physical/mechanical or biological. We argue that a power-law dependence of bio-mechanical activity (a) on kinematic viscosity (ν), i.e. a ~ ν^−m, should be applied to available data. Based on a general close matching of the response data to power...

  6. VISCOSITY ANALYSIS OF EMPTY FRUIT BUNCH (EFB BIO-OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.S. Nazirah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Empty fruit bunches (EFB are one of the solid wastes produced by the palm oil industry, which is increasing rapidly. The aim of this paper is to analyse the viscosity of empty fruit bunch (EFB bio-oil that can be extracted from all solid waste EFB as a sample, and a few processes were executed. The samples underwent two processes, which were pre-treatment and pyrolysis. The pre-treatment involved three processes, namely, cutting, shredding and sieving, which were necessary in order to prepare EFB into a particle size suitable for the reactor. After that, the samples were fed into the feedback reactor as feedstock for the pyrolysis process to produce bio-oil. Once the bio-oil was produced, its viscosity was tested using the Brookfield Viscometer in two conditions: before and after the chemical reaction. The bio-oil was treated by adding 10 ml and 20 ml of acetone respectively through the chemical reaction. The viscosity test was carried out at different temperatures, which were 25°C, 30°C, 35°C, 40°C, 45°C and 50°C respectively. The observed viscosity of the EFB bio-oil varied and was higher as the temperature decreased. In addition, the viscosity of the EFB bio-oil was higher when it reacted chemically with the acetone added. Therefore, the results showed that the chemical reaction with acetone has the potential to increase the viscosity of EFB bio-oil.

  7. Evidence for a Role of Vascular Endothelium in the Control of Arterial Wall Viscosity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Frederic; Iacob, Michele; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Bellien, Jeremy; Joannides, Robinson

    2018-01-01

    Arterial wall viscosity (AWV) is a major cause of energy dissipation along the arterial tree. Its determinants remain controversial but an active endothelial regulation has been suggested. Our objective was to assess in humans the physiological role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and the effect of modulating smooth muscle tone in the regulation of AWV. We simultaneously measured radial artery diameter, wall thickness, and arterial pressure in healthy volunteers during the local infusion of inhibitors of NO-synthase ( N G -monomethyl-l-arginine), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids synthesis by cytochrome P450 (fluconazole), the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids cellular targets calcium-activated potassium channels (tetraethylammonium), alone and in combination. AWV was estimated from the relative viscosity expressed as the ratio of the area of the hysteresis loop of the pressure-diameter relationship to the area under the loading phase. Arterial tone was assessed by measuring change in wall stiffness and midwall stress. N G -monomethyl-l-arginine paradoxically reduced relative viscosity (34.9±8.9%-28.9±8.6%). Conversely, relative viscosity was not modified by fluconazole (33.5±15.5%-32.0±13.6%) but increased by tetraethylammonium (31.7±6.6%-35.7±8.0%). This increase was more marked with N G -monomethyl-l-arginine+fluconazole (31.1±10.7%-43.3±13.2%) and N G -monomethyl-l-arginine+tetraethylammonium (29.5±2.3%-41.5±11.1%) compared with inhibitors alone. Sodium nitroprusside decreased AWV (35.4±2.9%-28.7±2.0%). These effects were associated with parallel change in tone but of different magnitude for similar variations in viscosity, suggesting tone-dependent and independent mechanisms. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration that the endothelial factors, NO and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, regulate AWV in humans and support the role of arterial tone in this regulation. URL: https://eudract.ema.europa.eu. Unique identifier: RCB2007-A

  8. A memory-based model for blood viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Clara M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a comparison between existing models for non-Newtonian fluid viscosity as a function of shear rate variations. A novel model is introduced whose parameters are linked to physiological phenomena in the blood. The end use of such models is to predict changes in viscosity to adapt the speed of a nanorobot device for targeted drug delivery purposes. Simulation results show the agreement between the proposed model and available models from literature. A laboratory scale validation of the proposed model for a fluid mimicking non-Newtonian properties has been performed. Conceptual perspectives are also given in this work.

  9. Analytical shear viscosity in hyperscaling violating black brane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xiao-Mei; Wu, Jian-Pin

    2017-10-01

    In this letter, with the use of matching method, we investigate the shear viscosity in a non-relativistic boundary filed theory without hyperscaling symmetry, which is dual to a bulk charged hyperscaling violating black brane. By matching the solutions to the inner region and outer region at the matching region, we analytically obtain that the ratio of shear viscosity and the entropy density is alway 1 / 4 π at zero temperature and finite temperatures. Our results satisfy the Kovtun-Starinets-Son (KSS) bound.

  10. Viscosity-Induced Crossing of the Phantom Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We show explicitly, by using astrophysical data plus reasonable assumptions for the bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid, how the magnitude of this viscosity may be high enough to drive the fluid from its position in the quintessence region at present time t = 0 across the barrier w = −1 into the phantom region in the late universe. The phantom barrier is accordingly not a sharp mathematical divide, but rather a fuzzy concept. We also calculate the limiting forms of various thermodynamical quantities, including the rate of entropy production, for a dark energy fluid near the future Big Rip singularity.

  11. Time Dependent and Steady Uni-axial Elongational Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens K.; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Here we present measurements of transient and steady uni-axial elongational viscosity, using the Filament Stretching Rheometer1 or FSR1 (see Fig. 1) of the following melts: Four narrow MMD polystyrene (PS) samples with weight-average molar mass Mw in the range of 50k to 390k. Three different bi......-disperse samples, mixed from the narrow MMD PS. Two low-density polyethylene (LDPE) melts (Lupolen 1840D and 3020D). A steady-state viscosity was kept for 1-2.5 Hencky strain units in all measurements....

  12. Viscosities in the Gluon-Plasma within a Quasiparticle Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bluhm, M; Redlich, K

    2009-01-01

    A phenomenological quasiparticle model, featuring dynamically generated self-energies of excitation modes, successfully describes lattice QCD results relevant for the QCD equation of state and related quantities both at zero and non-zero net baryon density. Here, this model is extended to study bulk and shear viscosities of the gluon-plasma within an effective kinetic theory approach. In this way, the compatibility of the employed quasiparticle ansatz with the apparent low viscosities of the strongly coupled deconfined gluonic medium is shown.

  13. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stefano; Morgavi, Daniele; Namur, Olivier; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego; Mancinelli, Paolo; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    After more than four years of orbiting Mercury, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft came to an end in late April 2015. MESSENGER has provided many new and surprising results. This session will again highlight the latest results on Mercury based on MESSENGER observations or updated modelling. The session will further address instrument calibration and science performance both retrospective on MESSENGER and on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Papers covering additional themes related to Mercury are also welcomed. Please be aware that this session will be held as a PICO session. This will allow an intensive exchange of expertise and experience between the individual instruments and mission. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows S. Rossi1, D. Morgavi1, O. Namur2, D. Perugini1, F.Vetere1, P. Mancinelli1 and C. Pauselli1 1 Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, piazza Università 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy 2 Uni Hannover Institut für Mineralogie, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstraβe 3, 30167 Hannover, Germany In this contribution we report new measurements of viscosity of synthetic komatitic melts, used the behaviour of silicate melts erupted at the surface of Mercury. Composition of Mercurian surface magmas was calculated using the most recent maps produced from MESSENGER XRS data (Weider et al., 2015). We focused on the northern hemisphere (Northern Volcanic Province, NVP, the largest lava flow on Mercury and possibly in the Solar System) for which the spatial resolution of MESSENGER measurements is high and individual maps of Mg/Si, Ca/Si, Al/Si and S/Si were combined. The experimental starting material contains high Na2O content (≈7 wt.%) that strongly influences viscosity. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out at 1 atm using a concentric cylinder apparatus equipped with an Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the Department of Physics and Geology (PVRG_lab) at the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy

  14. Analytical shear viscosity in hyperscaling violating black brane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Kuang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, with the use of matching method, we investigate the shear viscosity in a non-relativistic boundary filed theory without hyperscaling symmetry, which is dual to a bulk charged hyperscaling violating black brane. By matching the solutions to the inner region and outer region at the matching region, we analytically obtain that the ratio of shear viscosity and the entropy density is alway 1/4π at zero temperature and finite temperatures. Our results satisfy the Kovtun–Starinets–Son (KSS bound.

  15. Exact solutions of atmospheric (3+1-dimensional nonlinear incompressible non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equations with viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The symmetry reduction equations, similarity solutions, sub-groups and exact solutions of the (3+1-dimensional nonlinear incompressible non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equations with viscosity (INHBV equations, which describe the atmospheric gravity waves, are researched in this paper. Calculation on symmetry shows that the equations are invariant under the Galilean transformations, scaling transformations, rotational transformations and space-time translations. Three types of symmetry reduction equations and similar solutions for the (3+1-dimensional INHBV equations are proposed. Traveling wave solutions of the INHBV equations are demonstrated by means of symmetry method. The evolutions on the wind velocities and temperature perturbation are demonstrated by figures.

  16. Long-time stability effects of quadrature and artificial viscosity on nodal discontinuous Galerkin methods for gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Bradford; Hackl, Jason; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2017-11-01

    Nodal discontinuous Galerkin schemes present an attractive approach to robust high-order solution of the equations of fluid mechanics, but remain accompanied by subtle challenges in their consistent stabilization. The effect of quadrature choices (full mass matrix vs spectral elements), over-integration to manage aliasing errors, and explicit artificial viscosity on the numerical solution of a steady homentropic vortex are assessed over a wide range of resolutions and polynomial orders using quadrilateral elements. In both stagnant and advected vortices in periodic and non-periodic domains the need arises for explicit stabilization beyond the numerical surface fluxes of discontinuous Galerkin spectral elements. Artificial viscosity via the entropy viscosity method is assessed as a stabilizing mechanism. It is shown that the regularity of the artificial viscosity field is essential to its use for long-time stabilization of small-scale features in nodal discontinuous Galerkin solutions of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Supported by the Department of Energy Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Contract DE-NA0002378.

  17. Quantitatively mapping cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information via a designed PET fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-06-24

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions.

  18. Quantitatively Mapping Cellular Viscosity with Detailed Organelle Information via a Designed PET Fluorescent Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R.; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-01-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions. PMID:24957323

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of metal artifact reduction sequences in the assessment of metal-on-metal hip prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboelmagd SM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sharief M Aboelmagd, Paul N Malcolm, Andoni P Toms Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital National Health Service Trust, Norwich, UK Abstract: Recent developments in metal artifact reduction techniques in magnetic resonance (MR have, in large part, been stimulated by the advent of soft tissue complications associated with modern metal-on-metal total hip replacements. Metallic orthopedic implants can result in severe degradation of MR images because ferromagnetic susceptibility causes signal loss, signal pile-up, geometric distortion, and failure of fat suppression. There are several approaches to controlling these susceptibility artifacts. Standard fast spin echo sequences can be adapted by modifying echo times, matrix, receiver bandwidth, slice thickness, and echo trains to minimize frequency encoding misregistration. Short tau inversion recovery and 2-point Dixon techniques are both more resistant to susceptibility artifacts than spectral fat suppression. A number of dedicated metal artifact reduction sequences are now available commercially. The common approach of these multispectral techniques is to generate three dimensional datasets from which the final images are reconstructed. Frequency encoding misregistration is controlled using a variety of techniques, including specific resonant frequency acquisition, view-angle tilting, and phase encoding. Metal artifact reduction MR imaging has been the key to understanding the prevalence, severity, and prognosis of adverse reactions to metal debris in metal-on-metal hip replacements. Conventional radiographs are typically normal or demonstrate minimal change and are unable to demonstrate the often extensive soft tissue abnormalities, which include necrosis, soft tissue masses and fluid collections, myositis, muscle atrophy, tendon avulsions, and osteonecrosis. These MR findings correlate poorly with clinical and serological measures of disease, and therefore MR imaging is

  20. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.