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Sample records for assess lung dose

  1. 4D cone beam CT-based dose assessment for SBRT lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixing; Dhou, Salam; Cifter, Fulya; Myronakis, Marios; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Seco, Joao; Lewis, John H.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a 4DCBCT-based dose assessment method for calculating actual delivered dose for patients with significant respiratory motion or anatomical changes during the course of SBRT. To address the limitation of 4DCT-based dose assessment, we propose to calculate the delivered dose using time-varying (‘fluoroscopic’) 3D patient images generated from a 4DCBCT-based motion model. The method includes four steps: (1) before each treatment, 4DCBCT data is acquired with the patient in treatment position, based on which a patient-specific motion model is created using a principal components analysis algorithm. (2) During treatment, 2D time-varying kV projection images are continuously acquired, from which time-varying ‘fluoroscopic’ 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. (3) Lateral truncation artifacts are corrected using planning 4DCT images. (4) The 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach is validated using six modified XCAT phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions derived from patient data. The estimated doses are compared to that calculated using ground-truth XCAT phantoms. For each XCAT phantom, the calculated delivered tumor dose values generally follow the same trend as that of the ground truth and at most timepoints the difference is less than 5%. For the overall delivered dose, the normalized error of calculated 3D dose distribution is generally less than 3% and the tumor D95 error is less than 1.5%. XCAT phantom studies indicate the potential of the proposed method to accurately estimate 3D tumor dose distributions for SBRT lung treatment based on 4DCBCT imaging and motion modeling. Further research is necessary to investigate its performance for clinical patient data.

  2. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - a potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M;

    2011-01-01

    Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose....

  3. Quantification of Proton Dose Calculation Accuracy in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, Clemens, E-mail: Grassberger.Clemens@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Center for Proton Radiotherapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Daartz, Juliane; Dowdell, Stephen; Ruggieri, Thomas; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the accuracy of a clinical proton treatment planning system (TPS) as well as Monte Carlo (MC)–based dose calculation through measurements and to assess the clinical impact in a cohort of patients with tumors located in the lung. Methods and Materials: A lung phantom and ion chamber array were used to measure the dose to a plane through a tumor embedded in the lung, and to determine the distal fall-off of the proton beam. Results were compared with TPS and MC calculations. Dose distributions in 19 patients (54 fields total) were simulated using MC and compared to the TPS algorithm. Results: MC increased dose calculation accuracy in lung tissue compared with the TPS and reproduced dose measurements in the target to within ±2%. The average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target was 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients showed a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. For large tumors, MC also predicted consistently higher V5 and V10 to the normal lung, because of a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target could show large deviations, although this effect was highly patient specific. Range measurements showed that MC can reduce range uncertainty by a factor of ∼2: the average (maximum) difference to the measured range was 3.9 mm (7.5 mm) for MC and 7 mm (17 mm) for the TPS in lung tissue. Conclusion: Integration of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. In addition, the ability to confidently reduce range margins would benefit all patients by potentially lowering toxicity.

  4. Uncertainties on lung doses from inhaled plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, Matthew; Birchall, Alan; Bull, Richard K

    2011-10-01

    In a recent epidemiological study, Bayesian uncertainties on lung doses have been calculated to determine lung cancer risk from occupational exposures to plutonium. These calculations used a revised version of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) published by the ICRP. In addition to the Bayesian analyses, which give probability distributions of doses, point estimates of doses (single estimates without uncertainty) were also provided for that study using the existing HRTM as it is described in ICRP Publication 66; these are to be used in a preliminary analysis of risk. To infer the differences between the point estimates and Bayesian uncertainty analyses, this paper applies the methodology to former workers of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), who constituted a subset of the study cohort. The resulting probability distributions of lung doses are compared with the point estimates obtained for each worker. It is shown that mean posterior lung doses are around two- to fourfold higher than point estimates and that uncertainties on doses vary over a wide range, greater than two orders of magnitude for some lung tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that uncertainties on the parameter values, rather than the model structure, are largely responsible for these effects. Of these it appears to be the parameters describing absorption from the lungs to blood that have the greatest impact on estimates of lung doses from urine bioassay. Therefore, accurate determination of the chemical form of inhaled plutonium and the absorption parameter values for these materials is important for obtaining reliable estimates of lung doses and hence risk from occupational exposures to plutonium.

  5. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  6. The mean lung dose (MLD). Predictive criterion for lung damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, Peter; Appold, Steffen [Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden), Clinic and Polyclinic for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Carl Gustav Carus Medical Faculty, Dresden (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to prove the validity of the mean lung dose (MLD), widely used in clinical practice to estimate the lung toxicity of a treatment plan, by reevaluating experimental data from mini pigs. A total of 43 mini pigs were irradiated in one of four dose groups (25, 29, 33, and 37 Gy). Two regimens were applied: homogeneous irradiation of the right lung or partial irradiation of both lungs - including parts with lower dose - but with similar mean lung doses. The animals were treated with five fractions with a linear accelerator applying a CT-based treatment plan. The clinical lung reaction (breathing frequency) and morphological changes in CT scans were examined frequently during the 48 weeks after irradiation. A clear dose-effect relationship was found for both regimens of the trial. However, a straightforward relationship between the MLD and the relative number of responders with respect to different grades of increased breathing frequency for both regimens was not found. A morphologically based parameter NTCP{sub lung} was found to be more suitable for this purpose. The dependence of this parameter on the MLD is markedly different for the two regimens. In clinical practice, the MLD can be used to predict lung toxicity of a treatment plan, except for dose values that could lead to severe side effects. In the latter mentioned case, limitations to the predictive value of the MLD are possible. Such severe developments of a radiation-induced pneumopathy are better predicted by the NTCP{sub lung} formalism. The predictive advantage of this parameter compared to the MLD seems to remain in the evaluation and comparison of widely differing dose distributions, like in the investigated trial. (orig.) [German] Es soll unter Reevaluation von Tierversuchsdaten am Minischwein geprueft werden, ob die in der klinischen Praxis zur Beurteilung der Lungentoxizitaet eines Bestrahlungsregims regelhaft verwendete mittlere Lungendosis (MLD) eine zuverlaessige

  7. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  8. Tissue heterogeneity in IMRT dose calculation for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuti, Katia; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia; Malatesta, Tiziana; Benassi, Marcello; Di Nallo, Anna Maria; Mirri, Alessandra; Pinzi, Valentina; Landoni, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in accuracy of dose calculation between 3 commonly used algorithms, the Pencil Beam algorithm (PB), the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), and the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition (CCCS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The 2D dose distributions obtained with the 3 algorithms were compared on each CT slice pixel by pixel, using the MATLAB code (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) and the agreement was assessed with the γ function. The effect of the differences on dose-volume histograms (DVHs), tumor control, and normal tissue complication probability (TCP and NTCP) were also evaluated, and its significance was quantified by using a nonparametric test. In general PB generates regions of over-dosage both in the lung and in the tumor area. These differences are not always in DVH of the lung, although the Wilcoxon test indicated significant differences in 2 of 4 patients. Disagreement in the lung region was also found when the Γ analysis was performed. The effect on TCP is less important than for NTCP because of the slope of the curve at the level of the dose of interest. The effect of dose calculation inaccuracy is patient-dependent and strongly related to beam geometry and to the localization of the tumor. When multiple intensity-modulated beams are used, the effect of the presence of the heterogeneity on dose distribution may not always be easily predictable. PMID:20970989

  9. SU-E-J-269: Assessing the Precision of Dose Delivery in CBCT-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung and Soft Tissue Metastatic Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsai, S; Dalhart, A; Chen, C; Parsai, E; Pearson, D; Sperling, N; Reddy, K [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Ensuring reproducibility of target localization is critical to accurate stereotactic body radiation treatment (SBRT) for lung and soft tissue metastatic lesions. To characterize interfraction variability in set-up and evaluate PTV margins utilized for SBRT, daily CBCTs were used to calculate delivered target and OAR doses compared to those expected from planning. Methods: CBCT images obtained prior to each fraction of SBRT for a lung and thyroid metastatic lesion were evaluated. The target CTV/ITV and OARs on each of 8 CBCT data sets were contoured. Using MIM fusion software and Pinnacle{sup 3} RTP system, delivered dose distribution was reconstructed on each CBCT, utilizing translational shifts performed prior to treatment. Actual delivered vs. expected doses received by target CTV/ITV and adjacent critical structures were compared to characterize accuracy of pre-treatment translational shifts and PTV margins. Results: The planned CTV/ITV D95% and V100% were 4595cGy and 91.47% for the lung lesion, and 3010cGy and 96.34% for the thyroid lesion. Based on CBCT analysis, actual mean D95% and V100% for lung ITV were 4542±344.4cGy and 91.54±3.45%; actual mean D95% and V100% for thyroid metastasis CTV were 3005±25.98cGy and 95.20±2.522%. For the lung lesion, ipsilateral lung V20, heart V32 (cc) and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 110.15cc, 3.33cc, and 1680cGy vs. 110.27±14.79cc, 6.74±3.76cc, and 1711±46.56cGy for planned vs. delivered doses, respectively. For the thyroid metastatic lesion, esophagus V18, trachea (.03 cc) max, and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 0.35cc, 2555cGy, and 850cGy vs. 0.16±0.13cc, 2147±367cGy, and 838±45cGy for planned vs. delivered treatments, respectively. Conclusion: Minimal variability in SBRT target lesion dose delivered based on pre-treatment CBCT-based translational shifts suggests tighter PTV margins may be considered to further decrease dose to surrounding critical structures. Guidelines for optimal target alignment during

  10. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  11. Microscopic dose to lung from inhaled alpha emitters in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the degree of uniformity of irradiation of the lung varies greatly depending on the form of the inhaled material. Animal studies have shown that the degree of dose uniformity influences the risk of lung cancer. This study investigates the radiation dose distribution of plutonium in human lung. Numerical maps of tissue configuration and target cell locations are obtained from histological sections of human lung tissue stained to enhance the identification of putative cell types for parenchymal lung cancers, i.e. alveolar type II cells and Clara cells. Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain dose distribution around individual particles, and these distributions are used to compute dose distribution in volumes of lung tissue. Lung dose is characterised both by the degree of non-uniformity of irradiation and the relative degree of irradiation of all tissue versus the special cells of interest. (authors)

  12. Dose reconstruction in deforming lung anatomy: Dose grid size effects and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigated the accumulation of dose to a deforming anatomy (such as lung) based on voxel tracking and by using time weighting factors derived from a breathing probability distribution function (p.d.f.). A mutual information registration scheme (using thin-plate spline warping) provided a transformation that allows the tracking of points between exhale and inhale treatment planning datasets (and/or intermediate state scans). The dose distributions were computed at the same resolution on each dataset using the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo code. Two accumulation/interpolation approaches were assessed. The first maps exhale dose grid points onto the inhale scan, estimates the doses at the 'tracked' locations by trilinear interpolation and scores the accumulated doses (via the p.d.f.) on the original exhale data set. In the second approach, the 'volume' associated with each exhale dose grid point (exhale dose voxel) is first subdivided into octants, the center of each octant is mapped to locations on the inhale dose grid and doses are estimated by trilinear interpolation. The octant doses are then averaged to form the inhale voxel dose and scored at the original exhale dose grid point location. Differences between the interpolation schemes are voxel size and tissue density dependent, but in general appear primarily only in regions with steep dose gradients (e.g., penumbra). Their magnitude (small regions of few percent differences) is less than the alterations in dose due to positional and shape changes from breathing in the first place. Thus, for sufficiently small dose grid point spacing, and relative to organ motion and deformation, differences due solely to the interpolation are unlikely to result in clinically significant differences to volume-based evaluation metrics such as mean lung dose (MLD) and tumor equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). The overall effects of deformation vary among patients. They depend on the tumor location, field

  13. Optimizing dose prescription in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumours using Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Hollander, Miranda; Ubbels, Jan F.; Bolt, Rene A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To define a method of dose prescription employing Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours aiming at a dose as low as possible outside of the PTV. Methods and materials: Six typical T1 lung tumours - three small, three large - were construc

  14. Relationship between radiation dose and lung function in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radical radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. The dose is limited by consequential pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Hence, a better understanding of the relationship between the dose-volume distributions and normal tissue side effects is needed. CT is a non-invasive method to monitor the development of fibrosis and pneumonitis, and spirometry is an established tool to measure lung function. NSCLC patients were included in a multicenter trial and treated with megavoltage conformal radiotherapy. In a subgroup comprising 16 patients, a total dose of 59-63 Gy with 1.8-1.9 Gy per fraction was given. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and corrected according to the linear-quadratic formula using alpha/beta=3 Gy. The patients underwent repetitive CT examinations (mean follow-up, 133 days) following radiotherapy, and pre and post treatment spirometry (mean follow-up, 240 days). A significant correlation was demonstrated between local lung dose and changes in CT numbers >30 days after treatment (p40 Gy Gy there was a sudden increase in CT numbers at 70-90 days. Somewhat unexpectedly, the highest mean lung doses were found in patients with the least reductions in lung function (peak expiratory flow; p<0.001). The correlation between CT numbers, radiation dose and time after treatment show that CT may be used to monitor development of lung fibrosis/pneumonitis after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Paradoxically, the patients with the highest mean lung doses experienced the minimum deterioration of lung function. This may be explained by reduction in the volume of existing tumour masses obstructing the airways, leading to relief of symptoms. This finding stresses the role of radiotherapy for lung cancer, especially where the treatment aim is palliative

  15. Assessment of the solubility of thorium and uranium from black sand of Camargue in both simulated lung and gut fluids for dose calculation after internal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frelon, S.; Chazel, V.; Tourlonias, E.; Paquet, F. [IRSN/ DRPH/ SRBE, LRTOX, BP 166, 26702 Pierrelatte Cedex (France); Blanchardon, E. [IRSN/ DRPH/ SDI, LEDI, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay Aux Roses Cedex (France); Bouisset, P. [IRSN/ DEI/ STEME, LMRE, Bois des rames, 91400 Orsay (France); Pourcelot, L. [IRSN/ DEI/ SESURE, LERCM, BP3, 13 115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the south of France, some beaches of Camargue present a high rate of natural radioactivity due to thorium and uranium from zircon and apatite heavy minerals present in the so-called black sand. These radionuclides may lead to internal exposure consecutive to inhalation or ingestion of this sand. The accurate assessment of radiological risk after internal exposure of public frequenting these beaches requires some information on the human bioavailability of U and Th from the sand. Both routes of intake were studied in this work and the consecutive dose delivered was calculated under two different scenarios for each type of exposure. As far as inhalation is concerned, the first important conclusion is that the inhalable fraction, i.e. particles with aerodynamic diameters below 50 {mu}m, was tiny (0.002%) in this sample of sand. Moreover in vitro assays of solubility were performed for this fraction and showed that U and Th as well as their progeny presented moderate solubility. Then effective doses under several scenarios were calculated and seem to demonstrate a very poor risk of exposure after inhalation. Indeed, a dose of 1 mSv would be received by a babies after inhalation of about 40 Kg of sand, that is impossible, whereas a more realistic scenario of chronic exposure only reached 31 {mu} Sv. In case of ingestion, the solubility of Th and U in the gastrointestinal fluids was found to be very low with a maximum solubility of 0.5% of the initial mass of radioelement in the sample of sand. Then the worst hypothesis studied yields an effective dose of 0.018 mSv./(g-swallowed sand) that is roughly 50 times less than the legal annual dose limit for members of the public. as a conclusion, the possible internal dose after exposure by inhalation or ingestion of black sand of Camargue seems to be very low under the conditions of this study. (N.C.)

  16. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  17. Dose-response relationship for lung cancer induction at radiotherapy dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer induction after radiation therapy is a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the treated patient. Currently there is large uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response relationship for carcinogenesis for most cancer types at high dose levels. In this work a dose-response relationship for lung cancer is derived based on (i) the analysis of lung cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease, (ii) a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and (iii) the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy. The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.061Gy-1 and R = 0.84. The value for α is in agreement with analysis of normal tissue complications of the lung after radiation therapy. The repopulation/repair parameter R is large, but seems to be characteristic for lung tissue which is sensitive with regard to fractionation. Lung cancer risk is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 15 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for lung after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 18.4/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies were EAR for lung varies between 9.7 and 21.5/10000PY. (orig.)

  18. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold 'tolerance dose-volume' levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects.

  19. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O;

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  20. Dose distribution and lung cancer incidence in thorotrast patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For German thorotrast patients, the application of lung cancer risk factors derived from radon daughter inhalation in uranium miners would predict the induction of lung tumors in about 10% of the patients surveyed. However, no increase of lung cancer incidence as compared to the control group has been observed by now. In order to refine the currently used dosimetric model, 1st the Landahl morphometry was replaced by Weibel model, and 2nd instead of assuming a homogeneous dose distribution around cylindrical airways with a constant depth, doses were calculated for bronchial stem cells located at generation-specific depths in epithelial tissue. This re-evaluation leads to a significant reduction of radiation doses in upper bronchial air passages, without, however, resolving the apparent discrepancy between observed and predicted lung cancer risk. This suggests that lung doses for radon daughter inhalation may have been underestimated; e.g. taking into account enhanced deposition at bronchial airway bifurcations would increase the radiation dose at such sites for inhalation, but not for exhalation. (orig.)

  1. Early radiation dose-response in lung: an ultrastructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic fine-structural study of dog lungs was undertaken to ascertain the radiation dose response in the lungs of large animals. The capillary endothelium appeared to be the initial site of the post-irradiation pulmonary damage. This subpheural response included diffuse septal thickening, fibrosis, edema, and reduced alveolar lumina. The deep parenchymal response involved perivascular fibrosis, which was associated with perivascular hyperplasia of Type II pneumocytes, increased number and sizes of lamellar bodies, increased production and release of lamellar surfactant. No changes of alveolar luminar size were noted. The most significant changes were observed in those dose zones exposed to greater than 2400 rad, suggesting the possibility of an identifiable dose-response relationship. Early detection of radiation pneumonitis by electron microscopy is demonstrated, and qualitative and quantitative correlation of injury with both postirradiation time and dose is presented

  2. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  3. Secondary scattered doses of IMRT for lung cancer cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu [Dept. of radiation oncology, Kyunghee university hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myong Geun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho [ASAN medical center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan , Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To compare the secondary radiation doses following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), Rapidarc and Tomotherapy(TOMO) in patients with lung cancer by using a radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD) which is newly introduced, as a substitution of themoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) or other. In conclusion, the secondary dose from TOMO is less than the secondary dose from conventional IMRT and RapidArc around the target area in spite of that tomotherapy has relatively higher monitor units(mu) than the other modalities. In another hand, it is found that rapidarc has shorter treatment time and MU than IMRT and TOMO.

  4. STUDY ON LUNG DOSE FOR DIFFERENT ANIMALS BY INHALATION OF SHORT—LIVED RADON DAUGHTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李素云; 张升慧; 等

    1994-01-01

    The dose distribution in the lung is inhomogeneous.The dose to the basal cell layer of trachea and main bronchi is much higher than the dose to total lung both for rabbits at different ages and for different animals.A maximum value of the dose to lung tissue for rabbits at ages of 20-40d is observed.The dose decreases with increasing body weight.The relationship between the dose and body weight can be descreibed by a power function.The dose to total lung increases exponentially with the minute breathing volume per unit of lung weight.

  5. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  6. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  7. Assessment of Peripheral Lung Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, Jason H. T.; Suki, Béla

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung periphery are major determinants of overall lung function, and can change dramatically in disease. In this review we examine the various experimental techniques that have provided data pertaining to the mechanical properties of the lung periphery, together with the mathematical models that have been used to interpret these data. These models seek to make a clear distinction between the central and peripheral compartments of the lung by encapsulating funct...

  8. Aerosol particle size does not predict pharmacokinetic determined lung dose in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Chawes, Bo L K; Vindfeld, Signe;

    2013-01-01

    In vitro measures of aerosol particles size, such as the fine particle mass, play a pivotal role for approval of inhaled anti-asthmatic drugs. However, the validity as a measure of dose to the lungs in children lacks evidence. In this study we investigated for the first time the association between...... was assessed after single inhalation. The corresponding emitted mass of drug in segments of aerosol particle size was assessed ex vivo by replicating the inhalation flows recorded by transducers built into the Diskus® inhaler and re-playing them in a breathing simulator. There was no correlation between any...... of drug delivery to the lung....

  9. Lung cancer risk at low doses of alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, W; Katz, R; Zhang, C X

    1986-10-01

    A survey of inhabitant exposures arising from the inhalation of 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, and lung cancer mortality has been carried out in two adjacent areas in Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, designated as the "high background" and the "control" area. Annual exposure rates are 0.38 working level months (WLM) per year in the high background, and 0.16 WLM/yr in the control area. In 14 yr of continuous study, from 1970 to 1983, age-adjusted mortality rates were found to be 2.7 per 10(5) living persons of all ages in the high background area, and 2.9 per 10(5) living persons in the control area. From this data, we conclude that we are unable to determine excess lung cancers over the normal fluctuations below a cumulative exposure of 15 WLM. This conclusion is supported by lung cancer mortality data from Austrian and Finnish high-background areas. A theoretical analysis of epidemiological data on human lung cancer incidence from inhaled 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, which takes into account cell killing as competitive with malignant transformation, leads to the evaluation of a risk factor which is either a linear-exponential or a quadratic-exponential function of the alpha-particle dose. Animal lung cancer data and theoretical considerations can be supplied to support either hypothesis. Thus we conclude that at our current stage of knowledge both the linear-exponential and the quadratic-exponential extrapolation to low doses seem to be equally acceptable for Rn-induced lung cancer risk, possibly suggesting a linear-quadratic transformation function with an exponential cell-killing term, or the influence of risk-modifying factors such as repair or proliferation stimuli.

  10. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart

  11. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Choi, N; Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart.

  12. Reducing the low-dose lung radiation for central lung tumors by restricting the IMRT beams and arc arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Florin; Kirk, Michael; Soto, Daniel; Sall, Walter; McIntyre, James

    2012-01-01

    To compare the extent to which 7 different radiotherapy planning techniques for mediastinal lung targets reduces the lung volume receiving low doses of radiation. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients with targets, including the mediastinal nodes, were identified. Treatment plans were generated to both 60- and 74-Gy prescription doses using 7 different planning techniques: conformal, hybrid conformal/intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), 7 equidistant IMRT beams, 2 restricted beam IMRT plans, a full (360°) modulated arc, and a restricted modulated arc plan. All plans were optimized to reduce total lung V5, V10, and V20 volumes, while meeting normal tissue and target coverage constraints. The mean values for the 13 patients are calculated for V5, V10, V20, V(ave), V0-20, and mean lung dose (MLD) lung parameters. For the 74-Gy prescription dose, the mean lung V10 was 42.7, 43.6, 48.2, 56.6, 57, 55.8, and 54.1% for the restricted ±36° IMRT, restricted modulated arc, restricted ±45° IMRT, full modulated arc, hybrid conformal/IMRT, equidistant IMRT, and conformal plans, respectively. A similar lung sparing hierarchy was found for the 60-Gy prescription dose. For the treatment of central lung targets, the ±36° restricted IMRT and restricted modulated arc planning techniques are superior in lowering the lung volume treated to low dose, as well as in minimizing MLD, followed by the ±45° restricted IMRT plan. All planning techniques that allow the use of lateral or lateral/oblique beams result in spreading the low dose over a higher lung volume. The area under the lung dose-volume histogram curve below 20 Gy, V0-20, is proposed as an alternative to individual V(dose) parameters, both as a measure of lung sparing and as a parameter to be minimized during IMRT optimization. PMID:22189028

  13. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 106 J.m-3 (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author)

  14. Inhomogeneous dose escalation increases expected local control for NSCLC patients with lymph node involvement without increased mean lung dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    dose distribution was created with dose constraints of: PTV-coverage ≥ 95%, same mean lung dose as obtained in the homogeneous dose plan, maximum doses of 45 and 66 Gy to spinal canal and oesophagus, respectively, and V74Gy ... on assumed homogeneous distribution of clonogenic cells either in the GTV, CTV or PTV showed absolute TCP increases of approximately 15, 10 and 5 percentage points, respectively. This increase in local control was obtained without increasing the mean lung dose. However, small increases in maximum doses...

  15. Metrics, Dose, and Dose Concept: The Need for a Proper Dose Concept in the Risk Assessment of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrtill Simkó

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate the dose for nanoparticles (NP, (i relevant information about the dose metrics and (ii a proper dose concept are crucial. Since the appropriate metrics for NP toxicity are yet to be elaborated, a general dose calculation model for nanomaterials is not available. Here we propose how to develop a dose assessment model for NP in analogy to the radiation protection dose calculation, introducing the so-called “deposited and the equivalent dose”. As a dose metric we propose the total deposited NP surface area (SA, which has been shown frequently to determine toxicological responses e.g. of lung tissue. The deposited NP dose is proportional to the total surface area of deposited NP per tissue mass, and takes into account primary and agglomerated NP. By using several weighting factors the equivalent dose additionally takes into account various physico-chemical properties of the NP which are influencing the biological responses. These weighting factors consider the specific surface area, the surface textures, the zeta-potential as a measure for surface charge, the particle morphology such as the shape and the length-to-diameter ratio (aspect ratio, the band gap energy levels of metal and metal oxide NP, and the particle dissolution rate. Furthermore, we discuss how these weighting factors influence the equivalent dose of the deposited NP.

  16. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  17. Effects of radioactive 125I seeds on A549 cell line and human embryonic lung diploid cell line 2BS cultivated in vitro and assessment of its clinical safety dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the cell count changes of A549 cell line and human embryonic lung diploid cell line 2BS after irradiated by 125I seeds with different doses, and to study the growth inhibition of 125I on this two kinds of cell lines, and to determine its clinical safety dose in treatment of non-small cell lung. Methods: 125I seeds with different doses (low dose: 0.2 mCi, mediate dose: 0.4 mCi, high dose: 0.8 mCi) were chosen and put into A549 cells and human embryonic lung diploid cell line 2BS in vitro, the cells on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th days after irradiation were collected, the alive cells were counted by cells dyeing experiments, then the growth curves were drawn, and the IC50 of the radioactive 125I seeds to both two cell lines were calculated. Results: Compared with blank and control groups, the cell proliferation trend of A549 cells in low dose group was not significantly influenced (P>0.05), but the growth of A549 cells in mediate and high dose groups were inhibited in a time-dependent manner, there were significant differences (P<0.05), the most obvious change was on the 6th day. The IC50 of the radioactive 125I seeds to A549 cells was about .04 mCi. While the growth inhibition of 125I 2BS had no statistically significant differences between various dose groups (P>0.05), and the IC50 of the radioactive 125I seeds to 2BS cell line was about 1.65 mCi. Conclusion: 0.4 mCi of radioactive 125I seeds has already had the obvious damage effect on A549 cell, 0.8 mCi of radioactive 125I seeds has the stronger effect. The IC50 of the radioactive 125I seeds to 2BS cells is about 1.65 mCi, so the clinical safety dosage is 0.4-0.8 mCi. (authors)

  18. Thoron in the air: assessment of the occupational dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational dose due to inhalation of thoron was assessed through the committed effective dose and the committed equivalent dose received by workers exposed to the radionuclide at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). The radiation doses were performed by compartmental analysis following the compartmental model of the lung and biokinetic model of the lead, through the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentrations. These values were obtained by gamma ray spectrometry, total alpha count and alpha particle spectrometry of air samples glass fiber filters. The results of the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration varied from 0.3 to 0,67 Bq/m3 at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.9 to 249.8 Bq/m3 at the thorium purification plant. The committed effective dose due to thoron inhalation varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.0 mSv/a at the thorium purification plant. The risk assessment of lung cancer and fatal cancers for the workers exposed to thoron at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant showed an increment for both risk cancer. (author)

  19. Automated detection and classification of interstitial lung diseases from low-dose CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Gur, David

    2004-05-01

    We developed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme to detect and quantitatively assess interstitial lung diseases (ILD) depicted on low-dose and multi-slice helical high-resolution computed tomography (CT) examinations. Eighteen CT cases acquired from patients who underwent routine low-dose whole-lung screening examinations for the detection of lung cancer were used to test the scheme. ILD was identified in all of these cases. The CAD scheme involves multiple steps to segment lung areas, identify suspicious ILD regions depicted on each CT slice, and generate volumetric ILD lesions by grouping and matching ILD regions detected on multiple adjacent slices. The scheme computes five "global" features for each identified ILD region, which include size (or volume), contrast, average local pixel value fluctuation, mean of stochastic fractal dimension, and geometric fractal dimension. Two sets of classification rules are applied to remove false-positive detections. The severity of ILD in each case was rated by one experienced chest radiologist into one of the three categories (mild, moderate, and severe). A distance-weighted k-nearest neighbor algorithm and round-robin validation method was applied to classify each testing case into one of the three categories of severity. In this experiment, the CAD scheme classified 78% (14 out of 18) cases into the same categories as rated by the radiologist.

  20. Low-dose CT of the lung: potential value of iterative reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumueller, Stephan; Winklehner, Anna; Karlo, Christoph; Goetti, Robert; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany); Russi, Erich W. [University Hospital Zurich, Pulmonary Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    To prospectively assess the impact of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) on image quality of nonenhanced low-dose lung CT as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Nonenhanced low-dose chest CT (tube current-time product: 30 mAs) was performed on 30 patients at 100 kVp and on 30 patients at 80 kVp. Images were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE. Two blinded, independent readers measured image noise; two readers assessed image quality of normal anatomic lung structures on a five-point scale. Radiation dose parameters were recorded. Image noise in datasets reconstructed with FBP (57.4 {+-} 15.9) was significantly higher than with SAFIRE (31.7 {+-} 9.8, P < 0.001). Image quality was significantly superior with SAFIRE than with FBP (P < 0.01), without significant difference between FBP at 100 kVp and SAFIRE at 80 kVp (P = 0.68). Diagnostic image quality was present with FBP in 96% of images at 100 kVp and 88% at 80 kVp, and with SAFIRE in 100% at 100 kVp and 98% at 80 kVp. There were significantly more datasets with diagnostic image quality with SAFIRE than with FBP (P < 0.01). Mean CTDI{sub vol} and effective doses were 1.5 {+-} 0.7 mGy.cm and 0.7 {+-} 0.2 mSv at 100 kVp, and 1.4 {+-} 2.8 mGy.cm and 0.5 {+-} 0.2 mSv at 80 kVp (P < 0.001, both). Use of SAFIRE in low-dose lung CT reduces noise, improves image quality, and renders more studies diagnostic as compared to FBP. (orig.)

  1. Early detection of lung cancer using low-dose CT: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from malignancy. Due to a lack of early symptoms patients usually undergo therapy at advanced tumor stages when prognosis is poor. Feasibility studies of low-dose spiral CT screening of heavy smokers have shown that many small, resectable lung cancers can be diagnosed at early stages using simple diagnostic algorithms based on size and attenuation of detected pulmonary nodules with a small proportion of invasive procedures for benign lesions. Preliminary results of repeat screening confirms small size and favourable stage distribution of detected cancers, using even simpler diagnostic algorithms: additional diagnostic procedures are only required in new or growing nodules whereas follow-up with low-dose CT is sufficient in nodules that appear unchanged to exclude slow growth. However, mortality reduction by lung cancer screening with low-dose CT has yet to be demonstrated. Several randomised controlled trials are under way to assess possible mortality reduction by comparison of mortalities in a screening group and a control group. It is hoped that through international cooperation data from these trials can be pooled to allow for statistically significant conclusions as early as possible. (orig.)

  2. Reducing the low-dose lung radiation for central lung tumors by restricting the IMRT beams and arc arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosca, Florin, E-mail: frosca@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mass General/North Shore, Danvers, MA (United States); Kirk, Michael; Soto, Daniel; Sall, Walter; McIntyre, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mass General/North Shore, Danvers, MA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    To compare the extent to which 7 different radiotherapy planning techniques for mediastinal lung targets reduces the lung volume receiving low doses of radiation. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients with targets, including the mediastinal nodes, were identified. Treatment plans were generated to both 60- and 74-Gy prescription doses using 7 different planning techniques: conformal, hybrid conformal/intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), 7 equidistant IMRT beams, 2 restricted beam IMRT plans, a full (360 Degree-Sign ) modulated arc, and a restricted modulated arc plan. All plans were optimized to reduce total lung V5, V10, and V20 volumes, while meeting normal tissue and target coverage constraints. The mean values for the 13 patients are calculated for V5, V10, V20, V{sub ave}, V0-20, and mean lung dose (MLD) lung parameters. For the 74-Gy prescription dose, the mean lung V10 was 42.7, 43.6, 48.2, 56.6, 57, 55.8, and 54.1% for the restricted {+-}36 Degree-Sign IMRT, restricted modulated arc, restricted {+-}45 Degree-Sign IMRT, full modulated arc, hybrid conformal/IMRT, equidistant IMRT, and conformal plans, respectively. A similar lung sparing hierarchy was found for the 60-Gy prescription dose. For the treatment of central lung targets, the {+-}36 Degree-Sign restricted IMRT and restricted modulated arc planning techniques are superior in lowering the lung volume treated to low dose, as well as in minimizing MLD, followed by the {+-}45 Degree-Sign restricted IMRT plan. All planning techniques that allow the use of lateral or lateral/oblique beams result in spreading the low dose over a higher lung volume. The area under the lung dose-volume histogram curve below 20 Gy, V0-20, is proposed as an alternative to individual V{sub dose} parameters, both as a measure of lung sparing and as a parameter to be minimized during IMRT optimization.

  3. SU-E-J-87: Ventilation Weighting Effect On Mean Doses of Both Side Lungs for Patients with Advanced Stage Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study ventilation weighting effect on radiation doses to both side lungs for patients with advanced stage lung cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients with advanced stage lung cancer were included in this retrospective study. Proprietary software was developed to calculate the lung ventilation map based on 4DCT images acquired for radiation therapy. Two phases of inhale (0%) and exhale (50%) were used for the lung ventilation calculations. For each patient, the CT images were resampled to the same dose calculation resolution of 3mmx3mmx3mm. The ventilation distribution was then normalized by the mean value of the ventilation. The ventilation weighted dose was calculated by applying linearly weighted ventilation to the dose of each pixel. The lung contours were automatically delineated from patient CT image with lung window, excluding the tumor and high density tissues. For contralateral and ipsilateral lungs, the mean lung doses from the original plan and ventilation weighted mean lung doses were compared using two tail t-Test. Results: The average of mean dose was 6.1 ±3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs, and 26.2 ± 14.0Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The average of ventilation weighted dose was 6.3± 3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs and 24.6 ± 13.1Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The statistics analysis shows the significance of the mean dose increase (p<0.015) for the contralateral lungs and decrease (p<0.005) for the ipsilateral lungs. Conclusion: Ventilation weighted doses were greater than the un-weighted doses for contralateral lungs and smaller for ipsilateral lungs. This Result may be helpful to understand the radiation dosimetric effect on the lung function and provide planning guidance for patients with advance stage lung cancer

  4. Low-dose CT scan screening for lung cancer: comparison of images and radiation doses between low-dose CT and follow-up standard diagnostic CT

    OpenAIRE

    ONO, KOJI; Hiraoka, Toru; Ono, Asami; Komatsu, Eiji; Shigenaga, Takehiko; Takaki, Hajime; Maeda, Toru; Ogusu, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Shintaro; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Kai, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aim to compare image quality and radiation doses between low-dose CT and follow-up standard diagnostic CT for lung cancer screening. Methods In a single medical institution, 19 subjects who had been screened for lung cancer by low-dose CT before going through follow-up standard diagnostic CT were randomly selected. Both CT image sets for all subjects were independently evaluated by five specialized physicians. Results There were no significant differences between low-dos...

  5. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  6. Loss of lung function after chemo-radiotherapy for NSCLC measured by perfusion SPECT/CT: Correlation with radiation dose and clinical morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Møller, Ditte S; Khalil, Azza A;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to assess dose and time dependence of radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in regional lung function measured with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the lung and relate these changes to the symptomatic endpoint of radiation pneumonitis (RP....... The risk of symptomatic RP was higher for the patients with perfusion reduction after RT (p = 0.02), with the relative risk estimate of 3.6 (95% CI 1.1-12). CONCLUSION: Perfusion lung function changes in a dose-dependent manner after RT. The severity of radiation-induced lung symptoms is significantly...

  7. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and assessment of personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence is discussed in terms of the energy band structure of a crystalline solid and the trapping of charge carriers by point defects. Some general properties of thermoluminescent materials used for dosimetry are outlined, with thermoluminescence of CaSO4:Dy being described in detail. The energy response function and the modification of the energy response of a dosimeter by shielding are discussed. The final section covers the connection between exposure, as recorded by a TLD badge, and the absorbed dose to various organs from gamma radiation in a uranium mine; the conversion from absorbed dose to dose equivalent; and uncertainties in assessment of dose equivalent

  8. The evidence for low-dose CT screening of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchalski, Kathleen; Gutierrez, Antonio; Genshaft, Scott; Abtin, Fereidoun; Suh, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. An effective screening tool for early lung cancer detection has long been sought. Early chest radiograph and low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening trials were promising and demonstrated increased cancer detection. However, these studies were not able to improve lung cancer mortality. The National Lung Screening Trial resulted in decreased lung cancer mortality with LDCT screening in a high-risk population. Similar trials are currently underway in Europe. With LDCT now being widely implemented, it is paramount for radiologists to understand the evidence for lung cancer screening.

  9. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  10. Detection of lung cancer through low-dose CT screening (NELSON) : a prespecifi ed analysis of screening test performance and interval cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horeweg, Nanda; Scholten, Ernst Th; de Jong, Pim A.; van der Aalst, Carlijn M.; Weenink, Carla; Lammers, Jan-Willem J.; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; ten Haaf, Kevin; Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh A.; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; Thunnissen, Erik; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mali, Willem; de Koning, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-dose CT screening is recommended for individuals at high risk of developing lung cancer. However, CT screening does not detect all lung cancers: some might be missed at screening, and others can develop in the interval between screens. The NELSON trial is a randomised trial to assess

  11. The effects of anatomic resolution, respiratory variations and dose calculation methods on lung dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Kerry Kent Ronald

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this thesis was to explore the effects of dose resolution, respiratory variation and dose calculation method on dose accuracy. To achieve this, two models of lung were created. The first model, called TISSUE, approximated the connective alveolar tissues of the lung. The second model, called BRANCH, approximated the lungs bronchial, arterial and venous branching networks. Both models were varied to represent the full inhalation, full exhalation and midbreath phases of the respiration cycle. To explore the effects of dose resolution and respiratory variation on dose accuracy, each model was converted into a CT dataset and imported into a Monte Carlo simulation. The resulting dose distributions were compared and contrasted against dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations which included the explicit model geometries. It was concluded that, regardless of respiratory phase, the exclusion of the connective tissue structures in the CT representation did not significantly effect the accuracy of dose calculations. However, the exclusion of the BRANCH structures resulted in dose underestimations as high as 14% local to the branching structures. As lung density decreased, the overall dose accuracy marginally decreased. To explore the effects of dose calculation method on dose accuracy, CT representations of the lung models were imported into the Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system. Dose distributions were calculated using the collapsed cone convolution method and compared to those derived using the Monte Carlo method. For both lung models, it was concluded that the accuracy of the collapsed cone algorithm decreased with decreasing density. At full inhalation lung density, the collapsed cone algorithm underestimated dose by as much as 15%. Also, the accuracy of the CCC method decreased with decreasing field size. Further work is needed to determine the source of the discrepancy.

  12. A brief measure of Smokers' knowledge of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstein, Lisa M; Richards, Vincent F; Leal, Viola B; Housten, Ashley J; Bevers, Therese B; Cantor, Scott B; Cinciripini, Paul M; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila M; Escoto, Kamisha H; Godoy, Myrna C B; Linder, Suzanne K; Munden, Reginald F; Volk, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    We describe the development and psychometric properties of a new, brief measure of smokers' knowledge of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). Content experts identified key facts smokers should know in making an informed decision about lung cancer screening. Sample questions were drafted and iteratively refined based on feedback from content experts and cognitive testing with ten smokers. The resulting 16-item knowledge measure was completed by 108 heavy smokers in Houston, Texas, recruited from 12/2014 to 09/2015. Item difficulty, item discrimination, internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed. Group differences based upon education levels and smoking history were explored. Several items were dropped due to ceiling effects or overlapping constructs, resulting in a 12-item knowledge measure. Additional items with high item uncertainty were retained because of their importance in informed decision making about lung cancer screening. Internal consistency reliability of the final scale was acceptable (KR-20 = 0.66) and test-retest reliability of the overall scale was 0.84 (intraclass correlation). Knowledge scores differed across education levels (F = 3.36, p = 0.04), while no differences were observed between current and former smokers (F = 1.43, p = 0.24) or among participants who met or did not meet the 30-pack-year screening eligibility criterion (F = 0.57, p = 0.45). The new measure provides a brief, valid and reliable indicator of smokers' knowledge of key concepts central to making an informed decision about lung cancer screening with LDCT, and can be part of a broader assessment of the quality of smokers' decision making about lung cancer screening. PMID:27512650

  13. Assessing dose rate distributions in VMAT plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Volken, W.; Terribilini, D.; Frauchiger, D.; Zaugg, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2016-04-01

    Dose rate is an essential factor in radiobiology. As modern radiotherapy delivery techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) introduce dynamic modulation of the dose rate, it is important to assess the changes in dose rate. Both the rate of monitor units per minute (MU rate) and collimation are varied over the course of a fraction, leading to different dose rates in every voxel of the calculation volume at any point in time during dose delivery. Given the radiotherapy plan and machine specific limitations, a VMAT treatment plan can be split into arc sectors between Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine control points (CPs) of constant and known MU rate. By calculating dose distributions in each of these arc sectors independently and multiplying them with the MU rate, the dose rate in every single voxel at every time point during the fraction can be calculated. Independently calculated and then summed dose distributions per arc sector were compared to the whole arc dose calculation for validation. Dose measurements and video analysis were performed to validate the calculated datasets. A clinical head and neck, cranial and liver case were analyzed using the tool developed. Measurement validation of synthetic test cases showed linac agreement to precalculated arc sector times within  ±0.4 s and doses  ±0.1 MU (one standard deviation). Two methods for the visualization of dose rate datasets were developed: the first method plots a two-dimensional (2D) histogram of the number of voxels receiving a given dose rate over the course of the arc treatment delivery. In similarity to treatment planning system display of dose, the second method displays the dose rate as color wash on top of the corresponding computed tomography image, allowing the user to scroll through the variation over time. Examining clinical cases showed dose rates spread over a continuous spectrum, with mean dose rates hardly exceeding 100 cGy min-1 for conventional

  14. Lung cancer screening by low-dose spiral computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, RJ; Habbema, JDF; Pedersen, JH; de Koning, HJ; Oudkerk, M; Hoogsteden, HC

    2001-01-01

    The poor prognosis of lung cancer has barely changed in the last decades, but the prognosis is better when the disease is detected earlier. Lung cancer screening by chest radiography did not lead to a decrease in lung cancer mortality, presumably because the chest radiograph is a poor screening tool

  15. Spectrum of early lung cancer presentation in low-dose screening CT: a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampinelli, Cristiano; Calloni, Sonia Francesca; Minotti, Marta; Bellomi, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The typical presentation of early stage lung cancers on low-dose CT screening are non-calcified pulmonary nodules. However, there is a wide spectrum of unusual focal abnormalities that can be early presentations of lung cancer. These abnormalities include, for example, cancers associated with 'cystic airspaces' or scar-like cancers. The detection of lung cancer with low-dose CT can be affected by the absence of intravenous contrast medium. As a consequence, endobronchial and central lesions can be difficult to recognize, raising the potential for missed cancers. Focal lesions arising within pre-existing lung disease, such as lung fibrosis or apical scars, can also be early lung cancer manifestations and deserve particular consideration as recognition of these lesions may be hindered by the underlying disease. Furthermore, the unpredictable growth rate of lung cancer, which ranges from indolent to aggressive cancers, necessitates attention to the wide spectrum of progression in lung cancer appearance on serial low-dose CT scans. In this pictorial review we discuss the spectrum of early lung cancer presentation in low-dose CT screening, highlighting typical as well as unusual radiological features and the varied growth rates of early lung cancer. Teaching Points • There is a wide spectrum of early presentations of lung cancer on LDCT. • Low radiation dose and the absence of contrast medium injection can affect lung cancer detection. • Lung cancer growth shows various behaviours, ranging from indolent to aggressive cancers. • Familiarity with LDCT technique can improve CT screening effectiveness and avoid missed diagnosis. PMID:27188380

  16. ESR dose assessment in irradiated chicken legs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordi, F. [II Universita, Rome (Italy). Dipartimento di Medicina Interna; Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.; Pantaloni, M. [Istituto Superiore di Santia, Rome (Italy)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy). Sezione Sanita

    1994-05-01

    The electron spin resonance technique has received a wide consensus for dose assessment in irradiated chicken bone. Nevertheless, some practical problems are still open like the most suitable mathematical expression to be used for dose evaluation with the re-irradiation method. In the present paper the linear and exponential approximations were analyzed using 40 bone chicken samples and a reproducible readout procedure. The results suggested the use of the exponential dose-effect relationship and gave some indications on the procedure to be practically adopted. (author).

  17. Longitudinal follow-up study of smoking-induced emphysema progression in low-dose CT screening of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Matsuhiro, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, N.

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a major public health problem that is predicted to be third leading cause of death in 2030. Although spirometry is traditionally used to quantify emphysema progression, it is difficult to detect the loss of pulmonary function by emphysema in early stage, and to assess the susceptibility to smoking. This study presents quantification method of smoking-induced emphysema progression based on annual changes of low attenuation volume (LAV) by each lung lobe acquired from low-dose CT images in lung cancer screening. The method consists of three steps. First, lung lobes are segmented using extracted interlobar fissures by enhancement filter based on fourdimensional curvature. Second, LAV of each lung lobe is segmented. Finally, smoking-induced emphysema progression is assessed by statistical analysis of the annual changes represented by linear regression of LAV percentage in each lung lobe. This method was applied to 140 participants in lung cancer CT screening for six years. The results showed that LAV progressions of nonsmokers, past smokers, and current smokers are different in terms of pack-year and smoking cessation duration. This study demonstrates effectiveness in diagnosis and prognosis of early emphysema in lung cancer CT screening.

  18. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  19. Early detection of lung cancer using low-dose CT: an update; Lungenkrebsfrueherkennung mit Low-dose-CT: ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from malignancy. Due to a lack of early symptoms patients usually undergo therapy at advanced tumor stages when prognosis is poor. Feasibility studies of low-dose spiral CT screening of heavy smokers have shown that many small, resectable lung cancers can be diagnosed at early stages using simple diagnostic algorithms based on size and attenuation of detected pulmonary nodules with a small proportion of invasive procedures for benign lesions. Preliminary results of repeat screening confirms small size and favourable stage distribution of detected cancers, using even simpler diagnostic algorithms: additional diagnostic procedures are only required in new or growing nodules whereas follow-up with low-dose CT is sufficient in nodules that appear unchanged to exclude slow growth. However, mortality reduction by lung cancer screening with low-dose CT has yet to be demonstrated. Several randomised controlled trials are under way to assess possible mortality reduction by comparison of mortalities in a screening group and a control group. It is hoped that through international cooperation data from these trials can be pooled to allow for statistically significant conclusions as early as possible. (orig.) [German] Lungenkrebs ist die haeufigste zum Tode fuehrende maligne Erkrankung. Wegen des Fehlens von Fruehsymptomen kommen Patienten meist in fortgeschrittenen Tumorstadien zur Behandlung, wenn die Prognose sehr schlecht ist. Machbarkeitsstudien zum Einsatz der Niedrigdosis-Spiral-Computertomographie bei starken Rauchern haben gezeigt, dass sich bei Einsatz simpler, auf Groesse und Dichte gefundener Rundherde basierender diagnostischer Algorithmen eine grosse Zahl kleiner, resektabler Bronchialkarzinome in fruehen Stadien diagnostizieren liess, wobei der Anteil invasiver Massnahmen wegen benigner Laesionen gering war. Erste Ergebnisse von Wiederholungsuntersuchungen zeigen wiederum eine geringe Groesse und guenstige

  20. Improved heart, lung and target dose with deep inspiration breath hold in a large clinical series of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study aims at evaluating the effect of deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) on target coverage and dose to organs at risk in a large series of breast cancer patients. Materials and methods: Clinical dose plans for 319 breast cancer patients were evaluated: 144 left-sided patients treated with DIBH and 175 free-breathing (FB) patients (83 left-sided and 92 right-sided). All patients received whole breast irradiation with tangential fields, based on a forward-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Dose to heart, ipsi-lateral lung and ipsi-lateral breast were assessed and median values compared between patient groups. Results: Comparing group median values, DIBH plans show large reductions of dose to the heart compared with left-sided FB plans; V20Gy (relative volume receiving ⩾20 Gy) for the heart is reduced from 7.8% to 2.3% (−70%, p < 0.0001), V40Gy from 3.4% to 0.3% (−91%, p < 0.0001) and mean dose from 5.2 to 2.7 Gy (−48%, p < 0.0001). Lung dose also shows a small reduction in V20Gy (p < 0.04), while median target coverage is slightly improved (p = 0.0002). Conclusions: In a large series of clinical patients we find that implementation of DIBH in daily clinical practice results in reduced irradiation of heart and lung, without compromising target coverage

  1. Utility of SPECT Lung Perfusion Scans in Assessing the Early Changes in Pulmonary Function after Radiotherapy for Patients with Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjie Zhang; Rong Zheng; Luiun Zhao; Luhua Wang; Shengzu Chen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Radiation-induced lung injury commonly follows radiotherapy (RT) fortumors within and near the thorax. Lung function is usually measured by pulmonary function tests (PFTs). But RT-induced regional changes of pulmonary function cannot be accurately evaluated by PFTs. Lung perfusion scintigraphy compared with other radiographic methods can assess well regional pulmonary physiological function, and a 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning system can quantitatively calculate irradiation dosage. The purpose of this study is to assess, by lung perfusion scintigraphy, early changes in the pulmonary function of patients with lung cancer when receiving thoracic 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT).METHODS Nineteen patients receiving thoracic 3D-CRT for lung cancer were studied. A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)lung perfusion scan, X-ray or CT scan before RT and after 40~50Gy radiation were performed. Pre-RT SPECT lung perfusion images were classified by comparing lung perfusion defects with radiological abnormalities before RT. Grade 0: There was no lung perfusion defect in the area of radiological abnormality. Grade 1: The size of the radiological abnormality was similar to the area of the lung perfusion defect. Grade 2: The area of the lung perfusion defect was bigger than the size of the radiological abnormality and extended to one lobe of the lung. Grade 3: The area of lung perfusion defect exceeded one lobe of the lung. The radiation field with more than 20 Gy was drawn as a region of interest (ROI). The proportion of radioactive dose within this ROI relative to total lung dose in one slice was calculated.RESULTS All patients had lung perfusion defects, nine patients with grade 1,five patients with grade 2 and five patients with grade 3 damage,respectively. All tumors in the 19 patients were reduced in CT or X-ray images to various degrees after 40~50 Gy radiation. The mean proportion of ROI in 19 patients was 53.7±29

  2. Inhalation dose assessment for Maralinga and Emu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose assessments for the inhalation of artificial radionuclides are presented for all types of contaminated areas at Maralinga and Emu. These enable Committed Effective Dose Equivalent (CEDE), to be estimated by scaling at any area of interest where activity concentrations are known. In the case of Aborigines, these dose are estimated assuming respirable dust loadings of 1 mg/m3 for adults and 1.5 mg/m3 for children and infants. Details of the calculations are presented in the appendix. The model of the respiratory system used in this assessment is that described in Interantional Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 (ICRP, 1979a). With the exception of Kuli, which is contaminated with uranium, at all other sites it is only the inhalation of plutonium and americium that contributes significantly to the dose, and of these 239Pu is the largest contributor. Therefore, considering the long half lives of the radionuclides concerned, it appears that the inhalation problems highlighted by this dose assessment will not diminish significantly within any reasonable period of time and hence management strategies must be developed to deal with such problems. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 1 fig

  3. Ultrasonography for the assessment of lung recruitment maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusman, Gerardo; Acosta, Cecilia M; Costantini, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Lung collapse is a known complication that affects most of the patients undergoing positive pressure mechanical ventilation. Such atelectasis and airways closure lead to gas exchange and lung mechanics impairment and has the potential to develop an inflammatory response in the lungs. These negative effects of lung collapse can be reverted by a lung recruitment maneuver (RM) i.e. a ventilatory strategy that resolves lung collapse by a brief and controlled increment in airway pressures. However, an unsolved question is how to assess such RM at the bedside. The aim of this paper is to describe the usefulness of lung sonography (LUS) to conduct and personalize RM in a real-time way at the bedside. LUS has favorable features to assess lung recruitment due to its high specificity and sensitivity to detect lung collapse together with its non-invasiveness, availability and simple use. PMID:27496127

  4. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  5. The embryogenesis of dose assessment at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several significant events occurred between 1955 and 1960 that resulted in major changes in environmental monitoring at Hanford and in the initiation of comprehensive dose assessments. These included: (1) specification of dose limits for nonoccupational exposure (including internal emitters); (2) a national and international awakening to the need for managing the disposal of radioactive wastes; (3) identification of the most important radionuclides and their sources of exposure; (4) data that quantified the transfer coefficients of nuclides along environmental pathways; and (5) development of greatly improved radiation detection instrumentation. In response to a growing need, the Hanford Laboratories formed the Environmental Studies and Evaluation component. This group revamped the monitoring and sampling programs so that analytical results contributed directly to dose estimation. Special studies were conducted to ascertain local dietary and recreational habits that affected dose calculations and to calibrate the models. These studies involved extensive contact with the public and governmental agencies, which elicited a positive reaction

  6. Internal dose assessment in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although numerous models have been developed for occupational and medical internal dosimetry, they may not be applicable to an accident situation. Published dose coefficients relate effective dose to intake, but if acute deterministic effects are possible, effective dose is not a useful parameter. Consequently, dose rates to the organs of interest need to be computed from first principles. Standard bioassay methods may be used to assess body contents, but, again, the standard models for bioassay interpretation may not be applicable because of the circumstances of the accident and the prompt initiation of decorporation therapy. Examples of modifications to the standard methodologies include adjustment of biological half-times under therapy, such as in the Goiania accident, and the same effect, complicated by continued input from contaminated wounds, in the Hanford 241Am accident. (author)

  7. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devpura, S.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chen, D.; Liu, D.; Li, H.; Kumar, S.; Gordon, J.; Ajlouni, M.; Movsas, B.; Chetty, I. J.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for "lung-island" tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ~10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type), a Monte

  8. Assessment of external dose indoors in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper was an assessment of external exposure indoors and its dependence on construction materials and indoor radon concentrations in Lithuanian living houses. Relationship of absorbed dose rate in air indoors and activity indexes of the most commonly used construction materials (wood, concrete and bricks) have been studied using results received in measurements done in >4700 rooms in 1995-2005. Possible connections of dose rate indoors with indoor radon concentrations are also discussed. Findings of this study helped to make an assessment of the mean value of effective dose of Lithuanian population due to external exposure indoors which is equal to 0.58 mSv y-1. The received data might also be used in improvement of quality of personal dosimetric measurements done in premises constructed of different construction materials. (authors)

  9. Development and application of a random lung model for dose calculations in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang

    Radiotherapy requires accurate dose calculations in the human body, especially in disease sites with large variations of electron density in neighboring tissues, such as the lung. Currently, the lung is modeled by a voxelized geometry interpolated from computed tomography (CT) scans to various resolutions. The simplest such voxelized lung, the atomic mix model, is a homogenized whole lung with a volume-averaged bulk density. However, according traditional transport theory, even the relatively fine CT voxelization of the lung is not valid, due to the extremely small mean free path (MFP) of the electrons. The purpose of this thesis is to study the impact of the lung's heterogeneities on dose calculations in lung treatment planning. We first extend the traditional atomic mix theory for charged particles by approximating the Boltzmann equation for electrons to its Fokker-Planck (FP) limit, and then applying a formal asymptotic analysis to the BFP equation. This analysis raises the length scale for homogenizing a heterogeneous medium from the electron mean free path (MFP) to the much larger electron transport MFP. Then, using the lung's anatomical data and our new atomic mix theory, we build a realistic 2 1/2-D random lung model. The dose distributions for representative realizations of the random lung model are compared to those from the atomic mix approximation of the random lung model, showing that significant perturbations may occur with small field sizes and large lung structures. We also apply our random lung model to a more realistic lung phantom and investigate the effect of CT resolutions on lung treatment planning. We show that, compared to the reference 1 x 1 mm2 CT resolution, a 2 x 2 mm2 CT resolution is sufficient to voxelize the lung, while significant deviations in dose can be observed with a larger 4 x 4 mm 2 CT resolution. We use the Monte Carlo method extensively in this thesis, to avoid systematic errors caused by inaccurate heterogeneity corrections

  10. Novel lung IMRT planning algorithms with nonuniform dose delivery strategy to account for respiratory motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Pengpeng; Mah, Dennis; Gewanter, Richard; Kutcher, Gerald

    2006-09-01

    To effectively deliver radiation dose to lung tumors, respiratory motion has to be considered in treatment planning. In this paper we first present a new lung IMRT planning algorithm, referred as the dose shaping (DS) method, that shapes the dose distribution according to the probability distribution of the tumor over the breathing cycle to account for respiratory motion. In IMRT planning a dose-based convolution method was generally adopted to compensate for random organ motion by performing 4-D dose calculations using a tumor motion probability density function. We modified the CON-DOSE method to a dose volume histogram based convolution method (CON-DVH) that allows nonuniform dose distribution to account for respiratory motion. We implemented the two new planning algorithms on an in-house IMRT planning system that uses the Eclipse (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) planning workstation as the dose calculation engine. The new algorithms were compared with (1) the conventional margin extension approach in which margin is generated based on the extreme positions of the tumor, (2) the dose-based convolution method, and (3) gating with 3 mm residual motion. Dose volume histogram, tumor control probability, normal tissue complication probability, and mean lung dose were calculated and used to evaluate the relative performance of these approaches at the end-exhale phase of the respiratory cycle. We recruited six patients in our treatment planning study. The study demonstrated that the two new methods could significantly reduce the ipsilateral normal lung dose and outperformed the margin extension method and the dose-based convolution method. Compared with the gated approach that has the best performance in the low dose region, the two methods we proposed have similar potential to escalate tumor dose, but could be more efficient because dose is delivered continuously. PMID:17022235

  11. Human data and internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent data on physical and anatomical and physiological or metabolic data regarding Japanese Reference Man is briefly reviewed. This includes reference values for masses of all organs and tissues proposed for a Japanese Reference male adult. Part of the data is used to assess alpha doses to bone tissues from naturally occurring 226Ra in bone of Japanese adult. (author)

  12. HRCT technique with low-dose protocols for interstitial lung diseases; HRCT-Technik mit Low-dose-Protokollen bei interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Ley, S. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Chirurgische Klinik Dr. Rinecker, Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    For optimal visualization of the lung parenchyma a dedicated computed tomography (CT) examination protocol has to be selected. High resolution CT (HRCT) is the best technique for non-invasive evaluation of the lung parenchyma. Given the possibility to examine the complete lungs within one breath hold, assessment of disease severity and distribution is easily possible. Various parameters have to be considered to generate optimal image quality and best possible clinical results. This review article discusses the various image acquisition parameters for HRCT as well as the issue of dose reduction. (orig.) [German] Die Wahl des optimalen Untersuchungsprotokolls fuer eine CT der Lunge ist relevant fuer die diagnostische Aussagekraft. Die hochaufloesende Computertomographie (HRCT) der Lunge ist das beste Verfahren zur nichtinvasiven Beurteilung des Lungenparenchyms. Durch die Moeglichkeit der Untersuchung der gesamten Lunge in einer Atemstillstandsphase ist die Abschaetzung der Erkrankungsschwere problemlos moeglich. Verschiedene Aspekte sind zu beachten, um eine optimale Bildqualitaet zu erreichen und eine bestmoegliche Aussagekraft der Untersuchung zu gewaehrleisten. In dieser Uebersicht werden die verschiedenen Aufnahmeparameter erlaeutert sowie das Thema der Dosisreduktion diskutiert. (orig.)

  13. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  14. Model-based risk assessment for motion effects in 3D radiotherapy of lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Although 4D CT imaging becomes available in an increasing number of radiotherapy facilities, 3D imaging and planning is still standard in current clinical practice. In particular for lung tumors, respiratory motion is a known source of uncertainty and should be accounted for during radiotherapy planning - which is difficult by using only a 3D planning CT. In this contribution, we propose applying a statistical lung motion model to predict patients' motion patterns and to estimate dosimetric motion effects in lung tumor radiotherapy if only 3D images are available. Being generated based on 4D CT images of patients with unimpaired lung motion, the model tends to overestimate lung tumor motion. It therefore promises conservative risk assessment regarding tumor dose coverage. This is exemplarily evaluated using treatment plans of lung tumor patients with different tumor motion patterns and for two treatment modalities (conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy and step-&- shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy). For the test cases, 4D CT images are available. Thus, also a standard registration-based 4D dose calculation is performed, which serves as reference to judge plausibility of the modelbased 4D dose calculation. It will be shown that, if combined with an additional simple patient-specific breathing surrogate measurement (here: spirometry), the model-based dose calculation provides reasonable risk assessment of respiratory motion effects.

  15. Mid-ventilation position planning: Optimal model for dose distribution in lung tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - The dose distribution for lung tumour is estimated using a 3D-CT scan, and since a person breathes while the images are captured, the dose distribution doesn't reflect the reality. A 4D-CT scan integrates the motion of the tumour during breathing and, therefore, provides us with important information regarding tumour's motion in all directions, the motion volume (ITV) and the time-weighted average position (MVP). Patient and methods. - Based on these two concepts, we have estimated, for a lung carcinoma case a 3D dose distribution from a 3D-CT scan, and a 4D dose distribution from a 4-D CT scan. To this, we have applied a non-rigid registration to estimate the cumulative dose. Results. - Our study shows that the 4D dose estimation of the GTV is almost the same when made using MVP and ITV concepts, but sparring of the healthy lung is better done using the MPV model (MVP), as compared to the ITV model. This improvement of the therapeutic index allows, from a projection on the theoretical maximal dose to PTV (strictly restricted to doses for the lungs and the spinal cord), for an increase of about 11% on the total dose (maximal dose of 86 Gy for the ITV and 96 Gy for the MVP). Conclusion. - Further studies with more patients are needed to confirm our data. (authors)

  16. Exposure pathways and environmental dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides released into the environment from various nuclear facilities during normal operating conditions and under accident conditions eventually reach man through various pathways of exposure. It is required to assess the dose received by members of the public at various stages of nuclear facility. At the design stage of the nuclear facility such assessment is necessary for determining the adequacy of design provisions. During the operational phase, the assessment is needed to establish compliance with the standards and limits laid down for the facility and site

  17. A new approach to radiopharmaceutical dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals relies on an accurate measurement of the activity administered, a model for uptake of the pharmaceutical, and calculations of the dose to the target organ. The authors report here a new approach to experimental assessment of the radiation dose to bone using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Ionizing radiations interact with mineralized bone tissue (hydroxyapatite) to produce dose-dependent concentrations of long-lived paramagnetic centers. They have successfully applied the EPR technique to bone tissues of an animal treated with a radiopharmaceutical to demonstrate its sensitivity towards radiation-induced centers in the mineralized tissue. Although the EPR bone dosimetry method is invasive, it does offer the first experimental technique for measuring and mapping the tissue response to the administered radioactivity

  18. Bio-indicators for radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear facilities, such as Chalk River Laboratories, dose to the atomic radiation workers (ARWs) is assessed routinely by using physical dosimeters and bioassay procedures in accordance with regulatory recommendations. However, these procedures may be insufficient in some circumstances, e.g., in cases where the reading of the physical dosimeters is questioned, in cases of radiation accidents where the person(s) in question was not wearing a dosimeter, or in the event of a radiation emergency when an exposure above the dose limits is possible. The desirability of being able to assess radiation dose on the basis of radio-biological effects has prompted the Dosimetric Research Branch to investigate the suitability of biological devices and techniques that could be used for this purpose. Current biological dosimetry concepts suggest that there does not appear to be any bio-indicator that could reliably measure the very low doses that are routinely measured by the physical devices presently in use. Nonetheless, bio-indicators may be useful in providing valuable supplementary information in cases of unusual radiation exposures, such as when the estimated body doses are doubtful because of lack of proper physical measurements, or in cases where available results need to be confirmed for medical treatment plannings. This report evaluates the present state of biological dosimetry and, in particular, assesses the efficiency and limits of individual indicators. This has led to the recommendation of a few promising research areas that may result in the development of appropriate biological dosimeters for operational and emergency needs at Chalk River

  19. Dose-Guided Radiotherapy: Potential Benefit of Online Dose Recalculation for Stereotactic Lung Irradiation in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether dose-guided radiotherapy (i.e., online recalculation and evaluation of the actual dose distribution) can improve decision making for lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: For this study 108 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of 10 non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment plans were recalculated on the CBCT scans. The V100% of the internal target volume (ITV) and Dmax of the organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Results from the recalculated data were compared with dose estimates for target and OARs by superposition of the originally planned dose distribution on CBCT geometry (i.e., the original dose distribution was assumed to be spatially invariant). Results: Before position correction was applied the V100% of the ITV was 100% in 65% of the cases when an ITV–PTV margin of 5 mm was used and 52% of the cases when a margin of 3 mm was used. After position correction, the difference of Dmax in the OARs with respect to the treatment plan was within 5% in the majority of the cases. When the dose was not recalculated but estimated assuming an invariant dose distribution, clinically relevant errors occurred in both the ITV and the OARs. Conclusion: Dose-guided radiotherapy can be used to determine the actual dose in OARs when the target has moved with respect to the OARs. When the workflow is optimized for speed, it can be used to prevent unnecessary position corrections. Estimating the dose by assuming an invariant dose instead of recalculation of the dose gives clinically relevant errors.

  20. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    compared to assess the improvement due to target immobilization and reduced lung density. To estimate the role of target immobilization alone, an additional plan is generated using the DIBH PTV, but with the assumption it is surrounded by free-breathing, not deep inspiration, density lung. Results: The results of the study suggest that the DIBH technique can reduce the mass of lung irradiated to high dose, so that the possibility for dose escalation is increased. The relative contribution of reduced lung density and reduced margin for motion vary depending on the tumor size, level of DIBH and extent of tumor motion in free-breathing. An example treatment plan comparison for a typical patient is shown in the figure, which is a cumulative dose mass histogram (DMH) depicting the mass of normal lung tissue receiving at least a certain dose. The lung DMHs shown are for three plans: (A) Free-breathing; (B) Target immobilization only; (C) Target immobilization plus reduced lung density. It is observed that the mass of lung tissue treated to high doses is less for cases B and C. For example, the mass receiving >24.5 Gy is 235 g for free-breathing (A), 180 g for immobilization alone (B) and 150 g for DIBH (C). For this patient, target immobilization alone would allow a dose escalation from 75.6 Gy to 95 Gy for the same level of NTCP as the free-breathing plan, the added effect of reduced density would then enable a further escalation from 95 Gy to 110 Gy. For this study, the measured tumor motions ranged from 5 to 12 mm for free-breathing and 1 to 3 mm for DIBH. For the example shown in the figure the tumor motion was 10 mm and DIBH reproducibility was 3 mm. Additional details on the DIBH technique and results for a group of patients will be presented. Conclusions: Compared to conventional free-breathing treatment the DIBH technique benefits from reduced margins, as a result of the suppressed target motion, as well as a decreased lung density - both contribute to moving normal lung

  1. Coronary artery calcification scoring in low-dose ungated CT screening for lung cancer: interscan agreement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.C.; Isgum, I.; Gondrie, M.J.; Mali, W.P.Th.; Ginneken, B. van; Prokop, M.; Graaf, Y. van der

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous studies detection of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with low-dose ungated MDCT performed for lung cancer screening has been compared with detection with cardiac CT. We evaluated the interscan agreement of CAC scores from two consecutive low-dose ungated MDCT examinations.

  2. Coronary Artery Calcification Scoring in Low-Dose Ungated CT Screening for Lung Cancer : Interscan Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Peter C. A.; Isgum, Ivana; Gondrie, Martijn J. A.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. In previous studies detection of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with low-dose ungated MDCT performed for lung cancer screening has been compared with detection with cardiac CT. We evaluated the interscan agreement of CAC scores from two consecutive low-dose ungated MDCT examinations.

  3. Dose. Detriment. Limit assessment; Dosis. Schadensmass. Grenzwertsetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2015-07-01

    One goal of radiation protection is the limitation of stochastic effects due to radiation exposure. The probability of occurrence of a radiation induced stochastic effect, however, is only one of several other parameters which determine the radiation detriment. Though the ICRP-concept of detriment is a quantitative definition, the kind of detriment weighting includes somewhat subjective elements. In this sense, the detriment-concept of ICRP represents already at the stage of effective dose a kind of assessment. Thus, by comparing radiation protection standards and concepts interconvertible or with those of environment or occupational protection one should be aware of the possibly different principles of detriment assessment.

  4. The impact of photon dose calculation algorithms on expected dose distributions in lungs under different respiratory phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A planning study was carried out on a cohort of CT datasets from breast patients scanned during different respiratory phases. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of different air filling in lungs on the calculation accuracy of photon dose algorithms and to identify potential patterns of failure with clinical implications. Selected respiratory phases were free breathing (FB), representative of typical end expiration, and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), a typical condition for clinical treatment with respiratory gating. Algorithms investigated were the pencil beam (PBC), the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the collapsed cone (CC) from the Varian Eclipse or Philips Pinnacle planning system. Reference benchmark calculations were performed with the Voxel Monte Carlo (VMC++). An analysis was performed in terms of physical quantities inspecting either dose-volume or dose-mass histograms and in terms of an extension to three dimensions of the γ index of Low. Results were stratified according to a breathing phase and algorithm. Collectives acquired in FB or DIBH showed well-separated average lung density distributions with mean densities of 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.16 ± 0.02 g cm-3, respectively, and average peak densities of 0.17 ± 0.03 and 0.09 ± 0.02 g cm-3. Analysis of volume-dose or mass-dose histograms proved the expected deviations on PBC results due to the missing lateral transport of electrons with underestimations in the low dose region and overestimations in the high dose region. From the γ analysis, it resulted that PBC is systematically defective compared to VMC++ over the entire range of lung densities and dose levels with severe violations in both respiratory phases. The fraction of lung voxels with γ > 1 for PBC reached 25% in DIBH and about 15% in FB. CC and AAA performed, in contrast, similarly and with fractions of lung voxels with γ > 1 in average inferior to 2% in FB and 4-5% (AAA) or 6-8% (CC) in DIBH. In summary, PBC

  5. The impact of photon dose calculation algorithms on expected dose distributions in lungs under different respiratory phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, 6504 Bellinzona (Switzerland); Winkler, Peter [Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)], E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch

    2008-05-07

    A planning study was carried out on a cohort of CT datasets from breast patients scanned during different respiratory phases. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of different air filling in lungs on the calculation accuracy of photon dose algorithms and to identify potential patterns of failure with clinical implications. Selected respiratory phases were free breathing (FB), representative of typical end expiration, and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), a typical condition for clinical treatment with respiratory gating. Algorithms investigated were the pencil beam (PBC), the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the collapsed cone (CC) from the Varian Eclipse or Philips Pinnacle planning system. Reference benchmark calculations were performed with the Voxel Monte Carlo (VMC++). An analysis was performed in terms of physical quantities inspecting either dose-volume or dose-mass histograms and in terms of an extension to three dimensions of the {gamma} index of Low. Results were stratified according to a breathing phase and algorithm. Collectives acquired in FB or DIBH showed well-separated average lung density distributions with mean densities of 0.27 {+-} 0.04 and 0.16 {+-} 0.02 g cm{sup -3}, respectively, and average peak densities of 0.17 {+-} 0.03 and 0.09 {+-} 0.02 g cm{sup -3}. Analysis of volume-dose or mass-dose histograms proved the expected deviations on PBC results due to the missing lateral transport of electrons with underestimations in the low dose region and overestimations in the high dose region. From the {gamma} analysis, it resulted that PBC is systematically defective compared to VMC++ over the entire range of lung densities and dose levels with severe violations in both respiratory phases. The fraction of lung voxels with {gamma} > 1 for PBC reached 25% in DIBH and about 15% in FB. CC and AAA performed, in contrast, similarly and with fractions of lung voxels with {gamma} > 1 in average inferior to 2% in FB and 4

  6. The impact of photon dose calculation algorithms on expected dose distributions in lungs under different respiratory phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Winkler, Peter; Cozzi, Luca

    2008-05-01

    A planning study was carried out on a cohort of CT datasets from breast patients scanned during different respiratory phases. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of different air filling in lungs on the calculation accuracy of photon dose algorithms and to identify potential patterns of failure with clinical implications. Selected respiratory phases were free breathing (FB), representative of typical end expiration, and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), a typical condition for clinical treatment with respiratory gating. Algorithms investigated were the pencil beam (PBC), the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the collapsed cone (CC) from the Varian Eclipse or Philips Pinnacle planning system. Reference benchmark calculations were performed with the Voxel Monte Carlo (VMC++). An analysis was performed in terms of physical quantities inspecting either dose-volume or dose-mass histograms and in terms of an extension to three dimensions of the γ index of Low. Results were stratified according to a breathing phase and algorithm. Collectives acquired in FB or DIBH showed well-separated average lung density distributions with mean densities of 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.16 ± 0.02 g cm-3, respectively, and average peak densities of 0.17 ± 0.03 and 0.09 ± 0.02 g cm-3. Analysis of volume-dose or mass-dose histograms proved the expected deviations on PBC results due to the missing lateral transport of electrons with underestimations in the low dose region and overestimations in the high dose region. From the γ analysis, it resulted that PBC is systematically defective compared to VMC++ over the entire range of lung densities and dose levels with severe violations in both respiratory phases. The fraction of lung voxels with γ > 1 for PBC reached 25% in DIBH and about 15% in FB. CC and AAA performed, in contrast, similarly and with fractions of lung voxels with γ > 1 in average inferior to 2% in FB and 4-5% (AAA) or 6-8% (CC) in DIBH. In summary, PBC

  7. Impact of temporal probability in 4D dose calculation for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabhi, Ouided; Ma, Mingyu; Bayouth, John; Xia, Junyi

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainty in 4D dose calculation using three temporal probability distributions: uniform distribution, sinusoidal distribution, and patient-specific distribution derived from the patient respiratory trace. Temporal probability, defined as the fraction of time a patient spends in each respiratory amplitude, was evaluated in nine lung cancer patients. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT), along with deformable image registration, was used to compute 4D dose incorporating the patient's respiratory motion. First, the dose of each of 10 phase CTs was computed using the same planning parameters as those used in 3D treatment planning based on the breath-hold CT. Next, deformable image registration was used to deform the dose of each phase CT to the breath-hold CT using the deformation map between the phase CT and the breath-hold CT. Finally, the 4D dose was computed by summing the deformed phase doses using their corresponding temporal probabilities. In this study, 4D dose calculated from the patient-specific temporal probability distribution was used as the ground truth. The dosimetric evaluation matrix included: 1) 3D gamma analysis, 2) mean tumor dose (MTD), 3) mean lung dose (MLD), and 4) lung V20. For seven out of nine patients, both uniform and sinusoidal temporal probability dose distributions were found to have an average gamma passing rate > 95% for both the lung and PTV regions. Compared with 4D dose calculated using the patient respiratory trace, doses using uniform and sinusoidal distribution showed a percentage difference on average of -0.1% ± 0.6% and -0.2% ± 0.4% in MTD, -0.2% ± 1.9% and -0.2% ± 1.3% in MLD, 0.09% ± 2.8% and -0.07% ± 1.8% in lung V20, -0.1% ± 2.0% and 0.08% ± 1.34% in lung V10, 0.47% ± 1.8% and 0.19% ± 1.3% in lung V5, respectively. We concluded that four-dimensional dose computed using either a uniform or sinusoidal temporal probability distribution can

  8. Geometric dose prediction model for hemithoracic intensity-modulated radiation therapy in mesothelioma patients with two intact lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, LiCheng; Yorke, Ellen D; Dumane, Vishruta A; Foster, Amanda; Zhang, Zhigang; Mechalakos, James G; Wu, Abraham J; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Rimner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The presence of two intact lungs makes it challenging to reach a tumoricidal dose with hemithoracic pleural intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) who underwent pleurectomy/decor-tications or have unresectable disease. We developed an anatomy-based model to predict attainable prescription dose before starting optimization. Fifty-six clinically delivered IMRT plans were analyzed regarding correlation of prescription dose and individual and total lung volumes, planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral normal lung volume and ratios: contralateral/ipsilateral lung (CIVR); contralateral lung/PTV (CPVR); ipsilateral lung /PTV (IPVR); ipsilateral normal lung /total lung (INTLVR); ipsilateral normal lung/PTV (INLPVR). Spearman's rank correlation and Fisher's exact test were used. Correlation between mean ipsilateral lung dose (MILD) and these volume ratios and between prescription dose and single lung mean doses were studied. The prediction models were validated in 23 subsequent MPM patients. CIVR showed the strongest correlation with dose (R = 0.603, p IMRT treatment of MPM patients with two intact lungs. PMID:27167294

  9. Evaluation of chronic infectious interstitial pulmonary disease in children by low-dose CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, Christoph M.; Lemburg, Stefan P.; Kagel, Thomas; Nicolas, Volkmar [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Mueller, Klaus-Michael [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Pathology, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Nuesslein, Thomas G.; Rieger, Christian H.L. [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Pediatric Hospital, Bochum (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Children with chronic infectious interstitial lung disease often have to undergo open lung biopsy to establish a final diagnosis. Open lung biopsy is an invasive procedure with major potential complications. Transthoracic lung biopsy (TLB) guided by computed tomography (CT) is a less-invasive well-established procedure in adults. Detailing the role of low-dose CT-guided TLB in the enhanced diagnosis of chronic lung diseases related to infection in children. A group of 11 children (age 8 months to 16 years) underwent CT-guided TLB with a 20-gauge biopsy device. All investigations were done under general anaesthesia on a multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a low-dose protocol (single slices, 120 kV, 20 mAs). Specimens were processed by histopathological, bacteriological, and virological techniques. All biopsies were performed without major complications; one child developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously. A diagnosis could be obtained in 10 of the 11 patients. Biopsy specimens revealed chronic interstitial alveolitis in ten patients. In five patients Chlamydia pneumoniae PCR was positive, in three Mycoplasma pneumoniae PCR was positive, and in two Cytomegalovirus PCR was positive. The average effective dose was 0.83 mSv. Low-dose CT-guided TLB can be a helpful tool in investigating chronic infectious inflammatory processes in children with minimal radiation exposure. It should be considered prior to any open surgical procedure performed for biopsy alone. In our patient group no significant complication occurred. A disadvantage of the method is that it does not allow smaller airways and vessels to be assessed. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of chronic infectious interstitial pulmonary disease in children by low-dose CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children with chronic infectious interstitial lung disease often have to undergo open lung biopsy to establish a final diagnosis. Open lung biopsy is an invasive procedure with major potential complications. Transthoracic lung biopsy (TLB) guided by computed tomography (CT) is a less-invasive well-established procedure in adults. Detailing the role of low-dose CT-guided TLB in the enhanced diagnosis of chronic lung diseases related to infection in children. A group of 11 children (age 8 months to 16 years) underwent CT-guided TLB with a 20-gauge biopsy device. All investigations were done under general anaesthesia on a multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a low-dose protocol (single slices, 120 kV, 20 mAs). Specimens were processed by histopathological, bacteriological, and virological techniques. All biopsies were performed without major complications; one child developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously. A diagnosis could be obtained in 10 of the 11 patients. Biopsy specimens revealed chronic interstitial alveolitis in ten patients. In five patients Chlamydia pneumoniae PCR was positive, in three Mycoplasma pneumoniae PCR was positive, and in two Cytomegalovirus PCR was positive. The average effective dose was 0.83 mSv. Low-dose CT-guided TLB can be a helpful tool in investigating chronic infectious inflammatory processes in children with minimal radiation exposure. It should be considered prior to any open surgical procedure performed for biopsy alone. In our patient group no significant complication occurred. A disadvantage of the method is that it does not allow smaller airways and vessels to be assessed. (orig.)

  11. Uncertainties in electron-absorbed fractions and lung doses from inhaled beta-emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Bolch, Wesley E; Huston, Thomas E; Rajon, Didier A; Huh, Chulhaeng; Bolch, W Emmett

    2005-01-01

    The computer code LUDUC (Lung Dose Uncertainty Code), developed at the University of Florida, was originally used to investigate the range of potential doses from the inhalation of either plutonium or uranium oxides. The code employs the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract model; however, rather than using simple point estimates for each of the model parameters associated with particle deposition, clearance, and lung-tissue dosimetry, probability density functions are ascribed to these parameters based upon detailed literature review. These distributions are subsequently sampled within LUDUC using Latin hypercube sampling techniques to generate multiple (e.g., approximately 1,000) sets of input vectors (i.e., trials), each yielding a unique estimate of lung dose. In the present study, the dosimetry component of the ICRP-66 model within LUDUC has been extended to explicitly consider variations in the beta particle absorbed fraction due to corresponding uncertainties and biological variabilities in both source and target tissue depths and thicknesses within the bronchi and bronchioles of the thoracic airways. Example dose distributions are given for the inhalation of absorption Type S compounds of 90Sr (Tmax = 546 keV) and 90Y (Tmax = 2,284 keV) as a function of particle size. Over the particle size range of 0.001 to 1 microm, estimates of total lung dose vary by a factor of 10 for 90Sr particles and by a factor of 4 to 10 for 90Y particles. As the particle size increases to 10 microm, dose uncertainties reach a factor of 100 for both radionuclides. In comparisons to identical exposures scenarios run by the LUDEP 2.0 code, Reference Man doses for inhaled beta-emitters were shown to provide slightly conservative estimates of lung dose compared to those in this study where uncertainties in lung airway histology are considered.

  12. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, X.; Penagaricano, J.; Zheng, D.; Morrill, S.; Zhang, X; Corry, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Han, E. Y.; Hardee, M.; Ratanatharathom, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dos...

  13. Comparison of dose distribution between hypofractionated IMRT and SRT plans in lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the characteristics of dose distribution between hypofractionated intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) plans in lung tumor and to select an optimal clinical approach. Methods: SRT plans were designed for 16 patients with lung tumors who had received IMRT between April 2007 and April 2008. The dose distribution of target volume and normal tissues, conformal index (CI) and heterogenous index (HI) were analyzed using the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the IMRT and SRT plans. Results: The mean dose and equivalent uni-form dose of planning target volume (PTV) in IMRT were similar to those in SRT. SRT had significantly better CI and HI than IMRT (t = 2.77, P 0.05). The lung V20 of IMRT and SRT was 6.9% ± 2.1% and 4.2%± 1.9%, respectively (t = 3.30, P 3 or the long diameter of tumor is less than 4.7 cm, hypofractionated SRT has similar dose distribution to hypofractionated IMRT, while the lung dose was lower in the former. (authors)

  14. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acuros XB (AXB dose calculation algorithm is available for external beam photon dose calculations in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS. The AXB can report the absorbed dose in two modes: dose-to-water (Dw and dose-to-medium (Dm. The main purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the AXB_Dm with that of AXB_Dw on real patient treatment plans. Methods: Four groups of patients (prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT lung cancer, left breast cancer, and right breast cancer were selected for this study, and each group consisted of 5 cases. The treatment plans of all cases were generated in the Eclipse TPS. For each case, treatment plans were computed using AXB_Dw and AXB_Dm for identical beam arrangements. Dosimetric evaluation was done by comparing various dosimetric parameters in the AXB_Dw plans with that of AXB_Dm plans for the corresponding patient case. Results: For the prostate cancer, the mean planning target volume (PTV dose in the AXB_Dw plans was higher by up to 1.0%, but the mean PTV dose was within ±0.3% for the SBRT lung cancer. The analysis of organs at risk (OAR results in the prostate cancer showed that AXB_Dw plans consistently produced higher values for the bladder and femoral heads but not for the rectum. In the case of SBRT lung cancer, a clear trend was seen for the heart mean dose and spinal cord maximum dose, with AXB_Dw plans producing higher values than the AXB_Dm plans. However, the difference in the lung doses between the AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw plans did not always produce a clear trend, with difference ranged from -1.4% to 2.9%. For both the left and right breast cancer, the AXB_Dm plans produced higher maximum dose to the PTV for all cases. The evaluation of the maximum dose to the skin showed higher values in the AXB_Dm plans for all 5 left breast cancer cases, whereas only 2 cases had higher maximum dose to the skin in the AXB_Dm plans for the right breast cancer

  15. Radiobiological impact of dose calculation algorithms on biologically optimized IMRT lung stereotactic body radiation therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) vs. Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms in combined dose-volume and biological optimized IMRT plans of SBRT treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Twenty eight patients with NSCLC previously treated SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse (V11) with combined dose-volume and biological optimization IMRT sliding window technique. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 60 Gy with 12 Gy per fraction. The plans were initially optimized using AAA algorithm, and then were recomputed using AXB using the same MUs and MLC files to compare with the dose distribution of the original plans and assess the radiobiological as well as dosimetric impact of the two different dose algorithms. The Poisson Linear-Quadatric (PLQ) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models were used for estimating the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), respectively. The influence of the model parameter uncertainties on the TCP differences and the NTCP differences between AAA and AXB plans were studied by applying different sets of published model parameters. Patients were grouped into peripheral and centrally-located tumors to evaluate the impact of tumor location. PTV dose was lower in the re-calculated AXB plans, as compared to AAA plans. The median differences of PTV(D95%) were 1.7 Gy (range: 0.3, 6.5 Gy) and 1.0 Gy (range: 0.6, 4.4 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. The median differences of PTV(mean) were 0.4 Gy (range: 0.0, 1.9 Gy) and 0.9 Gy (range: 0.0, 4.3 Gy) for peripheral tumors and centrally-located tumors, respectively. TCP was also found lower in AXB-recalculated plans compared with the AAA plans. The median (range) of the TCP differences for 30 month local control were 1.6 % (0.3 %, 5.8 %) for peripheral tumors and 1.3 % (0.5 %, 3.4 %) for centrally located tumors. The lower TCP

  16. [Phantom Study on Dose Reduction Using Iterative Reconstruction in Low-dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minehiro, Kaori; Takata, Tadanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sakuda, Keita; Nunome, Haruka; Kawashima, Hiroko; Sanada, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    We investigated dose reduction ability of an iterative reconstruction technology for low-dose computed tomography (CT) for lung cancer screening. The Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) provided in a multi slice CT system, Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare) was used. An anthropomorphic chest phantom (N-1, Kyoto Kagaku) was scanned at volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of 0.50-11.86 mGy with 120 kV. For noise (standard deviation) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements, CTP486 and CTP515 modules in the Catphan (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned. Radiological technologists were participated in the perceptual comparison. SAFIRE reduced the SD values by approximately 50% compared with filter back projection (FBP). The estimated dose reduction rates by SAFIRE determined from the perceptual comparison was approximately 23%, while 75% dose reduction rate was expected from the SD value reduction of 50%. PMID:26685831

  17. Lung cancer treatment with high cyclophosphamide doses versus high cyclophosphamide doses plus radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty-six evaluable male patients with a histologically proved inoperable lung cancer, with a Karnofsky's score greater than or equal to 30, were considered for study. The mean age was 57.2 (range 20 to 74) years. Tumor cell types were of epidermoid carcinoma 50, adenocarcinoma 6, undifferentiated small cell carcinoma 5, and undifferentiated large cell carcinoma 5. Fifty patients had limited disease and 15 had extensive disease. They were treated with combined modality therapy Cyclophosphamide (CY) 50 mg/kg body weight, administered into the tubing of a freely running intravenous infusion of 5% dextrose every 10 to 12 days, followed by radiation therapy with 60Co, 6000 rad and then, with CY 17 mg/kg body weight every 15 days until progression (Ch-R-Ch group). The control group (Ch) of 31 patients was treated with CY 50 mg/kg body every 10/12 days. Complete response was achieved in 3/35 patients and partial response in 15/35 patients of the Ch-R-Ch group. In the control group, 12/31 patients achieved partial response. Total dose of CY was higher in responders achieving a significantly longer survival (median 12+ months) in comparison to non-responders (median 7 months) and the control group (median 6 months). Less toxic reactions were seen in patients responding to Ch-R-Ch regimen. Bone marrow depletion did not affect the patient's survival, but cystitis and alopecia, it appeared, decreased life expectancy. It is concluded that combined modality therapy is better than chemotherapy alone, with less cytotoxicity in responders

  18. Lack of a Dose-Effect Relationship for Pulmonary Function Changes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: Guckenberger_M@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klement, Rainer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hope, Andrew J. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Belderbos, Jose [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yan, Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of tumor size, prescription dose, and dose to the lungs on posttreatment pulmonary function test (PFT) changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: The analysis is based on 191 patients treated at 5 international institutions: inclusion criteria were availability of pre- and post-SBRT PFTs and dose-volume histograms of the lung and planning target volume (PTV); patients treated with more than 1 SBRT course were excluded. Correlation between early (1-6 months, median 3 months) and late (7-24 months, median 12 months) PFT changes and tumor size, planning target volume (PTV) dose, and lung doses was assessed using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristics analysis, and Lyman's normal tissue complication probability model. The PTV doses were converted to biologically effective doses and lung doses to 2 Gy equivalent doses before correlation analyses. Results: Up to 6 months after SBRT, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity changed by −1.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], −3.4% to 0) and −7.6% (95% CI, −10.2% to −3.4%) compared with pretreatment values, respectively. A modest decrease in PFTs was observed 7-24 months after SBRT, with changes of −8.1% (95% CI, −13.3% to −5.3%) and −12.4% (95% CI, −15.5% to −6.9%), respectively. Using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and normal tissue complication probability modeling, all evaluated parameters of tumor size, PTV dose, mean lung dose, and absolute and relative volumes of the lung exposed to minimum doses of 5-70 Gy were not correlated with early and late PFT changes. Subgroup analysis based on pre-SBRT PFTs (greater or equal and less than median) did not identify any dose-effect relationship. Conclusions: This study failed to demonstrate a significant dose-effect relationship for

  19. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy using Monte Carlo (MC) technology. Four treatment plans were designed using Oncentra Masterplan TPS for each patient. Two intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms, and two three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms. The DICOM-RT files of the treatment plans were exported to the Monte Carlo system to recalculate. The dose distributions of GTV, PTV and ipsilateral lung calculated by the TPS and MC were compared. For 3DCRT and IMRT plans, the mean dose differences for GTV between the CCC and MC increased with decreasing of the GTV volume. For IMRT, the mean dose differences were found to be higher than that of 3DCRT. The CCC algorithm overestimated the GTV mean dose by approximately 3% for IMRT. For 3DCRT plans, when the volume of the GTV was greater than 100 cm3, the mean doses calculated by CCC and MC almost have no difference. PBC shows large deviations from the MC algorithm. For the dose to the ipsilateral lung, the CCC algorithm overestimated the dose to the entire lung, and the PBC algorithm overestimated V20 but underestimated V5; the difference in V10 was not statistically significant. PBC substantially overestimates the dose to the tumour, but the CCC is similar to the MC simulation. It is recommended that the treatment plans for lung cancer be developed using an advanced dose calculation algorithm other than PBC. MC can accurately

  20. Reviewing risks and benefits of low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Ishveen; Chopra, Avijeet; Bias, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the third most common cancer among men and women and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality. Diagnosis at an early stage has been suggested crucial for improving survival in individuals at high-risk of lung cancer. One potential facilitator to early diagnosis is low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). The United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines call for annual LDCT screening for individuals at high-risk of lung cancer. This recommendation was based on the effectiveness of LDCT in early diagnosis of lung cancer, as indicated by the findings from the National Lung Screening Trial conducted in 2011. Although lung cancer accounts for more than a quarter of all cancer deaths in the United States and LDCT screening shows promising results regarding early lung cancer diagnosis, screening for lung cancer remains controversial. There is uncertainty about risks, cost-effectiveness, adequacy of evidence, and application of screening in a clinical setting. This narrative review provides an overview of risks and benefits of LDCT screening for lung cancer. Further, this review discusses the potential for implementation of LDCT in clinical setting. PMID:26680693

  1. Not traditional regimes of radiotherapeutic dose fractionation as modifier of radiotherapy for carcinoma of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of applying various of radiotherapeutic dose fractionation was analyzed. The results of the own studies performed at the Scientific and Research Institute of Oncology and Medical Radiology for elaborating not traditional regimes of radiotherapeutic dose fractionation (a dynamic fractionation applying enlarged regimes at the first stage and the classic ones at the second stage) were presented. Appliance of the modified radiotherapy for the epidermoid carcinoma of the lungs allowed to increase the objective response from 45,3+-3% to 80+-5% the tumor disappearing completely in 40+-6% of patients as compared with 10+-2%. Appliance of the intensive not traditional variant of the radiotherapy dynamic fractionation in case of a small cell carcinoma of the lungs resulted in the therapy duration reduction from 6 to 4 weeks. Thus the not traditional dose fractionation might become a mechanism for the improving the radiotherapy of persons suffering from the carcinoma of the lungs. (authors)

  2. Assessment of dose during an SGTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires utilities to determine the response of a pressurized water reactor to a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) as part of the safety analysis for the plant. The SGTR analysis includes assumptions regarding the iodine concentration in the reactor coolant system (RCS) due to iodine spikes, primary flashing and bypass fractions, and iodine partitioning in the secondary coolant system (SCS). Experimental and analytical investigations have recently been completed wherein these assumptions were tested to determine whether and to what degree they were conservative (that is, whether they result in a calculated iodine source term/dose that is at least as large or larger than that expected during an actual event). The current study has the objective to assess the overall effects of the results of these investigations on the calculated iodine dose to the environment during an SGTR. To assist in this study, a computer program, DOSE, was written. This program uses a simple, non-mechanistic model to calculate the iodine source term to the environment during an SGTR as a function of water mass inventories and flow rates and iodine concentrations in the RCS and SCS. The principal conclusion of this study is that the iodine concentration in the RCS is the dominant parameter, due to the dominance of primary flashing on the iodine source term

  3. Quantitative Risk Assessment for Lung Cancer from Exposure to Metal Ore Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUHUA; JINGXIPENG; 等

    1992-01-01

    To quantitatively assess risk for lung cancer of metal miners,a historical cohort study was conducted.The cohort consisted of 1113 miners who were employed to underground work for at least 12 months between January 1,1960and December,12,1974,According to the records or dust concentration,a cumulative dust dose of each miner in the cohort was estimated.There wer 162 deaths in total and 45 deaths from lung cancer with a SMR of 2184,The SMR for lung cancer increased from 1019 for those with cumulative dust of less than 500mg-year to 2469 for those with the dose of greater than 4500mg-year.Furthermore,the risk in the highest category of combined cumulative dust dose and cigarette smoking was 46-fold greater than the lowest category of dust dose and smoking.This study showed that there was an exposure-response relationship between metal ore dust and lung cancer,and an interaction of lung cancer between smoking and metal ore dust exposure.

  4. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Danielle J.; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B.; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K.; Gow, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 µg/g body weight) 20 and 110nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered. PMID:26152688

  5. Smoking habits in the randomised Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial with low-dose CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Saghir, Zaigham; Dirksen, Asger;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present the final results of the effect of lung cancer screening with low-dose CT on the smoking habits of participants in a 5-year screening trial. METHODS: The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST) was a 5-year screening trial that enrolled 4104 subjects; 2052 were randomised...... to annual low-dose CT (CT group) and 2052 received no intervention (control group). Participants were current and ex-smokers (≥4 weeks abstinence from smoking) with a tobacco consumption of ≥20 pack years. Smoking habits were determined annually. Missing values for smoking status at the final screening...

  6. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanca, F., E-mail: Federica.Zanca@med.kuleuven.be [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Jacobs, A. [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Crijns, W. [Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Wever, W. [Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  7. TH-A-19A-03: Impact of Proton Dose Calculation Method On Delivered Dose to Lung Tumors: Experiments in Thorax Phantom and Planning Study in Patient Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, C; Daartz, J; Dowdell, S; Ruggieri, T; Sharp, G; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Evaluate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation and the prediction of the treatment planning system (TPS) in a lung phantom and compare them in a cohort of 20 lung patients treated with protons. Methods: A 2-dimensional array of ionization chambers was used to evaluate the dose across the target in a lung phantom. 20 lung cancer patients on clinical trials were re-simulated using a validated Monte Carlo toolkit (TOPAS) and compared to the TPS. Results: MC increases dose calculation accuracy in lung compared to the clinical TPS significantly and predicts the dose to the target in the phantom within ±2%: the average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target is 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients show a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. The lower dose correlates significantly with aperture size and the distance of the tumor to the chest wall (Spearman's p=0.0002/0.004). For large tumors MC also predicts consistently higher V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} to the normal lung, due to a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target can show large deviations, though this effect is very patient-specific. Conclusion: Advanced dose calculation techniques, such as MC, would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. This would increase the accuracy of the relationships between dose and effect, concerning tumor control as well as normal tissue toxicity. As the role of proton therapy in the treatment of lung cancer continues to be evaluated in clinical trials, this is of ever-increasing importance. This work was supported by National Cancer Institute Grant R01CA111590.

  8. Biological dose assessment of 15 victims in Haerbin radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: a) On July 5 and 8, 2005, Two patients with bone marrow suppression were successively hospitalized by the First Affiliated Hospital of Haerbin Medical University. Examination results showed that the patients seemed to get suspicious radiation disease. On July 13, 2005, a radioactive source was found in the patients' dwelling. The radiation source is Iridium-192 with 0.5 Ci(1.85 x 1010Bq) radioactivity. The radiation source is a metal bar which is a kind of radioactive industrial detection source for welding. The source is currently stored in the urban radioactive waste storehouse of Heilongjiang province. After finding the radioactive source on July 13, The Haerbin municipal government initiated an emergency response plan and developed medical rescue, radioactive source examination and case detection through organizing ministries involving health, environmental protection and public security. After receiving a report at 17:00 on July 14, 2005, Chinese Ministry of Health immediately sent experts to the spot for investigation, dose estimation and direction of patients' rescue. Health authority carried out physical examination twice on 113 residents within 30 meters to the source, among which 4 got radiation sickness, 5 showed abnormal hemotogram, and others showed no abnormal response. Of 4 patients with radiation sickness, one 81 year old patient has died of severe bone marrow form of sub acute radiation sickness coupled with lung infection and prostrate apparatus at 13:00 on Oct., 20. Two children have been treated in Beitaiping Road Hospital in Beijing, another patient has been treated in local hospital. b) Biological dosimetry using conventional chromosome aberration analysis in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been shown as a reliable and useful tool in medical management of radiation accident victims. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of the victims were cultured using conventional culture medium with colchicine added at the beginning. Chromosome

  9. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  10. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the lungs due to Xe133 and Tc99m (MAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose in lungs of an adult patient has been evaluated using the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing Xe133 or Tc99m (MAA). The absorbed dose was calculated using the MIRD formalism, and the Cristy-and Eckerman lungs model. The absorbed dose in the lungs due to 133Xe is 0.00104 mGy/MBq. Here, the absorbed dose due to remaining tissue, included in the 133Xe biokinetics is not significant. The absorbed dose in the lungs, due Tc99m (MAA), is 0.065 mGy/MBq. Approximately, 4.6% of the absorbed dose is due to organs like liver, kidneys, bladder, and the rest of tissues, included in the Tc99m biokinetics. Here, the absorbed dose is very significant to be overlooked. The dose contribution is mainly due to photons emitted by the liver. (Author)

  11. Lung cancer screening beyond low-dose computed tomography: the role of novel biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Naveed; Kumar, Rohit; Kavuru, Mani S

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common and lethal malignancy in the world. The landmark National lung screening trial (NLST) showed a 20% relative reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals with screening low-dose computed tomography. However, the poor specificity and low prevalence of lung cancer in the NLST provide major limitations to its widespread use. Furthermore, a lung nodule on CT scan requires a nuanced and individualized approach towards management. In this regard, advances in high through-put technology (molecular diagnostics, multi-gene chips, proteomics, and bronchoscopic techniques) have led to discovery of lung cancer biomarkers that have shown potential to complement the current screening standards. Early detection of lung cancer can be achieved by analysis of biomarkers from tissue samples within the respiratory tract such as sputum, saliva, nasal/bronchial airway epithelial cells and exhaled breath condensate or through peripheral biofluids such as blood, serum and urine. Autofluorescence bronchoscopy has been employed in research setting to identify pre-invasive lesions not identified on CT scan. Although these modalities are not yet commercially available in clinic setting, they will be available in the near future and clinicians who care for patients with lung cancer should be aware. In this review, we present up-to-date state of biomarker development, discuss their clinical relevance and predict their future role in lung cancer management.

  12. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5–30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5–30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of...

  13. Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive 131I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of 131I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 106 person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 107 person-rem (2 x 105 Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs

  14. Dose-rate effects on lung cancers induced by exposure to radon progeny in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    months period, at a potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) of 0.042 mJm-3 (2 WL), resulted in fewer lung carcinoma in rats than a similar cumulative exposure protracted over 4 to 6 months at a PAEC of 2.1 mJm-3 (100 WL). Moreover, the lung cancer incidence in rats exposed at low exposure rate (0.60%) was slightly lower than that in control animals (0.63%). The results of a new series of experiments carried out to investigate the influence of exposure-rate on lung cancer induction in rats at relatively low cumulative exposures of 0.36 Jhm-3 (100 WLM), and PAEC varying from 0.22 mJm-3 (13 WL) to 3.15 mJm-3 (150 WL) indicate that at relatively low cumulative exposures comparable to lifetime exposures in high-radon houses or current underground mining exposures, the risk of lung cancer in rats decreases with decreasing PAEC, i.e., exposure rates. These data suggest that in terms of risk of induction of lung cancer, there is a complex interplay between cumulative exposure and exposure rate, resulting in an optimal exposure rate at a given exposure level. The significance of exposure rates in assessing the hazards of domestic radon exposure was addressed on biophysical grounds by Brenner, who concluded that, when cumulative exposures are sufficiently low that multiple traversals of target cells by alpha particles are rare - that is the case for typical domestic radon exposures -, all exposure-rate enhancement effects disappear. The results of recent experiments of the same group showed that traversal of cell nuclei by a single alpha particle induced significantly lower oncogenic transformation in the C3H10T1/2 mouse fibroblast system than does a Poisson-distributed mean of one alpha particle, suggesting that cells traversed by multiple alpha particles contribute most to the risk. In this respect, based on dose-rate effect considerations, extrapolation of lower exposure-rate miner data to residential exposures - where no target cell is traversed by more than a single alpha

  15. Validation of dose painting of lung tumours using alanine/EPR dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudtsen, Ingerid Skjei; Svestad, Jørund Graadal; Skaug Sande, Erlend Peter; Rekstad, Bernt Louni; Rødal, Jan; van Elmpt, Wouter; Öllers, Michel; Hole, Eli Olaug; Malinen, Eirik

    2016-03-21

    Biologic image guided radiotherapy (RT) with escalated doses to tumour sub volumes challenges today's RT dose planning and delivery systems. In this phantom study, we verify the capability of a clinical dose planning and delivery system to deliver an 18F-FDG-PET based dose painted treatment plan to a lung tumour. Furthermore, we estimate the uncertainties of the dose painted treatment compared to conventional RT plans. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom of polystyrene and polyurethane was constructed based on CT images of a lung cancer patient. 101 EPR/alanine dosimeters were placed in separate cavities within the phantom. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated in Eclipse (version 10.0, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm version 10.2.28, Varian Medical Systems, Inc.) for 6 and 15 MV photons, based on 18F-FDG-PET/CT images of the patient. A boost dose of 3.8 Gy/fraction was given to the 18F-FDG-avid region (biological planning volume; BTV), whereas 3.1 Gy/fraction was planned to the planning target volume (PTV, excluding the BTV). For the homogenous plans, 3.2 Gy/fraction was given to the PTV. Irradiation of the phantom was carried out at a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Inc.). Uncertainties involved in treatment planning and delivery were estimated from portal dosimetry gamma evaluation. Measured and calculated doses were compared by Bland-Altmann analysis. For all treatment plans, all dose-volume objectives could be achieved in the treatment planning system. The mean absolute differences between calculated and measured doses were small (lung and soft tissue. The estimated uncertainty of the planned doses was less than 3% for all plans, whereas the estimated uncertainty in the measured doses was less 2.3%. Our results show that planning and delivery of dose escalated lung cancer treatment on a clinical dose planning and delivery system has high dosimetric accuracy. The uncertainties associated with the dose escalated treatment plans are

  16. Paraquat poisoning: an experimental model of dose-dependent acute lung injury due to surfactant dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F.R. Silva

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the most characteristic feature of paraquat poisoning is lung damage, a prospective controlled study was performed on excised rat lungs in order to estimate the intensity of lesion after different doses. Twenty-five male, 2-3-month-old non-SPF Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, received paraquat dichloride in a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 1, 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg body weight 24 h before the experiment. Static pressure-volume (PV curves were performed in air- and saline-filled lungs; an estimator of surface tension and tissue works was computed by integrating the area of both curves and reported as work/ml of volume displacement. Paraquat induced a dose-dependent increase of inspiratory surface tension work that reached a significant two-fold order of magnitude for 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (P<0.05, ANOVA, sparing lung tissue. This kind of lesion was probably due to functional abnormalities of the surfactant system, as was shown by the increase in the hysteresis of the paraquat groups at the highest doses. Hence, paraquat poisoning provides a suitable model of acute lung injury with alveolar instability that can be easily used in experimental protocols of mechanical ventilation

  17. The estimation of lung dose from mid-perineum ionization chamber measurements in total body irradiations: A quality control check on dose delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of patients (eleven males and eight females) receiving total body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation was monitored during treatment by recording the dose from an ionization chamber placed between the thighs in the mid-perineal region. The treatment was delivered by opposed lateral 6 MV photon beams. The patient was encompassed by the radiation field with the maximum collimator opening at a distance of 3.49 m from the X-ray focus to the patient mid-line. An analysis was made of the measured dose and the calculated percentage average lung dose for each patient in the series to seek a correlation between measured doses and patients' anatomical data so that estimates of delivered lung doses could be made. Whilst a global factor can be applied to measured dose to predict lung dose, it is concluded that perineal dose measurements distal to the region where dose is prescribed (mean lung dose) are sub-optimal for checks on target dose delivery. Entrance and exit dose measurements at the level of dose prescription (in the thorax) are preferable for more accurate predictions and quality control checks. 6 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  18. The estimation of lung dose from mid-perineum ionization chamber measurements in total body irradiations: A quality control check on dose delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, P. [Saint Vincent`s Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    A series of patients (eleven males and eight females) receiving total body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation was monitored during treatment by recording the dose from an ionization chamber placed between the thighs in the mid-perineal region. The treatment was delivered by opposed lateral 6 MV photon beams. The patient was encompassed by the radiation field with the maximum collimator opening at a distance of 3.49 m from the X-ray focus to the patient mid-line. An analysis was made of the measured dose and the calculated percentage average lung dose for each patient in the series to seek a correlation between measured doses and patients` anatomical data so that estimates of delivered lung doses could be made. Whilst a global factor can be applied to measured dose to predict lung dose, it is concluded that perineal dose measurements distal to the region where dose is prescribed (mean lung dose) are sub-optimal for checks on target dose delivery. Entrance and exit dose measurements at the level of dose prescription (in the thorax) are preferable for more accurate predictions and quality control checks. 6 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  19. Analysis of the dose calculation accuracy for IMRT in lung: A 2D approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, Pavel; Stock, Markus; Kroupa, Bernhard; Bogner, Joachim; Georg, Diet mar [Div. of Medical Radiation Physics, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, AKH Vienna, Medical Univ. Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric accuracy of IMRT plans for targets in lung with the accuracy of standard uniform-intensity conformal radiotherapy for different dose calculation algorithms. Tests were performed utilizing a special phantom manufactured from cork and polystyrene in order to quantify the uncertainty of two commercial TPS for IMRT in the lung. Ionization and film measurements were performed at various measuring points/planes. Additionally, single-beam and uniform-intensity multiple-beam tests were performed, in order to investigate deviations due to other characteristics of IMRT. Helax-TMS V6.1(A) was tested for 6, 10 and 25 MV and BrainSCAN 5.2 for 6 MV photon beams, respectively. Pencil beam (PB) with simple inhomogeneity correction and 'collapsed cone' (CC) algorithms were applied for dose calculations. However, the latter was not incorporated during optimization hence only post-optimization recalculation was tested. Two-dimensional dose distributions were evaluated applying the b.gamma index concept. Conformal plans showed the same accuracy as IMRT plans. Ionization chamber measurements detected deviations of up to 5% when a PB algorithm was used for IMRT dose calculations. Significant improvement was observed when IMRT plans were recalculated with the CC algorithm, especially for the highest nominal energy. All b.gamma evaluations confirmed substantial improvement with the CC algorithm in 2D. While PB dose distributions showed most discrepancies in lower (<50%) and high (>90%) dose regions, the CC dose distributions deviated mainly in the high dose gradient (20-80%) region. The advantages of IMRT (conformity, intra-target dose control) should be counterbalanced with possible calculation inaccuracies for targets in the lung. Until no superior dose calculation algorithms are involved in the iterative optimization process it should be used with great care. When only PB algorithm with simple inhomogeneity correction is

  20. Analysis of the dose calculation accuracy for IMRT in lung: a 2D approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Pavel; Stock, Markus; Kroupa, Bernhard; Bogner, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric accuracy of IMRT plans for targets in lung with the accuracy of standard uniform-intensity conformal radiotherapy for different dose calculation algorithms. Tests were performed utilizing a special phantom manufactured from cork and polystyrene in order to quantify the uncertainty of two commercial TPS for IMRT in the lung. Ionization and film measurements were performed at various measuring points/planes. Additionally, single-beam and uniform-intensity multiple-beam tests were performed, in order to investigate deviations due to other characteristics of IMRT. Helax-TMS V6.1(A) was tested for 6, 10 and 25 MV and BrainSCAN 5.2 for 6 MV photon beams, respectively. Pencil beam (PB) with simple inhomogeneity correction and 'collapsed cone' (CC) algorithms were applied for dose calculations. However, the latter was not incorporated during optimization hence only post-optimization recalculation was tested. Two-dimensional dose distributions were evaluated applying the gamma index concept. Conformal plans showed the same accuracy as IMRT plans. Ionization chamber measurements detected deviations of up to 5% when a PB algorithm was used for IMRT dose calculations. Significant improvement (deviations approximately 2%) was observed when IMRT plans were recalculated with the CC algorithm, especially for the highest nominal energy. All gamma evaluations confirmed substantial improvement with the CC algorithm in 2D. While PB dose distributions showed most discrepancies in lower (90%) dose regions, the CC dose distributions deviated mainly in the high dose gradient (20-80%) region. The advantages of IMRT (conformity, intra-target dose control) should be counterbalanced with possible calculation inaccuracies for targets in the lung. Until no superior dose calculation algorithms are involved in the iterative optimization process it should be used with great care. When only PB algorithm with simple inhomogeneity correction is

  1. Analysis of the dose calculation accuracy for IMRT in lung: A 2D approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric accuracy of IMRT plans for targets in lung with the accuracy of standard uniform-intensity conformal radiotherapy for different dose calculation algorithms. Tests were performed utilizing a special phantom manufactured from cork and polystyrene in order to quantify the uncertainty of two commercial TPS for IMRT in the lung. Ionization and film measurements were performed at various measuring points/planes. Additionally, single-beam and uniform-intensity multiple-beam tests were performed, in order to investigate deviations due to other characteristics of IMRT. Helax-TMS V6.1(A) was tested for 6, 10 and 25 MV and BrainSCAN 5.2 for 6 MV photon beams, respectively. Pencil beam (PB) with simple inhomogeneity correction and 'collapsed cone' (CC) algorithms were applied for dose calculations. However, the latter was not incorporated during optimization hence only post-optimization recalculation was tested. Two-dimensional dose distributions were evaluated applying the b.gamma index concept. Conformal plans showed the same accuracy as IMRT plans. Ionization chamber measurements detected deviations of up to 5% when a PB algorithm was used for IMRT dose calculations. Significant improvement was observed when IMRT plans were recalculated with the CC algorithm, especially for the highest nominal energy. All b.gamma evaluations confirmed substantial improvement with the CC algorithm in 2D. While PB dose distributions showed most discrepancies in lower (90%) dose regions, the CC dose distributions deviated mainly in the high dose gradient (20-80%) region. The advantages of IMRT (conformity, intra-target dose control) should be counterbalanced with possible calculation inaccuracies for targets in the lung. Until no superior dose calculation algorithms are involved in the iterative optimization process it should be used with great care. When only PB algorithm with simple inhomogeneity correction is used, lower energy photon

  2. Population dose assessment: characteristics of PC CREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the main features of the PC CREAM, a program for performing radiological impact assessments due to radioactive discharges into the environment during the operation of radioactive and nuclear facilities. PC CREAM is a suite of six programs that can be used to estimate individual and collective radiation doses. The methodology of PC CREAM is based on updated environmental and dosimetric models, including ICRP 60 recommendations. The models include several exposure pathways and the input files are easy to access. The ergonomics of the program improves the user interaction and makes easier the input of local data. This program is useful for performing sensitivity analysis, siting studies and validation of model comparing the activity concentration output data with environmental monitoring data. The methodology of each module is described as well as the output data. (author)

  3. Italian intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001, the Radiation Protection Institute of ENEA promoted an Italian intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment addressed to the qualified experts in radiation protection, following the coming into force in Italian law of the EURATOM 96/29 Directive. Five case studies of occupational exposure related to the Italian situation are used. The considered radioisotopes are: 60Co, 89Sr, 125I, 131I, and 222Rn + NORM (238U-235U-232Th). Data related to WBC, thyroid and urine excretion measurements, as well as radionuclide air concentration in the workplace are provided to the participants. The results related to medical, industrial and Rn occupational exposure are well represented as means of log-normal distributions with values of the geometric standard deviation less than 2. A wider spread of results is present for the evaluation of occupational exposure to NORM. (author)

  4. Assessment of internal doses in emergency situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahola, T.; Muikku, M. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK (Finland); Falk, R.; Johansson, J. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority - SSI (Sweden); Liland, A.; Thorshaug, S. [NRPA (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    The need for assessing internal radiation doses in emergency situations was demonstrated after accidents in Brazil, Ukraine and other countries. Lately more and more concern has been expressed regarding malevolent use of radiation and radioactive materials. The scenarios for such use are more difficult to predict than for nuclear power plant or weapons accidents. Much of the results of the work done in the IRADES project can be adopted for use in various accidental situations involving radionuclides that are not addressed in this report. If an emergency situation occurs in only one or a few of the Nordic countries, experts from the other countries could be called upon to assist in monitoring. A big advantage is then our common platform. In the Nordic countries much work has been put down on quality assurance of measurements and on training of dose assessment calculations. Attention to this was addressed at the internal dosimetry course in October 2005. Nordic emergency preparedness exercises have so far not included training of direct measurements of people in the early phase of an emergency. The aim of the IRADES project was to improve the preparedness especially for thyroid measurements. The modest financial support did not enable the participants to make big efforts but certainly acted as a much appreciated reminder of the importance of being prepared also to handle situations with malevolent use of radioactive materials. It was left to each country to decide to which extent to improve the practical skills. There is still a need for detailed national implementation plans. Measurement strategies need to be developed in each country separately taking into account national regulations, local circumstances and resources. End users of the IRADES report are the radiation protection authorities. (au)

  5. Feasibility of high-dose three-dimensional radiation therapy in the treatment of localised non-small-cell lung cancer; Irradiation conformationelle de haute dose dans les cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules localement evolues: etude de faisabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belliere, A.; Girard, N.; Chapet, O.; Khodri, M.; Kubas, A.; Mornex, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Dept. de Radiotherapie-Oncologie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Souquet, P.J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Dept. de Medecine Respiratoire, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose/ Chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of inoperable and/or non-resectable IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer (N.S.C.L.C.). Aware of the necessity to increase local control in locally advanced N.S.C.L.C., we analyzed the feasibility of high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-C.R.T.) in the treatment of localised N.S.C.L.C. Patients and methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with non-resectable N.S.C.L.C. treated with high-dose (74 Gy) standard-fractionation 3D-C.R.T., with particular attention to the relationship between lung and heart radiation-induced toxicities. Results: Fifty patients (41 males, 9 females) were included. A total of 35 (70%) patients received the planned total dose of 74 Gy. Patients irradiated to inferior doses interrupted the treatment because of limiting toxicities. Induction and concurrent chemotherapy was delivered to 39 (78%) and 14 (28%) patients, respectively. Eight (16%) patients experienced grade 3-4 acute lung toxicity, all of them having a history of pulmonary disease, a FEV1 below 1.6 L, and a lung V20 of at least 25%. Three (6%) patients were deemed to experience radiation-induced cardiac toxicity. Conclusions: This study assesses the feasibility of delivering a total dose of 74 Gy combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced N.S.C.L.C.. High lung and heart V20 increases the risk of radiation-induced lung and cardiac toxicity, the later being highly difficult to precisely assess, as late deaths are rarely documented, and responsibility of the treatment might be often underestimated. The precise evaluation of cardiac condition may be helpful to spare fragile patients from potentially toxic effects of high-dose radiation, especially in controlled trials. (authors)

  6. The effect of different lung densities on the accuracy of various radiotherapy dose calculation methods: implications for tumour coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Lasse Rye; Nahum, Alan E; Zacharatou, Christina;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate against Monte-Carlo the performance of various dose calculations algorithms regarding lung tumour coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dose distributions in virtual lung phantoms have been calculated using four commercial...... Treatment Planning System (TPS) algorithms and one Monte Carlo (MC) system (EGSnrc). We compared the performance of the algorithms in calculating the target dose for different degrees of lung inflation. The phantoms had a cubic 'body' and 'lung' and a central 2-cm diameter spherical 'tumour' (the body...... and tumour have unit density). The lung tissue was assigned five densities (rho(lung)): 0.01, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 1g/cm(3). Four-field treatment plans were calculated with 6- and 18 MV narrow beams for each value of rho(lung). We considered the Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC(Ecl)) and the Analytical Anisotropic...

  7. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; Schelfhout, J.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  8. [Breast dose reduction in female CT screening for lung cancer using various metallic shields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kenta; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Kiyoshi

    2009-12-20

    We evaluated the effectiveness of metallic shields that were used for reduction of the breast dose in thoracic computed tomography(CT). For the evaluation, we measured breast surface dose and image standard deviation(SD)in the lung area. The metallic shields were made from bismuth, zinc, copper, and iron. The bismuth shield has been marketed and used for dose reduction. The other three metallic shields were chosen because they have lower atomic numbers and a lower yield of characteristic X-rays. As a result, use of the metallic shields showed a lower breast dose than the decrement of the tube current in the same image SD. The insertion of a thin aluminum sheet between the shield and a phantom was also effective in reducing breast surface dose. We calculated the dose reduction rate to evaluate the effectiveness of these metallic shields. This dose reduction rate was defined as the ratio of the decrease in breast surface dose by metallic shields to the breast surface dose measured with the tube current decrement in the same image SD. The maximum dose reduction rate was 6.4% for the bismuth shield, and 12.0-13.3% for the other shields. These results indicate that the shields made from zinc, copper, and iron are more effective for dose reduction than the shield made form bismuth. The best dose reduction rate, 13.3%, has been achieved when the zinc shield placed 20 mm apart from a phantom with 0.2 mm aluminum was used.

  9. More than lung cancer: Automated analysis of low-dose screening CT scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mets, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a major health care problem and is projected to cause over 8 million deaths per year worldwide in the coming decades. To reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy smokers, several randomized screening trials were initiated in the past years using screening with low-dose Computed Tomography (C

  10. Dose verification of radiotherapy for lung cancer by using plastic scintillator dosimetry and a heterogeneous phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Behrens, C. F.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2015-01-01

    Bone, air passages, cavities, and lung are elements present in patients, but challenging to properly correct for in treatment planning dose calculations. Plastic scintillator detectors (PSDs) have proven to be well suited for dosimetry in non-reference conditions such as small fields. The objecti...

  11. Dosimetric impact of Acuros XB deterministic radiation transport algorithm for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Tao; Followill, David; Repchak, Roman; Molineu, Andrea; Howell, Rebecca; Salehpour, Mohammad [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Mikell, Justin [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The novel deterministic radiation transport algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), has shown great potential for accurate heterogeneous dose calculation. However, the clinical impact between AXB and other currently used algorithms still needs to be elucidated for translation between these algorithms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AXB for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The thorax phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) was used for this study. IMRT and VMAT plans were created for the phantom in the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system. Each plan was delivered to the phantom three times using a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator to ensure reproducibility. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 film were placed inside the phantom to measure delivered doses. The measurements were compared with dose calculations from AXB 11.0.21 and the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) 11.0.21. Two dose reporting modes of AXB, dose-to-medium in medium (D{sub m,m}) and dose-to-water in medium (D{sub w,m}), were studied. Point doses, dose profiles, and gamma analysis were used to quantify the agreement between measurements and calculations from both AXB and AAA. The computation times for AAA and AXB were also evaluated. Results: For the RPC lung phantom, AAA and AXB dose predictions were found in good agreement to TLD and film measurements for both IMRT and VMAT plans. TLD dose predictions were within 0.4%-4.4% to AXB doses (both D{sub m,m} and D{sub w,m}); and within 2.5%-6.4% to AAA doses, respectively. For the film comparisons, the gamma indexes ({+-}3%/3 mm criteria) were 94%, 97%, and 98% for AAA, AXB{sub Dm,m}, and AXB{sub Dw,m}, respectively. The differences between AXB and AAA in dose-volume histogram mean doses were within 2% in the planning target volume, lung, heart, and within 5% in the spinal cord

  12. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): scenarios for comparing dose-assessment models. Vol.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program designed to provide rapid assessments of the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. The main body of this document consists of 28 examples of IRDAM input and output, representing various types of accidents and releases. These examples are intended to provide a basis for comparison with other models or for testing IRDAM itself. Figures are included which show dose rates calculated by IRDAM for each scenario. Figures are also included which show calculations made using the computer codes WRAITH (Scherpelz, Borst and Hoenes, 1980) and RADPUR (Dabbert, et. al., 1982). Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. The User's Guide (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 1) describes the setup and operation of equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations

  13. Quantitative assessment of pulmonary function using low dose multi-slice spiral CT in smoker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of low dose MSCT for quantitative assessment of pulmonary function in smokers. Methods: One hundred and forty-six patients with chronic objective pulmonary disease (COPD) including 109 smokers (74.6%) and 37 non-smokers (25.3%) underwent pulmonary function test and low-dose MSCT scan. All data were analyzed using computer-aided lung analysis software. Pulmonary function parameters from low-dose MSCT were compared between smokers and non-smokers and also compared with pulmonary function test in non-smokers (Pearson test). Results: In smokers, the average volume at full inspiratory phase (Vin) was (5125 ± 862 ) ml, mean lung attenuation was (-902 ± 26) HU, mean lung density was (0.0984 ± 0.0260 ) g/cm3, emphysema volume was (2890 ±1370) ml. The average volume at full expiratory phase (Vex) was (2756 ±1027) ml, mean lung attenuation was (-811 ±62) HU, mean lung density was (0.1878 ±0.0631) g/cm3, emphysema volume was (685 ±104) ml. In non-smokers, the average Vin was (3734 ± 759) ml, mean lung attenuation was (-876 ±40) HU,mean lung density was (0.1244 ±0.0401)g/cm3, emphysema volume was ( 1503 ± 1217) ml. The average Vex was (1770 ± 679) ml, mean lung attenuation was (-765 ± 56) HU, mean lung density was (0.2360 ± 0.0563) g/cm3, emphysema volume was (156 ± 45) ml. There were significant differences between smokers and non-smokers (P<0.01). The Vex/Vin was correlated with residual volume/total lung capacity (RV/TLC, r=0.60, P<0.01), and Vin was correlated with TLC (r=0.58, P<0.01), Vex with RV (r=0.59, P<0.01). Pixel index (PI) -950 in was correlated with FEV 1% pre and FEV1/FVC% (r=-0.53, -0.62, respective, P<0.01), Pl-950ex was correlated with FEV1 % pre and FEV1/FVC% (r=-0.71, -0.77, respective, P<0.01). Conclusion: Low-dose MSCT can be a potential imaging tool for quantitative pulmonary function assessment in smokes. (authors)

  14. Hypersensitive response of normal human lung epithelial cells at low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of very low single X-ray doses (0.05-4Gy) was investigated in a human lung epithelial cell line (L132). Cell survival measurements were made using a Dynamic Microscopic Imaging Processing Scanner (DMIPS), which allowed single cells to be located accurately, their positions recorded and these positions revisited after an appropriate incubation period at 37oC; surviving cells were identified by their ability to produce a colony ≥50 cells. The survival data at doses ≥2 Gy were well-fitted by a linear-quadratic (LQ) model. For doses <1 Gy, increased X-ray effectiveness was observed with cell survival below the prediction from the fit of the LQ model to the higher dose data, extrapolated into the low dose region. This is the first evidence for the existence of a hypersensitive survival response to very low doses in normal human cells. (Author)

  15. TU-F-17A-08: The Relative Accuracy of 4D Dose Accumulation for Lung Radiotherapy Using Rigid Dose Projection Versus Dose Recalculation On Every Breathing Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of 4D dose accumulation using projection of dose calculated on the end-exhalation, mid-ventilation, or average intensity breathing phase CT scan, versus dose accumulation performed using full Monte Carlo dose recalculation on every breathing phase. Methods: Radiotherapy plans were analyzed for 10 patients with stage I-II lung cancer planned using 4D-CT. SBRT plans were optimized using the dose calculated by a commercially-available Monte Carlo algorithm on the end-exhalation 4D-CT phase. 4D dose accumulations using deformable registration were performed with a commercially available tool that projected the planned dose onto every breathing phase without recalculation, as well as with a Monte Carlo recalculation of the dose on all breathing phases. The 3D planned dose (3D-EX), the 3D dose calculated on the average intensity image (3D-AVE), and the 4D accumulations of the dose calculated on the end-exhalation phase CT (4D-PR-EX), the mid-ventilation phase CT (4D-PR-MID), and the average intensity image (4D-PR-AVE), respectively, were compared against the accumulation of the Monte Carlo dose recalculated on every phase. Plan evaluation metrics relating to target volumes and critical structures relevant for lung SBRT were analyzed. Results: Plan evaluation metrics tabulated using 4D-PR-EX, 4D-PR-MID, and 4D-PR-AVE differed from those tabulated using Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase by an average of 0.14±0.70 Gy, - 0.11±0.51 Gy, and 0.00±0.62 Gy, respectively. Deviations of between 8 and 13 Gy were observed between the 4D-MC calculations and both 3D methods for the proximal bronchial trees of 3 patients. Conclusions: 4D dose accumulation using projection without re-calculation may be sufficiently accurate compared to 4D dose accumulated from Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase, depending on institutional protocols. Use of 4D dose accumulation should be considered when evaluating normal tissue complication

  16. Stereotactic, single-dose irradiation of stage I non-small cell lung cancer and lung metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We prospectively reviewed response rates, local control, and side effects after non-fractionated stereotactic high single-dose body radiation therapy for lung tumors. Fifty-eight patients underwent radiosurgery involving single-dose irradiation. With 25 patients, 31 metastases in the lungs were irradiated; with each of 33 patients, stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was subject to irradiation. The standard dose prescribed to the isocenter was 30 Gy with an axial safety margin of 10 mm and a longitudinal safety margin of 15 mm. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined using three CT scans with reference to the phases of respiration so that the movement span of the clinical target volume (CTV) was enclosed. The volume of the metastases (CTV) varied from 2.8 to 55.8 cm3 (median: 6.0 cm3) and the PTV varied from 12.2 to 184.0 cm3 (median: 45.0 cm3). The metastases ranged from 0.7 to 4.5 cm in largest diameter. The volume of the bronchial carcinomas varied from 4.2 to 125.4 cm3(median: 17.5 cm3) and the PTV from 15.6 to 387.3 cm3 (median: 99.8 cm3). The bronchial carcinomas ranged from 1.7 to 10 cm in largest diameter. Follow-up periods varied from 6.8 to 63 months (median: 22 months for metastases and 18 months for NSCLC). Local control was achieved with 94% of NSCLC and 87% of metastases. No serious symptomatic side effects were observed. According to the Kaplan-Meier method the overall survival probability rates of patients with lung metastases were as follows: 1 year: 97%, 2 years: 73%, 3 years: 42%, 4 years: 42%, 5 years: 42% (median survival: 26 months); of those with NSCLC: 1 year: 83%, 2 years: 63%, 3 years: 53%, 4 years: 39%: (median survival: 20.4 months). Non-fractionated single-dose irradiation of metastases in the lungs or of small, peripheral bronchial carcinomas is an effective and safe form of local treatment and might become a viable alternative to invasive techniques

  17. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-applied ultra-low-dose CT with radiography- comparable radiation dose: Usefulness for lung nodule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jung Won [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To assess the performance of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)-applied ultra-low-dose CT (ULDCT) in detecting small lung nodules. Thirty patients underwent both ULDCT and standard dose CT (SCT). After determining the reference standard nodules, five observers, blinded to the reference standard reading results, independently evaluated SCT and both subsets of ASIR- and filtered back projection (FBP)-driven ULDCT images. Data assessed by observers were compared statistically. Converted effective doses in SCT and ULDCT were 2.81 ± 0.92 and 0.17 ± 0.02 mSv, respectively. A total of 114 lung nodules were detected on SCT as a standard reference. There was no statistically significant difference in sensitivity between ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT for three out of the five observers (p = 0.678, 0.735, < 0.01, 0.038, and < 0.868 for observers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively). The sensitivity of FBP-driven ULDCT was significantly lower than that of ASIR-driven ULDCT in three out of the five observers (p < 0.01 for three observers, and p = 0.064 and 0.146 for two observers). In jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis, the mean values of figure-of-merit (FOM) for FBP, ASIR-driven ULDCT, and SCT were 0.682, 0.772, and 0.821, respectively, and there were no significant differences in FOM values between ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT (p = 0.11), but the FOM value of FBP-driven ULDCT was significantly lower than that of ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT (p = 0.01 and 0.00). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-driven ULDCT delivering a radiation dose of only 0.17 mSv offers acceptable sensitivity in nodule detection compared with SCT and has better performance than FBP-driven ULDCT.

  18. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  19. A Proposed In Vitro Method to Assess Effects of Inhaled Particles on Lung Surfactant Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørli, Jorid B; Da Silva, Emilie; Bäckman, Per; Levin, Marcus; Thomsen, Birthe L; Koponen, Ismo K; Larsen, Søren T

    2016-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) lining is a thin liquid film covering the air-liquid interface of the respiratory tract. LS reduces surface tension, enabling lung surface expansion and contraction with minimal work during respiration. Disruption of surface tension is believed to play a key role in severe lung conditions. Inhalation of aerosols that interfere with the LS may induce a toxic response and, as a part of the safety assessment of chemicals and inhaled medicines, it may be relevant to study their impact on LS function. Here, we present a novel in vitro method, based on the constrained drop surfactometer, to study LS functionality after aerosol exposure. The applicability of the method was investigated using three inhaled asthma medicines, micronized lactose, a pharmaceutical excipient used in inhaled medication, and micronized albumin, a known inhibitor of surfactant function. The surfactometer was modified to allow particles mixed in air to flow through the chamber holding the surfactant drop. The deposited dose was measured with a custom-built quartz crystal microbalance. The alterations allowed the study of continuously increasing quantified doses of particles, allowing determination of the dose of particles that affects the LS function. The tested pharmaceuticals did not inhibit the function of a model LS even at extreme doses--neither did lactose. Micronized albumin, however, impaired surfactant function. The method can discriminate between safe inhaled aerosols--as exemplified by the approved inhaled medicines and the pharmaceutical excipient lactose--and albumin known to impair lung functionality by inhibiting LS function. PMID:26524226

  20. Relation between intravascular clots of pulmonary artery and lung perfusion defects: assessment with dual source CT low-dose contrast perfusion imaging%双源CT低剂量对比剂肺灌注成像评估肺动脉内血栓与灌注缺损间的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭四平; 沈比先; 陈丽兴; 薛水培; 楚二伟; 刘康; 汪春荣; 贾飞鸽

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relation between intravascular clots of pulmonaiy artery and lung perfusion defects with dual source CT low-dose contrast perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods: Image quality of low-dose and conventional dose dual energy lung perfusion imaging (DEP1) in 15 patients without pulmonary embolism (PE) was analyzed. Twenty consecutive patients with suspected PE underwent dual source CT low-dose contrast perfusion imaging. CT pulmonary angiogra-phy (CTPA) and lung perfusion images were analyzed at the same time. Intravascular clots of pulmonary artery were analyzed,including the location,number and morphology by the axial image and three-dimensional reconstruction of CTPA. Lung perfusion defects and its location,extent were evaluated with lung PBV software on the workstation. The relationship between in-trava8Cular clots of pulmonary artery and lung perfusion defects were analyzed statistically. Results: No significant difference was found in the image quality of low-dose and conventional dose DEPI of patients without PE(P>0.05). One hundred and two perfusion defects were found in 13 patients by pulmonary perfusion imaging,including lobular,segmental and BubsegmentaJ perfusion defects. Six perfusion defects in 4 cases had no clear intravascular clots. Images of axial CTPA and three-dimensional reconstruction showed 43 intravascular clots in 11 patients. Two cases with 5 intravascular clots depicted by CTPA showed no perfusion defects. Nine cases showed both intravascular clots and perfusion defects,with 21 perfusion defects unrelated to the blood supply areas of pulmonary artery(8 segmental and 13 subsegmental),and the remaining 75 perfusion defects consistent with the blood supply areas of pulmonary artery. Conclusion: There is unexpected dissociation between the intravascular clots of pulmonary artery and lung perfusion defects. Analysing the perfusion maps and CTPA of dual source CT low-dose contrast perfusion image will improve the accuracy

  1. Impact of dose calculation accuracy during optimization on lung IMRT plan quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Rodrigues, Anna; Li, Taoran; Yuan, Lulin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q Jackie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose calculation accuracy and the use of an intermediate dose calculation step during the optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning on the final plan quality for lung cancer patients. This study included replanning for 11 randomly selected free-breathing lung IMRT plans. The original plans were optimized using a fast pencil beam convolution algorithm. After optimization, the final dose calculation was performed using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA). The Varian Treatment Planning System (TPS) Eclipse v11, includes an option to perform intermediate dose calculation during optimization using the AAA. The new plans were created using this intermediate dose calculation during optimization with the same planning objectives and dose constraints as in the original plan. Differences in dosimetric parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage, organs-at-risk (OARs) dose sparing, and the number of monitor units (MU) between the original and new plans were analyzed. Statistical significance was determined with a p-value of less than 0.05. All plans were normalized to cover 95% of the PTV with the prescription dose. Compared with the original plans, the PTV in the new plans had on average a lower maximum dose (69.45 vs. 71.96Gy, p = 0.005), a better homogeneity index (HI) (0.08 vs. 0.12, p = 0.002), and a better conformity index (CI) (0.69 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). In the new plans, lung sparing was increased as the volumes receiving 5, 10, and 30 Gy were reduced when compared to the original plans (40.39% vs. 42.73%, p = 0.005; 28.93% vs. 30.40%, p = 0.001; 14.11%vs. 14.84%, p = 0.031). The volume receiving 20 Gy was not significantly lower (19.60% vs. 20.38%, p = 0.052). Further, the mean dose to the lung was reduced in the new plans (11.55 vs. 12.12 Gy, p = 0.024). For the esophagus, the mean dose, the maximum dose, and the volumes receiving 20 and 60 Gy were lower in

  2. Risk assessment of lung cancer for Brazilian uranium mining workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fatality risks of lung cancer is estimated for several categories of miners working in the Brazilian uranium mine Osamu Utsumi in Pocos de Caldas, during the period of 03/76 to 07/78. A total of 198 miners were classified conforming the type of work performed and it was considered the lung dose equivalent received due only to the inhalation of the short lived airborne Radon-222 daughters. The average lung dose equivalent values were evaluated from the individual accumulated alpha exposure. These were expressed in unit of WLM derived from the periods of occupancy and working level data obtained by daily air monitoring using the Harley method. (M.A.C.)

  3. Investigation of lung nodule detectability in low-dose 320-slice computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, J. D.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C6 (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Low-dose imaging protocols in chest CT are important in the screening and surveillance of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules. Techniques that maintain nodule detectability yet permit dose reduction, particularly for large body habitus, were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which radiation dose can be minimized while maintaining diagnostic performance through knowledgeable selection of reconstruction techniques. A 320-slice volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems) was used to scan an anthropomorphic phantom at doses ranging from {approx}0.1 mGy up to that typical of low-dose CT (LDCT, {approx}5 mGy) and diagnostic CT ({approx}10 mGy). Radiation dose was measured via Farmer chamber and MOSFET dosimetry. The phantom presented simulated nodules of varying size and contrast within a heterogeneous background, and chest thickness was varied through addition of tissue-equivalent bolus about the chest. Detectability of a small solid lung nodule (3.2 mm diameter, -37 HU, typically the smallest nodule of clinical significance in screening and surveillance) was evaluated as a function of dose, patient size, reconstruction filter, and slice thickness by means of nine-alternative forced-choice (9AFC) observer tests to quantify nodule detectability. For a given reconstruction filter, nodule detectability decreased sharply below a threshold dose level due to increased image noise, especially for large body size. However, nodule detectability could be maintained at lower doses through knowledgeable selection of (smoother) reconstruction filters. For large body habitus, optimal filter selection reduced the dose required for nodule detection by up to a factor of {approx}3 (from {approx}3.3 mGy for sharp filters to {approx}1.0 mGy for the optimal filter). The results indicate that radiation dose can be reduced below the current low-dose (5 mGy) and ultralow-dose (1 mGy) levels with knowledgeable selection of

  4. Quantitative assessment of smoking-induced emphysema progression in longitudinal CT screening for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Mizuguchi, R.; Matsuhiro, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Moriyama, N.

    2015-03-01

    Computed tomography has been used for assessing structural abnormalities associated with emphysema. It is important to develop a robust CT based imaging biomarker that would allow quantification of emphysema progression in early stage. This paper presents effect of smoking on emphysema progression using annual changes of low attenuation volume (LAV) by each lung lobe acquired from low-dose CT images in longitudinal screening for lung cancer. The percentage of LAV (LAV%) was measured after applying CT value threshold method and small noise reduction. Progression of emphysema was assessed by statistical analysis of the annual changes represented by linear regression of LAV%. This method was applied to 215 participants in lung cancer CT screening for five years (18 nonsmokers, 85 past smokers, and 112 current smokers). The results showed that LAV% is useful to classify current smokers with rapid progression of emphysema (0.2%/year, plung cancer.

  5. Dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of Acuros XB and AAA dose calculation algorithm for stereotactic and conventional lung volumetric modulated arc therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the current study was to assess the dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for stereotactic (stage I) and conventional (stage III) lung cancer treatments planned with Eclipse version 10.0 Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm. The dosimetric impact of using AAA instead of AXB, and grid size 2.5 mm instead of 1.0 mm for VMAT treatment plans was evaluated. The clinical plan quality of AXB VMAT was assessed using 45 stage I and 73 stage III patients, and was compared with published results, planned with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The dosimetric impact on near-minimum PTV dose (D98%) using AAA instead of AXB was large (underdose up to 12.3%) for stage I and very small (underdose up to 0.8%) for stage III lung treatments. There were no significant differences for dose volume histogram (DVH) values between grid sizes. The calculation time was significantly higher for AXB grid size 1.0 than 2.5 mm (p < 0.01). The clinical quality of the VMAT plans was at least comparable with clinical qualities given in literature of lung treatment plans with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The average mean lung dose (MLD), lung V20Gy and V5Gy in this study were respectively 3.6 Gy, 4.1% and 15.7% for 45 stage I patients and 12.4 Gy, 19.3% and 46.6% for 73 stage III lung patients. The average contra-lateral lung dose V5Gy-cont was 35.6% for stage III patients. For stereotactic and conventional lung treatments, VMAT calculated with AXB grid size 2.5 mm resulted in accurate dose calculations. No hybrid technique was needed to obtain the dose constraints. AXB is recommended instead of AAA for avoiding serious overestimation of the minimum target doses compared to the actual delivered dose

  6. Paraquat poisoning: an experimental model of dose-dependent acute lung injury due to surfactant dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    M.F.R. Silva; P.H.N. Saldiva

    1998-01-01

    Since the most characteristic feature of paraquat poisoning is lung damage, a prospective controlled study was performed on excised rat lungs in order to estimate the intensity of lesion after different doses. Twenty-five male, 2-3-month-old non-SPF Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, received paraquat dichloride in a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 1, 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg body weight) 24 h before the experiment. Static pressure-volume (PV) curves were performed in air- and saline-filled l...

  7. An automated system for lung nodule detection in low-dose computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Gori, I.; Fantacci, M. E.; Martinez, A. Preite; Retico, A.

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a n...

  8. Radiation dose is associated with prognosis of small cell lung cancer with superior vena cava syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Ning, Fang-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Le; Cheng, Yu-Feng; Dong, Xin-Jun; Liu, Chang-Min; Chen, Shao-Shui

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10% of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cases develop superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Many SCLC patients with SVCS have relatively limited disease, requiring curative rather than palliative treatment. Besides chemotherapy, radiotherapy is important for treating SCLC with SVCS. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of radiotherapy dose on the prognosis of 57 patients with SCLC with SVCS treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The mean biological equivalent radiation dose was 71.5 Gy. We administered etoposide/cisplatin as sequential and concurrent chemotherapy. All patients received at least one cycle of concurrent chemotherapy. All patients had partial or complete response; SVCS-associated symptoms were reduced in 87.7% (50/57) of patients within 3-10 days after treatment. Radiation dose did not affect 2-year local control (74.2% vs. 80.8%). Patients who received high-dose radiation had a lower 2-year overall survival rate than those who received low-dose radiation (11.6 vs. 33%; P = 0.024). The high dose group median survival was 15.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.2-19.0) compared with 18.7 months (95% CI: 13.9-23.6) in the low dose group. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 22/26 high dose patients (84.6%) and 21/31 low dose patients (67.7%). In the high dose group, 30.8% of patients had grade 3/4 esophagitis compared with 19.4% of low dose patients. Only 29.0% of low dose patients received < 4 cycles of chemotherapy in the first 12 weeks after treatment began compared with 46.2% of high dose patients. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a tolerable modality for treating stage IIIA/IIIB SCLC with SVCS. Moderate-dose radiotherapy is preferable. PMID:26064339

  9. Relation between intravascular clots of pulmonary artery and lung perfusion defects: assessment with dual source CT low-dose contrast perfusion imaging%低剂量对比剂双能量肺灌注成像评估肺动脉内血栓与灌注缺损间的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈比先; 谭四平; 彭冬红; 汪春荣; 贾飞鸽; 李元歌; 罗玉娟; 楚二伟

    2012-01-01

    目的:应用双源CT低剂量对比剂双能量肺灌注成像评估急性肺动脉栓塞患者血管内血栓与肺灌注缺损间的关系,以提高对肺动脉栓塞诊断的准确性.方法:随机选择无肺动脉栓塞患者的低剂量与常规剂量双能量肺灌注成像各15例,对比分析其图像质量;收集20例疑肺动脉栓塞患者行低剂量双能量肺灌注成像;同时获得肺动脉CTA及肺灌注图像.分析肺动脉内有无血栓.以及血栓的部位、数量及形态特征.用双能量肺灌注分析软件判断有无灌注缺损及缺损的部位、形态及范围.对比分析并统计肺动脉内血栓与肺灌注缺损间的关系.结果:肺动脉栓塞患者的低剂量与常规剂量双能量肺灌注成像质量无明显差异(P>0.05).20例疑似病例中,15例诊断为肺动脉栓塞,其中13例患者肺灌注图像中出现102个肺叶、肺段、或亚段灌注缺损,4例共6个灌注缺损CTA无明确血栓;11例肺动脉CTA显示43个血栓,其中9例血栓与灌注缺损同时存在,2例CTA共5个血栓肺内无灌注缺损.75个灌注缺损与栓塞肺动脉供血范围一致,21个灌注缺损(8段、13亚段)与肺动脉供血范围无关.结论:综合分析双源CT低剂量双能量肺灌注图与CTPA,可以提高肺动脉栓塞诊断的准确性.%Objective: To assess the relation between intravascular clots of pulmonary artery and lung perfusion defects with dual source CT low-dose contrast perfusion imaging so as to elevate the accuracy of diagnosis of PE. Methods: The image quality of low-dose and conventional dose dual energy lung perfusion imaging (DEPI) of patients without pulmonary embolism (PE). With 15 cases in each sose, were analyzed. Twenty consecutive patients with suspected PE underwent dual source CT low-dose contrast perfusion imaging and CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and lung perfusion images were aquired at the same time. The intravascular clots of pulmonary artery if or not, including the

  10. Program for rapid dose assessment in criticality accident, RADAPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a criticality accident, a person near fissile material can receive extremely high dose which can cause acute health effect. For such a case, medical treatment should be carried out for the exposed person, according to severity of the exposure. Then, radiation dose should be rapidly assessed soon after an outbreak of an accident. Dose assessment based upon the quantity of induced 24Na in human body through neutron exposure is expected as one of useful dosimetry techniques in a criticality accident. A dose assessment program, called RADAPAS (RApid Dose Assessment Program from Activated Sodium in Criticality Accidents), was therefore developed to assess rapidly radiation dose to exposed persons from activity of induced 24Na. RADAPAS consists of two parts; one is a database part and the other is a part for execution of dose calculation. The database contains data compendiums of energy spectra and dose conversion coefficients from specific activity of 24Na induced in human body, which had been derived in a previous analysis using Monte Carlo calculation code. Information for criticality configuration or characteristics of radiation in the accident field is to be interactively given with interface displays in the dose calculation. RADAPAS can rapidly derive radiation dose to the exposed person from the given information and measured 24Na specific activity by using the conversion coefficient in database. This report describes data for dose conversions and dose calculation in RADAPAS and explains how to use the program. (author)

  11. Depth-dose evaluation for lung and pancreas cancer treatment by BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depth-dose distributions were evaluated for possible treatment of both lung and pancreas cancers using an epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP calculations showed that physical dose in tumors were 6 and 7 Gy/h, respectively, for lung and pancreas, attaining an epithermal neutron flux of 5x108 ncm-2s-1. The boron concentrations were assumed at 100 ppm and 30 ppm, respectively, for lung and pancreas tumors and normal tissues contains 1/10 tumor concentrations. The dose ratios of tumor to normal tissue were 2.5 and 2.4, respectively, for lung and pancreas. The dose evaluation suggests that BNCT could be applied for both lung and pancreas cancer treatment. (author)

  12. Comparative hazard identification by a single dose lung exposure of zinc oxide and silver nanomaterials in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Gosens

    Full Text Available Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag, non-functionalised zinc oxide (ZnO and a triethoxycaprylylsilane functionalised ZnO NM suspended in water with 2% mouse serum were examined 24 hours following a single intratracheal instillation (I.T.. An acute pulmonary inflammation was noted (marked by a polymorphonuclear neutrophil influx with cell damage (LDH and total protein in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF after administration of both non-functionalised and functionalised ZnO. The latter also induced systemic inflammation measured as an increase in blood neutrophils and a decrease in blood lymphocytes. Exposure to Ag NM was not accompanied by pulmonary inflammation or cytotoxicity, or by systemic inflammation. A decrease in glutathione levels was demonstrated in the liver following exposure to high doses of all three nanomaterials irrespective of any noticeable inflammatory or cytotoxic effects in the lung. By applying benchmark dose (BMD modeling statistics to compare potencies of the NMs, we rank functionalised ZnO ranked the highest based on the largest number of affected endpoints, as well as the strongest responses observed after 24 hours. The non-functionalised ZnO NM gave an almost similar response, whereas Ag NM did not cause an acute response at similar doses.

  13. 64层螺旋CT低剂量双相扫描肺密度在COPD患者肺功能评价中的应用研究%Sixty-four slice spiral CT low-dose chest two-phase scanning for lung density measurement in assessing the pulmonary function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张利华; 王云华

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨64层螺旋CT(spiral CT,SCT)低剂量双相扫描肺密度测定在慢性阻塞性肺部疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)患者肺功能评价中的应用价值.方法:选择经临床肺功能检查确诊的COPD患者36例(COPD组)和30例无任何心肺疾患且胸部CT检查正常的健康体检者(正常对照组).两组研究对象均采用德国Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64层SCT机进行深吸气末、深呼气末的全肺低剂量(50 mAs)扫描.按扫描层数将全肺分为上、中、下3个肺区.利用Pulmo软件,分别测量和计算出COPD组与正常对照组深吸气末、深呼气末上、中、下肺区及全肺的各密度指标:深吸气末密度(Din)、深呼气末密度(Dex)、密度差(Dex-Din)、密度比(Dex/Din)、密度变化百分比(Din-Dex)/Din.所有COPD患者均在SCT检查前后3d内完成肺功能检测(pulmonary function tests,PFT),指标为第1秒用力肺活量的实测值与预计值的比值(FEV1%)及第1秒用力肺活量与用力肺活量的比值(FEV1/FVC).比较COPD组与正常对照组之间SCT各密度指标,利用Pearson相关分析来检验各密度指标与肺功能指标FEV1%和FEV1/FVC的相关性.结果:COPD组与正常对照组比较,Din在上、中、下及全肺区的差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);Dex,Dex-Din,Dex/Din,(Din-Dex)/Din在各肺区及全肺区的差异亦有统计学意义(P<0.01).Dex,Dex-Din,Dex/Din,(Din-Dex)/Din均分别与FEV1%,FEV1/FVC有良好的相关性(P<0.01).结论:64层SCT低剂量双相扫描能便捷、准确地获得评价COPD肺功能的密度指标,与FEV1%和FEV1/FVC两项肺功能指标相关性良好,可用于评估COPD患者的肺功能状况,有较高的临床应用价值.%Objective: To explore the value of 64 slice spiral CT (SCT) low-dose chest scanning at full inspiration and full expiration for lung density measurement in assessing the pulmonary function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods

  14. SU-E-P-03: Implementing a Low Dose Lung Screening CT Program Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; O' Donnell, G [Baystate Health Systems, Inc., Springfield (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Purpose: Provide guidance to the Radiology Departments with the intent of implementing a Low Dose CT Screening Program using different CT Scanners with multiple techniques within the framework of the required state regulations. Method: State Requirements for the purpose of implementing a Low Dose CT Lung Protocol required working with the Radiology and Pulmonary Department in setting up a Low Dose Screening Protocol designed to reduce the radiation burden to the patients enrolled. Radiation dose measurements (CTDIvol) for various CT manufacturers (Siemens16, Siemens 64, Philips 64, and Neusoft128) for three different weight based protocols. All scans were reviewed by the Radiologist. Prior to starting a low dose lung screening protocol, information had to be submitted to the state for approval. Performing a Healing Arts protocol requires extensive information. This not only includes name and address of the applicant but a detailed description of the disease, the x-ray examination and the population to be examined. The unit had to be tested by a qualified expert using the technique charts. The credentials of all the operators, the supervisors and the Radiologists had to be submitted to the state. Results: All the appropriate documentation was sent to the state for review. The measured results between the Low Dose Protocol versus the default Adult Chest Protocol showed that there was a dose reduction of 65% for small (100-150 lb.) patient, 75% for the Medium patient (151-250 lbs.), and a 55% reduction for the Large patient ( over 250 lbs.). Conclusion: Measured results indicated that the Low Dose Protocol indeed lowered the screening patient's radiation dose and the institution was able to submit the protocol to the State's regulators.

  15. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.31–0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high “vitamins and fiber” pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95 % CI = 0.36–0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the “vitamin and fiber” nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  16. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bellomi, Massimo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Palli, Domenico; Veronesi, Giulia

    2013-06-01

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.31-0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high "vitamins and fiber" pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.36-0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the "vitamin and fiber" nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  17. Assessment of the mode of action for hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer following inhalation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • No published or well recognized MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. • MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer was conducted to inform risk assessment. • Cr(VI) epidemiologic, toxicokinetic, toxicological, mechanistic data were evaluated. • Weight of evidence does not support a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. • Non-linear approaches should be considered for evaluating Cr(VI) lung cancer risk. - Abstract: Inhalation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is associated with increased lung cancer risk among workers in several industries, most notably chromate production workers exposed to high concentrations of Cr(VI) (≥100 μg/m3), for which clear exposure–response relationships and respiratory irritation and tissue damage have been reported. Data from this industry are used to assess lung cancer risk associated with environmental and current occupational exposures, occurring at concentrations that are significantly lower. There is considerable uncertainty in the low dose extrapolation of historical occupational epidemiology data to assess risk at current exposures because no published or well recognized mode of action (MOA) for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. We conducted a MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer evaluating toxicokinetic and toxicological data in humans and rodents and mechanistic data to assess plausibility, dose–response, and temporal concordance for potential MOAs. Toxicokinetic data support that extracellular reduction of Cr(VI), which limits intracellular absorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced toxicity, can be overwhelmed at high exposure levels. In vivo genotoxicity and mutagenicity data are mostly negative and do not support a mutagenic MOA. Further, both chronic bioassays and the epidemiologic literature support that lung cancer occurs at exposures that cause tissue damage. Based on this MOA analysis, the overall weight of evidence supports a MOA involving deposition and accumulation of

  18. Assessing the Clinical Impact of Approximations in Analytical Dose Calculations for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemann, Jan, E-mail: jschuemann@mgh.harvard.edu; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Moteabbed, Maryam; Min, Chul Hee; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of approximations in current analytical dose calculation methods (ADCs) on tumor control probability (TCP) in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions planned with ADC were compared with delivered dose distributions as determined by Monte Carlo simulations. A total of 50 patients were investigated in this analysis with 10 patients per site for 5 treatment sites (head and neck, lung, breast, prostate, liver). Differences were evaluated using dosimetric indices based on a dose-volume histogram analysis, a γ-index analysis, and estimations of TCP. Results: We found that ADC overestimated the target doses on average by 1% to 2% for all patients considered. The mean dose, D95, D50, and D02 (the dose value covering 95%, 50% and 2% of the target volume, respectively) were predicted within 5% of the delivered dose. The γ-index passing rate for target volumes was above 96% for a 3%/3 mm criterion. Differences in TCP were up to 2%, 2.5%, 6%, 6.5%, and 11% for liver and breast, prostate, head and neck, and lung patients, respectively. Differences in normal tissue complication probabilities for bladder and anterior rectum of prostate patients were less than 3%. Conclusion: Our results indicate that current dose calculation algorithms lead to underdosage of the target by as much as 5%, resulting in differences in TCP of up to 11%. To ensure full target coverage, advanced dose calculation methods like Monte Carlo simulations may be necessary in proton therapy. Monte Carlo simulations may also be required to avoid biases resulting from systematic discrepancies in calculated dose distributions for clinical trials comparing proton therapy with conventional radiation therapy.

  19. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bree, Ingrid de; van Hinsberg, Mariëlle G E; van Veelen, Lieneke R

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control. PMID:22459649

  20. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bree, Ingrid de, E-mail: i.de.bree@zrti.nl [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands); Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  1. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  2. Individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer radiotherapy: an in silico trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, A.L.; Troost, E.G.C.; Huizenga, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various h

  3. Low-dose budesonide treatment improves lung function in patients with infrequent asthma symptoms at baseline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddel, H. K.; Busse, W. W.; Pedersen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    in patients with less frequent symptoms at presentation. This was investigated in a post-hoc analysis of the multinational inhaled Steroid Treatment As Regular Therapy in early asthma (START) study.2 METHODS: Patients aged 4-66 years (median 21 years) with a history of recent-onset mild asthma (11 years......RATIONALE: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are highly effective in low doses for improving asthma outcomes, including lung function. In the past, ICS treatment was recommended for patients with 'persistent' asthma, defined by symptoms >2 days/week.1 However, evidence is lacking for the benefit of ICS...... symptom frequency groups (Figure). CONCLUSIONS: Long-term, once-daily, low-dose budesonide treatment plus usual asthma medication improves lung function in patients with mild, recent-onset asthma. These beneficial effects were seen even in patients with the lowest baseline asthma symptom frequency (0...

  4. An automated system for lung nodule detection in low-dose computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, I; Martinez, A Preite; Retico, A

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The results obtained on the collected database of low-dose thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  5. Dose assessment in pediatric computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography scans, considering the high doses usually involved and the absence of any previous evaluation in Brazil. Dose values were determined for skull and abdomen examinations, for different age ranges, by using the radiographic techniques routinely used in the clinical centers investigated. Measurements were done using pencil shape ionization chambers inserted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms. These were compact phantoms of different diameters were specially designed and constructed for this work, which simulate different age ranges. Comparison of results with published values showed that doses were lower than the diagnostic reference levels established to adults exams by the European Commission. Nevertheless, doses in paediatric phantoms were higher than those obtained in adult phantoms. The paediatric dose values obtained in Hospitals A and B were lower than the reference level (DRL) adopted by SHIMPTON for different age ranges. In the range 0 - 0.5 year (neonatal), the values of DLP in Hospital B were 94 por cent superior to the DRL For the 10 years old children the values of CTDIw obtained were inferior in 89 por cent for skull and 83 por cent for abdomen examinations, compared to the values published by SHRIMPTON and WALL. Our measured CTDIw values were inferior to the values presented for SHRIMPTON and HUDA, for all the age ranges and types of examinations. It was observed that the normalized dose descriptors values in children in the neonatal range were always superior to the values of doses for the adult patient. In abdomen examinations, the difference was approximately 90% for the effective dose (E) and of 57%.for CTDIw . (author)

  6. Dose calculation accuracy of lung planning with a commercial IMRT treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Patrick N; He, Tongming; DeYoung, A

    2003-01-01

    The dose calculation accuracy of a commercial pencil beam IMRT planning system is evaluated by comparison with Monte Carlo calculations and measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom. The target volume is in the right lung and mediastinum and thus significant tissue inhomogeneities are present. The Monte Carlo code is an adaptation of the MCNP code and the measurements were made with TLD and film. Both the Monte Carlo code and the measurements show very good agreement with the treatment planning system except in regions where the dose is high and the electron density is low. In these regions the commercial system shows doses up to 10% higher than Monte Carlo and film. The average calculated dose for the CTV is 5% higher with the commercial system as compared to Monte Carlo. PMID:14604424

  7. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, W. L.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved.

  8. Comparison of the dose to lung volume between supine and prone position during treatment planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Huijun Xu ; Sujing Zhang; Xiaoliang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare the dose to lung volume in the supine and prone posi-tion while designing CyberKnife treatment plans to treat metastatic tumors in the spinous processes of the thoracic vertebrae, and of er a reference for reducing damage to normal tissues. Methods Nine cases of metastatic tumors in the spinous processes of the thoracic vertebrae were se-lected, and then we designed treatment plans based on the supine and prone positions and compared the results. Results In contrast with the treatment plan based on the prone position, the one for the supine position required 14862–36337 MU more; the lung D5% was 5.20–7.90 Gy higher; and the lung D20% was 2.61–5.73 Gy higher. The dif erence of dose to spine volume between the two plans was –2.21–2.67 Gy; to the skin volume was –3.93–7.85 Gy; and to the esophagus was 0.28–6.39 Gy. Conclusion The treatment plan based on the prone position of patients can better protect lung tissues than the one based on the supine position, and can also improve the availability of beams.

  9. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.T. Dexheimer

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, perform associated equipment maintenance. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the CHF and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  10. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, perform associated equipment maintenance. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the CHF and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application

  11. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) of the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The FHF is a surface facility supporting waste handling operations i.e. receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results are also limited to normal operations only. Results of this calculation will be used to support the FHF design and License Application

  12. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDIvol was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  13. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  14. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective

  15. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56–87.5 Gy; 1.5–2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade ≥2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4–37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512–67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm3 of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966–24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267–17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future

  16. Eye dose assessment and management: overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some publications have shown that Hp(0.07) or even Hp(10) can be used as good operational quantities for X-rays in view of difficulties with Hp(3). With increasing awareness, there is tendency to use whatever dosimeter is available with correction factor to estimate eye lens dose. The best position for an eye lens dosimeter has been reported to be at the side of the head nearest to the radiation source, close to the eye. Recent studies have reported eye doses with cone beam CT (CBCT) both for patients and staff, and there are many papers reporting eye lens doses to staff in nuclear medicine. To minimise the dose to eyes, the user can take advantage of a feature of CBCT of projections acquired over an angular span of 1808 plus cone angle of the X-ray tube and with tube under scan arcs. (authors)

  17. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for small lung tumors with a moderate dose. Favorable results and low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncker-Rohr, V.; Nestle, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Momm, F. [Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg (Germany)] [and others

    2013-01-15

    Background: Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SBRT, SABR) is being increasingly applied because of its high local efficacy, e.g., for small lung tumors. However, the optimum dosage is still under discussion. Here, we report data on 45 lung lesions [non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastases] in 39 patients treated between 2009 and 2010 by SABR. Patients and methods: SABR was performed with total doses of 35 Gy (5 fractions) or 37.5 Gy (3 fractions) prescribed to the 60% isodose line encompassing the planning target volume. Three-monthly follow-up CT scans were supplemented by FDG-PET/CT if clinically indicated. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months. Local progression-free survival rates were 90.5% (all patients), 95.0% (NSCLC), and 81.8% (metastases) at 1 year. At 2 years, the respective local progression-free survival rates were 80.5%, 95.0%, and 59.7%. Overall survival rates were 71.1% (all patients), 65.4% (NSCLC), and 83.3% (metastases) at 1 year. Overall survival rates at 2 years were 52.7%, 45.9%, and 66.7%, respectively. Acute side effects were mild. Conclusion: With the moderate dose schedule used, well-tolerated SABR led to favorable local tumor control as in other published series. Standardization in reporting the dose prescription for SABR is needed to allow comparison of different series in order to determine optimum dosage. (orig.)

  18. MESORAD dose assessment of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accident involving Unit 4 of the Chernobylskaya Atomic Energy Station resulted in the release of a large amount of radioactive material to the atmosphere. This report describes the results of an assessment of the doses near the site (within 80 km) made at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory using the MESORAD Dose Assessment model. 6 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  20. Cystic Fibrosis: Are Volumetric Ultra-Low-Dose Expiratory CT Scans Sufficient for Monitoring Related Lung Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Lequin, Maarten H; Bruijne, Marleen de;

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether chest computed tomography (CT) scores from ultra-low-dose end-expiratory scans alone could suffice for assessment of all cystic fibrosis (CF)-related structural lung abnormalities. Materials and Methods: In this institutional review board–approved study, 20 patients with...... CF aged 6–20 years (eight males, 12 females) underwent low-dose end-inspiratory CT and ultra-low-dose end-expiratory CT. Informed consent was obtained. Scans were randomized and scored by using the Brody-II CT scoring system to assess bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, mucus plugging, and......-inspiratory and end-expiratory CT scores for Brody-II total score (ICC = 0.96), bronchiectasis (ICC = 0.98), airway wall thickening (ICC = 0.94), mucus plugging (ICC = 0.96), and opacities (ICC = 0.90). Intra- and interobserver agreement were good to very good (ICC range, 0.70–0.98). Bland-Altman plots showed...

  1. Effect of lung and target density on small-field dose coverage and PTV definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Patrick D., E-mail: higgi010@umn.edu; Ehler, Eric D.; Cho, Lawrence C.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    2015-04-01

    We have studied the effect of target and lung density on block margin for small stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) targets. A phantom (50 × 50 × 50 cm{sup 3}) was created in the Pinnacle (V9.2) planning system with a 23-cm diameter lung region of interest insert. Diameter targets of 1.6, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were placed in the lung region of interest and centered at a physical depth of 15 cm. Target densities evaluated were 0.1 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, whereas the surrounding lung density was varied between 0.05 and 0.6 g/cm{sup 3}. A dose of 100 cGy was delivered to the isocenter via a single 6-MV field, and the ratio of the average dose to points defining the lateral edges of the target to the isocenter dose was recorded for each combination. Field margins were varied from none to 1.5 cm in 0.25-cm steps. Data obtained in the phantom study were used to predict planning treatment volume (PTV) margins that would match the clinical PTV and isodose prescription for a clinical set of 39 SBRT cases. The average internal target volume (ITV) density was 0.73 ± 0.17, average local lung density was 0.33 ± 0.16, and average ITV diameter was 2.16 ± 0.8 cm. The phantom results initially underpredicted PTV margins by 0.35 cm. With this offset included in the model, the ratio of predicted-to-clinical PTVs was 1.05 ± 0.32. For a given target and lung density, it was found that treatment margin was insensitive to target diameter, except for the smallest (1.6-cm diameter) target, for which the treatment margin was more sensitive to density changes than the larger targets. We have developed a graphical relationship for block margin as a function of target and lung density, which should save time in the planning phase by shortening the design of PTV margins that can satisfy Radiation Therapy Oncology Group mandated treatment volume ratios.

  2. Effect of lung and target density on small-field dose coverage and PTV definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the effect of target and lung density on block margin for small stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) targets. A phantom (50 × 50 × 50 cm3) was created in the Pinnacle (V9.2) planning system with a 23-cm diameter lung region of interest insert. Diameter targets of 1.6, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were placed in the lung region of interest and centered at a physical depth of 15 cm. Target densities evaluated were 0.1 to 1.0 g/cm3, whereas the surrounding lung density was varied between 0.05 and 0.6 g/cm3. A dose of 100 cGy was delivered to the isocenter via a single 6-MV field, and the ratio of the average dose to points defining the lateral edges of the target to the isocenter dose was recorded for each combination. Field margins were varied from none to 1.5 cm in 0.25-cm steps. Data obtained in the phantom study were used to predict planning treatment volume (PTV) margins that would match the clinical PTV and isodose prescription for a clinical set of 39 SBRT cases. The average internal target volume (ITV) density was 0.73 ± 0.17, average local lung density was 0.33 ± 0.16, and average ITV diameter was 2.16 ± 0.8 cm. The phantom results initially underpredicted PTV margins by 0.35 cm. With this offset included in the model, the ratio of predicted-to-clinical PTVs was 1.05 ± 0.32. For a given target and lung density, it was found that treatment margin was insensitive to target diameter, except for the smallest (1.6-cm diameter) target, for which the treatment margin was more sensitive to density changes than the larger targets. We have developed a graphical relationship for block margin as a function of target and lung density, which should save time in the planning phase by shortening the design of PTV margins that can satisfy Radiation Therapy Oncology Group mandated treatment volume ratios

  3. Is the dose-response relationship for local control of Hodgkin disease obscured by lung inhomogeneity corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absence of dose response has been reported for local control of Hodgkin disease between 30 Gy and 42 Gy delivered to the mantle field in definitive irradiation. These dose ranges were determined at the central ray by using irregular field calculations without benefit of dosimetric correction for lung inhomogeneity. The authors have performed a detailed analysis of dose delivered to the hilar and mediastinal regions with mantle field irradiation incorporating lung inhomogeneity corrections for the dose ranges indicated for both cobalt-60 and 6 MVX linear accelerator. For a prescribed dose of 36 Gy to midline with 6 MVX, the hila and mediastinum would receive 40-42 Gy with irregular field and lung inhomogeneity corrections. Similar increases in hilar and lateral mediastinal doses were observed with cobalt-60

  4. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titt, Uwe, E-mail: utitt@mdanderson.org; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Sell, Martin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research, 123 Old Brompton Road, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses.

  5. Smoking cessation interventions within the context of Low-Dose Computed Tomography lung cancer screening: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Bárbara; Simmons, Vani N; Palmer, Amanda M; Correa, John B; Brandon, Thomas H

    2016-08-01

    The integration of smoking cessation interventions (SCIs) within the context of lung cancer screening programs is strongly recommended by screening guidelines, and is a requirement for Medicare coverage of screening in the US. In Europe, there are no lung cancer screening guidelines, however, research trials are ongoing, and prominent professional societies have begun to recommend lung cancer screening. Little is known about the types and efficacy of SCIs among patients receiving low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening. This review addresses this gap. Based on a systematic search, we identified six empirical studies published prior to July 1, 2015, that met inclusion criteria for our review: English language, SCI for LDCT patients, and reported smoking-related outcomes. Three randomized studies and three single-arm studies were identified. Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated self-help SCIs, whereas one pilot RCT evaluated the timing (before or after the LDCT scan) of a combined (counseling and pharmacotherapy) SCI. Among the single-arm trials, two observational studies evaluated the efficacy of combined SCI, and one retrospectively assessed the efficacy of clinician-delivered smoking assessment, advice, and assistance. Given the limited research to date, and particularly the lack of studies reporting results from RCTs, assumptions that SCIs would be effective among this population should be made with caution. Findings from this review suggest that participation in a lung screening trial promotes smoking cessation and may represent a teachable moment to quit smoking. Findings also suggest that providers can take advantage of this potentially teachable moment, and that SCIs have been successfully implemented in screening settings. Continued systematic and methodologically sound research in this area will help improve the knowledge base and implementation of interventions for this population of smokers at risk for chronic disease. PMID:27393513

  6. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering

  7. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Parnell-Parmley, June E.; Charkot, Ellen; BenDavid, Guila; Krajewski, Connie [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Haidar, Salwa [Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Department of Radiology, Salmiya (Kuwait); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-08-15

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  9. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography-guided lung interventions using an iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.H.; Hiss, S.; Borggrefe, J.; Bunck, A.C.; Maintz, D.; Hackenbroch, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Mueller, D. [Clinical Science Philips Healthcare GmbH, Munich (Germany). Clinical Science; Hellmich, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2015-10-15

    To compare the radiation doses and image qualities of computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions using a standard-dose CT (SDCT) protocol with filtered back projection and a low-dose CT (LDCT) protocol with both filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction. Image quality and radiation doses (dose-length product and CT dose index) were retrospectively reviewed for 130 patients who underwent CT-guided lung interventions. SDCT at 120 kVp and automatic mA modulation and LDCT at 100 kVp and a fixed exposure were each performed for 65 patients. Image quality was objectively evaluated as the contrast-to-noise ratio and subjectively by two radiologists for noise impression, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability on a four-point scale. The groups did not significantly differ in terms of diagnostic acceptability and complication rate. LDCT yielded a median 68.6 % reduction in the radiation dose relative to SDCT. In the LDCT group, iterative reconstruction was superior to filtered back projection in terms of noise reduction and subjective image quality. The groups did not differ in terms of beam hardening artifacts. LDCT was feasible for all procedures and yielded a more than two-thirds reduction in radiation exposure while maintaining overall diagnostic acceptability, safety and precision. The iterative reconstruction algorithm is preferable according to the objective and subjective image quality analyses.

  10. SU-C-BRB-02: Symmetric and Asymmetric MLC Based Lung Shielding and Dose Optimization During Translating Bed TBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S; Kakakhel, MB [Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmed, SBS; Hussain, A [Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The primary aim was to introduce a dose optimization method for translating bed total body irradiation technique that ensures lung shielding dynamically. Symmetric and asymmetric dynamic MLC apertures were employed for this purpose. Methods: The MLC aperture sizes were defined based on the radiological depth values along the divergent ray lines passing through the individual CT slices. Based on these RD values, asymmetrically shaped MLC apertures were defined every 9 mm of the phantom in superior-inferior direction. Individual MLC files were created with MATLAB™ and were imported into Eclipse™ treatment planning system for dose calculations. Lungs can be shielded to an optimum level by reducing the MLC aperture width over the lungs. The process was repeated with symmetrically shaped apertures. Results: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis shows that the asymmetric MLC based technique provides better dose coverage to the body and optimum shielding of the lungs compared to symmetrically shaped beam apertures. Midline dose homogeneity is within ±3% with asymmetric MLC apertures whereas it remains within ±4.5% with symmetric ones (except head region where it drops down to −7%). The substantial over and under dosage of ±5% at tissue interfaces has been reduced to ±2% with asymmetric MLC technique. Lungs dose can be reduced to any desired limit. In this experiment lungs dose was reduced to 80% of the prescribed dose, as was desired. Conclusion: The novel asymmetric MLC based technique assures optimum shielding of OARs (e.g. lungs) and better 3-D dose homogeneity and body-dose coverage in comparison with the symmetric MLC aperture optimization. The authors acknowledge the financial and infrastructural support provided by Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad and Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi during the course of this research project. Authors have no conflict of interest with any national / international

  11. SU-C-BRB-02: Symmetric and Asymmetric MLC Based Lung Shielding and Dose Optimization During Translating Bed TBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The primary aim was to introduce a dose optimization method for translating bed total body irradiation technique that ensures lung shielding dynamically. Symmetric and asymmetric dynamic MLC apertures were employed for this purpose. Methods: The MLC aperture sizes were defined based on the radiological depth values along the divergent ray lines passing through the individual CT slices. Based on these RD values, asymmetrically shaped MLC apertures were defined every 9 mm of the phantom in superior-inferior direction. Individual MLC files were created with MATLAB™ and were imported into Eclipse™ treatment planning system for dose calculations. Lungs can be shielded to an optimum level by reducing the MLC aperture width over the lungs. The process was repeated with symmetrically shaped apertures. Results: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis shows that the asymmetric MLC based technique provides better dose coverage to the body and optimum shielding of the lungs compared to symmetrically shaped beam apertures. Midline dose homogeneity is within ±3% with asymmetric MLC apertures whereas it remains within ±4.5% with symmetric ones (except head region where it drops down to −7%). The substantial over and under dosage of ±5% at tissue interfaces has been reduced to ±2% with asymmetric MLC technique. Lungs dose can be reduced to any desired limit. In this experiment lungs dose was reduced to 80% of the prescribed dose, as was desired. Conclusion: The novel asymmetric MLC based technique assures optimum shielding of OARs (e.g. lungs) and better 3-D dose homogeneity and body-dose coverage in comparison with the symmetric MLC aperture optimization. The authors acknowledge the financial and infrastructural support provided by Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad and Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi during the course of this research project. Authors have no conflict of interest with any national / international

  12. Lung cancer incidence and mortality in National Lung Screening Trial participants who underwent low-dose CT prevalence screening: a retrospective cohort analysis of a randomised, multicentre, diagnostic screening trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Edward F; Greco, Erin; Gatsonis, Constantine; Pinsky, Paul; Kramer, Barnett S; Aberle, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Annual low-dose CT screening for lung cancer has been recommended for high-risk individuals, but the necessity of yearly low-dose CT in all eligible individuals is uncertain. This study examined rates of lung cancer in National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had a negative prevalence (initial) low-dose CT screen to explore whether less frequent screening could be justified in some lower-risk subpopulations. Methods We did a retrospective cohort analysis of data from the NLST, a randomised, multicentre screening trial comparing three annual low-dose CT assessments with three annual chest radiographs for the early detection of lung cancer in high-risk, eligible individuals (aged 55–74 years with at least a 30 pack-year history of cigarette smoking, and, if a former smoker, had quit within the past 15 years), recruited from US medical centres between Aug 5, 2002, and April 26, 2004. Participants were followed up for up to 5 years after their last annual screen. For the purposes of this analysis, our cohort consisted of all NLST participants who had received a low-dose CT prevalence (T0) screen. We determined the frequency, stage, histology, study year of diagnosis, and incidence of lung cancer, as well as overall and lung cancer-specific mortality, and whether lung cancers were detected as a result of screening or within 1 year of a negative screen. We also estimated the effect on mortality if the first annual (T1) screen in participants with a negative T0 screen had not been done. The NLST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00047385. Findings Our cohort consisted of 26 231 participants assigned to the low-dose CT screening group who had undergone their T0 screen. The 19 066 participants with a negative T0 screen had a lower incidence of lung cancer than did all 26 231 T0-screened participants (371·88 [95% CI 337·97–408·26] per 100 000 person-years vs 661·23 [622·07–702·21]) and had lower lung cancer

  13. IAEA/IDEAS intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Internet based intercomparison exercise on assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides has been performed to check the applicability of the 'General Guidelines for the Assessment of Internal Dose from Monitoring Data' developed by the IDEAS group. There were six intake cases presented on the Internet and 81 participants worldwide reported solutions to these cases. Results of the exercise indicate that the guidelines have a positive influence on the methodologies applied for dose assessments and, if correctly applied, improve the harmonisation of assessed doses. (authors)

  14. Non-solid lung nodules on low-dose computed tomography : comparison of detection rate between 3 visualization techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Ernst Th.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Prokop, Mathias; van Ginneken, Bram; Glandorf, Ron; van Klaveren, Rob; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Jong, Pim A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare various visualization techniques for the detection of non-solid nodules in low-dose lung cancer screening computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: An enriched sample of 216 male lung cancer screening subjects aged 60.4 +/- 6.0 years was used. Two blinded independent readers sea

  15. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ≥2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI (P lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ≥2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ≥2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ≥564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  16. Combination chemotherapy including high dose methotrexate and radiotherapy, in the treatment of small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-nine (88%) of thirty-three patients who were treated with multiple drug chemotherapy, including high dose methotrexate, and radiotherapy for small cell carcinoma of the lung showed significant improvement in their clinical condition and quality of life. Treatment was well tolerated and toxicity acceptable. Cerebral metastases were not detected in any patient on presentation and only developed in three patients (9%). Little information exists regarding the use of high dose methotrexate in small cell carcinoma of the lung. There is no evidence, on the data available, that high dose methotrexate is any more effective than conventional doses. (author)

  17. Randomised crossover trial of salbutamol aerosol delivered by metered dose inhaler, jet nebuliser, and ultrasonic nebuliser in chronic lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fok, T; Lam, K.; Ng, P; So, H.; Cheung, K; Wong, Van W.; So, K

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To compare the efficacy of salbutamol delivered by metered dose inhaler (MDI), jet nebuliser, and ultrasonic nebuliser in ventilated infants with chronic lung disease.
METHODS—Twenty preterm ventilated infants with chronic lung disease were enrolled in two studies. In study 1 (n=10), each infant was given 200 µg of salbutamol at 4 hour intervals and in random sequence from a metered dose inhaler-spacer device, a jet nebuliser, and an ultrasonic nebuliser with a small me...

  18. Osteoporosis markers on low-dose lung cancer screening chest computed tomography scans predict all-cause mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckens, C.F. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Y. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verkooijen, H.M.; Mali, W.P.; Jong, P.A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, I.; Mol, C.P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaar, H.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, R.; Oudkerk, M. [Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aalst, C.M. van; Koning, H.J. de [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Further survival benefits may be gained from low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by assessing vertebral fractures and bone density. We sought to assess the association between CT-measured vertebral fractures and bone density with all-cause mortality in lung cancer screening participants. Following a case-cohort design, lung cancer screening trial participants (N = 3,673) who died (N = 196) during a median follow-up of 6 years (inter-quartile range: 5.7-6.3) were identified and added to a random sample of N = 383 from the trial. We assessed vertebral fractures using Genant and acute;s semiquantative method on sagittal reconstructions and measured bone density (Hounsfield Units (HU)) in vertebrae. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine if vertebral fractures or bone density were independently predictive of mortality. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was 35 % (95 % confidence interval 30-40 %) among survivors and 51 % (44-58 %) amongst cases. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, pack years smoked, coronary and aortic calcium volume and pulmonary emphysema, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for vertebral fracture was 2.04 (1.43-2.92). For each 10 HU decline in trabecular bone density, the adjusted HR was 1.08 (1.02-1.15). Vertebral fractures and bone density are independently associated with all-cause mortality. (orig.)

  19. An Internal Dose Assessment Associated with Personal Food Intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joeun; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Wontae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection), Therefore, had recommended the concept of 'Critical Group'. Recently the ICRP has recommended the use of 'Representative Person' on the new basic recommendation 103. On the other hand the U.S. NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) has adopted more conservative concept, 'Maximum Exposed Individuals (MEI)' of critical Group. The dose assessment in Korea is based on MEI. Although dose assessment based on MEI is easy to receive the permission of the regulatory authority, it is not efficient. Meanwhile, the internal dose by food consumption takes an important part. Therefore, in this study, the internal dose assessment was performed in accordance with ICRP's new recommendations. The internal dose assessment was performed in accordance with ICRP's new recommendations. It showed 13.2% decreased of the annual internal dose due to gaseous effluents by replacing MEI to the concept of representative person. Also, this calculation based on new ICRP's recommendation has to be extended to all areas of individual dose assessment. Then, more accurate and efficient values might be obtained for dose assessment.

  20. Radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Recently, interest has grown in therapeutic agents for a number of applications in nuclear medicine. Internal dose models and methods have been in use for many years, are well established and can give radiation doses to stylized models representing reference individuals. Kinetic analyses need to be carefully planned, and dose conversion factors should be chosen that are most similar to the subject in question and that can then be tailored to be more patient specific. Such calculations, however, are currently not relevant in patient management in internal emitter therapy, as they are not sufficiently accurate or detailed to guide clinical decision making. Great strides are being made at many centres regarding the use of patient image data to construct individualized voxel based models for more detailed and patient specific dose calculations.These recent advances make it likely that the relevance will soon change to be more similar to that of external beam treatment planning. (author)

  1. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yoon, Sungwon [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Krishna, Ganesh [Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Mountain View, California 94040 (United States); Wilfley, Brian [Triple Ring Technologies, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An improved method of image guidance for lung tumor biopsies could help reduce the high rate of false negatives. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of the scanning-beam digital tomography system (SBDX) for providing real-time 3D tomographic reconstructions for target verification. The unique geometry of the system requires trade-offs between patient dose, imaging field of view (FOV), and tomographic angle.Methods: Tomosynthetic angle as a function of tumor-to-detector distance was calculated. Monte Carlo Software (PCXMC) was used to calculate organ doses and effective dose for source-to-detector distances (SDDs) from 90 to 150 cm, patient locations with the tumor at 20 cm from the source to 20 cm from the detector, and FOVs centered on left lung and right lung as well as medial and distal peripheries of the lungs. These calculations were done for two systems, a SBDX system and a GE OEC-9800 C-arm fluoroscopic unit. To evaluate the dose effect of the system geometry, results from PCXMC were calculated using a scan of 300 mAs for both SBDX and fluoroscopy. The Rose Criterion was used to find the fluence required for a tumor SNR of 5, factoring in scatter, air-gap, system geometry, and patient position for all models generated with PCXMC. Using the calculated fluence for constant tumor SNR, the results from PCXMC were used to compare the patient dose for a given SNR between SBDX and fluoroscopy.Results: Tomographic angle changes with SDD only in the region near the detector. Due to their geometry, the source array and detector have a peak tomographic angle for any given SDD at a source to tumor distance that is 69.7% of the SDD assuming constant source and detector size. Changing the patient location in order to increase tomographic angle has a significant effect on organ dose distribution due to geometrical considerations. With SBDX and fluoroscopy geometries, the dose to organs typically changes in an opposing manner with changing patient

  2. Computer-aided detection of nodule in low-dose CT screening for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) system for detection of pulmonary nodules in 64-slice low-dose CT screening and to investigate whether CAD can improve the performance of radiologists in detecting pulmonary nodules. Methods: One hundred low-dose screening CT examinations were randomly selected from the database containing 578 consecutive cases between Jun 2007 and Jun 2008. All the examinations were performed on a 64-MSCT scanner with the exposure of 120 kVp, 30 or 40 mA, or automatic exposure control. Before the study started, the screening reports had been made with double reading by two radiologists. All the selected images were analyzed with the lung VCAR software from GE Healthcare with a nodule diameter threshold 3.0 mm. All discrepancies between the screening reports and the CAD results were reviewed and the true non-calcified nodules were determined in consensus by two experienced chest radiologists. Detected nodules were classified by density, size and location.The performance of the double reading and the CAD system were compared and analyzed statistically. McNemar-Bowker test was used for the statistical analysis. Results: A total of 257 true noncalcified nodules were determined in all 100 low-dose screening CT examinations. The detection rate of CAD system was 91.1% (234/257), with the missed rate of 8.9% (23/257). Twenty three nodules were missed by CAD, in which 10 were solid with the diameter ranged from 2.4 to 6.0 mm, and 13 were nonsolid with the diameter ranged from 2.1 to 8.6 mm.Of the 23 nodules, 17 were located in the outer zones of lungs and 6 in the inner zones. The double reading showed a detection rate of 59.1% (152/257) and a missed rate of 40.9% (105/257), which was significantly lower than CAD. The diameter of all the 105 missed nodules by radiologists were ranged from 2.4 to 11.8 mm, in which 94 nodules were solid, 10 were partly solid and 1 was nonsolid, with 69 located in outer zones of lungs

  3. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K.; Kim, Soo Hyung; Zheng, Bin

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 ± 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  4. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Soo Hyung [School of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, Jun; Wang Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K; Zheng Bin, E-mail: zhengb@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 {+-} 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  5. Variations of dose to the lung during computed tomography (CT) thorax examinations: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determined the influence of patient individuality on lung organ doses for chest CT examinations. The aim was a statistical statement on the variability as well as the uncertainty caused by the patient individuality. Furthermore, the reproducibility of the mean organ dose value of the lung using the new ICRP 110 voxelized adult female phantom was determined. Calculation of lung doses for 61 female chest CT studies with identical scan parameters (120 kV, 135 mAs, 100 mm collimation, 1.5 pitch) were done. For all patients, the lung was contoured and the geometry was simulated using the Monte Carlo method without patient table and with its original voxel size. The lungs were completely included in the scan area. A so-called user code CTDOSPP was developed which extends the Monte Carlo package EGSnrc and enables rotational simulation of CT X-ray sources. A developed graphical user interface GMctdospp allows easy handling of simulation parameters and CT studies, which are loaded in the DicomRT struct format. The transformation of CT values to material and density values is carried out with a standard relationship. The ICRP adult female material composition of all organs were directly taken from the publication. The patient table and bed and pillow were assumed to be air in order to be similar to patient pool. All simulations were calibrated for better handling and visualisation to a CTDIair value of 22.9 mGy. Simulation values were grouped into 1 mSv classes. The organ dose classes fit well to a Gaussian distribution (correlation coefficient R2 = 0.97). The fit's mean value is 10 mSv with a standard deviation of 2 mSv. The variability is about ± 30 % with minimum at 8 mSv and maximum at 13 mSv. The calculated organ dose to the lungs of the ICRP adult female phantom is about 11 mSv and thus within the calculated standard deviation of the patient pool. For all simulations the statistical uncertainty was between 2 and 3.5 %. This present study shows good

  6. Design of spray dried insulin microparticles to bypass deposition in the extrathoracic region and maximize total lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Keith T; Rao, Nagaraja; Weers, Jeffry G; Huang, Daniel; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-09-25

    Inhaled drugs all too often deliver only a fraction of the emitted dose to the target lung site due to deposition in the extrathoracic region (i.e., mouth and throat), which can lead to increased variation in lung exposure, and in some instances increases in local and systemic side effects. For aerosol medications, improved targeting to the lungs may be achieved by tailoring the micromeritic properties of the particles (e.g., size, density, rugosity) to minimize deposition in the mouth-throat and maximize the total lung dose. This study evaluated a co-solvent spray drying approach to modulate particle morphology and dose delivery characteristics of engineered powder formulations of insulin microparticles. The binary co-solvent system studied included water as the primary solvent mixed with an organic co-solvent, e.g., ethanol. Factors such as the relative rate of evaporation of each component of a binary co-solvent mixture, and insulin solubility in each component were considered in selecting feedstock compositions. A water-ethanol co-solvent mixture with a composition range considered suitable for modulating particle shell formation during drying was selected for experimental investigation. An Alberta Idealized Throat model was used to evaluate the in vitro total lung dose of a series of spray dried insulin formulations engineered with different bulk powder properties and delivered with two prototype inhalers that fluidize and disperse powder using different principles. The in vitro total lung dose of insulin microparticles was improved and favored for powders with low bulk density and small primary particle size, with reduction of deposition in the extrathoracic region. The results demonstrated that a total lung dose >95% of the delivered dose can be achieved with engineered particles, indicating a high degree of lung targeting, almost completely bypassing deposition in the mouth-throat. PMID:27480399

  7. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate 68Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r2=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r2=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET/CT imaging. These

  8. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva, Shankar, E-mail: shankar.siva@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hardcastle, Nicholas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Steinfort, Daniel [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Department of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Ball, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  9. Radiation dose assessments for materials with elevated natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides practical information needed for evaluating the radiation dose to the general public and workers caused by materials containing elevated levels of natural radionuclides. The report presents criteria, exposure scenarios and calculations used to assess dose with respect to the safety requirements set for construction materials in accordance with the Finnish Radiation Act. A method for calculating external gamma exposure from building materials is presented in detail. The results for most typical cases are given as specific dose rates in table form to enable doses to be assessed without computer calculation. A number of such dose assessments is presented, as is the corresponding computer code. Practical investigation levels for the radioactivity of materials are defined. (23 refs.)

  10. Application of biota dose assessment tools for Japan environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined applicability of two biota assessment tools RESRAD-BIOTA and ERICA assessment tool, to Japanese environment. We considered paddy field as the typical Japan environment and used maximum of global fallout nuclide concentrations. The case studies showed that graded approaches used in RESRAD-BIOTA and ERICA assessment tool are effective to apply Japanese environment. In addition, we concluded that it is important to clarify the suitability of some parameter values used in biota dose assessment. Further study is necessary on the recommendation of environmental parameter values for biota dose assessment for Japan environment. (author)

  11. A methodology for using SPECT to reduce intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose to functioning lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a map of the spatial distribution of lung perfusion. Thus, SPECT guidance can be used to divert dose away from higher-functioning lung, potentially reducing lung toxicity. We present a methodology for achieving this aim and test it in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment-planning. Methods and Materials: IMRT treatment plans were generated with and without SPECT guidance and compared for 5 patients. Healthy lung was segmented into four regions on the basis of SPECT intensity in the SPECT plan. Dose was sequentially allowed to the target via regions of increasing SPECT intensity. This process results in reduction of dose to functional lung, reflected in the dose-function histogram (DFH). The plans were compared using DFHs and F2/F3 values (Fx is the functional lung receiving dose above x Gy). Results: In all cases, the SPECT-guided plan produced a more favorable DFH compared with the non-SPECT-guided plan. Additionally, the F2 and F3 values were reduced for all patients by an average of 13.6% ± 5.2% and 10.5% ± 5.8%, respectively. In all patients, DFHs of the two highest-functioning SPECT regions were reduced, whereas DFHs of the two lower-functioning regions were increased, illustrating the dose 'give-take' between SPECT regions during redistribution. Conclusions: SPECT-guided IMRT shows potential for reducing the dose delivered to highly functional lung regions. This dose reduction could reduce the number of high-grade pneumonitis cases that develop after radiation treatment and improve patient quality of life

  12. A Monte Carlo approach to lung dose calculation in small fields used in intensity modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Mesbahi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed that the dose reduction with small fields in the lung was very enormous. Thus, inaccurate prediction of absorbed dose inside lung and also lung soft-tissue interfaces with small photon beams may lead to critical consequences for treatment outcome.

  13. Study of the heterogeneity effects of lung in the evaluation of absorbed dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of radiotherapy is to deliver the highest possible dose to the tumour, in order to destroy it, reducing as much as possible the doses to healthy tissues adjacent to the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to do a planning of the treatment. The more complex is the treatment, the more difficult the planning will be, demanding computation sophisticated methods in its execution, in order to consider the heterogeneities present in the human body. Additionally, with the appearing of new radiotherapeutic techniques, that used irradiation fields of small area, for instance, the intensity modulated radiotherapy, the difficulties for the execution of a reliable treatment planning, became still larger. In this work it was studied the influence of the lung heterogeneity in the planning of the curves of percentage depth dose, PDP, obtained with the EclipseR planning system for different sizes of irradiation fields, using the correction algorithms for heterogeneities available in the planning system: modified Batho, general Batho and equivalent tissue-air ratio. A thorax phantom, manufactured in acrylic, containing a region made of cork to simulate the lung tissue, was used. The PDP curves generated by the planning system were compared to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and with the use of thermoluminescent, TL, dosimetry. It was verified that the algorithms used by the EclipseR system for the correction of heterogeneity effects are not able to generate correct results for PDP curves in the case of small fields, occurring differences of up to 100%, when the 1x1 cm2 treatment field is considered. These differences can cause a considerable subdosage in the lung tissue, reducing the possibility of the patient cure. (author)

  14. Patient Perspectives on Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening, New Mexico, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Andrew L.; Murrietta, Ambroshia M.; Getrich, Christina M.; Rhyne, Robert; Crowell, Richard E.; Taylor, Kathryn L.; Reifler, Ellen J.; Wescott, Pamela H.; Saeed, Ali I.; Hoffman, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction National guidelines call for annual lung cancer screening for high-risk smokers using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). The objective of our study was to characterize patient knowledge and attitudes about lung cancer screening, smoking cessation, and shared decision making by patient and health care provider. Methods We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with patients with histories of heavy smoking who received care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC Clinic) and at a comprehensive cancer center-affiliated chest clinic (Chest Clinic) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The interviews, conducted from February through September 2014, focused on perceptions about health screening, knowledge and attitudes about LDCT screening, and preferences regarding decision aids. We used a systematic iterative analytic process to identify preliminary and emergent themes and to create a coding structure. Results We reached thematic saturation after 22 interviews (10 at the FQHC Clinic, 12 at the Chest Clinic). Most patients were unaware of LDCT screening for lung cancer but were receptive to the test. Some smokers said they would consider quitting smoking if their screening result were positive. Concerns regarding screening were cost, radiation exposure, and transportation issues. To support decision making, most patients said they preferred one-on-one discussions with a provider. They also valued decision support tools (print materials, videos), but raised concerns about readability and Internet access. Conclusion Implementing lung cancer screening in sociodemographically diverse populations poses significant challenges. The value of tobacco cessation counseling cannot be overemphasized. Effective interventions for shared decision making to undergo lung cancer screening will need the active engagement of health care providers and will require the use of accessible decision aids designed for people with low health literacy. PMID:27536900

  15. The dose-area product and assessment of the occupational dose in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study used dose-area product (DAP) data to determine the relationship between the dose received by radiologists and the DAP. The working conditions were simulated by phantom measurements. The doses of scattered radiation were measured using various scattering angles, distances and tube voltages. The calculated doses of scattered radiation were compared with the measured doses of scattered radiation. To test the validity of using such data for assessing occupational doses, the scatter dose on the radiologist or cardiologist was calculated from the DAP using the measured scatter factors. The dose to the lenses of the eyes may exceed the annual limit, and may therefore restrict the number of interventional procedures. A relation between the DAP and the occupational dose is difficult to establish, especially because staff doses are associated with the use of protective devices, positions of projections with respect to the patient, and working methods. However, the DAP may provide a good reference value for the dosimetric monitoring of staff. (author)

  16. TH-A-19A-10: Fast Four Dimensional Monte Carlo Dose Computations for Proton Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Mohan, R [U.T M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yepes, P [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate four dimensional (4D) Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation system for proton therapy of lung cancer and other thoracic and abdominal malignancies in which the delivered dose distributions can be affected by respiratory motion of the patient. Methods: A 4D computer tomography (CT) scan for a lung cancer patient treated with protons in our clinic was used to create a time dependent patient model using our in-house, MCNPX-based Monte Carlo system (“MC{sup 2}”). The beam line configurations for two passively scattered proton beams used in the actual treatment were extracted from the clinical treatment plan and a set of input files was created automatically using MC{sup 2}. A full MC simulation of the beam line was computed using MCNPX and a set of phase space files for each beam was collected at the distal surface of the range compensator. The particles from these phase space files were transported through the 10 voxelized patient models corresponding to the 10 phases of the breathing cycle in the 4DCT, using MCNPX and an accelerated (fast) MC code called “FDC”, developed by us and which is based on the track repeating algorithm. The accuracy of the fast algorithm was assessed by comparing the two time dependent dose distributions. Results: The error of less than 1% in 100% of the voxels in all phases of the breathing cycle was achieved using this method with a speedup of more than 1000 times. Conclusion: The proposed method, which uses full MC to simulate the beam line and the accelerated MC code FDC for the time consuming particle transport inside the complex, time dependent, geometry of the patient shows excellent accuracy together with an extraordinary speed.

  17. SU-E-T-633: Dose Differences in Lung Cancer SBRT: The Influences of MLC Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to compare the plan dose distribution of lung SBRT with MLCs in different width. Methods: Cases with phase INSCLC were enrolled. 9 cases were undergone 4D-CT scanning in the supine position with both arms raised. 3D-CT images without IV contrast were afterwards acquired with 3mm thickness and used for dose calculations. ITV was generated by using the inspiration and expiration images. The ITV can be expanded by geometric set-up uncertainty (5 mm) to generate the PTV. All chest normal tissues including chest wall were contoured by doctors. A total dose of 55 Gy will be given in 5 fractions within 10–14 days with an inter fraction interval of 2–3 days. Guided by the RTOG trial 3502 protocol, 11–13 non-coplanar fields with 6MV photon were arranged. Three types of MLCs with width of 3mm, 5mm and 10mm at isocenter position, were used separately to generate a CRT plan for each case. Monte Carlo algorithm was applied to dose calculation. All plans were adjusted as possible to meet the dose constraints. Dose-volume parameters from plans as followed were compared and analysized: PTV V55Gy, COMPTV D70% (70% of normalization dose), volume A (body minus PTV), and R100% and R50% (the ratio of x% of prescription dose isoline volume to PTV volume). Results: MLCs, 3mm and 5mm wide, played the identical roles on dosimetry of the plans, excluding the parameter volume A (p<0.05). On the contrary, MLC with width of 10mm was significantly inferior to the other two types on most parameters (p<0.05). For R50%, all types contributed equally (p>0.05). Conclusion: For lung cancer SBRT, MLC width had influence to dosimetry, especially in irradiation area. Small size MLC, e.g. 3mm and 5mm, are helpful to generate a high quality treatment plan, which could meet the strict criteria for targets and OAR.

  18. A Novel Method to Incorporate the Spatial Location of the Lung Dose Distribution into Predictive Radiation Pneumonitis Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Studies have proposed that patients who receive radiation therapy to the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis than patients who receive therapy to the apex of the lung. The primary purpose of the present study was to develop a novel method to incorporate the lung dose spatial information into a predictive radiation pneumonitis model. A secondary goal was to apply the method to a 547 lung cancer patient database to determine whether including the spatial information could improve the fit of our model. Methods and Materials: The three-dimensional dose distribution of each patient was mapped onto one common coordinate system. The boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. Once all dose distributions were mapped onto the common coordinate system, the spatial information was incorporated into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman predictive radiation pneumonitis model. Specifically, the lung dose voxels were weighted using a user-defined spatial weighting matrix. We investigated spatial weighting matrices that linearly scaled each dose voxel according to the following orientations: superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, medial–lateral, left–right, and radial. The model parameters were fit to our patient cohort with the endpoint of severe radiation pneumonitis. The spatial dose model was compared against a conventional dose–volume model to determine whether adding a spatial component improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. Adding in a spatial parameter did not significantly increase the accuracy of the model for any of the weighting schemes. Conclusions: A novel method was developed to investigate the relationship between the location of the deposited lung dose and pneumonitis rate. The method was applied to a patient database, and we found that for our patient cohort, the spatial location does not

  19. MOSFET assessment of radiation dose delivered to mice using the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Korideck, Houari; Chin, Lee M; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I

    2011-12-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a novel isocentric irradiation system that enables state-of-the-art image-guided radiotherapy research to be performed with animal models. This paper reports the results obtained from investigations assessing the radiation dose delivered by the SARRP to different anatomical target volumes in mice. Surgically implanted metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET) dosimeters were employed for the dose assessment. The results reveal differences between the calculated and measured dose of -3.5 to 0.5%, -5.2 to -0.7%, -3.9 to 0.5%, -5.9 to 2.5%, -5.5 to 0.5%, and -4.3 to 0% for the left kidney, liver, pancreas, prostate, left lung, and brain, respectively. Overall, the findings show less than 6% difference between the delivered and calculated dose, without tissue heterogeneity corrections. These results provide a useful assessment of the need for tissue heterogeneity corrections in SARRP dose calculations for clinically relevant tumor model sites. PMID:21962005

  20. Dose escalation for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: end of the line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 was a randomized trial that investigated both the impact of radiation dose-escalation and the addition of cetuximab on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of RTOG 0617 were surprising, with the dose escalation randomization being closed prematurely due to futility stopping rules, and cetuximab ultimately showing no overall survival benefit. Locally advanced unresectable NSCLC has conventionally been treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Though advances in treatment technology have improved the ability to deliver adequate treatment dose, the foundation for radiotherapy (RT) has remained the same since the 1980s. Since then, progressive studies have sought to establish the safety and efficacy of escalating radiation dose to loco-regional disease. Though RTOG 0617 did not produce the anticipated result, much interest remains in dose escalation and establishing an explanation for the findings of this study. Cetuximab was also not found to provide a survival benefit when applied to an unselected population. However, planned retrospective analysis suggests that those patients with high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression may benefit, suggesting that cetuximab should be applied in a targeted fashion. We discuss the results of RTOG 0617 and additional findings from post-hoc analysis that suggest that dose escalation may be limited by normal tissue toxicity. We also present ongoing studies that aim to address potential causes for mortality in the dose escalation arm through adaptive or proton therapy, and are also leveraging additional concurrent systemic agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for EGFR-activating mutations or EML4-ALK rearrangements, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.

  1. Moving tumour influence in dose distribution for stereotactic lung radiotherapy; Influencia do movimento tumoral na distribuicao de dose em radioterapia estereotaxica de pulmao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, D.E.E.S.; Lopes, C.P.; Ferrigno, R.; Goncalves, V.D.; Sakuraba, R.K.; Cruz, J.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Cesar, D.L. [Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2010-07-01

    The stereotactic body radiation treatment for lung tumours in inoperable patients was possible due to the safety margin reduction from the advances in the simulation process and treatment setup. The IMRT treatment planning promoted reduction in the side effects for hypofractionated techniques. However, the intrafraction moving target combined with the field variation can result in interplay of the dose distribution at the target. The dose deviation was analysed for moving ionization chambers measurements relative to static for Rapidarc, IMRT SW, IMRT SS and conformational planning with 150 cGy to 1800 cGy doses per fraction. The maximum relative deviation between the fields was 14,9% for IMRT SS planning with lower dose. The average total dose deviation showed a higher value for IMRT SS with lower dose, with global mean 0,7%{+-}0,7%. Although, high variations has occurred between fields, there was no significant influence to total dose. (author)

  2. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Sykes, J. R.; Barber, J.;

    2015-01-01

    tumours across a range of treatment planning systems compared to the conventional Flatting Filter (FF) beams, (II) investigate how sharing knowledge between centres of different experience can improve plan quality. All vendor/treatment planning system (TPS) combinations investigated were able to produce...... acceptable treatment plans and the dose accuracy was clinically acceptable for all plans. By sharing knowledge between the different centres, the minor protocol violations (MPV) could be significantly reduced, from an average of 1.9 MPV per plan to 0.6 after such sharing of treatment planning knowledge......When implementing new technology into clinical practice, there will always be a need for large knowledge gain. The aim of this study was twofold, (I) audit the treatment planning and dose delivery of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam technology for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of lung...

  3. CT patterns of fungal pulmonary infections of the lung: Comparison of standard-dose and simulated low-dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christe, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.christe@insel.ch [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Lin, Margaret C., E-mail: mc_lin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Yen, Andrew C., E-mail: acyen@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Hallett, Rich L., E-mail: xraydoc97@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Roychoudhury, Kingshuk, E-mail: kingshuk@statucc.ie [Statistics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Schmitzberger, Florian, E-mail: florians@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Fleischmann, Dominik, E-mail: d.fleischmann@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Leung, Ann N., E-mail: aleung@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Rubin, Geoffry D., E-mail: grubin@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Vock, Peter, E-mail: peter.vock@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Roos, Justus E., E-mail: justus.roos@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of radiation dose reduction on the appearance and visual quantification of specific CT patterns of fungal infection in immuno-compromised patients. Materials and methods: Raw data of thoracic CT scans (64 × 0.75 mm, 120 kVp, 300 reference mAs) from 41 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary fungal infection were collected. In 32 patients fungal infection could be proven (median age of 55.5 years, range 35–83). A total of 267 cuboids showing CT patterns of fungal infection and 27 cubes having no disease were reconstructed at the original and 6 simulated tube currents of 100, 40, 30, 20, 10, and 5 reference mAs. Eight specific fungal CT patterns were analyzed by three radiologists: 76 ground glass opacities, 42 ground glass nodules, 51 mixed, part solid, part ground glass nodules, 36 solid nodules, 5 lobulated nodules, 6 spiculated nodules, 14 cavitary nodules, and 37 foci of air-space disease. The standard of reference was a consensus subjective interpretation by experts whom were not readers in the study. Results: The mean sensitivity and standard deviation for detecting pathological cuboids/disease using standard dose CT was 0.91 ± 0.07. Decreasing dose did not affect sensitivity significantly until the lowest dose level of 5 mAs (0.87 ± 0.10, p = 0.012). Nodular pattern discrimination was impaired below the dose level of 30 reference mAs: specificity for fungal ‘mixed nodules’ decreased significantly at 20, 10 and 5 reference mAs (p < 0.05). At lower dose levels, classification drifted from ‘solid’ to ‘mixed nodule’, although no lesion was missed. Conclusion: Our simulation data suggest that tube current levels can be reduced from 300 to 30 reference mAs without impairing the diagnostic information of specific CT patterns of pulmonary fungal infections.

  4. CT patterns of fungal pulmonary infections of the lung: Comparison of standard-dose and simulated low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the effect of radiation dose reduction on the appearance and visual quantification of specific CT patterns of fungal infection in immuno-compromised patients. Materials and methods: Raw data of thoracic CT scans (64 × 0.75 mm, 120 kVp, 300 reference mAs) from 41 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary fungal infection were collected. In 32 patients fungal infection could be proven (median age of 55.5 years, range 35–83). A total of 267 cuboids showing CT patterns of fungal infection and 27 cubes having no disease were reconstructed at the original and 6 simulated tube currents of 100, 40, 30, 20, 10, and 5 reference mAs. Eight specific fungal CT patterns were analyzed by three radiologists: 76 ground glass opacities, 42 ground glass nodules, 51 mixed, part solid, part ground glass nodules, 36 solid nodules, 5 lobulated nodules, 6 spiculated nodules, 14 cavitary nodules, and 37 foci of air-space disease. The standard of reference was a consensus subjective interpretation by experts whom were not readers in the study. Results: The mean sensitivity and standard deviation for detecting pathological cuboids/disease using standard dose CT was 0.91 ± 0.07. Decreasing dose did not affect sensitivity significantly until the lowest dose level of 5 mAs (0.87 ± 0.10, p = 0.012). Nodular pattern discrimination was impaired below the dose level of 30 reference mAs: specificity for fungal ‘mixed nodules’ decreased significantly at 20, 10 and 5 reference mAs (p < 0.05). At lower dose levels, classification drifted from ‘solid’ to ‘mixed nodule’, although no lesion was missed. Conclusion: Our simulation data suggest that tube current levels can be reduced from 300 to 30 reference mAs without impairing the diagnostic information of specific CT patterns of pulmonary fungal infections

  5. Assessment of doses to game animals in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was carried out to assess the dose rates to game animals in Finland affected by the radioactive caesium deposition that occurred after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine in 1986. The aim of this assessment was to obtain new information on the dose rates to mammals and birds under Finnish conditions. Dose rates were calculated using the ERICA Assessment Tool developed within the EC 6th Framework Programme. The input data consisted of measured activity concentrations of 137Cs and 134Cs in soil and lake water samples and in flesh samples of selected animal species obtained for environmental monitoring. The study sites were located in the municipality of Lammi, Southern Finland, where the average 137Cs deposition was 46.5 kBq m−2 (1 October 1987). The study sites represented the areas receiving the highest deposition in Finland after the Chernobyl accident. The selected species included moose (Alces alces), arctic hare (Lepus timidus) and several bird species: black grouse (Tetrao tetrix), hazel hen (Bonasia bonasia), mallard (Anas platurhynchos), goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) and teal (Anas crecca). For moose, dose rates were calculated for the years 1986–1990 and for the 2000s. For all other species, maximal measured activity concentrations were used. The results showed that the dose rates to these species did not exceed the default screening level of 10 μGy h−1 used as a protection criterion. The highest total dose rate (internal and external summed), 3.7 μGy h−1, was observed for the arctic hare in 1986. Although the dose rate of 3.7 μGy h−1 cannot be considered negligible given the uncertainties involved in predicting the dose rates, the possible harmful effects related to this dose rate are too small to be assessed based on current knowledge on the biological effects of low doses in mammals

  6. Functional and histological assessment of the radiobiology of normal rat lung in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the radiobiology and sensitivity of the normal rat lung to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiation. Rat thorax irradiations were carried out with x-rays or with neutrons in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Lung damage were assessed functionally with breathing rate measurement up to 180 days after irradiation and then histologically. Breathing rates 20% (∼3 σ) above the control group (sham-irradiated rats) mean were considered as positive responses to lung radiation damage. Though most responding animals demonstrated radiation induced pneumonitis (≤110 days) as well as pulmonary fibrosis (>110 days), some animals receiving neutrons plus BPA showed only the latter. The breathing rate dose response data were fit using probit analysis. The ED50 values measured for x-rays, neutron beam only, and neutrons plus BPA were 11.5±0.4 Gy, 9.2±0.5 Gy, and 6.7±0.4 Gy, respectively. The biological weighting factors for the neutron beam (n+γ), the thermal neutron dose component, and the 10B dose component were determined to be 1.2±0.1, 2.2±0.4, and 2.3±0.3, respectively. The histological dose response curves were linear. Consistent with the functional assay, the weighting factors measured histologically were 1.2±0.1 for the thermal neutron beam and 1.9±0.2 for the 10B dose component. (author)

  7. Assessment of the exposure to and dose from radon decay products in normally occupied homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.; Jensen, B.; Li, C.S.; Montassier, N.; Wasiolek, P. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States); Cavallo, A.J.; Gatsby, K.; Socolow, R.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); James, A.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The exposure to radon decay products has been assessed in seven homes in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. In two of the houses, there was a single individual who smoked cigarettes. There were a variety of heating and cooking appliances among these homes. These studies have provide 565 measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions in these houses. The median value for the equilibrium factor was 0.408 as compared with the previously employed value of 0.50. Using the recently adopted ICRP lung deposition and dosimetry model, the hourly equivalent lung dose rate per unit, radon exposure was estimated for each measured size distribution. Differences between houses with smokers present and absent were noted in the exposure conditions, but the resulting dose rate per unit of radon gas concentration was essentially the same for the two groups. Expressed in terms of ICRP`s unit of effective dose for members of the public, the mean dose rate conversion coefficient with respect to radon gas concentration found in this study was 3.8 nSv h{sup -} Bq{sup -} m{sup -3}. 26 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The MAGIC-5 CAD for nodule detection in low dose and thin slice lung CTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in developed countries. Only 10-15% of all men and women diagnosed with lung cancer live 5 years after the diagnosis. However, the 5-year survival rate for patients diagnosed in the early asymptomatic stage of the disease can reach 70%. Early-stage lung cancers can be diagnosed by detecting non-calcified small pulmonary nodules with computed tomography (CT). Computer-aided detection (CAD) could support radiologists in the analysis of the large amount of noisy images generated in screening programs, where low-dose and thin-slice settings are used. The MAGIC-5 project, funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN, Italy) and Ministero dell'Universita e della Ricerca (MUR, Italy), developed a multi-method approach based on three CAD algorithms to be used in parallel with a merging of their results: the Channeler Ant Model (CAM), based on Virtual Ant Colonies, the Dot-Enhancement/Pleura Surface Normals/VBNA (DE-PSN-VBNA), and the Region Growing Volume Plateau (RGVP). Preliminary results show quite good performances, to be improved with the refining of the single algorithm and the added value of the results merging.

  9. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Cell Proliferation in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts but not in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis and adaptive responses are 2 important biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR. In normal tissue, LDR induces hormesis as evinced by increased cell proliferation; however, whether LDR also increases tumor cell proliferation needs to be investigated. In this study, cell proliferation was assayed by total cell numbers and the Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3′ -kinase(PI3K-Akt (PI3K/AKT phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Human embryonic lung fibroblast 2BS and lung cancer NCI-H446 cell lines were irradiated with LDR at different doses (20-100 mGy. In response to 20 to 75 mGy X-rays, cell proliferation was significantly increased in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. In 2BS cells, LDR at 20 to 75 mGy also stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK pathway proteins including ERK, MEK, and Raf and of the PI3K/AKT pathway protein AKT. To test whether ERK1/2 and AKT pathway activation was involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation in 2BS cells, the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways were inhibited using their specific inhibitors, U0126 and LY294002. U0126 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and LY294002 decreased the phosphorylation of AKT; each could significantly inhibit LDR-induced 2BS cell proliferation. However, LDR did not stimulate these kinases, and kinase inhibitors also did not affect cell proliferation in the NCI-H446 cells. These results suggest that LDR stimulates cell proliferation via the activation of both MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. This finding implies the potential for applying LDR to protect normal tissues from radiotherapy without diminishing the efficacy of tumor therapy.

  10. Asbestos Surveillance Program Aachen (ASPA): initial results from baseline screening for lung cancer in asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals using low-dose multidetector-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of lung cancer in a high-risk asbestos-exposed cohort using low-dose MDCT. Of a population of 5,389 former power-plant workers, 316 were characterized as individuals at highest risk for lung cancer according to a lung-cancer risk model including age, asbestos exposure and smoking habits. Of these 316, 187 (mean age: 66.6 years) individuals were included in a prospective trial. Mean asbestos exposure time was 29.65 years and 89% were smokers. Screening was performed on a 16-slice MDCT (Siemens) with low-dose technique (10/20 mAseff.; 1 mm/0.5 mm increment). In addition to soft copy PACS reading analysis on a workstation with a dedicated lung analysis software (LungCARE; Siemens) was performed. One strongly suspicious mass and eight cases of histologically proven lung cancer were found plus 491 additional pulmonary nodules (average volume: 40.72 ml, average diameter 4.62 mm). Asbestos-related changes (pleural plaques, fibrosis) were visible in 80 individuals. Lung cancer screening in this high-risk cohort showed a prevalence of lung cancer of 4.28% (8/187) at baseline screening with an additional large number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Low-dose MDCT proved to be feasible in this highly selected population. (orig.)

  11. Phase I and pharmacological study of the pulmonary cytotoxin 4-ipomeanol on a single dose schedule in lung cancer patients: hepatotoxicity is dose limiting in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowinsky, E K; Noe, D A; Ettinger, D S; Christian, M C; Lubejko, B G; Fishman, E K; Sartorius, S E; Boyd, M R; Donehower, R C

    1993-04-15

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO), a naturally occurring pulmonary toxin, is the first cytotoxic agent to undergo clinical development based on a biochemical-biological rationale as an antineoplastic agent targeted specifically against lung cancer. This rationale is based on preclinical observations that metabolic activation and intracellular binding of IPO, as well as cytotoxicity, occurred selectively in tissues and cancers derived from tissues that are rich in specific P450 mixed function oxidase enzymes. Although tissues capable of activating IPO to cytotoxic intermediates in vitro include liver, lung, and kidney, IPO has been demonstrated in rodents and dogs to undergo in situ activation, bind covalently, and induce cytotoxicity preferentially in lung tissue at doses not similarly affecting liver or kidneys. Although the drug was devoid of antitumor activity in the conventional murine preclinical screening models, cytotoxic activity was observed in human lung cancers in vitro and in human lung cancer xenografts in vivo, adding to the rationale for clinical development. Somewhat unexpectantly, hepatocellular toxicity was the dose-limiting principal toxicity of IPO administered as a 30-min infusion every 3 weeks to patients with lung cancer. In this study, 55 patients received 254 courses at doses almost spanning 3 orders of magnitude, 6.5 to 1612 mg/m2. Transient and isolated elevations in hepatocellular enzymes, predominantly alanine aminotransferase, occurred in the majority of courses of IPO at 1032 mg/m2, which is the recommended IPO dose for subsequent phase II trials. At higher doses, hepatocellular toxicity was more severe and was often associated with right upper quadrant pain and severe malaise. Toxic effects were also noted in other tissues capable of activating IPO, including possible nephrotoxicity in a patient treated with one course of IPO at 154 mg/m2 and severe, reversible pulmonary toxicity in another patient who received nine courses of IPO at doses ranging

  12. Improved dosimetry and risk assessment for plutonium-induced lung disease using a microdosimetric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of developing radiation-induced lung cancer is currently estimated using models based on epidemiological data from populations exposed either to relatively uniform, low-LET radiation, or from uranium miners exposed to radon and its progeny. Because inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides (e.g., Pu, Am) produce nonuniform, chronic irradiation of the parenchymal region of the lung, a better scientific basis is needed for assessing the risk of developing radiation-induced disease from these radionuclides. Scientists at FIB-1 and LRRI are using a unique resource at the FIB-1, i.e., a set of about 600 lung specimens fixed in 10% formalin, and obtained from a population of workers at the Mayak Production Association, many of whom inhaled significant quantities of Pu and other alpha-emitting radionuclides during their careers. The objectives of this research are to measure the microscopic distribution of Pu by quantitative autoradiography, to determine the spatial distribution of Pu in human lung tissue with respect to specific lung structures and to determine the effect of chronic tobacco-smoke exposure on the distribution of local Pu radiation dose. The approach to analyzing these lung samples is to utilize contemporary stereological sampling and analysis techniques together with quantitative alpha-particle autoradiography. Our initial results have validated the usefulness of these lung specimens for determining Pu particle distribution with respect to anatomic location, as well as identifying normal and diseased compartments in the lung. In brief, particles were most often found associated with parenchymal and nonparenchymal scars, with other particles in organized lymphoid tissue or the interstitium of the pulmonary parenchyma (respiratory bronchioles and alveolar region). Based on comparison of one lung from a smoker and one from a nonsmoker, there was an increased fraction of Pu particles associated with tissue scars in the smoker vs the nonsmoker, and this

  13. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  14. Automated detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cascio, D; Chincarini, A; De Nunzio, G; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Gargano, G; Gori, I; Masala, G L; Martinez, A Preite; Retico, A; Santoro, M; Spinelli, C; Tarantino, T

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector computed-tomography (CT) images has been developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, consisting in a 3D dot-enhancement filter for nodule detection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The database used in this study consists of 17 low-dose CT scans reconstructed with thin slice thickness (~300 slices/scan). The preliminary results are shown in terms of the FROC analysis reporting a good sensitivity (85% range) for both internal and sub-pleural nodules at an acceptable level of false positive findings (1-9 FP/scan); the sensitivity value remains very hig...

  15. Emitted dose and lung deposition of inhaled terbutaline from Turbuhaler at different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahim, Mohamed E

    2010-05-01

    Turbuhaler has a very high resistance hence patient inhalation flow when using it would be low. The total emitted dose (TED) of 500microg terbutaline sulphate from a Bricanyl Turbuhaler was determined using a range of inhalation flows (10-60L min(-1)) with inhalation volume of 2 and 4L using a DPI sampling apparatus after one and two inhalations. The relative lung and systemic bioavailability of terbutaline from Bricanyl Turbuhaler when used by healthy subjects and COPD patients were determined after one and two inhalations at slow and fast inhalation flows using a novel urinary terbutaline pharmacokinetic method. The TED resulted from the one and two inhalations increased significantly (p<0.05) with the increase of the inhalation flow at both 2 and 4L inhalation volumes. The relative lung and systemic bioavailability after one inhalation at fast inhalation flow were significantly higher (p<0.01) than at slow inhalation flow in both healthy subjects and patients. Also the healthy subjects results were significantly higher (p<0.05) than the COPD patients after one inhalation. However after two inhalations there was no significant difference between slow and fast inhalation flow or healthy subjects and COPD patients. Hence it is essential to inhale twice and as deep and hard as possible from each dose of Turbuhaler for patients with low inspiratory flow and limited inhalation volume as they may not receive much benefit from one inhalation. PMID:20004090

  16. Radiation doses to lungs and whole body from use of tritium in luminous paint industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudran, K.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation dose to persons exposed to tritium in the luminous paint industry is reported. The biological half-life of labile tritium is observed to be 7 to 10 days. There is evidence of exposure of lung tissue from tritium labelled polystyrene deposited in the pulmonary region and of soft tissue from organically bound tritium. Delayed excretion of labile tritium in urine following removal of the individuals from tritium handling, presence of tritium in organic constituents of blood and urine, and presence of non-volatile tritium in faecal excretion have been verified. From in vitro studies using fresh bovine serum, solubilisation half-life of tritium from the labelled paint is estimated to be 35 to 70 days after the initial fast clearance. Probable annual doses to the whole body, soft tissue and lungs under the prevailing working conditions have been estimated from the urinary and faecal excretion data. It is revealed that the actual values thus estimated are likely to exceed the values estimated by the conventional technique based on urine analysis for tritiated water.

  17. The effect of rib and lung heterogeneities on the computed dose to lung in Ir-192 High-Dose-Rate breast brachytherapy: Monte Carlo versus a treatment planning system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Salehi Yazdi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Taking into account the ribs and entering the actual data for breasts, ribs, and lungs, revealed an average overestimation of the dose by a factor of 8% in the lung for TPS calculations. Therefore, the accuracy of the TPS results may be limited to regions near the implants where the treatment is planned, and is a more conservative approach for regions at boundaries with curvatures or tissues with a different material than that in the breast.

  18. Estradiol valerate and alcohol intake: dose-response assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirarte, Gina L; Reid, Larry D; de la Teja, I Sofía Ledesma; Reid, Meta L; Sánchez, Marco A; Díaz-Trujillo, Arnulfo; Aguilar-Vazquez, Azucena; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A

    2007-01-01

    Background An injection of estradiol valerate (EV) provides estradiol for a prolonged period. Recent research indicates that a single 2.0 mg injection of EV modifies a female rat's appetite for alcoholic beverages. This research extends the initial research by assessing 8 doses of EV (from .001 to 2.0 mg/female rat), as well assessing the effects of 2.0 mg EV in females with ovariectomies. Results With the administration of EV, there was a dose-related loss of bodyweight reaching the maximum loss, when it occurred, at about 4 days after injections. Subsequently, rats returned to gaining weight regularly. Of the doses tested, only the 2.0 mg dose produced a consistent increase in intake of ethanol during the time previous research indicated that the rats would show enhanced intakes. There was, however, a dose-related trend for smaller doses to enhance intakes. Rats with ovariectomies showed a similar pattern of effects, to intact rats, with the 2 mg dose. After extensive histories of intake of alcohol, both placebo and EV-treated females had estradiol levels below the average measured in females without a history of alcohol-intake. Conclusion The data support the conclusion that pharmacological doses of estradiol can produce enduring changes that are manifest as an enhanced appetite for alcoholic beverages. The effect can occur among females without ovaries. PMID:17335585

  19. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and oligometastatic lung tumors: a single institutional study with almost uniform dose with different five treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized primary and oligometastatic lung tumors by assessing efficacy and safety of 5 regimens of varying fraction size and number. One-hundred patients with primary lung cancer (n = 69) or oligometastatic lung tumors (n = 31), who underwent SBRT between May 2003 and August 2010, were included. The median age was 75 years (range, 45–88). Of them, 98 were judged to have medically inoperable disease, predominantly due to chronic illness or advanced age. SBRT was performed using 3 coplanar and 3 non-coplanar fixed beams with a standard linear accelerator. Fraction sizes were escalated by 1 Gy, and number of fractions given was decreased by 1 for every 20 included patients. Total target doses were between 50 and 56 Gy, administered as 5–9 fractions. The prescribed dose was defined at the isocenter, and median overall treatment duration was 10 days (range, 5–22). The median follow-up was 51.1 months for survivors. The 3-year local recurrence rates for primary lung cancer and oligometastasis was 6 % and 3 %, respectively. The 3-year local recurrence rates for tumor sizes ≤3 cm and >3 cm were 3 % and 14 %, respectively (p = 0.124). Additionally, other factors (fraction size, total target dose, and BED10) were not significant predictors of local control. Radiation pneumonia (≥ grade 2) was observed in 2 patients. Radiation-induced rib fractures were observed in 22 patients. Other late adverse events of greater than grade 2 were not observed. Within this dataset, we did not observe a dose response in BED10 values between 86.4 and 102.6 Gy. SBRT with doses between 50 and 56 Gy, administered over 5–9 fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without severe complications

  20. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water impairs early life lung mechanics in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a significant environmental issue affecting millions of people around the world. Exposure to arsenic during foetal development has been shown to impair somatic growth and increase the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if in utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water is capable of altering lung growth and postnatal lung mechanics. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were given drinking water containing 0, 10 (current World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum contaminant level) or 100μg/L arsenic from gestational day 8 to birth. Birth outcomes and somatic growth were monitored. Plethysmography and the forced oscillation technique were used to collect measurements of lung volume, lung mechanics, pressure-volume curves and the volume dependence of lung mechanics in male and female offspring at two, four, six and eight weeks of age. Results In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water resulted in low birth weight and impaired parenchymal lung mechanics during infancy. Male offspring were more susceptible to the effects of arsenic on growth and lung mechanics than females. All alterations to lung mechanics following in utero arsenic exposure were recovered by adulthood. Conclusions Exposure to arsenic at the current WHO maximum contaminant level in utero impaired somatic growth and the development of the lungs resulting in alterations to lung mechanics during infancy. Deficits in growth and lung development in early life may contribute to the increased susceptibility of developing chronic respiratory disease in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23419080

  1. How extensive of a 4D dataset is needed to estimate cumulative dose distribution plan evaluation metrics in conformal lung therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the number of intermediate states required to adequately approximate the clinically relevant cumulative dose to deforming/moving thoracic anatomy in four-dimensional (4D) conformal radiotherapy that uses 6 MV photons to target tumors. Four patients were involved in this study. For the first three patients, computed tomography images acquired at exhale and inhale were available; they were registered using B-spline deformation model and the computed transformation was further used to simulate intermediate states between exhale and inhale. For the fourth patient, 4D-acquired, phase-sorted datasets were available and each dataset was registered with the exhale dataset. The exhale-inhale transformation was also used to simulate intermediate states in order to compare the cumulative doses computed using the actual and the simulated datasets. Doses to each state were calculated using the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo code and dose was accumulated for scoring on the exhale anatomy via the transformation matrices for each state and time weighting factors. Cumulative doses were estimated using increasing numbers of intermediate states and compared to simpler scenarios such as a '2-state' model which used only the exhale and inhale datasets or the dose received during the average phase of the breathing cycle. Dose distributions for each modeled state as well as the cumulative doses were assessed using dose volume histograms and several treatment evaluation metrics such as mean lung dose, normal tissue complication probability, and generalized uniform dose. Although significant 'point dose' differences can exist between each breathing state, the differences decrease when cumulative doses are considered, and can become less significant yet in terms of evaluation metrics depending upon the clinical end point. This study suggests that for certain ''clinical'' end points of importance for lung cancer, satisfactory predictions

  2. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose

  3. Investigating the low-dose limits of multidetector CT in lung nodule surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, N S; Siewerdsen, J H; Patsios, D; Chung, T B

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors limiting nodule detection in thoracic computed tomography (CT) and to determine whether prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation, available from a baseline CT study, influences the minimum radiation dose at which nodule surveillance CT scans can be performed while maintaining current levels of nodule detectability. Multiple nodules varying in attenuation (-509 to + 110 HU) and diameter (1.6 to 9.5 mm) were layered in random and ordered sequences within 2 lung cylinders made of Rando lung material and suspended within a custom-built CT phantom. Multiple CT scans were performed at varying kVp (120, 100, and 80), mA (200, 150, 100, 50, 20, and 10), and beam collimation (5, 2.5, and 1.25 mm) on a four-row multidetector scanner (Lightspeed, General Electric, Milwaukee, WI) using 0.8 s gantry rotation. The corresponding range of radiation dose over which images were acquired was 0.3-26.4 mGy. Nine observers independently performed three specific tasks, namely: (1) To detect a 3.2 mm nodule of 23 HU; (2) To detect 3.2 mm nodules of varying attenuation (-509 to -154 HU); and (3) To detect nodules varying in size (1.6-9 mm) and attenuation (-509 to 110 HU). A two-alternative forced-choice test was used in order to determine the limits of nodule detection in terms of the proportion of correct responses (Pcorr, related to the area under the ROC curve) as a summary metric of observer performance. The radiation dose levels for detection of 99% of nodules in each task were as follows: Task 1 (1 mGy); Task 2 (5 mGy); and Task 3 (7 mGy). The corresponding interobserver confidence limits were 1, 5, and 10 mGy for Tasks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a fivefold increase in the radiation dose required for detection of lower-density nodules (Tasks 1 to 2). Absence of prior knowledge of the nodule size and density (Task 3) corresponds to a significant increase in the minimum required radiation dose. Significant image

  4. Thoron-in-breath as a method of internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most promising bioassay methodology for measuring the internal exposure from the chronic inhalation of thorium ore dusts is thoron-in-breath. The current detection limits are of the order 2.5 to 3 Bq of thorium lung burden and it is predicted that this can be readily reduced to better than 1 Bq. An extensive field study of the technique has been undertaken involving tests at six monthly intervals over a twelve, or in one case, eighteen month period. In excess of 350 tests on 115 workers have been made. Thorium lung burdens have been detected over the range -1 over 5 years. The technique is under review as an approved method for assessing the internal dose arising from the chronic inhalation of thorium ore dusts

  5. Erlotinib dosing-to-rash: A phase II intrapatient dose escalation and pharmacologic study of erlotinib in previously treated advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. mita (Alain); K. Papadopoulos (K.); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); G. Schwartz (G.); J. Verweij (Jaap); A. Ricart (A.); Q.S.C. Chu (Q. S C); A.W. Tolcher (A. W.); L. Wood (Lori); S.W. McCarthy (Stanley); M. Hamilton; K.K. Iwata (Kenneth); B. Wacker; K. de Witte (Karel); E.K. Rowinsky (Eric Keith)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To evaluate the anticancer activity of erlotinib in patients with previously treated, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose dose is increased to that associated with a maximal level of tolerable skin toxicity (i.e., target rash (TR)); to characterise the pharmacok

  6. A Phase I trial of dose escalation of topotecan combined with whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Ge; Wenyan Zhao; Xiaocang Ren; Yongqiang Wang; Zhigang Li; Yanqi Li; Yuee Liu; Qiang Lin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to define the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and observe the toxicity of escalating topotecan combined whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer. Methods: Patients with brain metastasis of lung cancer received conventional fractionation radiotherapy, with 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy per week, the total radiation dose was 40 Gy, while the larger lesions were boosted to 50-60 Gy. The initial dose of topotecan was 1.0 mg/m2. Escalation dose was 0.25 mg/m2. Every cohort contained at least 3 patients.If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed,the next dose level was opened for entry. These courses were repeated until DLT appeared. MTD was declared as one dose level below which DLT appeared. Results: Eighteen patients were recruited. Two cases of grade 3 leucopenia/neutropenia was observed as DLT at the level of topotecan 2.0 mg/m2. MTD of topotecan was defined as 1.75 mg/m2.The major side effects were leucopenia/neutropenia, nausea and vomiting. Conclusion: Topotecan combined with whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer is well tolerated. Maximum-tolerated dose of topotecan is 1.75 mg/m2, once a week of a total of four.

  7. SU-E-J-149: Establishing the Relationship Between Pre-Treatment Lung Ventilation, Dose, and Toxicity Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recently, there has been an interest in incorporating functional information in treatment planning especially in thoracic tumors. The rationale is that healthy lung regions need to be spared from radiation if possible to help achieve better control on toxicity. However, it is still unclear whether high functioning regions need to be spared or have more capacity to deal with the excessive radiation as compared to the compromised regions of the lung. Our goal with this work is to establish the tools by which we can establish a relationship between pre-treatment lung function, dose, and radiographic outcomes of lung toxicity. Methods: Treatment planning was performed using a single phase of a 4DCT scan, and follow-up anatomical CT scans were performed every 3 months for most patients. In this study, we developed the pipeline of tools needed to analyze such a large dataset, while trying to establish a relationship between function, dose, and outcome. Pre-treatment lung function was evaluated using a recently published technique that evaluates Fractional Regional Ventilation (FRV). All images including the FRV map and the individual follow-up anatomical CT images were all spatially matched to the planning CT using a diffusion based Demons image registration algorithm. Change in HU value was used as a metric to capture the effects of lung toxicity. To validate the findings, a radiologist evaluated the follow-up anatomical CT images and scored lung toxicity. Results: Initial experience in 1 patient shows a relationship between the pre-treatment lung function, dose and toxicity outcome. The results are also correlated to the findings by the radiologist who was blinded to the analysis or dose. Conclusion: The pipeline we have established to study this enables future studies in large retrospective studies. However, the tools are dependent on the fidelity of 4DCT reconstruction for accurate evaluation of regional ventilation. Patent Pending for the technique

  8. Reduced lung dose during radiotherapy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma: VMAT combined with active breathing control for moderate DIBH

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, GuanZhong; Wang, Ruozheng; Guo, Yujie; Zhai, Deyin; Liu, Tonghai; Lu, Jie; Chen, Jinhu; Liu, Chengxin; Yin, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung radiation injury is a critical complication of radiotherapy (RT) for thoracic esophageal carcinoma (EC). Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility and dosimetric effects of reducing the lung tissue irradiation dose during RT for thoracic EC by applying volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH). Methods Fifteen patients with thoracic EC were randomly sele...

  9. Mesorad dose assessment model. Volume 1. Technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MESORAD is a dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Using release data for as many as 50 radionuclides, the model calculates: (1) external doses resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides contained in elevated or deposited material; (2) internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation; and (3) total whole-body doses. External doses from airborne material are calculated using semi-infinite and finite cloud approximations. At each stage in model execution, the appropriate approximation is selected after considering the cloud dimensions. Atmospheric processes are represented in MESORAD by a combination of Lagrangian puff and Gaussian plume dispersion models, a source depletion (deposition velocity) dry deposition model, and a wet deposition model using washout coefficients based on precipitation rates

  10. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 ± 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising

  11. The assessment of personal dose due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental basis of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is discussed and a number of considerations in the measurement of thermoluminescence described, with particular reference to CaSO4:Dy. The steps taken to convert a thermoluminescence measurement to an exposure and then an absorbed dose are outlined. The calculation of effective dose equivalents due to external exposure to γ-radiation in a number of situations commonly encountered in a uranium mine is discussed. Factors which may affect the accuracy of external dose assessments are described

  12. Role of lung scanning in assessing the resectability of bronchial carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, D A; Hawkins, T.; Gibson, G. J.; Nariman, S

    1983-01-01

    Ventilation and perfusion lung scans were performed in 58 patients before operation for bronchial carcinoma to determine in which patients the lung scan was most useful for assessing mediastinal spread and resectability of the tumour. Perfusion of the affected lung was less with larger and more centrally situated tumours. Perfusion was also less for left-sided than for right-sided tumours but this is explained by the normal differential perfusion of the right and left lungs. The lung scan was...

  13. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography: Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2003, the department of medical imaging at the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario, became the first Canadian site of the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program (I-ELCAP). We report the results from the first 1000 baseline studies. Between June 2003 and December 2005, we enrolled 1000 high-risk smokers (that is, smokers with a history of a least 10 pack years, or the equivalent of one pack daily for 10 years), aged 55 years or older. A low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) (40 to 60 mA, 120 kV) was performed with 1.0mm to 1.25 collimation. Nodules found at baseline were followed according to the I-ELCAP protocol: 1) no noncalcified nodules (NCNs) or NCNs ≤ 4 mm or nonsolid nodules < 8 mm, annual repeat: 2) NCNs ≥ 5mm or nonsolid nodules ≥ 8 mm, 3-month follow up: or 3) nonsolid nodules ≥ 15 mm, antibiotics and 1-month follow-up. The first 100 study participants were aged 63 years, standard deviation (SD) 6 years, with a smoking history of 38 pack years, SD 22 pack years; 662 (66%) were former smokers, and 338 (34%) were current smokers; 453 (45%) were men, and 547 (55%) were women. Of the participants, 256 (26%) had a positive baseline low-dose computed tomography (LCDT) scan; 227 (23%) were followed after 3 months and 15 (1.6%) after 1 month; 7 (0.7%) received a contrast-enhanced CT and 6 (0.6%) an immediate CT-guided biopsy. Twenty-six invasive procedures were performed: 22 CT-guided biopsies, 1 ultrasound-guided lymph node metastasis biopsy, 1 bronchoscopic biopsy and 2 surgeries. The malignancy rate of the invasive procedures was 85%. Overall, the malignancy prevalence is 2.2%. Of the malignancies, 20 are lung carcinomas: 19 non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) (14 adenocarcinoma or bronchioalveolar carcinoma [BAC], 4 squamous carcinoma, and 1 large-cell carcinoma) and 1 small-cell carcinoma; 15 (78%) of the NSCLCs are Stage 1. Fourteen patients underwent surgery (1 pneumonectomy, 9 lobectomies, and 4 segmentectomies). Our

  14. Updated radiological dose assessment of Bikini and Eneu Islands at Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is part of a continuing effort to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Radionuclide concentration data developed at Bikini Atoll since 1977 have been used in conjunction with recent dietary information and current dose models to develop the annual dose rate and 30- and 50-y integral doses presented here for Bikini and Eneu Island living patterns. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant exposure pathway--it contributes more than 50% of the total dose--and external gamma exposure is the second most significant pathway. Other pathways evaluated are the marine food chain, drinking water, and inhalation. Cesium-137 produces more than 85% of the predicted dose; 90Sr is the second most significant radionuclide; 60Co contributes to the external gamma exposure in varying degrees, but is a small part of the total predicted dose; the transuranic radionuclides contribute a small portion of the total predicted lung and bone doses but do present a long-term source of exposure. Maximum annual dose rates for Bikini Island are about 1 rem/y for the whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and about 1.9 rem/y when imports are unavailable. Maximum annual dose rates for Eneu Island when imports are available are 130 mrem/y for the whole body and 136 mrem/y for bone marrow. Similar doses when imported foods are unavailable are 245 and 263 mrem/y, respectively. The 30-y integral doses for Bikini Island are about 23 rem for whole body and bone marrow when imported foods are available and more than 40 rem when imports are unavailable. The Eneu Island 30-y integral doses for whole body and bone marrow are about 3 rem when imports are available and 5.5 and 6.1 rem, respectively, when imports are unavailable. Doses from living patterns involving some combination of Bikini and Eneu Islands fall between the doses listed above for each island separately

  15. External dose assessment in the Ukraine following the Chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Remi Jordan Lesartre

    While the physiological effects of radiation exposure have been well characterized in general, it remains unclear what the relationship is between large-scale radiological events and psychosocial behavior outcomes in individuals or populations. To investigate this, the National Science Foundation funded a research project in 2008 at the University of Colorado in collaboration with Colorado State University to expand the knowledge of complex interactions between radiation exposure, perception of risk, and psychosocial behavior outcomes by modeling outcomes for a representative sample of the population of the Ukraine which had been exposed to radiocontaminant materials released by the reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. In service of this project, a methodology (based substantially on previously published models specific to the Chernobyl disaster and the Ukrainian population) was developed for daily cumulative effective external dose and dose rate assessment for individuals in the Ukraine for as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. A software platform was designed and produced to estimate effective external dose and dose rate for individuals based on their age, occupation, and location of residence on each day between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 2009. A methodology was developed to transform published 137Cs soil deposition contour maps from the Comprehensive Atlas of Caesium Deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl Accident into a geospatial database to access these data as a radiological source term. Cumulative effective external dose and dose rate were computed for each individual in a 703-member cohort of Ukrainians randomly selected to be representative of the population of the country as a whole. Error was estimated for the resulting individual dose and dose rate values with Monte Carlo simulations. Distributions of input parameters for the dose assessment methodology were compared to computed dose and dose rate estimates to determine which

  16. Low dose elective brain irradiation in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elective brain irradiation (EBI) in a dosage of 3000 rad (midplane) in 2 weeks (nominal standard dose (NSD) = 1314 ret) has proven highly effective in preventing initial brain relapse in small cell lung carcinoma. However, the optimal radiation dose for EBI is unknown. 55 patients (31 with regional disease, 24 with extensive disease) without brain metastases were treated with a 4 drug chemotherapy program, (lomustine (CCNU), methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, vincristine) plus radiotherapy (R.T.), 3000 rad in 2 weeks to the primary chest lesion and were randomized to EBI or a control group. The EBI consisted of 2400 rad whole brain, midplane, in 8 fractions, 10 days (NSD = 1130 ret) given at the same time as the R.T. to the primary (3 weeks post-initial chemotherapy). Though all 54 evaluable patients received CCNU 50 mg/M2q. 6 weeks, there were 5 initial brain relapses among 31 control patients (16%) vs none in the 23 EBI patients. The time at risk for recurrence was similar in the two groups, i.e. 31 weeks median in the EBI and 32 weeks in the no-EBI patients. Brain relapses occurred in 2/17 with limited disease and 3/14 with extensive disease. It appears that 2400 rad in 8 fractions is as effective for EBI as larger doses. Toxicity was limited to alopecia. Survival was not significantly affected by EBI, though there is a suggestion of improvement in the regional group

  17. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes

  18. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Delis [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes

  19. Development of a real-time radiological dose assessment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil

    1997-07-01

    A radiological dose assessment system named FADAS has been developed. This system is necessary to estimated the radiological consequences against a nuclear accident. Mass-consistent wind field module was adopted for the generation of wind field over the whole domain using the several measured wind data. Random-walk dispersion module is used for the calculation of the distribution of radionuclides in the atmosphere. And volume-equivalent numerical integration method has been developed for the assessment of external gamma exposure given from a randomly distributed radioactive materials and a dose data library has been made for rapid calculation. Field tracer experiments have been carried out for the purpose of analyzing the site-specific meteorological characteristics and increasing the accuracy of wind field generation and atmospheric dispersion module of FADAS. At first, field tracer experiment was carried out over flat terrain covered with rice fields using the gas samplers which were designed and manufactured by the staffs of KAERI. The sampled gas was analyzed using gas chromatograph. SODAR and airsonde were used to measure the upper wind. Korean emergency preparedness system CARE was integrated at Kori 4 nuclear power plants in 1995. One of the main functions of CARE is to estimate the radiological dose. The developed real-time dose assessment system FADAS was adopted in CARE as a tool for the radiological dose assessment. (author). 79 refs., 52 tabs., 94 figs.

  20. Assessment of the expected harm from prenatal irradiation with low doses and low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity of the coefficients, suggested by ICRP (Publication 45) for assessment of the risk from prenatal irradiation with low doses and low dose rates is discussed. This includes: development of lethal and curable cancer, severe genetic defects, death before implantation and retarded mental development. Summarizing the individual assessment, the total harm from prenatal irradiation with 1 mvSv have been estimated at 4,9.104 lost years. The expected harm from the additional irradiation of the Bulgarian population during the first year after the Chernobyl accident is evaluated on that basis, taking into account the number of expected pregnancies among Bulgarian women in reproductive age and the individual effective equivalent doses. 15 refs

  1. Optimization strategies for pulsed low-dose-rate IMRT of recurrent lung and head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shengwei; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Lin, Muhan; Chen, Xiaoming; Guo, Ming; Chen, Fu; Chen, Lili; Ma, Charlie Ming

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed low-dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been proven to be a valid method of reirradiation. Previous studies of recurrent cancer radiotherapy were mainly based on conventional 3D CRT and VMAT delivery techniques. There are difficulties in IMRT planning using existing commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) to meet the PLDR protocol. This work focuses on PLDR using ten-field IMRT and a commercial TPS for two specific sites: recurrent lung cancers and head and neck cancers. Our PLDR protocol requires that the maximum dose to the PTV be less than 0.4 Gy and the mean dose to be 0.2 Gy per field. We investigated various planning strategies to meet the PLDR requirements for 20 lung and head and neck patients. The PTV volume for lung cases ranged from 101.7 to 919.4 cm3 and the maximum dose to the PTV ranged from 0.22 to 0.39 Gy. The PTV volume for head and neck cases ranged from 66.2 to 282.1 cm3 and the maximum dose to the PTV ranged from 0.21 to 0.39 Gy. With special beam arrangements and dosimetry parameters, it is feasible to use a commercial TPS to generate quality PLDR IMRT plans for lung and head and neck reirradiation. PMID:24892337

  2. Is a reduction in radiation lung volume and dose necessary with paclitaxel chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate and quantify the effect of irradiated lung volume, radiation dose, and paclitaxel chemotherapy on the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in breast cancer patients with positive lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: We previously reported the incidence of RP among 41 patients with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant paclitaxel-containing chemotherapy. We recorded the central lung distance, a measure of the extent of lung included in the RT volume, in these patients. We used this measure and the historical and observed rates of RP in our series to model the lung tolerance to RT in patients receiving chemotherapy (CHT) both with and without paclitaxel. To evaluate the risk factors for the development of RP, we performed a case-control study comparing paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP with those who did not, and a second case-control study comparing patients receiving paclitaxel in addition to standard CHT/RT (n = 41) and controls receiving standard CHT/RT alone (n 192). Results: The actuarial rate of RP in the paclitaxel-treated group was 15.4% compared with 0.9% among breast cancer patients treated with RT and non-paclitaxel-containing CHT. Our mathematical model found that the effective lung tolerance for patients treated with paclitaxel was reduced by approximately 24%. No statistically significant difference was found with regard to the dose delivered to specific radiation fields, dose per fraction, central lung distance, or percentage of lung irradiated in the case-control study of paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP compared with those who did not. In the comparison of 41 patients receiving RT and CHT with paclitaxel and 192 matched controls receiving RT and CHT without paclitaxel, the only significant differences identified were the more frequent use of a supraclavicular radiation field and a decrease in the RT lung dose among the paclitaxel-treated patients. This finding indicates that the

  3. Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present no simple statement can be made relative to the role of radionuclidic lung studies in the pediatric population. It is safe to assume that they will be used with increasing frequency for research and clinical applications because of their sensitivity and ready applicability to the pediatric patient. Methods comparable to those used in adults can be used in children older than 4 years. In younger children, however, a single injection of 133Xe in solution provides an index of both regional perfusion and ventilation which is easier to accomplish. This method is particularly valuable in infants and neonates because it is rapid, requires no patient cooperation, results in a very low radiation dose, and can be repeated in serial studies. Radionuclidic studies of ventilation and perfusion can be performed in almost all children if the pediatrician and the nuclear medicine specialist have motivation and ingenuity. S

  4. Inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma growth using survivint34a by low-dose systematic administration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Shan; Chunting Wang; Li Yang; Li Juan Chen; Hong Xin Deng; Han Shuo Yang; Zhimian Li; Zhiyong Li; Li Pan; Fei Leng; Yuquan Wei

    2010-06-01

    Anti-apoptosis plays an important role in tumour formation and development. Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, which is a target for anti-cancer drug exploitation was replaced as development. We investigated the role of the homo dominant-negative mutant Survivin-T34A in suppressing human lung adenocarcinomas (A549). The anti-tumour activity of HSurvivinT34A plasmid was evaluated in the A549 cell line and nude mice bearing A549 subcutaneous tumours. Low-dose systemic administration was continuously used. The HSurvivinT34A plasmid (5 g/one) complexed with a cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) significantly inhibited tumour growth in our model. We observed microvessel density degradation by CD31 immunohistochemistry and apoptotic cell increase by TUNEL assay, PI staining and flow cytometric analysis in the treated group. The present findings suggest that the HSurvivinT34A plasmid complexed with a cationic liposome may provide an effective approach to inhibit the growth of human lung adenocarcinomas in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Dose differences in intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans calculated with pencil beam and Monte Carlo for lung SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Zhuang, Tingliang; Stephans, Kevin; Videtic, Gregory; Raithel, Stephen; Djemil, Toufik; Xia, Ping

    2015-01-01

    For patients with medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy, early treatment plans were based on a simpler dose calculation algorithm, the pencil beam (PB) calculation. Because these patients had the longest treatment follow-up, identifying dose differences between the PB calculated dose and Monte Carlo calculated dose is clinically important for understanding of treatment outcomes. Previous studies found significant dose differences between the PB dose calculation and more accurate dose calculation algorithms, such as convolution-based or Monte Carlo (MC), mostly for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) plans. The aim of this study is to investigate whether these observed dose differences also exist for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for both centrally and peripherally located tumors. Seventy patients (35 central and 35 peripheral) were retrospectively selected for this study. The clinical IMRT plans that were initially calculated with the PB algorithm were recalculated with the MC algorithm. Among these paired plans, dosimetric parameters were compared for the targets and critical organs. When compared to MC calculation, PB calculation overestimated doses to the planning target volumes (PTVs) of central and peripheral tumors with different magnitudes. The doses to 95% of the central and peripheral PTVs were overestimated by 9.7% ± 5.6% and 12.0% ± 7.3%, respectively. This dose overestimation did not affect doses to the critical organs, such as the spinal cord and lung. In conclusion, for NSCLC treated with IMRT, dose differences between the PB and MC calculations were different from that of 3D CRT. No significant dose differences in critical organs were observed between the two calculations. PMID:26699560

  6. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia detected at low-dose CT for lung cancer screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Bae, Kyung Soo; Kim, Ho Cheol [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, radiologic findings and clinical significance of the simple pulmonary eosinophilia (SPE) that was diagnosed among the asymptomatic patients who underwent low-dose CT scans for the early detection of lung cancer. From June 2003 to May 2005, 1,239 asymptomatic patients (1,275 examinations) who visited the health promotion center in our hospital and who underwent low-dose CT were enrolled in this study. SPE was defined as the presence of > 500 eosinophils per microliter of peripheral blood and the presence of abnormal parenchymal lesions such as nodules, airspace consolidation or areas of ground-glass attenuation (GGA) on CT, and there was spontaneous resolution or migration of the lesions on the follow-up examination. We analyzed the CT findings of SPE and we investigated the relationship between the occurrence of SPE and the season, smoking and the presence of parasite infestation. 36 patients were finally diagnosed as having SPE; this was 24% of the 153 patients who were diagnosed with parasite infestation and 2.8% of the total low-dose CT scans. These 36 patients consisted of 31 men and 5 women with a mean age 45.7 years. There was no significant relationship between SPE and the presence of parasite infestation, smoking or gender. Among the patients with peripheral blood eosinophilia, the eosinophil count was significantly higher in the patients with SPE than that in the patients without pulmonary infiltration ({rho} < 0.05). SPE more frequently occurred in winter and spring than in summer and autumn ({rho} < 0.05). The CT findings were single or multiple nodules in 18 patients, nodules and focal GGA in 9 patients and GGA only in 9 patients. Most of the nodules were less than 10 mm (88%, 49/56) in diameter and they showed an ill-defined margin (82%, n = 46); 30% of the nodules (n = 17) showed a halo around them. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia can be suggested as the cause if single or multiple ill-defined nodules

  7. Radon dose assessment in underground mines in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T O; Rocha, Z; Cruz, P; Gouvea, V A; Siqueira, J B; Oliveira, A H

    2014-07-01

    Underground miners are internally exposed to radon, thoron and their short-lived decay products during the mineral processing. There is also an external exposure due to the gamma emitters present in the rock and dust of the mine. However, the short-lived radon decay products are recognised as the main radiation health risk. When inhaled, they are deposited in the respiratory system and may cause lung cancer. To address this concern, concentration measurements of radon and its progeny were performed, the equilibrium factor was determined and the effective dose received was estimated in six Brazilian underground mines. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman. The annual effective dose for the miners was estimated according to United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation methodologies. The mean value of the equilibrium factor was 0.4. The workers' estimated effective dose ranged from 1 to 21 mSv a(-1) (mean 9 mSv a(-1)). PMID:24723186

  8. Radon dose assessment in underground mines in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T O; Rocha, Z; Cruz, P; Gouvea, V A; Siqueira, J B; Oliveira, A H

    2014-07-01

    Underground miners are internally exposed to radon, thoron and their short-lived decay products during the mineral processing. There is also an external exposure due to the gamma emitters present in the rock and dust of the mine. However, the short-lived radon decay products are recognised as the main radiation health risk. When inhaled, they are deposited in the respiratory system and may cause lung cancer. To address this concern, concentration measurements of radon and its progeny were performed, the equilibrium factor was determined and the effective dose received was estimated in six Brazilian underground mines. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman. The annual effective dose for the miners was estimated according to United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation methodologies. The mean value of the equilibrium factor was 0.4. The workers' estimated effective dose ranged from 1 to 21 mSv a(-1) (mean 9 mSv a(-1)).

  9. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  10. Assessing exposure risk for dust storm events-associated lung function decrement in asthmatics and implications for control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Liao, Chung-Min

    2013-04-01

    Asian dust storms (ADS) events are seasonally-based meteorological phenomena that exacerbate chronic respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess human health risk from airborne dust exposure during ADS events in Taiwan. A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed based on exposure and experimental data to quantify ADS events induced lung function decrement. The study reanalyzed experimental data from aerosol challenge in asthmatic individuals to construct the dose-response relationship between inhaled dust aerosol dose and decreasing percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1). An empirical lung deposition model was used to predict deposition fraction for size specific dust aerosols in pulmonary regions. The toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models were used to simulate dust aerosols binding kinetics in lung airway in that %FEV1 change was also predicted. The mask respirators were applied to control the inhaled dose under dust aerosols exposure. Our results found that only 2% probability the mild ADS events were likely to cause %FEV1 decrement higher than 5%. There were 50% probability of decreasing %FEV1 exceeding 16.9, 18.9, and 7.1% in north, center, and south Taiwan under severe ADS events, respectively. Our result implicates that the use of activated carbon of mask respirators has the best efficacy for reducing inhaled dust aerosol dose, by which the %FEV1 decrement can be reduced up to less than 1%.

  11. Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Escalation Using SBRT Boost for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Peter, Justin; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Patel, Salil; Osibanjo, Oluwademilade; Safran, Howard; Curran, Bruce; DiPetrillo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard chemoradiation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCa) results in suboptimal outcomes with a high rate of local failure and poor overall survival. We hypothesize that dose escalation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost could improve upon these results. We present here a study evaluating the dosimetric feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Anonymized CT data sets from five randomly selected patients with stage III NSCLCa undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy in our department with disease volumes appropriate for SBRT boost were selected. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) plans to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions were generated follow by SBRT plans to two dose levels, 16 Gy in two fractions and 28 Gy in two fractions. SBRT plans and total composite (3D-CRT and SBRT) were optimized and evaluated for target coverage and dose to critical structures; lung, esophagus, cord, and heart. Results: All five plans met predetermined target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints. PTV V95 was equal to or greater than 95% in all cases. The cumulative lung V20 and V5 of the combined 3D-CRT and SBRT plans were less than or equal to 30 and 55%, respectively. The 5 cc esophageal dose was less than 12 Gy for all low and high dose SBRT plans. The cumulative dose to the esophagus was also acceptable with less than 10% of the esophagus receiving doses in excess of 50 Gy. The cumulative spinal cord dose was less than 33 Gy and heart V25 was less than 5%. Conclusion: The combination of chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy followed by SBRT boost to gross disease at the primary tumor and involved regional lymph nodes is feasible with respect to normal tissue dose constraints in this dosimetric pilot study. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of this approach is being undertaken. PMID:23057009

  12. A decrease in lung cancer mortality following the introduction of low-dose chest CT screening in Hitachi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tohru; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kusano, Suzushi; Chonan, Tatsuya; Hayashihara, Kenji; Suito, Tetsushi; Endo, Katsuyuki

    2012-12-01

    Recent US clinical trial demonstrated that CT screening prevents lung cancer death among high risk individuals. However, it remains unclear whether wide implementation of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer can decrease mortality in the community. Among residents in Hitachi City (Japan), where nearly 40% of inhabitants aged 50-69 years were estimated to have participated in the screening at least once from 1998 through 2009, the trend of lung cancer mortality was described in relation to the timing of implementation of the CT screening. Cancer mortality data were obtained from regional cancer registry and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of lung cancer was calculated for each 5-year period during 1995-2009. In both men and women aged 60 years or older, age-specific lung cancer mortality rates were generally lower during 2005-2009 as compared with those during 1995-2004. For combined men and women aged 50-79 years, SMR was nearly unity prior to or during introductory phase of CT screening and during early period of implementation; however, it was significantly decreased during 2005-2009, well after the implementation of CT screening, with SMR (95% confidence interval) being 0.76 (0.67-0.86). Results suggest that wide implementation of low-dose chest CT screening may decrease lung cancer mortality in the community 4-8 years after introduction of the screening.

  13. Radiotherapy dose calculation on KV cone-beam CT image for lung tumor using the CIRS calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changsheng; Cao, Jianping; Yin, Yong; Zhu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    On-board kilovoltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are used predominantly for the setup of patients' positioning. The image data can also potentially be used for dose calculation with the precise calibration of Hounsfield units (HU) to electron density (HU-density). CBCT calibration was analyzed in this study. A clinical treatment planning system was employed for CT and KV CBCT image to dose calculations and subsequent comparisons. Two HU-density tables were generated using the Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) phantom. The results showed that a maximum ∼4% dose discrepancy was observed for inserts. The single field isodose curves were very close. The lung clinical patient study indicated that the volume of lung tumor that achieved the prescribed dose in CBCT was lower than in the CT plan. Our study showed that the dosimetric accuracy of CBCT-based dose calculation for lung tumor is acceptable only for the purpose of dosimetric checks with calibration applied. KV CBCT images cannot replace traditional CT images for dose calculation accuracy. PMID:26766975

  14. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides

  15. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  16. Urinary tobacco smoke-constituent biomarkers for assessing risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Min; Butler, Lesley M; Stepanov, Irina; Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-01-15

    Tobacco-constituent biomarkers are metabolites of specific compounds present in tobacco or tobacco smoke. Highly reliable analytic methods, based mainly on mass spectrometry, have been developed for quantitation of these biomarkers in both urine and blood specimens. There is substantial interindividual variation in smoking-related lung cancer risk that is determined in part by individual variability in the uptake and metabolism of tobacco smoke carcinogens. Thus, by incorporating these biomarkers in epidemiologic studies, we can potentially obtain a more valid and precise measure of in vivo carcinogen dose than by using self-reported smoking history, ultimately improving the estimation of smoking-related lung cancer risk. Indeed, we have demonstrated this by using a prospective study design comparing biomarker levels in urine samples collected from smokers many years before their development of cancer versus those in their smoking counterparts without a cancer diagnosis. The following urinary metabolites were associated with lung cancer risk, independent of smoking intensity and duration: cotinine plus its glucuronide, a biomarker of nicotine uptake; 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL), a biomarker of the tobacco carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK); and r-1-,t-2,3,c-4-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrene (PheT), a biomarker of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These results provide several possible new directions for using tobacco smoke-constituent biomarkers in lung cancer prevention, including improved lung cancer risk assessment, intermediate outcome determination in prevention trials, and regulation of tobacco products.

  17. TSD-DOSE: A radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfingston, M.; Arnish, J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.

    1998-10-14

    Past practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) field facilities resulted in the presence of trace amounts of radioactive materials in some hazardous chemical wastes shipped from these facilities. In May 1991, the DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping all hazardous waste until procedures could be established to ensure that only nonradioactive hazardous waste would be shipped from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. To aid in assessing the potential impacts of shipments of mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes, a radiological assessment computer model (or code) was developed on the basis of detailed assessments of potential radiological exposures and doses for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. The model, called TSD-DOSE, is designed to incorporate waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste-handling operations at a TSD facility. The code is intended to provide both DOE and commercial TSD facilities with a rapid and cost-effective method for assessing potential human radiation exposures from the processing of chemical wastes contaminated with trace amounts of radionuclides.

  18. Dose estimates for the solid waste performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittman, P.D.

    1994-08-30

    The Solid Waste Performance Assessment calculations by PNL in 1990 were redone to incorporate changes in methods and parameters since then. The ten scenarios found in their report were reduced to three, the Post-Drilling Resident, the Post-Excavation Resident, and an All Pathways Irrigator. In addition, estimates of population dose to people along the Columbia River are also included. The attached report describes the methods and parameters used in the calculations, and derives dose factors for each scenario. In addition, waste concentrations, ground water concentrations, and river water concentrations needed to reach the performance objectives of 100 mrem/yr and 500 person-rem/yr are computed. Internal dose factors from DOE-0071 were applied when computing internal dose. External dose rate factors came from the GENII Version 1.485 software package. Dose calculations were carried out on a spreadsheet. The calculations are described in detail in the report for 63 nuclides, including 5 not presently in the GENII libraries. The spreadsheet calculations were checked by comparison with GENII, as described in Appendix D.

  19. Dose estimates for the solid waste performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Solid Waste Performance Assessment calculations by PNL in 1990 were redone to incorporate changes in methods and parameters since then. The ten scenarios found in their report were reduced to three, the Post-Drilling Resident, the Post-Excavation Resident, and an All Pathways Irrigator. In addition, estimates of population dose to people along the Columbia River are also included. The attached report describes the methods and parameters used in the calculations, and derives dose factors for each scenario. In addition, waste concentrations, ground water concentrations, and river water concentrations needed to reach the performance objectives of 100 mrem/yr and 500 person-rem/yr are computed. Internal dose factors from DOE-0071 were applied when computing internal dose. External dose rate factors came from the GENII Version 1.485 software package. Dose calculations were carried out on a spreadsheet. The calculations are described in detail in the report for 63 nuclides, including 5 not presently in the GENII libraries. The spreadsheet calculations were checked by comparison with GENII, as described in Appendix D

  20. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Mishra, Pankaj, E-mail: wcai@lroc.harvard.edu, E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Lewis, John H., E-mail: wcai@lroc.harvard.edu, E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Seco, Joao [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically feasible method of calculating actual delivered dose distributions for patients who have significant respiratory motion during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: A novel approach was proposed to calculate the actual delivered dose distribution for SBRT lung treatment. This approach can be specified in three steps. (1) At the treatment planning stage, a patient-specific motion model is created from planning 4DCT data. This model assumes that the displacement vector field (DVF) of any respiratory motion deformation can be described as a linear combination of some basis DVFs. (2) During the treatment procedure, 2D time-varying projection images (either kV or MV projections) are acquired, from which time-varying “fluoroscopic” 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. The DVF of each timepoint in the time-varying reconstruction is an optimized linear combination of basis DVFs such that the 2D projection of the 3D volume at this timepoint matches the projection image. (3) 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D reconstructed fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach was first validated using two modified digital extended cardio-torso (XCAT) phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions. The estimated doses were compared to the dose that would be calculated for routine 4DCT-based planning and to the actual delivered dose that was calculated using “ground truth” XCAT phantoms at all timepoints. The approach was also tested using one set of patient data, which demonstrated the application of our method in a clinical scenario. Results: For the first XCAT phantom that has a mostly regular breathing pattern, the errors in 95% volume dose (D95) are 0.11% and 0.83%, respectively for 3D fluoroscopic images

  1. Quantitative assessment of global lung inflammation following radiation therapy using FDG PET/CT: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulla, Sarah; Salavati, Ali; Saboury, Babak; Torigian, Drew A. [University of Pennsylvania, and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Basu, Sandip [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tata Memorial Center Annexe, Radiation Medicine Center, Bombay (India); Alavi, Abass [University of Pennsylvania, and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Radiation pneumonitis is the most severe dose-limiting complication in patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify global lung inflammation following radiation therapy using FDG PET/CT. We studied 20 subjects with stage III non-small-cell lung carcinoma who had undergone FDG PET/CT imaging before and after radiation therapy. On all PET/CT studies, the sectional lung volume (sLV) of each lung was calculated from each slice by multiplying the lung area by slice thickness. The sectional lung glycolysis (sLG) was calculated by multiplying the sLV and the lung sectional mean standardized uptake value (sSUVmean) on each slice passing through the lung. The lung volume (LV) was calculated by adding all sLVs from the lung, and the global lung glycolysis (GLG) was calculated by adding all sLGs from the lung. Finally, the lung SUVmean was calculated by dividing the GLG by the LV. The amount of inflammation in the lung parenchyma directly receiving radiation therapy was calculated by subtracting tumor measurements from GLG. In the lung directly receiving radiation therapy, the lung parenchyma SUVmean and global lung parenchymal glycolysis were significantly increased following therapy. In the contralateral lung (internal control), no significant changes were observed in lung SUVmean or GLG following radiation therapy. Global lung parenchymal glycolysis and lung parenchymal SUVmean may serve as potentially useful biomarkers to quantify lung inflammation on FDG PET/CT following thoracic radiation therapy. (orig.)

  2. Construction of average adult Japanese voxel phantoms for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted the adult reference voxel phantoms based on the physiological and anatomical reference data of Caucasian on October, 2007. The organs and tissues of these phantoms were segmented on the basis of ICRP Publication 103. In future, the dose coefficients for internal dose and dose conversion coefficients for external dose calculated using the adult reference voxel phantoms will be widely used for the radiation protection fields. On the other hand, the body sizes and organ masses of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasian. In addition, there are some cases that the anatomical characteristics such as body sizes, organ masses and postures of subjects influence the organ doses in dose assessment for medical treatments and radiation accident. Therefore, it was needed to use human phantoms with average anatomical characteristics of Japanese. The authors constructed the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms by modifying the previously developed high-resolution adult male (JM) and female (JF) voxel phantoms. It has been modified in the following three aspects: (1) The heights and weights were agreed with the Japanese averages; (2) The masses of organs and tissues were adjusted to the Japanese averages within 10%; (3) The organs and tissues, which were newly added for evaluation of the effective dose in ICRP Publication 103, were modeled. In this study, the organ masses, distances between organs, specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and dose conversion coefficients of these phantoms were compared with those evaluated using the ICRP adult reference voxel phantoms. This report provides valuable information on the anatomical and dosimetric characteristics of the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms developed as reference phantoms of adult Japanese. (author)

  3. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

  4. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients

  5. Assessment of out-of-field absorbed dose and equivalent dose in proton fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clasie, Ben; Wroe, Andrew; Kooy, Hanne; Depauw, Nicolas; Flanz, Jay; Paganetti, Harald; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    . Conclusions: The dose deposited immediately downstream of the primary field, in these cases, is dominated by internally produced neutrons; therefore, scattered and scanned fields may have similar risk of second cancer in this region. The authors confirm that there is a reduction in the out-of-field dose in active scanning but the effect decreases with depth. GEANT4 is suitable for simulating the dose deposited outside the primary field. The agreement with measurements is comparable to or better than the agreement reported for other implementations of Monte Carlo models. Depending on the position, the absorbed dose outside the primary field is dominated by contributions from primary protons that may or may not have scattered in the brass collimating devices. This is noteworthy as the quality factor of the low LET protons is well known and the relative dose risk in this region can thus be assessed accurately.

  6. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This study evaluates the dosimetric benefits and feasibility of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in the treatment of lung tumors. The technique has two distinct features--deep inspiration, which reduces lung density, and breath-hold, which immobilizes lung tumors, thereby allowing for reduced margins. Both of these properties can potentially reduce the amount of normal lung tissue in the high-dose region, thus reducing morbidity and improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Five patients treated for non-small cell lung carcinoma (Stage IIA-IIIB) received computed tomography (CT) scans under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing, DIBH, shallow inspiration breath-hold, and shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans were used to generate 3-dimensional conformal treatment plans for comparison, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans determined the extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry, and for DIBH, modified slow vital capacity maneuvers. Planning target volumes (PTVs) for free-breathing plans included a margin for setup error (0.75 cm) plus a margin equal to the extent of tumor motion due to respiration (1-2 cm). Planning target volumes for DIBH plans included the same margin for setup error, with a reduced margin for residual uncertainty in tumor position (0.2-0.5 cm) as determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies. To simulate the effects of respiration-gated treatments and estimate the role of target immobilization alone (i.e., without the benefit of reduced lung density), a third plan is generated from the free-breathing scan using a PTV with the same margins as for DIBH plans. Results: The treatment plan comparison suggests that, on average, the DIBH technique can reduce the volume of lung receiving more than 25 Gy by 30% compared to free

  7. Assessing nodule detection on lung cancer screening CT: the effects of tube current modulation and model observer selection on detectability maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. M.; Noo, F.; McMillan, K.; Young, S.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening using low dose CT has been shown to reduce lung cancer related mortality and been approved for widespread use in the US. These scans keep radiation doses low while maximizing the detection of suspicious lung lesions. Tube current modulation (TCM) is one technique used to optimize dose, however limited work has been done to assess TCM's effect on detection tasks. In this work the effect of TCM on detection is investigated throughout the lung utilizing several different model observers (MO). 131 lung nodules were simulated at 1mm intervals in each lung of the XCAT phantom. A Sensation 64 TCM profile was generated for the XCAT phantom and 2500 noise realizations were created using both TCM and a fixed TC. All nodules and noise realizations were reconstructed for a total of 262 (left and right lungs) nodule reconstructions and 10 000 XCAT lung reconstructions. Single-slice Hotelling (HO) and channelized Hotelling (CHO) observers, as well as a multislice CHO were used to assess area-under-the-curve (AUC) as a function of nodule location in both the fixed TC and TCM cases. As expected with fixed TC, nodule detectability was lowest through the shoulders and leveled off below mid-lung; with TCM, detectability was unexpectedly highest through the shoulders, dropping sharply near the mid-lung and then increasing into the abdomen. Trends were the same for all model observers. These results suggest that TCM could be further optimized for detection and that detectability maps present exciting new opportunities for TCM optimization on a patient-specific level.

  8. Improvement of the following accident dose assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FADAS has been updates for calculating the real-time wind fields continuously at the nuclear sites in Korea. The system has been constructed to compute the wind fields using its own process for the dummy meteorological data, and dose not effect on the overall wind field module. If the radioactive materials are released into the atmosphere in real situation, the calculations of wind fields and exposure dose in the previous FADAS are performed in the case of the recognition of the above situation in the source term evaluation module. The current version of FADAS includes the program for evaluating the effect of the predicted accident and the assumed scenario together. The dose assessment module is separated into the real-time and the supposed accident respectively

  9. Improvement of the following accident dose assessment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Enn Han; Han, Moon Hee; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    The FADAS has been updates for calculating the real-time wind fields continuously at the nuclear sites in Korea. The system has been constructed to compute the wind fields using its own process for the dummy meteorological data, and dose not effect on the overall wind field module. If the radioactive materials are released into the atmosphere in real situation, the calculations of wind fields and exposure dose in the previous FADAS are performed in the case of the recognition of the above situation in the source term evaluation module. The current version of FADAS includes the program for evaluating the effect of the predicted accident and the assumed scenario together. The dose assessment module is separated into the real-time and the supposed accident respectively.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF COLLECTIVE DOSE FOR TRAVELLERS BY WATERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳清宇; 姜萍; 等

    1995-01-01

    People travelling by air will receive more exposure dose and by water will receive less one.According to statistic data from the Ministry of Communications in 1988,the turnover in that year was about 2×1010 man.km.The total number of fishermen for inshore fishing was nearly two million reported by Ministry of Agriculture,Animal Husbandry and Fishery.Based on measured data on 212 points in six typical shipping lines of inshore lines and inland rivers,and the total voyage is 5625km,the average natural radiation dose rate received by travellers was calculated.From that assessment of collective effective dose for passengers by water and fishermen was derived.The value is 32.7man.Sv for passengers and 265.3man.Sv for fishermen.

  11. {sup 99m}Tc-MAA overestimates the absorbed dose to the lungs in radioembolization: a quantitative evaluation in patients treated with {sup 166}Ho-microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Nijsen, Johannes F.W.; Lam, Marnix G.E.H.; Smits, Maarten L.J.; Prince, Jip F.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Jong, Hugo W.A.M. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Radiation pneumonitis is a rare but serious complication of radioembolic therapy of liver tumours. Estimation of the mean absorbed dose to the lungs based on pretreatment diagnostic {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) imaging should prevent this, with administered activities adjusted accordingly. The accuracy of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA-based lung absorbed dose estimates was evaluated and compared to absorbed dose estimates based on pretreatment diagnostic {sup 166}Ho-microsphere imaging and to the actual lung absorbed doses after {sup 166}Ho radioembolization. This prospective clinical study included 14 patients with chemorefractory, unresectable liver metastases treated with {sup 166}Ho radioembolization. {sup 99m}Tc-MAA-based and {sup 166}Ho-microsphere-based estimation of lung absorbed doses was performed on pretreatment diagnostic planar scintigraphic and SPECT/CT images. The clinical analysis was preceded by an anthropomorphic torso phantom study with simulated lung shunt fractions of 0 to 30 % to determine the accuracy of the image-based lung absorbed dose estimates after {sup 166}Ho radioembolization. In the phantom study, {sup 166}Ho SPECT/CT-based lung absorbed dose estimates were more accurate (absolute error range 0.1 to -4.4 Gy) than {sup 166}Ho planar scintigraphy-based lung absorbed dose estimates (absolute error range 9.5 to 12.1 Gy). Clinically, the actual median lung absorbed dose was 0.02 Gy (range 0.0 to 0.7 Gy) based on posttreatment {sup 166}Ho-microsphere SPECT/CT imaging. Lung absorbed doses estimated on the basis of pretreatment diagnostic {sup 166}Ho-microsphere SPECT/CT imaging (median 0.02 Gy, range 0.0 to 0.4 Gy) were significantly better predictors of the actual lung absorbed doses than doses estimated on the basis of {sup 166}Ho-microsphere planar scintigraphy (median 10.4 Gy, range 4.0 to 17.3 Gy; p < 0.001), {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT imaging (median 2.5 Gy, range 1.2 to 12.3 Gy; p < 0.001), and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA planar

  12. Emphysema quantification on low-dose CT using percentage of low-attenuation volume and size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions: Effects of adaptive iterative dose reduction using 3D processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Mizuho, E-mail: nmizuho@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Matsumoto, Sumiaki, E-mail: sumatsu@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro, E-mail: sshin@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu, E-mail: hkoyama@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Fujisawa, Yasuko, E-mail: yasuko1.fujisawa@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, 1385 Shimoishigami, Otawara, Tochigi 324-8550 (Japan); Sugihara, Naoki, E-mail: naoki.sugihara@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, 1385 Shimoishigami, Otawara, Tochigi 324-8550 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Emphysema quantification (LAV% and D) was affected by image noise on low-dose CT. • For LAV% and D, AIDR 3D improved agreement of quantification on low-dose CT. • AIDR 3D has the potential to quantify emphysema accurately on low-dose CT. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the effects of adaptive iterative dose reduction using 3D processing (AIDR 3D) for quantification of two measures of emphysema: percentage of low-attenuation volume (LAV%) and size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions. Method and materials: : Fifty-two patients who underwent standard-dose (SDCT) and low-dose CT (LDCT) were included. SDCT without AIDR 3D, LDCT without AIDR 3D, and LDCT with AIDR 3D were used for emphysema quantification. First, LAV% was computed at 10 thresholds from −990 to −900 HU. Next, at the same thresholds, linear regression on a log–log plot was used to compute the power law exponent (D) for the cumulative frequency-size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions. Bland–Altman analysis was used to assess whether AIDR 3D improved agreement between LDCT and SDCT for emphysema quantification of LAV% and D. Results: The mean relative differences in LAV% between LDCT without AIDR 3D and SDCT were 3.73%–88.18% and between LDCT with AIDR 3D and SDCT were −6.61% to 0.406%. The mean relative differences in D between LDCT without AIDR 3D and SDCT were 8.22%–19.11% and between LDCT with AIDR 3D and SDCT were 1.82%–4.79%. AIDR 3D improved agreement between LDCT and SDCT at thresholds from −930 to −990 HU for LAV% and at all thresholds for D. Conclusion: AIDR 3D improved the consistency between LDCT and SDCT for emphysema quantification of LAV% and D.

  13. Proton MRI as a noninvasive tool to assess elastase-induced lung damage in spontaneously breathing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Harry Karmouty; Cannet, Catherine; Zurbruegg, Stefan; Blé, François-Xavier; Fozard, John R; Page, Clive P; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2006-12-01

    Elastase-induced changes in lung morphology and function were detected in spontaneously breathing rats using conventional proton MRI at 4.7 T. A single dose of porcine pancreatic elastase (75 U/100 g body weight) or vehicle (saline) was administered intratracheally (i.t.) to male Brown Norway (BN) rats. MRI fluid signals were detected in the lungs 24 hr after administration of elastase and resolved within 2 weeks. These results correlated with perivascular edema and cellular infiltration observed histologically. Reductions in MRI signal intensity of the lung parenchyma, and increases in lung volume were detected as early as 2 weeks following elastase administration and remained uniform throughout the study, which lasted 8 weeks. Observations were consistent with air trapping resulting from emphysema detected histologically. In a separate experiment, animals were treated daily intraperitoneally (i.p.) with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA; 500 microg/kg body weight) or its vehicle (triglyceride oil) starting on day 21 after elastase administration and continuing for 12 days. Under these conditions, ATRA did not elicit a reversal of elastase-induced lung damage as measured by MRI and histology. The present approach complements other validated applications of proton MRI in experimental lung research as a method for assessing drugs in rat models of respiratory diseases. PMID:17029230

  14. Applying the PCXMC{sup R} software for dose assessment in patients submitted to chest and skull X-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Vania Lucia S. de; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C. de; Abrantes, Marcos Eugenio S., E-mail: vaniabaia@bol.com.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Silva, Teogenes A. da, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The International Commission of radiation and Units (ICRU) has recommended the use of Monte Carlo calculation software to assess the organ doses in patient undergoing x-ray examinations. The PCXMC{sup R} is a largely used computational program for assessing organ doses in chest and skull diagnostic radiology. The aim of this work was assess doses in critical and relevant organs of several patients in a hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. The work was done by recording the patient and geometrical data during several exams in the xray sectors of the hospital. Patients were classified according to their biotype as A, B and C and they were chosen for dose assessment s. Patients A, B and C have the smallest, the medium and the largest dimensions, respectively. Simulation was dose using the PCXMC{sup R} and organ doses were assessed. Analyses were carried out only for the highest exposed organs in terms of their contribution to the effective dose; doses due to the posteroanterior followed by lateral projections were added. During the chest examinations, the lungs got the highest doses. The lung doses were 23.5, 33.6, 45.4 muSv in patients A, B and C, respectively. During the skull examinations, the thyroid was the critical organ that gave the highest contribution to the effective dose. The thyroid doses were 30.5, 27.6 and 22.3 muSv, in patient A, B and C, respectively. Doses variations suggested that there is space for standardization of the radiological techniques and for optimizing the radiographic procedures to reduce patient doses. (author)

  15. SU-E-T-573: Normal Tissue Dose Effect of Prescription Isodose Level Selection in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Zhou, S; Zhen, W [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dose fall-off in normal tissue for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases planned with different prescription isodose levels (IDLs), by calculating the dose dropping speed (DDS) in normal tissue on plans computed with both Pencil Beam (PB) and Monte-Carlo (MC) algorithms. Methods: The DDS was calculated on 32 plans for 8 lung SBRT patients. For each patient, 4 dynamic conformal arc plans were individually optimized for prescription isodose levels (IDL) ranging from 60% to 90% of the maximum dose with 10% increments to conformally cover the PTV. Eighty non-overlapping rind structures each of 1mm thickness were created layer by layer from each PTV surface. The average dose in each rind was calculated and fitted with a double exponential function (DEF) of the distance from the PTV surface, which models the steep- and moderate-slope portions of the average dose curve in normal tissue. The parameter characterizing the steep portion of the average dose curve in the DEF quantifies the DDS in the immediate normal tissue receiving high dose. Provided that the prescription dose covers the whole PTV, a greater DDS indicates better normal tissue sparing. The DDS were compared among plans with different prescription IDLs, for plans computed with both PB and MC algorithms. Results: For all patients, the DDS was found to be the lowest for 90% prescription IDL and reached a highest plateau region for 60% or 70% prescription. The trend was the same for both PB and MC plans. Conclusion: Among the range of prescription IDLs accepted by lung SBRT RTOG protocols, prescriptions to 60% and 70% IDLs were found to provide best normal tissue sparing.

  16. Coronary artery disease in lung transplant candidates: role of routine invasive assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, Johannes; Arrigo, Mattia; Isenring, Bruno Dieter; Buergi, Urs; Kurowski, Thomas; Schuurmans, Macé M.; Huber, Lars C; Benden, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An atherosclerotic disease burden sufficient to put lung transplant candidates at risk for end-organ disease after transplantation is considered to be a relative contraindication for lung transplantation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess our current practice of cardiac workup by coronary angiography in lung transplant candidates ≥50 years of age. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 50 consecutive lung transplant candidates ≥50 years of age in which coronary a...

  17. [Early lung cancer detection in an occupational asbestos exposed population: clinical impact of low-dose computed tomography screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pira, E; Coggiola, M; Bosio, D

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. Early detection and surgical resection is essential for the treatment of lung cancer. The introduction of low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT) is considered one of the most promising clinical research developments in early diagnosis of lung cancer. Our study is aimed at the evaluation of spiral CT in a cohort of subjects with a past occupational exposure to asbestos at high risk of developing lung cancer. 149 subjects were enrolled between 2007 and 2009 (the criteria for enrollment were date of birth between 1930-1961, no previous cancer and general good health, latency from the beginning of exposure > 10 years, exposure duration > 1 year, possibility to undergo to surgery). A helical low-dose CT (LDCT) of the chest was performed yearly and an evaluation protocol derived from IEO with a morphological analysis of nodules have been adopted. 13 nodules were diagnosed in the first CT, 7 in the second and 3 in the third but no invasive procedures have been taken and no lung cancer have been detected. Our early follow-up data aren't able yet to evaluate the effect of screening with LDCT on mortality but have do not confirm some of the literature initial results such as the Increase in cases of overdiagnosis (false positive) due to the high prevalence of benign lesions. PMID:21438306

  18. Biokinetics and dose assessment of radionuclides in juveniles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, it becomes evident that dose coefficients for members of the public are necessary. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) established a task group of Committee 2 charged with the assessment of dose coefficients as a function of an individual's age. However, little data is available on the biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile and there is a need to develop age-dependent biokinetic models, such as for the gastrointestinal tract. The present paper reviewed an outline on characteristics of biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile animals focusing on the previous experimental data. The following radionuclides are discussed: 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 106Ru, 110mAg, 115mCd, 125Sb, 137Cs, 141Ce, 203Hg and 3H. Generally, intestinal absorption and whole-body retention of radionuclides in juveniles were higher than that of adult. In the case of sucklings, it is very important to study how radionuclides are transferred through the placenta and milk. The transfer rate of radionuclides through the placenta and milk is dependent on the period of gestation at the time of dosing. The IDES(Internal Dose Estimation System) which is based on the ICRP model was used for dose calculation. We modified the IDES using the biokinetic data which was gained animal experiment. The IDES is flexible because the absorbed dose can be calculated by substituting arbitrary physical and physiological parameters and also substituting ingested dose coefficients not only for the ICRP Reference Man, but also for Japanese of 1 year old, 5 years old, 10 years old, 15 years old and the adult, respectively. (author)

  19. Even low doses of radiation lead to DNA damage accumulation in lung tissue according to the genetically-defined DNA repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for thoracic malignancies increases the exposure of healthy lung tissue to low-dose radiation. The biological impact of repetitive low-dose radiation on the radiosensitive lung is unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, using mouse strains with different genetic DNA repair capacities, we monitored the extent of DNA damage in lung parenchyma after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks of daily low-dose 100-mGy radiation. Results: Using 53BP1 as a marker for double-strand breaks, we observed DNA damage accumulation during fractionated low-dose radiation with increasing cumulative doses. The amount of radiation-induced 53BP1 varied significantly between bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, suggesting that different cell populations in the lung parenchyma had varying vulnerabilities to ionizing radiation. The genetic background of DNA repair determined the extent of cumulative low-dose radiation damage. Moreover, increased DNA damage during fractionated low-dose radiation affected replication, and apoptosis in the lung parenchyma, which may influence overall lung function. Conclusion: Collectively, our results suggest that low, yet damaging, doses of radiation increase the risk of toxicity to normal lung tissue and the probability of developing secondary malignancies

  20. Development of radiation dose assessment system for radiation accident (RADARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of radiation accident is very rare, but cannot be regarded as zero. Medical treatments are quite essential for a heavily exposed person in an occurrence of a radiation accident. Radiation dose distribution in a human body is useful information to carry out effectively the medical treatments. A radiation transport calculation utilizing the Monte Carlo method has an advantageous in the analysis of radiation dose inside of the body, which cannot be measured. An input file, which describes models for the accident condition and quantities of interest, should be prepared to execute the radiation transport calculation. Since the accident situation, however, cannot be prospected, many complicated procedures are needed to make effectively the input file soon after the occurrence of the accident. In addition, the calculated doses are to be given in output files, which usually include much information concerning the radiation transport calculation. Thus, Radiation Dose Assessment system for Radiation Accident (RADARAC) was developed to derive effectively radiation dose by using the MCNPX or MCNP code. RADARAC mainly consists of two parts. One part is RADARAC-INPUT, which involves three programs. A user can interactively set up necessary resources to make input files for the codes, with graphical user interfaces in a personnel computer. The input file includes information concerning the geometric structure of the radiation source and the exposed person, emission of radiations during the accident, physical quantities of interest and so on. The other part is RADARAC-DOSE, which has one program. The results of radiation doses can be effectively indicated with numerical tables, graphs and color figures visibly depicting dose distribution by using this program. These results are obtained from the outputs of the radiation transport calculations. It is confirmed that the system can effectively make input files with a few thousand lines and indicate more than 20

  1. Toxicology study assessing efficacy and safety of repeated administration of lipid/DNA complexes to mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, E W F W; Boyd, A C; Cheng, S H; Davies, J C; Davies, L A; Dayan, A; Gill, D R; Griesenbach, U; Higgins, T; Hyde, S C; Innes, J A; McLachlan, G; Porteous, D; Pringle, I; Scheule, R K; Sumner-Jones, S

    2014-01-01

    For gene therapy to improve lung function in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects, repeated administration of the gene transfer agent over the lifetime of patients is likely to be necessary. This requirement limits the utility of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors (both previously evaluated in CF gene therapy trials) because of induced adaptive immune responses that render repeated dosing ineffective. For CF gene therapy trials, non-viral vectors are currently the only viable option. We previously showed that the cationic lipid formulation GL67A is the most efficient of several non-viral vectors analysed for airway gene transfer. Here, we assessed the efficacy and safety of administering 12 inhaled doses of GL67A complexed with pGM169, a CpG-free plasmid encoding human CFTR complementary DNA, into mice. We show that repeated administration of pGM169/GL67A to murine lungs is feasible, safe and achieves reproducible, dose-related and persistent gene expression (>140 days after each dose) using an aerosol generated by a clinically relevant nebuliser. This study supports progression into the first non-viral multidose lung trial in CF patients. PMID:24196086

  2. Biological dosimetry: chromosomal aberration analysis for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the growing importance of chromosomal aberration analysis as a biological dosimeter, the present report provides a concise summary of the scientific background of the subject and a comprehensive source of information at the technical level. After a review of the basic principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation biology basic information on the biology of lymphocytes, the structure of chromosomes and the classification of chromosomal aberrations are presented. This is followed by a presentation of techniques for collecting blood, storing, transporting, culturing, making chromosomal preparations and scaring of aberrations. The physical and statistical parameters involved in dose assessment are discussed and examples of actual dose assessments taken from the scientific literature are given

  3. Assessment of dose measurement uncertainty using RisøScan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement uncertainty of the dosimeter system RisoScan, office scanner and Riso B3 dosimeters has been assessed by comparison with spectrophotometer measurements of the same dosimeters. The reproducibility and the combined uncertainty were found to be approximately 2% and 4......%, respectively, at one standard deviation. The subroutine in RisoScan for electron energy measurement is shown to give results that are equivalent to the measurements with a scanning spectrophotometer. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Accuracy of patient dose calculation for lung IMRT: A comparison of Monte Carlo, convolution/superposition, and pencil beam computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Reynaert, Nick; Paelinck, Leen; Madani, Indira; De Wagter, Carlos; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2006-09-01

    The accuracy of dose computation within the lungs depends strongly on the performance of the calculation algorithm in regions of electronic disequilibrium that arise near tissue inhomogeneities with large density variations. There is a lack of data evaluating the performance of highly developed analytical dose calculation algorithms compared to Monte Carlo computations in a clinical setting. We compared full Monte Carlo calculations (performed by our Monte Carlo dose engine MCDE) with two different commercial convolution/superposition (CS) implementations (Pinnacle-CS and Helax-TMS's collapsed cone model Helax-CC) and one pencil beam algorithm (Helax-TMS's pencil beam model Helax-PB) for 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) lung cancer patients. Treatment plans were created for two photon beam qualities (6 and 18 MV). For each dose calculation algorithm, patient, and beam quality, the following set of clinically relevant dose-volume values was reported: (i) minimal, median, and maximal dose (Dmin, D50, and Dmax) for the gross tumor and planning target volumes (GTV and PTV); (ii) the volume of the lungs (excluding the GTV) receiving at least 20 and 30 Gy (V20 and V30) and the mean lung dose; (iii) the 33rd percentile dose (D33) and Dmax delivered to the heart and the expanded esophagus; and (iv) Dmax for the expanded spinal cord. Statistical analysis was performed by means of one-way analysis of variance for repeated measurements and Tukey pairwise comparison of means. Pinnacle-CS showed an excellent agreement with MCDE within the target structures, whereas the best correspondence for the organs at risk (OARs) was found between Helax-CC and MCDE. Results from Helax-PB were unsatisfying for both targets and OARs. Additionally, individual patient results were analyzed. Within the target structures, deviations above 5% were found in one patient for the comparison of MCDE and Helax-CC, while all differences between MCDE and Pinnacle-CS were below 5%. For both

  5. Accuracy of patient dose calculation for lung IMRT: A comparison of Monte Carlo, convolution/superposition, and pencil beam computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of dose computation within the lungs depends strongly on the performance of the calculation algorithm in regions of electronic disequilibrium that arise near tissue inhomogeneities with large density variations. There is a lack of data evaluating the performance of highly developed analytical dose calculation algorithms compared to Monte Carlo computations in a clinical setting. We compared full Monte Carlo calculations (performed by our Monte Carlo dose engine MCDE) with two different commercial convolution/superposition (CS) implementations (Pinnacle-CS and Helax-TMS's collapsed cone model Helax-CC) and one pencil beam algorithm (Helax-TMS's pencil beam model Helax-PB) for 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) lung cancer patients. Treatment plans were created for two photon beam qualities (6 and 18 MV). For each dose calculation algorithm, patient, and beam quality, the following set of clinically relevant dose-volume values was reported: (i) minimal, median, and maximal dose (Dmin, D50, and Dmax) for the gross tumor and planning target volumes (GTV and PTV); (ii) the volume of the lungs (excluding the GTV) receiving at least 20 and 30 Gy (V20 and V30) and the mean lung dose; (iii) the 33rd percentile dose (D33) and Dmax delivered to the heart and the expanded esophagus; and (iv) Dmax for the expanded spinal cord. Statistical analysis was performed by means of one-way analysis of variance for repeated measurements and Tukey pairwise comparison of means. Pinnacle-CS showed an excellent agreement with MCDE within the target structures, whereas the best correspondence for the organs at risk (OARs) was found between Helax-CC and MCDE. Results from Helax-PB were unsatisfying for both targets and OARs. Additionally, individual patient results were analyzed. Within the target structures, deviations above 5% were found in one patient for the comparison of MCDE and Helax-CC, while all differences between MCDE and Pinnacle-CS were below 5%. For both

  6. Radiological environmental dose assessment methods and compliance dose results for 2015 operations at the savannah river site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2015 Savannah River Site (SRS) atmospheric and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios - such as the consumption of deer meat, fish, and goat milk.

  7. Radiological environmental dose assessment methods and compliance dose results for 2015 operations at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2015 Savannah River Site (SRS) atmospheric and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios - such as the consumption of deer meat, fish, and goat milk.

  8. An airborne dispersion/dose assessment computer program. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff have a need for an airborne dispersion-dose assessment computer programme for a microcomputer. The programme must be capable of analyzing the dispersion of both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. A further requirement of the programme is that it be implemented on the AECB complex of microcomputers and that it have an advanced graphical user interface. A survey of computer programs was conducted to determine which, if any, could meet the AECB's requirements in whole or in part. Ten programmes were selected for detailed review including programs for nuclear and non-radiological emergencies. None of the available programmes for radiation dose assessment meets all the requirements for reasons of user interaction, method of source term estimation or site specificity. It is concluded that the best option for meeting the AECB requirements is to adopt the CAMEO programme (specifically the ALOHA portion) which has a superior graphical user interface and add the necessary models for radiation dose assessment

  9. Spiritual Assessment in a Patient With Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Tami

    2014-01-01

    CASE STUDY  Mr. G., an 82-year-old retired European man, was diagnosed with stage 4 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and recently enrolled on a phase II clinical trial. He is married and has two adult children, who are very supportive. He and his wife described themselves as nonpracticing Catholics. He had never smoked, and there was no personal or family history of cancer. Fatigue was the main side effect from the clinical trial drugs, necessitating frequent periods of rest throughout the day and ultimately requiring dose reduction. His left leg was edematous and painful, and he was diagnosed with and treated for deep-vein thrombosis. Over time, these symptoms resolved, and Mr. G. enjoyed a fairly normal quality of life (QOL). He continued to do well for almost a year, but then his cancer progressed and his performance status began to decline. When offered treatment options, he elected to discontinue the clinical trial, take a break, and then initiate single-agent chemotherapy. Mr. G. was enrolled in a palliative care research study that provided patient-tailored education by an advanced practitioner (AP). The education addressed each QOL domain: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual. When the AP connected with Mr. G. during one of his clinic appointments, he appeared very concerned. He shared that he previously had lived in a communist country and now that he was in the United States, he was afraid of losing his insurance and having to stop treatment. The conversation was interrupted as he was called in for his appointment, yet he consented to talk about the matter further by telephone. The AP contacted Mr. G. the next day. He shared a glimpse of his childhood and experience in his homeland to try to explain his current fears. After reassuring him that his insurance would not be withdrawn, the AP asked whether he would be willing to talk about his life before coming to the United States more than 50 years ago. She wanted to assess where he was

  10. Spiritual Assessment in a Patient With Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Tami

    2014-01-01

    CASE STUDY  Mr. G., an 82-year-old retired European man, was diagnosed with stage 4 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and recently enrolled on a phase II clinical trial. He is married and has two adult children, who are very supportive. He and his wife described themselves as nonpracticing Catholics. He had never smoked, and there was no personal or family history of cancer. Fatigue was the main side effect from the clinical trial drugs, necessitating frequent periods of rest throughout the day and ultimately requiring dose reduction. His left leg was edematous and painful, and he was diagnosed with and treated for deep-vein thrombosis. Over time, these symptoms resolved, and Mr. G. enjoyed a fairly normal quality of life (QOL). He continued to do well for almost a year, but then his cancer progressed and his performance status began to decline. When offered treatment options, he elected to discontinue the clinical trial, take a break, and then initiate single-agent chemotherapy. Mr. G. was enrolled in a palliative care research study that provided patient-tailored education by an advanced practitioner (AP). The education addressed each QOL domain: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual. When the AP connected with Mr. G. during one of his clinic appointments, he appeared very concerned. He shared that he previously had lived in a communist country and now that he was in the United States, he was afraid of losing his insurance and having to stop treatment. The conversation was interrupted as he was called in for his appointment, yet he consented to talk about the matter further by telephone. The AP contacted Mr. G. the next day. He shared a glimpse of his childhood and experience in his homeland to try to explain his current fears. After reassuring him that his insurance would not be withdrawn, the AP asked whether he would be willing to talk about his life before coming to the United States more than 50 years ago. She wanted to assess where he was

  11. Isolated lung perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Isolated lung perfusion (ILP) has been historically used as a method to study basic lung physiologic concepts using animal models. More recently, ILP has been applied in lung transplantation and thoracic oncology. In lung transplantation, ILP has been used to assess physiological integrity of donor lungs after the organ is removed from the donor. This procedure is called Ex vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP), and it has also been proposed as a method for active treatment and repair of injured unsuitable donor organs ex vivo. In oncology, ILP is an attractive method to deliver high dose chemotherapy to treat pulmonary metastatic disease. Since the lung vasculature is isolated in vivo, this technique is called in vivo lung perfusion (IVLP). This review will focus on the rationale, technical aspects, experimental and clinical experience of EVLP and IVLP. A perspective on the future use of these techniques is described. PMID:22202033

  12. SU-E-I-34: Evaluating Use of AEC to Lower Dose for Lung Cancer Screening CT Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbique, G; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Guild, J; Duan, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Malguria, N; Omar, H; Brewington, C [Ut Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, D [Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The National Lung Screening Trial mandated manual low dose CT technique factors, where up to a doubling of radiation output could be used over a regular to large patient size range. Recent guidance from the AAPM and ACR for lung cancer CT screening recommends radiation output adjustment for patient size either through AEC or a manual technique chart. This study evaluated the use of AEC for output control and dose reduction. Methods: The study was performed on a multidetector helical CT scanner (Aquillion ONE, Toshiba Medical) equipped with iterative reconstruction (ADIR-3D), AEC was adjusted with a standard deviation (SD) image quality noise index. The protocol SD parameter was incrementally increased to reduce patient population dose while image quality was evaluated by radiologist readers scoring the clinical utility of images on a Likert scale. Results: Plots of effective dose vs. body size (water cylinder diameter reported by the scanner) demonstrate monotonic increase in patient dose with increasing patient size. At the initial SD setting of 19 the average CTDIvol for a standard size patient was ∼ 2.0 mGy (1.2 mSv effective dose). This was reduced to ∼1.0 mGy (0.5 mSv) at an SD of 25 with no noticeable reduction in clinical utility of images as demonstrated by Likert scoring. Plots of effective patient diameter and BMI vs body size indicate that these metrics could also be used for manual technique charts. Conclusion: AEC offered consistent and reliable control of radiation output in this study. Dose for a standard size patient was reduced to one-third of the 3 mGy CTDIvol limit required for ACR accreditation of lung cancer CT screening. Gary Arbique: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Cecelia Brewington: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Di Zhang: Employee, Toshiba America Medical Systems.

  13. Percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media for small fields of CyberKnife

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Suh, Tae Suk; Hong, Seung-Woo; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media are studied. For lung equivalent media a Balsa wood is used, and for a soft bone equivalent media a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as an inhomogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT film by using photon beams from 6MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5, 10 to 30 mm. As a simulation tool GEANT4 Monte Carlo code v9.4.p02 is used. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT film in and beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT film and the dose without EBT film ca...

  14. Radiation dose in lungs and gonads due to radiographic exams in patients at an emergency hospital service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrantes, Marcos E.S.; Heeren, Arno [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Mestrado em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: marcosabrantes2003@yahoo.com.br; heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da; Lacerda, Marco A.S.; Guedes, E. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br; masl@cdtn.br; ecg@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Radiographic exams for diagnostic purposes of patients undergoing emergence attendance situations are done at technique and geometrical conditions very difficult to be standardized. Exposure parameters like entrance skin air-kerma, skin-focus distance, irradiated area sizes, total filtration and others vary from patient to patient accordingly to their biotype and they cause large variations in the radiation dose. Radiographic exposure conditions observed in an emergency hospital service were simulated in the PCXMC software to evaluate organ doses in lung and gonads for a 1.74 m height, 71.1 kg weigh adult patient. Exposure parameters were varied within determined ranges and respective variations of the organ doses were evaluated. As an example, for the pelvis radiation exposure under determined conditions results showed that the uterus, the ovaries or the testicles would get, respectively, 1.05, 0.65 or 2.96 mGy. Doses in the same organs would be reduced at 22%, 32.3% or 7%, if the field sizes were reduced 1 cm. For the trunk radiation exposure, the lung dose was 47% lower than 0.25 mGy for the same 1 cm field size reduction. Results show that optimization can be suggested to achieve organ dose reduction without any prejudice to the diagnostic exam. (author)

  15. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  16. Research on pharmacokinetics of high-dose tamoxifen in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the pharmacokinetics of tamoxifen at a high dosage, which will offer a theoretical support for an appropriate clinical use of the medicine in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Three qualified NSCLC patients are selected and given tamoxifen (TAM) 160 mg per Os. Blood samples were collected at different times and then analyzed by high-performance liguid chromatography. The PK-GRAPH program was used to obtain the parameters. Results The concentration-time courses of the TAM 160 mg were fitted to one-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated as follows: Tmax (6.35±1.24)h, Cmax (217.39±7.71)ng/Ml, AUC (12 127.39±636.16)ng·h/Ml and T1/2ke (34.13±2.97)h. Conclusion TAM 160mg one day per Os cannot reach the effective maintenance concentration in vivo required for reversing MDR in vitro. Loading-maintenance dose strategy is recommended to study the pharmacodynamics of tamoxifen at a high dosage in NSCLC patients.

  17. Epidemiology and diagnostic assessment of interstitial lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Thomeer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The interstitial lung diseases affect the parenchyma of the lung including the pulmonary alveolar epithelium, the capillary endothelium and the spaces between these structures, together with the tissues within the septa including the perivascular and perilymphatic tissues. Although the different interstitial lung diseases have rather similar clinical presentations with increasing shortness of breath, a restrictive lung function and a widespread shadowing on the chest radiograph, they comprise...

  18. Phase 1 Study of Dose Escalation in Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Swanick, Cameron; Alvarado, Tina; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Many patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cannot undergo concurrent chemotherapy because of comorbidities or poor performance status. Hypofractionated radiation regimens, if tolerable, may provide an option to these patients for effective local control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were enrolled in a phase 1 dose-escalation trial of proton beam therapy (PBT) from September 2010 through July 2012. Eligible patients had histologically documented lung cancer, thymic tumors, carcinoid tumors, or metastatic thyroid tumors. Concurrent chemotherapy was not allowed, but concurrent treatment with biologic agents was. The dose-escalation schema comprised 15 fractions of 3 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE])/fraction, 3.5 Gy(RBE)/fraction, or 4 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Dose constraints were derived from biologically equivalent doses of standard fractionated treatment. Results: The median follow-up time for patients alive at the time of analysis was 13 months (range, 8-28 months). Fifteen patients received treatment to hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity possibly related to treatment; 1 received 3.5-Gy(RBE) fractions and experienced an in-field tracheoesophageal fistula 9 months after PBT and 1 month after bevacizumab. The other patient received 4-Gy(RBE) fractions and was hospitalized for bacterial pneumonia/radiation pneumonitis 4 months after PBT. Conclusion: Hypofractionated PBT to the thorax delivered over 3 weeks was well tolerated even with significant doses to the lungs and mediastinal structures. Phase 2/3 trials are needed to compare the efficacy of this technique with standard treatment for locally advanced NSCLC.

  19. Non-human biota dose assessment. Sensitivity analysis and knowledge quality assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of a programme of work, commissioned within the BIOPROTA collaborative forum, to assess the quantitative and qualitative elements of uncertainty associated with biota dose assessment of potential impacts of long-term releases from geological disposal facilities (GDF). Quantitative and qualitative aspects of uncertainty were determined through sensitivity and knowledge quality assessments, respectively. Both assessments focused on default assessment parameters within the ERICA assessment approach. The sensitivity analysis was conducted within the EIKOS sensitivity analysis software tool and was run in both generic and test case modes. The knowledge quality assessment involved development of a questionnaire around the ERICA assessment approach, which was distributed to a range of experts in the fields of non-human biota dose assessment and radioactive waste disposal assessments. Combined, these assessments enabled critical model features and parameters that are both sensitive (i.e. have a large influence on model output) and of low knowledge quality to be identified for each of the three test cases. The output of this project is intended to provide information on those parameters that may need to be considered in more detail for prospective site-specific biota dose assessments for GDFs. Such information should help users to enhance the quality of their assessments and build greater confidence in the results. (orig.)

  20. Approach to derive doses for case-control studies of lung cancer and leukaemia among workers internally exposed to uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case-control studies are currently conducted in 3 European countries (Belgium, France and the United Kingdom) to estimate the risk of lung cancer and leukaemia in relation to internal exposure to uranium and plutonium amongst workers in the nuclear industry. The project requires calculating doses absorbed by the lung and the bone marrow for many hundreds of cases and controls internally exposed. In order to establish a common approach to dose reconstruction, a detailed dosimetry protocol and a database of individual exposure were set up and will be presented. The dose reconstruction relies heavily on bioassay data, which are usually urine analysis, extending back over 50 years in some cases. Inevitably, data obtained over such a time span are of variable quality. It is important to review the monitoring practices at the various laboratories and to assess the reliability of these data in order to estimate possible biases as well as random uncertainties. Another key step in the reconstruction process is to decide upon the likely intake regimes consistent with the data. Generally, chronic intakes will be assumed and acute intakes will be added only when their existence is supported by operational data. Biokinetic models are used both to calculate intakes from bioassay data and to convert intakes to doses. The ICRP publication 66 respiratory tract model will be used along with the latest systemic models described by ICRP. These will be supplemented by the Leggett 2005 model for plutonium. These various models will be implemented by the code IMBA-Expert. Since it is essential to obtain central estimates for the doses, a particular problem is encountered with datasets consisting only of values below the limit of detection. For these cases Bayesian statistics will be employed using a non-informative prior probability distribution. (author)

  1. Use of FDG-PET to guide dose prescription heterogeneity in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancers with volumetric modulated arc therapy: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess if FDG-PET could guide dose prescription heterogeneity and decrease arbitrary location of hotspots in SBRT. For three patients with stage I lung cancer, a CT-simulation and a FDG-PET were registered to define respectively the PTVCT and the biological target volume (BTV). Two plans involving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) were calculated. The first plan delivered 4 × 12 Gy within the PTVCT and the second plan, with SIB, 4 × 12 Gy and 13.8 Gy (115% of the prescribed dose) within the PTVCT and the BTV respectively. The Dmax-PTVCT had to be inferior to 60 Gy (125% of the prescribed dose). Plans were evaluated through the D95%, D99% and Dmax-PTVCT, the D2 cm, the R50% and R100% and the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the isodose 115% and BTV. DSC allows verifying the location of the 115% isodose (ideal value = 1). The mean PTVCT and BTV were 36.7 (±12.5) and 6.5 (±2.2) cm3 respectively. Both plans led to similar target coverage, same doses to the OARs and equivalent fall-off of the dose outside the PTVCT. On the other hand, the location of hotspots, evaluated through the DSC, was improved for the SIB plans with a mean DSC of 0.31 and 0.45 for the first and the second plans respectively. Use of PET to decrease arbitrary location of hotspots is feasible with VMAT and SIB for lung cancer

  2. Improvement of the following accident dose assessment system (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Enn Han; Han, Moon Hee; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    The FADAS and its database have been updates for calculating the real-time wind fields continuously at the nuclear sites in Korea. The system has been constructed to compute the wind fields using its own process for the dummy meteorological data, and does not effect on the overall wind field module. If the radioactive materials are released into the atmosphere in real situation, the calculations of wind fields and exposure dose in the previous FADAS are performed in the case of the recognition of the above situation in the source term evaluation module. The current version of FADAS includes the program for evaluating the effect of the predicted accident and the assumed scenario together. The dose assessment module is separated into the real-time and the supposed accident respectively. 7 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  3. Source term calculations for assessing radiation dose to equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines results of analyses performed with the Source Term Code Package to develop updated source terms using NUREG-0956 methods. The updated source terms are to be used to assess the adequacy of current regulatory source terms used as the basis for equipment qualification. Time-dependent locational distributions of radionuclides within a containment following a severe accident have been developed. The Surry reactor has been selected in this study as representative of PWR containment designs. Similarly, the Peach Bottom reactor has been used to examine radionuclide distributions in boiling water reactors. The time-dependent inventory of each key radionuclide is provided in terms of its activity in curies. The data are to be used by Sandia National Laboratories to perform shielding analyses to estimate radiation dose to equipment in each containment design. See NUREG/CR-5175, ''Beta and Gamma Dose Calculations for PWR and BWR Containments.'' 6 refs., 11 tabs

  4. ARAC: a flexible real-time dose consequence assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ARAC (the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability), an emergency radiological dose assessment capability of the U.S. Government, has been called on to do consequence assessments for releases into the atmosphere of radionuclides and a variety of other substances. Because of the variety of requirements of each unique assessment, ARAC has developed and maintains a flexible system of people, computer software and hardware. A new version of ADPIC that can simulate the transport of any number of radionuclide particulates and gases and all of the decay products that are generated during transport and after deposition. This code will be most suitable for application to nuclear reactor accidents. ARAC has personal computer and advanced computer workstations at approximately 50 remote sites that communicate central system and which can initiate an ARAC response by transmitting time, location and source information about an accident to the central system

  5. Internal dose assessment in nuclear medicine: fetal doses due to radiopharmaceutical administration to the mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this publication is to present a guideline for the dose assessment through a comprehensive introduction of knowledge on ionizing radiation, radiation protection during pregnancy and fetal dosimetry for physician and other professionals involved in nuclear medicine practices. It contains tables with recommended dose estimates at all stages of pregnancy for many radiopharmaceuticals. Compounds for which some information was available regarding placental crossover are shown in shaded rows. It includes the most common diagnostic and therapy practices in nuclear medicine considering the four radioactive isotopes selected: 99mTc, 131I, 201Tl and 67Ga. There is a special case included, it is when conception occurs after the iodine has been administered. In almost every case, the diagnostic benefit to the mother outweighs the risk of any irradiation of the fetus. However, there is one situation in which severe fetal injury can be incurred from administering a radiopharmaceutical to the mother, and that is use of iodine-131 therapy for ablation of the thyroid in cases of hyperthyroidism or carcinoma. Radioactive iodine readily crosses the placenta and concentrates in the fetal thyroid, where, because of its small organ mass, high radiation doses are received. (author)

  6. Effect of deformable registration on the dose calculated in radiation therapy planning CT scans of lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Armato, Samuel G.; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Contee, Clay; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: hal-hallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of deformable image registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pretherapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map were collected. To establish correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pretherapy scans then were coregistered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the demons deformable registration algorithm and two variants of the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm (“Fast” and “EMPIRE10”). Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from each of the three algorithms. The Euclidean distance between manually and automatically mapped landmark points (d{sub E}) and the absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) were calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of d{sub E}, dose (D), dose standard deviation (SD{sub dose}) in an eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: Over 1400 landmark point pairs were identified, with 58–93 (median: 84) points identified per patient. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.5 Gy (range: 0.9–10.6 Gy). Registration accuracy was highest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm, with an average d{sub E} across patients of 5.2 mm (compared with >7 mm for the other two algorithms). Consequently, average |ΔD| was also lowest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of d{sub E} (0.42 Gy/mm), D (0.05 Gy/Gy), SD{sub dose} (1.4 Gy/Gy), and the algorithm used (≤1 Gy). Conclusions: An

  7. MR assessment of fetal lung development using lung volumes and signal intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Thomas M.; Michel, Sven C.A.; Marincek, Borut [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich (Switzerland); Rake, Annett; Wisser, Josef [Department of Obstetrics, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [Department of Biostatistics, University of Zurich, Sumatrastrasse 30, 8006, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich (Switzerland); Institute of Radiology, Kantonsspital Baden, 5404, Baden (Switzerland)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the monitoring and diagnostic potential of MRI in fetal lung development and disease using lung volume and signal intensity changes through gestation. Thirty-five healthy fetuses (22-42 weeks) were examined on a 1.5- T MR system using sagittal T2w single-shot fast spin-echo imaging (TR indefinite, TE 90 ms, slice thickness/gap 3-5/0 mm, FOV 26-40 cm, NEX 0.5). Fetal body and lung were segmented manually and volumes calculated. Signal intensities (SI) of fetal lung and three reference values were measured on the section best displaying the lung. Regions of interests were defined by including the maximal organ area possible. The following SI ratios were generated: lung/liver, lung/amniotic fluid, lung/muscle, liver/fluid and liver/muscle. Volumes and ratios were correlated with gestational age. Data from seven fetuses with pulmonary pathology were compared with these normative values. Absolute lung volume varied from 12.3 to 143.5 cm{sup 3} in correlation with gestational age (P<0.001); lung volume relative to total body volume ranged from 1.6 to 5.0%, decreasing with gestational age (P=0.001). (orig.)

  8. MR assessment of fetal lung development using lung volumes and signal intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the monitoring and diagnostic potential of MRI in fetal lung development and disease using lung volume and signal intensity changes through gestation. Thirty-five healthy fetuses (22-42 weeks) were examined on a 1.5- T MR system using sagittal T2w single-shot fast spin-echo imaging (TR indefinite, TE 90 ms, slice thickness/gap 3-5/0 mm, FOV 26-40 cm, NEX 0.5). Fetal body and lung were segmented manually and volumes calculated. Signal intensities (SI) of fetal lung and three reference values were measured on the section best displaying the lung. Regions of interests were defined by including the maximal organ area possible. The following SI ratios were generated: lung/liver, lung/amniotic fluid, lung/muscle, liver/fluid and liver/muscle. Volumes and ratios were correlated with gestational age. Data from seven fetuses with pulmonary pathology were compared with these normative values. Absolute lung volume varied from 12.3 to 143.5 cm3 in correlation with gestational age (P<0.001); lung volume relative to total body volume ranged from 1.6 to 5.0%, decreasing with gestational age (P=0.001). (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of dose-volume histogram parameters (V20 and mean dose) in lung cancer adaptive radiotherapy with design of composite lung volumes (ITV; Evaluacion de parametros del histograma dosis-volumen (V20 y dosis media) en radioterapia adaptada de cancer de pulmon con diseno de volumenes pulmonares compuestos (Internal Target Volume, ITV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroy Anton, J. L.; Solar Tortosa, M.; Lopez Munoz, M.; Navarro Bergada, A.; Estornell gualde, M. A.; Melchor Iniguez, M.

    2013-07-01

    Physiological respiratory motion is a challenge in external radiotherapy for lung tumors. In adaptive radiotherapy, changing position of the target volume should be reflected in the simulation procedure and taken into account in the design of volumes for CTV/PTV proper coverage. This may be achieved through the design of an Internal Target Volume (ITV) as indicated in ICRU-62. However, the Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) evaluation of the doses received by the healthy lung may vary in the case of designing a single lung volume, compared to the composite lung volume obtained with the fusion of normal breathing, inspiration and expiration (ITV{sub l}ung). (Author)

  10. Long-term prognosis of patients with lung cancer detected on low-dose chest computed tomography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tohru; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kusano, Suzushi; Chonan, Tatsuya; Fukai, Shimao; Endo, Katsuyuki

    2012-02-01

    The effectiveness of lung cancer screening using low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) remains elusive. The present study examined the prognosis of patients with lung cancer detected on CT screening in Japanese men and women. Subjects were 210 patients with primary lung cancer identified on CT screening at two medical facilities in Hitachi, Japan, where a total of 61,914 CT screenings were performed among 25,385 screenees between 1998 and 2006. Prognostic status of these patients was sought by examining medical records at local hospitals, supplemented by vital status information from local government. The 5-year survival rate was estimated according to the characteristics of patients and lung nodule. A total of 203 (97%) patients underwent surgery. During a 5.7-year mean follow-up period, 19 patients died from lung cancer and 6 died from other causes. The estimated 5-year survival rate for all patients and for those on stage IA was 90% and 97%, respectively. Besides cancer stage, smoking and nodule appearance were independent predictors of a poor survival; multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 4.7 (1.3, 16.5) for current and past smokers versus nonsmokers and 4.6 (1.6, 13.9) for solid nodule versus others. Even patients with solid shadow had a 5-year survival of 82% if the lesion was 20mm or less in size. Results suggest that lung cancers detected on CT screening are mostly curative. The impact of CT screening on mortality at community level needs to be clarified by monitoring lung cancer deaths.

  11. Development of Landscape Dose Factors for dose assessments in SR-Can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous safety assessments Ecosystem Dose Factors (EDFs), were derived from estimates of doses to the most exposed group resulting from constant unit radionuclide release rates over 10,000 years to various ecosystem types, e.g. mires, agricultural lands, lakes and marine ecosystems. A number of limitations of the EDF approach have been identified. The objectives of this report is to further develop the EDF approach, in order to resolve the identified limitations, and to use the improved approach for deriving Dose Conversion Factors for use in the SR-Can risk assessments. The Dose Conversion Factors derived in this report are named Landscape Dose Factors (LDFs). It involves modelling the fate of the radionuclides in the whole landscape, which develops from a sea to a inland situation during 20,000 years. Both candidate sites studies in SR-Can, Forsmark and Laxemar, are included in the study. As a basis for the modelling, the period starting at the beginning of the last interglacial (8,000 BC) is used, over which releases from a hypothetical repository were assumed to take place. For the present temperate period, the overall development of the biosphere at each site is outlined in a 1,000 year perspective and beyond, essentially based on the ongoing shoreline displacement and the understanding on the impact this has on the biosphere. The past development, i.e. from deglaciation to the present time, is inferred from geological records and associated reconstructions of the shore-line. For each time step of 1,000 years, the landscape at the site is described as a number of interconnected biosphere objects constituting an integrated landscape model of each site. The water fluxes through the objects were estimated from the average run-off at the site, the areas of the objects and their associated catchment areas. Radionuclides in both dissolved and particulate forms were considered in the transport calculations. The transformation between ecosystems was modelled as

  12. Circulating miR-29a and miR-150 correlate with delivered dose during thoracic radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk of normal tissue toxicity limits the amount of thoracic radiation therapy (RT) that can be routinely prescribed to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An early biomarker of response to thoracic RT may provide a way to predict eventual toxicities—such as radiation pneumonitis—during treatment, thereby enabling dose adjustment before the symptomatic onset of late effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were studied as potential serological biomarkers for thoracic RT. As a first step, we sought to identify miRNAs that correlate with delivered dose and standard dosimetric factors. We performed miRNA profiling of plasma samples obtained from five patients with Stage IIIA NSCLC at five dose-points each during radical thoracic RT. Candidate miRNAs were then assessed in samples from a separate cohort of 21 NSCLC patients receiving radical thoracic RT. To identify a cellular source of circulating miRNAs, we quantified in vitro miRNA expression intracellularly and within secreted exosomes in five NSCLC and stromal cell lines. miRNA profiling of the discovery cohort identified ten circulating miRNAs that correlated with delivered RT dose as well as other dosimetric parameters such as lung V20. In the validation cohort, miR-29a-3p and miR-150-5p were reproducibly shown to decrease with increasing radiation dose. Expression of miR-29a-3p and miR-150-5p in secreted exosomes decreased with radiation. This was concomitant with an increase in intracellular levels, suggesting that exosomal export of these miRNAs may be downregulated in both NSCLC and stromal cells in response to radiation. miR-29a-3p and miR-150-5p were identified as circulating biomarkers that correlated with delivered RT dose. miR-150 has been reported to decrease in the circulation of mammals exposed to radiation while miR-29a has been associated with fibrosis in the human heart, lungs, and kidneys. One may therefore hypothesize that outlier levels of circulating miR-29a-3p and miR-150-5p may eventually help

  13. Four-dimensional layer-stacking carbon-ion beam dose distribution by use of a lung numeric phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    To extend layer-stacking irradiation to accommodate intrafractional organ motion, we evaluated the carbon-ion layer-stacking dose distribution using a numeric lung phantom. We designed several types of range compensators. The planning target volume was calculated from the respective respiratory phases for consideration of intrafractional beam range variation. The accumulated dose distribution was calculated by registering of the dose distributions at respective phases to that at the reference phase. We evaluated the dose distribution based on the following six parameters: motion displacement, direction, gating window, respiratory cycle, range-shifter change time, and prescribed dose. All parameters affected the dose conformation to the moving target. By shortening of the gating window, dose metrics for superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) motions were decreased from a D95 of 94 %, Dmax of 108 %, and homogeneity index (HI) of 23 % at T00-T90, to a D95 of 93 %, Dmax of 102 %, and HI of 20 % at T40-T60. In contrast, all dose metrics except the HI were independent of respiratory cycle. All dose metrics in SI motion were almost the same in respective motion displacement, with a D95 of 94 %, Dmax of 108 %, Dmin of 89 %, and HI of 23 % for the ungated phase, and D95 of 93 %, Dmax of 102 %, Dmin of 85 %, and HI of 20 % for the gated phase. The dose conformation to a moving target was improved by the gating strategy and by an increase in the prescribed dose. A combination of these approaches is a practical means of adding them to existing treatment protocols without modifications.

  14. Dose-volummetrics in the prediction of pulmonary function changes after radiotherapy in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the correlation between dose-volummetrics and changes of pulmonary function tests (PFTs), and to study the ability of standard dose-volummetrics to predict these changes after radiotherapy. Methods: Pulmonary function was measured in 39 patients with inoperable lung cancer one week before and 2-4 months after radiotherapy. The pulmonary function parameters were the forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s ( FEV 1.0) and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO). Dose-volummetrics were V10, V15, V20, V25, V30, V35, V40, CTV100, CTV95, CTV90, CTV80, lung Dean, Veff and NTCP. Pearson and line regression analysis was performed to determine whether the correlation existed between the metrics and the changes of PFTs. Results: No correlation was found between the dose- volummetrics and the changes in PFTs. Excluding patients (n=15) with pretreatment atelectasis, significant correlation was found between the dose-volummetrics (V20, V25, V30, V35, V40, GTV, Veff and Dmean) and the PFTs changes(r=0.469-0.695, P≤0.05). Therefore, the re-expansion may have jesperdized the proper data to the present record. Multivariate analysis showed that V30 was the risk factor to affect the changes of FEV 1.0 and DLCO (P=0.046, 0.041). The pulmonary function of patients with V30≥18% was worse than patients with V30 30 is the risk factor to affect the pulmonary function changes in patients with lung cancer excluding those who have had pretreatment atelectasis. (authors)

  15. Aspergillosis Superinfection as a Cause of Death of Crizotinib-Induced Interstitial Lung Disease Successfully Treated with High-Dose Corticosteroid Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Deiana, Laura; Grisanti, Salvatore; Ferrari, Vittorio; Tironi, Andrea; Brugnoli, Giulia; Ferrari, Laura; Bozzola, Giordano; Berruti, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Crizotinib is an efficacious and well-tolerated drug in the management of ALK-positive lung cancer. Crizotinib treatment, however, is rarely complicated by the occurrence of acute interstitial lung disease (ILD) that is often fatal. There is no treatment for this serious adverse event. We report a female non-small cell lung cancer patient who developed ILD after a few days of crizotinib therapy. She showed a significant improvement after a high dose of pulse corticosteroid therapy, both radio...

  16. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Paradigm shift in LUNG SBRT dose calculation associated with Heterogeneity correction; Cambio de paradigma en SBRT pulmonar asociada al calculo de dosis con correccion de heterogeneidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Pinto Monedero, M.; Marti Asensjo, J.; Alonso Iracheta, L.

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of lung injury SBRT requires great dosimetric accuracy, the increasing clinical importance of dose calculation heterogeneities introducing algorithms that adequately model the transport of particles narrow beams in media of low density, as with Monte Carlo calculation. (Author)

  18. Lung nodule detection in a high-risk population: Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.sommer@usb.ch [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Tremper, Jan, E-mail: j.tremper@dkfz.de [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto – University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Campus Universitario Monte Alegre, 14048 900 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz.de [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Becker, Nikolaus, E-mail: n.becker@dkfz.de [Division of Cancer Epidemiology (C020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.biederer@uni-heidelberg.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    Objective: To investigate the potential of MRI for lung nodule detection in a high-risk population in comparison to low-dose CT. Methods: 49 participants (31 men, 18 women, 51–71 years) of the German Lung Cancer Screening and Intervention Trial (LUSI) with a cancer-suspicious lung lesion in CT were examined with non-contrast-enhanced MRI of the lung at 1.5 T. Data were pseudonymized and presented at random order together with 30 datasets (23 in men, 7 in women, 18–64 years) from healthy volunteers. Two radiologists read the data for the presence of nodules. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Gold standard was either histology or long-term follow-up. Contrast-to-Noise-Ratio (CNR) was measured for all detected lesions in all MRI sequences. Results: Average maximum diameter of the lesions was 15 mm. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 48% (26/54) and 88% (29/33) compared to low-dose CT. Sensitivity of MRI was significantly higher for malignant nodules (78% (12.5/16)) than for benign ones (36% (13.5/38); P = 0.007). There was no statistically significant difference in sensitivity between nodules (benign and malignant) larger or smaller than 10 mm (P = 0.7). Inter observer agreement was 84% (κ = 0.65). Lesion-to-background CNR of T2-weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo was significantly higher for malignant nodules (89 ± 27) than for benign ones (56 ± 23; P = 0.002). Conclusion: The sensitivity of MRI for detection of malignant pulmonary nodules in a high-risk population is 78%. Due to its inherent soft tissue contrast, MRI is more sensitive to malignant nodules than to benign ones. MRI may therefore represent a useful test for early detection of lung cancer.

  19. ARAC: a computer-based emergency dose-assessment service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 15 years, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) has developed and evolved a computer-based, real-time, radiological-dose-assessment service for the United States Departments of Energy and Defense. This service is built on the integrated components of real-time computer-acquired meteorological data, extensive computer databases, numerical atmospheric-dispersion models, graphical displays, and operational-assessment-staff expertise. The focus of ARAC is the off-site problem where regional meteorology and topography are dominant influences on transport and dispersion. Through application to numerous radiological accidents/releases on scales from small accidental ventings to the Chernobyl reactor disaster, ARAC has developed methods to provide emergency dose assessments from the local to the hemispheric scale. As the power of computers has evolved inversely with respect to cost and size, ARAC has expanded its service and reduced the response time from hours to minutes for an accident within the United States. Concurrently the quality of the assessments has improved as more advanced models have been developed and incorporated into the ARAC system. Over the past six years, the number of directly connected facilities has increased from 6 to 73. All major U.S. Federal agencies now have access to ARAC via the Department of Energy. This assures a level of consistency as well as experience. ARAC maintains its real-time skills by participation in approximately 150 exercises per year; ARAC also continuously validates its modeling systems by application to all available tracer experiments and data sets

  20. Assessing medical students’ competence in calculating drug doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Harries

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that healthcare professionals are not optimally able to calculate medicine doses and various strategies have been employed to improve these skills. In this study, the performance of third and fourth year medical students was assessed and the success of various educational interventions investigated. Students were given four types of dosing calculations typical of those required in an emergency setting. Full competence (at the 100% level was defined as correctly answering all four categories of calculation at any one time. Three categories correct meant competence at the 75% level. Interventions comprised an assignment with a model answer for self-assessment in the third year and a small group tutorial in the fourth year. The small groups provided opportunities for peer-assisted learning. A subgroup of 23 students received individual tuition from the lecturer prior to the start of the fourth year. Amongst the 364 eligible students, full competence rose from 23% at the beginning of the third year to 66% by the end of the fourth year. More students succeeded during the fourth than the third year of study. Success of small group tuition was assessed in a sample of 200 students who had formal assessments both before and after the fourth year tuition. Competence at the 75% level improved by 10% in attendees and decreased by 3% in non-attendees, providing evidence of the value of students receiving assistance from more able same-language peers. Good results were achieved with one-on-one tuition where individualised assistance allowed even struggling students to improve.

  1. Comparative hazard identification by a single dose lung exposure of zinc oxide and silver nanomaterials in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Ilse; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Bokkers, Bas; de Jong, Wim H; Krystek, Petra; Tran, Lang; Stone, Vicki; Wallin, Håkan; Stoeger, Tobias; Cassee, Flemming R

    2015-01-01

    Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs) can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag), non-functionalised zinc oxide (ZnO) and a tri

  2. Comparative hazard identification by a single dose lung exposure of zinc oxide and silver nanomaterials in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosens, Ilse; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun;

    2015-01-01

    Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs) can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag), non-functionalised zinc oxide (Zn...

  3. The impact of radiation dose and fractionation on the risk factor of radiation pneumonitis on four radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) lung cancer trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the relationship between total dose of radiation delivered, the fractionation scheme used, age, and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) on the risk of moderate to severe (≥ Grade 2) radiation pneumonitis in patients treated with radiotherapy alone for lung cancer on four RTOG Trials. Materials and Methods: Between February of 1984 and April of 1989, 1701 patients with clinically localized (I-IIIb) lung cancer were entered on clinical trials employing radiotherapy alone. Twelve hundred and forty-seven patients were entered on RTOG 8311 or 8407 (phase I/II trials) and 454 patients were entered on RTOG 8321 or 8403 (phase III trials). RTOG 8403 and 8321 patients received once-a-day irradiation to 60 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 64.8, 69.6, 74.4 or 79.2 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 63 Gy or 70.2 Gy. All patients were assessed for the incidence of Grade 2-5, radiation pneumonitis. One hundred and seven (6%) of patients were either ineligible or canceled (n=60), or were excluded because of incomplete data (n=47). The factors evaluated included total dose of radiation, the fractionation scheme, age and pre-treatment KPS. Patients treated to doses ≥ 72 Gy were considered to have received high doses (72.0 - 81.6 Gy), while the remaining patients treated to doses < 72 Gy (57.6 - 71.9 Gy) were considered to have received standard dose radiation. For the this analysis, information regarding field size and baseline pulmonary function was not available. Results: Age, sex, stage distribution, and the percentage of patients with a KPS ≥90 were similar among the patients treated on these four studies. Patients receiving hyperfractionated radiotherapy to doses ≥ 72 Gy experienced a higher incidence of radiation pneumonitis ≥ Grade 2, than patients treated with standard doses < 72

  4. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  5. Dose calculation of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment with flattening filter free beams and the potential role of calculation grid size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study aimed to appraise the dose differences between Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for lung cancer with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Additionally, the potential role of the calculation grid size (CGS) on the dose differences between the two algorithms was also investigated. SBRT plans with 6X and 10X FFF beams produced from the CT scan data of 10 patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Clinically acceptable treatment plans with AAA were recalculated using AXB with the same monitor units (MU) and identical multileaf collimator (MLC) settings. Furthermore, different CGS (2.5 mm and 1 mm) in the two algorithms was also employed to investigate their dosimetric impact. Dose to planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) between the two algorithms were compared. PTV was separated into PTV-soft (density in soft-tissue range) and PTV-lung (density in lung range) for comparison. The dose to PTV-lung predicted by AXB was found to be 1.33 ± 1.12% (6XFFF beam with 2.5 mm CGS), 2.33 ± 1.37% (6XFFF beam with 1 mm CGS), 2.81 ± 2.33% (10XFFF beam with 2.5 mm CGS) and 3.34 ± 1.76% (10XFFF beam with 1 mm CGS) lower compared with that by AAA, respectively. However, the dose directed to PTV-soft was comparable. For OARs, AXB predicted a slightly lower dose to the aorta, chest wall, spinal cord and esophagus, regardless of whether the 6XFFF or 10XFFF beam was utilized. Exceptionally, dose to the ipsilateral lung was significantly higher with AXB. AXB principally predicts lower dose to PTV-lung compared to AAA and the CGS contributes to the relative dose difference between the two algorithms

  6. Lung Texture in Serial Thoracic Computed Tomography Scans: Correlation of Radiomics-based Features With Radiation Therapy Dose and Radiation Pneumonitis Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra; Armato, Samuel G. [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Pham, Ngoc [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: hal-hallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between radiation dose and change in a set of mathematical intensity- and texture-based features and to determine the ability of texture analysis to identify patients who develop radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 106 patients who received radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified under institutional review board approval. For each patient, diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired before (0-168 days) and after (5-120 days) RT, and a treatment planning CT scan with an associated dose map was obtained. 32- × 32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) were randomly identified in the lungs of each pre-RT scan. ROIs were subsequently mapped to the post-RT scan and the planning scan dose map by using deformable image registration. The changes in 20 feature values (ΔFV) between pre- and post-RT scan ROIs were calculated. Regression modeling and analysis of variance were used to test the relationships between ΔFV, mean ROI dose, and development of grade ≥2 RP. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to determine each feature's ability to distinguish between patients with and those without RP. A classifier was constructed to determine whether 2- or 3-feature combinations could improve RP distinction. Results: For all 20 features, a significant ΔFV was observed with increasing radiation dose. Twelve features changed significantly for patients with RP. Individual texture features could discriminate between patients with and those without RP with moderate performance (AUCs from 0.49 to 0.78). Using multiple features in a classifier, AUC increased significantly (0.59-0.84). Conclusions: A relationship between dose and change in a set of image-based features was observed. For 12 features, ΔFV was significantly related to RP development. This study demonstrated the ability of radiomics to provide a quantitative, individualized

  7. Impact of different beam directions on intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivered to functioning lung tissue identified using single-photon emission computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Qin; Zhang, Fucheng; Wang, Yanming; Qu, Weiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To use different beam arrangements and numbers to plan intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and investigate their effects on low and high radiation doses delivered to the functional lung, in order to reduce radiation-induced lung damage. Material and methods Ten patients with stage I–III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) underwent IMRT. Beam arrangements were selected on the basis of orientation and dose-volume histograms to create SPECT-guided IMRT plans that spa...

  8. Low-dose nicotine does not promote lung tumors in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments in mice show that low levels of exposure to nicotine, equivalent to those in humans who use nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to help them quit smoking, did not promote lung tumor growth.

  9. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  10. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  11. Proton magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lung function and respiratory dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, Monika [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: m.eichinger@dkfz.de; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Puderbach, Michael [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Woodhouse, Neil [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Kauczor, H.-U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Radiology (E010), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Since many pulmonary diseases present with a variable regional involvement, modalities for assessment of regional lung function gained increasing attention over the last years. Together with lung perfusion and gas exchange, ventilation, as a result of the interaction of the respiratory pump and the lungs, is an indispensable component of lung function. So far, this complex mechanism is still mainly assessed indirectly and globally. A differentiation between the individual determining factors of ventilation would be crucial for precise diagnostics and adequate treatment. By dynamic imaging of the respiratory pump, the mechanical components of ventilation can be assessed regionally. Amongst imaging modalities applicable to this topic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a tool not relying on ionising radiation, is the most attractive. Recent advances in MRI technology have made it possible to assess diaphragmatic and chest wall motion, static and dynamic lung volumes, as well as regional lung function. Even though existing studies show large heterogeneity in design and applied methods, it becomes evident that MRI is capable to visualise pulmonary function as well as diaphragmatic and thoracic wall movement, providing new insights into lung physiology. Partly contradictory results and conclusions are most likely caused by technical limitations, limited number of studies and small sample size. Existing studies mainly evaluate possible imaging techniques and concentrate on normal physiology. The few studies in patients with lung cancer and emphysema already give a promising outlook for these techniques from which an increasing impact on improved and quantitative disease characterization as well as better patient management can be expected.

  12. Proton magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lung function and respiratory dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since many pulmonary diseases present with a variable regional involvement, modalities for assessment of regional lung function gained increasing attention over the last years. Together with lung perfusion and gas exchange, ventilation, as a result of the interaction of the respiratory pump and the lungs, is an indispensable component of lung function. So far, this complex mechanism is still mainly assessed indirectly and globally. A differentiation between the individual determining factors of ventilation would be crucial for precise diagnostics and adequate treatment. By dynamic imaging of the respiratory pump, the mechanical components of ventilation can be assessed regionally. Amongst imaging modalities applicable to this topic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a tool not relying on ionising radiation, is the most attractive. Recent advances in MRI technology have made it possible to assess diaphragmatic and chest wall motion, static and dynamic lung volumes, as well as regional lung function. Even though existing studies show large heterogeneity in design and applied methods, it becomes evident that MRI is capable to visualise pulmonary function as well as diaphragmatic and thoracic wall movement, providing new insights into lung physiology. Partly contradictory results and conclusions are most likely caused by technical limitations, limited number of studies and small sample size. Existing studies mainly evaluate possible imaging techniques and concentrate on normal physiology. The few studies in patients with lung cancer and emphysema already give a promising outlook for these techniques from which an increasing impact on improved and quantitative disease characterization as well as better patient management can be expected

  13. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): reactor-accident assessment methods. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This document describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. IRDAM calculates whole body (5-cm depth) and infant thyroid doses at six fixed downwind distances between 500 and 20,000 meters. Radionuclides considered primarily consist of noble gases and radioiodines. In order to provide a rapid assessment capability consistent with the capacity of the Osborne-1 computer, certain simplifying approximations and assumptions are made. These are described, along with default values (assumptions used in the absence of specific input) in the text of this document. Two companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. The user's Guide (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 1) describes the setup and operation of equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios.

  14. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): reactor-accident assessment methods. Vol.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This document describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. IRDAM calculates whole body (5-cm depth) and infant thyroid doses at six fixed downwind distances between 500 and 20,000 meters. Radionuclides considered primarily consist of noble gases and radioiodines. In order to provide a rapid assessment capability consistent with the capacity of the Osborne-1 computer, certain simplifying approximations and assumptions are made. These are described, along with default values (assumptions used in the absence of specific input) in the text of this document. Two companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. The user's Guide (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 1) describes the setup and operation of equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios

  15. Patient dose assessment in different diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective doses have been estimated for 314 patients under diagnostic procedures in a Nuclear Medicine Department using data reported in ICRP-80 and RIDIC (Radiation Internal Dose Information Center). Data on administered activity, radiopharmaceutical and administration route, age and sex of the patients have been collected. Doses in the most exposed critical organ for every protocol, doses in uterus, doses in fetus versus the stage of pregnancy (in case the female patient was pregnant) and doses for nursing infants have been also estimated. Ga-67 studies give the highest effective doses per protocol followed by cardiac SPECT procedures using Tl-201 chloride. Ga-67 studies also give the highest absorbed doses in uterus. Due to not administering different activities, depending on height and weight of adults, women receive doses about 20% higher than men. This would be a practice to modify in the future in order to optimise doses. (author)

  16. Dose distribution of IMRT and 3D-CRT on treating central non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D-CRT and IMRT were used in the radiation therapy of Central Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the dose difference of the methods was estimated. Thirty-two patients suffering with II class NSCLC were selected. Based on CT images, each patient was given 1 3D-CRT (3 dimensional conformal radiotherapy) and 2 IMRT(intensity modulated radiation therapy) treatment plans (5 fields and 7 fields), respectively, and the dose distribution was evaluated too. The results showed that PTVDmean and the PTVmax, PTVDmax (%) and CI of IMRT were both higher than those of 3D-CRT, but the uniformity was not as good as 3D-CRT. All indexes of lung and spinal cord treated with IMRT were lower than that treated with 3D-CRT. Moreover, there was no significance of the difference between 5 fields and 7 fields. In a conclusion, IMRT could not only decrease the target dose of NSCLC, but it can protect normal tissue from radiation damage effectively. And when IMRT was used, 5 fields might be enough. (authors)

  17. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment. - Highlights: • Formaldehyde exposure does not cause lung inflammation in pregnant rats. • Formaldehyde exposure suppresses allergic lung inflammation in the offspring. • Formaldehyde exposure induces oxidative stress in uterine environment

  18. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiellaro, Marília [Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Correa-Costa, Matheus [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Gimenes Júnior, João Antônio [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli [Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana, E-mail: adrilino@usp.br [Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment. - Highlights: • Formaldehyde exposure does not cause lung inflammation in pregnant rats. • Formaldehyde exposure suppresses allergic lung inflammation in the offspring. • Formaldehyde exposure induces oxidative stress in uterine environment.

  19. Update on donor assessment, resuscitation, and acceptance criteria, including novel techniques--non-heart-beating donor lung retrieval and ex vivo donor lung perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Cypel, Marcelo; Waddell, Thomas K; van Raemdonck, Dirk; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2009-05-01

    The shortage of adequate organ donors remains a great challenge in clinical lung transplantation. With increasing experience in the medical management and surgical technique of lung transplantation, gradual expansion of the criteria for lung donor selection has occurred with beneficial effects on the donor pool. Interest in donation after cardiac death also is increasing as the gap increases between donors and the needs of listed patients. Successful use of these new sources of lungs depends on the accurate assessment and prediction of transplanted lung function. Promising techniques for lung assessment and diagnostics include investigating key genes associated with graft failure or good graft performance using molecular approaches, and ex vivo evaluation. Further studies are needed to answer remaining questions about the best technique and solution to reperfuse human lungs for several hours without edema formation. As the predictive ability to discern good from injured donor lungs improves, strategies to repair donor lungs become increasingly important. Prolonged normothermic EVLP seems to be a platform on which many reparative strategies can be realized. With these new methods for assessing and resuscitating lungs accurately, it is hoped that inroads will be made toward providing every listed patient a chance for successful lung transplantation. PMID:19662970

  20. Extracting the normal lung dose–response curve from clinical DVH data: a possible role for low dose hyper-radiosensitivity, increased radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for lung cancer, radiation pneumonitis’ (RP) dependence on the normal lung dose-volume histogram (DVH) is not well understood. Complication models alternatively make RP a function of a summary statistic, such as mean lung dose (MLD). This work searches over damage profiles, which quantify sub-volume damage as a function of dose. Profiles that achieve best RP predictive accuracy on a clinical dataset are hypothesized to approximate DVH dependence.Step function damage rate profiles R(D) are generated, having discrete steps at several dose points. A range of profiles is sampled by varying the step heights and dose point locations. Normal lung damage is the integral of R(D) with the cumulative DVH. Each profile is used in conjunction with a damage cutoff to predict grade 2 plus (G2+) RP for DVHs from a University of Michigan clinical trial dataset consisting of 89 CFRT patients, of which 17 were diagnosed with G2+ RP.Optimal profiles achieve a modest increase in predictive accuracy—erroneous RP predictions are reduced from 11 (using MLD) to 8. A novel result is that optimal profiles have a similar distinctive shape: enhanced damage contribution from low doses (<20 Gy), a flat contribution from doses in the range ∼20–40 Gy, then a further enhanced contribution from doses above 40 Gy. These features resemble the hyper-radiosensitivity / increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR) observed in some cell survival curves, which can be modeled using Joiner’s induced repair model.A novel search strategy is employed, which has the potential to estimate RP dependence on the normal lung DVH. When applied to a clinical dataset, identified profiles share a characteristic shape, which resembles HRS/IRR. This suggests that normal lung may have enhanced sensitivity to low doses, and that this sensitivity can affect RP risk. (paper)

  1. Analyzing correlation between epicardial fat area and metabolic syndrome risk factor by using low-dose Lung CT

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Hyon-Chol; Lee, Hae-Kag; Lee, Heon; Cha, Jang-Gyu; Kim, Yoon-Shin; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study about the blood count of a risk factor related to physical measurement and metabolic syndrome, and the area of epicardial fat for medical checkup patients. Methods: From April 1st to November 15th in 2014, we measured the area of epicardial fat in the adult out patients under 60 years of age, who are in good health; and the patients took the blood test and low-dose lung CT. In order to identify the relationship between the area of epicardial fat and the risk factor of met...

  2. Assessing uncertainty in published risk estimates using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  3. Assessing model uncertainty using hexavalent chromium and lung cancer mortality as an example [Abstract 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The National Research Council recommended quantitative evaluation of uncertainty in effect estimates for risk assessment. This analysis considers uncertainty across model forms and model parameterizations with hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and lung cancer mortality a...

  4. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of

  5. Diffuse and fugitive emission dose assessment on the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and (2) continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request requires RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. The RL Compliance Plan included as one of its milestones the requirement to develop a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA). An FFCA was negotiated between RL and the EPA, Region 10, and was entered into on February 7, 1994. One of the milestones was to provide EPA, Region 10, with a copy of the Federal Clean Air Act Title V operating air permit application and Air Emission Inventory (AEI) concurrent with its submission to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The AEI will include an assessment of the diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Site. This assessment does not identify any diffuse or fugitive emission source that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  6. Lung cancer symptoms and pulse oximetry in the prognostic assessment of patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada Cecilia M

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical oncologists continue to use performance status as a proxy for quality of life (QOL measures, as completion of QOL instruments is perceived as time consuming, may measure aspects of QOL not affected by cancer therapy, and interpretation may be unclear. The pulse oximeter is widely used in clinical practice to predict cardiopulmonary morbidity after lung resection in cancer patients, but little is known on its role outside the surgical setting. We evaluated whether the Lung Cancer Symptom Scale and pulse oximetry may contribute to the evaluation of lung cancer patients who received standard anticancer therapy. Methods We enrolled forty-one consecutive, newly diagnosed, patients with locally advanced or metastatic lung cancer in this study. We developed a survival model with the variables gender, age, histology, clinical stage, Karnofsky performance status, wasting, LCSS symptom scores, average symptom burden index, and pulse oximetry (SpO2. Results Patient and observer-rated scores were correlated, except for the fatigue subscale. The median SpO2 was 95% (range: 86 to 98, was unrelated to symptom scores, and was weakly correlated with observer cough scores. In a multivariate survival model, SpO2 > 90% and patient scores on the LCSS appetite and fatigue subscales were independent predictors of survival. Conclusion LCSS fatigue and appetite rating, and pulse oximetry should be studied further as prognostic factors in lung cancer patients.

  7. Effect of lung resection on regional lung function assessed by 133Xe radiospirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regional lung function of 39 patients, 19 with lung cancer and 20 with a non-malignant condition, was studied radiospirometrically before partial lung resection and 2.6 and 12 months postoperatively. Dynamic spirometry was also performed at each stage. Initially, the postoperative reduction of total FEV1 was 19% and of VC 18%. There was 26% reduction of unilateral ventilation. 34% of perfusion and 30% of VC at two months post-operatively. At six months there was significant improvement in all parameters, whereas at twelve months there was no further notable change with the exception of total VC. At twelve months the reduction of FEV1 was 14% and of VC 8%. The unilateral perfusion was reduced 30%, ventilation 19%, and VC 17%. The V/Q ratio was 1.00 preoperatively and 1.11 12 months post-operatively. The results show that the final reduction of both unilateral and total function caused by partial lung resection is smaller than would be expected considering the anatomical extent of the operation. However, the V/Q mismatch ensuing from the operation may increase the functional impairment. Lung function appears to become stabilized at its permanent postoperative level during the first six months after operation. (orig.)

  8. Dose-responsiveness and persistence of microRNA expression alterations induced by cigarette smoke in mouse lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzotti, Alberto; Larghero, Patrizia; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Cartiglia, Cristina; Camoirano, Anna [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Steele, Vernon E. [National Cancer Institute (NCI), Rockville, MD (United States); De Flora, Silvio, E-mail: sdf@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), either mainstream or environmental, results in a remarkable downregulation of microRNA expression in the lung of both mice and rats. The goals of the present study were to evaluate the dose responsiveness to CS and the persistence of microRNA alterations after smoking cessation. ICR (CD-1) neonatal mice were exposed whole-body to mainstream CS, at the doses of 119, 292, 438, and 631 mg/m{sup 3} of total particulate matter. Exposure started within 12 h after birth and continued daily for 4 weeks. The levels of bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were measured by {sup 32}P postlabeling procedures, and the expression of 697 mouse microRNAs was analyzed by microarray. The highest CS dose was lethal. Exposure to CS caused a dose-dependent increase of DNA alterations. DNA adducts and, even more sharply, 8-oxodGuo were reverted 1 and 4 weeks after smoking cessation. Exposure to CS resulted in an evident dysregulation of microRNA expression profiles, mainly in the sense of downregulation. The two lowest doses were not particularly effective, while the highest nonlethal dose produced extensive microRNA alterations. The expression of most downregulated microRNAs, including among others 7 members of the let-7 family, was restored one week after smoking cessation. However, the recovery was incomplete for a limited array of microRNAs, including mir-34b, mir-345, mir-421, mir-450b, mir-466, and mir-469. Thus, it appears that microRNAs mainly behave as biomarkers of effect and that exposure to high-dose, lasting for an adequate period of time, is needed to trigger the CS-related carcinogenesis process in the experimental animal model used.

  9. Accuracy of postmortem radiography of excised air-inflated human lungs in assessment of pulmonary emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Sutinen, S; Lohela, P.; Pääkkö, P.; Lahti, R.

    1982-01-01

    The accuracy of radiography of excised air-inflated lungs in assessing pulmonary emphysema at necropsy was evaluated in a series of 107 adults who had died in hospital by reading the radiographs and examining the pathological specimens independently. The radiographic and pathological assessments of the severity of emphysema correlated significantly (r = 0.87, p less than 0.0001). Mild emphysema was recognised radiographically in 88.7% and moderate in 94.9% of the lungs. One of 16 normal lungs...

  10. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts from lung tumors maintain their immuno-suppressive abilities after high-dose irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia eGorchs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence supports the notion that high-dose (>5 Gy radiotherapy (RT regimens are triggering stronger pro-immunogenic effects than standard low-dose (2 Gy regimens. However, the effects of RT on certain immunoregulatory elements in tumors remain unexplored. In this study we have investigated the effects of high-dose irradiation (HD-RT on the immunomodulating functions of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. Primary CAF cultures were established from lung cancer specimens derived from patients diagnosed for non-small cell lung cancer. Irradiated and non-irradiated CAFs were examined for immunomodulation in experiments with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from random, healthy donors. Regulation of lymphocytes behavior was checked by lymphocyte proliferation assays, lymphocyte migration assays and T-cell cytokine production. Additionally, CAF-secreted immuno-regulatory factors were studied by multiplex protein arrays, ELISAs and by LC-MS/MS proteomics. In all functional assays we observed a powerful immuno-suppressive effect exerted by CAF-conditioned medium on activated T-cells (p>0,001, and this effect was sustained after a single radiation dose of 18 Gy. Relevant immuno-suppressive molecules such as prostaglandin E2, interleukin-6 and -10, or transforming growth factor-β were found in CAF conditioned medium, but their secretion was unchanged after irradiation. Finally, immunogenic cell death responses in CAFs were studied by exploring the release of high motility group box-1 and ATP. Both alarmins remained undetectable before and after irradiation. In conclusion, CAFs play a powerful immuno-suppressive effect over activated T-cells, and this effect remains unchanged after HD-RT. Importantly, CAFs do not switch on immunogenic cell death responses after exposure to HD-RT.

  11. The value of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing alveolar recruitment volume in acute lung injury patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李洋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the precision and feasibility of nitrogen washout/washin method in assessing lung recruitment of acute lung injury(ALI)patients.Methods Fifteen ALI patients underwent mechanical ventilation

  12. FBP Reconstruction and iDose4 IR in the Comparative Study of Low Dose Screening for Lung Cancer%FBP重建与iDose4 IR在肺癌低剂量筛查中的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温齐平; 张滨; 樊文鑫; 潘俊; 哈婷婷

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of iterative reconstruction (idose4) for radiation dose reduction in screening of lung cancer through the comparative study between the reconstructed image of the filtered back projection (FBP) and idose4 (level 6).Methods Forty-two patients at high risk of lung cancer accepted CT scan with Philips ingenuity core 128 scanner. Al image were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) (group A) and idose4(level 6) (group B). Four position which at the plane of bifurcation of trachea were chose to measure the CT value in both two groups, standard deviation (SD) of CT value were calculated to estimate the image quality Objective ly. Meanwhile, two radiologists assessed the quality of the image subjectively.Results Both the Objective and subjective Results show that the image quality of group B is better than group A.Conclusion The iterative reconstruction (idose4) for radiation dose reduction in screening of lung cancer can reduce the image noise and improve the image quality, it can also provide more accurate evidence to diagnose for the screening of lung cancer.%目的 通过FBP重建与iDose4(6级)重建,对图像的信噪比和图像质量的对比研究,评价iDose4迭代重建技术在低剂量肺癌筛查中的应用价值.方法 肺癌高危人群42例,采用Philips ingenuity core 128 CT进行全肺扫描后,所获图像经FBP重建(A组)与iDose4(6级)重建(B组),两组图像同时选取主支气管分叉层面并圈定四个位置,测量SD值进行客观评价图像的质量;同时由两名副主任医师对图像进行主观评价图像质量. 结果 客观、主观评价均可认为B组图像质量较A组为佳.结论 低剂量肺癌筛查同时应用iDose4(6级)迭代重建算法,可以减低图像噪声,提高所获得的图像质量,为肺癌筛查提供更准确的诊断依据.

  13. Calculations of dose distributions in the lungs of a rat model irradiated in the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor in Pavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protti, N; Bortolussi, S; Stella, S; Gadan, M A; De Bari, A; Ballarini, F; Bruschi, P; Ferrari, C; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Bakeine, J G; Dionigi, P; Zonta, A; Altieri, S

    2009-07-01

    To test the possibility to apply boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to lung tumors, some rats are planned to be irradiated in the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia. Before the irradiation, lung metastases will be induced in BDIX rats, which will be subsequently infused with boronophenylalanine (BPA). During the irradiation, the rats will be positioned in a box designed to shield the whole animal except the thorax area. In order to optimize the irradiation set-up and to design a suitable shielding box, a set of calculations were performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo transport code. A rat model was constructed using the MCNP geometry capabilities and was positioned in a box with walls filled with lithium carbonate. A window was opened in front of the lung region. Different shapes of the holder and of the window were tested and analyzed in terms of the dose distribution obtained in the lungs and of the dose absorbed by the radiosensitive organs in the rat. The best configuration of the holder ensures an almost uniform thermal neutron flux inside the lungs (Phi(max)/Phi(min)=1.5), an irradiation time about 10 min long, to deliver at least 40 Gy(w) to the tumor, a mean lung dose of 5.9+/-0.4 Gy(w), and doses absorbed by all the other healthy tissues below the tolerance limits. PMID:19406647

  14. Estimation of lung tissue doses following exposure to low-LET radiation in the Canadian study of cancer following multiple fluoroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung tissue doses from exposure to external low-LET radiation have been estimated for each year between 1930 and 1960 for 92,707 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canadian institutions between 1930 and 1952. Many of these patients received multiple chest fluoroscopies together with treatment by artificial pneumothorax, and thus accumulated doses up to 15.7 grays. The estimated doses have been used in a statistical analysis of lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 occurring among 64,698 patients known to be alive at the start of 1950, and followed by linkage to the Canadian national mortality data base. There were substantial variations in the total cumulative lung tissue dose received by the cohort, with 2,490 individuals having doses in excess of 1.7 grays. A total of 1,156 lung cancer deaths was observed in the cohort, and these have been used to estimate relative risks. The most appropriate risk model appears to be a simple linear relative risk function, with an excess relative risk coefficient of 0.089 for an absorbed dose of 1 gray. This contrasts with estimates of relative risk based on the atomic bomb survivors study, for which the excess relative risk coefficient for males 20 years after the first exposure is estimated to be 0.64. The difference is statistically significant. It is postulated that fractionation and dose rate effectiveness factors may account for some of the discrepancy. (Modified author abstract) (14 refs., 20 tabs.)

  15. Low-dose CT screening in an Asian population with diverse risk for lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer (LCA) detection in an Asian population with diverse risks for LCA. LCA screening was performed in 12,427 symptomless Asian subjects using either LDCT (5,771) or chest radiography (CXR) (6,656) in a non-trial setting. Subjects were divided into high-risk and non-high-risk groups. Data were collected on the number of patients with screening-detected LCAs and their survival in order to compare outcomes between LDCT and CXR screening with the stratification of risks considering age, sex and smoking status. In the non-high-risk group, a significant difference was observed for the detection of lung cancer (adjusted OR, 5.07; 95 % CI, 2.72-9.45) and survival (adjusted HR of LCA survival between LDCT vs. CXR group, 0.08; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.62). No difference in detection or survival of LCA was noticed in the high-risk group. LCAs in the non-high-risk group were predominantly adenocarcinomas (96 %), and more likely to be part-solid or non-solid compared with those in the high-risk group (p = 0.023). In the non-high-risk group, LDCT helps detect more LCAs and offers better survival than CXR screening, due to better detection of part solid or non-solid lung adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  16. Low-dose CT screening in an Asian population with diverse risk for lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Chin A. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Myung-Hee; Cho, Yun Yung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Center for Health Promotion, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, O. Jung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Eun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer (LCA) detection in an Asian population with diverse risks for LCA. LCA screening was performed in 12,427 symptomless Asian subjects using either LDCT (5,771) or chest radiography (CXR) (6,656) in a non-trial setting. Subjects were divided into high-risk and non-high-risk groups. Data were collected on the number of patients with screening-detected LCAs and their survival in order to compare outcomes between LDCT and CXR screening with the stratification of risks considering age, sex and smoking status. In the non-high-risk group, a significant difference was observed for the detection of lung cancer (adjusted OR, 5.07; 95 % CI, 2.72-9.45) and survival (adjusted HR of LCA survival between LDCT vs. CXR group, 0.08; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.62). No difference in detection or survival of LCA was noticed in the high-risk group. LCAs in the non-high-risk group were predominantly adenocarcinomas (96 %), and more likely to be part-solid or non-solid compared with those in the high-risk group (p = 0.023). In the non-high-risk group, LDCT helps detect more LCAs and offers better survival than CXR screening, due to better detection of part solid or non-solid lung adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  17. Dose-effect relationship of CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide 1826 in murine Lewis lung cancer treated with irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang XB

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Xibing Zhuang,1 Tiankui Qiao,1 Sujuan Yuan,1 Wei Chen,1 Lin Zha,2 Li Yan11Department of Oncology, Jinshan Hospital, Medical Center of Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, Tongling People's Hospital, Tongling, Anhui, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs, which induce signaling via Toll-like receptor 9, have recently been suggested to enhance sensitivity to traditional therapies, including chemotherapy, in certain cancer cell lines. This study aimed to define the dose-effect relationship for CpG ODN 1826 in increasing radiosensitivity and its impact on immune function in a mouse model of Lewis lung cancer.Methods: The tumor-bearing mouse model was induced by injecting Lewis lung cancer cells into the right anterior leg subcutaneously. Sixty-four C57BL/6 J mice were evenly randomized into eight groups, comprising: a control group; an irradiation group; a CpG ODN 0.15 group; a CpG ODN 0.3 group; a CpG ODN 0.45 group; a CpG 0.15 + irradiation group; a CpG 0.3 + irradiation group; and a CpG 0.45 + irradiation group. Tumor growth, serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-12 concentrations, spleen and thymus exponents, and effect of CpG on the secondary immune response were measured, and apoptosis of tumor cells was investigated using TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL after treatment.Results: Tumor volumes in the treated groups were smaller than in the control group, with those of the CpG 0.45 + irradiation group being the smallest. TUNEL showed that the apoptosis rate in all the active treatment groups was higher than in the control group. CpG ODN apoptosis rate, serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-12 levels, and the spleen and thymus exponent showed greater improvement in the groups receiving combination therapy of CpG ODN and irradiation than the control group or the group receiving irradiation alone. With the

  18. Models for dose assessments. Modules for various biosphere types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study was to provide a basis for illustrations of yearly dose rates to the most exposed individual from hypothetical leakages of radionuclides from a deep bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste. The results of this study will be used in the safety assessment SR 97 and in a study on the design and long-term safety for a repository planned to contain long-lived low and intermediate level waste. The repositories will be designed to isolate the radionuclides for several hundred thousands of years. In the SR 97 study, however, hypothetical scenarios for leakage are postulated. Radionuclides are hence assumed to be transported in the geosphere by groundwater, and probably discharge into the biosphere. This may occur in several types of ecosystems. A number of categories of such ecosystems were identified, and turnover of radionuclides was modelled separately for each ecosystem. Previous studies had focused on generic models for wells, lakes and coastal areas. These models were, in this study, developed further to use site-specific data. In addition, flows of groundwater, containing radionuclides, to agricultural land and peat bogs were considered. All these categories are referred to as modules in this report. The forest ecosystems were not included, due to a general lack of knowledge of biospheric processes in connection with discharge of groundwater in forested areas. Examples of each type of module were run with the assumption of a continuous annual release into the biosphere of 1 Bq for each radionuclide during 10 000 years. The results are presented as ecosystem specific dose conversion factors (EDFs) for each nuclide at the year 10 000, assuming stationary ecosystems and prevailing living conditions and habits. All calculations were performed with uncertainty analyses included. Simplifications and assumptions in the modelling of biospheric processes are discussed. The use of modules may be seen as a step

  19. Models for dose assessments. Modules for various biosphere types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, U.; Nordlinder, S.; Aggeryd, I. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide a basis for illustrations of yearly dose rates to the most exposed individual from hypothetical leakages of radionuclides from a deep bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste. The results of this study will be used in the safety assessment SR 97 and in a study on the design and long-term safety for a repository planned to contain long-lived low and intermediate level waste. The repositories will be designed to isolate the radionuclides for several hundred thousands of years. In the SR 97 study, however, hypothetical scenarios for leakage are postulated. Radionuclides are hence assumed to be transported in the geosphere by groundwater, and probably discharge into the biosphere. This may occur in several types of ecosystems. A number of categories of such ecosystems were identified, and turnover of radionuclides was modelled separately for each ecosystem. Previous studies had focused on generic models for wells, lakes and coastal areas. These models were, in this study, developed further to use site-specific data. In addition, flows of groundwater, containing radionuclides, to agricultural land and peat bogs were considered. All these categories are referred to as modules in this report. The forest ecosystems were not included, due to a general lack of knowledge of biospheric processes in connection with discharge of groundwater in forested areas. Examples of each type of module were run with the assumption of a continuous annual release into the biosphere of 1 Bq for each radionuclide during 10 000 years. The results are presented as ecosystem specific dose conversion factors (EDFs) for each nuclide at the year 10 000, assuming stationary ecosystems and prevailing living conditions and habits. All calculations were performed with uncertainty analyses included. Simplifications and assumptions in the modelling of biospheric processes are discussed. The use of modules may be seen as a step

  20. Magnetic resonance lung function – a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment? A phantom study and clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauh Manfred

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung diseases are a major issue in public health. A serial pulmonary assessment using imaging techniques free of ionizing radiation and which provides early information on local function impairment would therefore be a considerably important development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a powerful tool for the static and dynamic imaging of many organs. Its application in lung imaging however, has been limited due to the low water content of the lung and the artefacts evident at air-tissue interfaces. Many attempts have been made to visualize local ventilation using the inhalation of hyperpolarized gases or gadolinium aerosol responding to MRI. None of these methods are applicable for broad clinical use as they require specific equipment. Methods We have shown previously that low-field MRI can be used for static imaging of the lung. Here we show that mathematical processing of data derived from serial MRI scans during the respiratory cycle produces good quality images of local ventilation without any contrast agent. A phantom study and investigations in 85 patients were performed. Results The phantom study proved our theoretical considerations. In 99 patient investigations good correlation (r = 0.8; p ≤ 0.001 was seen for pulmonary function tests and MR ventilation measurements. Small ventilation defects were visualized. Conclusion With this method, ventilation defects can be diagnosed long before any imaging or pulmonary function test will indicate disease. This surprisingly simple approach could easily be incorporated in clinical routine and may be a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment.

  1. X-ray specks: low dose in vivo imaging of lung structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory health is directly linked to the structural and mechanical properties of the airways of the lungs. For studying respiratory development and pathology, the ability to quantitatively measure airway dimensions and changes in their size during respiration is highly desirable. Real-time imaging of the terminal airways with sufficient contrast and resolution during respiration is currently not possible. Herein we reveal a simple method for measuring lung airway dimensions in small animals during respiration from a single propagation-based phase contrast x-ray image, thereby requiring minimal radiation. This modality renders the lungs visible as a speckled intensity pattern. In the near-field regime, the size of the speckles is directly correlated with that of the dominant length scale of the airways. We demonstrate that Fourier space quantification of the speckle texture can be used to statistically measure regional airway dimensions at the alveolar scale, with measurement precision finer than the spatial resolution of the imaging system. Using this technique we discovered striking differences in developmental maturity in the lungs of rabbit kittens at birth. (paper)

  2. Strategies of dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: image guidance and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose in the setting of chemo-radiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has been historically limited by the risk of normal tissue toxicity and this has been hypothesized to correlate with the poor results in regard to local tumor recurrences. Dose escalation, as a means to improve local control, with concurrent chemotherapy has been shown to be feasible with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in early phase studies with good clinical outcome. However, the potential superiority of moderate dose escalation to 74 Gy has not been shown in phase III randomized studies. In this review, the limitations in target volume definition in previous studies; and the factors that may be critical to safe dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, such as respiratory motion management, image guidance, intensity modulation, FDG-PET incorporation in the treatment planning process, and adaptive radiotherapy, are discussed. These factors, along with novel treatment approaches that have emerged in recent years, are proposed to warrant further investigation in future trials in a more comprehensive and integrated fashion.

  3. Mechanisms, assessment and therapeutic implications of lung hyperinflation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Avdeev, Sergey; Di Maria, Giuseppe; Donner, Claudio F; Izquierdo, José Luis; Roche, Nicolas; Similowski, Thomas; Watz, Henrik; Worth, Heinrich; Miravitlles, Marc

    2015-07-01

    The main complaint of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is shortness of breath with exercise, that is usually progressive. The principal mechanism that explains this symptom is the development of lung hyperinflation (LH) which is defined by an increase of functional residual capacity (FRC) above predicted values. Patients with COPD may develop static LH (sLH) because of destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and loss of elastic recoil. In addition, dynamic LH (dLH) develops when patients with COPD breathe in before achieving a full exhalation and, as a consequence, air is trapped within the lungs with each further breath. Dynamic LH may also occur at rest but it becomes clinically relevant during exercise and exacerbation. Lung hyperinflation may have an impact beyond the lungs and the effects of LH on cardiovascular function have been extensively analysed. The importance of LH makes its identification and measurement crucial. The demonstration of LH in COPD leads to the adoption of strategies to minimise its impact on the daily activities of patients. Several strategies reduce the impact of LH; the use of long-acting bronchodilators has been shown to reduce LH and improve exercise capacity. Non pharmacologic interventions have also been demonstrated to be useful. This article describes the pathophysiology of LH, its impact on the lungs and beyond and reviews the strategies that improve LH in COPD.

  4. Mechanisms, assessment and therapeutic implications of lung hyperinflation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Avdeev, Sergey; Di Maria, Giuseppe; Donner, Claudio F; Izquierdo, José Luis; Roche, Nicolas; Similowski, Thomas; Watz, Henrik; Worth, Heinrich; Miravitlles, Marc

    2015-07-01

    The main complaint of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is shortness of breath with exercise, that is usually progressive. The principal mechanism that explains this symptom is the development of lung hyperinflation (LH) which is defined by an increase of functional residual capacity (FRC) above predicted values. Patients with COPD may develop static LH (sLH) because of destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and loss of elastic recoil. In addition, dynamic LH (dLH) develops when patients with COPD breathe in before achieving a full exhalation and, as a consequence, air is trapped within the lungs with each further breath. Dynamic LH may also occur at rest but it becomes clinically relevant during exercise and exacerbation. Lung hyperinflation may have an impact beyond the lungs and the effects of LH on cardiovascular function have been extensively analysed. The importance of LH makes its identification and measurement crucial. The demonstration of LH in COPD leads to the adoption of strategies to minimise its impact on the daily activities of patients. Several strategies reduce the impact of LH; the use of long-acting bronchodilators has been shown to reduce LH and improve exercise capacity. Non pharmacologic interventions have also been demonstrated to be useful. This article describes the pathophysiology of LH, its impact on the lungs and beyond and reviews the strategies that improve LH in COPD. PMID:25892293

  5. The value of regional nodal radiotherapy (dose/volume) in the treatment of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: an RTOG analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether or not the traditional practice of including all thoracic regional nodal areas in the radiotherapy volume in the treatment of unresectable lung cancer is of any therapeutic benefit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,705 patients from four large RTOG trials (78-11, 79-17, 83-11, 84-07) were analyzed for this purpose. Each of these trials had data on dose delivered to the nodal regions and assessment of nodal borders. The nodes were separated into mediastinal, contralateral hilar, ipsilateral hilar, and supraclavicular. Each node site was assessed for progression, defined as in-field or out-of-field, at the node site. In patients with adequate nodal field borders, the results were also analyzed according to the dose delivered. RESULTS: The majority (74%) of patients were between the age of 55 to 75. Forty-six percent of patients had KPS of 60 to 80 and 52% KPS of 90 to 100. Sixty percent of patients had a weight loss of less than 5%, and 40% had a weight loss of over 5% six months prior to diagnosis. Major variations from protocol in defining field borders (unacceptable field borders) were lowest for ipsilateral hilum ((42(727))) and the highest for mediastinal borders ((158(743))). Three groups had statistically significant differences in outcome (progression) between the per protocol and the unacceptable per protocol: ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders), 14% versus 26% (p = 0.03); dose to mediastinal nodes in CALGB eligible patients, 9% versus 19% (p = 0.02); and ipsilateral hilar nodes (field borders) for high-dose patients assigned to greater than or equal to 69.6 Gy, 14% versus 31% (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that inclusion of the ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes affect outcome in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer. Exclusion of the other thoracic lymph node regions did not affect outcome in this study. These findings have important implications for combined modality therapy and three

  6. Regional assessment of treatment in lung cancer using lung perfusion and ventilation images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 30 patients with lung cancer undergoing non-surgical treatment, we performed perfusion lung imaging using 99mTc-MAA and inhalation lung studies using Technegas before and after treatment and evaluated regional perfusion and ventilation status in the lung regions where bronchogenic carcinoma was located. Regional ventilation status was preserved rather than perfusion counterpart (V>P) in 18 patients (18/30=60.0%) before treatment, while the former was better than the latter in 27 patients (27/30=90.0%) after treatment, indicating that regional ventilation status improved more significantly than regional perfusion counterpart after treatment (P=0.005). We also classified the therapeutic effect for regional perfusion and ventilation status as improved, unchanged, or worsened, respectively; improvement in regional perfusion status was observed in 17 patients (56.7%) and that in regional ventilation status in 24 patients (80.0%). There was a statistically significant correlation between improved regional perfusion and ventilation status (P=0.0018) when therapeutic effect was recognized. The patients who showed improvement in regional perfusion status after treatment always showed improved regional ventilation status, but 7 patients showed either unchanged or worsened regional perfusion status after treatment, although regional ventilation status was improved. In conclusion the pulmonary vascular beds seem more vulnerable to bronchogenic carcinoma and improvement in regional perfusion status was revealed to be more difficult than that in regional ventilation status after treatment. (author)

  7. Radiation dose assessment of musa acuminata - triploid (AAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bananas are radioactive due to the presence of the radioisotope-40K. This imposes a possible health risk to the general public. This study intended to assess the annual equivalent dosages and the annual effective dosage committed by the body. This seeks to benefit the general public, students and researchers, and entrepreneurs. Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, lakatan banana (Musa acuminata-triploid (AAA), the most purchased variety cultivated in Barangay Adlawon, Cebu City, Philippines, was found to contain 0.53 g of total potassium for every 100 g of its fresh fruit wherein 6.2 x 10-5 g of which is potassium-40. Based on its 40K content banana was calculated to have a radioactivity of 16 Bq/100 g. it was found out that the body is exposed to radiation dosages ranging from 2.8 x 10-3 rem annually by eating 100 g of lakatan bananas everyday. Conversely, it is equivalent to the annual effective dosage of 0.0043 rem; the amount at which the body of an individual is uniformly exposed. However, no or extremely minute health risk was determined by just eating bananas. In fact, to exceed the radiation dose limits set by the International Commission on Radiation Protection, an individual may eat 116 kg of lakatan bananas everyday for a year. Fertilizers may be the major source of the radioisotope - 40K and assimilated by the plants. (author)

  8. Analysis of cell cycle regulated and regulating proteins following exposure of lung derived cells to sub-lethal doses of a-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, D.; Claudio, P. P.; Cassone, M.; Lucchetti, C.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Introduction Since the last century mankind had to face an increased exposure to man made and natural sources of radiation Radiation represents a therapeutic instrument for radiosensitive cancers as well as a cytotoxic agent for normal human tissues The effects of prolonged exposure to low doses of high energy radiation are still not well-known at the molecular and clinical level Understanding their molecular effects will aid in developing more tailored therapeutic strategies as well as implementing radio-protective measures essential prerequisite for the long-time permanence of men in space Objective of the study The general aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility and the response of lung epithelial cells to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiations We decided to study a panel of epithelial bronchial cell lines because of their fast-growth rate and their prominent exposure to both environmental and medical radiations The specific objective of our study was to qualitatively and semi-quantitatively assess the involvement and behaviour of selected genes in DNA damage DNA-repair mechanisms and apoptosis which follow radiation exposure with the aim to determine the involvement of the most promising targets for the early detection of radiation-mediated lung damage before chronic disease develops Methods Four epithelial cell lines one normal and three neoplastic were selected in order to detect and compare survival cell cycle and protein expression differences related to their different genetic asset

  9. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Kenneth D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerber, David E. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wardak, Zabi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sher, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Science, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Corona, Irma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sharma, Akanksha [School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wadsworth, Margaret E. [Radiation Oncology of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Timmerman, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  10. The study on the dose-effect relationship of radiation from α particles of plutonium on certain lung cells (in vivo and in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that plutonium is one of the most toxic radionuclides and its carcinogenic risk has been seriously concerned. In this study, the dose effect relationship of radiation from α particles of plutonium on certain lung cells (in vivo and in vitro) were investigated. The topics of study are as following: In vivo: deposition and clearance of Pu in respiratory tract, dose-effect relationship of lung cancer induced, histopathological type of lung cancer, primary hemangiosarcoma occurred in thoracic lumph node, radiation effects on Alveolar Macrophage (AM), radiation effect on Natural Killer Cell (NK) and radiation effect on Alveolar Type II (AT-II). In vitro: radiation effect on the immunological functions of AM, radiation effect on the membrane of AM, possible relationship between cytotoxicity and membranes of AM, effects of radiation (X, α) on the transformation of Wistar rat lung fibroblast cell line (WAL-F1) and protective effect of Se4+ against transformation

  11. Use of a realistic breathing lung phantom to evaluate dose delivery errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the effect of respiration-induced motion on delivered dose (the interplay effect) for different treatment techniques under realistic clinical conditions. Methods: A flexible resin tumor model was created using rapid prototyping techniques based on a computed tomography (CT) image of an actual tumor. Twenty micro-MOSFETs were inserted into the tumor model and the tumor model was inserted into an anthropomorphic breathing phantom. Phantom motion was programed using the motion trajectory of an actual patient. A four-dimensional CT image was obtained and several treatment plans were created using different treatment techniques and planning systems: Conformal (Eclipse), step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (Pinnacle), step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), complex dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), hybrid IMRT [60% conformal, 40% dynamic IMRT (Eclipse)], volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) [single-arc (Eclipse)], VMAT [double-arc (Eclipse)], and complex VMAT (Eclipse). The complex plans were created by artificially pushing the optimizer to give complex multileaf collimator sequences. Each IMRT field was irradiated five times and each VMAT field was irradiated ten times, with each irradiation starting at a random point in the respiratory cycle. The effect of fractionation was calculated by randomly summing the measured doses. The maximum deviation for each measurement point per fraction and the probability that 95% of the model tumor had dose deviations less than 2% and 5% were calculated as a function of the number of fractions. Tumor control probabilities for each treatment plan were calculated and compared. Results: After five fractions, measured dose deviations were less than 2% for more than 95% of measurement points within the tumor model for all plans, except the complex dynamic IMRT, step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), complex VMAT, and single-arc VMAT plans. Reducing the dose rate of the complex IMRT plans from 600 to 200 MU

  12. Dose assessment of digital tomosynthesis in pediatric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislason, Amber; Elbakri, Idris A.; Reed, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the potential for digital tomosynthesis (DT) to reduce pediatric x-ray dose while maintaining image quality. We utilized the DT feature (VolumeRadTM) on the GE DefiniumTM 8000 flat panel system installed in the Winnipeg Children's Hospital. Facial bones, cervical spine, thoracic spine, and knee of children aged 5, 10, and 15 years were represented by acrylic phantoms for DT dose measurements. Effective dose was estimated for DT and for corresponding digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) patient image sets. Anthropomorphic phantoms of selected body parts were imaged by DR, DT, and CT. Pediatric radiologists rated visualization of selected anatomic features in these images. Dose and image quality comparisons between DR, DT, and CT determined the usefulness of tomosynthesis for pediatric imaging. CT effective dose was highest; total DR effective dose was not always lowest - depending how many projections were in the DR image set. For the cervical spine, DT dose was close to and occasionally lower than DR dose. Expert radiologists rated visibility of the central facial complex in a skull phantom as better than DR and comparable to CT. Digital tomosynthesis has a significantly lower dose than CT. This study has demonstrated DT shows promise to replace CT for some facial bones and spinal diagnoses. Other clinical applications will be evaluated in the future.

  13. Local Tumor Control and Normal Tissue Toxicity of Pulsed Low-Dose Rate Radiotherapy for Recurrent Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigates (1 local tumor control and (2 normal tissue toxicity of pulsed low-dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR for recurrent lung cancer. Methods: For study 1, nude mice were implanted with A549 tumors and divided into the following 3 groups: (1 control (n = 10, (2 conventional radiotherapy (RT; n = 10, and (3 PLDR (n = 10. Tumor-bearing mice received 2 Gy daily dose for 2 consecutive days. Weekly magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumor growth monitoring. For study 2, 20 mice received 8 Gy total body irradiation either continuously (n = 10 or 40 × 0.2 Gy pulses with 3-minute intervals (n = 10. Results: For study 1, both conventional RT and PLDR significantly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts compared with the control group (>35% difference in the mean tumor volume; P .05. For study 2, the average weight was 20.94 ± 1.68 g and 25.69 ± 1.27 g and the survival time was 8 days and 12 days for mice treated with conventional RT and PLDR (P < .05, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that PLDR could control A549 tumors as effectively as conventional RT, and PLDR induced much less normal tissue toxicity than conventional RT. Thus, PLDR would be a good modality for recurrent lung cancers. Advances in Knowledge: This article reports our results of an in vivo animal investigation of PLDR for the treatment of recurrent cancers, which may not be eligible for treatment because of the dose limitations on nearby healthy organs that have been irradiated in previous treatments. This was the first in vivo study to quantify the tumor control and normal tissue toxicities of PLDR using mice with implanted tumors, and our findings provided evidence to support the clinical trials that employ PLDR treatment techniques.

  14. Effect of intensiti modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fu Zhou; Qian Sun; Ya-Jun Zhang; Geng-Ming Wang; Bin He; Tao Qi; An Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of the intensity modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer.Methods:A total of 82 cases of non-small cell lung cancer were divided into observation group and control group according to the random number table method. Patients in the control group received conventional radiotherapy while observation group received intensity modulated radiotherapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimization method. The treatment effects, survival times, blood vessel-related factors, blood coagulation function and the levels of inflammatory factors and so on were compared between the two groups of patients.Results:The effective rate of the observation group after treatment was higher than that of the control group. Progression free survival and median overall survival times were longer than those of patients in the control group (P<0.05). The serum VEGF and HIF-αα levels as well as D-D, TT, PT, APTT and FIB levels were lower in observation group patients after treatment than those in the control group(P<0.05). At the same time point, serum TNF-αα, CRP and PCT levels in the observation group after treatment were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Serum M2-PK, CA125, CEA and SCC values of patients in the observation group after treatment were all significantly lower than those in the control group (P< 0.05).Conclusions:Intensity modulated radiation therapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimized method can improve the treatment effect, prolong the survival time, optimize micro inflammatory environment and inhibit tumor biological behavior at the same time.

  15. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Seppala Jan; Suilamo Sami; Kulmala Jarmo; Mali Pekka; Minn Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the prob...

  16. Lung nodule detection in low-dose and high-resolution CT scans

    CERN Document Server

    Delogu, P; Gori, I; Preite Martínez, A; Retico, A; Tata, A

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of small pulmonary nodules in screening CT scans. The main modules of our system, i.e. a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false positive finding reduction, are described. The preliminary results obtained on the so-far collected database of lung CT are discussed.

  17. Dose assessment in pediatric computerized tomography; Avaliacao de doses em tomografia computadorizada pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarinho, Luisa Maria Auredine Lima

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography scans, considering the high doses usually involved and the absence of any previous evaluation in Brazil. Dose values were determined for skull and abdomen examinations, for different age ranges, by using the radiographic techniques routinely used in the clinical centers investigated. Measurements were done using pencil shape ionization chambers inserted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms. These were compact phantoms of different diameters were specially designed and constructed for this work, which simulate different age ranges. Comparison of results with published values showed that doses were lower than the diagnostic reference levels established to adults exams by the European Commission. Nevertheless, doses in paediatric phantoms were higher than those obtained in adult phantoms. The paediatric dose values obtained in Hospitals A and B were lower than the reference level (DRL) adopted by SHIMPTON for different age ranges. In the range 0 - 0.5 year (neonatal), the values of DLP in Hospital B were 94 por cent superior to the DRL For the 10 years old children the values of CTDI{sub w} obtained were inferior in 89 por cent for skull and 83 por cent for abdomen examinations, compared to the values published by SHRIMPTON and WALL. Our measured CTDI{sub w} values were inferior to the values presented for SHRIMPTON and HUDA, for all the age ranges and types of examinations. It was observed that the normalized dose descriptors values in children in the neonatal range were always superior to the values of doses for the adult patient. In abdomen examinations, the difference was approximately 90% for the effective dose (E) and of 57%.for CTDI{sub w} . (author)

  18. Practical methods for improving dose distributions in Monte Carlo-based IMRT planning of lung wall-seated tumors treated with SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Michael B; Jin, Jian-Yue; Kim, Sangroh; Wen, Ning; Liu, Dezhi; Siddiqui, M Salim; Ajlouni, Munther I; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J

    2012-01-01

    Current commercially available planning systems with Monte Carlo (MC)-based final dose calculation in IMRT planning employ pencil-beam (PB) algorithms in the optimization process. Consequently, dose coverage for SBRT lung plans can feature cold-spots at the interface between lung and tumor tissue. For lung wall (LW)-seated tumors, there can also be hot spots within nearby normal organs (example: ribs). This study evaluated two different practical approaches to limiting cold spots within the target and reducing high doses to surrounding normal organs in MC-based IMRT planning of LW-seated tumors. First, "iterative reoptimization", where the MC calculation (with PB-based optimization) is initially performed. The resultant cold spot is then contoured and used as a simultaneous boost volume. The MC-based dose is then recomputed. The second technique uses noncoplanar beam angles with limited path through lung tissue. Both techniques were evaluated against a conventional coplanar beam approach with a single MC calculation. In all techniques the prescription dose was normalized to cover 95% of the PTV. Fifteen SBRT lung cases with LW-seated tumors were planned. The results from iterative reoptimization showed that conformity index (CI) and/or PTV dose uniformity (UPTV) improved in 12/15 plans. Average improvement was 13%, and 24%, respectively. Nonimproved plans had PTVs near the skin, trachea, and/or very small lung involvement. The maximum dose to 1cc volume (D1cc) of surrounding OARs decreased in 14/15 plans (average 10%). Using noncoplanar beams showed an average improvement of 7% in 10/15 cases and 11% in 5/15 cases for CI and UPTV, respectively. The D1cc was reduced by an average of 6% in 10/15 cases to surrounding OARs. Choice of treatment planning technique did not statistically significantly change lung V5. The results showed that the proposed practical approaches enhance dose conformity in MC-based IMRT planning of lung tumors treated with SBRT, improving target

  19. SU-F-BRD-15: The Impact of Dose Calculation Algorithm and Hounsfield Units Conversion Tables On Plan Dosimetry for Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, L; Yorke, E; Lim, S; Mechalakos, J; Rimner, A [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dosimetric differences in IMRT lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans calculated with Varian AAA and Acuros (AXB) and with vendor-supplied (V) versus in-house (IH) measured Hounsfield units (HU) to mass and HU to electron density conversion tables. Methods: In-house conversion tables were measured using Gammex 472 density-plug phantom. IMRT plans (6 MV, Varian TrueBeam, 6–9 coplanar fields) meeting departmental coverage and normal tissue constraints were retrospectively generated for 10 lung SBRT cases using Eclipse Vn 10.0.28 AAA with in-house tables (AAA/IH). Using these monitor units and MLC sequences, plans were recalculated with AAA and vendor tables (AAA/V) and with AXB with both tables (AXB/IH and AXB/V). Ratios to corresponding AAA/IH values were calculated for PTV D95, D01, D99, mean-dose, total and ipsilateral lung V20 and chestwall V30. Statistical significance of differences was judged by Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (p<0.05). Results: For HU<−400 the vendor HU-mass density table was notably below the IH table. PTV D95 ratios to AAA/IH, averaged over all patients, are 0.963±0.073 (p=0.508), 0.914±0.126 (p=0.011), and 0.998±0.001 (p=0.005) for AXB/IH, AXB/V and AAA/V respectively. Total lung V20 ratios are 1.006±0.046 (p=0.386), 0.975±0.080 (p=0.514) and 0.998±0.002 (p=0.007); ipsilateral lung V20 ratios are 1.008±0.041(p=0.284), 0.977±0.076 (p=0.443), and 0.998±0.018 (p=0.005) for AXB/IH, AXB/V and AAA/V respectively. In 7 cases, ratios to AAA/IH were within ± 5% for all indices studied. For 3 cases characterized by very low lung density and small PTV (19.99±8.09 c.c.), PTV D95 ratio for AXB/V ranged from 67.4% to 85.9%, AXB/IH D95 ratio ranged from 81.6% to 93.4%; there were large differences in other studied indices. Conclusion: For AXB users, careful attention to HU conversion tables is important, as they can significantly impact AXB (but not AAA) lung SBRT plans. Algorithm selection is also important for

  20. Comparison of pencil beam–based homogeneous vs inhomogeneous target dose planning for stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral lung tumors through Monte Carlo–based recalculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro, E-mail: ohtakara@murakami.asahi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Murakami Memorial Hospital, Asahi University, Gifu (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain whether homogeneous target dose planning is suitable for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung cancer under appropriate breath-holding. For 20 peripheral lung tumors, paired dynamic conformal arc plans were generated by only adjusting the leaf margin to the planning target volume (PTV) edge for fulfilling the conditions such that the prescription isodose surface (IDS) encompassing exactly 95% of the PTV (PTV D{sub 95}) corresponds to 95% and 80% IDS, normalized to 100% at the PTV isocenter under a pencil beam (PB) algorithm with radiologic path length correction. These plans were recalculated using the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm under otherwise identical conditions, and then compared. Lesions abutting the parietal pleura or not were defined as edge or island tumors, respectively, and the influences of the target volume and its location relative to the chest wall on the target dose were examined. The median (range) leaf margin required for the 95% and 80% plans was 3.9 mm (1.3 to 5.0) and −1.2 mm (−1.8 to 0.1), respectively. Notably, the latter was significantly correlated negatively with PTV. In the 80% plans, the PTV D{sub 95} was slightly higher under XVMC, whereas the PTV D{sub 98} was significantly lower, irrespective of the dose calculation algorithm used. Other PTV and all gross tumor volume doses were significantly higher, while the lung doses outside the PTV were slightly lower. The target doses increased as a function of PTV and were significantly lower for island tumors than for edge tumors. In conclusion, inhomogeneous target dose planning using smaller leaf margin for a larger tumor volume was deemed suitable in ensuring more sufficient target dose while slightly reducing lung dose. In addition, more inhomogeneous target dose planning using <80% IDS (e.g., 70%) for PTV covering would be preferable for island tumors.

  1. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanqun; Qi, Guohai; Yin, Gang; Wang, Xianliang; Wang, Pei; Li, Jian; Xiao, Mingyong; Li, Jie; Kang, Shengwei; Liao, Xiongfei

    2014-01-01

    Background The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC alg...

  2. Cystic fibrosis in adults. Short-term and long-term reproducibility of the Brody score for lung morphology in low-dose MDCT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, K.; Paolini, M.; Schmitz, M.; Coppenrath, E.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Fischer, R.; Huber, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Medical Hospital V

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The semi-quantitative Brody score measures the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF)-related lung disease. We investigated the short-term (28 - 60 days) and long-term (2 - 7 years) intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of the Brody score in low-dose multidetector row computed tomography examinations performed in inspiration (LDCTs) of adult CF patients. Materials and Methods: Composite Brody scores and respective underlying bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, peribronchial thickening, parenchymal opacity, and hyperinflation subscores were evaluated twice (time interval, 1 - 84 months) by each of 3 independent radiologists (1 - 20 years of professional diagnostic radiology experience) in LDCTs (4 - 64 rows, 120 KVp, 10 - 15 mAs/slice, CTDIw approx. 1.0 mGy, effective dose approx. 0.5 mSv) of 15 adult patients with CF-related lung disease (8 female, 7 male, age, 18 - 50 years, mean, 33 years). Results: The average reproducibility of the Brody score was within +/-7 % (range, 2 - 30 %) between radiologists, and +/-6 % (3 - 12 %) within radiologists (short-term, 28 - 60 days, 4 %, 0 - 12 %, long-term, 2 - 7 years, 12 %, 1 - 36 %). For the different subscores, the reproducibility was within +/-25 % (15 - 41 %) between radiologists and +/-23 % (12 - 46 %) within radiologists. Conclusion: The Brody score shows high average inter-observer reproducibility in LDCTs of adult CF patients. The Brody score also demonstrates high average intra-observer reproducibility if subsequent assessments are made within 28 - 61 days. With time intervals of 2 - 7 years between subsequent evaluations, however, intra-observer reproducibility decreases. Respective subscores each demonstrate lower intra- and inter-observer reproducibility than does the composite Brody score. (orig.)

  3. Cystic fibrosis in adults. Short-term and long-term reproducibility of the Brody score for lung morphology in low-dose MDCT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The semi-quantitative Brody score measures the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF)-related lung disease. We investigated the short-term (28 - 60 days) and long-term (2 - 7 years) intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of the Brody score in low-dose multidetector row computed tomography examinations performed in inspiration (LDCTs) of adult CF patients. Materials and Methods: Composite Brody scores and respective underlying bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, peribronchial thickening, parenchymal opacity, and hyperinflation subscores were evaluated twice (time interval, 1 - 84 months) by each of 3 independent radiologists (1 - 20 years of professional diagnostic radiology experience) in LDCTs (4 - 64 rows, 120 KVp, 10 - 15 mAs/slice, CTDIw approx. 1.0 mGy, effective dose approx. 0.5 mSv) of 15 adult patients with CF-related lung disease (8 female, 7 male, age, 18 - 50 years, mean, 33 years). Results: The average reproducibility of the Brody score was within +/-7 % (range, 2 - 30 %) between radiologists, and +/-6 % (3 - 12 %) within radiologists (short-term, 28 - 60 days, 4 %, 0 - 12 %, long-term, 2 - 7 years, 12 %, 1 - 36 %). For the different subscores, the reproducibility was within +/-25 % (15 - 41 %) between radiologists and +/-23 % (12 - 46 %) within radiologists. Conclusion: The Brody score shows high average inter-observer reproducibility in LDCTs of adult CF patients. The Brody score also demonstrates high average intra-observer reproducibility if subsequent assessments are made within 28 - 61 days. With time intervals of 2 - 7 years between subsequent evaluations, however, intra-observer reproducibility decreases. Respective subscores each demonstrate lower intra- and inter-observer reproducibility than does the composite Brody score. (orig.)

  4. Optimization of dose and fractionation of endobronchial brachytherapy with or without external radiation in the palliative management of non-small cell lung cancer: A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallick I

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Endobronchial brachytherapy (EBBT is an established modality for the palliation in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. We compared three different schedules using EBBT with or without external radiation (XRT in this setting. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients were randomized to three treatment arms. Arm A received XRT to a dose of 30 Gy/ 10 fr/ 2 weeks and two sessions of EBBT 8 Gy each. Arm B received the same XRT and a single session of EBBT 10 Gy at 1 cm. Arm C received only a single fraction of brachytherapy to a dose of 15 Gy at 1 cm without XRT. Symptomatic response rates, duration of symptom palliation, obstruction scores, quality of life outcomes and complications were assessed and compared. Results: The overall symptomatic response rates were 91% for dyspnea, 84% for cough, 94% for hemoptysis and 83% for obstructive pneumonia. There was no significant difference between the arms. The median time to symptom relapse was 4-8 months for all symptoms and the median time to symptom progression was 6-11 months. The results were comparable between groups except for hemoptysis, where a shorter palliation was seen in Arm C that achieved statistical significance ( P < 0.01. Quality of life showed significant improvement, with maximum benefit in Arm A. Complication rates were low. Only one patient died of fatal hemoptysis. Conclusion: EBBT is thus a safe and effective palliative tool in advanced non-small cell lung cancer, either alone or in conjunction with XRT. The difference between the treatment arms were not statistically significant in most categories, but patients treated with XRT and two endobronchial sessions of 8 Gy had the most consistent benefit in terms of all the parameters studied.

  5. Visual assessment of early emphysema and interstitial abnormalities on CT is useful in lung cancer risk analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Mathilde M W; Thomsen, Laura H.; Petersen, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Screening for lung cancer should be limited to a high-risk-population, and abnormalities in low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening images may be relevant for predicting the risk of lung cancer. Our aims were to compare the occurrence of visually detected emphysema and interstitial...... abnormalities in subjects with and without lung cancer in a screening population of smokers. Methods: Low-dose chest CT examinations (baseline and latest possible) of 1990 participants from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial were independently evaluated by two observers who scored emphysema and interstitial.......499). Conclusions: Even early signs of emphysema and interstitial abnormalities are associated with lung cancer. Quantitative measurements of emphysema—regardless of type—do not show the same association. Key Points: • Visually detected emphysema on CT is more frequent in individuals who develop lung cancer...

  6. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  7. Assessment of bronchodilator response through changes in lung volumes in chronic airflow obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    J.B. Figueroa-Casas; A.R. Diez; M. P. Rondelli; M. p. Figueroa-Casas; J. C. Figueroa-Casas

    2003-01-01

    Although FEV1 improvement is routinely used to define bronchodilator (BD) response, it correlates poorly with clinical effects. Changes in lung volumes (LV) have shown better correlation with exercise tolerance and might be more sensitive to detect BD effects. We assessed the additional contribution of measuring LV before and after BD to detect acute improvement in lung function not demonstrated by FEV1, and the influence of the response criteria selected on this contribution. We analyzed 98 ...

  8. Cardiac toxicity and radiation dose to the heart in definitive treated non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred (Dept. of Oncology, Odense Univ. Hospital, 5000 Odense C (Denmark)), E-mail: tine.schytte@dadlnet.dk; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Brink, Carsten (Radiophysic Laboratory, Odense Univ. Hospital, 5000 Odense C (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    In this retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, we did not find a correlation between high mean-dose to three different volumes of the heart (left ventricle, both ventricles or whole heart) and cardiac toxicity defined as having an cardiac event after radiotherapy start. This is not as shown in studies with other diseases treated with radiotherapy. Darby et al. recently published a review concerning radiation related heart disease. They reported a significantly worse survival beyond ten years for breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Some studies reported mortality from heart disease increased by 27%. In Hodgkin lymphoma patients an increased risk value of three to five for cardiac morbidity in general compared to general population and relative risk of death from myocardial infarction compared with general population in range 2 to 4. There may be several possible reasons why we did not experience a significant toxicity despite the high doses we delivered to the heart compared with patients receiving RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Only relative few NSCLC patients live long enough to experience cardiac disease either due to lung cancer itself or comorbidity as a competitive risk factor. In our study the five year survival was 15% leaving very few patients at risk for developing cardiac disease. Without long-term survivors cardiac toxicity does not seem to be a problem, and this suggests that we should aim to increase tumour control by administrating larger doses of radiotherapy to the tumour and/or by adding concurrent chemotherapy. However, the latter may increase the risk of cardiac toxicity by itself, and the results given in present study, may not be extrapolated to this situation. Another reason might be that if NSCLC patients develop dyspnoea, chest pain, etc. it is interpreted as being due to a relapse of lung cancer and not cardiac disease. There are several studies indicating that

  9. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  10. Assessment of prospective foodchain doses from radioactive discharges from BNFL Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the method used by the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) to assess the potential impact of proposed radioactive discharges from the Sellafield nuclear site on food and determine their acceptability. It explains aspects of a cautious method that has been adopted to reflect the UK government policy and uncertainties related to people's habits with regard to food production and consumption. Two types of ingestion doses are considered in this method: 'possible' and 'probable' doses. The method is specifically applied to Sellafield discharge limits and calculated possible and probable ingestion doses are presented and discussed. Estimated critical group ingestion doses are below the dose limit and constraint set for members of the public. The method may be subject to future amendments to take account of changes in government policy and the outcome of a recent Consultative Exercise on Dose Assessments carried out by FSA. Uncertainties inherent in dose assessments are discussed and quantified wherever possible

  11. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: assessment of causality and dose in reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L; Bond, G Randall; Clark, Richard F; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S; Dart, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study was to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years who were administered repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. We reviewed US Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reports, and US Manufacturer Safety Reports describing adverse effects after acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death after acetaminophen administration to children younger than 6 years were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supratherapeutic. Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Although we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death after repeated doses of acetaminophen, all the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses more than 75 mg/kg per day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg per day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years.

  12. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  13. Quality of Life (QOL) Analysis of a Randomized Radiation Dose Escalation Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Study: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0617

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hu, Chen; Sloan, Jeffrey; Bradley, Jeffrey; Komaki, Ritsuko; Masters, Gregory; Kavadi, Vivek; Narayan, Samir; Michalski, Jeff; Johnson, Douglas W.; Koprowski, Christopher; Curran, Walter J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Gaur, Rakesh; Wynn, Raymond B.; Schallenkamp, John; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; MacRae, Robert M; Paulus, Rebecca; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Importance A recent randomized radiation dose escalation trial in unresectable stage III NSCLC showed a lower survival in the high-dose arm (74Gy vs. 60Gy) with concurrent chemotherapy. Quality of life (QOL), an important secondary endpoint, is presented here. Objective The primary QOL hypothesis predicted a clinically meaningful decline (CMD) in QOL via the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) in the high-dose RT-arm at 3 months. Design RTOG 0617 was a randomized phase III study (conducted from Nov 2007 to Nov 2011) in stage III NSCLC using a 2×2 factorial design and stratified by histology, PET staging, performance status and radiation technique (3D-conformal RT [3DCRT] vs. intensity-modulated radiation [IMRT]). Setting 185 institutions in the USA and Canada. Participants Of 424 eligible stage III NSCLC patients randomized, 360 (85%) consented to QOL, of whom 313 (88%) completed baseline QOL assessments. Intervention for Clinical Trials 74Gy vs. 60Gy with concurrent and consolidation carboplatin/paclitaxel +/− cetuximab. Main Outcomes and Measures QOL was collected prospectively via FACT-Trial Outcome Index (FACT-TOI), equaling Physical-Well-Being (PWB) + Functional-Well-Being (FWB) + Lung Cancer Subscale (LCS). Data are presented at baseline & 3 and 12 months via minimal clinically meaningful changes of >=2 points for PWB, FWB or LCS or >=5 points for TOI. Results Patient demographics and baseline QOL scores were comparable between the 74Gy and 60Gy arms. Two-hundred-nineteen (72%) of living patients who completed QOL at baseline did so at 3 months and 137 (57%) of living patients did so at 12 months. Significantly more patients on 74Gy arm had clinically meaningful decline in FACT-LCS at 3 months than on the 60Gy arm (45% vs. 30%, p=0.02). At 12 months, fewer patients who received IMRT (vs 3DCRT) had clinically meaningful decline in FACT-LCS (21% vs 46%, p=0.003). Baseline FACT-TOI was associated with overall survival in

  14. Research on pharmacokinetics of high-dose tamoxifen in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玲; 李旭; 李蓉; 赵新汉; 李睿; 郑晓辉; 王嗣岑

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the pharmacokinetics of tamoxifen at a high dosage, which will offer a theoretical support for an appropriate clinical use of the medicine in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Three qualified NSCLC patients are selected and given tamoxifen (TAM) 160 mg per Os. Blood samples were collected at different times and then analyzed by high-performance liguid chromatography. The PK-GRAPH program was used to obtain the parameters. Results The concentration-time courses of the TA...

  15. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Ikuo, E-mail: isekine@ncc.go.jp [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  16. Using Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Atlases to Combine and Analyze Prospective Dosimetric and Radiation Pneumonitis Data From 2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Dose Escalation Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fan; Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Borst, Gerben R. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Lebesque, Joos V. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate {>=}20% were plotted. Results: The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. Conclusions: The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power.

  17. Clinical application of low-dose CT combined with computer-aided detection in lung cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of chest low-dose CT (LDCT) combined with computer-aided detection (CAD) system for lung cancer screening in high risk population. Methods: Two hundred and nineteen healthy candidates underwent 64-slice LDCT scan. All images were reviewed in consensus by two radiologists with 15 years of thoracic CT diagnosis experience. Then the image data were analyzed with CAD alone. Finally images were reviewed by two radiologists with 5 years of CT diagnosis experience with and without CT Viewer software. The sensitivity, false positive rate of CAD for pulmonary nodule detection were calculated. SPSS 11.5 software and Chi-square test were used for the statistics. Results: Of 219 candidates ,104(47.5% ) were detected with lung nodules. There were 366 true nodules confirmed by the senior radiologists. The CAD system detected 271 (74.0%) true nodules and 424 false-positive nodules. The false-positive rate was 1.94/per case. The two junior radiologists indentifid 292 (79.8%), 286(78.1%) nodules without CAD and 336 (91.8%), 333 (91.0%) nodules with CAD respectively. There were significant differences for radiologists in indentifying nodules with or without CAD system (P<0.01). Conclusions: CAD is more sensitive than radiologists for indentifying the nodules in the central area or in the hilar region of the lung. While radiologists are more sensitive for the peripheral and sub-pleural nodules,or ground glass opacity nodules, or nodules smaller than 4 mm. CAD can not be used alone. The detection rate can be improved with the combination of radiologist and CAD in LDCT screen. (authors)

  18. Fetal and maternal dose assessment for diagnostic scans during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafat Motavalli, Laleh; Miri Hakimabad, Hashem; Hoseinian Azghadi, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Despite the concerns about prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation, the number of nuclear medicine examinations performed for pregnant women increased in the past decade. This study attempts to better quantify radiation doses due to diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures during pregnancy with the help of our recently developed 3, 6, and 9 month pregnant hybrid phantoms. The reference pregnant models represent the adult female international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) reference phantom as a base template with a fetus in her gravid uterus. Six diagnostic scintigraphy scans using different radiopharmaceuticals were selected as typical diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Furthermore, the biokinetic data of radioiodine was updated in this study. A compartment representing iodide in fetal thyroid was addressed explicitly in the biokinetic model. Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo transport method. Tabulated dose coefficients for both maternal and fetal organs are provided. The comparison was made with the previously published fetal doses calculated for stylized pregnant female phantoms. In general, the fetal dose in previous studies suffers from an underestimation of up to 100% compared to fetal dose at organ level in this study. A maximum of difference in dose was observed for the fetal thyroid compared to the previous studies, in which the traditional models did not contain the fetal thyroid. Cumulated activities of major source organs are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. The differences in fetal dose depend on several other factors including chord length distribution between fetal organs and maternal major source organs, and anatomical differences according to gestation periods. Finally, considering the results of this study, which was based on the realistic pregnant female phantoms, a more informed evaluation of the risks and benefits of the different procedures could be made.

  19. Are mean lung dose and changes in respiration during RT predictive for pulmonary function changes after RT?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.; Bernchou, U.; Schytte, T.;

    2015-01-01

    ://elastix.isi.uu.nl/), which was used for deformable registrations between inspiration phases and expiratory phases as well as calculation of Jacobian determinant images of Elekta XVI 4D-CBCT reconstructions. Approximately 3000 recorded XVI scans were available for this study group. The mean of the Jacobian determinant (MJD.......009 and DELTAFVCREL=- 0.008MLD+0.115; pMLD=0.002, respectively). Plots of DELTAFEV1 REL and DELTAFVCREL as a function of MLD are shown in the figure. Both plots show a declining tendency, indicating that higher MLD corresponds to larger decrease in clinically measured lung function tests. Spearman correlation...... coefficient between DELTAFEV1 REL and DELTAFVCREL versus mean lung dose were - 0.249 (p=0.003) and -0.252 (p=0.003), respectively. Conclusions: In this study it was possible to carry out the deformable registrations on the 4D-CBCT-scans, but for the current 4D-CBCTimage quality, it was not possible to show...

  20. Determination of Carboplatin Dose by Area Under the Curve in Combination Chemotherapy for Senile Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Tiejun; LIU Qingqing; HU Changyao; LIU Mengtao

    2007-01-01

    To preliminarily determine the appropriate dosage of carboplatin (CBP) at AUC of 5 mg·Ml-1·min-1 in the combination chemotherapy for Chinese senile patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirty-five Chinese senile patients with NSCLC in advanced stage (Ⅲ/Ⅳ) were given 96 cycles of combination chemotherapy. Chemotherapy schedules included Taxol+CBE Gemzar+CBP and NVB+CBP. The dose of CBP was at 5 mg·mL-1·min-1 of area under the concen- tration-time curve (AUC). Side effects and quality of life were observed before and after the chemo- therapy. Myelosuppression was severe and commonly observed. Grade 3/4 of granuiocytopenia was found in 47.9% (46/96) of the patients and grade 3/4 of thrombocytopenia was noted in 28.1% (27/96) of the subjects. However, other side effects were slight. The mean score of quality of life (QOL), ac- cording to the criteria of QOL for Chinese cancer patients had reduced 6.8. At 5 mg·mL-1·min-1 by AUC, the hematological toxicity of CBP was severe and it had some negative effects on the QOL. The administration of CBP at 5 mg·mL-1·min-1 by AUC may be too high for Chinese senile patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. To Screen or not to Screen: Low Dose Computed Tomography in Comparison to Chest Radiography or Usual Care in Reducing Morbidity and Mortality from Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Jay; Moats, Austin; Nguyen, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all cancers. This paper seeks to address the question: Can the mortality of lung cancer be decreased by screening with low-dose computerized tomography (LDCT) in higher risk patients compared to chest X-rays (CXR) or regular patient care? Currently, CXR screening is recommended for certain high-risk patients. Several recent trials have examined the effectiveness of LDCT versus chest radiography or usual care as a control. These trials include National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), Detection And screening of early lung cancer with Novel imaging TEchnology (DANTE), Lung Screening Study (LSS), Depiscan, Italian Lung (ITALUNG), and Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON study). NLST, the largest trial (n=53, 454), demonstrated a decrease in mortality from lung cancer in the LDCT group (RRR=20%, P=0.004). LSS demonstrated a greater sensitivity in detecting both early stage and any stage of lung cancer in comparison to traditional CXR. Although the DANTE trial yielded data consistent with findings in LSS, it also showed that via LDCT screening a greater proportion of patients were placed under unnecessary surgical procedures. The Depiscan trial yielded a high nodule detection rate at the cost of a high false-positive rate compared to CXR screening. The ITALUNG and NELSON trials demonstrated the early detection capabilities of LDCT for lung cancers compared to usual care without surveillance imaging. False-positive findings with unnecessary workup, intervention, and radiation exposure remain significant concerns for routine LDCT screening. However, current data suggests LDCT may provide a highly sensitive and specific means for detecting lung cancers and reducing mortality. PMID:27375974

  2. To Screen or not to Screen: Low Dose Computed Tomography in Comparison to Chest Radiography or Usual Care in Reducing Morbidity and Mortality from Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajac, Joshua; Kamdar, Jay; Moats, Austin; Nguyen, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all cancers. This paper seeks to address the question: Can the mortality of lung cancer be decreased by screening with low-dose computerized tomography (LDCT) in higher risk patients compared to chest X-rays (CXR) or regular patient care? Currently, CXR screening is recommended for certain high-risk patients. Several recent trials have examined the effectiveness of LDCT versus chest radiography or usual care as a control. These trials include National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), Detection And screening of early lung cancer with Novel imaging TEchnology (DANTE), Lung Screening Study (LSS), Depiscan, Italian Lung (ITALUNG), and Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON study). NLST, the largest trial (n=53, 454), demonstrated a decrease in mortality from lung cancer in the LDCT group (RRR=20%, P=0.004). LSS demonstrated a greater sensitivity in detecting both early stage and any stage of lung cancer in comparison to traditional CXR. Although the DANTE trial yielded data consistent with findings in LSS, it also showed that via LDCT screening a greater proportion of patients were placed under unnecessary surgical procedures. The Depiscan trial yielded a high nodule detection rate at the cost of a high false-positive rate compared to CXR screening. The ITALUNG and NELSON trials demonstrated the early detection capabilities of LDCT for lung cancers compared to usual care without surveillance imaging. False-positive findings with unnecessary workup, intervention, and radiation exposure remain significant concerns for routine LDCT screening. However, current data suggests LDCT may provide a highly sensitive and specific means for detecting lung cancers and reducing mortality. PMID:27375974

  3. Long-term epigenetic effects of exposure to low doses of 56Fe in the mouse lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite significant progress, the long-term health effects of exposure to high charge (Z) and energy (E) nuclei (HZEs) and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Mouse studies show that space missions can result in pulmonary pathological states. The goal of this study was to evaluate the pro-fibrotic and pro-carcinogenic effects of exposure to low doses of heavy iron ions (56Fe) in the mouse lung. Exposure to 56Fe (600 MeV; 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 Gy) resulted in minor pro-fibrotic changes, detected at the beginning of the fibrotic phase (22 weeks post exposure), which were exhibited as increased expression of chemokine Ccl3, and interleukin Il4. Epigenetic alterations were exhibited as global DNA hypermethylation, observed after exposure to 0.4 Gy. Cadm1, Cdh13, Cdkn1c, Mthfr and Sfrp1 were significantly hypermethylated after exposure to 0.1 Gy, while exposure to higher doses resulted in hypermethylation of Cdkn1c only. However, expression of these genes was not affected by any dose. Congruently with the observed patterns of global DNA methylation, DNA repetitive elements were hypermethylated after exposure to 0.4 Gy, with minor changes observed after exposure to lower doses. Importantly, hypermethylation of repetitive elements coincided with their transcriptional repression. The findings of this study will aid in understanding molecular determinants of pathological states associated with exposure to 56Fe, as well as serve as robust biomarkers for the delayed effects of irradiation. Further studies are clearly needed to investigate the persistence and outcomes of molecular alterations long term after exposure. (author)

  4. Pulmonary Artery Invasion, High-Dose Radiation, and Overall Survival in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Cheng-Bo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Wang, Wei-Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fourth Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Quint, Leslie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Xue, Jian-Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Matuszak, Martha; Ten Haken, Randall [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fkong@gru.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose radiation to the pulmonary artery (PA) affects overall survival (OS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Patients with medically inoperable/unresectable NSCLC treated with definitive radiation therapy in prospective studies were eligible for this study. Pulmonary artery involvement was defined on the basis of pretreatment chest CT and positron emission tomography/CT fusion. Pulmonary artery was contoured according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1106 atlas, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results: A total of 100 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year for surviving patients were enrolled: 82.0% underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Radiation dose ranged from 60 to 85.5 Gy in 30-37 fractions. Patients with PA invasion of grade ≤2, 3, 4, and 5 had 1-year OS and median survival of 67% and 25.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.7-35.1), 62% and 22.2 months (95% CI 5.8-38.6), 90% and 35.8 months (95% CI 28.4-43.2), and 50% and 7.0 months, respectively (P=.601). Two of the 4 patients with grade 5 PA invasion died suddenly from massive hemorrhage at 3 and 4.5 months after completion of radiation therapy. Maximum and mean doses to PA were not significantly associated with OS. The V45, V50, V55, and V60 of PA were correlated significantly with a worse OS (P<.05). Patients with V45 >70% or V60 >37% had significantly worse OS (13.3 vs 37.9 months, P<.001, and 13.8 vs 37.9 months, P=.04, respectively). Conclusions: Grade 5 PA invasion and PA volume receiving more than 45-60 Gy may be associated with inferior OS in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  5. Dose assessment in accordance with the measured position of size specific dose estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su [Dept. of Radio-technology, Health Welfare, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Wan [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated the size specific dose estimates of difference localizer on pediatric CT image. Seventy one cases of pediatric abdomen-pelvic CT (M:F=36:35) were included in this study. Anterior-posterior and lateral diameters were measured in axial CT images. Conversion factors from American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report 204 were obtained for effective diameter to determine size specific dose estimate (SSDE) from the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) recorded from the dose reports. For the localizer of mid-slice SSDE was 107.63% higher than CTDIvol and that of xiphoid-process slices SSDE was higher than 92.91%. The maximum error of iliac crest slices, xiphoid process slices and femur head slices between mid-slices were 7.48%, 17.81% and 14.04%. In conclusion, despite the SSDE of difference localizer has large number of errors, SSDE should be regarded as the primary evaluation tool of the patient radiation in pediatric CT for evaluation.

  6. A methodology for selecting the beam arrangement to reduce the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose to the SPECT-defined functioning lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, S. M.; Marks, L. B.; Yin, F. F.; Das, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Macroaggregated albumin single-photon emission computed tomography (MAA-SPECT) provides a map of the spatial distribution of lung perfusion. Our previous work developed a methodology to use SPECT guidance to reduce the dose to the functional lung in IMRT planning. This study aims to investigate the role of beam arrangement on both low and high doses in the functional lung. In our previous work, nine-beam IMRT plans were generated with and without SPECT guidance and compared for five patients. For the current study, the dose-function histogram (DFH) contribution for each of the nine beams for each patient was calculated. Four beams were chosen based on orientation and DFH contributions to create a SPECT-guided plan that spared the functional lung and maintained target coverage. Four-beam SPECT-guided IMRT plans reduced the F20 and F30 values by (16.5 ± 6.8)% and (6.1 ± 9.2)%, respectively, when compared to nine-beam conventional IMRT plans. Moreover, the SPECT-4F Plan reduces F5 and F13 for all patients by (11.0 ± 8.2)% and (6.1 ± 3.6)%, respectively, compared to the SPECT Plan. Using fewer beams in IMRT planning may reduce the amount of functional lung that receives 5 and 13 Gy, a factor that has recently been associated with radiation pneumonitis.

  7. A methodology for selecting the beam arrangement to reduce the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose to the SPECT-defined functioning lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S M [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Marks, L B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Yin, F F; Das, S K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: sarah-mcguire@uiowa.edu

    2010-01-21

    Macroaggregated albumin single-photon emission computed tomography (MAA-SPECT) provides a map of the spatial distribution of lung perfusion. Our previous work developed a methodology to use SPECT guidance to reduce the dose to the functional lung in IMRT planning. This study aims to investigate the role of beam arrangement on both low and high doses in the functional lung. In our previous work, nine-beam IMRT plans were generated with and without SPECT guidance and compared for five patients. For the current study, the dose-function histogram (DFH) contribution for each of the nine beams for each patient was calculated. Four beams were chosen based on orientation and DFH contributions to create a SPECT-guided plan that spared the functional lung and maintained target coverage. Four-beam SPECT-guided IMRT plans reduced the F{sub 20} and F{sub 30} values by (16.5 {+-} 6.8)% and (6.1 {+-} 9.2)%, respectively, when compared to nine-beam conventional IMRT plans. Moreover, the SPECT-4F Plan reduces F{sub 5} and F{sub 13} for all patients by (11.0 {+-} 8.2)% and (6.1 {+-} 3.6)%, respectively, compared to the SPECT Plan. Using fewer beams in IMRT planning may reduce the amount of functional lung that receives 5 and 13 Gy, a factor that has recently been associated with radiation pneumonitis.

  8. A methodology for selecting the beam arrangement to reduce the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose to the SPECT-defined functioning lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroaggregated albumin single-photon emission computed tomography (MAA-SPECT) provides a map of the spatial distribution of lung perfusion. Our previous work developed a methodology to use SPECT guidance to reduce the dose to the functional lung in IMRT planning. This study aims to investigate the role of beam arrangement on both low and high doses in the functional lung. In our previous work, nine-beam IMRT plans were generated with and without SPECT guidance and compared for five patients. For the current study, the dose-function histogram (DFH) contribution for each of the nine beams for each patient was calculated. Four beams were chosen based on orientation and DFH contributions to create a SPECT-guided plan that spared the functional lung and maintained target coverage. Four-beam SPECT-guided IMRT plans reduced the F20 and F30 values by (16.5 ± 6.8)% and (6.1 ± 9.2)%, respectively, when compared to nine-beam conventional IMRT plans. Moreover, the SPECT-4F Plan reduces F5 and F13 for all patients by (11.0 ± 8.2)% and (6.1 ± 3.6)%, respectively, compared to the SPECT Plan. Using fewer beams in IMRT planning may reduce the amount of functional lung that receives 5 and 13 Gy, a factor that has recently been associated with radiation pneumonitis.

  9. Assessment of doses due to secondary neutrons received by patient treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton therapy is a specific technique