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Sample records for assess engineered nanoparticle

  1. Exploring the development of a decision support system (DSS) to prioritize engineered nanoparticles for risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marvin, H.J.P.; Bouwmeester, H.; Bakker, M.; Kroese, E.D.; Meent, D. van de; Bourgeois, F.; Lokers, R.; Ham, H. van der; Verhelst, L.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have gained huge commercial interest because of their unique and size-related physicochemical properties. The diversity and complexity of ENPs is increasing with the introduction of next generation nanoparticles. The current approaches are not able to assess the safet

  2. Methods for assessing basic particle properties and cytotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalantzi, O.-I.; Biskos, G.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing penetration of materials and products containing engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the market is posing many concerns regarding their environmental impacts. To assess these impacts, there is an urgent need of techniques for determining the health-related properties of ENPs and standa

  3. Microplastic Exposure Assessment in Aquatic Environments: Learning from Similarities and Differences to Engineered Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüffer, Thorsten; Praetorius, Antonia; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2017-02-21

    Microplastics (MPs) have been identified as contaminants of emerging concern in aquatic environments and research into their behavior and fate has been sharply increasing in recent years. Nevertheless, significant gaps remain in our understanding of several crucial aspects of MP exposure and risk assessment, including the quantification of emissions, dominant fate processes, types of analytical tools required for characterization and monitoring, and adequate laboratory protocols for analysis and hazard testing. This Feature aims at identifying transferrable knowledge and experience from engineered nanoparticle (ENP) exposure assessment. This is achieved by comparing ENP and MPs based on their similarities as particulate contaminants, whereas critically discussing specific differences. We also highlight the most pressing research priorities to support an efficient development of tools and methods for MPs environmental risk assessment.

  4. Methods for Assessing Basic Particle Properties and Cytotoxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga-Ioanna Kalantzi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing penetration of materials and products containing engineered nanoparticles (ENPs to the market is posing many concerns regarding their environmental impacts. To assess these impacts, there is an urgent need of techniques for determining the health-related properties of ENPs and standards for assessing their toxicity. Although a wide number of systems for characterizing nanoparticles in different media (i.e., gases and liquids is already commercially available, the development of protocols for determining the cytotoxicity of ENPs is still at an infant stage, drawing upon existing knowledge from general toxicology. In this regard, differences in the preparation of ENP-containing solutions for cytotoxicity testing, as well as in the steps involved in the tests can result in significant deviations and inconsistencies between studies. In an attempt to highlight the urgent need for assessing the environmental impacts of nanotechnology, this article provides a brief overview of the existing methods for determining health-related properties of ENPs and their cytotoxicity.

  5. Exploring the development of a decision support system (DSS) to prioritize engineered nanoparticles for risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvin, Hans J. P., E-mail: hans.marvin@wur.nl; Bouwmeester, Hans [RIKILT, Wageningen UR (Netherlands); Bakker, Martine [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, RIVM (Netherlands); Kroese, E. Dinant [TNO Innovation for Life, Earth, Environmental and Life Sciences (Netherlands); Meent, Dik van de [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Department of Environmental Science (Netherlands); Bourgeois, Francois [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, RIVM (Netherlands); Lokers, Rob [Alterra, Wageningen UR (Netherlands); Ham, Henk van der [RIKILT, Wageningen UR (Netherlands); Verhelst, Lieke [Alterra, Wageningen UR (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have gained huge commercial interest because of their unique and size-related physicochemical properties. The diversity and complexity of ENPs is increasing with the introduction of next generation nanoparticles. The current approaches are not able to assess the safety of all types and applications of ENPs. Therefore, we are developing a decision support system (DSS) that helps to identify those ENPs and applications that should get priority in the risk assessment. This DSS smartly uses existing knowledge in publicly available databases. With the aid of vocabularies, knowledge rules and logic reasoning new knowledge will be derived. In this paper, the procedure for a DSS is described. Since this system is open by design, others can re-use and extend the DSS content, and newly developed DSS tools can be easily accommodated, which will make the DSS more effective over the years. Data of newly emerging studies will be used for the validation of the DSS. The results will benefit regulating authorities and scientists focussing on the development of inherently safe ENPs.

  6. Analytical characterization of engineered ZnO nanoparticles relevant for hazard assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragaru, Adina, E-mail: adina.bragaru@imt.ro; Kusko, Mihaela [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology (Romania); Vasile, Eugeniu [SC METAV CD (Romania); Simion, Monica; Danila, Mihai; Ignat, Teodora; Mihalache, Iuliana; Pascu, Razvan; Craciunoiu, Florea [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology (Romania)

    2013-01-15

    The optoelectronic properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) have determined development of novel applications in catalysis, paints, wave filters, UV detectors, transparent conductive films, solar cells, or sunscreens. While the immediate advantages of using nano-ZnO in glass panel coatings and filter screens for lamps, as protecting products against bleaching, have been demonstrated, the potential environmental effect of the engineered NPs and the associated products was not fully estimated; this issue being of utmost importance, as these materials will be supplied to the market in quantities of tons per year, equating to thousands of square meters. In this study, ZnO-NPs with commercial name Zincox Trade-Mark-Sign have been subjected to a comprehensive characterization, relevant for hazard assessment, using complementary physico-chemical methods. Therefore, the morphological investigations have been corroborated with XRD pattern analyses and UV-Vis absorption related properties resulting an excellent correlation between the geometrical sizes revealed by microscopy (8.0-9.0 nm), and, respectively, the crystallite size (8.2-9.5 nm) and optical size (7.8 nm) calculated from the last two techniques' data. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic diameter of ZnO-NPs and stability of aqueous dispersions with different concentration of nanoparticles have been analyzed as function of significant solution parameters, like concentration, pH and solution ionic strength. The results suggest that solution chemistry exerts a strong influence on ZnO dissolution stability, the complete set of analyses providing useful information toward better control of dosage during biotoxicological tests.

  7. Methodological considerations for using umu assay to assess photo-genotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Baun, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the feasibility of high-throughput (96-well plate) umu assay to test the genotoxic effect of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) under UV light (full spectrum) and visible light (455nm). Exposure of TiO2 ENPs to up to 60min of UV light induced a photocatalytic...... production of ROS. However, UV light itself caused cytotoxic damage to Salmonella typhimurium at exposures >15min and a genotoxic effect at exposures >0.5min; and use of UV filters did not lower this effect. No genotoxicity of TiO2 ENPs was observed under visible light conditions at concentrations up to 100......μgmL(-1); or under dark conditions at concentrations up to 667μgmL(-1), though cytotoxicity was seen at the higher concentrations. Additionally, the growth factor calculation was influenced by a shading effect due to ENPs, and was corrected by considering the pre-incubation OD readings of Plate B...

  8. New insight into artifactual phenomena during in vitro toxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles: study of TNF-α adsorption on alumina oxide nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailleux, Mélanie; Boudard, Delphine; Pourchez, Jérémie; Forest, Valérie; Grosseau, Philippe; Cottier, Michèle

    2013-04-01

    Biomolecules can be adsorbed on nanoparticles (NPs) and degraded during in vitro toxicity assays. These artifactual phenomena could lead to misinterpretation of biological activity, such as false-negative results. To avoid possible underestimation of cytokine release after contact between NP and cells, we propose a methodology to account for these artifactual phenomena and lead to accurate measurements. We focused on the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor TNF-α. We studied well-characterized boehmite engineered NP [aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlO(OH)]. The rate of TNF-α degradation and its adsorption (on boehmite and on the walls of wells) were determined in cell-free conditions by adding a known TNF-α concentration (1500 pg/ml) under various experimental conditions. After a 24-h incubation, we quantified that 7 wt.% of the initial TNF-α was degraded over time, 6 wt.% adsorbed on the walls of 96-well plates, and 13 wt.% adsorbed on the boehmite surface. Finally, boehmite NP were incubated with murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 cell line). The release of TNF-α was assessed for boehmite NP and the experimental data were corrected considering the artifactual phenomena, which accounted for about 20-30% of the total.

  9. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment of Engineered Aluminum Nanoparticles in DoD Materiel: Evaluation before Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    macrophages function 2. Dermal – Dermal contact may increase proinflammation, dermatitis 3. Internal – Neurotoxicity (blood brain barrier disruption) and...Benefiting from Environmental Hazard Assessment A CB Concept Decision System Integration System Demonstration Full‐Rate Production & Deployment...Sustainment Disposal CONCEPT REFINEMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM  DEVELOPMENT & DEMONSTRATION PRODUCTION & DEPLOYMENT OPERATIONS & SUPPORT Pre‐ Systems

  10. Exposure assessment and engineering control strategies for airborne nanoparticles: an application to emissions from nanocomposite compounding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Candace S.-J., E-mail: candace.umass@gmail.com [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States); White, David [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Plastics Engineering (United States); Rodriguez, Henoc; Munoz, Christian E. [University of Puerto Rico Mayagueez, Industrial Microbiology Department (Puerto Rico); Huang, Cheng-Yu; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn [National Chiao Tung University, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Taiwan (China); Barry, Carol [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Plastics Engineering (United States); Ellenbecker, Michael J. [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States)

    2012-07-15

    In this study, nanoalumina and nanoclay particles were compounded separately with ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymer to produce nanocomposites using a twin-screw extruder to investigate exposure and effective controls. Nanoparticle exposures from compounding processes were elevated under some circumstances and were affected by many factors including inadequate ventilation, surrounding air flow, feeder type, feeding method, and nanoparticle type. Engineering controls such as improved ventilation and enclosure of releasing sources were applied to the process equipment to evaluate the effectiveness of control. The nanoparticle loading device was modified by installing a ventilated enclosure surrounding the loading chamber. Exposures were studied using designed controls for comparison which include three scenarios: (1) no isolation; (2) enclosed sources; and (3) enclosed sources and improved ventilation. Particle number concentrations for diameters from 5 to 20,000 nm measured by the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer and aerodynamic particle sizer were studied. Aerosol particles were sampled on transmission electron microscope grids to characterize particle composition and morphology. Measurements and samples were taken at the near- and far-field areas relative to releasing sources. Airborne particle concentrations were reduced significantly when using the feeder enclosure, and the concentrations were below the baseline when two sources were enclosed, and the ventilation was improved when using either nanoalumina or nanoclay as fillers.

  11. Engineered Nanoparticle (Eco)Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa

    , various international organizations (e.g. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development and International Organization for Standardization) have recognized the need to amend and refine the current standard tests in relation to nanomaterials. Methodological considerations to standard testing...... for the purpose of testing engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in aquatic system are a central theme in this thesis. The research presented herein has included acute tests with freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna, genotoxicity tests with bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, as well as acellular and in vitro assays....... An understanding of different physico-chemical properties and specific characteristics of various nanoparticles employed in this project has been attained by reviewing the literature in the field. Specific processes such as agglomeration in aquatic suspension, influence of environmental conditions on toxicity...

  12. Method development for the characterization of transport processes of engineered nanoparticles in saturated soils with focus on silver nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Anika

    2015-01-01

    With the growing amount of production and application of engineered nanoparticles, concerns are raising regarding the fate of the potentially toxic materials in the environment. In order to assess the potential of engineered nanoparticles for migration in soils and aquifers, an experimental study and subsequent mathematical modeling were carried out with the objective of the qualitative and quantitative description of the transport and deposition processes of engineered nanoparticles in water...

  13. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  14. Behavior of engineered nanoparticles in landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolyard, Stephanie C; Reinhart, Debra R; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2013-08-01

    This research sought to understand the behavior of engineered nanoparticles in landfill leachate by examining the interactions between nanoparticles and leachate components. The primary foci of this paper are the effects of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag nanoparticles on biological landfill processes and the form of Zn, Ti, and Ag in leachate following the addition of nanoparticles. Insight into the behavior of nanoparticles in landfill leachate was gained from the observed increase in the aqueous concentrations over background for Zn, Ti, and Ag in some tested leachates attributed to leachate components interacting with the nanoparticle coatings resulting in dispersion, dissolution/dissociation, and/or agglomeration. Coated nanoparticles did not affect biological processes when added to leachate; five-day biochemical oxygen demand and biochemical methane potential results were not statistically different when exposed to nanoparticles, presumably due to the low concentration of dissolved free ionic forms of the associated metals resulting from the interaction with leachate components. Chemical speciation modeling predicted that dissolved Zn in leachate was primarily associated with dissolved organic matter, Ti with hydroxide, and Ag with hydrogen sulfide and ammonia; less than 1% of dissolved Zn and Ag was in the free ionic form, and free ionic Ti and Ag concentrations were negligible.

  15. Engineering Liposomes and Nanoparticles for Biological Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær; Andersen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Our ability to engineer nanomaterials for biological and medical applications is continuously increasing, and nanomaterial designs are becoming more and more complex. One very good example of this is the drug delivery field where nanoparticle systems can be used to deliver drugs specifically...... to diseased tissue. In the early days, the design of the nanoparticles was relatively simple, but today we can surface functionalize and manipulate material properties to target diseased tissue and build highly complex drug release mechanisms into our designs. One of the most promising strategies in drug...

  16. Engineered Gold Nanoparticles and Plant Adaptation Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-09-01

    Use of metal nanoparticles in biological system has recently been recognised although little is known about their possible effects on plant growth and development. Nanoparticles accumulation, translocation, growth response and stress modulation in plant system is not well understood. Plants exposed to gold and gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated to exhibit both positive and negative effects. Their growth and yield vary from species to species. Cytoxicity of engineered gold nanoparticles depends on the concentration, particle size and shape. They exhibit increase in vegetative growth and yield of fruit/seed at lower concentration and decrease them at higher concentration. Studies have shown that the gold nanoparticles exposure has improved free radical scavenging potential and antioxidant enzymatic activities and alter micro RNAs expression that regulate different morphological, physiological and metabolic processes in plants. These modulations lead to improved plant growth and yields. Prior to the use of gold nanoparticles, it has been suggested that its cost may be calculated to see if it is economically feasible.

  17. Method of tracing engineered nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present application discloses a population of non-aggregated polymer-coated nanoparticles having a mean particle size (diameter) in the range of 1-100 nm, said population comprising (i) a first subpopulation of (re)active particles coated with a first polymer, and (ii) a second subpopulation...... of non-(re)active tracer particles coated with a second polymer, wherein the weight ratio between said first subpopulation and said second subpopulation is from between 85:15 to 99.99:0.01, as well as a composition comprising such a population. The population of particles is particularly useful...

  18. Inorganic nanoparticles engineered to attack bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristen P; Wang, Lei; Benicewicz, Brian C; Decho, Alan W

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics were once the golden bullet to constrain infectious bacteria. However, the rapid and continuing emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR) among infectious microbial pathogens has questioned the future utility of antibiotics. This dilemma has recently fueled the marriage of the disparate fields of nanochemistry and antibiotics. Nanoparticles and other types of nanomaterials have been extensively developed for drug delivery to eukaryotic cells. However, bacteria have very different cellular architectures than eukaryotic cells. This review addresses the chemistry of nanoparticle-based antibiotic carriers, and how their technical capabilities are now being re-engineered to attack, kill, but also non-lethally manipulate the physiologies of bacteria. This review also discusses the surface functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles with small ligand molecules, polymers, and charged moieties to achieve drug loading and controllable release.

  19. Nanoparticle emissions from combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Merkisz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

     This book focuses on particulate matter emissions produced by vehicles with combustion engines. It describes the physicochemical properties of the particulate matter, the mechanisms of its formation and its environmental impacts (including those on human beings). It discusses methods for measuring particulate mass and number, including the state-of-the-art in Portable Emission Measurement System (PEMS) equipment for measuring the exhaust emissions of both light and heavy-duty vehicles and buses under actual operating conditions. The book presents the authors’ latest investigations into the relations between particulate emission (mass and number) and engine operating parameters, as well as their new findings obtained through road tests performed on various types of vehicles, including those using diesel particulate filter regeneration. The book, which addresses the needs of academics and professionals alike, also discusses relevant European regulations on particulate emissions and highlights selected metho...

  20. Optimization of nanoparticles for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifar, Mohammad; Kelly, Michael E.; Haddadi, Azita; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2015-06-01

    Nano-particulate delivery systems have increasingly been playing important roles in cardiovascular tissue engineering. Properties of nanoparticles (e.g. size, polydispersity, loading capacity, zeta potential, morphology) are essential to system functions. Notably, these characteristics are regulated by fabrication variables, but in a complicated manner. This raises a great need to optimize fabrication process variables to ensure the desired nanoparticle characteristics. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental study on this matter, along with a novel method, the so-called Geno-Neural approach, to analyze, predict and optimize fabrication variables for desired nanoparticle characteristics. Specifically, ovalbumin was used as a protein model of growth factors used in cardiovascular tissue regeneration, and six fabrication variables were examined with regard to their influence on the characteristics of nanoparticles made from high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide). The six-factor five-level central composite rotatable design was applied to the conduction of experiments, and based on the experimental results, a geno-neural model was developed to determine the optimum fabrication conditions. For desired particle sizes of 150, 200, 250 and 300 nm, respectively, the optimum conditions to achieve the low polydispersity index, higher negative zeta potential and higher loading capacity were identified based on the developed geno-neural model and then evaluated experimentally. The experimental results revealed that the polymer and the external aqueous phase concentrations and their interactions with other fabrication variables were the most significant variables to affect the size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, loading capacity and initial burst release of the nanoparticles, while the electron microscopy images of the nanoparticles showed their spherical geometries with no sign of large pores or cracks on their surfaces. The release study revealed

  1. Immunogenicity and ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa Ann

    The growing use of nanoscale materials in commercially available products and therapeutics has created an urgent need to determine the toxicity of these materials so that they may be designed and employed safely. As nanoparticles have unique physical and chemical properties, the challenges in determining their physiological and environmental impact have been numerous. It is, therefore, the goal of my thesis work to employ sensitive analytical tools to fundamentally understand the how nanoparticles interact with immunologically and ecologically relevant models. My project approaches nanotoxicity studies starting with a relevant model system exposed to well-characterized nanoparticles to (1) determine if cells/organisms survive exposure using traditional toxicological assays and, if the majority survives exposure, (2) use sensitive analytical tools to determine if there are changes to critical cell/organism function. If perturbation of function is detected, (3) the mechanism or cause of changes in cell function should be determined, including assessment of nanoparticle uptake and localization. Once a mechanism of interaction is determined, this process could begin again with a modified particle that may address the toxic response. Chapter Two describes the impact of metal oxide (TiO2 and SiO2) nanoparticles on mast cells, critical immune system cells, and utilizes the sensitive technique of carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry (CFMA) to monitor changes in the important mast cell function of exocytosis. Chapter Three expands upon Chapter Two and examines in more detail the mechanism by which TiO2 nanoparticles impact exocytotic cell function, completing the process nanotoxicity described above. From these studies, it was determined that, while nanoparticles do not decrease the viability of mast cells, there are significant changes to exocytosis upon nanoparticle exposure, and in the case of TiO2, these changes in exocytosis are correlated to nanoparticle

  2. Life-cycle assessment of engineered nanomaterials: A literature review of assessment status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miseljic, Mirko; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2014-01-01

    The potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), and their engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), have, in recent years, been a cause of concern. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a highly qualified tool to assess products and systems and has an increasing extent been applied to ENM...

  3. Application of Multi-Species Microbial Bioassay to Assess the Effects of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Aquatic Environment: Potential of a Luminous Microbial Array for Toxicity Risk Assessment (LumiMARA on Testing for Surface-Coated Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YounJung Jung

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Four different manufactured surface-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with coating of citrate, tannic acid, polyethylene glycol, and branched polyethylenimine were used in this study. The toxicity of surface-coated AgNPs was evaluated by a luminous microbial array for toxicity risk assessment (LumiMARA using multi-species of luminescent bacteria. The salt stability of four different AgNPs was measured by UV absorbance at 400 nm wavelength, and different surface-charged AgNPs in combination with bacteria were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Both branched polyethylenimine (BPEI-AgNPs and polyethylene glycol (PEG-AgNPs were shown to be stable with 2% NaCl (non-aggregation, whereas both citrate (Cit-AgNPs and tannic acid (Tan-AgNPs rapidly aggregated in 2% NaCl solution. The values of the 50% effective concentration (EC50 for BPEI-AgNPs in marine bacteria strains (1.57 to 5.19 mg/L were lower than those for the other surface-coated AgNPs (i.e., Cit-AgNPs, Tan-AgNPs, and PEG-AgNPs. It appears that the toxicity of AgNPs could be activated by the interaction of positively charged AgNPs with the negatively charged bacterial cell wall from the results of LumiMARA. LumiMARA for toxicity screening has advantageous compared to a single-species bioassay and is applicable for environmental samples as displaying ranges of assessment results.

  4. Engineered inorganic core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mélinon, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.melinon@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [IPCMS et OMNT, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, 67034 STRASBOURG Cedex 2 (France); Duvail, Jean Luc [IMN UMR 6502 et OMNT Campus Sciences : 2 rue de la Houssinire, BP32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex3 (France); Gauffre, Fabienne [SPM et OMNT : Institut des sciences chimiques de Rennes - UMR 6226, 263 Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 74205, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Boime, Nathalie Herlin [IRAMIS-NIMBE, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CEA CNRS URA 2453) et OMNT, Bat 522, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ledoux, Gilles [Institut Lumière Matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Alfred Kastler 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918 F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Plain, Jérôme [Universit de technologie de Troyes LNIO-ICD, CNRS et OMNT 12 rue Marie Curie - CS 42060 - 10004 Troyes cedex (France); Reiss, Peter [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM, UMR 5819 CEA-CNRS-UJF et OMNT, Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Silly, Fabien [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, TITANS, CNRS 2464 et OMNT, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [CEMES-CNRS, Université de Toulouse et OMNT, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig F 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2014-10-20

    It has been for a long time recognized that nanoparticles are of great scientific interest as they are effectively a bridge between bulk materials and atomic structures. At first, size effects occurring in single elements have been studied. More recently, progress in chemical and physical synthesis routes permitted the preparation of more complex structures. Such structures take advantages of new adjustable parameters including stoichiometry, chemical ordering, shape and segregation opening new fields with tailored materials for biology, mechanics, optics magnetism, chemistry catalysis, solar cells and microelectronics. Among them, core/shell structures are a particular class of nanoparticles made with an inorganic core and one or several inorganic shell layer(s). In earlier work, the shell was merely used as a protective coating for the core. More recently, it has been shown that it is possible to tune the physical properties in a larger range than that of each material taken separately. The goal of the present review is to discuss the basic properties of the different types of core/shell nanoparticles including a large variety of heterostructures. We restrict ourselves on all inorganic (on inorganic/inorganic) core/shell structures. In the light of recent developments, the applications of inorganic core/shell particles are found in many fields including biology, chemistry, physics and engineering. In addition to a representative overview of the properties, general concepts based on solid state physics are considered for material selection and for identifying criteria linking the core/shell structure and its resulting properties. Chemical and physical routes for the synthesis and specific methods for the study of core/shell nanoparticle are briefly discussed.

  5. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  6. Characterization of surface hydrophobicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yao; Wiesner, Mark R

    2012-05-15

    The surface chemistry of nanoparticles, including their hydrophobicity, is a key determinant of their fate, transport and toxicity. Engineered NPs often have surface coatings that control the surface chemistry of NPs and may dominate the effects of the nanoparticle core. Suitable characterization methods for surface hydrophobicity at the nano-scale are needed. Three types of methods, surface adsorption, affinity coefficient and contact angle, were investigated in this study with seven carbon and metal based NPs with and without coatings. The adsorption of hydrophobic molecules, Rose Bengal dye and naphthalene, on NPs was used as one measure of hydrophobicity and was compared with the relative affinity of NPs for octanol or water phases, analogous to the determination of octanol-water partition coefficients for organic molecules. The sessile drop method was adapted for measuring contact angle of a thin film of NPs. Results for these three methods were qualitatively in agreement. Aqueous-nC(60) and tetrahydrofuran-nC(60) were observed to be more hydrophobic than nano-Ag coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone or gum arabic, followed by nano-Ag or nano-Au with citrate-functionalized surfaces. Fullerol was shown to be the least hydrophobic of seven NPs tested. The advantages and limitations of each method were also discussed.

  7. Oral Assessment in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an oral assessment technique that has been used for over 20 years at the Centre of Maritime Studies and Engineering in the Faroe Islands. The technique has proven less laborious for the examiners and the students agree that this technique not only assesses their surface...

  8. Towards localization of engineered silver nanoparticles in Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch

    Silver nanoparticles have increased cytotoxic properties compared to larger particles. Reflecting these properties, engineered silver nanoparticles are now added to an increasing number of consumer products often labelled as anti-bacterial. These particles are presently considered the fastest...... growing nanotechnology application. Accordingly, silver nanoparticles are now postulated to be released into the sewerage systems and wider environment in increasing quantities. Here they could potentially interfere with aquatic life and this ongoing project aims to localize possible particles taken up...

  9. Fate of Zinc and Silver Engineered Nanoparticles in Sewerage Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered zinc oxide (ZnO) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) used in consumer products are largely released into the environment through the wastewater stream. Limited information is available regarding the transformations they undergo during their transit through sewerage sy...

  10. Engineering biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles for biotechnological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moros, Maria; Pelaz, Beatriz; López-Larrubia, Pilar; García-Martin, Maria L.; Grazú, Valeria; de La Fuente, Jesus M.

    2010-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the surrounding water protons due to nanoparticle aggregation demonstrates the bioactivity of these nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. To finish with, nanoparticle toxicity is evaluated by means of MTT assay. The obtained results clearly indicate that these nanoparticles are excellent candidates for their further application in nanomedicine or nanobiotechnology.Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the

  11. Effects of Engineered Nanoparticles on Crops, their Symbionts, and Soil Microbial Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Janine

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are small particles (< 100 nm) that are widely used in electronics, paints, cosmetics, and composite materials. As a result of the production and use of NP containing materials, NPs are released into the environment. For future risk assessment it is, therefore, importa

  12. Multimedia Modeling of engineered Nanoparticles with SimpleBox4Nano: Model Definition and Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, J.; Koelmans, A.A.; Quik, J.T.K.; Hendriks, A.J.; Meent, van de D.

    2014-01-01

    Screening level models for environmental assessment of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) are not generally available. Here we present SimpleBox for Nano (SB4N) as the first model of this type, motivate its validity and evaluate it by comparisons with a known material flow model. SB4N expresses ENP tran

  13. Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumakova, A. A.; Gmoshinski, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.; Trushina, E. N.

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential trace elements must be taken into consideration when estimating risks of NPs presented in the natural environment. The purpose of this work was to study the possible influence of silica, titanium dioxide (rutile) and fullerenol NPs on the toxicity of cadmium and to research the status of some trace elements and related indices of immune function in experiments on laboratory animals. Young male Wistar rats received cadmium salt (1 mg/kg b.w. Cd) orally for 28 days separately or in conjunction with the said kinds of NPs in different doses. A number of effects was observed as a result of combined action of Cd together with NPs, increase in bioaccumulation of this toxic trace element in the liver was most evident. The observed effects didn't show simple dose- dependence in respect to nanomaterials that should be taken into consideration when assessing the possible risks of joint action of nanoparticles and toxic elements existing in the environment in extremely low doses. Violation of microelement homeostasis caused by the combined action of Cd and NPs can have various adverse effects, such as inhibition of T-cell immunity induced by co-administration of Cd with rutile NPs.

  14. Promising iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Vo, Toi Van; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2012-12-01

    For the past few decades biomedical engineering has imprinted its significant impact on the map of science through its wide applications on many other fields. An important example obviously proving this fact is the versatile application of magnetic nanoparticles in theranostics. Due to preferable properties such as biocompatibility, non-toxicity compared to other metal derivations, iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles was chosen to be addressed in this review. Aim of this review is to give the readers a whole working window of these magnetic nanoparticles in the current context of science. Thus, preparation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the so-far techniques, methods of characterizing the nanoparticles as well as their most recent biomedical applications will be stated.

  15. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  16. Rationally engineered polymeric cisplatin nanoparticles for improved antitumor efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu; Soni, Shivani; Basu, Sudipta; Srivats, Shyam; Roy, Rituparna Sinha; Sengupta, Shiladitya [BWH-HST Center for Biomedical Engineering, Harvard Medical School, 65 Landsdowne street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J; Lupoli, Nicola, E-mail: ssengupta2@partners.org [Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 65 Landsdowne street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The use of cisplatin, a first line chemotherapy for most cancers, is dose-limited due to nephrotoxicity. While this toxicity can be addressed through nanotechnology, previous attempts at engineering cisplatin nanoparticles have been limited by the impact on the potency of cisplatin. Here we report the rational engineering of a novel cisplatin nanoparticle by harnessing a novel polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly-isobutylene-maleic acid (PEG-PIMA) copolymer, which can complex with cis-platinum (II) through a monocarboxylato and a coordinate bond. We show that this complex self-assembles into a nanoparticle, and exhibits an IC{sub 50} = 0.77 {+-} 0.11 {mu}M comparable to that of free cisplatin (IC{sub 50} = 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}M). The nanoparticles are internalized into the endolysosomal compartment of cancer cells, and release cisplatin in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, the nanoparticles exhibit significantly improved antitumor efficacy in a 4T1 breast cancer model in vivo, with limited nephrotoxicity, which can be explained by preferential biodistribution in the tumor with reduced kidney concentrations. Our results suggest that the PEG-PIMA-cisplatin nanoparticle can emerge as an attractive solution to the challenges in cisplatin chemotherapy.

  17. Diesel Engine Emission Reduction Using Catalytic Nanoparticles: An Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajin C. Sajeevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide being a rare earth metal with dual valance state existence has exceptional catalytic activity due to its oxygen buffering capability, especially in the nanosized form. Hence when used as an additive in the diesel fuel it leads to simultaneous reduction and oxidation of nitrogen dioxide and hydrocarbon emissions, respectively, from diesel engine. The present work investigates the effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on performance and emissions of diesel engine. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical method and techniques such as TEM, EDS, and XRD have been used for the characterization. Cerium oxide was mixed in diesel by means of standard ultrasonic shaker to obtain stable suspension, in a two-step process. The influence of nanoparticles on various physicochemical properties of diesel fuel has also been investigated through extensive experimentation by means of ASTM standard testing methods. Load test was done in the diesel engine to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on the efficiency and the emissions from the engine. Comparisons of fuel properties with and without additives are also presented.

  18. Ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to freshwater organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch

    with freshwater filter feeder Daphnia magna, sediment feeder Lumbriculus variegatus and green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The results made it possible to identify major scientific and methodological challenges in the testing of nanoparticles compared to ‘conventional’ chemicals. It has been highlighted...

  19. Engineered protein nanoparticles for in vivo tumor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Keum-Young; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Bo-Ram; Lee, Eun Jung; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Byun, Youngro; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2014-08-01

    Two different protein nanoparticles that are totally different in shape and surface structure, i.e. Escherichia coli DNA-binding protein (eDPS) (spherical, 10 nm) and Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome (tPTS) (cylindrical, 12 × 15 nm) were engineered for in vivo optical tumor detection: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide (CDCRGDCFC) was genetically inserted to the surface of each protein nanoparticle, and also near-infrared fluorescence dye was chemically linked to the surface lysine residues. The specific affinity of RGD for integrin (αvβ3) facilitated the uptake of RGD-presenting protein nanoparticles by integrin-expressing tumor cells, and also the protein nanoparticles neither adversely affected cell viability nor induced cell damage. After intravenously injected to tumor-bearing mice, all the protein nanoparticles successfully reached tumor with negligible renal clearance, and then the surface RGD peptides caused more prolonged retention of protein nanoparticles in tumor and accordingly higher fluorescence intensity of tumor image. In particular, the fluorescence of tumor image was more intensive with tPTS than eDPS, which is due presumably to longer in vivo half-life and circulation of tPTS that originates from thermophilic and acidophilic bacterium. Although eDPS and tPTS were used as proof-of-concept in this study, it seems that other protein nanoparticles with different size, shape, and surface structure can be applied to effective in vivo tumor detection.

  20. Therapeutic nanoparticles from novel multiblock engineered polyesterurethanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattu, C., E-mail: clara.mattu@polito.it; Boffito, M.; Sartori, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Ranzato, E. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, DiSIT-Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica (Italy); Bernardi, E.; Sassi, M. P. [INRIM-Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (Italy); Di Rienzo, A. M.; Ciardelli, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    A novel biodegradable material belonging to the class of polyester-urethanes (PURs), based on poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) blocks, was proposed as matrix-forming material for the preparation of nanoparticles by the solvent displacement method. This method has been widely applied to prepare nanoparticles with reproducible, small size with commercially available polyesters or polyester-polyether copolymers. These carriers often displayed fast and poorly controllable release rates. In response to these problems we proposed the insertion of polyesters into a more complex microstructure, such as that of polyurethanes, characterized by the alternation of hard and soft segments, in order to modulate and control the degradation rate and release profiles. PCL-based PUR (C-BC2000) was synthesized according to a two step synthesis procedure. Commercial PCL and poly(d, l lactide) (PLA) were used as controls; and paclitaxel, a potent anti-neoplastic drug, was encapsulated inside all carriers. Carriers prepared with the new material showed no intrinsic cytotoxicity (A-431 cells), with similar size in the range 211-226 nm and surface charge as the commercial controls. Moreover, C-BC2000 nanoparticles exhibited a slightly faster degradation rate, a much higher encapsulation efficiency (89 % against 24 % and 18 % for PLA and PCL, respectively) and a longer and more controlled release profile. This study highlighted the possibility to successfully employ biodegradable polyurethanes to prepare particles for controlled drug delivery, suggesting further and extensive investigation on the introduction of different PUR formulations in this field.

  1. Engineering spatial gradients of signaling proteins using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnemay, L; Hostachy, S; Hoffmann, C; Gautier, J; Gueroui, Z

    2013-11-13

    Intracellular biochemical reactions are often localized in space and time, inducing gradients of enzymatic activity that may play decisive roles in determining cell's fate and functions. However, the techniques available to examine such enzymatic gradients of activity remain limited. Here, we propose a new method to engineer a spatial gradient of signaling protein concentration within Xenopus egg extracts using superparamagnetic nanoparticles. We show that, upon the application of a magnetic field, a concentration gradient of nanoparticles with a tunable length extension is established within confined egg extracts. We then conjugate the nanoparticles to RanGTP, a small G-protein controlling microtubule assembly. We found that the generation of an artificial gradient of Ran-nanoparticles modifies the spatial positioning of microtubule assemblies. Furthermore, the spatial control of the level of Ran concentration allows us to correlate the local fold increase in Ran-nanoparticle concentration with the spatial positioning of the microtubule-asters. Our assay provides a bottom-up approach to examine the minimum ingredients generating polarization and symmetry breaking within cells. More generally, these results show how magnetic nanoparticles and magnetogenetic tools can be used to control the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling pathways.

  2. Analyzing Engineered Nanoparticles using Photothermal Infrared Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Shoko

    using redox activity measurements. With a new setup adapted to miniaturization, stable pH was achieved, platinum was found to be more suitable than gold for open circuit potential-time measurements, miniaturized platinum working electrodes and quasi silver/silver chloride reference electrodes were...... of design rules for the responsivity of the string-based photothermal spectrometer. Responsivity is maximized for a thin, narrow and long string irradiated by high power radiation. Various types of nanoparticles and binary mixtures of them were successfully detected and analyzed. Detection of copper...

  3. Cellular interactions with tissue-engineered microenvironments and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi

    Tissue-engineered hydrogels composed of intermolecularlly crosslinked hyaluronan (HA-DTPH) and fibronectin functional domains (FNfds) were applied as a physiological relevant ECM mimic with controlled mechanical and biochemical properties. Cellular interactions with this tissue-engineered environment, especially physical interactions (cellular traction forces), were quantitatively measured by using the digital image speckle correlation (DISC) technique and finite element method (FEM). By correlating with other cell functions such as cell morphology and migration, a comprehensive structure-function relationship between cells and their environments was identified. Furthermore, spatiotemporal redistribution of cellular traction stresses was time-lapse measured during cell migration to better understand the dynamics of cell mobility. The results suggest that the reinforcement of the traction stresses around the nucleus, as well as the relaxation of nuclear deformation, are critical steps during cell migration, serving as a speed regulator, which must be considered in any dynamic molecular reconstruction model of tissue cell migration. Besides single cell migration, en masse cell migration was studied by using agarose droplet migration assay. Cell density was demonstrated to be another important parameter to influence cell behaviors besides substrate properties. Findings from these studies will provide fundamental design criteria to develop novel and effective tissue-engineered constructs. Cellular interactions with rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were also studied. These particles can penetrate easily through the cell membrane and impair cell function, with the latter being more damaging. The exposure to nanoparticles was found to decrease cell area, cell proliferation, motility, and contractility. To prevent this, a dense grafted polymer brush coating was applied onto the nanoparticle surface. These modified nanoparticles failed to adhere to and penetrate

  4. Engineered Hybrid Nanoparticles for On-Demand Diagnostics and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim Truc; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-12-15

    Together with the simultaneous development of nanomaterials and molecular biology, the bionano interface brings about various applications of hybrid nanoparticles in nanomedicine. The hybrid nanoparticles not only present properties of the individual components but also show synergistic effects for specialized applications. Thus, the development of advanced hybrid nanoparticles for targeted and on-demand diagnostics and therapeutics of diseases has rapidly become a hot research topic in nanomedicine. The research focus is to fabricate novel classes of programmable hybrid nanoparticles that are precisely engineered to maximize drug concentrations in diseased cells, leading to enhanced efficacy and reduced side effects of chemotherapy for the disease treatment. In particular, the hybrid nanoparticle platforms can simultaneously target diseased cells, enable the location to be imaged by optical methods, and release therapeutic drugs to the diseased cells by command. This Account specially discusses the rational fabrication of integrated hybrid nanoparticles and their applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. For diagnostics applications, hybrid nanoparticles can be utilized as imaging agents that enable detailed visualization at the molecular level. By the use of suitable targeting ligands incorporated on the nanoparticles, targeted optical imaging may be feasible with improved performance. Novel imaging techniques such as multiphoton excitation and photoacoustic imaging using near-infrared light have been developed using the intrinsic properties of particular nanoparticles. The use of longer-wavelength excitation sources allows deeper penetration into the human body for disease diagnostics and at the same time reduces the adverse effects on normal tissues. Furthermore, multimodal imaging techniques have been achieved by combining several types of components in nanoparticles, offering higher accuracy and better spatial views, with the aim of detecting life

  5. Gold nanoparticle-decellularized matrix hybrids for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevach, Michal; Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Dvir, Tal

    2014-10-01

    Decellularized matrices are valuable scaffolds for engineering functional cardiac patches for treating myocardial infarction. However, the lack of quick and efficient electrical coupling between adjacent cells may jeopardize the success of the treatment. To address this issue, we have deposited gold nanoparticles on fibrous decellularized omental matrices and investigated their morphology, conductivity, and degradation. We have shown that cardiac cells engineered within the hybrid scaffolds exhibited elongated and aligned morphology, massive striation, and organized connexin 43 electrical coupling proteins. Finally, we have shown that the hybrid patches demonstrated superior function as compared to pristine patches, including a stronger contraction force, lower excitation threshold, and faster calcium transients.

  6. Civil Engineering Technology Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed Civil Engineering Technology program. An initial examination of the literature focused on industry needs and the job market for civil engineering technicians. In order to gather information on local area employers' hiring practices and needs, a…

  7. Downsizing assessment of automotive Stirling engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, R. H.; Tew, R. C., Jr.; Klann, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A 67 kW (90 hp) Stirling engine design, sized for use in a 1984 1440 kg (3170 lb) automobile was the focal point for developing automotive Stirling engine technology. Since recent trends are towards lighter vehicles, an assessment was made of the applicability of the Stirling technology being developed for smaller, lower power engines. Using both the Philips scaling laws and a Lewis Research Center (Lewis) Stirling engine performance code, dimensional and performance characteristics were determined for a 26 kW (35 hp) and a 37 kW (50 hp) engine for use in a nominal 907 kg (2000 lb) vehicle. Key engine elements were sized and stressed and mechanical layouts were made to ensure mechanical fit and integrity of the engines. Fuel economy estimates indicated that the Stirling engine would maintain a 30 to 45 percent fuel economy advantage comparable spark ignition and diesel powered vehicles in the 1984 period.

  8. Enabling performance skills: Assessment in engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Jenny Kristina

    Current reform in engineering education is part of a national trend emphasizing student learning as well as accountability in instruction. Assessing student performance to demonstrate accountability has become a necessity in academia. In newly adopted criterion proposed by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), undergraduates are expected to demonstrate proficiency in outcomes considered essential for graduating engineers. The case study was designed as a formative evaluation of freshman engineering students to assess the perceived effectiveness of performance skills in a design laboratory environment. The mixed methodology used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to assess students' performance skills and congruency among the respondents, based on individual, team, and faculty perceptions of team effectiveness in three ABET areas: Communications Skills. Design Skills, and Teamwork. The findings of the research were used to address future use of the assessment tool and process. The results of the study found statistically significant differences in perceptions of Teamwork Skills (p teamwork, among freshman engineering students; (2) incorporate feedback into the learning process; (3) strengthen the assessment process with a follow-up plan that specifically targets performance skill deficiencies, and (4) integrate the assessment instrument and practice with ongoing curriculum development. The findings generated by this study provides engineering departments engaged in assessment activity, opportunity to reflect, refine, and develop their programs as it continues. It also extends research on ABET competencies of engineering students in an under-investigated topic of factors correlated with team processes, behavior, and student learning.

  9. Soil-pore water distribution of silver and gold engineered nanoparticles in undisturbed soils under unsaturated conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavares, D.S.; Rodrigues, S.M.; Cruz, N.; Carvalho, C.; Teixeira, T.; Carvalho, L.; Duarte, A.C.; Trindade, T.; Pereira, E.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to soil is well documented but little is known on the subsequent soil-pore water distribution of ENPs once present in soil. In this study, the availability and mobility of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) ENPs added to agricultural soils were assessed in two se

  10. Re: Engineered Nanoparticles Induce Cell Apoptosis: Potential for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs have been widely applied in industry, biology and medicine recently (i.e. clothes, sunscreens, cosmetics, foods, diagnostic medicine, imaging and drug delivery. There are many kinds of manufactured nanomaterial products including TiO2, ZnO, CeO2, Fe2O3, and CuO (as metal oxide nanoparticles as well as gold, silver, platinum and palladium (as metal nanoparticles, and other carbon-based ENP’s such as carbon nanotububes and quantum dots. ENPs with their sizes no larger than 100 nm are able to enter the human body and accumulate in organs and cause toxic effects. In many researches, ENP effects on the cancer cells of different organs with related cell apoptosis were noted (AgNP, nano-Cr2O3, Au-Fe2O3 NPs, nano-TiO2, nano-HAP, nano-Se, MoO3 nanoplate, Realgar nanoparticles. ENPs, with their unique properties, such as surface charge, particle size, composition and surface modification with tissue recognition ligands or antibodies, has been increasingly explored as a tool to carry small molecular weight drugs as well as macromolecules for cancer therapy, thus generating the new concept “nanocarrier”. Direct induction of cell apoptosis by ENPs provides an opportunity for cancer treatment. In the century of nanomedicine that depends on development of the nanotechnology, ENPs have a great potential for application in cancer treatment with minimal side effects.

  11. Engineering Mathematics Assessment Using "MapleTA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ian S.

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of degree level engineering mathematics students using the computer-aided assessment package MapleTA is discussed. Experience of academic and practical issues for both online coursework and examination assessments is presented, hopefully benefiting other academics in this novel area of activity. (Contains 6 figures and 1 table.)

  12. Teaching and Assessing Engineering Professional Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Al-Bahi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Engineering students are required to have, by the time of graduation, a set of professional skills related to teamwork, oral and written communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and knowledge of contemporary issues. Teaching and assessment of these skills, as part of ABET accreditation, remains problematic. A systematic methodology to integrate these skills and their assessment in the curriculum is described. The method was recently applied in several engineering programs and proved to be efficient in generating data and evidences for evaluation and continuous improvement of these outcomes.

  13. Stem cell engineering a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, Jeanne; McDevitt, Todd; Palecek, Sean; Schaffer, David; Zandstra, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This book describes a global assessment of stem cell engineering research, achieved through site visits by a panel of experts to leading institutes, followed by dedicated workshops. The assessment made clear that engineers and the engineering approach with its quantitative, system-based thinking can contribute much to the progress of stem cell research and development. The increased need for complex computational models and new, innovative technologies, such as high-throughput screening techniques, organ-on-a-chip models and in vitro tumor models require an increasing involvement of engineers and physical scientists. Additionally, this book will show that although the US is still in a leadership position in stem cell engineering, Asian countries such as Japan, China and Korea, as well as European countries like the UK, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands are rapidly expanding their investments in the field. Strategic partnerships between countries could lead to major advances of the field and scalable expansi...

  14. Assessment of professional engineering skills - define, monitor and assess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive pedagogical approach of CDIO is designed to meet the current and future requirements for engineering education. CDIO integrates the disciplinary technical knowledge and the professional engineering skills required in order to operate as an engineer in industry. Accordingly......, professional engineering skills need to be included in the syllabus of engineering courses and study programs, which in turn call for the implementation of learning objectives, teaching activities as well as methods for assessing the professional performance of the engineering students. The implicit...... and intangible characteristics of professional skills, in comparison to the traditional disciplinary technical knowledge, require teaching activities, as well as assessment methods, that adapt to the nature and learning processes of these skills. Besides, university professors do not always have profound real...

  15. Transport and retention of carbon-based engineered and natural nanoparticles through saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Maryeh; Sharma, Prabhakar; Katyal, Deeksha; Fagerlund, Fritjof

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-based engineered nanoparticles have been widely used due to their small size and unique physical and chemical properties. At the same time, the toxic effects of these nanoparticles on human and fish cells have also been observed; therefore, their release and distribution into the surface and subsurface environment is a subject of concern. The aim of this research is to evaluate and compare the transports and retentions of two types of engineered nanoparticles (multiwalled carbon nanotubes and C60) and the natural carbon nanoparticles collected from a fire accident. Several laboratory experiments were conducted to observe the transport behavior of nanoparticles through a column packed with silica sand. The column experiments were intended to monitor the effect of ionic strength on transport of nanoparticles as a function of their shapes. It was observed that the mobilities of both types of engineered nanoparticles were reduced with the increasing ionic strength from 1.34 to 60 mM. However, at ionic strengths up to 10.89 mM, spherical nanoparticles were more mobile than cylindrical nanoparticles, but the mobility of the cylindrical nanoparticles became significantly higher than spherical nanoparticles at the ionic strength of 60 mM. In comparison with natural fire-born nanoparticles, both types of engineered nanoparticles were much less mobile under the selected experimental condition in this study. Furthermore, inverse modeling was used to calculate parameters such as attachment efficiency, the longitudinal dispersivity, and capacity of the solid phase for the attachment of nanoparticles. The results indicate that the combination of the shape and the solution chemistry of the NPs are responsible for the transport and the retention of nanoparticles in natural environment; however, fire-burned nanoparticles can be highly mobile at the natural groundwater chemistry.

  16. Inhibition effect of engineered silver nanoparticles to bloom forming cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy Duong, Thi; Son Le, Thanh; Thu Huong Tran, Thi; Kien Nguyen, Trung; Ho, Cuong Tu; Hien Dao, Trong; Phuong Quynh Le, Thi; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Dang, Dinh Kim; Thu Huong Le, Thi; Thu Ha, Phuong

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) has a wide range antibacterial effect and is extensively used in different aspects of medicine, food storage, household products, disinfectants, biomonitoring and environmental remediation etc. In the present study, we examined the growth inhibition effect of engineered silver nanoparticles against bloom forming cyanobacterial M. aeruginosa strain. AgNPs were synthesized by a chemical reduction method at room temperature and UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that they presented a maximum absorption at 410 nm and size range between 10 and 18 nm. M. aeruginosa cells exposed during 10 d to AgNPs to a range of concentrations from 0 to 1 mg l-1. The changes in cell density and morphology were used to measure the responses of the M. aeruginosa to AgNPs. The control and treatment units had a significant difference in terms of cell density and growth inhibition (p < 0.05). Increasing the concentration of AgNPs, a reduction of the cell growths in all treatment was observed. The inhibition efficiency was reached 98.7% at higher concentration of AgNPs nanoparticles. The term half maximal effective concentration (EC50) based on the cell growth measured by absorbance at 680 nm (A680) was 0.0075 mg l-1. The inhibition efficiency was 98.7% at high concentration of AgNPs (1 mg l-1). Image of SEM and TEM reflected a shrunk and damaged cell wall indicating toxicity of silver nanoparticles toward M. aeruginosa.

  17. Vulnerability of drinking water supplies to engineered nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troester, Martin; Brauch, Heinz-Juergen; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-06-01

    The production and use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) inevitably leads to their release into aquatic environments, with the quantities involved expected to increase significantly in the future. Concerns therefore arise over the possibility that ENPs might pose a threat to drinking water supplies. Investigations into the vulnerability of drinking water supplies to ENPs are hampered by the absence of suitable analytical methods that are capable of detecting and quantifiying ENPs in complex aqueous matrices. Analytical data concerning the presence of ENPs in drinking water supplies is therefore scarce. The eventual fate of ENPs in the natural environment and in processes that are important for drinking water production are currently being investigated through laboratory based-experiments and modelling. Although the information obtained from these studies may not, as yet, be sufficient to allow comprehensive assessment of the complete life-cycle of ENPs, it does provide a valuable starting point for predicting the significance of ENPs to drinking water supplies. This review therefore addresses the vulnerability of drinking water supplies to ENPs. The risk of ENPs entering drinking water is discussed and predicted for drinking water produced from groundwater and from surface water. Our evaluation is based on reviewing published data concerning ENP production amounts and release patterns, the occurrence and behavior of ENPs in aquatic systems relevant for drinking water supply and ENP removability in drinking water purification processes. Quantitative predictions are made based on realistic high-input case scenarios. The results of our synthesis of current knowledge suggest that the risk probability of ENPs being present in surface water resources is generally limited, but that particular local conditions may increase the probability of raw water contamination by ENPs. Drinking water extracted from porous media aquifers are not generally considered to be prone to ENP

  18. Peer Assessment in Engineering Group Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Peer review has proved to be beneficial in project-based environments by involving students in the process and encouraging them to take ownership of their learning. This article reviews how peer assessment has been employed within group work for different engineering programs. Since the administr......Peer review has proved to be beneficial in project-based environments by involving students in the process and encouraging them to take ownership of their learning. This article reviews how peer assessment has been employed within group work for different engineering programs. Since...

  19. A global assessment of stem cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, Jeanne F; McDevitt, Todd C; Palecek, Sean P; Schaffer, David V; Zandstra, Peter W; Nerem, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    Over the last 2 years a global assessment of stem cell engineering (SCE) was conducted with the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation, the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The purpose was to gather information on the worldwide status and trends in SCE, that is, the involvement of engineers and engineering approaches in the stem cell field, both in basic research and in the translation of research into clinical applications and commercial products. The study was facilitated and managed by the World Technology Evaluation Center. The process involved site visits in both Asia and Europe, and it also included several different workshops. From this assessment, the panel concluded that there needs to be an increased role for engineers and the engineering approach. This will provide a foundation for the generation of new markets and future economic growth. To do this will require an increased investment in engineering, applied research, and commercialization as it relates to stem cell research and technology. It also will require programs that support interdisciplinary teams, new innovative mechanisms for academic-industry partnerships, and unique translational models. In addition, the global community would benefit from forming strategic partnerships between countries that can leverage existing and emerging strengths in different institutions. To implement such partnerships will require multinational grant programs with appropriate review mechanisms.

  20. Fate and Bioavailability of Engineered Nanoparticles in Soils: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, G.; Hund-Rinke, K.; Kuhlbusch, T.; Brink, van den N.W.; Nickel, C.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions within natural soils have often been neglected when assessing fate and bioavailability of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in soils. This review combines patchwise ENM research using natural soils with the much wider literature on ENM performed in standard tests or on the fate of colloids

  1. Engineered silica nanoparticles as additives in lubricant oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Faes López, Teresa; Fernández González, Alfonso; Del Reguero, Ángel; Matos, María; Díaz-García, Marta E.; Badía-Laíño, Rosana

    2015-10-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) synthesized by the sol-gel approach were engineered for size and surface properties by grafting hydrophobic chains to prevent their aggregation and facilitate their contact with the phase boundary, thus improving their dispersibility in lubricant base oils. The surface modification was performed by covalent binding of long chain alkyl functionalities using lauric acid and decanoyl chloride to the SiO2 NP surface. The hybrid SiO2 NPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, simultaneous differential thermal analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance and dynamic light scattering, while their dispersion in two base oils was studied by static multiple light scattering at low (0.01% w/v) and high (0.50%w/v) concentrations. The nature of the functional layer and the functionalization degree seemed to be directly involved in the stability of the suspensions. The potential use of the functional SiO2 NPs as lubricant additives in base oils, specially designed for being used in hydraulic circuits, has been outlined by analyzing the tribological properties of the dispersions. The dendritic structure of the external layer played a key role in the tribological characteristics of the material by reducing the friction coefficient and wear. These nanoparticles reduce drastically the waste of energy in friction processes and are more environmentally friendly than other additives.

  2. Risk Assessment in Advanced Engineering Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holický

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods for designing of civil engineering structures and other engineering systems are frequently based on the concept of target probability of failure. However, this fundamental quantity is usually specified on the basis of comparative studies and past experience only. Moreover, probabilistic design methods suffer from several deficiencies, including lack of consideration for accidental and other hazard situations and their consequences. Both of these extreme conditions are more and more frequently becoming causes of serious failures and other adverse events. Available experience clearly indicates that probabilistic design procedures may be efficiently supplemented by a risk analysis and assessment, which can take into account various consequences of unfavourable events. It is therefore anticipated that in addition to traditional probabilistic concepts the methods of advanced engineering design will also commonly include criteria for acceptable risks.

  3. Synthesis and optimization of chitosan nanoparticles: Potential applications in nanomedicine and biomedical engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadi, Arezou; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Talebnia, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chitosan nanoparticles have become of great interest for nanomedicine, biomedical engineering and development of new therapeutic drug release systems with improved bioavailability, increased specificity and sensitivity, and reduced pharmacological toxicity. The aim of the present study was to synthesis and optimize of the chitosan nanoparticles for industrial and biomedical applications. Methods: Fe3O4 was synthesized and optimized as magnetic core nanoparticles and then chitosan ...

  4. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  5. Multimedia Environmental Fate and Speciation of Engineered Nanoparticles: A Probabilistic Modeling Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, J.; Quik, J.T.K.; Koelmans, A.A.; Hendriks, A.J.; Meent, van de D.

    2016-01-01

    The robustness of novel multimedia fate models in environmental exposure estimation of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) remains unclear, because of uncertainties in the emission, physicochemical properties and natural variability in environmental systems. Here, we evaluate the uncertainty in predicte

  6. Colloidal microcapsules: Surface engineering of nanoparticles for interfacial assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Debabrata

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal Microcapsules (MCs), i.e. capsules stabilized by nano-/microparticle shells are highly modular inherently multi-scale constructs with applications in many areas of material and biological sciences e.g. drug delivery, encapsulation and microreactors. These MCs are fabricated by stabilizing emulsions via self-assembly of colloidal micro/nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface. In these systems, colloidal particles serve as modular building blocks, allowing incorporation of the particle properties into the functional capabilities of the MCs. As an example, nanoparticles (NPs) can serve as appropriate antennae to induce response by external triggers (e.g. magnetic fields or laser) for controlled release of encapsulated materials. Additionally, the dynamic nature of the colloidal assembly at liquid-liquid interfaces result defects free organized nanostructures with unique electronic, magnetic and optical properties which can be tuned by their dimension and cooperative interactions. The physical properties of colloidal microcapsules such as permeability, mechanical strength, and biocompatibility can be precisely controlled through the proper choice of colloids and preparation conditions for their. This thesis illustrates the fabrication of stable and robust MCs through via chemical crosslinking of the surface engineered NPs at oil-water interface. The chemical crosslinking assists NPs to form a stable 2-D network structure at the emulsion interface, imparting robustness to the emulsions. In brief, we developed the strategies for altering the nature of chemical interaction between NPs at the emulsion interface and investigated their role during the self-assembly process. Recently, we have fabricated stable colloidal microcapsule (MCs) using covalent, dative as well as non-covalent interactions and demonstrated their potential applications including encapsulation, size selective release, functional devices and biocatalysts.

  7. Mobility of engineered inorganic nanoparticles in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metreveli, George; Heidmann, Ilona; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-04-01

    Besides the excellent properties and great potential for various industrial, medical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and life science applications, engineered inorganic nanoparticles (EINP) can show also disadvantages concerning increasing risk potential with increasing application, if they are released in the environmental systems. EINP can influence microbial activity and can show toxic effects (Fabrega et al., 2009). Similar to the inorganic natural colloids, EINP can be transported in soil and groundwater systems (Metreveli et al., 2005). Furthermore, due to the large surface area and high sorption and complex formation capacity, EINP can facilitate transport of different contaminants. In this study the mobility behaviour of EINP and their effect on the transport of different metal(loid) species in water saturated porous media was investigated. For these experiments laboratory column system was used. The column was filled with quartz sand. The interactions between EINP and metal(loid)s were characterised by coupling of asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). As EINP laponite (synthetic three layer clay mineral), and as metal(loid)s Cu, Pb, Zn, Pt and As were used. In AF4 experiments sorption of metal(loid)s on the surface of EINP could be observed. The extent of interactions was influenced by pH value and was different for different metal(loid)s. Laboratory column experiments showed high mobility of EINP, which facilitated transport of most of metal(loid)s in water saturated porous media. Furthermore the migration of synthetic silver nanoparticles in natural soil columns was determined in leaching experiments. Acknowledgement Financial support by German Research Council (DFG) and Max-Buchner-Research Foundation (MBFSt) is gratefully acknowledged. We thank Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) for the opportunity to perform the column and AF4 experiments. References: Fabrega, J., Fawcett, S. R

  8. Monitor for detecting and assessing exposure to airborne nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Johan; Voetz, Matthias; Kiesling, Heinz-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    An important safety aspect of the workplace environment concerns the severity of its air pollution with nanoparticles (NP; workplace air pollution level and the personal exposure to airborne NPs. This article describes the design and operation of the Aerasense NP monitor that enables intelligence gathering in particular with respect to airborne particles in the 10-300 nm size range. The NP monitor provides real time information about their number concentration, average size, and surface areas per unit volume of inhaled air that deposit in the various compartments of the respiratory tract. The monitor's functionality relies on electrical charging of airborne particles and subsequent measurements of the total particle charge concentration under various conditions. Information obtained with the NP monitor in a typical workplace environment has been compared with simultaneously recorded data from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) capable of measuring the particle size distribution in the 11-1086 nm size range. When the toxicological properties of the engineered and/or released particles in the workplace are known, personal exposure monitoring allows a risk assessment to be made for a worker during each workday, when the workplace-produced particles can be distinguished from other (ambient) particles.

  9. The assessment of learning in engineering education practice and policy

    CERN Document Server

    Heywood, John

    2016-01-01

    Explores how we judge engineering education in order to effectively redesign courses and programs that will prepare new engineers for various professional and academic careers This book considers the functions of assessment and its measurement in engineering education. Chapters two through three discuss efforts toward alternative curriculum in engineering and advanced level exams for university entry in engineering science. Chapter four reviews investigations of what engineers do at work and their implications assessment. Chapter five records the development of competency based assessment and considers its implications for the engineering curriculum. Chapter six discusses the impact of the accrediting authorities on assessment, outcomes based assessment, taxonomies and assessment in mastery and personalized systems of instruction. Chapters seven through eight consider student variability (e.g. intellectual development, emotional intelligence) and reflective practice. Questio s are raised about the assessment...

  10. Environmentally relevant approaches to assess nanoparticles ecotoxicity: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bour, Agathe; Mouchet, Florence; Silvestre, Jérôme; Gauthier, Laury [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INP (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement) (France); ENSAT, Avenue de l’Agrobiopôle, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement), F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); Pinelli, Eric, E-mail: pinelli@ensat.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INP (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement) (France); ENSAT, Avenue de l’Agrobiopôle, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement), F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Integrated ecotoxicity of NPs from organism to community level is reviewed. • Trophic chains allow determining the implication of trophic route in NP toxicity. • The use of microcosms and mesocosms allows studies at larger scale. • Data concerning NP fate and effects in environmental conditions are lacking. - Abstract: Despite the increasing production and use of nanoparticles (NPs), there is a lack of knowledge about their environmental fate and ecotoxicity. Studies in environmentally relevant conditions are necessary to better assess these parameters, but such studies are rather rare. The present work represents first time that studies on engineered NPs using environmentally relevant exposure methods have been reviewed. These exposure methods differ from standardized protocols and can be classified into three groups: experimental trophic chains that allow study of the trophic route, multi-species exposures under laboratory conditions that allow for complex but controlled exposure and outdoor exposures that are more similar to environmentally realistic conditions. The majority of studies of micro- or mesocosms have focused on NP partitioning and bioaccumulation. The other major parameter that has been studied is NP ecotoxicity, which has been assessed in single species, in single species via the trophic route, and at the community level. The induction of biochemical defense systems, immunomodulation, effects on growth and reproduction, behavioral alterations and mortality have been used as indicators of major toxicity, depending on the species studied. The major effects of NPs on both microbial and algal communities include modifications of community compositions and diversities, decreased biomass and changes in community activities.

  11. Impact of engineered zinc oxide nanoparticles on the energy budgets of Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Erik B.; Hanna, Shannon K.; Lenihan, Hunter S.; Miller, Robert J.; Nisbet, Roger M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper characterizes the sublethal impact of engineered ZnO nanoparticles on the individual performance of the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis within the context of Dynamic Energy Budget theory, thereby allowing an integrated evaluation of the impact of multiple stressors on various endpoints. Data include measurements of the impact of ZnO nanoparticles on body burden, feeding, respiration, shell length, biomass, and mortality of mussels kept in laboratory tanks for over 100 days. ZnO nanoparticles in the environment impair the mussels' feeding rate (EC50 for the maximum feeding rate is 1.5 mg ZnO nanoparticles L- 1). Zn accumulated in tissue increases respiration (EC50 for the respiration rate is 0.9 mg environmental ZnO nanoparticles L- 1 with the body burden having reached its ultimate level), indicating that maintenance processes are more affected by ZnO nanoparticles than feeding. The feeding regime constrained growth and biomass production to the extent that the impact of ZnO nanoparticles on these processes was undetectable, yet the remaining measurements allowed the estimation of the toxicity parameters. The toxicity representation, combined with the DEB model, allowed the calculation of the effect of the nanoparticles on the expected lifetime production of reproductive matter. EC50 for the expected lifetime production of reproductive matter is less than 0.25 mg ZnO nanoparticles L- 1, indicating that that the ecological impact of ZnO nanoparticle exposure is stronger than its impact on individual physiological rates.

  12. 2003 SNL ASCI applications software quality engineering assessment report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Ellis, Molly A.; Williamson, Charles Michael; Bonano, Lora A.

    2004-02-01

    This document describes the 2003 SNL ASCI Software Quality Engineering (SQE) assessment of twenty ASCI application code teams and the results of that assessment. The purpose of this assessment was to determine code team compliance with the Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices, Version 2.0 as part of an overall program assessment.

  13. Modulating pharmacokinetics, tumor uptake and biodistribution by engineered nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle R Arvizo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inorganic nanoparticles provide promising tools for biomedical applications including detection, diagnosis and therapy. While surface properties such as charge are expected to play an important role in their in vivo behavior, very little is known how the surface chemistry of nanoparticles influences their pharmacokinetics, tumor uptake, and biodistribution. METHOD/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a family of structurally homologous nanoparticles we have investigated how pharmacological properties including tumor uptake and biodistribution are influenced by surface charge using neutral (TEGOH, zwitterionic (Tzwit, negative (TCOOH and positive (TTMA nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were injected into mice (normal and athymic either in the tail vein or into the peritoneum. CONCLUSION: Neutral and zwitterionic nanoparticles demonstrated longer circulation time via both i.p. and i.v. administration, whereas negatively and positively charged nanoparticles possessed relatively short half-lives. These pharmacological characteristics were reflected on the tumor uptake and biodistribution of the respective nanoparticles, with enhanced tumor uptake by neutral and zwitterionic nanoparticles via passive targeting.

  14. Engineering critical assessment of PETROBRAS Camarupim pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J.R. [Microalloying International, Houston, TX (United States); Gatlin, R.W. [Global Industries, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zumpano Junior, P.; Kaspary, T. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    This paper presents details of an Engineering Critical Assessment (ECA) performed to develop girth weld flaw acceptance criteria for the PETROBRAS Camarupim Pipeline which was installed in Espirito Santo Basin, ES, offshore Brazil in May 2008 by Global Industries. The pipeline was constructed using 24-inch diameter API Grade X65 pipe with wall thicknesses of 0.875-inch (22.2 mm) and 1.00 inch (25.4 mm). Although the Camarupim pipeline will initially transport sweet gas there is the potential for mildly sour service operation in mid to late life. To assess the effect of sour service on the material toughness properties a series of slow strain rate fracture toughness tests were performed in a Project representative sour service environment. In addition the results of sour service fatigue crack growth tests were analyzed to develop a conservative sour service fatigue crack growth law for the ECA analysis. (author)

  15. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  16. Anticancer activity of Ficus religiosa engineered copper oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, Renu; Maheswari, Ramasamy; Karthik, Selvaraju [Department of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India); Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian, E-mail: shivashangari@gmail.com [Regional Forensic Science Laboratory, Tiruchirapalli, Tamilnadu (India); Ravikumar, Vilwanathan, E-mail: ravikumarbdu@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-11-01

    The design, synthesis, characterization and application of biologically synthesized nanomaterials have become a vital branch of nanotechnology. There is a budding need to develop a method for environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis, that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on an eco-friendly process for rapid synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract as reducing and protecting agent. The synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles were confirmed by UV–vis spectrophotometer, absorbance peaks at 285 nm. The copper oxide nanoparticles were analyzed with field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum. The FE-SEM and DLS analyses exposed that copper oxide nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average particle size of 577 nm. FT-IR spectral analysis elucidates the occurrence of biomolecules required for the reduction of copper oxide ions. Zeta potential studies showed that the surface charge of the formed nanoparticles was highly negative. The XRD pattern revealed that synthesized nanoparticles are crystalline in nature. Further, biological activities of the synthesized nanoparticles were confirmed based on its stable anti-cancer effects. The apoptotic effect of copper oxide nanoparticles is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in A549 cells. The observed characteristics and results obtained in our in vitro assays suggest that the copper nanoparticles might be a potential anticancer agent. - Highlights: • Biogenic synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles by leaf extract of Ficus religiosa • Characterized via UV–vis, FT-IR, DLS, FE-SEM with EDAX and XRD • Protein may act as an encapsulating, reducing and stabilizing

  17. Performance Assessment and Scooter Verification of Nano-Alumina Engine Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Lue

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance assessment and vehicle verification of nano-alumina (Al2O3 engine oil (NAEO were conducted in this study. The NAEO was produced by mixing Al2O3 nanoparticles with engine oil using a two-step synthesis method. The weight fractions of the Al2O3 nanoparticles in the four test samples were 0 (base oil, 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 wt. %. The measurement of basic properties included: (1 density; (2 viscosity at various sample temperatures (20–80 °C. A rotary tribology testing machine with a pin-on-disk apparatus was used for the wear test. The measurement of the before-and-after difference of specimen (disk weight (wear test indicates that the NAEO with 1.5 wt. % Al2O3 nanoparticles (1.5 wt. % NAEO was the chosen candidate for further study. For the scooter verification on an auto-pilot dynamometer, there were three tests, including: (1 the European Driving Cycle (ECE40 driving cycle; (2 constant speed (50 km/h; and (3 constant throttle positions (20%, 40%, 60%, and 90%. For the ECE40 driving cycle and the constant speed tests, the fuel consumption was decreased on average by 2.75%, while it was decreased by 3.57% for the constant throttle case. The experimental results prove that the engine oil with added Al2O3 nanoparticles significantly decreased the fuel consumption. In the future, experiments with property tests of other nano-engine oils and a performance assessment of the nano-engine-fuel will be conducted.

  18. Natural organic matter concentration and hydrochemistry influence aggregation kinetics of functionalized engineered nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Legros, Samuel; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the colloidal stability of functionalized engineered nanoparticles (FENPs) in aquatic environments is of paramount importance in order to assess the risk related to FENPs. In this study, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of 68 and 43 nm diameter, coated with citrate and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) respectively, were used as models of FENPs. Time-resolved dynamic light scattering was employed to investigate the aggregation kinetics of two types of GNPs. The results show that without Suwannee river natural organic matter (SRNOM), MUA coating resulted in greater stability than citrate coating for GNPs. Cations have a destabilizing effect on both GNPs following the order Ca(2+) ≈ Mg(2+) > Na(+); different anions (Cl(-) and SO4(2-)) showed no difference in effects. In the fast aggregation regime, adding SRNOM enhanced the stability of MUA-coated GNPs in both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) solutions. However citrate-coated GNPs were only stabilized in Mg(2+) solution but enhanced aggregation occurred in high Ca(2+) concentration due to interparticle bridging. For the investigated GNPs and in the presence of SRNOM, Ca(2+) does not always act as a strong coagulant. This indicates that for the new materials emerging from the application of nanotechnology the well-described aggregation mechanisms of colloids in the environment require a detailed re-examination.

  19. The effects of surface aging on nanoparticle fate and transport in natural and engineered porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, Anjuliee M.

    Nanomaterials will be subjected to various surface transformations in the environment and within water and wastewater treatment systems. A comprehensive understanding of the fate and transport behavior of "aged" nanomaterials in both natural and engineered porous media is required in order to accurately quantify ecological and human health risks. This research sought to (1) evaluate the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light aging on nanoparticle transport in water-saturated porous media; and (2) assess the effects of influent water quality on silver nanoparticle retention and dissolution in ceramic water filters. Additionally, the value of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) data in nanoparticle fate and transport studies was evaluated by comparing deposition behavior in complementary QCM-D and sand columns experiments. Silver (nAg) and iron oxide nanoparticles exposed to UV light were up to 50% more strongly retained in porous media compared with freshly prepared suspensions due to less negative surface charge and larger aggregate sizes. UV-aged nAg were more prone to dissolution in sand columns, resulting in effluent Ag+ concentrations as high as 1.2 mg/L. In ceramic water filters, dissolution and cation exchange processes controlled silver release into treated water. The use of acidic, high salinity, or high hardness water accelerated oxidative dissolution of the silver coating and resulted in effluent silver concentrations 5-10 times above international drinking water guidelines. Results support the recommendation for a regular filter replacement or silver re-application schedule to ensure ongoing efficacy. Taken in concert, these research findings suggest that oxidative aging of nanomaterial surfaces (either through exposure to UV light or aggressive water chemistries) will alter the fate of nanomaterials in the environment and may decrease the effective lifetime of devices which utilize nanotechnology. Corresponding QCM-D and column experiments revealed that

  20. Anticancer activity of Ficus religiosa engineered copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Maheswari, Ramasamy; Karthik, Selvaraju; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2014-11-01

    The design, synthesis, characterization and application of biologically synthesized nanomaterials have become a vital branch of nanotechnology. There is a budding need to develop a method for environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis, that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on an eco-friendly process for rapid synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract as reducing and protecting agent. The synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis spectrophotometer, absorbance peaks at 285 nm. The copper oxide nanoparticles were analyzed with field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum. The FE-SEM and DLS analyses exposed that copper oxide nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average particle size of 577 nm. FT-IR spectral analysis elucidates the occurrence of biomolecules required for the reduction of copper oxide ions. Zeta potential studies showed that the surface charge of the formed nanoparticles was highly negative. The XRD pattern revealed that synthesized nanoparticles are crystalline in nature. Further, biological activities of the synthesized nanoparticles were confirmed based on its stable anti-cancer effects. The apoptotic effect of copper oxide nanoparticles is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in A549 cells. The observed characteristics and results obtained in our in vitro assays suggest that the copper nanoparticles might be a potential anticancer agent.

  1. Engineering the Structure and Properties of DNA-Nanoparticle Superstructures Using Polyvalent Counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Leo Y T; Song, Fayi; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-04-06

    DNA assembly of nanoparticles is a powerful approach to control their properties and prototype new materials. However, the structure and properties of DNA-assembled nanoparticles are labile and sensitive to interactions with counterions, which vary with processing and application environment. Here we show that substituting polyamines in place of elemental counterions significantly enhanced the structural rigidity and plasmonic properties of DNA-assembled metal nanoparticles. These effects arose from the ability of polyamines to condense DNA and cross-link DNA-coated nanoparticles. We further used polyamine wrapped DNA nanostructures as structural templates to seed the growth of polymer multilayers via layer-by-layer assembly, and controlled the degree of DNA condensation, plasmon coupling efficiency, and material responsiveness to environmental stimuli by varying polyelectrolyte composition. These results highlight counterion engineering as a versatile strategy to tailor the properties of DNA-nanoparticle assemblies for various applications, and should be applicable to other classes of DNA nanostructures.

  2. 2002 SNL ASCI Applications Software Engineering Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILLIAMSON, CHARLES MICHAEL; OGDEN, HARVEY C.; BYLE, KATHLEEN A.

    2002-07-01

    This document describes the 2002 SNL Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) Applications Software Quality Engineering (SQE) Assessment and the assessment results. The primary purpose of the assessment was to establish the current state of software engineering practices within the SNL ASCI Applications Program.

  3. Refinement of the Nanoparticle Emission Assessment Technique into the Nanomaterial Exposure Assessment Technique (NEAT 2.0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastlake, Adrienne C; Beaucham, Catherine; Martinez, Kenneth F; Dahm, Matthew M; Sparks, Christopher; Hodson, Laura L; Geraci, Charles L

    2016-09-01

    Engineered nanomaterial emission and exposure characterization studies have been completed at more than 60 different facilities by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). These experiences have provided NIOSH the opportunity to refine an earlier published technique, the Nanoparticle Emission Assessment Technique (NEAT 1.0), into a more comprehensive technique for assessing worker and workplace exposures to engineered nanomaterials. This change is reflected in the new name Nanomaterial Exposure Assessment Technique (NEAT 2.0) which distinguishes it from NEAT 1.0. NEAT 2.0 places a stronger emphasis on time-integrated, filter-based sampling (i.e., elemental mass analysis and particle morphology) in the worker's breathing zone (full shift and task specific) and area samples to develop job exposure matrices. NEAT 2.0 includes a comprehensive assessment of emissions at processes and job tasks, using direct-reading instruments (i.e., particle counters) in data-logging mode to better understand peak emission periods. Evaluation of worker practices, ventilation efficacy, and other engineering exposure control systems and risk management strategies serve to allow for a comprehensive exposure assessment.

  4. Ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to aquatic invertebrates: a brief review and recommendations for future toxicity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Anders; Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Grieger, Khara Deanne;

    2008-01-01

    Based on a literature review and an overview of toxic effects of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic invertebrates, this paper proposes a number of recommendations for the developing field of nanoecotoxicology by highlighting the importance of invertebrates as sensitive and relevant test organisms....... Results show that there is a pronounced lack of data in this field (less than 20 peer-reviewed papers are published so far), and the most frequently tested engineered nanoparticles in invertebrate tests are C-60, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide. In addition, the majority of the studies have used...... Daphnia magna as the test organism. To date, the limited number of studies has indicated acute toxicity in the low mgl(-1) range and higher of engineered nanoparticles to aquatic invertebrates, although some indications of chronic toxicity and behavioral changes have also been described at concentrations...

  5. NANOPARTICLE DESIGN AND HANDLING--CHALLENGES FOR ENGINEERS AND PARTICLE TECHNOLOGISTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Einar Kruis; Rakesh K. Joshi

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the opportunities and challenges which future applications based on nanoparticles offer to engineers are described. New high-added value products induce us to rethink ways to control nanoparticle design and handling. Several challenges are described and typical solutions are given: (1) finding relevant engineering tasks outside traditional process industry; (2) the importance of mixing reactants; (3) obtaining monodisperse particles; (4) gaining efficient control via electric forces and (5) developing multi-step processes which allow more control over particle properties.

  6. Multimedia modeling of engineered nanoparticles with SimpleBox4nano: model definition and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Johannes A J; Koelmans, Albert A; Quik, Joris T K; Hendriks, A Jan; van de Meent, Dik

    2014-05-20

    Screening level models for environmental assessment of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) are not generally available. Here, we present SimpleBox4Nano (SB4N) as the first model of this type, assess its validity, and evaluate it by comparisons with a known material flow model. SB4N expresses ENP transport and concentrations in and across air, rain, surface waters, soil, and sediment, accounting for nanospecific processes such as aggregation, attachment, and dissolution. The model solves simultaneous mass balance equations (MBE) using simple matrix algebra. The MBEs link all concentrations and transfer processes using first-order rate constants for all processes known to be relevant for ENPs. The first-order rate constants are obtained from the literature. The output of SB4N is mass concentrations of ENPs as free dispersive species, heteroaggregates with natural colloids, and larger natural particles in each compartment in time and at steady state. Known scenario studies for Switzerland were used to demonstrate the impact of the transport processes included in SB4N on the prediction of environmental concentrations. We argue that SB4N-predicted environmental concentrations are useful as background concentrations in environmental risk assessment.

  7. Size Matters: Developing Design Rules to Engineer Nanoparticles for Solid Tumour Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Edward Alexander

    Nanotechnology enables the design of highly customizable platforms for producing minimally invasive and programmable strategies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advances in this field have demonstrated that nanoparticles can enhance specificity of anti-cancer agents, respond to tumour-specific cues, and direct the visualization of biological targets in vivo. . Nanoparticles can be synthesized within the 1 to 100 nm range to achieve different electromagnetic properties and specifically interact with biological tissues by tuning their size, shape, and surface chemistry. However, it remains unclear which physicochemical parameters are critical for delivering nanomaterials to the tumour site. With less than 5% of administered nanoparticles reaching the tumour, engineering of nanoparticles for effective delivery to solid tumours remains a critical challenge to cancer nanomedicine. A more comprehensive understanding of the interplay between the nanomaterial physicochemical properties and biological systems is necessary to enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle tumour targeting. This thesis explores how nanoparticle size and functionalization with cancer cell specific agents impact nanoparticle delivery to tumours. Furthermore, this doctoral work (i) discusses how tumour structure evolves with growth, (ii) elucidates how such changes modulate nanoparticle accumulation, and (iii) identifies how the skin serves as a significant off-target site for nanoparticle uptake. This thesis also demonstrates the utility of empirically-derived parametric models, Monte Carlo simulations, and decision matrices for mechanistically understanding and predicting the impact of nanomaterial features and tumour biology on nanoparticle fate in vivo. These topics establish key design considerations to tailor nanoparticles for enhanced tumour targeting. Collectively, the concepts presented herein form a fundamental framework for the development of personalized nanomedicine and nano

  8. Polymer coated gold nanoparticles for tracing the mobility of engineered nanoparticles in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthuppu, Basil; Sidelmann Fjordbøge, Annika; Caspersen, Eva; Broholm, Mette Martina; Havsteen Jakobsen, Mogens

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are manufactured for their specific properties providing possibilities for new and improved products and applications. The use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has therefore brought significant innovation and advances to society, including benefits for human health and the environment. At the same time, little is known about the potential risk associated with the inevitable release of these new materials to the environment, and their new properties are poorly understood . Suspensions of ENPs are not very stable, as they tend to aggregate thereby losing their properties as single particles. Coatings, including a large variety of natural and synthetic polymers, are used to enhance the colloid stability in high concentrations . However, increasing the stability of these materials may lead to unintended effects, such as enhancing their mobility in surface water and groundwater leading to inadvertent impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health. Detection of ENPs in natural water systems, however, has proved very challenging. Hence, there is a need for tracing of ENP behaviour in the environment. We suggest a possibility of introducing inert gold NPs with the same mobility as the reactive NPs, as tracer particles. Colloidal gold has been of great interest for centuries due to its vibrant colors produced by the interaction with visible light. The unusual optical-electronic properties, high chemical stability and relatively low toxicity have made them the model system of choice in this context. Also, the natural occurrence of these particles in the proposed environment is very rare. Laboratory based experiments conducted in sand columns show that stable aqueous suspensions of gold NPs coated with amphiphilic block co polymers (PVP-VA and PVA-COOH) are extremely mobile (retardation factors of 1.0-1.2) with high recovery values (50-95 %). The specific retardation and recovery depends on the coating type, concentration and grafting method. The NPs

  9. Cream Formulation Impact on Topical Administration of Engineered Colloidal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Roberta; Cigni, Clara; Bedoni, Marzia; Gramatica, Furio; Palugan, Luca; Corsi, Fabio; Granucci, Francesca; Colombo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In order to minimize the impact of systemic toxicity of drugs in the treatment of local acute and chronic inflammatory reactions, the achievement of reliable and efficient delivery of therapeutics in/through the skin is highly recommended. While the use of nanoparticles is now an established practice for drug intravenous targeted delivery, their transdermal penetration is still poorly understood and this important administration route remains almost unexplored. In the present study, we have synthesized magnetic (iron oxide) nanoparticles (MNP) coated with an amphiphilic polymer, developed a water-in-oil emulsion formulation for their topical administration and compared the skin penetration routes with the same nanoparticles deposited as a colloidal suspension. Transmission and scanning electron microscopies provided ultrastructural evidence that the amphiphilic nanoparticles (PMNP) cream formulation allowed the efficient penetration through all the skin layers with a controllable kinetics compared to suspension formulation. In addition to the preferential follicular pathway, also the intracellular and intercellular routes were involved. PMNP that crossed all skin layers were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The obtained data suggests that combining PMNP amphiphilic character with cream formulation improves the intradermal penetration of nanoparticles. While PMNP administration in living mice via aqueous suspension resulted in preferential nanoparticle capture by phagocytes and migration to draining lymph nodes, cream formulation favored uptake by all the analyzed dermis cell types, including hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic. Unlike aqueous suspension, cream formulation also favored the maintenance of nanoparticles in the dermal architecture avoiding their dispersion and migration to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatics. PMID:25962161

  10. Cream formulation impact on topical administration of engineered colloidal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Benedetta; Zanoni, Ivan; Marzi, Roberta; Cigni, Clara; Bedoni, Marzia; Gramatica, Furio; Palugan, Luca; Corsi, Fabio; Granucci, Francesca; Colombo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In order to minimize the impact of systemic toxicity of drugs in the treatment of local acute and chronic inflammatory reactions, the achievement of reliable and efficient delivery of therapeutics in/through the skin is highly recommended. While the use of nanoparticles is now an established practice for drug intravenous targeted delivery, their transdermal penetration is still poorly understood and this important administration route remains almost unexplored. In the present study, we have synthesized magnetic (iron oxide) nanoparticles (MNP) coated with an amphiphilic polymer, developed a water-in-oil emulsion formulation for their topical administration and compared the skin penetration routes with the same nanoparticles deposited as a colloidal suspension. Transmission and scanning electron microscopies provided ultrastructural evidence that the amphiphilic nanoparticles (PMNP) cream formulation allowed the efficient penetration through all the skin layers with a controllable kinetics compared to suspension formulation. In addition to the preferential follicular pathway, also the intracellular and intercellular routes were involved. PMNP that crossed all skin layers were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The obtained data suggests that combining PMNP amphiphilic character with cream formulation improves the intradermal penetration of nanoparticles. While PMNP administration in living mice via aqueous suspension resulted in preferential nanoparticle capture by phagocytes and migration to draining lymph nodes, cream formulation favored uptake by all the analyzed dermis cell types, including hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic. Unlike aqueous suspension, cream formulation also favored the maintenance of nanoparticles in the dermal architecture avoiding their dispersion and migration to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatics.

  11. Cream formulation impact on topical administration of engineered colloidal nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Santini

    Full Text Available In order to minimize the impact of systemic toxicity of drugs in the treatment of local acute and chronic inflammatory reactions, the achievement of reliable and efficient delivery of therapeutics in/through the skin is highly recommended. While the use of nanoparticles is now an established practice for drug intravenous targeted delivery, their transdermal penetration is still poorly understood and this important administration route remains almost unexplored. In the present study, we have synthesized magnetic (iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP coated with an amphiphilic polymer, developed a water-in-oil emulsion formulation for their topical administration and compared the skin penetration routes with the same nanoparticles deposited as a colloidal suspension. Transmission and scanning electron microscopies provided ultrastructural evidence that the amphiphilic nanoparticles (PMNP cream formulation allowed the efficient penetration through all the skin layers with a controllable kinetics compared to suspension formulation. In addition to the preferential follicular pathway, also the intracellular and intercellular routes were involved. PMNP that crossed all skin layers were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The obtained data suggests that combining PMNP amphiphilic character with cream formulation improves the intradermal penetration of nanoparticles. While PMNP administration in living mice via aqueous suspension resulted in preferential nanoparticle capture by phagocytes and migration to draining lymph nodes, cream formulation favored uptake by all the analyzed dermis cell types, including hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic. Unlike aqueous suspension, cream formulation also favored the maintenance of nanoparticles in the dermal architecture avoiding their dispersion and migration to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatics.

  12. Thermogelling chitosan-collagen-bioactive glass nanoparticle hybrids as potential injectable systems for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cheisy D F; Carvalho, Sandhra M; Mansur, Herman S; Pereira, Marivalda M

    2016-01-01

    Recently, stimuli-responsive nanocomposite-derived hydrogels have gained prominence in tissue engineering because they can be applied as injectable scaffolds in bone and cartilage repair. Due to the great potential of these systems, this study aimed to synthesize and characterize novel thermosensitive chitosan-based composites, chemically modified with collagen and reinforced by bioactive glass nanoparticles (BG) on the development of injectable nanohybrids for regenerative medicine applications. Thus, the composite hydrogels were extensively characterized by structural, morphological, rheological, and biological testing. The composites showed thermosensitive response with the gelation temperature at approximately 37 °C, which is compatible with the human body temperature. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that the chitosan hydrogels exhibited 3D-porous structures, and the incorporation of collagen in the system caused increase on the average pore size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicated the main functional groups of each component of the composite system and their chemical interactions forming the scaffold. Moreover, rheological measurements were employed to assess the viscoelastic behavior of the hydrogels as a function of the temperature. The results demonstrated that the addition of collagen and bioactive glass increases the mechanical properties after the gelation process. The addition of 2 wt.% of BG nanoparticles caused an increase of approximately 39% on stiffness compared to pure chitosan and the addition of 30 wt.% collagen caused a further increase on the stiffness by 95%. The cytotoxicity and cell viability of the hydrogels were assessed by MTT and LIVE/DEAD® assays, where the results demonstrated no toxic effect of the composites on the human osteosarcoma cell culture (SAOS) and kidney cells line of human embryo (HEK 293 T). Hence, it can be stated that innovative composites were

  13. Multidimensional sustainability assessment of solar products: Educating engineers and designers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, S.F.J.; Bakker, C.A.; Verwaal, M.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2008 the faculty of Industrial Design Engineering at the TU Delft hosts the minor Sustainable Design Engineering. The minor has been highly useful as a platform to pilot new ways of teaching engineering for sustainable development. Instead of having students make life cycle assessments and int

  14. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhou, Xianguang [National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wang, Jiandong [Department of Pathology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Longjiang [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Teng, Zhaogang, E-mail: tzg@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu, Guangming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles are synthesized. • The mechanism of CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles is revealed. • This new delivery system increased the drug accumulation in vitro and in vivo. • This new delivery system offers an effective approach to treat multidrug resistance. - Abstract: Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  15. 322-R2U2 Engineering Assessment - August 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abri, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Griffin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-13

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of retention tank system 322-R2 has been prepared for tank systems that store and neutralizes hazardous waste and have secondary containment. The regulations require that this assessment be completed periodically and certified by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer. Abri Environmental Engineering performed an inspection of the 322-R2 Tank system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA. Mr. William W. Moore, P.E., conducted this inspection on March 16, 2015. Mr. Moore is a California Registered Civil Engineer, with extensive experience in civil engineering, and hazardous waste management.

  16. Impact of alginate concentration on the stability of agglomerates made of TiO{sub 2} engineered nanoparticles: Water hardness and pH effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loosli, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.loosli@unige.ch [University of Geneva, Section des Sciences de la Terre et de l’Environnement, Group of Environmental Physical Chemistry, F.-A. Forel Institute (Switzerland); Coustumer, Philippe Le, E-mail: philippe.le-coustumer@u-bordeaux1.fr [Université Bordeaux 3, EA 4592 Géoressources & Environnement, ENSEGID (France); Stoll, Serge, E-mail: serge.stoll@unige.ch [University of Geneva, Section des Sciences de la Terre et de l’Environnement, Group of Environmental Physical Chemistry, F.-A. Forel Institute (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    The stability of engineered nanoparticles in natural aquatic systems is of high interest for environmental risk assessment since an already important quantity of these reactive species is entering aquatic systems. In the present study, an important issue is addressed by investigating (i) the influence of divalent cations and water hardness (Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) in agglomerate formation and (ii) alginate concentration effect on the stability TiO{sub 2} agglomerates formed in environmental freshwater conditions (pH and total hardness) representative of Lake Geneva, France/Switzerland. Our results indicate that the presence of alginate at typical natural organic matter concentration strongly modifies the stability of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle agglomerates by inducing their partial disagglomeration. Significant TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles redispersion and formation of small fragments are expected to be induced by alginate adsorbed layer formed at the nanoparticle surfaces within the agglomerates.Graphical Abstract.

  17. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  18. Antibacterial effect assessment of ZnS: Ag nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Najme Parvin; Gholamreza Amiri; Vajihe Karbasizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): A large ratio of surface to volume of nanoparticles in comparison with bulk ones, will increase the cell penetration and therefore their toxicity. Materials and Methods: Chemical precipitation method was used in order to synthesis of ZnS:Ag quantum dots. Their Physical properties and characteristics were assessed by X-ray diffraction, Ultra Violet-Visible Spectrophotometer, Transmission Electron Microscope and it was shown that the obtained ZnS:Ag quantum dots are cubic with hig...

  19. Smart Cancer Cell Targeting Imaging and Drug Delivery System by Systematically Engineering Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nan; Tian, Ying; Tian, Wei; Huang, Peng; Liu, Ying; Tang, Yuxia; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Shouju; Su, Yunyan; Zhang, Yunlei; Pan, Jing; Teng, Zhaogang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-02-10

    The integration of diagnosis and therapy into one nanoplatform, known as theranostics, has attracted increasing attention in the biomedical areas. Herein, we first present a cancer cell targeting imaging and drug delivery system based on engineered thioether-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (PMOs). The PMOs are stably and selectively conjugated with near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye Cyanine 5.5 (Cy5.5) and anti-Her2 affibody on the outer surfaces to endow them with excellent NIRF imaging and cancer targeting properties. Also, taking the advantage of the thioether-group-incorporated mesopores, the release of chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX) loaded in the PMOs is responsive to the tumor-related molecule glutathione (GSH). The drug release percentage reaches 84.8% in 10 mM of GSH solution within 24 h, which is more than 2-fold higher than that without GSH. In addition, the drug release also exhibits pH-responsive, which reaches 53.6% at pH 5 and 31.7% at pH 7.4 within 24 h. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis demonstrate that the PMOs-based theranostic platforms can efficiently target to and enter Her2 positive tumor cells. Thus, the smart imaging and drug delivery nanoplatforms induce high tumor cell growth inhibition. Meanwhile, the Cy5.5 conjugated PMOs perform great NIRF imaging ability, which could monitor the intracellular distribution, delivery and release of the chemotherapy drug. In addition, cell viability and histological assessments show the engineered PMOs have good biocompatibility, further encouraging the following biomedical applications. Over all, the systemically engineered PMOs can serve as a novel cancer cell targeting imaging and drug delivery platform with NIRF imaging, GSH and pH dual-responsive drug release, and high tumor cell targeting ability.

  20. Mesoscopic metal nanoparticles doubly functionalized with natural and engineered lipidic dispersants for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tatsuya; Nakatsuji, Hirotaka; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Ishidate, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2014-07-22

    Surface engineering of mesoscopic metal nanoparticles to increase biocompatibility and cell interaction is important for improvement of their therapeutic properties. Here, we describe a strategy to stabilize mesoscopic metal nanoparticles and to enhance their cell interaction by stepwise addition of (Z)-9-octadecenoate (oleate) and a cell-penetrating peptide-fused high-density lipoprotein (cpHDL). Oleate replaces a cytotoxic dispersant on the surface of gold nanorods (AuNRs), which enables subsequent cpHDL binding without causing aggregation. Notably, these two lipidic dispersants are probably intercalated on the surface. This procedure was also used to stabilize 20 nm spherical gold nanoparticles and 40 nm aggregates of 10 nm magnetite nanoparticles. cpHDL-bound AuNRs were internalized greater than 80 times more efficiently than poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated AuNRs and were able to elicit cancer cell photoablation.

  1. Polymer coated nanogold for tracing mobility of engineered nanoparticles in subsurface water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uthuppu, Basil; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Fischer, Søren Vang;

    2014-01-01

    ions. Such a low level detection of particles is achieved by non-destructive simple UV-Vis spectroscopic technique equipped with liquid wave guide capillary cell (LWCC) units. These results propose the possibility of using surface engineered gold nanoparticles as model system for tracing the mobility...

  2. Thermogelling chitosan–collagen–bioactive glass nanoparticle hybrids as potential injectable systems for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Cheisy D.F.; Carvalho, Sandhra M.; Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: hmansur@demet.ufmg.br; Pereira, Marivalda M., E-mail: mpereira@demet.ufmg.br

    2016-01-01

    Recently, stimuli-responsive nanocomposite-derived hydrogels have gained prominence in tissue engineering because they can be applied as injectable scaffolds in bone and cartilage repair. Due to the great potential of these systems, this study aimed to synthesize and characterize novel thermosensitive chitosan-based composites, chemically modified with collagen and reinforced by bioactive glass nanoparticles (BG) on the development of injectable nanohybrids for regenerative medicine applications. Thus, the composite hydrogels were extensively characterized by structural, morphological, rheological, and biological testing. The composites showed thermosensitive response with the gelation temperature at approximately 37 °C, which is compatible with the human body temperature. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that the chitosan hydrogels exhibited 3D-porous structures, and the incorporation of collagen in the system caused increase on the average pore size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicated the main functional groups of each component of the composite system and their chemical interactions forming the scaffold. Moreover, rheological measurements were employed to assess the viscoelastic behavior of the hydrogels as a function of the temperature. The results demonstrated that the addition of collagen and bioactive glass increases the mechanical properties after the gelation process. The addition of 2 wt.% of BG nanoparticles caused an increase of approximately 39% on stiffness compared to pure chitosan and the addition of 30 wt.% collagen caused a further increase on the stiffness by 95%. The cytotoxicity and cell viability of the hydrogels were assessed by MTT and LIVE/DEAD® assays, where the results demonstrated no toxic effect of the composites on the human osteosarcoma cell culture (SAOS) and kidney cells line of human embryo (HEK 293T). Hence, it can be stated that innovative composites were

  3. Engineering plasmon dispersion relations : hybrid nanoparticle chain - substrate plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, Paul J.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    We consider the dispersion relations of the optical excitations in a chain of silver nanoparticles situated above a metal substrate and show that they are hybrid plasmon polaritons, composed of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons. We demonstrate a strong dependence of the syste

  4. Engineering nanofluid electrodes: controlling rheology and electrochemical activity of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sujat; Moazzen, Elahe; Aryal, Shankar; Segre, Carlo U.; Timofeeva, Elena V.

    2015-11-01

    Nanofluid electrodes or nanoelectrofuels have significant potential in the field of flow batteries, as at high loadings of solid battery active nanoparticles, their energy density can be orders of magnitude higher than in traditional redox flow battery electrolytes. Nanofluid electrodes must have a manageable viscosity at high particle concentrations (i.e., easily pumpable) and exhibit good electrochemical activity toward charge and discharge reactions. Engineering of such nanofluid electrodes involves development of new and unique approaches to stabilization of nanoparticle suspensions. In this work, we demonstrate a surface modification approach that allows controlling the viscosity of nanofluids at high solid loading, while simultaneously retaining electrochemical activity of the nanoparticles. A scalable single step procedure for the surface grafting of small organic molecules onto iron (III) oxide nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3, maghemite, 40-150 nm) is demonstrated. Modified iron oxide nanoparticles reported here have 5 wt% of the grafting moiety on the surface, which helps forming stable dispersions with up to 40 wt% of solid loading in alkali aqueous electrolytes with a maximum viscosity of 12 cP at room temperature. The maximum particle concentration achievable in the same electrolyte with pristine nanoparticles is 15 wt%. Electrochemical testing of the pristine and modified nanomaterials in the form of solid-casted electrodes showed a maximum reversible discharge capacity of 280 and 155 mAh/g, respectively, indicating that electrochemical activity of modified nanoparticles is partially suppressed due to the surface grafted moiety.

  5. IN VIVO TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES IN CHICK EMBRYO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrapragasam Vani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Silica is one of the most effective stored seedand food grain protecting pesticide agent, usedfor ages Silica nanoparticles are hard and strong andresistant to brittle fracture under an imposed stress. The aim of our study is to synthesize and evaluate the toxicity of silica nanoparticles at various concentrations using chick embryo, as it serves as a bridging model between in vivo and ex vivo studies. Silica nanoparticles of 70 nm sizewith concentrations of 10, 20, 40 and 80 PPM were injected in vivo and incubated for 19 days as per IACUC guidelines. The study was carried out on dissected chick embryo after the 19th day of incubation. Vital tissues such as liver and heart tissues were subjected to toxicity assays. Biochemical assay of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxide were assessed. The results showed a decreased level of MDA (Malondialdehyde, an end product of lipid Peroxidation, whereas increased activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxide were observed. Therefore silica nanoparticles may be used as a pesticide and also as a biomaterial for therapeutic application in the field of medicine.

  6. Radiation-Engineered Functional Nanoparticles in Aqueous Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispenza, Clelia; Grimaldi, Natascia; Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Soroka, Inna L; Jonsson, Mats

    2015-05-01

    Controlled synthesis of nanoscalar and nanostructured materials enables the development of novel functional materials with fine-tuned optical, mechanical, electronic, magnetic, conductive and catalytic properties that are of use in numerous applications. These materials have also found their potential use in medicine as vehicles for drug delivery, in diagnostics or in combinations thereof. In principle, nanoparticles can be divided into two broad categories, organic and inorganic nanoparticles. For both types of nanoparticles there are numerous possible synthetic routes. Considering the large difference in nature of these materials and the elementary reactions involved in the synthetic routes, most manufacturing techniques are complex and only suitable for one type of particle. Interestingly, radiation chemistry, i.e., the use of ionizing radiation from radioisotopes and accelerators to induce nanomaterials or chemical changes in materials, has proven to be a versatile tool for controlled manufacturing of both organic and inorganic nanoparticles. The advantages of using radiation chemistry for this purpose are many, such as low energy consumption, minimal use of potentially harmful chemicals and simple production schemes. For medical applications one more advantage is that the material can be sterile as manufactured. Radiation-induced synthesis can be carried out in aqueous systems, which minimizes the use of organic solvents and the need for separation and purification of the final product. The radiation chemistry of water is well known, as are the various ways of fine-tuning the reactivity of the system towards a desired target by adding different solutes. This, in combination with the controllable and adjustable irradiation process parameters, makes the technique superior to most other chemical methods. In this review, we discuss the fundamentals of radiation chemistry and radiation-induced synthesis of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. The impact of dose and

  7. Plant Mediated Green Synthesis of CuO Nanoparticles: Comparison of Toxicity of Engineered and Plant Mediated CuO Nanoparticles towards Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Saif

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on green production methods for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs is growing, with the objective to overcome the potential hazards of these chemicals for a safer environment. In this study, facile, ecofriendly synthesis of copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles was successfully achieved using aqueous extract of Pterospermum acerifolium leaves. P. acerifolium-fabricated CuO nanoparticles were further characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. Plant-mediated CuO nanoparticles were found to be oval shaped and well dispersed in suspension. XPS confirmed the elemental composition of P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles as comprised purely of copper and oxygen. DLS measurements and ion release profile showed that P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles were more stable than the engineered CuO NPs. Copper oxide nanoparticles are used in many applications; therefore, their potential toxicity cannot be ignored. A comparative study was performed to investigate the bio-toxic impacts of plant-synthesized and engineered CuO nanoparticles on water flea Daphnia. Experiments were conducted to investigate the 48-h acute toxicity of engineered CuO NPs and plant-synthesized nanoparticles. Lower EC50 value 0.102 ± 0.019 mg/L was observed for engineered CuO NPs, while 0.69 ± 0.226 mg/L was observed for plant-synthesized CuO NPs. Additionally, ion release from CuO nanoparticles and 48-h accumulation of these nano CuOs in daphnids were also calculated. Our findings thus suggest that the contribution of released ions from nanoparticles and particles/ions accumulation in Daphnia needs to be interpreted with care.

  8. A novel paradigm for engineering education: virtual internships with individualized mentoring and assessment of engineering thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Naomi C; Ruis, A R; Collier, Wesley; Swiecki, Zachari; Arastoopour, Golnaz; Williamson Shaffer, David

    2015-02-01

    Engineering virtual internships are a novel paradigm for providing authentic engineering experiences in the first-year curriculum. They are both individualized and accommodate large numbers of students. As we describe in this report, this approach can (a) enable students to solve complex engineering problems in a mentored, collaborative environment; (b) allow educators to assess engineering thinking; and (c) provide an introductory experience that students enjoy and find valuable. Furthermore, engineering virtual internships have been shown to increase students'-and especially women's-interest in and motivation to pursue engineering degrees. When implemented in first-year engineering curricula more broadly, the potential impact of engineering virtual internships on the size and diversity of the engineering workforce could be dramatic.

  9. Curriculum Assessment as a Direct Tool in ABET Outcomes Assessment in a Chemical Engineering Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Al-Attar, Hazim

    2010-01-01

    The chemical engineering programme at the United Arab Emirates University is designed to fulfil the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) (A-K) EC2000 criteria. The Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering has established a well-defined process for outcomes assessment for the chemical engineering programme in order to…

  10. Engineering of drug nanoparticles by HGCP for pharmaceutical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TingTing Hu; JieXin Wang; ZhiGang Shen; JianFeng Chen

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews our work on the fundamental principles of high gravity controlled precipitation (HGCP) technology, and its applications in the production of drug nenoparticles, which was carded out in a rotating packed bed (RPB). Several kinds of drug nanoparticles with narrow particle size distributions (PSDs) were successfully prepared via HGCP, including the 300-nm Cefuroxirne Axetil (CFA) particles, 200-400-nm cephradine particles, 500-nm salbutamol sulfate (SS) particles (100 nm in width), end 850-nm beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) particles, etc. Compared to drugs available in the current market, all the drug nanoparticles produced by HGCP exhibited advantages in both formulation end drug delivery, thus improving the bioavailability of drugs. HGCP is essentially a platform technology for the preparation of poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles for oral and injection delivery, and of inhalable drugs for pulmonary delivery. Consequently, HGCP offers potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry due to its cost-effectiveness, efficient processing end the ease of scaling-up.

  11. Biopolymer-Based Nanoparticles for Drug/Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Numata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a great interest in application of nanoparticles as biomaterials for delivery of therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genes, and for tissue engineering. In particular, biopolymers are suitable materials as nanoparticles for clinical application due to their versatile traits, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. Biopolymers are polymers that are produced from living organisms, which are classified in three groups: polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids. It is important to control particle size, charge, morphology of surface and release rate of loaded molecules to use biopolymer-based nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery carriers. To obtain a nano-carrier for therapeutic purposes, a variety of materials and preparation process has been attempted. This review focuses on fabrication of biocompatible nanoparticles consisting of biopolymers such as protein (silk, collagen, gelatin, β-casein, zein and albumin, protein-mimicked polypeptides and polysaccharides (chitosan, alginate, pullulan, starch and heparin. The effects of the nature of the materials and the fabrication process on the characteristics of the nanoparticles are described. In addition, their application as delivery carriers of therapeutic drugs and genes and biomaterials for tissue engineering are also reviewed.

  12. Surface engineering of macrophages with nanoparticles to generate a cell–nanoparticle hybrid vehicle for hypoxia-targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Holden

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Holden1, Quan Yuan1, W Andrew Yeudall2,3, Deborah A Lebman3,4, Hu Yang11Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, 2Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, School of Dentistry, 3Massey Cancer Center, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USAAbstract: Tumors frequently contain hypoxic regions that result from a shortage of oxygen due to poorly organized tumor vasculature. Cancer cells in these areas are resistant to radiation- and chemotherapy, limiting the treatment efficacy. Macrophages have inherent hypoxia-targeting ability and hold great advantages for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics to cancer cells in hypoxic areas. However, most anticancer drugs cannot be directly loaded into macrophages because of their toxicity. In this work, we designed a novel drug delivery vehicle by hybridizing macrophages with nanoparticles through cell surface modification. Nanoparticles immobilized on the cell surface provide numerous new sites for anticancer drug loading, hence potentially minimizing the toxic effect of anticancer drugs on the viability and hypoxia-targeting ability of the macrophage vehicles. In particular, quantum dots and 5-(aminoacetamido fluoresceinlabeled polyamidoamine dendrimer G4.5, both of which were coated with amine-derivatized polyethylene glycol, were immobilized to the sodium periodate-treated surface of RAW264.7 macrophages through a transient Schiff base linkage. Further, a reducing agent, sodium cyanoborohydride, was applied to reduce Schiff bases to stable secondary amine linkages. The distribution of nanoparticles on the cell surface was confirmed by fluorescence imaging, and it was found to be dependent on the stability of the linkages coupling nanoparticles to the cell surface.Keywords: anticancer drug, cellular vehicle, confocal microscopy, dendrimer, drug delivery, hypoxia

  13. Engineered metal nanoparticles in the sub-nanomolar levels kill cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodyanoy V

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitaly Vodyanoy,1 Yasmine Daniels,2 Oleg Pustovyy,1 William A MacCrehan,2 Shin Muramoto,2 Gheorghe Stan21Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn, AL, 2Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MA, USA Background: Small metal nanoparticles obtained from animal blood were observed to be toxic to cultured cancer cells, whereas noncancerous cells were much less affected. In this work, engineered zinc and copper metal nanoparticles were produced from bulk metal rods by an underwater high-voltage discharge method. The metal nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The metal nanoparticles, with estimated diameters of 1 nm–2 nm, were determined to be more than 85% nonoxidized. A cell viability assay and high-resolution light microscopy showed that exposure of RG2, cultured rat brain glioma cancer cells, to the zinc and copper nanoparticles resulted in cell morphological changes, including decreased cell adherence, shrinking/rounding, nuclear condensation, and budding from cell bodies. The metal-induced cell injuries were similar to the effects of staurosporine, an active apoptotic reagent. The viability experiments conducted for zinc and copper yielded values of dissociation constants of 0.22±0.08 nmol/L (standard error [SE] and 0.12±0.02 nmol/L (SE, respectively. The noncancerous astrocytes were not affected at the same conditions. Because metal nanoparticles were lethal to the cancer cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, they are potentially important as nanomedicine.Purpose: Lethal concentrations of synthetic metal nanoparticles reported in the literature are a few orders of magnitude higher than the natural, blood-isolated metal nanoparticles; therefore, in this work, engineered metal nanoparticles were examined to mimic the properties of endogenous metal

  14. Wrinkling instability in nanoparticle-supported graphene: implications for strain engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, William; Yamamoto, Mahito; Pierre-Louis, Olivier; Huang, Jia; Fuhrer, Michael; Einstein, Theodore

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out a systematic study of the wrinkling instability of graphene membranes supported on SiO2 substrates with randomly placed silica nanoparticles. At small nanoparticle density, monolayer graphene adheres to the substrate and is highly conformal over the nanoparticles. With increasing nanoparticle density, and decreasing nanoparticle separation to ~100 nm, graphene's elastic response dominates substrate adhesion, and elastic stretching energy is reduced by the formation of wrinkles which connect protrusions. Above a critical nanoparticle density, the wrinkles form a percolating network through the sample. As the graphene membrane is made thicker, delamination from the substrate is observed. Since the wrinkling instability acts to remove inhomogeneous in-plane elastic strains through out-of-plane buckling, our results can be used to place limits on the possible in-plane strain magnitudes that may be created in graphene to realized strain-engineered electronic structures.[2] Supported by the UMD NSF-MRSEC under Grant No. DMR 05-20471, the US ONR MURI and UMD CNAM.

  15. Assessment and Development of Engineering Design Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrikkeholm, Jeppe Bjerrum

    customer demands for customised products. The thesis at hand is based on six scientific articles. Three of the articles are written and presented at scientific conferences whereas the remaining three are submitted to scientific journals. The results of the six papers constitute the main contribution......Many engineering companies are currently facing a significant challenge as they are experiencing increasing demands from their customers for delivery of customised products that have almost the same delivery time, price and quality as mass-produced products. In order to comply with this development......, the engineering companies need to have efficient engineering design processes in place, so they can design customised product variants faster and more efficiently. It is however not an easy task to model and develop such processes. To conduct engineering design is often a highly iterative, illdefined and complex...

  16. Learning theories and assessment methodologies - an engineering educational perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, O. A. B.

    2011-08-01

    This paper attempts to critically review theories of learning from the perspective of engineering education in order to align relevant assessment methods with each respective learning theory, considering theoretical aspects and practical observations and reflections. The role of formative assessment, taxonomies, peer learning and educational policy as regards promoting the learning of engineering is discussed. It is suggested that an integrated learning method in which cognitive levels, social factors and teamwork and behaviouristic elements are integrated will optimise the learning process on an engineering course. Moreover, assessment of learning should not be isolated from views of teaching and the learning methods employed by the university teacher.

  17. Risks from accidental exposures to engineered nanoparticles and neurological health effects: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattsson Mats-Olof

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are certain concerns regarding the safety for the environment and human health from the use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs which leads to unintended exposures, as opposed to the use of ENPs for medical purposes. This review focuses on the unintended human exposure of ENPs. In particular, possible effects in the brain are discussed and an attempt to assess risks is performed. Animal experiments have shown that investigated ENPs (metallic nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes can translocate to the brain from different entry points (skin, blood, respiratory pathways. After inhalation or instillation into parts of the respiratory tract a very small fraction of the inhaled or instilled ENPs reaches the blood and subsequently secondary organs, including the CNS, at a low translocation rate. Experimental in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that several types of ENPs can have various biological effects in the nervous system. Some of these effects could also imply that ENPs can cause hazards, both acutely and in the long term. The relevance of these data for risk assessment is far from clear. There are at present very few data on exposure of the general public to either acute high dose exposure or on chronic exposure to low levels of air-borne ENPs. It is furthermore unlikely that acute high dose exposures would occur. The risk from such exposures for damaging CNS effects is thus probably very low, irrespective of any biological hazard associated with ENPs. The situation is more complicated regarding chronic exposures, at low doses. The long term accumulation of ENPs can not be excluded. However, we do not have exposure data for the general public regarding ENPs. Although translocation to the brain via respiratory organs and the circulation appears to be very low, there remains a possibility that chronic exposures, and/or biopersistent ENPs, can influence processes within the brain that are triggering or aggravating

  18. Applying accelerator mass spectrometry for low-level detection of complex engineered nanoparticles in biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binghui; Jackson, George S; Yokel, Robert A; Grulke, Eric A

    2014-08-01

    Complex engineered nanoparticles (CENPs), which have different core and surface components, are being developed for medicinal, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. One of the key challenges for environmental health and safety assessments of CENPs is to identify and quantity their transformations in biological environments. This study reports the effects of in vivo exposure of citrate-coated nanoalumina with different rare isotope labels on each component. This CENP was dosed to the rat and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to quantify (26)Al, (14)C, and their ratio in the dosing material and tissue samples. For CENPs detected in the liver, the rare isotope ratio, (14)C/(26)Al, was 87% of the dosing material's ratio. The citrate coating on the nanoalumina in the liver was stable or, if it degraded, its metabolites were incorporated with nearby tissues. However, in brain and bone where little alumina was detected, the rare isotope ratio greatly exceeded that of the dosing material. Therefore, in the animal, citrate dissociated from CENPs and redistributed to brain and bone. Tracking both the core and surface components by AMS presents a new approach for characterizing transformations of CENPs components in biological milieu or environments.

  19. Quantitative Evaluation of the Stability of Engineered Water Soluble Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, M. J.; Habas, S.; Mokari, T.; Wan, J.

    2009-12-01

    Stability of nanoparticle solutions is a key factor dictating the bioavailability and transport characteristics of nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment. The synthesis of materials with dimensions less than 100 nm relies on the ability to stabilize surfaces. If the stabilization of the material is disrupted by aggregation, precipitation, or dissolution, the chemical and physical properties often revert to the properties of the bulk material or molecular constituents. We synthesized CdSe and gold NPs, and studied their aggregation rate and the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The chemical and physical properties of our NPs have been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV-VIS spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, Zeta potential measurements, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. This comprehensive approach to synthesis and characterization enables the isolation of design parameters with greater precision that can be obtained using commercially available NPs. This research evaluates NP design parameters including composition, size, and surface coating, as a function of concentration, pH, and ionic strength, to determine which factors most affect NP stability. The aggregation characteristics of both gold NPs and cadmium selinide NPs, which are between 2-12 nm in diameter, and have been capped with various ligands, have been studied. While previous work demonstrates that these variables influence stability, it does not systematically compare their relative significance. Our results indicate that changing the ligand shell radically affects the stability of NP as a function of both pH and ionic strength, while changing the material from CdSe to gold has only a moderate influence on the stability and aggregation characteristics of our particles. Additionally, the ligand charge, length, and binding affinity all significantly effect NP stability. Funding was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy

  20. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  1. Optimization of nanoparticle focusing by coupling thermophoresis and engineered vortex in a microfluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Cao, Zhibo; Fraser, John; Oztekin, Alparslan; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2017-01-01

    Enriching nanoparticles in an aqueous solution is commonly practiced for various applications. Despite recent advances in microfluidic technologies, a general method to concentrate nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel in a label free and continuous flow fashion is not yet available, due to strong Brownian motion on the nanoscale. Recent research of thermophoresis indicates that thermophoretic force can overcome the Brownian force to direct nanoparticle movement. Coupling thermophoresis with natural convection on the microscale has been shown to induce significant enrichment of biomolecules in a thermal diffusion column. However, the column operates in a batch process, and the concentrated samples are inconvenient to retrieve. We have recently designed a microfluidic device that combines a helical fluid motion and simple one-dimensional temperature gradient to achieve effective nanoparticle focusing in a continuous flow. The helical convection is introduced by microgrooves patterned on the channel floor, which directly controls the focusing speed and power. Here, COMSOL simulations are conducted to study how the device geometry and flow rate influence transport and subsequent nanoparticle focusing, with a constant temperature gradient. The results demonstrate a complex dependence of nanoparticle accumulation on the microgroove tilting angle, depth, and spacing, as well as channel width and flow rate. Further dimensional analyses reveal that the ratio between particle velocities induced by thermophoretic and fluid inertial forces governs the particle concentration factor, with a maximum concentration at a ratio of approximately one. This simple relationship provides fundamental insights about nanoparticle transport in coupled flow and thermal fields. The study also offers a useful guideline to the design and operation of nanoparticle concentrators based on combining engineered helical fluid motion subject to phoretic fields.

  2. Evaluation of Current Assessment Methods in Engineering Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purzer, Senay; Fila, Nicholas; Nataraja, Kavin

    2016-01-01

    Quality assessment is an essential component of education that allows educators to support student learning and improve educational programs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the current state of assessment in engineering entrepreneurship education. We identified 52 assessment instruments covered in 29 journal articles and conference…

  3. Engineering Hydrophobic Organosilica Nanoparticle-Doped Nanofibers for Enhanced and Fouling Resistant Membrane Distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Hammami, Mohammed Amen

    2016-12-15

    Engineering and scaling-up new materials for better water desalination are imperative to find alternative fresh water sources to meet future demands. Herein, the fabrication of hydrophobic poly(ether imide) composite nanofiber membranes doped with novel ethylene-pentafluorophenylene-based periodic mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles is reported for enhanced and fouling resistant membrane distillation. Novel organosilica nanoparticles were homogeneously incorporated into electrospun nanofiber membranes depicting a proportional increase of hydrophobicity to the particle contents. Direct contact membrane distillation experiments on the organosilica-doped membrane with only 5% doping showed an increase of flux of 140% compared to commercial membranes. The high porosity of organosilica nanoparticles was further utilized to load the eugenol antimicrobial agent which produced a dramatic enhancement of the antibiofouling properties of the membrane of 70% after 24 h.

  4. Engineering empty space between Si nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liu, Nian; Carney, Thomas J; Yang, Yuan; Cui, Yi

    2012-02-01

    Silicon is a promising high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries yet attaining long cycle life remains a significant challenge due to pulverization of the silicon and unstable solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation during the electrochemical cycles. Despite significant advances in nanostructured Si electrodes, challenges including short cycle life and scalability hinder its widespread implementation. To address these challenges, we engineered an empty space between Si nanoparticles by encapsulating them in hollow carbon tubes. The synthesis process used low-cost Si nanoparticles and electrospinning methods, both of which can be easily scaled. The empty space around the Si nanoparticles allowed the electrode to successfully overcome these problems Our anode demonstrated a high gravimetric capacity (~1000 mAh/g based on the total mass) and long cycle life (200 cycles with 90% capacity retention).

  5. A resilience engineering approach to assess major accident risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how the principles of Resilience Engineering can be used to make a risk assessment of an Integrated Operations (IO) scenario. It refers to the case study provided in Chapter 12.......This chapter describes how the principles of Resilience Engineering can be used to make a risk assessment of an Integrated Operations (IO) scenario. It refers to the case study provided in Chapter 12....

  6. IN VITRO EFFECT OF SILVER ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES ON HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Terzuoli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Silver (Ag NPs are among the most commercialized NPs due to their antimicrobial potential. They are highly at- tractive for possible applications in manufacture of medical device. However there is a serious lack of information concerning their impact on the human health and the environment. Moreover studies on the effects of NPs on ejaculated sperm are rather limited. For these reasons our study explored the in vitro effects of Ag NPs on human ejaculated spermatozoa. Ag NPs have been produced, characterized, and furnished by Colorobbia Industry, Sovigliana (Vinci, Florence, Italy. Aliquots of total semen were incubated at 37°C for 60 minutes (min and 120 min at the concentration of 125 μM, 250 μM, and 500 μM of engineered Ag NPs. The control was represented by specimens of semen samples treated with the same procedure without NPs. After the incubations, sperm motility was evaluated following WHO guidelines and sperm viability was eval- uated by Eosin Y test. At the end of incubation with Ag NPs the samples were processed by a Field Emission Gun-based Scanning Transmition Electron Microscope/ Energy Dispertion Spectrometry (STEM/EDS. We observed that sperm motility percentage was significantly reduced in semen samples treated with 125 μM, 250 μM and 500 μM of Ag NPs after 60 min and 120 min of incubation respect to controls (P<0.001; P<0.01, 125 μM at 60 min. Sperm viability percentage significantly decreased in a progressive manner after 125 μM (P<0.05, 250 μM (P<0.05 and 500 μM (P<0.001 Ag NPs incubation at 60 min and 120 min. We did not find any significant difference between the values assessed after 60 min of NPs incubation and those estimated after 120 min of incubation. In the control samples, the sperm motility and the sperm viability percentages significantly decreased after 120 min of incubation (P<0.001 respect to the basal values. Ag NPs were undetectable in all treated samples by STEM/EDS. These in vitro results show a

  7. Improving Sensitivity and Specificity when Measuring Environmental Exposure to Engineered Nanoparticle Releases with the use of Low-Background Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Papinchak, Heather Laine

    2013-01-01

    As applications of nanotechnology expand, there is an increasing need to develop inexpensive, sensitive, and specific procedures to measure occupational exposures to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). The use of hand-held direct reading instruments to screen for airborne ENPs is attractive due to the relatively low cost of such commercially available instruments and the immediate feedback provided. However, because ambient air typically contains thousands of non-engineered nanoparticles per cu...

  8. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-07-01

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold.Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00300d

  9. Harnessing structure-activity relationship to engineer a cisplatin nanoparticle for enhanced antitumor efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu S; Soni, Shivani; Chin, Kenneth T; Chaudhuri, Padmaparna; Muto, Katherine W; Berkowitz, Julia; Handlogten, Michael W; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2010-07-13

    Cisplatin is a first line chemotherapy for most types of cancer. However, its use is dose-limited due to severe nephrotoxicity. Here we report the rational engineering of a novel nanoplatinate inspired by the mechanisms underlying cisplatin bioactivation. We engineered a novel polymer, glucosamine-functionalized polyisobutylene-maleic acid, where platinum (Pt) can be complexed to the monomeric units using a monocarboxylato and an O --> Pt coordinate bond. We show that at a unique platinum to polymer ratio, this complex self-assembles into a nanoparticle, which releases cisplatin in a pH-dependent manner. The nanoparticles are rapidly internalized into the endolysosomal compartment of cancer cells, and exhibit an IC50 (4.25 +/- 0.16 microM) comparable to that of free cisplatin (3.87 +/- 0.37 microM), and superior to carboplatin (14.75 +/- 0.38 microM). The nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved antitumor efficacy in terms of tumor growth delay in breast and lung cancers and tumor regression in a K-ras(LSL/+)/Pten(fl/fl) ovarian cancer model. Furthermore, the nanoparticle treatment resulted in reduced systemic and nephrotoxicity, validated by decreased biodistribution of platinum to the kidney as quantified using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. Given the universal need for a better platinate, we anticipate this coupling of nanotechnology and structure-activity relationship to rationally reengineer cisplatin could have a major impact globally in the clinical treatment of cancer.

  10. Experimental investigations on a CRDI system assisted diesel engine fuelled with aluminium oxide nanoparticles blended biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Syed Aalam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to determine engine performance, exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics of a single cylinder, common rail direct injection (CRDI system assisted diesel engine using diesel with 25 percentage of zizipus jujube methyl ester blended fuel (ZJME25. Along with this ZJME25 aluminium oxide nanoparticles were added as additive in mass fractions of 25 ppm (AONP 25 and 50 ppm (AONP 50 with the help of a mechanical Homogenizer and an ultrasonicator. It was observed that aluminium oxide nanoparticles blended fuel exhibits a significant reduction in specific fuel consumption and exhaust emissions at all operating loads. At the full load, the magnitude of HC and smoke emission for the ZJME25 before the addition of aluminium oxide nanoparticles was 13.459 g/kW h and 79 HSU, whereas it was 8.599 g/kW h and 49 HSU for the AONP 50 blended ZJME25 fuel respectively. The results also showed a considerable enhancement in brake thermal efficiency and heat release rate due to the influence of aluminium oxide nanoparticles addition in biodiesel–diesel blend.

  11. Environmental behaviour and ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to algae, plants and fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, E.; Baun, Anders; Behra, R.

    2008-01-01

    Developments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance...... cell structures and molecules, as well as protective mechanisms. Indirect effects of ENPs depend on their chemical and physical properties and may include physical restraints (clogging effects), solubilization of toxic ENP compounds, or production of reactive oxygen species. Many questions regarding...

  12. Potent engineered PLGA nanoparticles by virtue of exceptionally high chemotherapeutic loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, Elizabeth M; Luft, J Christopher; Napier, Mary E; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2011-02-01

    Herein we report the fabrication of engineered poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles via the PRINT (particle replication in nonwetting templates) process with high and efficient loadings of docetaxel, up to 40% (w/w) with encapsulation efficiencies >90%. The PRINT process enables independent control of particle properties leading to a higher degree of tailorability than traditional methods. Particles with 40% loading display better in vitro efficacy than particles with lower loadings and the clinical formulation of docetaxel, Taxotere.

  13. Multimedia Environmental Fate and Speciation of Engineered Nanoparticles: A Probabilistic Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Meesters, J.A.J.; Quik, J.T.K.; Koelmans, A.A.; Hendriks, A.J.; Meent, D. van de

    2016-01-01

    The robustness of novel multimedia fate models in environmental exposure estimation of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) remains unclear, because of uncertainties in the emission, physicochemical properties and natural variability in environmental systems. Here, we evaluate the uncertainty in predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) by using the SimpleBox4nano (SB4N) model. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed on the environmental fate, concentrations and speciation of nano-CeO2, -T...

  14. Designed synthesis and surface engineering strategies of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Jiang, Chang Zhong; Roy, Vellaisamy A L

    2016-12-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold great promise for future biomedical applications because of their magnetic properties as well as other intrinsic properties such as low toxicity, colloidal stability, and surface engineering capability. Numerous related studies on iron oxide NPs have been conducted. Recent progress in nanochemistry has enabled fine control over the size, crystallinity, uniformity, and surface properties of iron oxide NPs. This review examines various synthetic approaches and surface engineering strategies for preparing naked and functional iron oxide NPs with different physicochemical properties. Growing interest in designed and surface-engineered iron oxide NPs with multifunctionalities was explored in in vitro/in vivo biomedical applications, focusing on their combined roles in bioseparation, as a biosensor, targeted-drug delivery, MR contrast agents, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. This review outlines the limitations of extant surface engineering strategies and several developing strategies that may overcome these limitations. This study also details the promising future directions of this active research field.

  15. Knocking at the door of the unborn child: engineered nanoparticles at the human placental barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula; Wick, Peter

    2012-04-05

    Exposure of pregnant women and their unborn children to engineered nanoparticles (NPs) is not yet of major public concern. However, this may soon change in light of the ever-increasing production of NPs and the continuous appearance of novel NP-containing consumer products. However, NPs may not only pose risks to exposed individuals; they offer major potential for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat specifically either the mother or the developing foetus. Hence there is every reason to explore the transplacental transfer of engineered NPs in more detail, and to find answers to the vast number of open questions in this fascinating field of research.

  16. Development of screening assays for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in human blood: preliminary studies with charged Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A; Thompson, John W; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-09-01

    As nanoparticles have found increased use in both consumer and medical applications, corresponding increases in possible exposure to humans necessitate studies examining the impacts of these nanomaterials in biological systems. This article examines the effects of approximately 30-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles, with positively and negatively charged surface coatings in human blood. Here, we study the exposure effects, with up to 72 h of exposure to 5, 15, 25 and 50 µg/ml nanoparticles on hemolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and platelet aggregation in subsets of cells from human blood. Assessing viability with hemolysis, results show significant changes in a concentration-dependent fashion. Rates of ROS generation were investigated using the dichlorofluorscein diacetate-based assay as ROS generation is a commonly suspected mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity; herein, ROS was not a significant factor. Optical monitoring of platelet aggregation revealed that none of the examined nanoparticles induced aggregation upon short-term exposure.

  17. Tuning the reactivity of Ru nanoparticles by defect engineering of the reduced graphene oxide support

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We systematically investigated the electronic structure of Ru nanoparticles supported on various local structures on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) by first-principles-based calculations. We showed that Ru nanoparticles prefer to nucleate at these localized defect structures on rGO, which act as strong trapping sites for Ru nanoparticles and inhibit their aggregation. The binding of Ru nanoparticles to rGO, which is dependent on these local defect structures and correlates with the interfacial charge transfer, determines the electronic structure of the composites. Further study reveals that the performance of these composites against oxygen adsorption changes proportionally with the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticles. The correlation between the defect structures on rGO and the reactivity of the composites suggests that controlled modification of the graphenic support by defect engineering would be an efficient way to fabricate new transition metal/rGO composites with high stability and desired reactivity. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  18. Assessment of long-term effects of nanoparticles in a microcarrier cell culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mrakovcic

    Full Text Available Nano-sized materials could find multiple applications in medical diagnosis and therapy. One main concern is that engineered nanoparticles, similar to combustion-derived nanoparticles, may cause adverse effects on human health by accumulation of entire particles or their degradation products. Chronic cytotoxicity must therefore be evaluated. In order to perform chronic cytotoxicity testing of plain polystyrene nanoparticles on the endothelial cell line EAhy 926, we established a microcarrier cell culture system for anchorage-dependent cells (BioLevitator(TM. Cells were cultured for four weeks and exposed to doses, which were not cytotoxic upon 24 hours of exposure. For comparison, these particles were also studied in regularly sub-cultured cells, a method that has traditionally been used to assess chronic cellular effects. Culturing on basal membrane coated microcarriers produced very high cell densities. Fluorescent particles were mainly localized in the lysosomes of the exposed cells. After four weeks of exposure, the number of cells exposed to 20 nm polystyrene particles decreased by 60% as compared to untreated controls. When tested in sub-cultured cells, the same particles decreased cell numbers to 80% of the untreated controls. Dose-dependent decreases in cell numbers were also noted after exposure of microcarrier cultured cells to 50 nm short multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Our findings support that necrosis, but not apoptosis, contributed to cell death of the exposed cells in the microcarrier culture system. In conclusion, the established microcarrier model appears to be more sensitive for the identification of cellular effects upon prolonged and repeated exposure to nanoparticles than traditional sub-culturing.

  19. Converging hazard assessment of gold nanoparticles to aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cambero, Jesús Pablo; Núñez García, Mercedes; López, Gema Díaz; Herranz, Ana López; Cuevas, Laureano; Pérez-Pastrana, Esperanza; Cuadal, Judith Sendra; Castelltort, Marc Ramis; Calvo, Argelia Castaño

    2013-10-01

    The gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) are being increasingly used because of their huge diversity of applications, and consequently, elevated levels in the environment are expected. However, due to their physico-chemical properties and functionalization a high variety of Au-NPs can be found, and complete toxicological information for each type of Au-NPs still lacks, and even, the toxicological information for the same species is sometimes contradictory. Therefore, hazard assessment should be done case by case. Hence, the objective of this study was to obtain ecotoxicological information of the same Au-NPs in aquatic organisms and to find a rationale for Au-NPs toxicity. For such a purpose, bare and hyaluronic acid capped Au-NPs (12.5 nm) along with Au-NPs bulk material were tested on freshwater algae, Daphnia and zebrafish. Results showed that while gold nanoparticles were found to be harmless to the tested organisms, the soluble gold showed to be toxic to algae and Daphnia, with an LC50 between 1 and 2 mg L(-1). Comparing our results with those gathered in the literature, it appears that a common hazard assessment of Au-NPs on the studied organisms can be elucidated.

  20. Effect of electrolyte valency, alginate concentration and pH on engineered TiO₂ nanoparticle stability in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Stoll, Serge

    2015-12-01

    Agglomeration and disagglomeration processes are expected to play a key role on the fate of engineered nanoparticles in natural aquatic systems. These processes are investigated here in detail by studying first the stability of TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of monovalent and divalent electrolytes at different pHs (below and above the point of zero charge of TiO2) and discussing the importance of specific divalent cation adsorption with the help of the DLVO theory as well as the importance of the nature of the counterions. Then the impact of one polysaccharide (alginate) on the stability of agglomerates formed under pH and water hardness representative of Lake Geneva environmental conditions is investigated. In these conditions the large TiO2 agglomerates (diameter>1μm) are positively charged due to Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) specific adsorption and alginate, which is negatively charged, adsorbs onto the agglomerate surface. Our results indicate that the presence of alginate at typical natural organic matter concentration (1-10 mg L(-1)) strongly modifies the TiO2 agglomerate (50 mg L(-1)) stability by inducing their partial and rapid disagglomeration. The importance of disagglomeration is found dependent on the alginate concentration with maximum of disagglomeration obtained for alginate concentration ≥8 mg L(-1) and leading to 400 nm fragments. From an environmental point of view partial restabilization of TiO2 agglomerates in the presence of alginate constitutes an important outcome. Disagglomeration will enhance their transport and residence time in aquatic systems which is an important step in the current knowledge on risk assessment associated to engineered nanoparticles.

  1. Portable Nanoparticle-Based Sensors for Food Safety Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Gonca; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-12-05

    The use of nanotechnology-derived products in the development of sensors and analytical measurement methodologies has increased significantly over the past decade. Nano-based sensing approaches include the use of nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures to enhance sensitivity and selectivity, design new detection schemes, improve sample preparation and increase portability. This review summarizes recent advancements in the design and development of NP-based sensors for assessing food safety. The most common types of NPs used to fabricate sensors for detection of food contaminants are discussed. Selected examples of NP-based detection schemes with colorimetric and electrochemical detection are provided with focus on sensors for the detection of chemical and biological contaminants including pesticides, heavy metals, bacterial pathogens and natural toxins. Current trends in the development of low-cost portable NP-based technology for rapid assessment of food safety as well as challenges for practical implementation and future research directions are discussed.

  2. Engineered gold nanoparticles for identification of novel ovarian biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Karuna

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer related death among women in the US and worldwide. The disease has a high mortality rate due to limited tools available that can diagnose ovarian cancer at an early stage and the lack of effective treatments for disease free survival at late stages. Identification of proteins specifically expressed/overexpressed in ovarian cancer could lead to identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets that improve patient outcomes. In this regard, mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to probe the proteome of a cancer cell. It can aid discovery of proteins important for the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer. These proteins in turn could serve as diagnostic and treatment biomarkers of the disease. However, a limitation of mass spectrometry based proteomic analyses is that the technique lacks sensitivity and is biased against detection of low abundance proteins. With current approaches to biomarker discovery, we may therefore be overlooking candidate proteins that are important for ovarian cancer. This study presents a new approach to enrich low abundance proteins and subsequently detect them with mass spectrometry. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and functionalization of their surfaces provide an excellent opportunity to capture and enrich low abundance proteins. First, the study focused on conducting an extensive investigation of the time evolution of nanoparticle-protein interaction and understanding drivers of protein attachment on nanoparticle surface. The adsorption of proteins to AuNPs was found to be highly dynamic with multiple attachment and detachment events which decreased over time. Initially, electrostatic forces played an important role in protein binding and structurally flexible proteins such as those involved in RNA processing were more likely to bind to AuNPs. More importantly, the feasibility and success of protein enrichment by AuNPs was evaluated. The AuNPs based approach was able to detect

  3. New Bismuth-Substituted Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Bargan, Ana Maria; Luca, Constantin

    2015-11-01

    New bismuth-substituted hydroxyapatite [Ca10- x Bi x (PO4)6(OH)2 where x = 0-2.5] nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method from aqueous solutions. The structural properties of the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray analysis, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. The results confirm that bismuth ions have been incorporated into the hydroxyapatite lattice. The prepared nanocrystalline powders consisted of hydroxyapatite as single phase with hexagonal structure, crystal sizes smaller than 60 nm and (Bi + Ca)/P atomic ratio of around 1.67. The hydroxyapatite samples doped with Bi have mesoporous textures with pores size of around 2 nm and specific surface area in the range of 12-25 m2/g. The Bi-substituted hydroxyapatite powders are more effective against Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria than Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  4. Supercritical Fluid Synthesis and Tribological Applications of Silver Nanoparticle-decorated Graphene in Engine Oil Nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yuan; Su, Fenghua; Chen, Yangzhi

    2016-08-04

    Silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene nanocomposites were synthesized by a facile chemical reduction approach with the assistance of supercritical CO2 (ScCO2). The silver nanoparticles with diameters of 2-16 nm are uniformly distributed and firmly anchored on graphene nanosheets. The tribological properties of the as-synthesized nanocomposites as lubricant additives in engine oil were investigated by a four-ball tribometer. The engine oil with 0.06~0.10 wt.% Sc-Ag/GN nanocomposites displays remarkable lubricating performance, superior than the pure engine oil, the engine oil containing zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP), as well as the oil dispersed with the single nanomaterial of graphene oxides (GOs) and nano-Ag particles alone. The remarkable lubricating behaviors of Sc-Ag/GN probably derive from the synergistic interactions of nano-Ag and graphene in the nanocomposite and the action of the formed protective film on the contact balls. The anchored nano-Ag particles on graphene expand the interlamination spaces of graphene nanosheets and can prevent them from restacking during the rubbing process, resulting in the full play of lubricating activity of graphene. The formed protective film on the friction pairs significantly reduces the surface roughness of the sliding balls and hence preventing them from direct interaction during the sliding process.

  5. Supercritical Fluid Synthesis and Tribological Applications of Silver Nanoparticle-decorated Graphene in Engine Oil Nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yuan; Su, Fenghua; Chen, Yangzhi

    2016-08-01

    Silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene nanocomposites were synthesized by a facile chemical reduction approach with the assistance of supercritical CO2 (ScCO2). The silver nanoparticles with diameters of 2–16 nm are uniformly distributed and firmly anchored on graphene nanosheets. The tribological properties of the as-synthesized nanocomposites as lubricant additives in engine oil were investigated by a four-ball tribometer. The engine oil with 0.06~0.10 wt.% Sc-Ag/GN nanocomposites displays remarkable lubricating performance, superior than the pure engine oil, the engine oil containing zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP), as well as the oil dispersed with the single nanomaterial of graphene oxides (GOs) and nano-Ag particles alone. The remarkable lubricating behaviors of Sc-Ag/GN probably derive from the synergistic interactions of nano-Ag and graphene in the nanocomposite and the action of the formed protective film on the contact balls. The anchored nano-Ag particles on graphene expand the interlamination spaces of graphene nanosheets and can prevent them from restacking during the rubbing process, resulting in the full play of lubricating activity of graphene. The formed protective film on the friction pairs significantly reduces the surface roughness of the sliding balls and hence preventing them from direct interaction during the sliding process.

  6. Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael

    that of their bulk forms. With release of ENPs to the environment a need for evaluation of the potential risk of ENPs is necessary. Potential risks are assessed through a chemical safety assessment. Test guidelines (TGs) to evaluate the risk of compounds for the chemical safety assessment were developed for soluble...... and a physical identity. For soluble chemicals the chemical identity has been the parameter controlling ecotoxicological endpoints (e.g. toxicity and bioaccumulation). However, with ENPs consisting of a wide range of particle sizes, coatings and functionalizations influencing the performance and result of test...... of different particle sizes, coatings and functionalizations were investigated using model ENPs (Au ENPs) with two different sizes (10 and 30nm) and coatings (citrate and mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA)) and a standardized test setup with a standardized test organism (Daphnia magna). It was found that while...

  7. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly;

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternat......The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case...... for alternatives assessment approaches as they can be considered both emerging “chemicals” of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging and critical elements...... in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. This paper...

  8. Response to "Critical Assessment of the Evidence for Striped Nanoparticles".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Khac Ong

    Full Text Available Stirling et al., (10.1371/journal.pone.0108482 presented an analysis on some of our publications on the formation of stripe-like domains on mixed-ligand coated gold nanoparticles. The authors shed doubts on some of our results however no valid argument is provided against what we have shown since our first publication: scanning tunneling microscopy (STM images of striped nanoparticles show stripe-like domains that are independent of imaging parameters and in particular of imaging speed. We have consistently ruled out the presence of artifacts by comparing sets of images acquired at different tip speeds, finding invariance of the stipe-like domains. Stirling and co-workers incorrectly analyzed this key control, using a different microscope and imaging conditions that do not compare to ours. We show here data proving that our approach is rigorous. Furthermore, we never solely relied on image analysis to draw our conclusions; we have always used the chemical nature of the particles to assess the veracity of our images. Stirling et al. do not provide any justification for the spacing of the features that we find on nanoparticles: ~1 nm for mixed ligand particles and ~ 0.5 nm for homoligand particles. Hence our two central arguments remain unmodified: independence from imaging parameters and dependence on ligand shell chemical composition. The paper report observations on our STM images; none is a sufficient condition to prove that our images are artifacts. We thoroughly addressed issues related to STM artifacts throughout our microscopy work. Stirling et al. provide guidelines for what they consider good STM images of nanoparticles, such images are indeed present in our literature. They conclude that the evidences we provided to date are insufficient, this is a departure from one of the authors' previous article which concluded that our images were composed of artifacts. Given that four independent laboratories have reproduced our measurements and

  9. Embedded Formative Assessment in the Undergraduate Engineering Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Frank V

    2015-01-01

    This paper first provides an overview of the pedagogical role of formative assessment in the undergraduate engineering classroom. In the last decade, technology-facilitated implementation of the collection and analysis of student responses has reduced the clerical burden on educators, making the practice more widespread. We discuss some of the reasons why this practice may not have yet reached its full potential in undergraduate engineering classrooms, as well as some available solutions.

  10. Assessment of an anomaly detector for jet engine health monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastien Borguet; Olivier Léonard

    2011-01-01

    The goal of module performance analysis is to reliably assess the health of the main components of an aircraft engine. A predictive maintenance strategy can leverage this information to increase operability and safety as well as to reduce costs. Degradation undergone by an engine can be divided into gradual deterioration and accidental events. Kalman filters have proven very efficient at tracking progressive deterioration but are poor performers in the face of abrupt events. Adaptive estimati...

  11. Retaining minorities in engineering: Assessment of a program prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jennifer Marie (Phillips)

    Program assessment is an essential part of healthy program development. Assessment should include multiple considerations, dimensions, and outcomes that match the program's objectives. As a newly formed retention program, the Auburn University Minority Engineering Program, designed to help pre-engineering minority students make the transition into their freshman year of university studies, incorporated evaluation and assessment into all three components of the program (the interactive learning laboratory, critical-thinking workshops, and Sunday-evening tutorials) from the program's inception. If students successfully adapted to the university environment and the demands of the pre-engineering course of study, then retention of minority students in the College of Engineering should improve. Data were gathered on the students involved in the various program components. Students who entered the Minority Engineering Program were pre- and posttested on three standardized subtests (critical thinking, mathematics, and science reasoning) of the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency. The first-quarter grade-point averages of the students were also gathered to compare their grades to freshman students in previous quarters within the College of Engineering. Qualitative data were also gathered on this same group of students. An analysis of the data revealed that student achievement is affected by involvement in the Minority Engineering Program. Specifically, the first quarter grade point averages of students involved in the program exceeded those of their peers in earlier years of study prior to the program's existence. In addition, mathematics and science reasoning scores on standardized tests increased pre- to postintervention. Comments collected in journals and files also demonstrated use of critical-thinking and problem-solving skills employed by the students. Recommendations for alterations of the program were made based on the outcome of the program evaluation

  12. Assessment and Development of Software Engineering Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-16

    Assessment (REA) tool would advise a potential software reuser on the tradeoffs between reusing a RSC versus developing a brand new software product...of memberships in the key RSC reusability attributes; e.g., size, structure, or documentation, etc., all of which would be weighted by reuser

  13. Enhanced and tunable optical quantum efficiencies from plasmon bandwidth engineering in bimetallic CoAg nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malasi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanoparticles are amongst the most effective ways to resonantly couple optical energy into and out of nanometer sized volumes. However, controlling and/or tuning the transfer of this incident energy to the surrounding near and far field is one of the most interesting challenges in this area. Due to the dielectric properties of metallic silver (Ag, its nanoparticles have amongst the highest radiative quantum efficiencies (η, i.e., the ability to radiatively transfer the incident energy to the surrounding. Here we report the discovery that bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag made with immiscible and plasmonically weak Co metal can show comparable and/or even higher η values. The enhancement is a result of the narrowing of the plasmon bandwidth from these bimetal systems. The phenomenological explanation of this effect based on the dipolar approximation points to the reduction in radiative losses within the Ag nanoparticles when in contact with cobalt. This is also supported by a model of coupling between poor and good conductors based on the surface to volume ratio. This study presents a new type of bandwidth engineering, one based on using bimetal nanostructures, to tune and/or enhance the quality factor and quantum efficiency for near and far-field plasmonic applications.

  14. Enhanced and tunable optical quantum efficiencies from plasmon bandwidth engineering in bimetallic CoAg nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Ehrsam, M.; Goodwin, J.; Garcia, H.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-10-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles are amongst the most effective ways to resonantly couple optical energy into and out of nanometer sized volumes. However, controlling and/or tuning the transfer of this incident energy to the surrounding near and far field is one of the most interesting challenges in this area. Due to the dielectric properties of metallic silver (Ag), its nanoparticles have amongst the highest radiative quantum efficiencies (η), i.e., the ability to radiatively transfer the incident energy to the surrounding. Here we report the discovery that bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag made with immiscible and plasmonically weak Co metal can show comparable and/or even higher η values. The enhancement is a result of the narrowing of the plasmon bandwidth from these bimetal systems. The phenomenological explanation of this effect based on the dipolar approximation points to the reduction in radiative losses within the Ag nanoparticles when in contact with cobalt. This is also supported by a model of coupling between poor and good conductors based on the surface to volume ratio. This study presents a new type of bandwidth engineering, one based on using bimetal nanostructures, to tune and/or enhance the quality factor and quantum efficiency for near and far-field plasmonic applications.

  15. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG&G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG&G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  16. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  17. Shape-engineered multifunctional porous silicon nanoparticles by direct imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Jeremy W; Fain, Joshua S; Beavers, Kelsey R; Duvall, Craig L; Weiss, Sharon M

    2015-07-10

    A versatile and scalable method for fabricating shape-engineered nano- and micrometer scale particles from mesoporous silicon (PSi) thin films is presented. This approach, based on the direct imprinting of porous substrates (DIPS) technique, facilitates the generation of particles with arbitrary shape, ranging in minimum dimension from approximately 100 nm to several micrometers, by carrying out high-pressure (>200 MPa) direct imprintation, followed by electrochemical etching of a sub-surface perforation layer and ultrasonication. PSi particles (PSPs) with a variety of geometries have been produced in quantities sufficient for biomedical applications (≫10 μg). Because the stamps can be reused over 150 times, this process is substantially more economical and efficient than the use of electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching for the fabrication of nanometer-scale PSPs directly. The versatility of this fabrication method is demonstrated by loading the DIPS-imprinted PSPs with a therapeutic peptide nucleic acid drug molecule, and by vapor deposition of an Au coating to facilitate the use of PSPs as a photothermal contrast agent.

  18. Potentials of engineered nanoparticles as fertilizers for increasing agronomic productions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiqiang; Lal, Rattan

    2015-05-01

    Development and application of new types of fertilizers using innovative nanotechnology are one of the potentially effective options of significantly enhancing the global agricultural productions needed to meet the future demands of the growing population. Indeed, the review of available literature indicates that some engineered nanomaterials can enhance plant-growth in certain concentration ranges and could be used as nanofertilizers in agriculture to increase agronomic yields of crops and/or minimize environmental pollution. This article summarizes this type of nanomaterials under four categories: macronutrient nanofertilizers, micronutrient nanofertilizers, nutrient-loaded nanofertilizers, and plant-growth-enhancing nanomaterials. Each category is discussed respectively with reference to nanomaterials' chemical composition, particle size, concentrations applied, benefited plant species, plant incubation methods, and plant-growth enhancement aspects and the rates. The importance, research directions, and research requirements of each nanofertilizer category for achieving sustainable agriculture are also specifically examined. Finally, this review suggests that development of N and P macronutrient nanofertilizers is a high research and development priority both for food production and environmental protection.

  19. Application of a pilot control banding tool for risk level assessment and control of nanoparticle exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, S Y; Zalk, D M; Swuste, P

    2008-03-03

    Control Banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents that are found in the workplace in the absence of firm toxicological and exposure data. These strategies may be particularly useful in nanotechnology applications, considering the overwhelming level of uncertainty over what nanomaterials and nanotechnologies present as potential work-related health risks, what about these materials might lead to adverse toxicological activity, how risk related to these might be assessed, and how to manage these issues in the absence of this information. This study introduces a pilot CB tool or 'CB Nanotool' that was developed specifically for characterizing the health aspects of working with engineered nanoparticles and determining the level of risk and associated controls for five ongoing nanotechnology-related operations being conducted at two Department of Energy (DOE) research laboratories. Based on the application of the CB Nanotool, four of the five operations evaluated in this study were found to have implemented controls consistent with what was recommended by the CB Nanotool, with one operation even exceeding the required controls for that activity. The one remaining operation was determined to require an upgrade in controls. By developing this dynamic CB Nanotool within the realm of the scientific information available, this application of CB appears to be a useful approach for assessing the risk of nanomaterial operations, providing recommendations for appropriate engineering controls, and facilitating the allocation of resources to the activities that most need them.

  20. FedExosomes: Engineering Therapeutic Biological Nanoparticles that Truly Deliver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E. Marcus

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Many aspects of intercellular communication are mediated through “sending” and “receiving” packets of information via the secretion and subsequent receptor-mediated detection of biomolecular species including cytokines, chemokines, and even metabolites. Recent evidence has now established a new modality of intercellular communication through which biomolecular species are exchanged between cells via extracellular lipid vesicles. A particularly important class of extracellular vesicles is exosomes, which is a term generally applied to biological nanovesicles ~30–200 nm in diameter. Exosomes form through invagination of endosomes to encapsulate cytoplasmic contents, and upon fusion of these multivesicular endosomes to the cell surface, exosomes are released to the extracellular space and transport mRNA, microRNA (miRNA and proteins between cells. Importantly, exosome-mediated delivery of such cargo molecules results in functional modulation of the recipient cell, and such modulation is sufficiently potent to modulate disease processes in vivo. It is possible that such functional delivery of biomolecules indicates that exosomes utilize native mechanisms (e.g., for internalization and trafficking that may be harnessed by using exosomes to deliver exogenous RNA for therapeutic applications. A complementary perspective is that understanding the mechanisms of exosome-mediated transport may provide opportunities for “reverse engineering” such mechanisms to improve the performance of synthetic delivery vehicles. In this review, we summarize recent progress in harnessing exosomes for therapeutic RNA delivery, discuss the potential for engineering exosomes to overcome delivery challenges and establish robust technology platforms, and describe both potential challenges and advantages of utilizing exosomes as RNA delivery vehicles.

  1. Engineering an artificial amoeba propelled by nanoparticle-triggered actin polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Jinsoo; Schmidt, Jacob; Chien Aichi; Montemagno, Carlo D [Department of Bioengineering, University of California Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, 7523 Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1600 (United States)], E-mail: montemcd@ucmail.uc.edu

    2009-02-25

    We have engineered an amoeba system combining nanofabricated inorganic materials with biological components, capable of propelling itself via actin polymerization. The nanofabricated materials have a mechanism similar to the locomotion of the Listeria monocytogenes, food poisoning bacteria. The propulsive force generation utilizes nanoparticles made from nickel and gold functionalized with the Listeria monocytogenes transmembrane protein, ActA. These Listeria-mimic nanoparticles were in concert with actin, actin binding proteins, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and encapsulated within a lipid vesicle. This system is an artificial cell, such as a vesicle, where artificial nanobacteria and actin polymerization machinery are used in driving force generators inside the cell. The assembled structure was observed to crawl on a glass surface analogously to an amoeba, with the speed of the movement dependent on the amount of actin monomers and ATP present.

  2. Engineering an artificial amoeba propelled by nanoparticle-triggered actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinsoo; Schmidt, Jacob; Chien, Aichi; Montemagno, Carlo D

    2009-02-25

    We have engineered an amoeba system combining nanofabricated inorganic materials with biological components, capable of propelling itself via actin polymerization. The nanofabricated materials have a mechanism similar to the locomotion of the Listeria monocytogenes, food poisoning bacteria. The propulsive force generation utilizes nanoparticles made from nickel and gold functionalized with the Listeria monocytogenes transmembrane protein, ActA. These Listeria-mimic nanoparticles were in concert with actin, actin binding proteins, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and encapsulated within a lipid vesicle. This system is an artificial cell, such as a vesicle, where artificial nanobacteria and actin polymerization machinery are used in driving force generators inside the cell. The assembled structure was observed to crawl on a glass surface analogously to an amoeba, with the speed of the movement dependent on the amount of actin monomers and ATP present.

  3. Engineering the defect state and reducibility of ceria based nanoparticles for improved anti-oxidation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Jie; Dong, Hao; Lyu, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Huai-Yuan; Ke, Jun; Kang, Li-Qun; Teng, Jia-Li; Sun, Ling-Dong; Si, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Yun-Hui; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Due to their excellent anti-oxidation performance, CeO2 nanoparticles receive wide attention in pharmacological application. Deep understanding of the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles is extremely important to develop potent CeO2 nanomaterials for anti-oxidation application. Here, we report a detailed study on the anti-oxidation process of CeO2 nanoparticles. The valence state and coordination structure of Ce are characterized before and after the addition of H2O2 to understand the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles. Adsorbed peroxide species are detected during the anti-oxidation process, which are responsible for the red-shifted UV-vis absorption spectra of CeO2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, the coordination number of Ce in the first coordination shell slightly increased after the addition of H2O2. On the basis of these experimental results, the reactivity of coordination sites for peroxide species is considered to play a key role in the anti-oxidation performance of CeO2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, we present a robust method to engineer the anti-oxidation performance of CeO2 nanoparticles through the modification of the defect state and reducibility by doping with Gd3+. Improved anti-oxidation performance is also observed in cell culture, where the biocompatible CeO2-based nanoparticles can protect INS-1 cells from oxidative stress induced by H2O2, suggesting the potential application of CeO2 nanoparticles in the treatment of diabetes.Due to their excellent anti-oxidation performance, CeO2 nanoparticles receive wide attention in pharmacological application. Deep understanding of the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles is extremely important to develop potent CeO2 nanomaterials for anti-oxidation application. Here, we report a detailed study on the anti-oxidation process of CeO2 nanoparticles. The valence state and coordination structure of Ce are characterized before and after the addition of H2O2 to understand the anti

  4. Situated learning methodologies and assessment in civil engineering structures education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, Michael Davis

    This thesis describes an overarching study of civil engineering undergraduate structural education through student performance in recalling and applying basic structural engineering knowledge, and the viability of alternative situated learning environments for more effectively supporting the learning of this knowledge. To properly ground this study, a thorough investigation of related work in assessment, cognitive science, educational technology, and design education was completed, with connections and applications to civil engineering education highlighted. The experimental work of the thesis is organized into three parts: an assessment of civil engineering undergraduates' fundamental structural engineering knowledge and abilities; the development and testing of a software support environment for situated learning, the Civil Engineering Learning Library (CELL); and, the implementation and evaluation of the design studio, a pedagogical model for situated learning in the classroom. The results of the assessment study indicate that civil engineering seniors (and also students earlier in the curriculum) have difficulty retaining and applying basic knowledge of structural behavior, especially doing so in a flexible fashion in design situations. The survey also suggests that visualization plays an important role in understanding structural behavior. Tests with the CELL system show that a cognitively-flexible multimedia environment can support structural learning, but were inconclusive about whether the computer-based system helped the students to learn better than conventional classroom lecture. Two trial implementations of the design studio indicate that the studio model can serve as a powerful situated learning environment, and that it can be scaled up to reasonable class sizes. Significant requirements are associated with this model, however, primarily in faculty involvement, but also in physical resources and student time. In addition to these conclusions about the

  5. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly; Tickner, Joel; Ellenbecker, Michael; Baun, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternatives assessment approaches, because they can be considered both emerging "chemicals" of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging, and critical elements in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and to outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. The present paper focuses on the adaptability of existing hazard and exposure assessment approaches to engineered nanomaterials as well as strategies to design inherently safer nanomaterials. We argue that alternatives assessment for nanomaterials is complicated by the sheer number of nanomaterials possible. As a result, the inclusion of new data tools that can efficiently and effectively evaluate nanomaterials as substitutes is needed to strengthen the alternatives assessment process. However, we conclude that with additional tools to enhance traditional hazard and exposure assessment modules of alternatives assessment, such as the use of mechanistic toxicity screens and control banding tools, alternatives assessment can be adapted to evaluate engineered nanomaterials as potential substitutes for chemicals of concern and to ensure safer nanomaterials are incorporated in the design of new products. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:177-187. © 2016 SETAC.

  6. Histological assessment in peripheral nerve tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vctor Carriel; Ingrid Garzn; Miguel Alaminos; Maria Cornelissen

    2014-01-01

    The histological analysis of peripheral nerve regeneration is one of the most used methods to demonstrate the success of the regeneration through nerve conduits. Nowadays, it is possible to evaluate different parameters of nerve regeneration by using histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural techniques. The histochemical methods are very sensible and are useful tools to evaluate the extracellular matrix remodeling and the myelin sheath, but they are poorly speciifc. In contrast, the immunohistochemical methods are highly speciifc and are frequently used for the identiifcation of the regenerated axons, Schwann cells and proteins associated to nerve regeneration or neural linage. The ultrastructural techniques offer the possibility to perform a high resolution morphological and quantitative analysis of the nerve regeneration. However, the use of a single histological method may not be enough to assess the degree of regeneration, and the combination of different histological techniques could be necessary.

  7. International symposium on engineering under uncertainty : safety assessment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Gautam; ISEUSAM - 2012

    2013-01-01

    International Symposium on Engineering under Uncertainty: Safety Assessment and Management (ISEUSAM - 2012) is organized by Bengal Engineering and Science University, India during the first week of January 2012 at Kolkata.The primary aim of ISEUSAM 2012 is to provide a platform to facilitate the discussion for a better understanding and management of uncertainty and risk, encompassing various aspects of safety and reliability of engineering systems. The conference received an overwhelming response from national as well as international scholars, experts and delegates from different parts of the world.  Papers were received from authors of several countries including Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Italy, UAE, UK and USA, besides India. More than two hundred authors have shown their interest in the symposium. The Proceedings presents ninety two high quality papers which address issues of uncertainty encompassing various fields of engineering, i.e. uncertainty analysis and modelling, structural reliability...

  8. Environmental Engineering Curricula assessment in the global world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, Enrica; Catelani, Marcantonio; Manfrida, Giampaolo; Valdiserri, Juna

    2014-05-01

    Environmental engineers are technicians with specific expertise on the sustainability of human presence in the environment. Among other global dilemmas, to the environmental engineers it is often demanded to be able in developing systematic, innovative solutions in order to simultaneously meet water and energy needs, to build resilience to natural and technological disasters, to more accurately gauge and manage countries' greenhouse gas emissions. The general objectives of the Environmental Engineers are to establish actions of environmental sustainability as well as to verify progress toward global goals or international commitments. The globalization of challenges and problems to be faced, leads, in general, to the globalization of the engineering profession. In particular, since the environmental issues are without boundaries, and many and different are the involved professions and the competences, the environmental engineer must have a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to adequately answer to the demand of technical innovative knowledge at global scale. The environmental engineers, more and more, are involved in international projects were the effective collaboration requires not only the capacity to communicate in a common technical language, but also the assurance of an adequate and common level of technical competences, knowledge and understanding. The Europe-based EUR ACE system, currently operated by ENAEE - European Network for Accreditation of Engineering Education, can represent the proper framework and accreditation system in order to provide a set of measures to assess the quality of engineering degree programmes in Europe and abroad. In the global frame of the knowledge triangle: education-innovation-research, the accreditation and quality assurance of engineering curricula in Europe is discussed with reference to the Environmental engineering curricula, of the 1st and 2nd cycle, based on the European Credit Transfer System and in

  9. How important is drinking water exposure for the risks of engineered nanoparticles to consumers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiede, Karen; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Westerhoff, Paul;

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the potential for engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to contaminate the UK drinking water supplies and established the significance of the drinking water exposure route compared to other routes of human exposure. A review of the occurrence and quantities of ENPs in different...... of ENPs in raw water and treated drinking water, using a simple exposure model, were estimated and then qualitatively compared to available estimates for human exposure through other routes. A range of metal, metal oxide and organic-based ENPs were identified that have the potential to contaminate...

  10. Flame synthesis of nanoparticles - Applications in catalysis and product/process engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Jensen, Joakim R.; Mosleh, Majid;

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature flame processes for the production of nanoparticles can be applied in chemical product and process engineering. As an example one can produce well-defined spinel structures, e.g. zinc aluminate spinel (ZnAl2O4) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) with high specific surface...... area because the desired phase is formed directly without any need for post calcinations, as would be needed for, e.g., co-precipitated hydroxides. The production and characterization of other materials such as supported noble metals like Pt/TiO2 and Au/TiO2 will be outlined along with the optional...

  11. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  12. Nanoparticle emissions from a heavy-duty engine running on alternative diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Juha; Virtanen, Annele; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Murtonen, Timo

    2009-12-15

    We have studied the effect of three different fuels (fossil diesel fuel (EN590); rapeseed methyl ester (RME); and synthetic gas-to-liquid (GTL)) on heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Our main focus was on nanoparticle emissions of the engine. Our results show that the particle emissions from a modern diesel engine run with EN590, GTL, or RME consisted of two partly nonvolatile modes that were clearly separated in particle size. The concentration and geometric mean diameter of nonvolatile nucleation mode cores measured with RME were substantially greater than with the other fuels. The soot particle concentration and soot particle size were lowest with RME. With EN590 and GTL, a similar engine load dependence of the nonvolatile nucleation mode particle size and concentration imply a similar formation mechanism of the particles. For RME, the nonvolatile core particle size was larger and the concentration dependence on engine load was clearly different from that of EN590 and GTL. This indicates that the formation mechanism of the core particles is different for RME. This can be explained by differences in the fuel characteristics.

  13. Engineering Student Self-Assessment through Confidence-Based Scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen-Reed, Gigi; Reed, Kyle B.

    2015-01-01

    A vital aspect of an answer is the confidence that goes along with it. Misstating the level of confidence one has in the answer can have devastating outcomes. However, confidence assessment is rarely emphasized during typical engineering education. The confidence-based scoring method described in this study encourages students to both think about…

  14. Design of a Human Reliability Assessment model for structural engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, J.; Terwel, K.C.; Al-Jibouri, S.H.S.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that humans are the “weakest link” in structural design and construction processes. Despite this, few models are available to quantify human error within engineering processes. This paper demonstrates the use of a quantitative Human Reliability Assessment model within struct

  15. Investigation of nanoparticle additives to biodiesel for improvement of the performance of the exhaust emissions in a compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgur, Tayfun; Ozcanli, Mustafa; Aydin, Kadir [Cukurova University Engineering Architecture Faculty Mechanical Engineering Department (Turkey)], E-mail: tozgur@cu.edu.tr, email: ozcanli@cu.edu.tr, email: kdraydin@cu.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    Reformulated diesel fuels have been studied recently to achieve substantial reductions in harmful emissions by varying the physicochemical properties and combustion characteristics of the hydrocarbon fuel. This article investigates the effects of the addition of oxygen containing nanoparticle additives to biodiesel on fuel properties, engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics. Due to the addition of magnesium oxide (MgO) and silicon oxide (SiO2) nanoparticles at different dosing levels (25 and 50 ppm), it was observed that the density of biodiesel fuel does not show significant variation but the viscosity of biodiesel fuel was found to decrease. As a result of this study, optimum additive and addition dosage was determined as 25 ppm MgO and 25 ppm SiO2, engine emission values namely nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) were decreased and engine performance values slightly increased with the addition of nanoparticle additives at low extra cost of the biodiesel.

  16. Interior engineering of a viral nanoparticle and its tumor homing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Amy M; Shukla, Sourabh; Saxena, Pooja; Aljabali, Alaa A A; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Dey, Sourav; Mealy, Joshua E; Yang, Alice C; Evans, David J; Lomonossoff, George P; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2012-12-10

    The development of multifunctional nanoparticles for medical applications is of growing technological interest. A single formulation containing imaging and/or drug moieties that is also capable of preferential uptake in specific cells would greatly enhance diagnostics and treatments. There is growing interest in plant-derived viral nanoparticles (VNPs) and establishing new platform technologies based on these nanoparticles inspired by nature. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) serves as the standard model for VNPs. Although exterior surface modification is well-known and has been comprehensively studied, little is known of interior modification. Additional functionality conferred by the capability for interior engineering would be of great benefit toward the ultimate goal of targeted drug delivery. Here, we examined the capacity of empty CPMV (eCPMV) particles devoid of RNA to encapsulate a wide variety of molecules. We systematically investigated the conjugation of fluorophores, biotin affinity tags, large molecular weight polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and various peptides through targeting reactive cysteines displayed selectively on the interior surface. Several methods are described that mutually confirm specific functionalization of the interior. Finally, CPMV and eCPMV were labeled with near-infrared fluorophores and studied side-by-side in vitro and in vivo. Passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention effect and optical imaging were confirmed using a preclinical mouse model of colon cancer. The results of our studies lay the foundation for the development of the eCPMV platform in a range of biomedical applications.

  17. Teaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Lingard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To be successful in today's workplace, engineering and computer science students must possess high levels of teamwork skills. Unfortunately, most engineering programs provide little or no specific instruction in this area. This paper outlines an assessment-driven approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Working with the Industrial Advisory Board for the College, a set of performance criteria for teamwork was developed. This set of criteria was used to build an assessment instrument to measure the extent to which students are able to achieve the necessary skills. This set of criteria provides a clear basis for the development of an approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Furthermore, the results from the assessment can be used to adjust the teaching techniques to address the particular skills where students show some weaknesses. Although this effort is in the early stages, the approach seems promising and will be improved over time.

  18. Influence of real-world engine load conditions on nanoparticle emissions from a DPF and SCR equipped heavy-duty diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvengadam, Arvind; Besch, Marc C; Carder, Daniel K; Oshinuga, Adewale; Gautam, Mridul

    2012-02-07

    The experiments aimed at investigating the effect of real-world engine load conditions on nanoparticle emissions from a Diesel Particulate Filter and Selective Catalytic Reduction after-treatment system (DPF-SCR) equipped heavy-duty diesel engine. The results showed the emission of nucleation mode particles in the size range of 6-15 nm at conditions with high exhaust temperatures. A direct result of higher exhaust temperatures (over 380 °C) contributing to higher concentration of nucleation mode nanoparticles is presented in this study. The action of an SCR catalyst with urea injection was found to increase the particle number count by over an order of magnitude in comparison to DPF out particle concentrations. Engine operations resulting in exhaust temperatures below 380 °C did not contribute to significant nucleation mode nanoparticle concentrations. The study further suggests the fact that SCR-equipped engines operating within the Not-To-Exceed (NTE) zone over a critical exhaust temperature and under favorable ambient dilution conditions could contribute to high nanoparticle concentrations to the environment. Also, some of the high temperature modes resulted in DPF out accumulation mode (between 50 and 200 nm) particle concentrations an order of magnitude greater than typical background PM concentrations. This leads to the conclusion that sustained NTE operation could trigger high temperature passive regeneration which in turn would result in lower filtration efficiencies of the DPF that further contributes to the increased solid fraction of the PM number count.

  19. Nanoparticle toxicity assessment using an in vitro 3-D kidney organoid culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astashkina, Anna I; Jones, Clint F; Thiagarajan, Giridhar; Kurtzeborn, Kristen; Ghandehari, Hamid; Brooks, Benjamin D; Grainger, David W

    2014-08-01

    Nanocarriers and nanoparticles remain an intense pharmaceutical and medical imaging technology interest. Their entry into clinical use is hampered by the lack of reliable in vitro models that accurately predict in vivo toxicity. This study evaluates a 3-D kidney organoid proximal tubule culture to assess in vitro toxicity of the hydroxylated generation-5 PAMAM dendrimer (G5-OH) compared to previously published preclinical in vivo rodent nephrotoxicity data. 3-D kidney proximal tubule cultures were created using isolated murine proximal tubule fractions suspended in a biomedical grade hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel. Toxicity in these cultures to neutral G5-OH dendrimer nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles in vitro was assessed using clinical biomarker generation. Neutral PAMAM nanoparticle dendrimers elicit in vivo-relevant kidney biomarkers and cell viability in a 3-D kidney organoid culture that closely reflect toxicity markers reported in vivo in rodent nephrotoxicity models exposed to this same nanoparticle.

  20. Detection of Engineered Copper Nanoparticles in Soil Using Single Particle ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Navratilova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory efforts rely on nanometrology for the development and implementation of laws regarding the incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs into industrial and consumer products. Copper is currently one of the most common metals used in the constantly developing and expanding sector of nanotechnology. The use of copper nanoparticles in products, such as agricultural biocides, cosmetics and paints, is increasing. Copper based ENMs will eventually be released to the environment through the use and disposal of nano-enabled products, however, the detection of copper ENMs in environmental samples is a challenging task. Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (spICP-MS has been suggested as a powerful tool for routine nanometrology efforts. In this work, we apply a spICP-MS method for the detection of engineered copper nanomaterials in colloidal extracts from natural soil samples. Overall, copper nanoparticles were successfully detected in the soil colloidal extracts and the importance of dwell time, background removal, and sample dilution for method optimization and recovery maximization is highlighted.

  1. Detection of Engineered Copper Nanoparticles in Soil Using Single Particle ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Jana; Praetorius, Antonia; Gondikas, Andreas; Fabienke, Willi; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-12-01

    Regulatory efforts rely on nanometrology for the development and implementation of laws regarding the incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into industrial and consumer products. Copper is currently one of the most common metals used in the constantly developing and expanding sector of nanotechnology. The use of copper nanoparticles in products, such as agricultural biocides, cosmetics and paints, is increasing. Copper based ENMs will eventually be released to the environment through the use and disposal of nano-enabled products, however, the detection of copper ENMs in environmental samples is a challenging task. Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (spICP-MS) has been suggested as a powerful tool for routine nanometrology efforts. In this work, we apply a spICP-MS method for the detection of engineered copper nanomaterials in colloidal extracts from natural soil samples. Overall, copper nanoparticles were successfully detected in the soil colloidal extracts and the importance of dwell time, background removal, and sample dilution for method optimization and recovery maximization is highlighted.

  2. Seismic characterization of select engineered nanoparticles in essentially saturated glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabdeen, Mohamed Nihad

    2011-12-01

    A laboratory testing apparatus was developed for the study of seismic body wave propagation through nanoparticles dispersed in pore fluid that is essentially saturating glass beads. First, the responses of water-saturated glass bead specimens were studied to establish baseline signatures. Then the seismic responses in the presence of engineered nanoparticles of various concentrations dispersed in the pore fluid of the specimen chamber were studied to observe variances from baseline. The testing apparatus incorporates piezoceramic bender elements to actuate and receive seismic body waves through a cylindrical column filled with glass beads and back-saturated at ambient pressure with liquid. The system was calibrated in air, water, and water-saturated glass beads. System repeatability was checked after the system was saturated and flushed once to soak and seat the beads. The water-saturated glass bead specimens were tested for compression, shear, and spectral response, from which baseline signatures were established. Criteria were proposed to evaluate the detectability of nanoparticle dispersions. Nanoparticle dispersions of zinc oxide (nZnO), titanium dioxide (nTiO 2), and silver (nAg) were tested. The testing system showed itself to be capable of registering subtle changes in the response caused by varying consolidation states of the glass beads and pore fluid content. The presence of nZnO was detectable for all the test methods except compression wave arrivals, nAg was detectable only by compression wave amplitude and spectral response and nTiO2 showed only subtle detectability for spectral response.

  3. NIOSH field studies team assessment: Worker exposure to aerosolized metal oxide nanoparticles in a semiconductor fabrication facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Sara A; Neu-Baker, Nicole M; Eastlake, Adrienne C; Beaucham, Catherine C; Geraci, Charles L

    2016-11-01

    The ubiquitous use of engineered nanomaterials-particulate materials measuring approximately 1-100 nanometers (nm) on their smallest axis, intentionally engineered to express novel properties-in semiconductor fabrication poses unique issues for protecting worker health and safety. Use of new substances or substances in a new form may present hazards that have yet to be characterized for their acute or chronic health effects. Uncharacterized or emerging occupational health hazards may exist when there is insufficient validated hazard data available to make a decision on potential hazard and risk to exposed workers under condition of use. To advance the knowledge of potential worker exposure to engineered nanomaterials, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Nanotechnology Field Studies Team conducted an on-site field evaluation in collaboration with on-site researchers at a semiconductor research and development facility on April 18-21, 2011. The Nanomaterial Exposure Assessment Technique (2.0) was used to perform a complete exposure assessment. A combination of filter-based sampling and direct-reading instruments was used to identify, characterize, and quantify the potential for worker inhalation exposure to airborne alumina and amorphous silica nanoparticles associated with th e chemical mechanical planarization wafer polishing process. Engineering controls and work practices were evaluated to characterize tasks that might contribute to potential exposures and to assess existing engineering controls. Metal oxide structures were identified in all sampling areas, as individual nanoparticles and agglomerates ranging in size from 60 nm to >1,000 nm, with varying structure morphology, from long and narrow to compact. Filter-based samples indicated very little aerosolized material in task areas or worker breathing zone. Direct-reading instrument data indicated increased particle counts relative to background in the wastewater treatment area; however

  4. NIOSH Field Studies Team Assessment: Worker Exposure to Aerosolized Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in a Semiconductor Fabrication Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Sara A.; Neu-Baker, Nicole M.; Eastlake, Adrienne C.; Beaucham, Catherine C.; Geraci, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of engineered nanomaterials – particulate materials measuring approximately 1–100 nanometers (nm) on their smallest axis, intentionally engineered to express novel properties – in semiconductor fabrication poses unique issues for protecting worker health and safety. Use of new substances or substances in a new form may present hazards that have yet to be characterized for their acute or chronic health effects. Uncharacterized or emerging occupational health hazards may exist when there is insufficient validated hazard data available to make a decision on potential hazard and risk to exposed workers under condition of use. To advance the knowledge of potential worker exposure to engineered nanomaterials, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Nanotechnology Field Studies Team conducted an on-site field evaluation in collaboration with on-site researchers at a semiconductor research and development facility on April 18–21, 2011. The Nanomaterial Exposure Assessment Technique (2.0) was used to perform a complete exposure assessment. A combination of filter-based sampling and direct-reading instruments was used to identify, characterize, and quantify the potential for worker inhalation exposure to airborne alumina and amorphous silica nanoparticles associated with the chemical mechanical planarization wafer polishing process. Engineering controls and work practices were evaluated to characterize tasks that might contribute to potential exposures and to assess existing engineering controls. Metal oxide structures were identified in all sampling areas, as individual nanoparticles and agglomerates ranging in size from 60nm to >1,000nm, with varying structure morphology, from long and narrow to compact. Filter-based samples indicated very little aerosolized material in task areas or worker breathing zone. Direct-reading instrument data indicated increased particle counts relative to background in the wastewater treatment area

  5. Assessment of an Anomaly Detector for Jet Engine Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Borguet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of module performance analysis is to reliably assess the health of the main components of an aircraft engine. A predictive maintenance strategy can leverage this information to increase operability and safety as well as to reduce costs. Degradation undergone by an engine can be divided into gradual deterioration and accidental events. Kalman filters have proven very efficient at tracking progressive deterioration but are poor performers in the face of abrupt events. Adaptive estimation is considered as an appropriate solution to this deficiency. This paper reports the evaluation of the detection capability of an adaptive diagnosis tool on the basis of simulated scenarios that may be encountered during the operation of a commercial turbofan engine. The diagnosis tool combines a Kalman filter and a secondary system that monitors the residuals. This auxiliary component implements a generalised likelihood ratio test in order to detect abrupt events.

  6. Nanoparticles Made From Xyloglucan-Block-Polycaprolactone Copolymers: Safety Assessment for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarino, Letícia; Loch-Neckel, Gecioni; Dos Santos Bubniak, Lorena; Ourique, Fabiana; Otsuka, Issei; Halila, Sami; Curi Pedrosa, Rozangela; Santos-Silva, Maria Cláudia; Lemos-Senna, Elenara; Curti Muniz, Edvani; Borsali, Redouane

    2015-09-01

    Xyloglucan-block-polycaprolactone (XGO-PCL) copolymer nanoparticles have been proposed as nanocarriers for drug delivery. However, the possible harmful effects of exposure to nanoparticles still remain a concern. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of XGO-PCL nanoparticles using in vitro and in vivo assays. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies were conducted on MRC-5 human fetal lung fibroblast cells upon exposure to XGO-PCL nanoparticles. No significant reduction in the cell viability and no DNA damage were observed at the different concentrations tested. Erythrocyte toxicity was assessed by the incubation of nanoparticles with human blood. XGO-PCL nanoparticles induced a hemolytic ratio of less than 1%, indicating good blood compatibility. Finally, the subacute toxicity of XGO-PCL nanoparticles (10 mg/kg/day) was evaluated in BALB/c mice when administered orally or intraperitoneally for 14 days. Results of the in vivo toxicity study showed no clinical signs of toxicity, mortality, weight loss, or hematological and biochemical alterations after treatment with nanoparticles. Also, microscopic analysis of the major organs revealed no histopathological abnormalities, corroborating the previous results. Thus, it can be concluded that XGO-PCL nanoparticles induced no effect indicative of toxicity, indicating their potential use as drug delivery systems.

  7. Eudragit nanoparticles containing genistein: formulation, development, and bioavailability assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jingling Tang2, Na Xu1,2, Hongyu Ji1, Hongmei Liu1, Zhiyong Wang1, Linhua Wu1,2 1Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Key Laboratory of College in Heilongjiang Province; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China Background: Genistein, one of the major isoflavones, has received great attention as a phytoestrogen and potential cancer chemoprevention agent. However, the dissolution and bioavailability of genistein from solid oral preparations is low due to its poor water solubility. Methods: In order to improve the oral bioavailability of genistein, genistein nanoparticles were prepared by the nanoprecipitation technique using Eudragit® E100 as carriers and an optimized formulation of mass ratio (genistein:Eudragit E100, 1:10. The mean particle size of genistein nanoparticles was approximately 120 nm when diluted 100 times with distilled water. The drug-loaded nanoparticles were spherical on observation by transmission electric microscopy. Results: Encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the genistein nanoparticles were approximately 50.61% and 5.02%, respectively. Release of drug from the genistein nanoparticles was two times greater than that from the conventional capsules. After administration of genistein suspension or genistein nanoparticles at a single dose of 100 mg/kg to fasted rats, the relative bioavailability of genistein from the nanoparticles compared with the reference suspension was 241.8%. Conclusion: These results suggested that a nanoparticle system is a potentially promising formulation for the efficient delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs by oral administration. Keywords: bioavailability, dissolution, genistein, nanoparticles, nanoprecipitation technique

  8. Coagulation of combustion generated nanoparticles and their measurement behind vehicle engines: can they play a role as atmospheric pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotheer, H.-H.; Gonzalez Baquet, T.; Thierley, M.; Pokorny, H.; Aigner, M.

    2005-06-01

    Based on photoionisation mass spectrometry two types of experiments were carried out. (i) In a fast flow reactor coupled to a low pressure flame as a particle source, rate coefficients for the coagulation of primary nanoparticles were measured through variation of the reactor residence time. The results are kc (350K) = 3.5x10-10cm3/s and kc (573K) = 1.1x10-9cm3/s, i.e. very high rate coefficients. It was also shown that coagulated nanoparticles can have masses beyond 50ku, corresponding to equivalent diameters between 4 to 5nm. These particles are easily fragmented during photoionisation. (ii) Using a second and mobile photoionisation mass spectrometer equipped with a fast flow inlet system, measurements were carried out behind three different vehicle engines, a two-stroke scooter engine, a four-stroke motorbike engine and a DI (direct injection) gasoline research engine. In all cases ion signals around 1000u were found that are clearly dependent on engine conditions. In the case of the DI engine, they correlate with the smoke number. These signals cannot be explained by PAHs due to their low volatility at the respective masses. Major contributions of soot or droplet fragmentation were ruled out through additional experiments using a heated inlet line and a filter. Consequently, these signals are interpreted as fragments of coagulated nanoparticles.

  9. Synthesis of Hollow Gold-Silver Alloyed Nanoparticles: A "Galvanic Replacement" Experiment for Chemistry and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Samir V.; Gohman, Taylor D.; Miller, Emily K.; Chen, Jingyi

    2015-01-01

    The rapid academic and industrial development of nanotechnology has led to its implementation in laboratory teaching for undergraduate-level chemistry and engineering students. This laboratory experiment introduces the galvanic replacement reaction for synthesis of hollow metal nanoparticles and investigates the optical properties of these…

  10. Novel magnetic fibrin hydrogel scaffolds containing thrombin and growth factors conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv-Polat O

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ofra Ziv-Polat1, Hadas Skaat1, Abraham Shahar2, Shlomo Margel11Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel; 2NVR Research Ltd, Nes-Ziona 74031, IsraelAbstract: Novel tissue-engineered magnetic fibrin hydrogel scaffolds were prepared by the interaction of thrombin-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with fibrinogen. In addition, stabilization of basal fibroblast growth factor (bFGF was achieved by the covalent and physical conjugation of the growth factor to the magnetic nanoparticles. Adult nasal olfactory mucosa (NOM cells were seeded in the transparent fibrin scaffolds in the absence or presence of the free or conjugated bFGF-iron oxide nanoparticles. The conjugated bFGF enhanced significantly the growth and differentiation of the NOM cells in the fibrin scaffolds, compared to the same or even five times higher concentration of the free bFGF. In the presence of the bFGF-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles, the cultured NOM cells proliferated and formed a three-dimensional interconnected network composed mainly of tapered bipolar cells. The magnetic properties of these matrices are due to the integration of the thrombin- and bFGF-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles within the scaffolds. The magnetic properties of these scaffolds may be used in future work for various applications, such as magnetic resonance visualization of the scaffolds after implantation and reloading the scaffolds via magnetic forces with bioactive agents, eg, growth factors bound to the iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles.Keywords: thrombin, fibroblast growth factor, fibrin scaffold, iron oxide nanoparticles, tissue engineering, magnetism, bioactive nanoparticle

  11. Assessing preferential flow by simultaneously injecting nanoparticle and chemical tracers

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    The exact manner in which preferential (e.g., much faster than average) flow occurs in the subsurface through small fractures or permeable connected pathways of other kinds is important to many processes but is difficult to determine, because most chemical tracers diffuse quickly enough from small flow channels that they appear to move more uniformly through the rock than they actually do. We show how preferential flow can be assessed by injecting 2 to 5 nm carbon particles (C-Dots) and an inert KBr chemical tracer at different flow rates into a permeable core channel that is surrounded by a less permeable matrix in laboratory apparatus of three different designs. When the KBr tracer has a long enough transit through the system to diffuse into the matrix, but the C-Dot tracer does not, the C-Dot tracer arrives first and the KBr tracer later, and the separation measures the degree of preferential flow. Tracer sequestration in the matrix can be estimated with a Peclet number, and this is useful for experiment design. A model is used to determine the best fitting core and matrix dispersion parameters and refine estimates of the core and matrix porosities. Almost the same parameter values explain all experiments. The methods demonstrated in the laboratory can be applied to field tests. If nanoparticles can be designed that do not stick while flowing through the subsurface, the methods presented here could be used to determine the degree of fracture control in natural environments, and this capability would have very wide ranging value and applicability.

  12. Comparative DNA damage and transcriptomic effects of engineered nanoparticles in human lung cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide engineered nanomaterials were assessed for their ability to induce cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), various types of DNA damage, and transcriptional changes in human respiratory BEAS-2B cells exposed in vitro at se...

  13. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  14. How important is drinking water exposure for the risks of engineered nanoparticles to consumers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiede, Karen; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    drinking waters. Worst case predicted concentrations in drinking waters were in the low- to sub-µg/l range and more realistic estimates were tens of ng/l or less. For the majority of product types, human exposure via drinking water was predicted to be less important than exposure via other routes......This study explored the potential for engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to contaminate the UK drinking water supplies and established the significance of the drinking water exposure route compared to other routes of human exposure. A review of the occurrence and quantities of ENPs in different...... product types on the UK market as well as release scenarios, their possible fate and behaviour in raw water and during drinking water treatment was performed. Based on the available data, all the ENPs which are likely to reach water sources were identified and categorized. Worst case concentrations...

  15. Manufacturing Techniques and Surface Engineering of Polymer Based Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of polymer based nanoparticles as a drug delivery carrier via pharmaceutical nano/microencapsulation has greatly promoted the development of nano- and micro-medicine in the past few decades. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA and chitosan, which are biodegradable and biocompatible polymers, have been approved by both the Food & Drug Administration (FDA and European Medicine Agency (EMA, making them ideal biomaterials that can be advanced from laboratory development to clinical oral and parental administrations. PLGA and chitosan encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs have successfully been developed as new oral drug delivery systems with demonstrated high efficacy. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the fabrication of PLGA and chitosan particulate systems using nano/microencapsulation methods, the current progress and the future outlooks of the nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Especially, we focus on the formulations and nano/micro-encapsulation techniques using top-down techniques. It also addresses how the different phases including the organic and aqueous ones in the emulsion system interact with each other and subsequently influence the properties of the drug delivery system. Besides, surface modification strategies which can effectively engineer intrinsic physicochemical properties are summarised. Finally, future perspectives and potential directions of PLGA and chitosan nano/microencapsulated drug systems are outlined.

  16. Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles for Direct Delivery of Tumor Antigens to Lymph Node and Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Ram; Ko, Ho Kyung; Ryu, Ju Hee; Ahn, Keum Young; Lee, Young-Ho; Oh, Se Jin; Na, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Woo; Byun, Youngro; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) to lymph nodes (LNs) is essential to eliciting robust immune response for cancer immunotherapy but still remains unsolved. Herein, we evaluated the direct LN-targeting performance of four different protein nanoparticles with different size, shape, and origin [Escherichia coli DNA binding protein (DPS), Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome (PTS), hepatitis B virus capsid (HBVC), and human ferritin heavy chain (hFTN)] in live mice, using an optical fluorescence imaging system. Based on the imaging results, hFTN that shows rapid LN targeting and prolonged retention in LNs was chosen as a carrier of the model TSA [red fluorescence protein (RFP)], and the flexible surface architecture of hFTN was engineered to densely present RFPs on the hFTN surface through genetic modification of subunit protein of hFTN. The RFP-modified hFTN rapidly targeted LNs, sufficiently exposed RFPs to LN immune cells during prolonged period of retention in LNs, induced strong RFP-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, and notably inhibited RFP-expressing melanoma tumor growth in live mice. This suggests that the strategy using protein nanoparticles as both TSA-carrying scaffold and anti-cancer vaccine holds promise for clinically effective immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:27725782

  17. Engineered Nanoparticles as Potential Food Contaminants and Their Toxicity to Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaomo; Nguyen, Trang H D; Lin, Mengshi; Mustapha, Azlin

    2016-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), such as metallic or metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs), have gained much attention in recent years. Increasing use of ENPs in various areas may lead to the release of ENPs into the environment and cause the contamination of agricultural and food products by ENPs. In this study, we selected two important ENPs (zinc oxide [ZnO] and silver [Ag] NPs) as potential food contaminants and investigated their toxicity via an in vitro model using Caco-2 cells. The physical properties of ENPs and their effects on Caco-2 cells were characterized by electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) techniques. Results demonstrate that a significant inhibition of cell viability was observed after a 24-h of exposure of Caco-2 cells to 3-, 6-, and 12-mM ZnO NPs or 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3-mM Ag NPs. The noticeable changes of cells include the alteration in cell shape, abnormal nuclear structure, membrane blebbing, and cytoplasmic deterioration. The toxicity of ZnO NPs, but not that of Ag NPs after exposure to simulated gastric fluid, significantly decreased. Scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO and Ag NPs penetrated the membrane of Caco-2 cells. EDS results also confirm the presence of NPs in the cytoplasm of the cells. This study demonstrates that ZnO and Ag NPs have cytotoxic effects and can inhibit the growth of Caco-2 cells.

  18. Bisphosphonate-adsorbed ceramic nanoparticles increase bone formation in an injectable carrier for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegan L Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB is a sugar-based carrier. We have previously applied SAIB as a minimally invasive system for the co-delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 and found synergy when co-delivering zoledronic acid (ZA and hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles. Alternative bioceramics were investigated in a murine SAIB/rhBMP-2 injection model. Neither beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP nor Bioglass (BG 45S5 had a significant effect on bone volume (BV alone or in combination with the ZA. 14C-labelled ZA binding assays showed particle size and ceramic composition affected binding with nano-HA > micro-HA > TCP > BG. Micro-HA and nano-HA increased BV in a rat model of rhBMP-2/SAIB injection (+278% and +337%, and BV was further increased with ZA–adsorbed micro-HA and nano-HA (+530% and +889%. These data support the use of ZA–adsorbed nanoparticle-sized HA as an optimal additive for the SAIB/rhBMP-2 injectable system for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Impedance spectroscopy studies of surface engineered TiO2 nanoparticles using slurry technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sasidhar Siddabattuni; Sri Harsha Akella; Abilash Gangula; Sandeep Patnaik

    2015-09-01

    Dielectric analysis of nanometre range size ceramic particles like TiO2 is very important in the understanding of the performance and design of their polymer nanocomposites for energy storage and other applications. In recent times, impedance spectroscopy is shown to be a very powerful tool to investigate the dielectric characteristics of not only sintered and/or pelleted ceramic materials but also particulates/powders (both micron-sized and nano-sized) using the slurry technique. In the present work, impedance spectroscopy employing slurry methodology was extended to study the influence of various chemical groups on the nano-TiO2 surface on the electrical resistivity and the dielectric permittivity of nanoparticles. In this regard, different organophosphate ligands with linear, aromatic and extended aromatic nature of organic groups were employed to remediate the surface effects of nanoTiO2. It was observed that the type of chemical nature of surface engineered nanoparticles’ surface played significant role in controlling the surface electrical resistivity of nanoparticles. Surface passivated nanoTiO2 yielded dielectric permittivity of about 70–80, respectively.

  20. Self-Regulation and Rubrics Assessment in Structural Engineering Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Consuelo Sáiz Manzanares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present-day university systems need to educate graduates who are confident and highly independent, attributes that are especially relevant to engineering. We need to develop active methods that can analyze the prior knowledge of students and that impart teaching based on self-regulation and self-assessment by the student. In this study, we work with a sample of 116 students of architecture following a Structural Engineering subject module (61 in the experimental group and 55 in the control group. The objectives of the investigation are (1 to test whether significant differences exist in the knowledge of students after a training program in self-regulation and (2 to test whether the use of rubrics will improve the perceptions of students with regard to their own knowledge. We found that students trained in self-regulation methodologies improved their procedural knowledge in the field of structural engineering. Likewise, student self-perceptions of their own knowledge increased in relation to the design and expert assessment of structural elements and the graphic representation of constructive elements.

  1. Onboard measurements of nanoparticles from a SCR-equipped marine diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Åsa M; Fridell, Erik; Westerlund, Jonathan; Hallquist, Mattias

    2013-01-15

    In this study nanoparticle emissions have been characterized onboard a ship with focus on number, size, and volatility. Measurements were conducted on one of the ship's four main 12,600 kW medium-speed diesel engines which use low sulfur marine residual fuel and have a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system for NO(X) abatement. The particles were measured after the SCR with an engine exhaust particle sizer spectrometer (EEPS), giving particle number and mass distributions in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. The thermal characteristics of the particles were analyzed using a volatility tandem DMA system (VTDMA). A dilution ratio of 450-520 was used which is similar to the initial real-world dilution. At a stable engine load of 75% of the maximum rated power, and after dilution and cooling of the exhaust gas, there was a bimodal number size distribution, with a major peak at ∼10 nm and a smaller peak at around 30-40 nm. The mass distribution peaked around 20 nm and at 50-60 nm. The emission factor for particle number, EF(PN), for an engine load of 75% in the open-sea was found to be 10.4 ± 1.6 × 10(16) (kg fuel)(-1) and about 50% of the particles by number were found to have a nonvolatile core at 250 °C. Additionally, 20 nm particles consist of ∼40% of nonvolatile material by volume (evaporative temperature 250 °C), while the particles with a particle diameter SCR and fuel with low sulfur content.

  2. Critical assessment of the evidence for striped nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, Julian; Sweetman, Adam; Djuranovic, Predrag; Guo, Quanmin; Granwehr, Josef; Lévy, Raphaël; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-01-01

    There is now a significant body of literature in which it is claimed that stripes form in the ligand shell of suitably functionalised Au nanoparticles. This stripe morphology has been proposed to strongly affect the physicochemical and biochemical properties of the particles. We critique the published evidence for striped nanoparticles in detail, with a particular focus on the interpretation of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) data (as this is the only technique which ostensibly provides direct evidence for the presence of stripes). Through a combination of an exhaustive re-analysis of the original data with new experimental measurements of a simple control sample comprising entirely unfunctionalised particles, we conclusively show that all of the STM evidence for striped nanoparticles published to date can instead be explained by a combination of well-known instrumental artefacts, strong observer bias, and/or improper data acquisition/analysis protocols. We also critically re-examine the evidence for the...

  3. Environmental value engineering (EVE): a green building performance assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudebush, W. H. [Bowling Green Univ., College of Technology, OH (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Establishing criteria for assessing green building performance is discussed. Performance criteria identified include building energy consumption, building material reduction, pollution minimization, indoor air quality, waste reduction, and occupant performance/output maximization. This paper specifically focuses on the use of an assessment methodology called environmental value engineering to maximize building performance at the least cost to the environment, i.e. the least quantity of inputs required per unit of building function. The inputs are grouped into four categories of: environment, fuel energy, goods, and services. The assessment is conducted at various points in the building`s life cycle (natural resource formation, exploration and extraction, material production, construction, use, demolition, natural resource recycling and disposal), with the four categories of inputs accounted for during each of the life cycle phases. Environmental value engineering is based on the EMERGY Analysis methodology developed at the University of Florida, and the ASTM (1993) UNIFORMAT of building subsystem organization. Total EMERGY per unit of function is considered to be the measure of building performance. The methodology can be used to compare traditional building performance to green building performance towards sustainable development. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Engineering the surface of rutile TiO2 nanoparticles with quantum pits towards excellent lithium storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Jinglu; Fang, Fang; Huang, Guoyong;

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the surface structure of nanomaterials is of great importance for applications in energy conversion and storage. Herein, unique rutile TiO2 nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a facile solution and subsequent thermal annealing method. Each particle surface has been...... etched to form pits with an average size of 2-5 nm, producing abundant steps and vacancies. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the yielded rutile TiO2 nanoparticle electrode exhibits a maximum specific capacity of ∼145 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.5C (1C = 335 A g-1...

  5. Research unit INTERNANO: Mobility, aging and functioning of engineered inorganic nanoparticles at the aquatic-terrestrial interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen; Metreveli, George; Baumann, Thomas; Klitzke, Sondra; Lang, Friederike; Manz, Werner; Nießner, Reinhard; Schulz, Ralf; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Engineered inorganic nanoparticles (EINP) are expected to pass the wastewater-river-topsoil-groundwater pathway. Despite their increasing release, the processes governing the EINP aging and the changes in functionality in the environment are up to now largely unknown. The objective of the interdisciplinary research unit INTERNANO funded by the DFG is to identify the processes relevant for the fate of EINP and EINP-associated pollutants in the interfacial zone between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The research unit consists of six subprojects and combines knowledge from aquatic and terrestrial sciences as well as from microbiology, ecotoxicology, physicochemistry, soil chemistry and soil physics. For the identification of key processes we will consider compartment specific flow conditions, physicochemistry and biological activity. Situations representative for a floodplain system are simulated using micromodels (μm scale) as well as incubation, soil column and joint laboratory stream microcosm experiments. These results will be transferred to a joint aquatic-terrestrial model system on EINP aging, transport and functioning across the aquatic-terrestrial transition zone. EINP isolation and characterization will be carried out via a combination of chromatographic, light scattering and microscopic methods including dynamic light scattering, elemental analysis, hydrodynamic radius chromatography, field flow fractionation as well as atomic force microscopy, Raman microscopy and electron microscopy. INTERNANO generates fundamental aquatic-terrestrial process knowledge, which will help to evaluate the environmental significance of the EINP at aquatic-terrestrial interfaces. Thus, INTERNANO provides a scientific basis to assess and predict the environmental impact of EINP release into the environment.

  6. Assessment of the cytotoxicity of aluminium oxide nanoparticles on selected mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziun, E; Dudkiewicz Wilczyńska, J; Książek, I; Nowak, K; Anuszewska, E L; Kunicki, A; Olszyna, A; Ząbkowski, T

    2011-12-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology raises both enthusiasm and anxiety among researchers, which is related to the safety use of the manufactured materials. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aluminium oxide nanoparticles on the viability of selected mammalian cells in vitro. The aluminium oxide nanoparticles were characterised using SEM and BET analyses. Based on Zeta (ζ) potential measurements and particle size distribution, the tested suspensions of aluminium oxide nanoparticles in water and nutrient solutions with or without FBS were classified as unstable. Cell viability, the degree of apoptosis induction and nanoparticles internalization into the cells were assessed after 24 h of cell exposure to Al2O3 nanoparticles. Our results confirm the ability of aluminium oxide nanoparticles to penetrate through the membranes of L929 and BJ cells. Despite this, there was no significant increase in apoptosis or decrease in cell viability observed, suggesting that aluminium oxide nanoparticles in the tested range of concentrations has no cytotoxic effects on the selected mammalian cells.

  7. Structural and Biological Assessment of Zinc Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Liana Popa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current research work was to study the physicochemical and biological properties of synthesized zinc doped hydroxyapatite (ZnHAp nanoparticles with Zn concentrations xZn=0 (HAp, xZn=0.07 (7ZnHAp, and xZn=0.1 (10ZnHAp for potential use in biological applications. The morphology, size, compositions, and incorporation of zinc into hydroxyapatite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Raman scattering, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS. In addition, the cytotoxicity of ZnHAp nanoparticles was tested on both E. coli bacteria and human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. The results showed that ZnHAp nanoparticles (HAp, 7ZnHAp, and 10ZnHAp have slightly elongated morphologies with average diameters between 25 nm and 18 nm. On the other hand, a uniform and homogeneous distribution of the constituent elements (calcium, phosphorus, zinc, and oxygen in the ZnHAp powder was noticed. Besides, FTIR and Raman analyses confirmed the proper hydroxyapatite structure of the synthesized ZnHAp nanoparticles with the signature of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl groups. Moreover, it can be concluded that Zn doping at the tested concentrations is not inducing a specific prokaryote or eukaryote toxicity in HAp compounds.

  8. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  9. Characterizing the Transport of a Novel, Engineered Nanoparticle for Use in Remediation of Hydrophobic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J. E.; Miller, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (MSCKs) were originally engineered to aid in the cleanup of oil spills. These polymeric particles are spherical and approximately 70 nm in diameter. MSCKs have a hydrophobic shell and hydrophilic core which encapsulates suspended iron oxide nanoparticles, rendering them magnetic. MSCKs operate like discrete surfactant packets: increasing the mobility and apparent solubility of hydrophobic species, but do so within the confines of discrete particles which can then be recovered by filtration or magnetic removal. MSCKs accomplish this via sequestration of hydrophobic species from through the hydrophilic shell and into the hydrophobic core where hydrocarbon contaminants are entropically stabilized. In batch reactor testing, MSCKs have been shown to sequester crude oil up to ten times their mass (1000 mg of oil per 100 mg of MSCKs). This study examines the transport characteristics and contaminant sequestration capabilities of MSCKs in saturated porous media, in order to establish their potential for use in groundwater remediation. Baseline MSCK transport parameters were determined via one dimensional impulse column experiments. MSCKs were readily transported in saturated sand, with an average recovery rate of 99%. In the presence of 10% clay particles, recovery was reduced to 68%. MSCKs were able to completely sequester an aqueous phase pollutant (8.7 mg/L m-xylene), although it further reduced their recovery rate to 61% in sand and 53% in clay. The presence of a free phase contaminant (5% of pore space occupied by mineral oil) reduced MSCKs recovery in sand to 53%. The MSCKs recovered in the effluent had sequestered the mineral at ratios far below their capability (3-10 mg of oil per 100 mg of MSCKs). Overall, this study indicated that MSCKs show a number of promising attributes for use in remediation. However, further manipulation of their chemical and morphological properties is needed, with the objective of

  10. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Stability Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Lee, Erik; Hulka, James R.; Casiano, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The J2X Gas Generator engine design specifications include dynamic, spontaneous, and broadband combustion stability requirements. These requirements are verified empirically based high frequency chamber pressure measurements and analyses. Dynamic stability is determined with the dynamic pressure response due to an artificial perturbation of the combustion chamber pressure (bomb testing), and spontaneous and broadband stability are determined from the dynamic pressure responses during steady operation starting at specified power levels. J2X Workhorse Gas Generator testing included bomb tests with multiple hardware configurations and operating conditions, including a configuration used explicitly for engine verification test series. This work covers signal processing techniques developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to help assess engine design stability requirements. Dynamic stability assessments were performed following both the CPIA 655 guidelines and a MSFC in-house developed statistical-based approach. The statistical approach was developed to better verify when the dynamic pressure amplitudes corresponding to a particular frequency returned back to pre-bomb characteristics. This was accomplished by first determining the statistical characteristics of the pre-bomb dynamic levels. The pre-bomb statistical characterization provided 95% coverage bounds; these bounds were used as a quantitative measure to determine when the post-bomb signal returned to pre-bomb conditions. The time for post-bomb levels to acceptably return to pre-bomb levels was compared to the dominant frequency-dependent time recommended by CPIA 655. Results for multiple test configurations, including stable and unstable configurations, were reviewed. Spontaneous stability was assessed using two processes: 1) characterization of the ratio of the peak response amplitudes to the excited chamber acoustic mode amplitudes and 2) characterization of the variability of the peak response

  11. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Barbara J.; West, Stephanie G.; Jones, Olga G.; Kerr, Dorothy A.; Bieri, Rita A.; Sanderson, Nancy L.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

  12. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Edward S.; Keating, John J.

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

  13. Integrating LCA and EHS expertise in the assessment of nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Stig Irving; Hankin, Steve; Chaudry, Qasim

    2009-01-01

    DTU with their expertise in LCA have joined forces with IOM in two nanotechnology-related projects, one of which additionally involves and is lead by FERA. The first project, Nancore, includes the evaluation of health risks and environmental impacts over the life cycle concurrently with the development of new production technology for lightweight materials used in e.g. wind turbine blades. As the new technology involves the use of nanoparticles, the health and safety workpackage is needed to ...

  14. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liau Ian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  15. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Liau, Ian; Huang, G. Steve

    2009-08-01

    The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  16. Coagulation of combustion generated nanoparticles and their measurement behind vehicle engines: can they play a role as atmospheric pollutants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-H. Grotheer

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on photoionisation mass spectrometry two types of experiments were carried out. (i In a fast flow reactor coupled to a low pressure flame as a particle source, rate coefficients for the coagulation of primary nanoparticles were measured through variation of the reactor residence time. The results are kc (350K = 3.5x10-10cm3/s and kc (573K = 1.1x10-9cm3/s, i.e. very high rate coefficients. It was also shown that coagulated nanoparticles can have masses beyond 50ku, corresponding to equivalent diameters between 4 to 5nm. These particles are easily fragmented during photoionisation. (ii Using a second and mobile photoionisation mass spectrometer equipped with a fast flow inlet system, measurements were carried out behind three different vehicle engines, a two-stroke scooter engine, a four-stroke motorbike engine and a DI (direct injection gasoline research engine. In all cases ion signals around 1000u were found that are clearly dependent on engine conditions. In the case of the DI engine, they correlate with the smoke number. These signals cannot be explained by PAHs due to their low volatility at the respective masses. Major contributions of soot or droplet fragmentation were ruled out through additional experiments using a heated inlet line and a filter. Consequently, these signals are interpreted as fragments of coagulated nanoparticles.

  17. Critical assessment of the evidence for striped nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Stirling

    Full Text Available There is now a significant body of literature which reports that stripes form in the ligand shell of suitably functionalised Au nanoparticles. This stripe morphology has been proposed to strongly affect the physicochemical and biochemical properties of the particles. We critique the published evidence for striped nanoparticles in detail, with a particular focus on the interpretation of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM data (as this is the only technique which ostensibly provides direct evidence for the presence of stripes. Through a combination of an exhaustive re-analysis of the original data, in addition to new experimental measurements of a simple control sample comprising entirely unfunctionalised particles, we show that all of the STM evidence for striped nanoparticles published to date can instead be explained by a combination of well-known instrumental artefacts, or by issues with data acquisition/analysis protocols. We also critically re-examine the evidence for the presence of ligand stripes which has been claimed to have been found from transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, small angle neutron scattering experiments, and computer simulations. Although these data can indeed be interpreted in terms of stripe formation, we show that the reported results can alternatively be explained as arising from a combination of instrumental artefacts and inadequate data analysis techniques.

  18. Changing the dose metric for inhalation toxicity studies: short-term study in rats with engineered aerosolized amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayes, Christie M; Reed, Kenneth L; Glover, Kyle P; Swain, Keith A; Ostraat, Michele L; Donner, E Maria; Warheit, David B

    2010-03-01

    Inhalation toxicity and exposure assessment studies for nonfibrous particulates have traditionally been conducted using particle mass measurements as the preferred dose metric (i.e., mg or microg/m(3)). However, currently there is a debate regarding the appropriate dose metric for nanoparticle exposure assessment studies in the workplace. The objectives of this study were to characterize aerosol exposures and toxicity in rats of freshly generated amorphous silica (AS) nanoparticles using particle number dose metrics (3.7 x 10(7) or 1.8 x 10(8) particles/cm(3)) for 1- or 3-day exposures. In addition, the role of particle size (d(50) = 37 or 83 nm) on pulmonary toxicity and genotoxicity endpoints was assessed at several postexposure time points. A nanoparticle reactor capable of producing, de novo synthesized, aerosolized amorphous silica nanoparticles for inhalation toxicity studies was developed for this study. SiO(2) aerosol nanoparticle synthesis occurred via thermal decomposition of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The reactor was designed to produce aerosolized nanoparticles at two different particle size ranges, namely d(50) = approximately 30 nm and d(50) = approximately 80 nm; at particle concentrations ranging from 10(7) to 10(8) particles/cm(3). AS particle aerosol concentrations were consistently generated by the reactor. One- or 3-day aerosol exposures produced no significant pulmonary inflammatory, genotoxic, or adverse lung histopathological effects in rats exposed to very high particle numbers corresponding to a range of mass concentrations (1.8 or 86 mg/m(3)). Although the present study was a short-term effort, the methodology described herein can be utilized for longer-term inhalation toxicity studies in rats such as 28-day or 90-day studies. The expansion of the concept to subchronic studies is practical, due, in part, to the consistency of the nanoparticle generation method.

  19. Assessment of nanoparticle exposure in nanosilica handling process: including characteristics of nanoparticles leaking from a vacuum cleaner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boowook; Kim, Hyunwook; Yu, Il Je

    2014-01-01

    Nanosilica is one of the most widely used nanomaterials across the world. However, their assessment data on the occupational exposure to nanoparticles is insufficient. The present study performed an exposure monitoring in workplace environments where synthetic powders are prepared using fumed nanosilica. Furthermore, after it was observed during exposure monitoring that nanoparticles were emitted through leakage in a vacuum cleaner (even with a HEPA-filter installed in it), the properties of the leaked nanoparticles were also investigated. Workers were exposed to high-concentration nanosilica emitted into the air while pouring it into a container or transferring the container. The use of a vacuum cleaner with a leak (caused by an inadequate sealing) was found to be the origin of nanosilica dispersion in the indoor air. While the particle size of the nanosilica that emitted into the air (during the handling of nanosilica by a worker) was mostly over 100 nm or several microns (µm) due to the coagulation of particles, the size of nanosilica that leaked out of vacuum cleaner was almost similar to the primary size (mode diameter 11.5 nm). Analysis of area samples resulted in 20% (60% in terms of peak concentration) less than the analysis of the personals sample.

  20. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 9000 Mayaguez, PR 00681 PR (United States); Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1006 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32603 (United States); Orange, François [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Guinel, Maxime J.-F. [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and polystyrene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory–Huggins interaction parameters. - Highlights: • Oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were dispersed in polymer melts. • MNPs dispersed well in polybutadiene but not in polystyrene. • Dynamic magnetic susceptibility (DMS) measurements assessed presence of aggregates. • DMS predictions were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. • The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter correlated with MNP dispersion.

  1. Engineering nanofluid electrodes: controlling rheology and electrochemical activity of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Sujat [Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division (United States); Moazzen, Elahe; Aryal, Shankar; Segre, Carlo U. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Physics Department & CSRRI (United States); Timofeeva, Elena V., E-mail: etimofeeva@gmail.com [Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Nanofluid electrodes or nanoelectrofuels have significant potential in the field of flow batteries, as at high loadings of solid battery active nanoparticles, their energy density can be orders of magnitude higher than in traditional redox flow battery electrolytes. Nanofluid electrodes must have a manageable viscosity at high particle concentrations (i.e., easily pumpable) and exhibit good electrochemical activity toward charge and discharge reactions. Engineering of such nanofluid electrodes involves development of new and unique approaches to stabilization of nanoparticle suspensions. In this work, we demonstrate a surface modification approach that allows controlling the viscosity of nanofluids at high solid loading, while simultaneously retaining electrochemical activity of the nanoparticles. A scalable single step procedure for the surface grafting of small organic molecules onto iron (III) oxide nanoparticles (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, maghemite, 40–150 nm) is demonstrated. Modified iron oxide nanoparticles reported here have ∼5 wt% of the grafting moiety on the surface, which helps forming stable dispersions with up to 40 wt% of solid loading in alkali aqueous electrolytes with a maximum viscosity of 12 cP at room temperature. The maximum particle concentration achievable in the same electrolyte with pristine nanoparticles is 15 wt%. Electrochemical testing of the pristine and modified nanomaterials in the form of solid-casted electrodes showed a maximum reversible discharge capacity of 280 and 155 mAh/g, respectively, indicating that electrochemical activity of modified nanoparticles is partially suppressed due to the surface grafted moiety.Graphical Abstract.

  2. Release, transport and fate of engineered nanoparticles in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Besides many benefits, nanotechnology brings us a new type of contaminant to worry about: nanoparticles - particles smaller than 100 nm. Silver nanoparticles are used in medical textile, because they kill bacteria. Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles are used as UV filters in sunscreens, a

  3. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers and polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery in tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Sumit

    Tissues and organs in vivo are structured in three dimensional (3-D) ordered assemblies to maintain their metabolic functions. In the case of an injury, certain tissues lack the regenerative abilities without an external supportive environment. In order to regenerate the natural in vivo environment post-injury, there is a need to design three-dimensional (3-D) tissue engineered constructs of appropriate dimensions along with strategies that can deliver growth factors or drugs at a controlled rate from such constructs. This thesis focuses on the applications of hydrogen bonded (H-bonded) nanoscale layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled multilayers for time controlled drug delivery, fabrication of polymeric nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers, and engineering 3-D cellular constructs. Axonal regeneration in the central nervous system after spinal cord injury is often disorganized and random. To support linear axonal growth into spinal cord lesion sites, certain growth factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), needs to be delivered at a controlled rate from an array of uniaxial channels patterned in a scaffold. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that H-bonded LbL assembled degradable thin films prepared over agarose hydrogel, whereby the protein was loaded separately from the agarose fabrication, provided sustained release of protein under physiological conditions for more than four weeks. Further, patterned agarose scaffolds implanted at the site of a spinal cord injury forms a reactive cell layer of leptomeningeal fibroblasts in and around the scaffold. This limits the ability of axons to reinnervate the spinal cord. To address this challenge, we demonstrate the time controlled release of an anti-mitotic agent from agarose hydrdgel to control the growth of the reactive cell layer of fibroblasts. Challenges in tissue engineering can also be addressed using gene therapy approaches. Certain growth factors in the body are known to inhibit

  4. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. The OCS administration at the INEL was the sixth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. The INEL Organization is somewhat different from other DOE facilities are which the OCS was administered, due to the presence of six different major operating contractors. The seven organizations assessed at the INEL are: (1) Argonne National Laboratory -- West; (2) DOE Fire Department/Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory; (3) EG G Idaho Incorporated; (4) MK Ferguson; (5) Protection Technology Incorporated; (6) Rockwell; and (7) Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company Incorporated. All data from the OCS is presented in group summaries by organization, Supervisory Level, Staff Classification, and department within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.

  5. Capture, isolation and electrochemical detection of industrially-relevant engineered aerosol nanoparticles using poly (amic) acid, phase-inverted, nano-membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okello, Veronica A. [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Systems (CASE), State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Gass, Samuel; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios [Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-6021 (United States); Du, Nian; Lake, Andrew; Kariuki, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Systems (CASE), State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Sotiriou, Georgios A. [Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-6021 (United States); Addolorato, Jessica [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Systems (CASE), State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Demokritou, Philip, E-mail: pdemokri@hsph.harvard.edu [Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-6021 (United States); Sadik, Omowunmi A., E-mail: osadik@binghamton.edu [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Systems (CASE), State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exposure level assessment of aerosol nanoparticles reported using Harvard's VENGES. • Device equipped with pi-conjugated conducting PAA membrane filters/sensor arrays. • PAA membrane motifs used to capture, isolate and detect the nanoparticles. • Manipulating the PAA delocalized π electron enabled electrocatalytic detection. • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnO and TiO{sub 2} quantified using impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. - Abstract: Workplace exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a potential health and environmental hazard. This paper reports a novel approach for tracking hazardous airborne ENPs by applying online poly (amic) acid membranes (PAA) with offline electrochemical detection. Test aerosol (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and ZnO) nanoparticles were produced using the Harvard (Versatile Engineered Generation System) VENGES system. The particle morphology, size and elemental composition were determined using SEM, XRD and EDS. The PAA membrane electrodes used to capture the airborne ENPs were either stand-alone or with electron-beam gold-coated paper substrates. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to conceptually illustrate that exposure levels of industry-relevant classes of airborne nanoparticles could be captured and electrochemically detected at PAA membranes filter electrodes. CV parameters showed that PAA catalyzed the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sup 2+} with a size-dependent shift in reduction potential (E{sup 0}). Using the proportionality of peak current to concentration, the amount of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be 4.15 × 10{sup −17} mol/cm{sup 3} PAA electrodes. Using EIS, the maximum phase angle (Φ{sub max}) and the interfacial charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) increased significantly using 100 μg and 1000 μg of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO respectively. The observed increase in Φ{sub max} and R{sub ct} at increasing

  6. Toxicity assessment of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The production and applications of nanoparticles (NP) in diverse fields has steadily increased in recent decades; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used engineere...

  7. Impact of engineered zinc oxide nanoparticles on the individual performance of Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K Hanna

    Full Text Available The increased use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs in consumer products raises the concern of environmental release and subsequent impacts in natural communities. We tested for physiological and demographic impacts of ZnO, a prevalent metal oxide ENP, on the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. We exposed mussels of two size classes, <4.5 and ≥ 4.5 cm shell length, to 0.1-2 mg l(-1 ZnO ENPs in seawater for 12 wk, and measured the effect on mussel respiration, accumulation of Zn, growth, and survival. After 12 wk of exposure to ZnO ENPs, respiration rates of mussels increased with ZnO concentration. Mussels had up to three fold more Zn in tissues than control groups after 12 wk of exposure, but patterns of Zn accumulation varied with mussel size and Zn concentrations. Small mussels accumulated Zn 10 times faster than large mussels at 0.5 mg l(-1, while large mussels accumulated Zn four times faster than small mussels at 2 mg l(-1. Mussels exposed to 2 mg l(-1 ZnO grew 40% less than mussels in our control group for both size classes. Survival significantly decreased only in groups exposed to the highest ZnO concentration (2 mg l(-1 and was lower for small mussels than large. Our results indicate that ZnO ENPs are toxic to mussels but at levels unlikely to be reached in natural marine waters.

  8. Poly-adenine-based programmable engineering of gold nanoparticles for highly regulated spherical DNAzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Pei, Hao; Chao, Jie; Su, Shao; Aldalbahi, Ali; Rahaman, Mostafizur; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2015-11-28

    Enzyme complexes are assembled at the two-dimensional lipid membrane or prearranged on three-dimensional scaffolding proteins to regulate their catalytic activity in cells. Inspired by nature, we have developed gold nanoparticle-based spherical DNAzymes (SNAzymes) with programmably engineered activities by exploiting poly-adenine (polyA)-Au interactions. In a SNAzyme, AuNPs serve as the metal core, which is decorated with a functional shell of DNAzymes. Conventional thiolated DNAzyme-based assembly leads to disordered structures with suppressed activity. In contrast, by using an anchoring block of polyA tails, we find that the activity of SNAzymes can be programmably regulated. By using a polyA30 tail, SNAzymes demonstrated remarkably enhanced binding affinity compared to the thiolated DNAzyme-based assembly (∼75-fold) or individual DNAzymes in the solution phase (∼10-fold). More significantly, this increased affinity is directly translated to the sensitivity improvement in the SNAzyme-based lead sensor. Hence, this design of SNAzymes may provide new opportunities for developing biosensors and bioimaging probes for theranostic applications.

  9. How important is drinking water exposure for the risks of engineered nanoparticles to consumers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Karen; Hanssen, Steffen Foss; Westerhoff, Paul; Fern, Gordon J; Hankin, Steven M; Aitken, Robert J; Chaudhry, Qasim; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the potential for engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to contaminate the UK drinking water supplies and established the significance of the drinking water exposure route compared to other routes of human exposure. A review of the occurrence and quantities of ENPs in different product types on the UK market as well as release scenarios, their possible fate and behaviour in raw water and during drinking water treatment was performed. Based on the available data, all the ENPs which are likely to reach water sources were identified and categorized. Worst case concentrations of ENPs in raw water and treated drinking water, using a simple exposure model, were estimated and then qualitatively compared to available estimates for human exposure through other routes. A range of metal, metal oxide and organic-based ENPs were identified that have the potential to contaminate drinking waters. Worst case predicted concentrations in drinking waters were in the low- to sub-µg/l range and more realistic estimates were tens of ng/l or less. For the majority of product types, human exposure via drinking water was predicted to be less important than exposure via other routes. The exceptions were some clothing materials, paints and coatings and cleaning products containing Ag, Al, TiO2, Fe2O3 ENPs and carbon-based materials.

  10. Engineering the internal structure of magnetic silica nanoparticles by thermal control

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2014-09-30

    Calcination of hydrated iron salts in the pores of both spherical and rod-shaped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (NPs) changes the internal structure from an ordered 2D hexagonal structure into a smaller number of large voids in the particles with sizes ranging from large hollow cores down to ten nanometer voids. The voids only form when the heating rate is rapid at a rate of 30 °C min-1. The sizes of the voids are controlled reproducibly by the final calcination temperature; as the temperature is decreased the number of voids decreases as their size increases. The phase of the iron oxide NPs is α-Fe2O3 when annealed at 500 °C, and Fe3O4 when annealed at lower temperatures. The water molecules in the hydrated iron (III) chloride precursor salts appear to play important roles by hydrolyzing Si-O-Si bonding, and the resulting silanol is mobile enough to affect the reconstruction into the framed hollow structures at high temperature. Along with hexahydrates, trivalent Fe3+ ions are assumed to contribute to the structure disruption of mesoporous silica by replacing tetrahedral Si4+ ions and making Fe-O-Si bonding. Volume fraction tomography images generated from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images enable precise visualization of the structures. These results provide a controllable method of engineering the internal shapes in silica matrices containing superparamagnetic NPs.

  11. Assessment of gold nanoparticle effects in a marine teleost (Sparus aurata) using molecular and biochemical biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teles, M., E-mail: mteles0@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Fierro-Castro, C. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Na-Phatthalung, P. [Department of Microbiology and Excellent Research Laboratory on Natural Products, Faculty of Science and Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112 (Thailand); Tvarijonaviciute, A. [Department of Medicine and Animal Surgery, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Trindade, T. [Department of Chemistry & CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Soares, A.M.V.M. [Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Tort, L. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Oliveira, M. [Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • AuNP effects were investigated at molecular and biochemical levels in Sparus aurata. • AuNP coated with PVP exerts more effects than AuNP coated with citrate. • AuNP-PVP induced changes in antioxidant, immune and apoptosis related-genes mRNA levels. • The increase in plasma TOS indicates that AuNP-PVP generates oxidative stress. • AuNP-PVP induced in S. aurata a non-monotonic response pattern. - Abstract: Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are increasingly employed in a variety of applications and are likely to be increasing in the environment, posing a potential emerging environmental threat. Information on possible hazardous effects of engineered nanoparticles is urgently required to ensure human and environmental safety and promote the safe use of novel nanotechnologies. Nevertheless, there is a lack of comprehensive knowledge on AuNP effects in marine species. The present study aimed to assess AuNP effects in a marine teleost, Sparus aurata, by combining endpoints at different biological levels (molecular and biochemical). For that purpose, fish were exposed via water for 96 h to 4, 80 and 1600 μg L{sup −1} of AuNP (∼40 nm) coated with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Results revealed a significant impact of AuNP-PVP in the hepatic expression of antioxidant, immune and apoptosis related genes. Total oxidative status was increased in plasma after exposure to the lowest concentration of AuNP-PVP, although without altering the total antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, AuNP did not induce significant damage in the liver since the activity of neither hepatic indicator (aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase) increased. Overall, the present study demonstrated that AuNP, even with a biocompatible coating is able to alter oxidative status and expression of relevant target genes in marine fish. Another important finding is that effects are mainly induced by the lowest and intermediate concentrations of the PVP coated AuNP revealing

  12. An approach for environmental risk assessment of engineered nanomaterials using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and fuzzy inference rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuz, Emel; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2016-01-01

    The usage of Engineered Nanoparticles (ENPs) in consumer products is relatively new and there is a need to conduct environmental risk assessment (ERA) to evaluate their impacts on the environment. However, alternative approaches are required for ERA of ENPs because of the huge gap in data and knowledge compared to conventional pollutants and their unique properties that make it difficult to apply existing approaches. This study aims to propose an ERA approach for ENPs by integrating Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and fuzzy inference models which provide a systematic evaluation of risk factors and reducing uncertainty about the data and information, respectively. Risk is assumed to be the combination of occurrence likelihood, exposure potential and toxic effects in the environment. A hierarchy was established to evaluate the sub factors of these components. Evaluation was made with fuzzy numbers to reduce uncertainty and incorporate the expert judgements. Overall score of each component was combined with fuzzy inference rules by using expert judgements. Proposed approach reports the risk class and its membership degree such as Minor (0.7). Therefore, results are precise and helpful to determine the risk management strategies. Moreover, priority weights calculated by comparing the risk factors based on their importance for the risk enable users to understand which factor is effective on the risk. Proposed approach was applied for Ag (two nanoparticles with different coating) and TiO2 nanoparticles for different case studies. Results verified the proposed benefits of the approach.

  13. Complementary use of life cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: Lessons learned from chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara D.; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Successful strategies to handle the potential health and environmental risks of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) often rely upon the well-established frameworks of life cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA). However, current research and specific guidance on how to actually apply these two...... scientific research efforts have taken into account some key lessons learned from past experiences with chemicals at the same time that many key challenges remain to applying these frameworks to ENM. In that setting, two main proposed approaches to use LCA and RA together for ENM are identified: i) LC...

  14. Silver nanoparticles in complex biological media: assessment of colloidal stability and protein corona formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentiere, Simona; Cella, Claudia; Cesaria, Maura; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are among the most used nanomaterials in consumer products, therefore concerns are raised about their potential for adverse effects in humans and environment. Although an increasing number of studies in vitro and in vivo are being reported on the toxicity of AgNPs, most of them suffer from incomplete characterization of AgNPs in the tested biological media. As a consequence, the comparison of toxicological data is troublesome and the toxicity evaluation still remains an open critical issue. The development of a reliable protocol to evaluate interactions of AgNPs with surrounding proteins as well as to assess their colloidal stability is therefore required. In this regard, it is of importance not only to use multiple, easy-to-access and simple techniques but also to understand limitations of each characterization methods. In this work, the morphological and structural behaviour of AgNPs has been studied in two relevant biological media, namely 10 % FBS and MP. Three different techniques (Dynamic Light Scattering, Transmission Electron Microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy) were tested for their suitability in detecting AgNPs of three different sizes (10, 40 and 100 nm) coated with either citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Results showed that UV-Vis spectroscopy is the most versatile and informative technique to gain information about interaction between AgNPs and surrounding proteins and to determine their colloidal stability in the tested biological media. These findings are expected to provide useful insights in characterizing AgNPs before performing any further in vitro/in vivo experiment.

  15. Environmental exposure assessment framework for nanoparticles in solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Information related to the potential environmental exposure of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the solid waste management phase is extremely scarce. In this paper, we define nanowaste as separately collected or collectable waste materials which are or contain ENMs, and we present a five-step f...

  16. Reactor technology assessment and selection utilizing systems engineering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar; Han, Ki-In

    2014-02-01

    The first Nuclear power plant (NPP) deployment in a country is a complex process that needs to consider technical, economic and financial aspects along with other aspects like public acceptance. Increased interest in the deployment of new NPPs, both among newcomer countries and those with expanding programs, necessitates the selection of reactor technology among commercially available technologies. This paper reviews the Systems Decision Process (SDP) of Systems Engineering and applies it in selecting the most appropriate reactor technology for the deployment in Malaysia. The integrated qualitative and quantitative analyses employed in the SDP are explored to perform reactor technology assessment and to select the most feasible technology whose design has also to comply with the IAEA standard requirements and other relevant requirements that have been established in this study. A quick Malaysian case study result suggests that the country reside with PWR (pressurized water reactor) technologies with more detailed study to be performed in the future for the selection of the most appropriate reactor technology for Malaysia. The demonstrated technology assessment also proposes an alternative method to systematically and quantitatively select the most appropriate reactor technology.

  17. Engineering Risk Assessment of Space Thruster Challenge Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Mattenberger, Christopher J.; Go, Susie

    2014-01-01

    The Engineering Risk Assessment (ERA) team at NASA Ames Research Center utilizes dynamic models with linked physics-of-failure analyses to produce quantitative risk assessments of space exploration missions. This paper applies the ERA approach to the baseline and extended versions of the PSAM Space Thruster Challenge Problem, which investigates mission risk for a deep space ion propulsion system with time-varying thruster requirements and operations schedules. The dynamic mission is modeled using a combination of discrete and continuous-time reliability elements within the commercially available GoldSim software. Loss-of-mission (LOM) probability results are generated via Monte Carlo sampling performed by the integrated model. Model convergence studies are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of integrated LOM results to the number of Monte Carlo trials. A deterministic risk model was also built for the three baseline and extended missions using the Ames Reliability Tool (ART), and results are compared to the simulation results to evaluate the relative importance of mission dynamics. The ART model did a reasonable job of matching the simulation models for the baseline case, while a hybrid approach using offline dynamic models was required for the extended missions. This study highlighted that state-of-the-art techniques can adequately adapt to a range of dynamic problems.

  18. Engineering epithelial-stromal interactions in vitro for toxicology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, David G; Abbott, Barbara D

    2017-03-08

    Crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells drives the morphogenesis of ectodermal organs during development and promotes normal mature adult epithelial tissue homeostasis. Epithelial-stromal interactions (ESIs) have historically been examined using mammalian models and ex vivo tissue recombination. Although these approaches have elucidated signaling mechanisms underlying embryonic morphogenesis processes and adult mammalian epithelial tissue function, they are limited by the availability of tissue, low throughput, and human developmental or physiological relevance. In this review, we describe how bioengineered ESIs, using either human stem cells or co-cultures of human primary epithelial and stromal cells, have enabled the development of human in vitro epithelial tissue models that recapitulate the architecture, phenotype, and function of adult human epithelial tissues. We discuss how the strategies used to engineer mature epithelial tissue models in vitro could be extrapolated to instruct the design of organotypic culture models that can recapitulate the structure of embryonic ectodermal tissues and enable the in vitro assessment of events critical to organ/tissue morphogenesis. Given the importance of ESIs towards normal epithelial tissue development and function, such models present a unique opportunity for toxicological screening assays to incorporate ESIs to assess the impact of chemicals on mature and developing epidermal tissues.

  19. Organically Modified Silica Nanoparticles Interaction with Macrophage Cells: Assessment of Cell Viability on the Basis of Physicochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Keshvan, Prashant C; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Mitra, Susmita

    2015-11-01

    Silica nanoparticles have drawn a lot of attention for nanomedicine application, and this is attributed to their biocompatibility and ease of surface functionalization. However, successful utilization of these inorganic systems for biomedical application depends on their physicochemical properties. This study, therefore, discusses in vitro toxicity of organically modified silica nanoparticles on the basis of size, shape, and surface properties of silica nanoparticles. Spherical- and oval-shaped nanoparticles having hydroxyl and amine groups were synthesized in Tween 80 micelles using different organosilanes. Nanoparticles of similar size and morphology were considered for comparative assessment. "As-prepared" nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, shape, and surface properties using ZetaSizer, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared to establish the above parameters. In vitro analysis in terms of nanoparticle-based toxicity was performed on J-774 (macrophage) cell line using propidium iodide-4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Fluorescent dye-entrapped nanoparticles were used to visualize the uptake of the nanoparticles by macrophage cells. Results from cell studies suggested low levels of toxicity for different nanoparticle formulations studied, therefore are suitable for nanocarrier application for poorly soluble molecules. On the contrary, the nanoparticles of similar size and shape, having amine groups and low net negative charge, do not exhibit any in vitro cytotoxicity.

  20. Engineering bioinspired bacteria-adhesive clay nanoparticles with a membrane-disruptive property for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yuan; Hu, Xiurong; Yao, Qi; Hu, Qida; Amini, Shahrouz; Miserez, Ali; Tang, Guping

    2016-09-28

    We present a bioinspired design strategy to engineer bacteria-targeting and membrane-disruptive nanoparticles for the effective antibiotic therapy of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Antibacterial nanoparticles were self-assembled from highly exfoliated montmorillonite (eMMT) and cationic linear polyethyleneimine (lPEI) via electrostatic interactions. eMMT functions as a bioinspired 'sticky' building block for anchoring antibacterial nanoparticles onto the bacterial cell surface via bacteria-secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), whereas membrane-disruptive lPEI is able to efficiently lyse the bacterial outer membrane to allow topical transmembrane delivery of antibiotics into the intracellular cytoplasm. As a result, eMMT-lPEI nanoparticles intercalated with the antibiotic metronidazole (MTZ) not only efficiently target bacteria via EPS-mediated adhesion and kill bacteria in vitro, but also can effectively remain in the stomach where H. pylori reside, thereby serving as an efficient drug carrier for the direct on-site release of MTZ into the bacterial cytoplasm. Importantly, MTZ-intercalated eMMT-lPEI nanoparticles were able to efficiently eradicate H. pylori in vivo and to significantly improve H. pylori-associated gastric ulcers and the inflammatory response in a mouse model, and also showed superior therapeutic efficacy as compared to standard triple therapy. Our findings reveal that bacterial adhesion plays a critical role in promoting efficient antimicrobial delivery and also represent an original bioinspired targeting strategy via specific EPS-mediated adsorption. The bacteria-adhesive eMMT-lPEI nanoparticles with membrane-disruptive ability may constitute a promising drug carrier system for the efficacious targeted delivery of antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections.

  1. Nanoparticles rapidly assess specific IgE in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Sarmadia; Qadri, Shahnaz; al-Ramadi, Basel; Haik, Yousef

    2012-08-01

    Allergy is the sixth leading cause of chronic disease in the world. This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting allergy indicators in human plasma, noninvasively, at the point of care and with a comparable efficiency and reduced turnaround time compared with the gold standard. Peanut allergy was utilized as a model due to its widespread occurrence among the US population and fatality if not treated. The detection procedure utilized magnetic nanoparticles that were coated with an allergen layer (peanut protein extract). Peanut immunoglobulin E (IgE) was detected in concentrations close to the minimum detection range of CAP assay. The results were obtained in minutes compared with the CAP assay which requires more than 3 h.

  2. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Hui; Liu, Xu-Jun; Guan, Lei-Lei; Li, Yan-Li; Sun, Jian; Ying, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Jia-Da; Xu, Ning

    2014-06-01

    Evenly separated crystalline CuIn0.8Ga0.2Se2 (CIGS) nanoparticles are deposited on ITO-glass substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Such CIGS layers are introduced between conjugated polymer layers and ITO-glass substrates for enhancing light absorbance of polymer solar cells. The P3HT:PCBM absorbance between 300 and 650 nm is enhanced obviously due to the introduction of CIGS nanoparticles. The current density-voltage curves of a P3HT:PCBM/CIGS solar cell demonstrate that the short-circuit current density is improved from 0.77 to 1.20 mA/cm2. The photoluminescence spectra show that the excitons in the polymer are obviously quenched, suggesting that the charge transfer between the P3HT:PCBM and CIGS occurred. The results reveal that the CIGS nanoparticles may exhibit the localized surface plasmon resonance effect just as metallic nanostructures.

  3. Science and the lay perspective: lay people's involvement in assessing tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeller, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) is a scientific field that will have an influence on our daily lives. It has the potential to revolutionize medical treatments, but it has also an impact on our human image and is associated with potential risks and ethical aspects. Among the publicly controversial issues are embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, cloning, uncertainties regarding risks and informed consent issues. To maintain public confidence in the science of TE, a good solution is public dialogues with patients and other interested lay people that gives the public the chance to independently evaluate TE issues and build their own opinion based on information from different perspectives. The article describes public participation projects in TE on stem cell research and gene therapy and presents the case study of the EU-Gene Activated Matrices for Bone and Cartilage Regeneration on Arthritis (GAMBA) panels, a dialogue with patient and citizen panels in three European countries. In the GAMBA panels, lay participants assessed the basic research project aimed at finding ways of healing osteoarthritis through a matrix composed of adult stem cells, gene vectors, nanoparticles, and biomaterials. The results of the dialogues in different countries, such as Denmark, Japan, Ireland, Switzerland, and Germany, are compared and the evaluation criteria for high quality dialogues are presented, including multiperspectivity, openness of results, a clear mandate, impartial facilitation of the panels, and transparency.

  4. Development of methodology for alternative testing strategies for the assessment of the toxicological profile of nanoparticles used in medical diagnostics. NanoTEST - EC FP7 project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria; Fjellsbo, Lise Maria; Heimstad, Eldbjorg; Harju, Mikael; Bartonova, Alena [Norwegian Institute for Air Research (Norway)], E-mail: dusinska@szu.sk; Tran, Lang [Institute of Occupational Medicine (United Kingdom); Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Halamoda, Blanka [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland); Marano, Francelyne; Boland, Sonja [University Paris Diderot Paris7 (France); Saunders, Margaret; Cartwright, Laura; Carreira, Sara; Thawley, Susan [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Whelan, Maurice; Klein, Christoph [EC - Directorate General Joint Research Centre (Italy); Housiadas, Christos [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos (Greece); Volkovova, Katarina; Tulinska, Jana; Beno, Milan [Slovak Medical University (Slovakia)] (and others)

    2009-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have unique, potentially beneficial properties, but their possible impact on human health is still not known. The area of nanomedicine brings humans into direct contact with NPs and it is essential for both public confidence and the nanotech companies that appropriate risk assessments are undertaken in relation to health and safety. There is a pressing need to understand how engineered NPs can interact with the human body following exposure. The FP7 project NanoTEST (www.nanotest-fp7.eu) addresses these requirements in relation to the toxicological profile of NPs used in medical diagnostics.

  5. Conducting SEI (Software Engineering Institute)-Assisted Software Process Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    4.1. Executive-Level Briefing 13 4.2. The Assessment Agreement 13 4.3. Assessment Team 14 4.3.1. Assessment Team Roles 14 4.3.2. Criteria for Selecting...assessment team members. 4.3.1. Assessment Team Roles In an SEI-assisted assessment, the assessment team consists of an assessment team leader, an SEI

  6. Cerebrolysin, a mixture of neurotrophic factors induces marked neuroprotection in spinal cord injury following intoxication of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Preeti Kumaran; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Sharma, Aruna; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the world's most disastrous disease for which there is no effective treatment till today. Several studies suggest that nanoparticles could adversely influence the pathology of SCI and thereby alter the efficacy of many neuroprotective agents. Thus, there is an urgent need to find suitable therapeutic agents that could minimize cord pathology following trauma upon nanoparticle intoxication. Our laboratory has been engaged for the last 7 years in finding suitable therapeutic strategies that could equally reduce cord pathology in normal and in nanoparticle-treated animal models of SCI. We observed that engineered nanoparticles from metals e.g., aluminum (Al), silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) (50-60 nm) when administered in rats daily for 7 days (50 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in exacerbation of cord pathology after trauma that correlated well with breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) to serum proteins. The entry of plasma proteins into the cord leads to edema formation and neuronal damage. Thus, future drugs should be designed in such a way to be effective even when the SCI is influenced by nanoparticles. Previous research suggests that a suitable combination of neurotrophic factors could induce marked neuroprotection in SCI in normal animals. Thus, we examined the effects of a new drug; cerebrolysin that is a mixture of different neurotrophic factors e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and other peptide fragments to treat normal or nanoparticle-treated rats after SCI. Our observations showed that cerebrolysin (2.5 ml/kg, i.v.) before SCI resulted in good neuroprotection in normal animals, whereas nanoparticle-treated rats required a higher dose of the drug (5.0 ml/kg, i.v.) to induce comparable neuroprotection in the cord after SCI. Cerebrolysin also reduced spinal cord water content, leakage of plasma proteins

  7. Measurement and modeling of engineered nanoparticle transport and aging dynamics in a reactive porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftaly, Aviv; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-07-01

    A continuous time random walk particle tracking (CTRW-PT) method was employed to model flow cell experiments that measured transport of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in a reactive porous medium. The experiments involved a water-saturated medium containing negatively charged, polyacrylamide beads, resembling many natural soils and aquifer materials, and having the same refraction index as water. Negatively and positively charged ENPs were injected into a uniform flow field in a 3-D horizontal flow cell, and the spatial and temporal concentrations of the evolving ENP plumes were obtained via image analysis. As a benchmark, and to calibrate the model, Congo red tracer was employed in 1-D column and 3-D flow cell experiments, containing the same beads. Negatively charged Au and Ag ENPs demonstrated migration patterns resembling those of the tracer but were slightly more dispersive; the transport was well represented by the CTRW-PT model. In contrast, positively charged AgNPs displayed an unusual behavior: establishment of an initial plume of essentially immobilized ENPs, followed by development of a secondary, freely migrating plume. The mobile plume was found to contain ENPs that, with aging, exhibited aggregation and charge inversion, becoming negatively charged and mobile. In this case, the CTRW-PT model was modified to include a probabilistic law for particle immobilization, to account for the decreasing tendency (over distance and time) of the positively charged AgNPs to attach to the porous medium. The agreement between experimental results and modeling suggests that the CTRW-PT framework can account for the non-Fickian and surface-charge-dependent transport and aging exhibited by ENPs in porous media.

  8. Addressing the complexity of water chemistry in environmental fate modeling for engineered nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani-Kast, Nicole; Scheringer, Martin; Slomberg, Danielle; Labille, Jérôme; Praetorius, Antonia; Ollivier, Patrick; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticle (ENP) fate models developed to date - aimed at predicting ENP concentration in the aqueous environment - have limited applicability because they employ constant environmental conditions along the modeled system or a highly specific environmental representation; both approaches do not show the effects of spatial and/or temporal variability. To address this conceptual gap, we developed a novel modeling strategy that: 1) incorporates spatial variability in environmental conditions in an existing ENP fate model; and 2) analyzes the effect of a wide range of randomly sampled environmental conditions (representing variations in water chemistry). This approach was employed to investigate the transport of nano-TiO2 in the Lower Rhône River (France) under numerous sets of environmental conditions. The predicted spatial concentration profiles of nano-TiO2 were then grouped according to their similarity by using cluster analysis. The analysis resulted in a small number of clusters representing groups of spatial concentration profiles. All clusters show nano-TiO2 accumulation in the sediment layer, supporting results from previous studies. Analysis of the characteristic features of each cluster demonstrated a strong association between the water conditions in regions close to the ENP emission source and the cluster membership of the corresponding spatial concentration profiles. In particular, water compositions favoring heteroaggregation between the ENPs and suspended particulate matter resulted in clusters of low variability. These conditions are, therefore, reliable predictors of the eventual fate of the modeled ENPs. The conclusions from this study are also valid for ENP fate in other large river systems. Our results, therefore, shift the focus of future modeling and experimental research of ENP environmental fate to the water characteristic in regions near the expected ENP emission sources. Under conditions favoring heteroaggregation in these

  9. Accumulation and Toxicity of Copper Oxide Engineered Nanoparticles in a Marine Mussel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K. Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cu is an essential trace element but can be highly toxic to aquatic organisms at elevated concentrations. Greater use of CuO engineered nanoparticles (ENPs may lead to increased concentrations of CuO ENPs in aquatic environments causing potential ecological injury. We examined the toxicity of CuO ENPs to marine mussels and the influence of mussels on the fate and transport of CuO ENPs. We exposed marine mussels to 1, 2, or 3 mg L−1 CuO ENPs for four weeks, and measured clearance rate, rejection, excretion and accumulation of Cu, and mussel shell growth. Mussel clearance rate was 48% less, and growth was 68% less, in mussels exposed to 3 mg L−1 than in control animals. Previous studies show 100% mortality at 1 mg Cu L−1, suggesting that CuO ENPs are much less toxic than ionic Cu, probably due to the slow dissolution rate of the ENPs. Mussels rejected and excreted CuO ENPs in biodeposits containing as much as 110 mg Cu g−1, suggesting the potential for magnification in sediments. Mussels exposed to 3 mg L−1 CuO ENPs accumulated 79.14 ± 12.46 µg Cu g−1 dry weight, which was 60 times more Cu than in control animals. Our results suggest that mussels have the potential to influence the fate and transport of CuO ENPs and potentially cause magnification of CuO ENPs in mussel bed communities, creating a significant source of Cu to marine benthos.

  10. Transport and Reactivity of Engineered Nanoparticles in Partially Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, I.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are being produced in increasing amounts and have numerous applications in a variety of products and industrial processes. The same properties that make these substances so appealing may also cause them to act as persistent and toxic pollutants. The post-use release of ENPs to the environment is inevitable and soil appears to be one of the largest sinks of these potential contaminants. To date, despite the significant attention that ENP behavior in the environment has received, only a few studies have considered the fate and transport of ENPs in partially saturated systems. Here, we report measurements on the transport and fate of three commonly used ENPs - silver (Ag), gold (Au) and zinc oxide (ZnO) - in partially saturated porous media. The results show that ENP interactions with the solid matrix and solution components affect the fate of the ENPs and their transport. The negatively charged ENPs (AgNPs and AuNPs) are shown to be mobile in sand (which is also negatively charged) under various conditions, including water saturation levels and inlet concentration, with transport behavior resembling conservative tracer movement. Various aging scenarios were considered and the interaction of AgNPs with sulfides, chlorides, and calcium ions, all of which are known to interact and change AgNP properties, are shown to affect AgNP fate; however, in some cases, the changed particles remained suspended in solution and mobile. The positively charged ZnO showed very low mobility, but when humic acid was present in the inlet solution, interactions leading to enhanced mobility were observed. The presence of humic acid also changes ENP size and surface charge, transforming them to negatively charged larger aggregates that can be transported through the sand. Finally, remobilization of particles that were retained in the porous media was also demonstrated for ZnO ENPs, indicating possible release of entrapped ENPs upon changes in solution chemistry.

  11. Electrically conductive gold nanoparticle-chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baei, Payam [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cardiovascular Engineering Laboratory, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalili-Firoozinezhad, Sasan [Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Hebelstrasse 20, CH-4031 Basel (Switzerland); Department of Bioengineeringand IBB - Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad [Cardiovascular Engineering Laboratory, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baharvand, Hossein, E-mail: Baharvand@royaninstitute.org [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Developmental Biology, University of Science and Culture, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghdami, Nasser, E-mail: Nasser.Aghdami@royaninstitute.org [Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels that resemble electromechanical properties of the myocardium are crucial for cardiac tissue engineering prospects. We have developed a facile approach that uses chitosan (CS) to generate a thermosensitive conductive hydrogel with a highly porous network of interconnected pores. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were evenly dispersed throughout the CS matrix in order to provide electrical cues. The gelation response and electrical conductivity of the hydrogel were controlled by different concentrations of GNPs. The CS-GNP hydrogels were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultivated for up to 14 days in the absence of electrical stimulations. CS-GNP scaffolds supported viability, metabolism, migration and proliferation of MSCs along with the development of uniform cellular constructs. Immunohistochemistry for early and mature cardiac markers showed enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of MSCs within the CS-GNP compared to the CS matrix alone. The results of this study demonstrate that incorporation of nanoscale electro-conductive GNPs into CS hydrogels enhances the properties of myocardial constructs. These constructs could find utilization for regeneration of other electroactive tissues. - Highlights: • Thermosensitive electro-conductive hydrogels were prepared from CS and GNPs. • Gelation time and conductivity were tuned by varying concentration of GNPs. • CS-2GNP with gelation time of 25.7 min and conductivity of 0.13 S·m{sup −1} was selected for in vitro studies. • CS-2GNP supported active metabolism, migration and proliferation of MSCs. • Expression of cardiac markers increased about two-fold in CS-2GNP compared to CS.

  12. Human Biomonitoring of Engineered Nanoparticles: An Appraisal of Critical Issues and Potential Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Bergamaschi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the applicability of biological monitoring to the assessment of exposure and possible effects deriving from exposure to engineered nanomaterials (NM. After establishing a conceptual framework in which human biomonitoring should be placed, the paper reviews the critical issues related to the unusual properties of NM affecting the implementation of biomonitoring activities for this new class of chemicals. Relying on the recent advances in the toxicogenomic, it is possible to assess whether specific biological pathways are activated or perturbed by specific NM. However, to evaluate if quantitative changes in these biomarkers can be used as indicators or predictors for toxicity in humans, validation on well characterised groups of exposed people is needed. At present, it appears more pragmatic to evolve NM-associated biomarker identification considering relevant biological responses found in environmental and occupational studies and assessing the early events associated with exposure to these NM. The battery of biochemical markers includes soluble molecules, antioxidant capacity, peroxidated lipids and carbonyl groups in serum proteins as a biomarkers of systemic inflammation and vascular adhesion molecules to assess endothelial activation/damage. Abnormalities in exhaled breath condensate chemistry reflecting intrinsic changes in the airway lining fluid and lung inflammation seem promising tools suitable for BM studies and are broadly discussed.

  13. Distinct Polymer Architecture Mediates Switching of Complement Activation Pathways at the Nanosphere-Serum Interface: Implications for Stealth Nanoparticle Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamad, I.; Al-Hanbali, O.; Hunter, A.C.;

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles with surface projected polyethyleneoxide (PEO) chains in 'mushroom-brush' and "brush" configurations display stealth properties in systemic circulation and have numerous applications in site specific targeting for controlled drug delivery and release as well as diagnostic Imaging. W...... engineering and design of immunologically safer stealth and targetable nanosystems with polymers for use in clinical medicine.......Nanoparticles with surface projected polyethyleneoxide (PEO) chains in 'mushroom-brush' and "brush" configurations display stealth properties in systemic circulation and have numerous applications in site specific targeting for controlled drug delivery and release as well as diagnostic Imaging. We...... switches complement activation from C1q dependent classical to lectin pathway but also reduces the level of generated complement activation, products C4d, Bb, C5a, and SC5b-9. Also changes In adsorbed polymer configuration trigger alternative pathway activation differently and through different initiators...

  14. ROMP-Derived cyclooctene-based monolithic polymeric materials reinforced with inorganic nanoparticles for applications in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Weichelt

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous monolithic inorganic/polymeric hybrid materials have been prepared via ring-opening metathesis copolymerization starting from a highly polar monomer, i.e., cis-5-cyclooctene-trans-1,2-diol and a 7-oxanorborn-2-ene-derived cross-linker in the presence of porogenic solvents and two types of inorganic nanoparticles (i.e., CaCO3 and calcium hydroxyapatite, respectively using the third-generation Grubbs initiator RuCl2(Py2(IMesH2(CHPh. The physico-chemical properties of the monolithic materials, such as pore size distribution and microhardness were studied with regard to the nanoparticle type and content. Moreover, the reinforced monoliths were tested for the possible use as scaffold materials in tissue engineering, by carrying out cell cultivation experiments with human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

  15. Assessment of Environmental Performance of TiO2 Nanoparticles Coated Self-Cleaning Float Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Pini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, superhydrophilic and photocatalytic self-cleaning nanocoatings have been widely used in the easy-to-clean surfaces field. In the building sector, self-cleaning glass was one of the first nanocoating applications. These products are based on the photocatalytic property of a thin layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles deposited on the surface of any kind of common glass. When exposed to UV radiation, TiO2 nanoparticles react with the oxygen and water molecules adsorbed on their surface to produce radicals leading to oxidative species. These species are able to reduce or even eliminate airborne pollutants and organic substances deposited on the material’s surface. To date, TiO2 nanoparticles’ benefits have been substantiated; however, their ecological and human health risks are still under analysis. The present work studies the ecodesign of the industrial scale-up of TiO2 nanoparticles self-cleaning coated float glass production performed by the life cycle assessment (LCA methodology and applies new human toxicity indicators to the impact assessment stage. Production, particularly the TiO2 nanoparticle application, is the life cycle phase most contributing to the total damage. According to the ecodesign approach, the production choices carried out have exacerbated environmental burdens.

  16. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehlke, G.

    2003-03-17

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead

  17. Assessment of lubricating oil degradation in small motorcycle engine fueled with gasohol

    OpenAIRE

    Nakorn Tippayawong

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the degradation of lubricating oil was performed on the lubricants which had been used in a small motorcycle engine fueled with gasohol in comparison with the lubricants from gasoline-run engine. The lubricant properties examined in the assessment were lubricating capacity, viscosity and stability to oxidation. Lubricating capacity was evaluated by accelerated wear test on the Timken tester. Lubricating oils from gasohol-run engine appeared to produce about 10% greater wear than...

  18. Safety Assessment of a Metal Cask under Aircraft Engine Crash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghoon Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of a dual-purpose metal cask currently under development by the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD was evaluated, through numerical simulations and a model test, under high-speed missile impact reflecting targeted aircraft crash conditions. The impact conditions were carefully chosen through a survey on accident cases and recommendations from literature. In the impact scenario, a missile flying horizontally hits the top side of the cask, which is freestanding on a concrete pad, with a velocity of 150 m/s. A simplified missile simulating a commercial aircraft engine was designed from an impact load–time function available in literature. In the analyses, the dynamic behavior of the metal cask and the integrity of the containment boundary were assessed. The simulation results were compared with the test results for a 1:3 scale model. Although the dynamic behavior of the cask in the model test did not match exactly with the prediction from the numerical simulation, other structural responses, such as the acceleration and strain history during the impact, showed very good agreement. Moreover, the containment function of the cask survived the missile impact as expected from the numerical simulation. Thus, the procedure and methodology adopted in the structural numerical analyses were successfully validated.

  19. Safety assessment of a metal cask under aircraft engine crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon [Dept. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Ki Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The structural integrity of a dual-purpose metal cask currently under development by the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD) was evaluated, through numerical simulations and a model test, under high-speed missile impact reflecting targeted aircraft crash conditions. The impact conditions were carefully chosen through a survey on accident cases and recommendations from literature. In the impact scenario, a missile flying horizontally hits the top side of the cask, which is free standing on a concrete pad, with a velocity of 150 m/s. A simplified missile simulating a commercial aircraft engine was designed from an impact load-time function available in literature. In the analyses, the dynamic behavior of the metal cask and the integrity of the containment boundary were assessed. The simulation results were compared with the test results for a 1:3 scale model. Although the dynamic behavior of the cask in the model test did not match exactly with the prediction from the numerical simulation, other structural responses, such as the acceleration and strain history during the impact, showed very good agreement. Moreover, the containment function of the cask survived the missile impact as expected from the numerical simulation. Thus, the procedure and methodology adopted in the structural numerical analyses were successfully validated.

  20. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein-particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  1. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei, E-mail: kwng@ntu.edu.sg; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein–particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  2. Facile synthesis of Curcuma longa tuber powder engineered metal nanoparticles for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Rahman, Pattanathu K. S. M.; Varunkumar, Krishnamoorthy; Anusha, Chidambaram; Kalaiarasi, Arunachalam; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials based fluorescent agents are rapidly becoming significant and promising transformative tools for improving medical diagnostics for extensive in vivo imaging modalities. Compared with conventional fluorescent agents, nano-fluorescence has capabilities to improve the in vivo detection and enriched targeting efficiencies. In our laboratory we synthesized fluorescent metal nanoparticles of silver, copper and iron using Curcuma longa tuber powder by simple reduction. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized metal nanoparticles were attained using UV-visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with EDAX spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Curcuma longa tuber powder has one of the bioactive compound Curcumin might act as a capping agent during the synthesis of nanoparticles. The synthesized metal nanoparticles fluorescence property was confirmed by spectrofluorometry. When compared with copper and iron nanoparticles the silver nanoparticles showed high fluorescence intensity under spectrofluorometry. Moreover, in vitro cell images of the silver nanoparticles in A549 cell lines also correlated with the results of spectrofluorometry. These silver nanoparticles show inspiring cell-imaging applications. They enter into cells without any further modifications, and the fluorescence property can be utilized for fluorescence-based cell imaging applications.

  3. Gold-plated silver nanoparticles engineered for sensitive plasmonic detection amplified by morphological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Krysten; Cathcart, Nicole; Kitaev, Vladimir

    2016-07-28

    Gold-plated silver nanoparticles have been developed to undergo morphological changes that enhance the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing response. These morphological changes were realized through thin-frame gold plating that both reinforces the nanoparticle edges and enables partial silver etching upon exposure to several biological molecules, including thiols and amines.

  4. Minimizing of the boundary friction coefficient in automotive engines using Al2O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohamed Kamal Ahmed; Xianjun, Hou; Elagouz, Ahmed; Essa, F. A.; Abdelkareem, Mohamed A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Minimizing of the boundary friction coefficient is critical for engine efficiency improvement. It is known that the tribological behavior has a major role in controlling the performance of automotive engines in terms of the fuel consumption. The purpose of this research is an experimental study to minimize the boundary friction coefficient via nano-lubricant additives. The tribological characteristics of Al2O3 and TiO2 nano-lubricants were evaluated under reciprocating test conditions to simulate a piston ring/cylinder liner interface in automotive engines. The nanoparticles were suspended in a commercially available lubricant in a concentration of 0.25 wt.% to formulate the nano-lubricants. The Al2O3 and TiO2 nanoparticles had sizes of 8-12 and 10 nm, respectively. The experimental results have shown that the boundary friction coefficient reduced by 35-51% near the top and bottom dead center of the stroke (TDC and BDC) for the Al2O3 and TiO2 nano-lubricants, respectively. The anti-wear mechanism was generated via the formation of protective films on the worn surfaces of the ring and liner. These results will be a promising approach for improving fuel economy in automotive.

  5. Effects of engineered iron nanoparticles on the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp, after foliar exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivet, L; Dubot, P; Garçon, G; Denayer, F-O

    2015-03-01

    The effects of iron nanoparticles on bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) were studied following foliar exposure. We used iron nanoparticles (Fe-NP) representative of industrial emissions from the metallurgical industries. After a characterization of iron nanoparticles and the validation of nanoparticle internalization in cells, the effects (cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation of membrane) of iron nanoparticles were determined through the axenic culturing of Physcomitrella patens exposed at five different concentrations (5 ng, 50 ng, 500 ng, 5 µg and 50 µg per plant). Following exposure, the plant health, measured as ATP concentrations, was not impacted. Moreover, we studied oxidative stress in three ways: through the measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, through malondialdehyde (MDA) production and also through glutathione regulation. At concentrations tested over a short period, the level of ROS, MDA and glutathione were not significantly disturbed.

  6. Review: Morphofunctional and biochemical markers of stress in sea urchin life stages exposed to engineered nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambardella, Chiara; Ferrando, Sara; Gatti, Antonietta M; Cataldi, Edoardo; Ramoino, Paola; Aluigi, Maria Grazia; Faimali, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Falugi, Carla

    2016-11-01

    We describe the use of different life stages of the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus for the assessment of the possible risk posed by nanoparticles (NPs) in the coastal water. A first screening for the presence of NPs in sea water may be obtained by checking their presence inside tissues of organisms taken from the wild. The ability of NPs to pass from gut to the coelomic fluid is demonstrated by accumulation in sea urchin coelomocytes; the toxicity on sperms can be measured by embryotoxicity markers after sperm exposure, whereas the transfer through the food chain can be observed by developmental anomalies in larvae fed with microalgae exposed to NPs. The most used spermiotoxicity and embryotoxicity tests are described, as well as the biochemical and histochemical analyses of cholinesterase (ChE) activities, which are used to verify toxicity parameters such as inflammation, neurotoxicity, and interference in cell-to-cell communication. Morphological markers of toxicity, in particular skeletal anomalies, are described and classified. In addition, NPs may impair viability of the immune cells of adult specimens. Molecular similarity between echinoderm and human immune cells is shown and discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1552-1562, 2016.

  7. Reducing the cytotoxicity of inhalable engineered nanoparticles via in situ passivation with biocompatible materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon, E-mail: postjb@yu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa, IA 52242 (United States); Roberts, Jeffrey T., E-mail: jtrob@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The cytotoxicity of model welding particles was modulated through in situ passivation. • Model welding particles were incorporated with chitosan nanoparticles for passivation. • In vitro assay revealed that the passivated particles had a lower cytotoxicity. • Passivation with chitosan adhesive or graphite paste could also reduce cytotoxicity. • This method would be suitable for efficient reduction of inhalable toxic components. - Abstract: The cytotoxicity of model welding nanoparticles was modulated through in situ passivation with soluble biocompatible materials. A passivation process consisting of a spark discharge particle generator coupled to a collison atomizer as a co-flow or counter-flow configuration was used to incorporate the model nanoparticles with chitosan. The tested model welding nanoparticles are inhaled and that A549 cells are a human lung epithelial cell line. Measurements of in vitro cytotoxicity in A549 cells revealed that the passivated nanoparticles had a lower cytotoxicity (>65% in average cell viability, counter-flow) than the untreated model nanoparticles. Moreover, the co-flow incorporation between the nanoparticles and chitosan induced passivation of the nanoparticles, and the average cell viability increased by >80% compared to the model welding nanoparticles. As a more convenient way (additional chitosan generation and incorporation devices may not be required), other passivation strategies through a modification of the welding rod with chitosan adhesive and graphite paste did also enhance average cell viability (>58%). The approach outlined in this work is potentially generalizable as a new platform, using only biocompatible materials in situ, to treat nanoparticles before they are inhaled.

  8. In Vivo Assessment of Clobetasol Propionate-Loaded Lecithin-Chitosan Nanoparticles for Skin Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Şenyiğit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess in vivo the anti-inflammatory efficacy and tolerability of clobetasol propionate (CP loaded lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles incorporated into chitosan gel for topical application (CP 0.005%. As a comparison, a commercial cream (CP 0.05% w/w, and a sodium deoxycholate gel (CP 0.05% w/w were also evaluated. Lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by self-assembling of the components obtained by direct injection of soybean lecithin alcoholic solution containing CP into chitosan aqueous solution. Nanoparticles obtained had a particle size around 250 nm, narrow distribution (polydispersity index below 0.2 and positive surface charge, provided by a superficial layer of the cationic polymer. The nanoparticle suspension was then loaded into a chitosan gel, to obtain a final CP concentration of 0.005%. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema test on Wistar rats, the effect of formulations on the barrier property of the stratum corneum were determined using transepidermal water loss measurements (TEWL and histological analysis was performed to evaluate the possible presence of morphological changes. The results obtained indicate that nanoparticle-in-gel formulation produced significantly higher edema inhibition compared to other formulations tested, although it contained ten times less CP. TEWL measurements also revealed that all formulations have no significant disturbance on the barrier function of skin. Furthermore, histological analysis of rat abdominal skin did not show morphological tissue changes nor cell infiltration signs after application of the formulations. Taken together, the present data show that the use of lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles in chitosan gel as a drug carrier significantly improves the risk-benefit ratio as compared with sodium-deoxycholate gel and commercial cream formulations of CP.

  9. In Vitro Toxicological Assessment of Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticle Exposure in Several Mammalian Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Abudayyak; Ezgi, Öztaş; Merve, Arici; Özhan, Gül

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide researchers have rising concerns about magnesium-based materials, especially magnesium oxide (MgO) nanaoparticles, due to increasing usage as promising structural materials in various fields including cancer treatment. However, there is a serious lack of information about their toxicity at the cellular and molecular levels. In this study, the toxic potentials of MgO nanoparticles were investigated on liver (HepG2), kidney (NRK-52E), intestine (Caco-2), and lung (A549) cell lines. For the toxicological assessment, the following assays were used: the particle characterization by transmission electron microscopy, the determination of cellular uptake by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, MTT and neutral red uptake assays for cytotoxicity, comet assay for genotoxicity, and the determination of malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, protein carbonyl, and glutathione levels by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assays for the potential of oxidative damage and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) apoptosis detection assay with propidium iodide (PI) for apoptosis. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles were taken up by the cells depending on their concentration and agglomeration/aggregation potentials. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles induced DNA (≤14.27 fold) and oxidative damage. At a concentration of ≥323.39 µg/mL, MgO nanoparticles caused 50% inhibition in cell viability by 2 different cytotoxicity assays. The cell sensitivity to cytotoxic and genotoxic damage induced by MgO nanoparticles was ranked as HepG2 oxidative damage effects of MgO nanoparticles should raise concern about the safety associated with their applications in consumer products.

  10. Analysis of volatile nanoparticles emitted from diesel engine using TOF-SIMS and metal-assisted SIMS (MetA-SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masae; Murase, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masami; Kubo, Shuichi

    2006-07-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and metal-assisted SIMS (MetA-SIMS), which is TOF-SIMS analysis of metal-deposited sample surfaces, were applied to analyze small quantities of volatile nanoparticles emitted from a light-duty diesel engine under idling and deceleration conditions. We investigated nucleation materials, i.e., >C35 hydrocarbons, oxidation products, etc., which have lower volatility than the main components of volatile nanoparticles and control the formation of volatile nanoparticles. Oxygenated hydrocarbons were detected by TOF-SIMS in volatile nanoparticles under idling condition. Their relative intensities increased as particle diameter decreased. This resulted in the oxygenated hydrocarbons acting as nucleation materials for volatile nanoparticles under idling condition. High-molecular-weight hydrocarbons of greater than C35 were detected in volatile nanoparticles under deceleration condition by MetA-SIMS. It was concluded that the detected hydrocarbons originated in lubricants and acted as nucleation materials for volatile nanoparticles under deceleration condition. TOF-SIMS makes it possible to detect traces of low-volatility molecules due to its high-vacuum environment. MetA-SIMS is the only method of directly detecting high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons in small quantities of nanoparticles. TOF-SIMS and MetA-SIMS were proved to be useful tools for analyzing of the properties of volatile nanoparticles.

  11. Signal Processing Methods for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Spontaneous Stability and Rough Combustion Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Casiano, Matthew; Fischbach, Sean; Hulka, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid rocket engine combustion stability assessments are traditionally broken into three categories: dynamic stability, spontaneous stability, and rough combustion. This work focuses on comparing the spontaneous stability and rough combustion assessments for several liquid engine programs. The techniques used are those developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator program. Stability assessment data from the Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD), FASTRAC, and Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) programs are compared against previously processed J-2X Gas Generator data. Prior metrics for spontaneous stability assessments are updated based on the compilation of all data sets.

  12. Meta-Assessment in a Project-Based Systems Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengrowicz, Niva; Dori, Yehudit Judy; Dori, Dov

    2017-01-01

    Project-based learning (PBL) facilitates significant learning, but it poses a major assessment challenge for assessing individual content knowledge. We developed and implemented an assessment approach and tool for a mandatory undergraduate systems engineering PBL-based course. We call this type of assessment "student-oriented"…

  13. Engineering Crack Formation in Carbon Nanotube-Silver Nanoparticle Composite Films for Sensitive and Durable Piezoresistive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Hoang, Phong; Salazar, Nicolas; Porkka, Thomas Nolan; Joshi, Kunal; Liu, Tao; Dickens, Tarik J.; Yu, Zhibin

    2016-09-01

    We report highly sensitive and reliable strain sensors based on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite thin films. The CNT/AgNP was prepared by a screen printing process using a mixture of a CNT paste and an AgNP ink. It is discovered that the sensitivity of such sensors are highly dependent on the crack formation in the composites. By altering the substrate use and the relative ratios of AgNPs and CNTs, the formation and propagation of cracks can be properly engineered, leading to piezoresistive strain sensors with enhanced sensitivity and robustness.

  14. Engineering Crack Formation in Carbon Nanotube-Silver Nanoparticle Composite Films for Sensitive and Durable Piezoresistive Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Hoang, Phong; Salazar, Nicolas; Porkka, Thomas Nolan; Joshi, Kunal; Liu, Tao; Dickens, Tarik J; Yu, Zhibin

    2016-12-01

    We report highly sensitive and reliable strain sensors based on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) and carbon nanotube (CNT) composite thin films. The CNT/AgNP was prepared by a screen printing process using a mixture of a CNT paste and an AgNP ink. It is discovered that the sensitivity of such sensors are highly dependent on the crack formation in the composites. By altering the substrate use and the relative ratios of AgNPs and CNTs, the formation and propagation of cracks can be properly engineered, leading to piezoresistive strain sensors with enhanced sensitivity and robustness.

  15. Integrated probabilistic risk assessment for nanoparticles: the case of nanosilica in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Rianne, E-mail: rianne.jacobs@wur.nl; Voet, Hilko van der; Braak, Cajo J. F. ter [Wageningen University and Research Centre, Biometris (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Insight into risks of nanotechnology and the use of nanoparticles is an essential condition for the social acceptance and safe use of nanotechnology. One of the problems with which the risk assessment of nanoparticles is faced is the lack of data, resulting in uncertainty in the risk assessment. We attempt to quantify some of this uncertainty by expanding a previous deterministic study on nanosilica (5–200 nm) in food into a fully integrated probabilistic risk assessment. We use the integrated probabilistic risk assessment method in which statistical distributions and bootstrap methods are used to quantify uncertainty and variability in the risk assessment. Due to the large amount of uncertainty present, this probabilistic method, which separates variability from uncertainty, contributed to a better understandable risk assessment. We found that quantifying the uncertainties did not increase the perceived risk relative to the outcome of the deterministic study. We pinpointed particular aspects of the hazard characterization that contributed most to the total uncertainty in the risk assessment, suggesting that further research would benefit most from obtaining more reliable data on those aspects.

  16. Integrated probabilistic risk assessment for nanoparticles: the case of nanosilica in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Rianne; van der Voet, Hilko; ter Braak, Cajo J. F.

    2015-06-01

    Insight into risks of nanotechnology and the use of nanoparticles is an essential condition for the social acceptance and safe use of nanotechnology. One of the problems with which the risk assessment of nanoparticles is faced is the lack of data, resulting in uncertainty in the risk assessment. We attempt to quantify some of this uncertainty by expanding a previous deterministic study on nanosilica (5-200 nm) in food into a fully integrated probabilistic risk assessment. We use the integrated probabilistic risk assessment method in which statistical distributions and bootstrap methods are used to quantify uncertainty and variability in the risk assessment. Due to the large amount of uncertainty present, this probabilistic method, which separates variability from uncertainty, contributed to a better understandable risk assessment. We found that quantifying the uncertainties did not increase the perceived risk relative to the outcome of the deterministic study. We pinpointed particular aspects of the hazard characterization that contributed most to the total uncertainty in the risk assessment, suggesting that further research would benefit most from obtaining more reliable data on those aspects.

  17. Interfacing engineered nanoparticles with biological systems: anticipating adverse nano-bio interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaz, Beatriz; Charron, Gaëlle; Pfeiffer, Christian; Zhao, Yuliang; de la Fuente, Jesus M; Liang, Xing-Jie; Parak, Wolfgang J; Del Pino, Pablo

    2013-05-27

    The innovative use of engineered nanomaterials in medicine, be it in therapy or diagnosis, is growing dramatically. This is motivated by the current extraordinary control over the synthesis of complex nanomaterials with a variety of biological functions (e.g. contrast agents, drug-delivery systems, transducers, amplifiers, etc.). Engineered nanomaterials are found in the bio-context with a variety of applications in fields such as sensing, imaging, therapy or diagnosis. As the degree of control to fabricate customized novel and/or enhanced nanomaterials evolves, often new applications, devices with enhanced performance or unprecedented sensing limits can be achieved. Of course, interfacing any novel material with biological systems has to be critically analyzed as many undesirable adverse effects can be triggered (e.g. toxicity, allergy, genotoxicity, etc.) and/or the performance of the nanomaterial can be compromised due to the unexpected phenomena in physiological environments (e.g. corrosion, aggregation, unspecific absorption of biomolecules, etc.). Despite the need for standard protocols for assessing the toxicity and bio-performance of each new functional nanomaterial, these are still scarce or currently under development. Nonetheless, nanotoxicology and relating adverse effects to the physico-chemical properties of nanomaterials are emerging areas of the utmost importance which have to be continuously revisited as any new material emerges. This review highlights recent progress concerning the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems and following adverse effects.

  18. Creative engineering design assessment background, directions, manual, scoring guide and uses

    CERN Document Server

    Charyton, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The Creative Engineering Design Assessment or CEDA is a newly developed tool to assess creativity specific to engineering design which is vital for innovation. The revised CEDA assesses usefulness in addition to originality.  Both originality and usefulness are key constructs in creativity but are primarily essential and emphasized ever more in engineering design.  Since the preliminary research was presented to the National Science Foundation, further reliability and validity has been developed and established. The CEDA is different from other general creativity measures as it demonstrates discriminant validity with the Creative Personality Scale, Creative Temperament Scale, and the Cognitive Risk Tolerance Scale, and has demonstrated convergent validity with the Purdue Creativity Test and the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test- Rotations. It focuses on engineering specific measures, measuring engineering creativity and spatial skills. The aim of this book is to disseminate the CEDA tool for use in engin...

  19. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  20. Life Cycle Assessment Framework for Indoor Emissions of Synthetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a well-established method to evaluate impacts of chemicals on the environment and human health along the lifespan of products. However, the increasingly produced and applied nanomaterials (defined as one dimension <100 nm) show particular characteri...

  1. A qualitative assessment of preservice elementary teachers' formative perceptions regarding engineering and K-12 engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Dennis Eugene

    Current teacher education programs provide limited instruction for preservice elementary teachers regarding the incorporation or teaching of engineering concepts and skills in their classrooms. Few studies have been conducted that focus specifically on preservice elementary teachers' formative perceptions and receptivity towards engineering education. That is, not enough is known about what preservice teachers know and think about engineering. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to investigate how forty-four preservice elementary teachers' from a large Midwestern university approached engineering design, the perceptions of engineering and K-12 engineering education that they possessed, and their level of receptiveness with regards to K-12 engineering education. Data were collected using a demographic survey, journal entries, observations, and focus group discussions. The written, verbal, and visual data collected in this study were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis, which consisted of inductively developing categories and codes after repeatedly examining the data. The results of the study indicate that the preservice elementary teachers did not utilize any deliberate design process when engaged in a design task. Engineering was perceived as being synonymous with construction and that engineering design consists of trial and error. Participants envisioned their students succeeding in engineering due to their students' prior knowledge, not necessarily the actions of themselves as the teacher. With regards to receptivity, participants expressed apprehension and optimism along with fear and pessimism. Tangential factors also impacted the receptivity of participants.

  2. Assessment of Communication Competencies in Engineering Design Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Gert W.; Geest, van der Thea M.

    2003-01-01

    Reforms in engineering education have caused a shift from the traditional stand-alone course in technical communication for Engineering students towards communication training integrated in courses and design projects that allows students to develop four layers of competence. This shift creates oppo

  3. Effect of engineered TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles on erythrocytes, platelet-rich plasma and giant unilamelar phospholipid vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimundić Metka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massive industrial production of engineered nanoparticles poses questions about health risks to living beings. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, we studied the effects of TiO2 and ZnO agglomerated engineered nanoparticles (EPs on erythrocytes, platelet-rich plasma and on suspensions of giant unilamelar phospholipid vesicles. Results Washed erythrocytes, platelet-rich plasma and suspensions of giant unilamelar phospholipid vesicles were incubated with samples of EPs. These samples were observed by different microscopic techniques. We found that TiO2 and ZnO EPs adhered to the membrane of washed human and canine erythrocytes. TiO2 and ZnO EPs induced coalescence of human erythrocytes. Addition of TiO2 and ZnO EPs to platelet-rich plasma caused activation of human platelets after 24 hours and 3 hours, respectively, while in canine erythrocytes, activation of platelets due to ZnO EPs occurred already after 1 hour. To assess the effect of EPs on a representative sample of giant unilamelar phospholipid vesicles, analysis of the recorded populations was improved by applying the principles of statistical physics. TiO2 EPs did not induce any notable effect on giant unilamelar phospholipid vesicles within 50 minutes of incubation, while ZnO EPs induced a decrease in the number of giant unilamelar phospholipid vesicles that was statistically significant (p  Conclusions These results indicate that TiO2 and ZnO EPs cause erythrocyte aggregation and could be potentially prothrombogenic, while ZnO could also cause membrane rupture.

  4. Assessment of a 40-kilowatt stirling engine for underground mining applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairelli, J. E.; Kelm, G. G.; Slaby, J. G.

    1982-06-01

    An assessment of alternative power souces for underground mining applications was performed. A 40-kW Stirling research engine was tested to evaluate its performance and emission characteristics when operated with helium working gas and diesel fuel. The engine, the test facility, and the test procedures are described. Performance and emission data for the engine operating with helium working gas and diesel fuel are reported and compared with data obtained with hydrogen working gas and unleaded gasoline fuel. Helium diesel test results are compared with the characteristics of current diesel engines and other Stirling engines. External surface temperature data are also presented. Emission and temperature results are compared with the Federal requirements for diesel underground mine engines. The durability potential of Stirling engines is discussed on the basis of the experience gaind during the engine tests.

  5. Method for assessing the reliability of molecular diagnostics based on multiplexed SERS-coded nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Y Leigh

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS nanoparticles have been engineered to generate unique fingerprint spectra and are potentially useful as bright contrast agents for molecular diagnostics. One promising strategy for biomedical diagnostics and imaging is to functionalize various particle types ("flavors", each emitting a unique spectral signature, to target a large multiplexed panel of molecular biomarkers. While SERS particles emit narrow spectral features that allow them to be easily separable under ideal conditions, the presence of competing noise sources and background signals such as detector noise, laser background, and autofluorescence confounds the reliability of demultiplexing algorithms. Results obtained during time-constrained in vivo imaging experiments may not be reproducible or accurate. Therefore, our goal is to provide experimentalists with a metric that may be monitored to enforce a desired bound on accuracy within a user-defined confidence level. We have defined a spectral reliability index (SRI, based on the output of a direct classical least-squares (DCLS demultiplexing routine, which provides a measure of the reliability of the computed nanoparticle concentrations and ratios. We present simulations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this strategy, which can potentially be utilized for a range of instruments and biomedical applications involving multiplexed SERS nanoparticles.

  6. Engineering biomaterial surfaces using nanoparticle assemblies: A new paradigm for modulating cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipski, Anna Marie

    Silica nanoparticles (NP) were investigated as a surface modification medium and their impact on cell function was studied. This work has demonstrated that NP assemblies are suitable for the surface modification of both metal and polymer substrates. Additionally, important surface parameters, such as nano-roughness, charge, and chemistry, can be imparted in a predictable manner. More importantly, by varying the NP size, nano-roughness of a surface can be varied independent of chemistry. Two terminally differentiated mammalian cell types, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) and murine calvarial osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1), were used to probe the effects of nano-topography on cell proliferation, metabolic activity, spreading, cytoskeletal F-actin alignment, and focal adhesion recruitment. Furthermore, the influence of nano-topography on cell migration was studied using BAEC and human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB). The results suggested that surface nano-rugosity affects cell behavior at various levels and that these effects are cell type specific; however, some clear trends were discerned with respect to F-actin alignment and cell migration. In particular, presentation of nano-features resulted in enhancement of cytoskeletal F-actin alignment along the long axis of the cells in comparison to unmodified glass. With respect to cell migration, increased nano-roughness resulted in decreased migration rates for both BAEC and hFOB. Finally, the potential of nano-rugosity as a mediator of cell differentiation was investigated by following the lineage specific differentiation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC) on NP-modified 316L stainless steel and titanium substrates. It was observed that NP modification enhanced the differentiation of MPC into an osteogenic lineage and that rugosity appeared to be the dominant factor in directing this differentiation. Thus, coatings composed of silica NPs presented a new paradigm that may lend themselves to

  7. Combustion synthesis and engineering nanoparticles for electronic, structural and superconductor applications. Final report, May 31, 1992--May 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stangle, G.C.; Schulze, W.A.; Amarakoon, V.R.W.

    1996-05-30

    Dense, nanocrystalline ceramic articles of doped ZrO{sub 2} (for use in solid electrolytes, oxygen sensors, electrode materials, thermal barrier coatings, etc.), BaTiO{sub 3} (for capacitor applications), and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (a high-temperature superconductor with uses, e.g., in magnetic flux trapping and high-speed capacitor applications) were prepared by the new nanofabrication process that has been developed in this research program. The process consists of two steps: synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles, and fabrication of dense ceramic articles that possess nanocrystalline features. The synthesis step is capable of producing 10-nanometer-diameter crystallites of doped ZrO{sub 2}, and of being scaled up to kilogram/hour production rates. The fabrication step produced dense, ultrafine-grained articles at significantly reduced sintering temperatures and times--representing a factor of 10-100 reduction in process energy requirements. The process has thus been shown to be technically feasible, while a preliminary engineering cost analysis of a pilot plant-scale version of the process indicates that it is both a cost- and an energy-efficient method of producing nanoparticles and nanocrystalline ceramics from those nanoparticles. One U.S. patent for this process has been allowed, and an additional five (continuation-in-part) applications have been filed. Technology transfer efforts have begun, through ongoing discussions with representatives from three manufacturing concerns.

  8. Hybrid composites made of multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with Fe3O4 nanoparticles for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, C.; Panseri, S.; Iannazzo, D.; Piperno, A.; Pistone, A.; Fazio, M.; Russo, A.; Marcacci, M.; Galvagno, S.

    2012-11-01

    A straightforward technique for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles was developed. Iron oxide nanoparticles were deposited on MWCNT surfaces by a deposition-precipitation method using Fe3+/Fe2+ salts precursors in basic solution. The characterizations by HRTEM, XRD, SEM/EDX, AAS and TPR analyses confirmed the successful formation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on the MWCNT surface. Fe3O4/MWCNT hybrid composites were analysed in vitro by incubation with mesenchymal stem cells for 1, 3 and 7 days, either in the presence or absence of a static magnetic field. Analysis of cell proliferation was performed by the MTT assay, quantification of cellular stress was performed by the Lactate Dehydrogenase assay and analysis of cell morphology was performed by actin immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Results demonstrate that the introduction of magnetite into the MWCNT structure increases biocompatibility of oxidized MWCNTs. In addition, the presence of a static magnetic field further increases Fe3O4/MWCNT influence on cell behaviour. These results demonstrate this novel Fe3O4/MWCNT hybrid composite has good potential for tissue engineering applications.

  9. In Vitro Toxicity Evaluation of Engineered Cadmium-Coated Silica Nanoparticles on Human Pulmonary Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uliana De Simone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity of cadmium-containing silica nanoparticles Cd-SiO2NPs (0.05–100 µg/mL versus SiO2NPs and CdCl2 was evaluated by an in vitro test battery in A549 by assessing (i mitochondrial function, (ii membrane integrity/cell morphology, (iii cell growth/proliferation, (iv apoptotic pathway, (v oxidative stress, after short- (24–48 h and long-term (10 days exposure. Both Cd-SiO2NPs and CdCl2 produced dose-dependent cytotoxic effects: (i MTT-assay: similar cytotoxicity pattern was observed at both 24 and 48 h, with a more Cd-SiO2NPs pronounced effect than CdCl2. Cd-SiO2NPs induced mortality (about 50% at 1 μg/mL, CdCl2 at 25 μg/mL; (ii calcein-AM/PI staining: decrease in cell viability, noticeable at 25 μg/mL, enhanced markedly at 50 and 100 μg/mL, after 24 h. Cd-SiO2NPs induced higher mortality than CdCl2 (25% versus 4%, resp., at 25 μg/mL with further exacerbation after 48h; (iii clonogenic assay: exposure for longer period (10 days compromised the A549 proliferative capacity at very low dose (0.05 μg/mL; (iv a progressive activation of caspase-3 immunolabelling was detected already at 1 μg/mL; (v GSH intracellular level was modified by all compounds. In summary, in vitro data demonstrated that both Cd-SiO2NPs and CdCl2 affected all investigated endpoints, more markedly after Cd-SiO2NPs, while SiO2NPs influenced GSH only.

  10. How to assess exposure of aquatic organisms to manufactured nanoparticles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quik, Joris T.K.; Vonk, Jan Arie; Hansen, Steffen Foss;

    2011-01-01

    Ecological risk of chemicals is measured by the quotient of predicted no-effect concentrations and predicted exposure concentrations, which are hard to assess for manufactured nanomaterials (NMs). This paper proposes modifications to currently used models, in order to make them suitable for estim......Ecological risk of chemicals is measured by the quotient of predicted no-effect concentrations and predicted exposure concentrations, which are hard to assess for manufactured nanomaterials (NMs). This paper proposes modifications to currently used models, in order to make them suitable...... for estimating exposure concentrations of NMs in the aquatic environment. We have evaluated the adequacy of the current guidance documents for use with NMs and conclude that nano-specific fate processes, such as sedimentation and dissolution need to be incorporated. We have reviewed the literature...... on sedimentation and dissolution of NMs in environmentally relevant systems. We deduce that the overall kinetics of water–sediment transport of NMs should be close to first order. The lack of data on dissolution of NMs under environmentally realistic conditions calls for a pragmatic decision on which rates...

  11. Adsorption of doxorubicin on citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: insights into engineering potent chemotherapeutic delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Dennis; Cameron, Amanda; MacDonald, Bruce; Nganou, Collins; Scheller, Hope; Marsh, James; Beale, Stefanie; Lu, Mingsheng; Shan, Zhi; Kaliaperumal, Rajendran; Xu, Heping; Servos, Mark; Bennett, Craig; Macquarrie, Stephanie; Oakes, Ken D.; Mkandawire, Martin; Zhang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied. Here, for the first time, we propose empirical and theoretical evidence suggestive of the main adsorption process where (1) hydrophobic forces drive doxorubicin towards the gold nanoparticle surface before (2) cation-π interactions and gold-carbonyl coordination between the drug molecule and the cations on AuNP surface facilitate DOX adsorption. In addition, biologically relevant compounds, such as serum albumin and glutathione, were shown to enhance desorption of loaded drug molecules from AuNP at physiologically relevant concentrations, providing insight into the drug release and in vivo stability of such drug conjugates.Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied

  12. Engineering of a novel adjuvant based on lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles: A quality-by-design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Fabrice; Wern, Jeanette Erbo; Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; van de Weert, Marco; Andersen, Peter; Follmann, Frank; Foged, Camilla

    2015-07-28

    The purpose of this study was to design a novel and versatile adjuvant intended for mucosal vaccination based on biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) modified with the cationic surfactant dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and the immunopotentiator trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) (CAF01) to tailor humoral and cellular immunity characterized by antibodies and Th1/Th17 responses. Such responses are important for the protection against diseases caused by intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The hybrid NPs were engineered using an oil-in-water single emulsion method and a quality-by-design approach was adopted to define the optimal operating space (OOS). Four critical process parameters (CPPs) were identified, including the acetone concentration in the water phase, the stabilizer [polyvinylalcohol (PVA)] concentration, the lipid-to-total solid ratio, and the total concentration. The CPPs were linked to critical quality attributes consisting of the particle size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta-potential, thermotropic phase behavior, yield and stability. A central composite face-centered design was performed followed by multiple linear regression analysis. The size, PDI, enthalpy of the phase transition and yield were successfully modeled, whereas the models for the zeta-potential and the stability were poor. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy revealed that the main structural effect on the nanoparticle architecture is caused by the use of PVA, and two different morphologies were identified: i) A PLGA core coated with one or several concentric lipid bilayers, and ii) a PLGA nanoshell encapsulating lipid membrane structures. The optimal formulation, identified from the OOS, was evaluated in vivo. The hybrid NPs induced antibody and Th1/Th17 immune responses that were similar in quality and magnitude to the response induced by DDA/TDB liposomes, showing that the adjuvant

  13. Consideration of interaction between nanoparticles and food components for the safety assessment of nanoparticles following oral exposure: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Juan; Liu, Fang; Li, Xiyue; Jiang, Qin; Cheng, Shanshan; Gu, Yuxiu

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used in food, and the toxicity of NPs following oral exposure should be carefully assessed to ensure the safety. Indeed, a number of studies have shown that oral exposure to NPs, especially solid NPs, may induce toxicological responses both in vivo and in vitro. However, most of the toxicological studies only used NPs for oral exposure, and the potential interaction between NPs and food components in real life was ignored. In this review, we summarized the relevant studies and suggested that the interaction between NPs and food components may exist by that 1) NPs directly affect nutrients absorption through disruption of microvilli or alteration in expression of nutrient transporter genes; 2) food components directly affect NP absorption through physico-chemical modification; 3) the presence of food components affect oxidative stress induced by NPs. All of these interactions may eventually enhance or reduce the toxicological responses induced by NPs following oral exposure. Studies only using NPs for oral exposure may therefore lead to misinterpretation and underestimation/overestimation of toxicity of NPs, and it is necessary to assess the synergistic effects of NPs in a complex system when considering the safety of NPs used in food.

  14. Stability of engineered nanomaterials in complex aqueous matrices: Settling behaviour of CeO2 nanoparticles in natural surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Koetsem, Frederik; Verstraete, Simon; Van der Meeren, Paul; Du Laing, Gijs

    2015-10-01

    The stability of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in complex aqueous matrices is a key determinant of their fate and potential toxicity towards the aquatic environment and human health. Metal oxide nanoparticles, such as CeO2 ENPs, are increasingly being incorporated into a wide range of industrial and commercial applications, which will undoubtedly result in their (unintentional) release into the environment. Hereby, the behaviour and fate of CeO2 ENPs could potentially serve as model for other nanoparticles that possess similar characteristics. The present study examined the stability and settling of CeO2 ENPs (7.3±1.4 nm) as well as Ce(3+) ions in 10 distinct natural surface waters during 7d, under stagnant and isothermal experimental conditions. Natural water samples were collected throughout Flanders (Belgium) and were thoroughly characterized. For the majority of the surface waters, a substantial depletion (>95%) of the initially added CeO2 ENPs was observed just below the liquid surface of the water samples after 7d. In all cases, the reduction was considerably higher for CeO2 ENPs than for Ce(3+) ions (CeO2 ENPs (R(2)≥0.998) and Ce(3+) ions (R(2)≥0.812) from the water column, at least in case notable sedimentation occurred over time. Solution-pH appeared to be a prime parameter governing nanoparticle colloidal stability. Moreover, the suspended solids (TSS) content also seemed to be an important factor affecting the settling rate and residual fraction of CeO2 ENPs as well as Ce(3+) ions in natural surface waters. Correlation results also suggest potential association and co-precipitation of CeO2 ENPs with aluminium- and iron-containing natural colloidal material. The CeO2 ENPs remained stable in dispersion in surface water characterized by a low pH, ionic strength (IS), and TSS content, indicating the eventual stability and settling behaviour of the nanoparticles was likely determined by a combination of physicochemical parameters. Finally, ionic

  15. The effects of engineered nanoparticles on survival, reproduction, and behaviour of freshwater snail, Physa acuta (Draparnaud, 1805).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musee, N; Oberholster, P J; Sikhwivhilu, L; Botha, A-M

    2010-11-01

    Increasing uses of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in commercial products and industrial applications has eventually resulted to their releases into atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic environments. However, knowledge gaps in ENPs toxicity, fate, and behaviour currently limit our ability to quantify risk assessment of materials with nanoscale dimensions, and therefore, the extent of the resultant environmental impacts remains unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of γ-alumina, α-alumina, modified TiO(2) (M-TiO(2)), and commercial TiO(2) (C-TiO(2)) ENPs on the survival, behaviour, and early life stages of the freshwater snail Physa acuta (Draparnaud). The toxicity evaluation was carried out after spiking commercial sand with ENPs concentrations of 0.005, 0.05, or 0.5 gk g(-1). Our findings suggest that increases of γ-alumina and α-alumina concentrations at sub-lethal level concentrations caused significant reduction in the embryo growth rate and embryo hatchability. In addition, these ENPs induced observable developmental deformities of the embryos. In addition, toxicity evaluations using acute 96-h and chronic 28-d tests showed exposure duration may be a significant factor in ENPs-induced toxicity. Therefore, long-term exposure of aquatic organisms to ENPs - potentially can alter certain ecological populations at different trophic levels - and may compromise the entire aquatic ecological functionality. The percentage hatchlings in test chambers containing 0.5 gk g(-1) γ-alumina and α-alumina concentration was 50% less to those observed in the controls. Our results suggest the embryonic growth and hatchability tests are useful endpoints in chronic sediment toxicity tests for determining the toxic thresholds of ENPs in sediment environment. Although no snail mortalities were observed during the static 96-h test containing sediment spiked with different concentrations of M-TiO(2), C-TiO(2), γ-alumina and α-alumina - the antioxidant

  16. Synthesis and surface engineering of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Mona

    2005-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with appropriate surface chemistry have been widely used experimentally for numerous in vivo applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery and in cell separation, etc. All these biomedical and bioengineering applications require that these nanoparticles have high magnetization values and size smaller than 100 nm with overall narrow particle size distribution, so that the particles have uniform physical and chemical properties. In addition, these applications need special surface coating of the magnetic particles, which has to be not only non-toxic and biocompatible but also allow a targetable delivery with particle localization in a specific area. To this end, most work in this field has been done in improving the biocompatibility of the materials, but only a few scientific investigations and developments have been carried out in improving the quality of magnetic particles, their size distribution, their shape and surface in addition to characterizing them to get a protocol for the quality control of these particles. Nature of surface coatings and their subsequent geometric arrangement on the nanoparticles determine not only the overall size of the colloid but also play a significant role in biokinetics and biodistribution of nanoparticles in the body. The types of specific coating, or derivatization, for these nanoparticles depend on the end application and should be chosen by keeping a particular application in mind, whether it be aimed at inflammation response or anti-cancer agents. Magnetic nanoparticles can bind to drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, or nucleotides and can be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumour using an external magnetic field or can be heated in alternating magnetic fields for use in hyperthermia. This review discusses the synthetic chemistry, fluid stabilization and

  17. Support vector machine to predict diesel engine performance and emission parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For SVM modelling, different values for radial basis function (RBF) kernel width and penalty parameters (C) were considered and the optimum values were then found. The results demonstrate that SVM is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve complete combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  18. Assessing Information-Seeking Behavior of Computer Science and Engineering Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Valerie K.

    2011-01-01

    This study, the first phase of a multi-phase effort, was undertaken to assess and provide for the information needs of the Faculty of the Schools of Science and Engineering at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) in the digital age. The objectives of this phase were to: 1) gain an in-depth understanding of how computer science and engineering faculty…

  19. A Process Analysis of Engineering Problem Solving and Assessment of Problem Solving Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    In the engineering profession, one of the most critical skills to possess is accurate and efficient problem solving. Thus, engineering educators should strive to help students develop skills needed to become competent problem solvers. In order to measure the development of skills, it is necessary to assess student performance, identify any…

  20. A Risk Assessment Architecture for Enhanced Engine Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sharp. Lauren M.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2010-01-01

    On very rare occasions, in-flight emergencies have occurred that required the pilot to utilize the aircraft's capabilities to the fullest extent possible, sometimes using actuators in ways for which they were not intended. For instance, when flight control has been lost due to damage to the hydraulic systems, pilots have had to use engine thrust to maneuver the plane to the ground and in for a landing. To assist the pilot in these situations, research is being performed to enhance the engine operation by making it more responsive or able to generate more thrust. Enabled by modification of the propulsion control, enhanced engine operation can increase the probability of a safe landing during an inflight emergency. However, enhanced engine operation introduces risk as the nominal control limits, such as those on shaft speed, temperature, and acceleration, are exceeded. Therefore, an on-line tool for quantifying this risk must be developed to ensure that the use of an enhanced control mode does not actually increase the overall danger to the aircraft. This paper describes an architecture for the implementation of this tool. It describes the type of data and algorithms required and the information flow, and how the risk based on engine component lifing and operability for enhanced operation is determined.

  1. Assessment of potential asbestos exposures from jet engine overhaul work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarek, S P; Van Orden, D R

    2012-06-01

    Asbestos fibers have been used in a wide variety of products and numerous studies have shown that exposures from the use or manipulation of these products can vary widely. Jet engines contained various components (gaskets, clamps, o-rings and insulation) that contained asbestos that potentially could release airborne fibers during routine maintenance or during an engine overhaul. To evaluate the potential exposures to aircraft mechanics, a Pratt & Whitney JT3D jet engine was obtained and overhauled by experienced mechanics using tools and work practices similar to those used since the time this engine was manufactured. This study has demonstrated that the disturbance of asbestos-containing gaskets, o-rings, and other types of asbestos-containing components, while performing overhaul work to a jet engine produces very few airborne fibers, and that virtually none of these aerosolized fibers is asbestos. The overhaul work was observed to be dirty and oily. The exposures to the mechanics and bystanders were several orders of magnitude below OSHA exposure regulations, both current and historic. The data presented underscore the lack of risk to the health of persons conducting this work and to other persons in proximity to it from airborne asbestos.

  2. Biodistribution and toxicity of engineered gold nanoparticles: a review of in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Dykman, Lev

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in wet chemical synthesis and biomolecular functionalization of gold nanoparticles have led to a dramatic expansion of their potential biomedical applications, including biosensorics, bioimaging, photothermal therapy, and targeted drug delivery. As the range of gold nanoparticle types and their applications continues to increase, human safety concerns are gaining attention, which makes it necessary to better understand the potential toxicity hazards of these novel materials. Whereas about 80 reports on the in vivo biodistribution and in vitro cell toxicity of gold nanoparticles are available in the literature, there is lack of correlation between both fields and there is no clear understanding of intrinsic nanoparticle effects. At present, the major obstacle is the significant discrepancy in experimental conditions under which biodistribution and toxicity effects have been evaluated. This critical review presents a detailed analysis of data on the in vitro and in vivo biodistribution and toxicity of most popular gold nanoparticles, including atomic clusters and colloidal particles of diameters from 1 to 200 nm, gold nanoshells, nanorods, and nanowires. Emphasis is placed on the systematization of data over particle types and parameters, particle surface functionalization, animal and cell models, organs examined, doses applied, the type of particle administration and the time of examination, assays for evaluating gold particle toxicity, and methods for determining the gold concentration in organs and distribution of particles over cells. On the basis of a critical analysis of data, we arrive at some general conclusions on key nanoparticle parameters, methods of particle surface modification, and doses administered that determine the type and kinetics of biodistribution and toxicity at cellular and organismal levels (197 references).

  3. Using engineered single-chain antibodies to correlate molecular binding properties and nanoparticle adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jered B; Pepper, Lauren R; Boder, Eric T; Hammer, Daniel A

    2011-11-15

    Elucidation of the relationship between targeting molecule binding properties and the adhesive behavior of therapeutic or diagnostic nanocarriers would aid in the design of optimized vectors and lead to improved efficacy. We measured the adhesion of 200-nm-diameter particles under fluid flow that was mediated by a diverse array of molecular interactions, including recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs), full antibodies, and the avidin/biotin interaction. Within the panel of scFvs, we used a family of mutants that display a spectrum of binding kinetics, allowing us to compare nanoparticle adhesion to bond chemistry. In addition, we explored the effect of molecular size by inserting a protein linker into the scFv fusion construct and by employing scFvs that are specific for targets with vastly different sizes. Using computational models, we extracted multivalent kinetic rate constants for particle attachment and detachment from the adhesion data and correlated the results to molecular binding properties. Our results indicate that the factors that increase encounter probability, such as adhesion molecule valency and size, directly enhance the rate of nanoparticle attachment. Bond kinetics had no influence on scFv-mediated nanoparticle attachment within the kinetic range tested, however, but did appear to affect antibody/antigen and avidin/biotin mediated adhesion. We attribute this finding to a combination of multivalent binding and differences in bond mechanical strength between recombinant scFvs and the other adhesion molecules. Nanoparticle detachment probability correlated directly with adhesion molecule valency and size, as well as the logarithm of the affinity for all molecules tested. On the basis of this work, scFvs can serve as viable targeting receptors for nanoparticles, but improvements to their bond mechanical strength would likely be required to fully exploit their tunable kinetic properties and maximize the adhesion efficiency of nanoparticles that

  4. R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

  5. Surface engineering of Co and FeCo nanoparticles for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Silke; Bönnemann, Helmut; Matoussevitch, Nina; Gorschinski, Angelika; Dinjus, Eckhard; Habicht, Wilhelm; Bolle, Jens; Zinoveva, Svetlana; Palina, Natalie; Hormes, Josef; Modrow, Hartwig; Bahr, Stephan; Kempter, Volker

    2006-09-01

    Monodisperse Co, Fe, and FeCo nanoparticles are prepared via thermal decomposition of metal carbonyls in the presence of aluminium alkyls, yielding air-stable magnetic metal nanoparticles after surface passivation. The particles are characterized by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, ESI), electron spectroscopy (MIES, UPS, and XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The particles are peptized by surfactants to form stable magnetic fluids in various organic media and water, exhibiting a high volume concentration and a high saturation magnetization. In view of potential biomedical applications of the particles, several procedures for surface modification are presented, including peptization by functional organic molecules, silanization, and in situ polymerization.

  6. Surface engineering of Co and FeCo nanoparticles for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Silke [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, Bereich Chemisch-Physikalische-Verfahren, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Boennemann, Helmut [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, Bereich Chemisch-Physikalische-Verfahren, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Matoussevitch, Nina [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, Bereich Chemisch-Physikalische-Verfahren, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gorschinski, Angelika [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, Bereich Chemisch-Physikalische-Verfahren, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dinjus, Eckhard [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, Bereich Chemisch-Physikalische-Verfahren, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Habicht, Wilhelm [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, Bereich Chemisch-Physikalische-Verfahren, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bolle, Jens [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, Bereich Wasser-Geotechnologie, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zinoveva, Svetlana [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12-14, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Palina, Natalie [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12-14, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Hormes, Josef [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12-14, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Modrow, Hartwig [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12-14, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Bahr, Stephan [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, TU Clausthal, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Kempter, Volker [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, TU Clausthal, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2006-09-27

    Monodisperse Co, Fe, and FeCo nanoparticles are prepared via thermal decomposition of metal carbonyls in the presence of aluminium alkyls, yielding air-stable magnetic metal nanoparticles after surface passivation. The particles are characterized by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, ESI), electron spectroscopy (MIES, UPS, and XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The particles are peptized by surfactants to form stable magnetic fluids in various organic media and water, exhibiting a high volume concentration and a high saturation magnetization. In view of potential biomedical applications of the particles, several procedures for surface modification are presented, including peptization by functional organic molecules, silanization, and in situ polymerization.

  7. In situ assessment of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces by multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Antonio; Su, Ge; Nobili, Maurizio; In, Martin; Wang, Dayang

    2014-09-28

    Here multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry was successfully applied to in situ assess the contact angle and surface coverage of gold nanoparticles as small as 18 nm, coated with stimuli-responsive polymers, at water-oil and water-air interfaces in the presence of NaCl and NaOH, respectively. The interfacial adsorption of the nanoparticles was found to be very slow and took days to reach a fairly low surface coverage. For water-oil interfaces, in situ nanoparticle contact angles agree with the macroscopic equilibrium contact angles of planar gold surfaces with the same polymer coatings, whilst for water-air interfaces, significant differences have been observed.

  8. Developing Instrumentation for Assessing Creativity in Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Cameron D.; Buelin, Jennifer K.; Lammi, Matthew D.; D'Amico, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A perceived inability to assess creative attributes of students' work has often precluded creativity instruction in the classroom. The Consensual Assessment Technique (CAT) has shown promise in a variety of domains for its potential as a valid and reliable means of creativity assessment. Relying upon an operational definition of creativity and a…

  9. Assess/Mitigate Risk through the Use of Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to perform an independent assessment of the mitigation of the Constellation Program (CxP) Risk 4421 through the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools. With the cancellation of the CxP, the assessment goals were modified to capture lessons learned and best practices in the use of CASE tools. The assessment goal was to prepare the next program for the use of these CASE tools. The outcome of the assessment is contained in this document.

  10. Creation of Novel Solid-Solution Alloy Nanoparticles on the Basis of Density-of-States Engineering by Interelement Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kusada, Kohei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-06-16

    Currently 118 known elements are represented in the periodic table. Of these 118 elements, only about 80 elements are stable, nonradioactive, and widely available for our society. From the viewpoint of the "elements strategy", we need to make full use of the 80 elements to bring out their latent ability and create innovative materials. Furthermore, there is a strong demand that the use of rare or toxic elements be reduced or replaced while their important properties are retained. Advanced science and technology could create higher-performance materials even while replacing or reducing minor or harmful elements through the combination of more abundant elements. The properties of elements are correlated directly with their electronic states. In a solid, the magnitude of the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level affects the physical and chemical properties. In the present age, more attention has been paid to improving the properties of materials by means of alloying elements. In particular, the solid-solution-type alloy is advantageous because the properties can be continuously controlled by tuning the compositions and/or combinations of the constituent elements. However, the majority of bulk alloys are of the phase-separated type under ambient conditions, where constituent elements are immiscible with each other. To overcome the challenge of the bulk-phase metallurgical aspects, we have focused on the nanosize effect and developed methods involving "nonequilibrium synthesis" or "a process of hydrogen absorption/desorption". We propose a new concept of "density-of-states engineering" for the design of materials having the most desirable and suitable properties by means of "interelement fusion". In this Account, we describe novel solid-solution alloys of Pd-Pt, Ag-Rh, and Pd-Ru systems in which the constituent elements are immiscible in the bulk state. The homogeneous solid-solution alloys of Pd and Pt were created from Pd core/Pt shell nanoparticles using a

  11. Decision Topology Assessment in Engineering Design Under Uncertainity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Mechanical Engineering Department,Oakland University,2200 N. Squirrel Road,Rochester,Mi,48309 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...System Failure Identification using Linear Algebra: Application to Cost-Reliability Tradeoffs under Uncertain Preferences,” Proceedings of SAE World

  12. Assessing infection risk in implanted tissue-engineered devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijer, Roel; Jansen, Edwin J. P.; Emans, Pieter J.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Riesle, Jens; Pieper, Jeroen; Grainger, David W.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    Peri-operative contamination is the major cause of biomaterial-associated infections, highly complicating surgical patient outcomes. While this risk in traditional implanted biomaterials is well-recognised, newer cell-seeded, biologically conducive tissue-engineered (TE) constructs now targeted for

  13. Robustness Assessment and Adaptive FDI for Car Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahavir Singh Sangha; Dingli Yu; J.Barry Gomm

    2008-01-01

    A new on-line fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme proposed for engines using an adaptive neural network classifier is evaluated for a wide range of operational modes to check the robustness of the scheme in this paper. The neural classifier is adaptive to cope with the significant parameter uncertainty, disturbances, and environment changes. The developed scheme is capable of diagnosing faults in on-line mode and can be directly implemented in an on-board diagnosis system (hardware). The robustness of the FDI for the closed-loop system with crankshaft speed feedback is investigated by testing it for a wide range of operational modes including robustness against fixed and sinusoidal throttle angle inputs, change in load, change in an engine parameter, and all these changes occurring at the same time. The evaluations are performed using a mean value engine model (MVEM), which is a widely used benchmark model for engine control system and FDI system design. The simulation results confirm the robustness of the proposed method for various uncertainties and disturbances.

  14. The effect of biodiesel and bioethanol blended diesel fuel on nanoparticles and exhaust emissions from CRDI diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwanam [Automobile Research Center, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea); Choi, Byungchul [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea)

    2010-01-15

    Biofuel (biodiesel, bioethanol) is considered one of the most promising alternative fuels to petrol fuels. The objective of the work is to study the characteristics of the particle size distribution, the reaction characteristics of nanoparticles on the catalyst, and the exhaust emission characteristics when a common rail direct injection (CRDI) diesel engine is run on biofuel-blended diesel fuels. In this study, the engine performance, emission characteristics, and particle size distribution of a CRDI diesel engine that was equipped with a warm-up catalytic converters (WCC) or a catalyzed particulate filter (CPF) were examined in an ECE (Economic Commission Europe) R49 test and a European stationary cycle (ESC) test. The engine performance under a biofuel-blended diesel fuel was similar to that under D100 fuel, and the high fuel consumption was due to the lowered calorific value that ensued from mixing with biofuels. The use of a biodiesel-diesel blend fuel reduced the total hydrocarbon (THC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions but increased nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions due to the increased oxygen content in the fuel. The smoke emission was reduced by 50% with the use of the bioethanol-diesel blend. Emission conversion efficiencies in the WCC and CPF under biofuel-blended diesel fuels were similar to those under D100 fuel. The use of biofuel-blended diesel fuel reduced the total number of particles emitted from the engine; however, the use of biodiesel-diesel blends resulted in more emissions of particles that were smaller than 50 nm, when compared with the use of D100. The use of a mixed fuel of biodiesel and bioethanol (BD15E5) was much more effective for the reduction of the particle number and particle mass, when compared to the use of BD20 fuel. (author)

  15. Hotspots engineering by grafting Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles on the Au film over slightly etched nanoparticles substrate for on-site paraquat sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoguang; Wu, Xuezhong; Dong, Peitao; Chen, Jian; Xiao, Rui

    2016-12-15

    Paraquat (PQ) pollutions are ultra-toxic to human beings and hard to be decomposed in the environment, thus requiring an on-site detection strategy. Herein, we developed a robust and rapid PQ sensing strategy based on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique. A hybrid SERS substrate was prepared by grafting the Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) on the Au film over slightly etched nanoparticles (Au FOSEN). Hotspots were engineered at the junctions as indicated by the finite difference time domain calculation. SERS performance of the hybrid substrate was explored using p-ATP as the Raman probe. The hybrid substrate gives higher enhancement factor comparing to either the Au FOSEN substrate or the Au@Ag core-shell NPs, and exhibits excellent reproducibility, homogeneity and stability. The proposed SERS substrates were prepared in batches for the practical PQ sensing. The total analysis time for a single sample, including the pre-treatment and measurement, was less than 5min with a PQ detection limit of 10nM. Peak intensities of the SERS signal were plotted as a function of the PQ concentrations to calibrate the sensitivity by fitting the Hill's equation. The plotted calibration curve showed a good log-log linearity with the coefficient of determination of 0.98. The selectivity of the sensing proposal was based on the "finger print" Raman spectra of the analyte. The proposed substrate exhibited good recovery when it applied to real water samples, including lab tap water, bottled water, and commercially obtained apple juice and grape juice. This SERS-based PQ detection method is simple, rapid, sensitive and selective, which shows great potential in pesticide residue and additives abuse monitoring.

  16. Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-01

    The different uses to which geothermal heat and fluids could be applied as a direct utilization of resource or as heat utilization are explored. The following aspects are covered: geotechnical assessment, agricultural and industrial applications, socioeconomic assessment, and engineering assessment. (MHR)

  17. Dose assessment of SiC nanoparticle dispersions during in vitro assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, Jorge, E-mail: jorge.mejiamendoza@unamur.be [University of Namur, Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (LARN-PMR) NARILIS (Belgium); Piret, Jean-Pascal; Noeel, Florence [University of Namur, Research Unit in Cellular Biology (URBC) NARILIS (Belgium); Masereel, Bernard [University of Namur, Department of Pharmacy NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Homeostasis Center (NTHC) NARILIS (Belgium); Toussaint, Olivier [University of Namur, Research Unit in Cellular Biology (URBC) NARILIS (Belgium); Lucas, Stephane [University of Namur, Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (LARN-PMR) NARILIS (Belgium)

    2013-08-15

    Here, we show that key physicochemical parameters of commercial Silicon Carbide nanoparticles, such as the primary particles of about 53 nm in size, the agglomerates size, and the surface composition, are considerably modified with respect to the pristine conditions, during in vitro assessment. The use of sample conditioning stages, such as the pre-dispersion in aqueous media and the subsequent dispersion in a culture medium specific to the in vitro assay, produce modifications as the absorption of N, C, and O, from the culture medium, in the nanoparticles surface. Our results show that the sedimented dose, fraction of sedimented NPs during incubation and consequently in contact with cells seeded at the bottom, of Silicon Carbide nanoparticles can be measured from the particle size distribution obtained using a centrifugal liquid sedimentation technique. It is underlined that the variations observed in the physicochemical properties are related to the in vitro assay conditions. Culture medium and incubation time are found to influence the most the sedimented dose and consequently the cells dose uptake.

  18. Exploiting Fast Exciton Diffusion in Dye-Doped Polymer Nanoparticles to Engineer Efficient Photoswitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofymchuk, Kateryna; Prodi, Luca; Reisch, Andreas; Mély, Yves; Altenhöner, Kai; Mattay, Jochen; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2015-06-18

    Photoswitching of bright fluorescent nanoparticles opens new possibilities for bioimaging with superior temporal and spatial resolution. However, efficient photoswitching of nanoparticles is hard to achieve using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to a photochromic dye, because the particle size is usually larger than the Förster radius. Here, we propose to exploit the exciton diffusion within the FRET donor dyes to boost photoswitching efficiency in dye-doped polymer nanoparticles. To this end, we utilized bulky hydrophobic counterions that prevent self-quenching and favor communication of octadecyl rhodamine B dyes inside a polymer matrix of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide). Among tested counterions, only perfluorinated tetraphenylborate that favors the exciton diffusion enables high photoswitching efficiency (on/off ratio ∼20). The switching improves with donor dye loading and requires only 0.1-0.3 wt % of a diphenylethene photochromic dye. Our nanoparticles were validated both in solution and at the single-particle level. The proposed concept paves the way to new efficient photoswitchable nanomaterials.

  19. Tangential Flow Filtration of Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles: A "Green" Laboratory Experiment for Chemistry and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Kevin M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Edwards, Michelle L.; Kanel, Sushil R.; O'Malley, Matthew; Pavel Sizemore, Ioana E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nanoparticle (NP) fabrication methodologies employ "bottom-up" syntheses, which may result in heterogeneous mixtures of NPs or may require toxic capping agents to reduce NP polydispersity. Tangential flow filtration (TFF) is an alternative "green" technique for the purification, concentration, and size-selection of…

  20. Validation of methods for the detection and quantification of engineered nanoparticles in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linsinger, T.P.J.; Chaudhry, Q.; Dehalu, V.

    2013-01-01

    The potential impact of nanomaterials on the environment and on human health has already triggered legislation requiring labelling of products containing nanoparticles. However, so far, no validated analytical methods for the implementation of this legislation exist. This paper outlines a generic...

  1. Hepatoprotective effect of engineered silver nanoparticles coated bioactive compounds against diethylnitrosamine induced hepatocarcinogenesis in experimental mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasannaraj, Govindaraj; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticle based drug delivery can rapidly improves the therapeutic potential of anti-cancer agents. The present study focused to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized using aqueous extracts of Andrographis paniculata leaves (ApAgNPs) and Semecarpus anacardium nuts (SaAgNPs) against diethylnitrosamine (DEN) induced liver cancer in mice model. The physico-chemical properties of synthesized AgNPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum, Zeta potential and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) analysis. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption spectrum revealed a strong peak at 420nm for both SaAgNPs and ApAgNPs. FTIR results exhibited the presence of possible functional groups in the synthesized AgNPs. TEM analysis determined the hexagonal, and spherical shape of the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The XRD and SAED pattern confirmed the crystalline nature and crystalline size of the AgNPs. EDX result clearly showed strong silver signals in the range between 2 and 4keV. Zeta potential measurements indicated a sharp peak at -3.93 and -13.8mV for ApAgNPs and SaAgNPs, respectively. DLS measurement expressed the particle size distribution was 70 and 60nm for ApAgNPs and SaAgNPs, respectively. DEN (20mg/kg b.wt.) was subjected to induce liver cancer in mice for 8weeks and treated with biosynthesized silver nanoparticles. Interestingly, ApAgNPs and SaAgNPs treated DEN induced animal groups show a decreased level of aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) activity and elevated level of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity over untreated DEN control

  2. Assessment of airborne nanoparticles present in industry of aluminum surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R J; Vieira, M T

    2017-03-01

    Conventional industrial processes are emission sources of unintended nanoparticles which are potentially harmful for the environment and human health. The aim of this study is to assess airborne nanoparticle release from aluminum surface treatment processes in various workplaces. Two direct reading instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure size distribution and a nanoparticle surface area monitoring to measure the surface area of particles deposited in the human lung, were employed to perform area monitoring. The lacquering paint was the process which released the highest concentration of particles from 10-487 nm (7.06 × 10(6) particles/cm(3)). The lacquering baths process emitted particles of the largest average size (76.9 nm) and the largest surface area deposited in the human lung (167.4 µm(2)/cm(3)). Conversely, the anodizing bath process generated particles of the smallest average size (44.3 nm) and the lowest human lung-deposited surface area (1.2 µm(2)/cm(3)). The total number of particles and the surface area can only be fairly correlated for environments in which the surface area presented higher values. The transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum oxide particles of different dimensions near the LB and AB areas and polymeric-based particles near the LP areas. The findings of this study indicated that lacquering and anodizing surface treatments are indeed responsible for the emission of airborne nanoparticles. It also highlights the importance of control strategies as a means of protecting workers' health and environment.

  3. An experimental assessment of toxic potential of nanoparticle preparation of heavy metals in streptozotocin induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sonia; Srinivasan, B P; Akarte, Atul Sureshrao

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals have attracted enormous scientific and technological interest. Biologically produced nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals are elaborately described in traditional texts and being widely prescribed. The underlying interactions of nano preparations within the physiological fluids are key feature to understand their biological impact. In this perspective, we performed an experimental assessment of the toxicity potential of a marketed metallic preparation named Vasant Kusumakar Ras (VKR), wherein different heavy metals in composite form are reduced to nanoparticle size to produce the desired effect in diabetes and its complications. VKR (50mg/kg) was administered to Albino Wistar rats rendered diabetic using streptozotocin (90mg/kg) in 2 days old neonates. Anti-hyperglycemic effect was observed with VKR along with increased levels of plasma insulin. Renal variables including total proteins and albumin along with glomerular filtration rate were found to improve biochemically. The results were supplemented by effects on different inflammatory and growth factors like TNF-α, nitric oxide, TGF-β and VEGF. However, the results observed in kidney histopathology were not in accordance with the biochemical parameters. Inflammation observed in kidney was confirmed by immunostaining metallothionein, which was due to the accumulation of heavy metals. Furthermore, mercury accumulation in kidney further confirmed by autometallography, which activated mononuclear phagocyte system, which generated an immune response. This was further supported by increase in the extent of apoptosis in kidney tissues. In conclusion, nanoparticle preparations of heavy metals can be toxic to kidney if it is not regulated with respect to its surface chemistry and dosage.

  4. An Assessment of Extreme Programming Based Requirement Engineering Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khalid

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive requirement engineering (RE process acts as a backbone of any successful project. RE processes are very complex because most of the requirement engineering documentation is written in natural languages, which are less formal and often distract the designers and developers of the system. To streamline different phases of the software lifecycle, first we need to model the requirement document so that we can analyze and integrate the software artifacts. Designers can ensure completeness and consistency of the system by generating models using the requirement documents. In this paper, we have made an attempt to analyze extreme programming based RE approach to understand its utility in the requirement elicitation phase. In this study, different RE process models are evaluated and a comparison of the extreme programming technique is drawn to highlight the merits of the latter technique over the conventional RE techniques.

  5. γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles filled polyvinyl alcohol as potential biomaterial for tissue engineering scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngadiman, Nor Hasrul Akhmal; Idris, Ani; Irfan, Muhammad; Kurniawan, Denni; Yusof, Noordin Mohd; Nasiri, Rozita

    2015-09-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticle with its unique magnetic properties is recently known to enhance the cell growth rate. In this study, γ-Fe2O3 is mixed into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and then electrospun to form nanofibers. Design of experiments was used to determine the optimum parameter settings for the electrospinning process so as to produce elctrospun mats with the preferred characteristics such as good morphology, Young's modulus and porosity. The input factors of the electrospinnning process were nanoparticles content (1-5%), voltage (25-35 kV), and flow rate (1-3 ml/h) while the responses considered were Young's modulus and porosity. Empirical models for both responses as a function of the input factors were developed and the optimum input factors setting were determined, and found to be at 5% nanoparticle content, 35 kV voltage, and 1 ml/h volume flow rate. The characteristics and performance of the optimum PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofiber mats were compared with those of neat PVA nanofiber mats in terms of morphology, thermal properties, and hydrophilicity. The PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofiber mats exhibited higher fiber diameter and surface roughness yet similar thermal properties and hydrophilicity compared to neat PVA PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofiber mats. Biocompatibility test by exposing the nanofiber mats with human blood cells was performed. In terms of clotting time, the PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofibers exhibited similar behavior with neat PVA. The PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofibers also showed higher cells proliferation rate when MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was done using human skin fibroblast cells. Thus, the PVA/γ-Fe2O3 electrospun nanofibers can be a promising biomaterial for tissue engineering scaffolds.

  6. Impact of Engineered Nanoparticles on Virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae and on Rice Sensitivity at its Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Degrassi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work of nanocotoxicity wants to propose a new plant model starting from the rice plant. The model takes into consideration the impact of engineered nanoparticles (Ag, Co, Ni, CeO2, Fe3O4, TiO2 on rice plants that were weakened by infections of Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae bacteria. The results indicate that some NPs increase the rice sensitivity to the pathogen while others decrease the virulence of the pathogen towards rice. No-enrichment in component metal concentration is detected in above organs of rice, with exception of Ni-NPs treatment. An imbalance of major elements in infected rice crops treated with NPs was investigated.

  7. Long-term effects of engineered nanoparticles on enzyme activity and functional bacteria in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Huang, Haining; Su, Yinglong; Wei, Yuanyuan; Chen, Yinguang

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in a wide range of fields raises concerns about their potential environmental impacts. Previous studies confirmed that some NPs had already entered wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Wastewater nutrient removal depends on the metabolisms of activated sludge bacteria and their related key enzymes. Therefore, this study compared the possible influences of Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and ZnO NPs on the key enzymes activities and microbial community structures involved in wastewater treatment facilities. It was found that long-term exposure to these NPs significantly affected the microbial communities and changed the relative abundances of key functional bacteria, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Also, the gene expressions and catalytic activities of essential enzymes, such as ammonia monooxygenase, nitrite oxidoreductase, nitrate reductase, and nitrite reductase, were decreased, which finally resulted in a lower efficiency of biological nitrogen removal.

  8. Plasmonic effect of Ag nanoparticles in a SiON antireflective coating: engineering rules and physical barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecler, S.; Bastide, S.; Tan, J.; Qu, M.; Slaoui, A.; Fix, T.

    2016-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been proposed in the architectures of several solar cells as a way to enhance light collection and thus to increase their efficiency. Here, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are embedded in a SiON antireflective layer using an electroless technique. The plasmonic effects are modeled and observed experimentally for NPs 5 to 200 nm in size. The systematic comparison of scattering and extinction efficiencies computed as a function of the NPs and surrounding medium properties allows establishing engineering rules, validated by the experimental measurements. The fact that Ag NPs larger than 30 nm mainly contribute to light scattering and therefore to optical path enlargement (green-red light), whereas those smaller than 15 nm absorb light by light trapping (blue-green), is demonstrated and physically explained. A physical barrier making it impossible to shift the dominant resonance beyond 650 nm is pointed out.

  9. Processing and characterization of diatom nanoparticles and microparticles as potential source of silicon for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thi Duy Hanh; Bonani, Walter; Speranza, Giorgio; Sglavo, Vincenzo; Ceccato, Riccardo; Maniglio, Devid; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Silicon plays an important role in bone formation and maintenance, improving osteoblast cell function and inducing mineralization. Often, bone deformation and long bone abnormalities have been associated with silica/silicon deficiency. Diatomite, a natural deposit of diatom skeleton, is a cheap and abundant source of biogenic silica. The aim of the present study is to validate the potential of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons as silicon-donor materials for bone tissue engineering applications. Raw diatomite (RD) and calcined diatomite (CD) powders were purified by acid treatments, and diatom microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by fragmentation of purified diatoms under alkaline conditions. The influence of processing on the surface chemical composition of purified diatomites was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Diatoms NPs were also characterized in terms of morphology and size distribution by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS), while diatom MPs morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface area and microporosity of the diatom particles were evaluated by nitrogen physisorption methods. Release of silicon ions from diatom-derived particles was demonstrated using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES); furthermore, silicon release kinetic was found to be influenced by diatomite purification method and particle size. Diatom-derived microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) showed limited or no cytotoxic effect in vitro depending on the administration conditions.

  10. Effect of biodiesel on the particle size distribution in the exhaust of common-rail diesel engine and the mechanism of nanoparticle formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Effect of biodiesel blends on the particle size distribution (PSD) of exhaust aerosol and the mechanism of nanoparticle formation were investigated with a modern common rail light-duty diesel engine. The results showed that PSD of diesel included two modes:nucleation mode (NM) and accumulation mode (CM). The criterion diameter of the two modes is 50 nm. Only CM was observed for all fuels under the condition of 50 N.m,2000 r/min. When the engine torque was higher than 150 N.m,log-modal PSD of diesel shifted to bimodal. At higher loads,if the biodiesel blend ratio was below 60%,the PSD of biodiesel blends still included the two modes. However,no NM particles were found for pure biodiesel. At lower loads,only CM was found in PSD of all fuels. Significant reduction of CM particles was found for biodiesel blends compared with diesel. Discussion on the mechanism of nanoparticle formation indicated that for the light-duty diesel engine with oxidation catalysts,fuel consumption and exhaust temperature increased with increasing the engine loads,and SO2 was converted to SO3 by catalyst which,in its hydrated form,could act as the precursor for biodiesel NM formation. Therefore,sulfur level of biodiesel blends dominates the nanoparticle formation in light-duty diesel engine with oxidation catalysts.

  11. Surface engineered nanoparticles for improved surface enhanced Raman scattering applications and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Talin, Albert Alec

    2009-11-27

    A method for producing metal nanoparticles that when associated with an analyte material will generate an amplified SERS spectrum when the analyte material is illuminated by a light source and a spectrum is recorded. The method for preparing the metal nanoparticles comprises the steps of (i) forming a water-in-oil microemulsion comprising a bulk oil phase, a dilute water phase, and one or more surfactants, wherein the water phase comprises a transition metal ion; (ii) adding an aqueous solution comprising a mild reducing agent to the water-in-oil microemulsion; (iii) stirring the water-in-oil microemulsion and aqueous solution to initiate a reduction reaction resulting in the formation of a fine precipitate dispersed in the water-in-oil microemulsion; and (iv) separating the precipitate from the water-in-oil microemulsion.

  12. Student Motivation in Low-Stakes Assessment Contexts: An Exploratory Analysis in Engineering Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musekamp, Frank; Pearce, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the relationship of student motivation and achievement in low-stakes assessment contexts. Using Pearson product-moment correlations and hierarchical linear regression modelling to analyse data on 794 tertiary students who undertook a low-stakes engineering mechanics assessment (along with the questionnaire of…

  13. Implementing Assessment Engineering in the Uniform Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Matthew; Devore, Richard; Stopek, Josh

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to bring principled assessment design to a large-scale, high-stakes licensure examination by employing the frameworks of Assessment Engineering (AE), the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy (RBT), and Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA). The Uniform CPA Examination is practice-oriented and focuses on the skills of accounting. In…

  14. A Study of STEM Assessments in Engineering, Science, and Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, Michael; Moreno, Mario; Phillips, Alison; Guzey, S. Selcen; Moore, Tamara J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, scale, and validate assessments in engineering, science, and mathematics with grade appropriate items that were sensitive to the curriculum developed by teachers. The use of item response theory to assess item functioning was a focus of the study. The work is part of a larger project focused on increasing…

  15. Assessing Cognitive Load Theory to Improve Student Learning for Mechanical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impelluso, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer programming class for students of mechanical engineering was redesigned and assessed: Cognitive Load Theory was used to redesign the content; online technologies were used to redesign the delivery. Student learning improved and the dropout rate was reduced. This article reports on both attitudinal and objective assessment: comparing…

  16. Alternative Assessment in Engineering Language Education: The case of the Technical University of Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce Mcmahon, Joana; Durán Escribano, María del Pilar; Ubeda Mansilla, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a research project involving students from nine different engineering degrees at the Technical university of Madrid. The purpose of the project was to analyze the use of peer and self assessment and the students? attitudes toward alternative assessment procedures.

  17. Approaches to the safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cockburn, A.; Bradford, R.; Buck, N.; Kampers, F.W.H.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic, tiered approach to assess the safety of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in foods is presented. The ENM is first compared to its non-nano form counterpart to determine if ENM-specific assessment is required. Of highest concern from a toxicological perspective are ENMs which have potenti

  18. Control of the interparticle spacing in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters by surface ligand engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Wang; Bingbing, Lin; Taipeng, Shen; Jun, Wu; Fuhua, Hao; Chunchao, Xia; Qiyong, Gong; Huiru, Tang; Bin, Song; Hua, Ai

    2016-07-01

    Polymer-mediated self-assembly of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allows modulation of the structure of SPIO nanocrystal cluster and their magnetic properties. In this study, dopamine-functionalized polyesters (DA-polyester) were used to directly control the magnetic nanoparticle spacing and its effect on magnetic resonance relaxation properties of these clusters was investigated. Monodisperse SPIO nanocrystals with different surface coating materials (poly(ɛ-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid)) of different molecular weights containing dopamine (DA) structure (DA-PCL2k, DA-PCL1k, DA-PLA1k)) were prepared via ligand exchange reaction, and these nanocrystals were encapsulated inside amphiphilic polymer micelles to modulate the SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied to quantify the interparticle spacing of SPIO clusters. The results demonstrated that the tailored magnetic nanoparticle clusters featured controllable interparticle spacing providing directly by the different surface coating of SPIO nanocrystals. Systematic modulation of SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing can regulate the saturation magnetization (M s) and T 2 relaxation of the aggregation, and lead to increased magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties with decreased interparticle spacing. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB933903), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2012BAI23B08), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20974065, 51173117, and 50830107).

  19. Engineered nanoparticles against MDR in cancer: The state of the art and its prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Nigel H.; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Midoux, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease, both within a single patient as well as between patients, and is the leading cause of death worldwide. A variety of mono and combinational therapies, including chemotherapy, have been developed and refined over recent years for its effective treatment. However, the evolution of chemotherapeutic resistance or multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer has become a major challenge to successful chemotherapy. MDR is a complex process that combines multifaceted non-cellular and cellular-based mechanisms. Research in the area of cancer nanotechnology over the past two decades has reached the point where smartly designed nanoparticles with targeting ligands can aid successful chemotherapy by preferentially accumulating within the tumor region through means of active and passive targeting to overcome MDR, and simultaneously reduce the off-target accumulation of their payload. Such nanoparticle formulations – sometimes termed nanomedicines - are at different stages of cancer clinical trials and show promise in resistant cases. Nanoparticles as chemotherapeutics carriers provide the opportunity to have multiple payloads of drug and/or imaging agents for combinational and theranostic therapy. Moreover, nanotechnology has the potential to combine new treatment strategies, such as near-infrared (NIR), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) into cancer chemotherapy and imaging. Here we discuss the cellular/non-cellular factors that underpin MDR in cancer, and the potential of nanomedicines to combat MDR, along with recent advances in combining nanotechnology with other approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:27319945

  20. Control of the interparticle spacing in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters by surface ligand engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 艾华; 林兵兵; 申太鹏; 吴君; 豪富华; 夏春潮; 龚启勇; 唐惠儒; 宋彬

    2016-01-01

    Polymer-mediated self-assembly of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allows modulation of the structure of SPIO nanocrystal cluster and their magnetic properties. In this study, dopamine-functionalized polyesters (DA-polyester) were used to directly control the magnetic nanoparticle spacing and its effect on magnetic resonance relaxation properties of these clusters was investigated. Monodisperse SPIO nanocrystals with different surface coating materials (poly(ε-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid)) of different molecular weights containing dopamine (DA) structure (DA-PCL2k, DA-PCL1k, DA-PLA1k)) were prepared via ligand exchange reaction, and these nanocrystals were encapsulated inside am-phiphilic polymer micelles to modulate the SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied to quantify the interparticle spacing of SPIO clusters. The results demonstrated that the tailored magnetic nanoparticle clusters featured controllable interparticle spacing providing directly by the different surface coating of SPIO nanocrystals. Systematic modulation of SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing can regulate the saturation magnetization (Ms) and T2 relaxation of the aggregation, and lead to increased magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties with de-creased interparticle spacing.

  1. Study of carbonaceous nanoparticles in premixed C{sub 2}H{sub 4}-air flames and behind a spark ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotheer, Horst-Henning; Hoffmann, Kai; Wolf, Katrin; Kanjarkar, Santosh; Wahl, Claus; Aigner, Manfred [Institute of Combustion Technology, DLR, Pfaffenwaldring 38, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Nanoparticle size distributions and their concentrations were studied in atmospheric premixed ethylene/air flames using photo ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and total organic carbon (TOC) calibration supplemented by differential mobility analysis (DMA). Focus of this study is the evolution of nanoparticles as a function of height above burner (HAB) and of the C/O ratio of the unburned gases. It was found that especially particles of the cluster type exhibit a sharp concentration drop by more than two orders of magnitude within a narrow C/O window which is close to the sooting threshold. Using DMA a decline by two orders of magnitude was found. These results suggest that at best only small concentrations of nanoparticles should be formed significantly below the sooting threshold. As these conditions prevail in a homogeneously charged IC engine no or only very small nanoparticle emissions are expected in the exhaust gas. This was indeed found for a small Otto engine driving a power generator unit. Using flame nanoparticle profiles as standard, absolute concentrations for their emissions could be deduced. These data were supported by additional DMA measurements. The calibration using TOC did not completely match the one based on the condensation particle counter of the DMA apparatus. (author)

  2. Image processing for safety assessment in civil engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Belen; Pomares, Juan C; Irles, Ramon; Espinosa, Julian; Mas, David

    2013-06-20

    Behavior analysis of construction safety systems is of fundamental importance to avoid accidental injuries. Traditionally, measurements of dynamic actions in civil engineering have been done through accelerometers, but high-speed cameras and image processing techniques can play an important role in this area. Here, we propose using morphological image filtering and Hough transform on high-speed video sequence as tools for dynamic measurements on that field. The presented method is applied to obtain the trajectory and acceleration of a cylindrical ballast falling from a building and trapped by a thread net. Results show that safety recommendations given in construction codes can be potentially dangerous for workers.

  3. The workload book: Assessment of operator workload to engineering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopher, D.

    1983-01-01

    The structure and initial work performed toward the creation of a handbook for workload analysis directed at the operational community of engineers and human factors psychologists are described. The goal, when complete, will be to make accessible to such individuals the results of theoretically-based research that are of practical interest and utility in the analysis and prediction of operator workload in advanced and existing systems. In addition, the results of laboratory study focused on the development of a subjective rating technique for workload that is based on psychophysical scaling techniques are described.

  4. Toxicological assessment of TiO2 nanoparticles by recombinant Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoxiang; Shen, Zhenyao; Niu, Junfeng; Bao, Yueping; Chen, Jing; He, Tiande

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and efficient methods to assess nanoparticle toxicity are desired in current research. Here we showed that Escherichia coli labeled by green fluorescent protein can be a good model bacterium for assessing acute toxicity of TiO(2) (about 50% inhibition ratios after 135 min exposure). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed that TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) can influence certain protein expression in the recombinant bacterium, and the obvious effects in repressed expression and elevated expression were observed in 30/40, 10/20 μg mL(-1) treated cells, respectively. However, the GFP expression (27 kD) was not influenced by introduced TiO(2) NPs. The change of the fluorescence intensity may be caused by the damage in folding and chromophore formation of the GFP post-translational modification due to generated reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, TiO(2) NPs at higher concentrations decreased their toxicity because of aggregation. 20 μg mL(-1) humic acid (HA) introduced to the medium can decrease the fluorescent inhibition owing to the barrier of steric hindrance it provides between NPs and cells.

  5. Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-18

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 aboveground UNS, and 79 candidate belowground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  6. Engineering Options Assessment Report. Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 above-ground UNS, and 79 candidate below-ground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  7. Computer-aided nanotoxicology: assessing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles under diverse experimental conditions by using a novel QSTR-perturbation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Feng; Kleandrova, Valeria V; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M; Melo, André; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2014-09-21

    Nowadays, the interest in the search for new nanomaterials with improved electrical, optical, catalytic and biological properties has increased. Despite the potential benefits that can be gathered from the use of nanoparticles, only little attention has been paid to their possible toxic effects that may affect human health. In this context, several assays have been carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells. Owing to the cost in both resources and time involved in such toxicological assays, there has been a considerable increase in the interest towards alternative computational methods, like the application of quantitative structure-activity/toxicity relationship (QSAR/QSTR) models for risk assessment of nanoparticles. However, most QSAR/QSTR models developed so far have predicted cytotoxicity against only one cell line, and they did not provide information regarding the influence of important factors rather than composition or size. This work reports a QSTR-perturbation model aiming at simultaneously predicting the cytotoxicity of different nanoparticles against several mammalian cell lines, and also considering different times of exposure of the cell lines, as well as the chemical composition of nanoparticles, size, conditions under which the size was measured, and shape. The derived QSTR-perturbation model, using a dataset of 1681 cases (nanoparticle-nanoparticle pairs), exhibited an accuracy higher than 93% for both training and prediction sets. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of our model, the cytotoxicity of different silica (SiO2), nickel (Ni), and nickel(ii) oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were predicted and found to be in very good agreement with experimental reports. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to simultaneously predict the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles under multiple experimental conditions by applying a single unique QSTR model.

  8. Practical framework for Bloom's based teaching and assessment of engineering outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Patricia F.; Bennett, Mary M.

    2009-06-01

    ABET's outcomes-based assessment and evaluation requirements for engineering school accreditation has been a catalyst for curricular reform for engineering programs across the U.S. and around the world. Norfolk State University launched programs in Electronics and Optical Engineering in 2003. In 2007, Norfolk State became one of only six accredited Optical Engineering programs in the United States. In preparation for their first ABET evaluation in fall 2007, the faculty initiated an embedded-assessment program to insure continuous improvement toward the desired learning outcomes. The initial program design includes embedded assessments that have been generated using a practical framework for the creation of course activities based on Bloom's Learning Taxonomy. The framework includes specific performance criteria for each ABET-defined learning outcome. The embedded assessments are generated by individual faculty for courses that they are assigned to teach, and the performance criteria provide sufficient information to guide the faculty as they generate the embedded assignments. The assignments are typically administered through course exams, projects, electronic portfolio assignments, and other structured educational activities. The effectiveness of the assessment design is being evaluated through faculty surveys, faculty group discussions, and student performance. This paper outlines the assessment and evaluation plan, and the integrated processes that have been used to support the evaluation of learning outcomes using embedded assessment instruments.

  9. Assessment of lubricating oil degradation in small motorcycle engine fueled with gasohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakorn Tippayawong

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the degradation of lubricating oil was performed on the lubricants which had been used in a small motorcycle engine fueled with gasohol in comparison with the lubricants from gasoline-run engine. The lubricant properties examined in the assessment were lubricating capacity, viscosity and stability to oxidation. Lubricating capacity was evaluated by accelerated wear test on the Timken tester. Lubricating oils from gasohol-run engine appeared to produce about 10% greater wear than that made in oils from gasoline-run engine. There was no significant difference between the effect of gasohol and gasoline on the viscosity of the used lubricating oils. Moreover, no oxidation products in any used oil samples could be detected.

  10. Assessing the Use of Failure Case Studies in Civil Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elleithy Wael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Civil engineering failures, unfortunately, occur from time to time leading to serious consequences. It is of importance that civil engineering undergraduate students are made aware of cases of failure in the past, and hence, to enhance their ability of identification of potential deficiencies. Investigating past cases of civil engineering failures has been carried out in UNMC for the last five years. The students are required to research, investigate and write essays reporting on these failures, detailing the causes and lessons learned. This study was conducted in order to assess the effectiveness of such approach. The outcomes of this study indicate that the use of civil engineering failure as case studies enhances the students’ educational experiences. In addition to the technical learning benefits from past civil engineering failure case studies, there are also impacts on students’ attitudes which has significant implications in their expected profession.

  11. Controllable degradation kinetics of POSS nanoparticle-integrated poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane elastomers for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirimer, Lara; Buanz, Asma; Gaisford, Simon; Malins, Edward L; Remzi Becer, C; Moiemen, Naiem; Reynolds, Gary M; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-10-14

    Biodegradable elastomers are a popular choice for tissue engineering scaffolds, particularly in mechanically challenging settings (e.g. the skin). As the optimal rate of scaffold degradation depends on the tissue type to be regenerated, next-generation scaffolds must demonstrate tuneable degradation patterns. Previous investigations mainly focussed on the integration of more or less hydrolysable components to modulate degradation rates. In this study, however, the objective was to develop and synthesize a family of novel biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs) based on a poly(ε-caprolactone urea)urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-PCLU) with varying amounts of hard segments (24%, 28% and 33% (w/v)) in order to investigate the influence of hard segment chemistry on the degradation rate and profile. PUs lacking POSS nanoparticles served to prove the important function of POSS in maintaining the mechanical structures of the PU scaffolds before, during and after degradation. Mechanical testing of degraded samples revealed hard segment-dependent modulation of the materials' viscoelastic properties, which was attributable to (i) degradation-induced changes in the PU crystallinity and (ii) either the presence or absence of POSS. In conclusion, this study presents a facile method of controlling degradation profiles of PU scaffolds used in tissue engineering applications.

  12. Development of a gene-activated scaffold platform for tissue engineering applications using chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles on collagen-based scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Rosanne M; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Cryan, Sally-Ann; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-07-28

    Biomaterial scaffolds that support cell infiltration and tissue formation can also function as platforms for the delivery of therapeutics such as drugs, proteins, and genes. As burst release of supraphysiological quantities of recombinant proteins can result in adverse side effects, the objective of this study was to explore the potential of a series of collagen-based scaffolds, developed in our laboratory, as gene-activated scaffold platforms with potential in a range of tissue engineering applications. The potential of chitosan, a biocompatible material derived from the shells of crustaceans, as a gene delivery vector was assessed using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). A transfection efficiency of >45% is reported which is similar to what is achieved with polyethyleneimine (PEI), a non-viral gold standard vector, without causing cytotoxic side effects. When the optimised chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated into a series of collagen-based scaffolds, sustained transgene expression from MSCs seeded on the scaffolds was maintained for up to 28days and interestingly the composition of the scaffold had an effect on transfection efficiency. These results demonstrate that by simply varying the scaffold composition and the gene (or combinations thereof) chosen; the system has potential for a myriad of therapeutic applications.

  13. Assessment of Governor Control Parameter Settings of a Submarine Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    University of Technology 15. Ogata , K. (1997) Modern control engineering. Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice-Hall 16. DiStephano, J., Stubberud, A. and...UNCLASSIFIED Assessment of Governor Control Parameter Settings of a Submarine Diesel Engine Peter Hield and Michael Newman...generators to provide power for propulsion and the hotel load. The governor, often a proportional-integral controller , attempts to maintain a constant

  14. Inventory of Engineered Nanoparticle-Containing Consumer Products Available in the Singapore Retail Market and Likelihood of Release into the Aquatic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer products containing engineered nanoparticles (ENP are already entering the marketplace. This leads, inter alia, to questions about the potential for release of ENP into the environment from commercial products. We have inventoried the prevalence of ENP-containing consumer products in the Singapore market by carrying out onsite assessments of products sold in all major chains of retail and cosmetic stores. We have assessed their usage patterns and estimated release factors and emission quantities to obtain a better understanding of the quantities of ENP that are released into which compartments of the aquatic environment in Singapore. Products investigated were assessed for their likelihood to contain ENP based on the declaration of ENP by producers, feature descriptions, and the information on particle size from the literature. Among the 1,432 products investigated, 138 were “confirmed” and 293 were “likely” to contain ENP. Product categories included sunscreens, cosmetics, health and fitness, automotive, food, home and garden, clothing and footwear, and eyeglass/lens coatings. Among the 27 different types of nanomaterials identified, SiO2 was predominant, followed by TiO2 and ZnO, Carbon Black, Ag, and Au. The amounts of ENP released into the aquatic system, which was estimated on the basis of typical product use, ENP concentration in the product, daily use quantity, release factor, and market share, were in the range of several hundred tons per year. As these quantities are likely to increase, it will be important to further study the fate of ENP that reach the aquatic environment in Singapore.

  15. Simple and facile approach to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles and assessment of their effects on blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotica, Luiz F., E-mail: lfcotica@pq.cnpq.br [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Freitas, Valdirlei F.; Dias, Gustavo S.; Santos, Ivair A. [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Vendrame, Sheila C.; Khalil, Najeh M.; Mainardes, Rubiana M. [Department of Pharmacy, Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava, PR 85040080 (Brazil); Staruch, Margo; Jain, Menka [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, a very simple and facile approach for the large scale synthesis of uniform and size-controllable single-domain magnetite nanoparticles is reported. These magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition of a ferric nitrate/ethylene glycol solution. The structural and morphological properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were carefully studied. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with inverted spinel structure and average particle and crystallite sizes smaller than 20 nm were obtained. The magnetic measurements revealed that magnetite nanoparticles have a magnetic saturation value near that of the bulk magnetite. The erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of the samples containing magnetite nanoparticles, indicating no cytotoxic activity on human erythrocytes, which makes these interesting for biotechnological applications. - Highlights: > Simple and facile approach to large scale synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. > Erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of nanoparticles. > Saturation magnetization of nanoparticles reached near that of the bulk magnetite.

  16. Thermal and structural assessments of a ceramic wafer seal in hypersonic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mike T.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal and structural performances of a ceramic wafer seal in a simulated hypersonic engine environment are numerically assessed. The effects of aerodynamic heating, surface contact conductance between the seal and its adjacent surfaces, flow of purge coolant gases, and leakage of hot engine flow path gases on the seal temperature were investigated from the engine inlet back to the entrance region of the combustion chamber. Finite element structural analyses, coupled with Weibull failure analyses, were performed to determine the structural reliability of the wafer seal.

  17. Thermal and structural assessments of a ceramic wafer seal in hypersonic engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mike; Steinetz, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    The thermal and structural performances of a ceramic wafer seal in a simulated hypersonic engine environment are numerically assessed. The effects of aerodynamic heating, surface contact conductance between the seal and its adjacent surfaces, flow of purge coolant gases, and leakage of hot engine flow path gases on the seal temperature were investigated from the engine inlet back to the entrance region of the combustion chamber. Finite element structural analyses, coupled with Weibull failure analyses, were performed to determine the structural reliability of the wafer seal.

  18. Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Assessment in Engineering Laboratory Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarakou, Maria; Fylladitakis, Emmanouil D.; Prentakis, Pantelis; Athineos, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    In laboratory courses, the assessment of exercises and assignments typically is treated as a simple, quantifiable approach. This approach however rarely includes qualitative factors, especially if the grading is being automatically performed by the system, and provides little to no feedback for the students to reflect on their work. The role of…

  19. Assessing asymmetry using reflection and rotoinversion in biomedical engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Shannon; Franco-Sepulveda, Esteban; Komeili, Amin; Trovato, Alexandra; Parent, Eric; Hill, Doug; Lou, Edmond; Adeeb, Samer

    2014-05-01

    Symmetry is a trait that has been extensively reviewed, especially clinically, as an indication of ideal geometry and health. Many geometric symmetry assessment techniques rely on two-dimensional measurements that do not account for the three-dimensional nature of the object. In this article, two methods, reflection and a process termed rotoinversion, a combination of reflection and rotation, are presented as potential methods to assess an object's deviation from symmetry. With reflection, the geometric models are reflected about a calculated best plane of symmetry. With rotoinversion, the models are reflected about an arbitrary plane and then rigidly translated and rotated to best align the translated and original models. The methods give the same results for bilaterally symmetric objects, but different results for bilaterally and rotationally symmetric objects. The two methods are applied to assess asymmetry in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis torso geometric models, producing similar results. There was an angle of 0.408° between the normal to the plane of reflection from the reflection process and the normal from the rotoinversion process and average rotation of 0.067° from rotoinversion. The most appropriate method depends on the purpose of the symmetry assessment and must be determined on a case-by-case basis.

  20. Bacillus subtilis Biosensor Engineered To Assess Meat Spoilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daszczuk, Alicja; Dessalegne, Yonathan; Drenth, Ismael; Hendriks, Elbrich; Jo, Emeraldo; van Lente, Tom; Oldebesten, Arjan; Parrish, Jonathon; Poljakova, Wlada; Purwanto, Annisa A.; van Raaphorst, Renske; Boonstra, Mirjam; van Heel, Auke; Herber, Martijn; van der Meulen, Sjoerd; Siebring, Jeroen; Sorg, Robin A.; Heinemann, Matthias; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    Here, we developed a cell-based biosensor that can assess meat freshness using the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis as a chassis. Using transcriptome analysis, we identified promoters that are specifically activated by volatiles released from spoiled meat. The most strongly activated

  1. Coaxial electrospun aligned tussah silk fibroin nanostructured fiber scaffolds embedded with hydroxyapatite–tussah silk fibroin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Weili [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); He, Jianxin, E-mail: hejianxin771117@163.com [College of Textiles, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Sang, Feng [Department of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Treatment and Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Ding, Bin [College of Textiles, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Chen, Li, E-mail: chenli@tjpu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cui, Shizhong; Li, Kejing; Han, Qiming; Tan, Weilin [College of Textiles, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2016-01-01

    The bone is a composite of inorganic and organic materials and possesses a complex hierarchical architecture consisting of mineralized fibrils formed by collagen molecules and coated with oriented hydroxyapatite. To regenerate bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a scaffold that mimics the architecture of the extracellular matrix in native bone. Here, we describe one such scaffold, a nanostructured composite with a core made of a composite of hydroxyapatite and tussah silk fibroin. The core is encased in a shell of tussah silk fibroin. The composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent and were characterized using different techniques. In comparison to nanofibers of pure tussah silk, composite notably improved mechanical properties, with 90-fold and 2-fold higher initial modulus and breaking stress, respectively, obtained. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were cultivated on the composite to assess its suitability as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We found that the fiber scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation and functionally promoted alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition relevant for biomineralization. In addition, the composite were more biocompatible than pure tussah silk fibroin or cover slip. Thus, the nanostructured composite has excellent biomimetic and mechanical properties and is a potential biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A designing scaffold strategy to imitate the mineralized collagen bundles in natural bone was presented. • Aligned nanostructured composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent. • Mechanical properties of aligned TSF nanofiber had been significantly improved by embedding with composite nanoparticles. • Composite scaffolds effectively supported proliferation of MG-63 cells and promoted biomineralization.

  2. High Field Sodium MRI Assessment of Stem Cell Chondrogenesis in a Tissue-Engineered Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Shreyan; Pothirajan, Padmabharathi; Dorcemus, Deborah; Nukavarapu, Syam; Kotecha, Mrignayani

    2016-04-01

    The development of non-invasive assessment techniques in vitro and in vivo is essential for monitoring and evaluating the growth of engineered cartilage tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading non-invasive imaging modality used for assessing engineered cartilage. Typical MRI uses water proton relaxation times (T1 and T2) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) to assess tissue growth. These techniques, while excellent in providing the first assurance of tissue growth, are unspecific to monitor the progress of engineered cartilage extracellular matrix components. In the current article, we present high field (11.7 T, (1)H freq. = 500 MHz) sodium MRI assessment of tissue-engineered cartilage at the early stage of tissue growth in vitro. We observed the chondrogenesis of human bone marrow derived stromal cells seeded in a gradient polymer-hydrogel matrix made out of poly(85 lactide-co-15 glycolide)--PuraMatrix™ for 4 weeks. We calculated the sodium concentration in the engineered constructs using a model of sodium MRI voxels that takes into account scaffold volume, cell density and amount of glycosaminoglycan (GAG). The sodium concentration was then converted to the fixed charge density (FCD) and compared with FCD derived from biochemical GAG analysis. Despite the small amount of GAG present in the engineered constructs, the sodium MRI derived FCD is found to be correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79) with the FCD derived from biochemical analysis. We conclude that sodium MRI could prove to be an invaluable tool in assessing engineered cartilage quantitatively during the repair or regeneration of cartilage defects.

  3. Risk assessment techniques with applicability in marine engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, E.; Panaitescu, F. V.; Panaitescu, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays risk management is a carefully planned process. The task of risk management is organically woven into the general problem of increasing the efficiency of business. Passive attitude to risk and awareness of its existence are replaced by active management techniques. Risk assessment is one of the most important stages of risk management, since for risk management it is necessary first to analyze and evaluate risk. There are many definitions of this notion but in general case risk assessment refers to the systematic process of identifying the factors and types of risk and their quantitative assessment, i.e. risk analysis methodology combines mutually complementary quantitative and qualitative approaches. Purpose of the work: In this paper we will consider as risk assessment technique Fault Tree analysis (FTA). The objectives are: understand purpose of FTA, understand and apply rules of Boolean algebra, analyse a simple system using FTA, FTA advantages and disadvantages. Research and methodology: The main purpose is to help identify potential causes of system failures before the failures actually occur. We can evaluate the probability of the Top event.The steps of this analize are: the system's examination from Top to Down, the use of symbols to represent events, the use of mathematical tools for critical areas, the use of Fault tree logic diagrams to identify the cause of the Top event. Results: In the finally of study it will be obtained: critical areas, Fault tree logical diagrams and the probability of the Top event. These results can be used for the risk assessment analyses.

  4. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshatwi, Ali A., E-mail: alshatwi@ksu.edu.sa; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica.

  5. Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of the Building 943 Tank System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abri Environmental Engineering Inc.

    2015-01-01

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of Building 943 (B943) Tank System has been prepared using the guidelines of 40 CFR 265.192(a) and 22 CCR 66265.192(a) for tank systems* that manage hazardous waste and have secondary containment. The regulations require that this assessment be completed and certified by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer. This technical assessment has been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer, who has certified the tank system for the following: • sufficient structural integrity, • acceptability for storing of hazardous waste, • compatibility with the waste, and • suitability of tank and containment system design to achieve the requirements of the applicable regulations so they will not collapse, rupture, or fail.

  6. Engineered nanomaterials in soil: Problems in assessing their effect on living organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhova, V. A.; Gladkova, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Studies on the occurrence and potential effects of nanomaterials (NMs) in the environment are analyzed. Mechanisms of action of some of the well-known nanotechnological products on test cultures are discussed. Attention is focused on the problems of determination of the ecotoxicity of NMs in soils in relation to their instability and variability in the environmental conditions. Our data indicate that the effect of the interactions between the nanoparticles should be taken into consideration in econanotoxicological studies. The formation of aggregates at high concentrations of nanoparticles and an increase in the content of free nanoparticles upon dilution largely explain the inverted dose-response ratio, or the U-shaped curve describing this relationship in the analysis of dispersed systems. Problems in the development of an assessment system for the effect of NMs on environments, including soils, are also discussed. Presently, there are no standards for assessing NMs, and approved Russian and international procedures for checking the sensitivity of standardized test organisms are used. However, the imperfection of the approaches to the analysis of NMs toxicity gives no ground for hampering the development of nanotechnologies for nature conservation purposes.

  7. Bioaccumulation, Subacute Toxicity, and Tissue Distribution of Engineered Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Goldfish (Carassius auratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ates

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased use of nanosized materials is likely to result in the release of these particles into the environment. It is, however, unclear if these materials are harmful to aquatic animals. In this study, the sublethal effects of exposure of low and high concentrations of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs on goldfish (Carassius auratus were investigated. Accumulation of TiO2 NPs increased from 42.71 to 110.68 ppb in the intestine and from 4.10 to 9.86 ppb in the gills of the goldfish with increasing exposure dose from 10 to 100 mg/L TiO2 NPs. No significant accumulation in the muscle and brain of the fish was detected. Malondialdehyde as a biomarker of lipid oxidation was detected in the liver of the goldfish. Moreover, TiO2 NPs exposure inhibited growth of the goldfish. Although there was an increase (8.1% in the body weights of the goldfish for the control group, in the low and high exposure groups 1.8% increase and 19.7% decrease were measured, respectively. The results of this study contribute to the current understanding of the potential ecotoxicological effects of nanoparticles and highlight the importance of characterization of NPs in understanding their behavior, uptake, and effects in aquatic systems and in fish.

  8. Nanoimaging: photophysical and pharmaceutical characterization of poly-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles engineered with quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederzoli, F.; Ruozi, B.; Pracucci, E.; Signore, G.; Zapparoli, Mauro; Forni, F.; Vandelli, M. A.; Ratto, G.; Tosi, G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are considered good binomials for the development of multifunctional nanomedicines for multimodal imaging. Fluorescent imaging of QDs can monitor the behavior of QD-labeled NPs in both cells and animals with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The comprehension of polymer interaction with the metallic QD surface must be considered to achieve a complete chemicophysical characterization of these systems and to describe the QD optical properties to be used for their unequivocal identification in the tissue. In this study, by comparing two different synthetic procedures to obtain polymeric nanoparticles labeled with QDs, we investigated whether their optical properties may change according to the formulation methods, as a consequence of the different polymeric environments. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy characterization demonstrated that NPs modified with QDs after the formulation process (post-NPs-QDs) conserved the photophysical features of the QD probe. In contrast, by using a polymer modified with QDs to formulate NPs (pre-NPs-QDs), a significant quenching of QD fluorescence and a blueshift in its emission spectra were observed. Our results suggest that the packaging of QDs into the polymeric matrix causes a modification of the QD optical properties: these effects must be characterized in depth and carefully considered when developing nanosystems for imaging and biological applications.

  9. Provenance information as a tool for addressing engineered nanoparticle reproducibility challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Donald R.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Thrall, Brian D.

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticles of various types are of increasing research and technological importance in biological and other applications. Difficulties in the production and delivery of nanoparticles with consistent and well defined properties appear in many forms and have a variety of causes. Among several issues are those associated with incomplete information about the history of particles involved in research studies including the synthesis method, sample history after synthesis including time and nature of storage and the detailed nature of any sample processing or modification. In addition, the tendency of particles to change with time or environmental condition suggests that the time between analysis and application is important and some type of consistency or verification process can be important. The essential history of a set of particles can be identified as provenance information tells the origin or source of a batch of nano-objects along with information related to handling and any changes that may have taken place since it was originated. A record of sample provenance information for a set of particles can play a useful role in identifying some of the sources and decreasing the extent of particle variability and the observed lack of reproducibility observed by many researchers.

  10. Novel Alginate-Gelatin Hybrid Nanoparticle for Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Mi Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel alginate-gelatin hybrid nanoparticles were fabricated using single oil in water (O/W emulsification techniques. Physicochemical property of the particle was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier’s transmission infrared spectroscopy. Particle size was determined using zeta potential metastasize analyzer and was found to be in range of 400–600 nm. AGNPs were used for culturing human keratinocytes for two weeks to check biocompatibility of synthesized AGNPs. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay showed increased metabolic activity of cells cultured on AGNPs in comparison to two-dimensional (2D system (control. Cellular attachment on nanoparticle was further confirmed using SEM and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining. The drug release profile shows possible electrostatic bond between alginate and gelatin resulting in controlled release of drug from AGNPs. For the first time alginate-gelatin hybrid nanosystem has been fabricated and all results showed it can be used as potential system for delivery of drug and therapeutical agents to cells and can also be used for regenerative medicine applications.

  11. Cyto- and genotoxicity assessment of Gold nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucchianico, Sebastiano Di [Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine (Sweden); Migliore, Lucia [University of Pisa, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, Division of Medical Genetics (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Institute of Complex Systems (ISC-CNR) (Italy); Vergari, Chiara [Plasma Diagnostics and Technologies s.r.l. (Italy); Giammanco, Francesco [University of Pisa, Department of Physics “E. Fermi” (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Institute of Complex Systems (ISC-CNR) (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted enormous interest in biomedical applications, based on their unique optical properties. However, their toxicity on human tissues is still an open issue. Beyond the potential intrinsic toxicity of nanostructured gold, a non-negligible contribution of stabilizers or reaction by-products related to current wet chemical synthesis procedures can be expected. Aimed at isolating gold contribution from that of any other contaminant, we produced colloidal suspensions of Gold nanoparticles having average size <10 nm in deionized water or acetone by pulsed laser ablation, that permits preparation of uncoated and highly stable Gold nanoparticles in pure solvents. Subsequently, we investigated the role of surface chemistry, size, and dispersivity of synthesized Gold nanoparticles in exerting toxicity in a cell model system of deep respiratory tract, representing the main route of exposure to NPs, namely adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells. Gold nanoparticles prepared in water showed no particular signs of cytotoxicity, cytostasis, and/or genotoxicity as assessed by MTT colorimetric viability test and Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay up to concentrations of the order of 5 μg/mL. In contrast, Gold nanoparticles produced in pure acetone and then transferred into deionized water showed impaired cell viability, apoptosis responses, micronuclei, and dicentric chromosomes induction as well as nuclear budding, as a function of the amount of surface contaminants like amorphous carbon and enolate ions.

  12. Assessing the Metacognitive Awareness among Foundation in Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Lee Guat Poh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The transition phase is a critical moment to students who have completed their secondary school education and are proceeding to pre-university education in Malaysia. The long duration of exposure to rote-learning and examination oriented education systems at school has somehow shaped these students’ perceptions about teaching and learning. Thus, this paper aims to examine the quality of first year students’ experiences in constructing their knowledge and skills throughout the Foundation in Engineering (FIE programme. This experience refers to metacognitive awareness, namely students’ learning experience from one mode of thinking to the other to construct meaningful knowledge and skills. The researchers used the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI (Schraw and Dennison, 1994 as a rating tool to trace the students’ baseline in metacognition and access their successive levels of metacognitive awareness throughout their first semester in the FIE program. The students showed improvements in a number of metacognitive sub-processes. The findings provided the details of the quality of the program’s efficacy and served as a benchmark for future development of effectiveness of teaching and learning approaches.

  13. Systematic assessment of blood circulation time of functionalized upconversion nanoparticles in the chick embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadort, Annemarie; Liang, Liuen; Grebenik, Ekaterina; Guller, Anna; Lu, Yiqing; Qian, Yi; Goldys, Ewa; Zvyagin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs and contrast agents holds great promise in cancer research, because of the increased delivery efficiency compared to `free' drugs and dyes. A versatile platform to investigate nanotechnology is the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane tumour model, due to its availability (easy, cheap) and accessibility (interventions, imaging). In our group, we developed this model using several tumour cell lines (e.g. breast cancer, colon cancer). In addition, we have synthesized in-house silica coated photoluminescent upconversion nanoparticles with several functional groups (COOH, NH2, PEG). In this work we will present the systematic assessment of their in vivo blood circulation times. To this end, we injected chick embryos grown ex ovo with the functionalized UCNPs and obtained a small amount of blood at several time points after injection to create blood smears The UCNP signal from the blood smears was quantified using a modified inverted microscope imaging set-up. The results of this systematic study are valuable to optimize biochemistry protocols and guide nanomedicine advancement in the versatile chick embryo tumour model.

  14. Quality Assessment Survey at the School of Civil Engineering at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    As part of an improved quality assessment procedure at the School of Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, an online survey has been undertaken among all students. Due to external requirements and a wish for more structured feedback, an online questionnaire was presented to all students under...... the study board of civil engineering. The questionnaire was jointly developed for all study boards at Aalborg University. The questionnaire forms an investigation of students' satisfaction and evaluation of the overall structure of the education including self-reported performance assessment. The paper...

  15. Re-assessing the enhanced permeability and retention effect in peripheral arterial disease using radiolabeled long circulating nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Christopher G; Im, Hyung-Jun; Feng, Liangzhu; Chen, Feng; Graves, Stephen A; Hernandez, Reinier; Orbay, Hakan; Xu, Cheng; Cho, Steve Y; Nickles, Robert J; Liu, Zhuang; Lee, Dong Soo; Cai, Weibo

    2016-09-01

    As peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results in muscle ischemia and neovascularization, it has been claimed that nanoparticles can passively accumulate in ischemic tissues through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. At this time, a quantitative evaluation of the passive targeting capabilities of nanoparticles has not been reported in PAD. Using a murine model of hindlimb ischemia, we quantitatively assessed the passive targeting capabilities of (64)Cu-labeled PEGylated reduced graphene oxide - iron oxide nanoparticles ((64)Cu-RGO-IONP-PEG) through the EPR effect using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Serial laser Doppler imaging was performed to monitor changes in blood perfusion upon surgical induction of ischemia. Nanoparticle accumulation was assessed at 3, 10, and 17 days post-surgery and found to be highest at 3 days post-surgery, with the ischemic hindlimb displaying an accumulation of 14.7 ± 0.5% injected dose per gram (%ID/g). Accumulation of (64)Cu-RGO-IONP-PEG was lowest at 17 days post-surgery, with the ischemic hindlimb displaying only 5.1 ± 0.5%ID/g. Furthermore, nanoparticle accumulation was confirmed by photoacoustic imaging (PA). The combination of PET and serial Doppler imaging showed that nanoparticle accumulation in the ischemic hindlimb negatively correlated with blood perfusion. Thus, we quantitatively confirmed that (64)Cu-RGO-IONP-PEG passively accumulated in ischemic tissue via the EPR effect, which is reduced as the perfusion normalizes. As (64)Cu-RGO-IONP-PEG displayed substantial accumulation in the ischemic tissue, this nanoparticle platform may function as a future theranostic agent, providing both imaging and therapeutic applications.

  16. Processing and characterization of diatom nanoparticles and microparticles as potential source of silicon for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Thi Duy Hanh [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Bonani, Walter [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Speranza, Giorgio [Center for Materials and Microsystems, PAM-SE, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento (Italy); Sglavo, Vincenzo; Ceccato, Riccardo [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Maniglio, Devid; Motta, Antonella [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Migliaresi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.migliaresi@unitn.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    Silicon plays an important role in bone formation and maintenance, improving osteoblast cell function and inducing mineralization. Often, bone deformation and long bone abnormalities have been associated with silica/silicon deficiency. Diatomite, a natural deposit of diatom skeleton, is a cheap and abundant source of biogenic silica. The aim of the present study is to validate the potential of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons as silicon-donor materials for bone tissue engineering applications. Raw diatomite (RD) and calcined diatomite (CD) powders were purified by acid treatments, and diatom microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by fragmentation of purified diatoms under alkaline conditions. The influence of processing on the surface chemical composition of purified diatomites was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Diatoms NPs were also characterized in terms of morphology and size distribution by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS), while diatom MPs morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface area and microporosity of the diatom particles were evaluated by nitrogen physisorption methods. Release of silicon ions from diatom-derived particles was demonstrated using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES); furthermore, silicon release kinetic was found to be influenced by diatomite purification method and particle size. Diatom-derived microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) showed limited or no cytotoxic effect in vitro depending on the administration conditions. - Highlights: • Diatomite is a natural source of silica and has a potential as silicon-donor for bone regenerative applications. • Diatom particles derived from purified diatom skeletons were prepared by fragmentation under extreme alkaline condition. • Dissolution of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons in DI water depend on purification method

  17. Characterisation of nanoparticle size and concentration for toxicological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendre, V; Gautam, M; Carr, R; Smith, J; Malloy, A

    2011-02-01

    The assessment of the complete distribution of nanoparticle sizes within a suspension is notoriously difficult to carry out. We demonstrate the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) technique that sizes nanoparticles in suspension, based on their Brownian motion. This technique has found significant use in the field of nano- and eco-toxicology, in several research groups showing of the technique to assess a range of engineered nanoparticles including gold, SiO2, TiO2 and polystyrene. This capability shares many features in common with conventional flow cytometry but is unique in this deeply sub-micron size range. NTA is a direct and fast technique by which nanoparticles in their natural solvated state in a liquid can be rapidly detected, sized and counted. The technique can be used to complement existing techniques for the sizing of nanoparticles (e.g., DLS, PCS) allowing data obtained from these methods to be validated by direct microscopical observation of the sample.

  18. Hybrid 3D structure of poly(d,l-lactic acid) loaded with chitosan/chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles to be used as carriers for biomacromolecules in tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Santo, Vítor E.; Duarte, Ana Rita C.; Gomes, Manuela E.; Mano, João F.; Rui L Reis

    2010-01-01

    In the tissue engineering (TE) field, the concept of producing multifunctional scaffolds, capable not only of acting as templates for cell transplantation but also of delivering bioactive agents in a controlled manner, is an emerging strategy aimed to enhance tissue regeneration. In this work, a complex hybrid release system consisting in a three-dimensional (3D) structure based on poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PDLLA) impregnated with chitosan/chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles (NPs) was ...

  19. Effect of biodiesel on the particle size distribution in the exhaust of common-rail diesel engine and the mechanism of nanoparticle formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XuSheng; ZHAO Hui; HU ZongJie; WU ZhiJun; LI LiGuang

    2009-01-01

    Effect of biodiesel blends on the particle size distribution (PSD) of exhaust aerosol and the mechanism of nanoparticle formation were investigated with a modern common rail light-duty diesel engine. The results showed that PSD of diesel included two modes: nucleation mode (NM) and accumulation mode (CM). The criterion diameter of the two modes is 50 rim. Only CM was observed for all fuels under the condition of 50 N. M, 2000 r/min. When the engine torque was higher than 150 N. M, log-modal PSD of diesel shifted to bimodal. At higher loads, if the biodiesel blend ratio was below 60%, the PSD of bio-diesel blends still included the two modes. However, no NM particles were found for pure biodiesel. At lower loads, only CM was found in PSD of all fuels. Significant reduction of CM particles was found for biodiesel blends compared with diesel. Discussion on the mechanism of nanoparUcle formation indi-cated that for the light-duty diesel engine with oxidation catalysts, fuel consumption and exhaust temperature increased with increasing the engine loads, and Sol was converted to SO3 by catalyst which, in its hydrated form, could act as the precursor for biodiesei NM formation. Therefore, sulfur level of biodiesel blends dominates the nanoparticle formation in light-duty diesel engine with oxidation catalysts.

  20. Selenium uptake and assessment of the biochemical changes in Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis biomass during the synthesis of selenium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinicovscaia, I; Chiriac, T; Cepoi, L; Rudi, L; Culicov, O; Frontasyeva, M; Rudic, V

    2017-01-01

    The process of selenium uptake by biomass of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis was investigated by neutron activation analysis at different selenium concentrations in solution and at different contact times. Experimental data showed good fit with the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model, with a regression coefficient value of 0.99. In terms of absorption dependence on time, the maximal selenium content was adsorbed in the first 5 min of interaction without significant further changes. It was also found that A. platensis biomass forms spherical selenium nanoparticles. Biochemical analysis was used to assess the changes in the main components of spirulina biomass (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and phycobilin) during nanoparticle formation.

  1. An Assessment of the "Diploma in Computer Engineering" Course in the Technical Education System in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Kul Bahadur; Kim, Jinsoo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the Diploma in Computer Engineering (DCE) courses offered at affiliated schools of the Council for Technical Education and Vocational Training (CTEVT) with a focus on the goals of the curriculum and employment opportunities. Document analysis, questionnaires, focus group discussions and semi-structured…

  2. Incorporating Risk Assessment and Inherently Safer Design Practices into Chemical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Jeffrey R.; Eden, Mario R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces, via case study example, the benefit of including risk assessment methodology and inherently safer design practices into the curriculum for chemical engineering students. This work illustrates how these tools can be applied during the earliest stages of conceptual process design. The impacts of decisions made during…

  3. Effect of Continuous Assessment on Learning Outcomes on Two Chemical Engineering Courses: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuunila, R.; Pulkkinen, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of continuous assessment on the learning outcomes of two chemical engineering courses is studied over a several-year period. Average grades and passing percentages of courses after the final examination are reported and also student feedback on the courses is collected. The results indicate significantly better learning…

  4. Assessment of pleiotropic transcriptome perturbations in Arabidopsis engineered for indirect insect defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houshyani Hassanzadeh, B.; Krol, van der A.R.; Bino, R.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Molecular characterization is an essential step of risk/safety assessment of genetically modified (GM) crops. Holistic approaches for molecular characterization using omics platforms can be used to confirm the intended impact of the genetic engineering, but can also reveal the unintended

  5. Phased array ultrasonic technology contribution to engineering critical assessment (ECA) of economizer piping welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciorau, P.; Gray, D.; Daks, W. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: peter.ciorau@opg.com

    2006-09-15

    This paper describes the application of phased array ultrasonic technology for engineering critical assessment of economizer piping welds. The objective is to detect and size fatigue cracks in the counter bore area of carbon steel boiler feedwater piping welds of a thermal station. A size accuracy of {+-} 1 mm for the outer ligament was required.

  6. Effectiveness of UK and International A-Level Assessment in Predicting Performance in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David M.; Rienties, Bart

    2014-01-01

    In many universities, admissions decisions are made based upon the advanced-level (A-Level) results. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of A-level and international equivalents as a predictor of early achievement in higher education. About 135 UK and 92 international undergraduate engineering students from 35 countries were assessed…

  7. An Assessment of Educational Needs for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastmond, J. Nicholls, Jr.

    Reported is a needs assessment study designed to determine priority needs for a college Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering for setting objectives and long range planning. Opinions were obtained from students, graduates, faculty, and employers. Each of the groups showed agreement on three priority items: (1) practical managerial…

  8. Improving Student Learning in Engineering Discipline Using Student- and Lecturer-Led Assessment Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Boulent; Rafiq, M. Imran; Kumar, Prashant

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the effectiveness of two distinct formative assessment methods for promoting deep learning and hence improving the performance amongst engineering students. The first method, applied for undergraduate students, employs a lecturer-led approach whereas the second method uses a student-led approach and e-learning for…

  9. Improving Electrical Engineering Education at the American University of Sharjah through Continuous Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nashash, Hasan; Khaliq, Abdul; Qaddoumi, Nasser; Al-Assaf, Yousef; Assaleh, Khaled; Dhaouadi, Rached; El-Tarhuni, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The electrical engineering (ELE) program at the American University of Sharjah (AUS) is designed to fulfill the ABET criteria. Several assessment tools are used to qualitatively and quantitatively measure the level of achievement of the program's educational objectives and outcomes. These tools include alumni, employer, and graduate advisor…

  10. Using Concept Maps to Assess Interdisciplinary Integration of Green Engineering Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Maura; Newswander, Chad B.; McNair, Lisa D.; McGinnis, Sean; Paretti, Marie C.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering education, like many fields, has started to explore the benefits of concept maps as an assessment technique for knowledge integration. Because they allow students to graphically link topics and represent complex interconnections among diverse concepts, we argue that concept maps are particularly appropriate for assessing…

  11. Use of Statistical Information for Damage Assessment of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.

    This paper considers the problem of damage assessment of civil engineering structures using statistical information. The aim of the paper is to review how researchers recently have tried to solve the problem. It is pointed out that the problem consists of not only how to use the statistical...

  12. Vibration Based Damage Assessment of a Civil Engineering Structures using a Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Rytter, A.

    In this paper the possibility of using a Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network trained with the Backpropagation Algorith as a non-destructive damage assessment technique to locate and quantify a damage in Civil Engineering structures is investigated. Since artificial neural networks are proving...

  13. Toxicity assessment of inorganic nanoparticles to acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity in anaerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2013-09-15

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to municipal wastewater from industrial and residential sources could impact biological systems in wastewater treatment plants. Methanogenic inhibition can cause failure of anaerobic waste(water) treatment. This study investigated the inhibitory effect of a wide array of inorganic NPs (Ag(0), Al₂O₃, CeO₂, Cu(0), CuO, Fe(0), Fe₂O₃, Mn₂O₃, SiO₂, TiO₂, and ZnO supplied up to 1500 mgL(-1)) to acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge. Of all the NPs tested, only Cu(0) and ZnO caused severe methanogenic inhibition. The 50% inhibiting concentrations determined towards acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were 62 and 68 mgL(-1) for Cu(0) NP; and 87 and 250 mgL(-1) for ZnO NP, respectively. CuO NPs also caused inhibition of acetoclastic methanogens. Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) salts caused similar levels of inhibition as Cu(0) and ZnO NPs based on equilibrium soluble metal concentrations measured during the assays, suggesting that the toxicity was due to the release of metal ions by NP-corrosion. A commercial dispersant, Dispex, intended to increase NP stability did not affect the inhibitory impact of the NPs. The results taken as a whole suggest that Zn- and Cu-containing NPs can release metal ions that are inhibitory for methanogenesis.

  14. Assessment of the biocompatibility and stability of a gold nanoparticle collagen bioscaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Sheila A; Spradling, Claire S; Grant, Daniel N; Fox, Derek B; Jimenez, Luis; Grant, David A; Rone, Rebecca J

    2014-02-01

    Collagen has been utilized as a scaffold for tissue engineering applications due to its many advantageous properties. However, collagen in its purified state is mechanically weak and prone to rapid degradation. To mitigate these effects, collagen can be crosslinked. Although enhanced mechanical properties and stability can be achieved by crosslinking, collagen can be rendered less biocompatible either due to changes in the overall microstructure or due to the cytotoxicity of the crosslinkers. We have investigated crosslinking collagen using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to enhance mechanical properties and resistance to degradation while also maintaining its natural microstructure and biocompatibility. Rat tail type I collagen was crosslinked with AuNPs using a zero-length crosslinker, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Several characterization studies were performed including electron microscopy, collagenase assays, ROS assays, and biocompatibility assays. The results demonstrated that AuNP-collagen scaffolds had increased resistance to degradation as compared to non-AuNP-collagen while still maintaining an open microstructure. Although the biocompatibility assays showed that the collagen and AuNP-collagen scaffolds are biocompatible, the AuNP-collagen demonstrated enhanced cellularity and glycoaminoglycans (GAG) production over the collagen scaffolds. Additionally, the Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assays indicated the ability of the AuNP-collagen to reduce oxidation. Overall, the AuNP-collagen scaffolds demonstrated enhanced biocompatibility and stability over non-AuNP scaffolds.

  15. Biocomposite scaffolds based on electrospun poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) nanofibers and electrosprayed hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramier, Julien [Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris-Est, UMR 7182 CNRS, Université Paris-Est Créteil, 2, rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Bouderlique, Thibault [Laboratoire “Croissance, Réparation et Régénération Tissulaires”, EAC 7149 CNRS, Université Paris-Est Créteil, 61, avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France); Stoilova, Olya; Manolova, Nevena; Rashkov, Iliya [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Langlois, Valérie; Renard, Estelle [Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris-Est, UMR 7182 CNRS, Université Paris-Est Créteil, 2, rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Albanese, Patricia [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grande, Daniel, E-mail: grande@icmpe.cnrs.fr [Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris-Est, UMR 7182 CNRS, Université Paris-Est Créteil, 2, rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France)

    2014-05-01

    The electrospinning technique combined with the electrospraying process provides a straightforward and versatile approach for the fabrication of novel nanofibrous biocomposite scaffolds with structural, mechanical, and biological properties potentially suitable for bone tissue regeneration. In this comparative investigation, three types of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)-based scaffolds were engineered: (i) PHB mats by electrospinning of a PHB solution, (ii) mats of PHB/hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHA) blends by electrospinning of a mixed solution containing PHB and nHAs, and (iii) mats constituted of PHB nanofibers and nHAs by simultaneous electrospinning of a PHB solution and electrospraying of a nHA dispersion. Scaffolds based on PHB/nHA blends displayed improved mechanical properties compared to those of neat PHB mats, due to the incorporation of nHAs within the fibers. The electrospinning/electrospraying approach afforded biocomposite scaffolds with lower mechanical properties, due to their higher porosity, but they displayed slightly better biological properties. In the latter case, the bioceramic, i.e. nHAs, largely covered the fiber surface, thus allowing for a direct exposure to cells. The 21 day-monitoring through the use of MTS assays and SEM analyses demonstrated that human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) remained viable on PHB/nHA biocomposite scaffolds and proliferated continuously until reaching confluence. - Highlights: • Three different types of PHB-based scaffolds are engineered and thoroughly investigated. • The combination of electrospinning and electrospraying affords original nanofibrous biocomposite scaffolds. • PHB-based scaffolds show a strong capability of supporting viable cell development for 21 days.

  16. Assessment and optimization of electroporation-assisted tumoral nanoparticle uptake in a nude mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Derek Lamont; White, Sarah B; Zhang, Zhouli; Larson, Andrew C; Omary, Reed A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a particularly lethal form of cancer. In 2012, the incidence of PDAC was 43,920. Five-year survival for patients with PDAC is around 6%, regardless of staging, making PDAC one of the deadliest forms of cancer. One reason for this dismal prognosis is chemoresistance to the current first-line therapy, gemcitabine. There are multiple factors that contribute to the chemoresistance observed in pancreatic cancer. Among them, desmoplasia has been increasingly seen as a significant contributor to chemoresistance. To overcome desmoplastic chemoresistance, several novel methods of treatment have been developed. Electroporation is one such novel treatment. High electrical fields are applied to cells to create pores that increase cell permeability. It has been previously demonstrated that electroporation enhances the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs in pancreatic tumor models. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems constitute a second novel method to overcome desmoplastic chemoresistance. Due to their intrinsic design advantages, nanoparticles have been shown to increase the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents, while further reducing or even eliminating side effects. To date, there have been no studies evaluating the cumulative effect of combining both nanoparticle and electroporation strategies to overcome chemoresistance in PDAC. Our preliminary studies assessed the in vitro and in vivo uptake of doxorubicin-loaded iron oxide nanoparticles as a function of electroporation voltage and timing of administration in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Our studies demonstrated that addition of electroporation to administration of nanoparticles significantly increased the amount of intracellular iron oxide nanoparticle uptake by a PANC-1 cell line in an athymic nude mouse model of PDAC. Further, electroporation-assisted nanoparticle uptake could be significantly altered by changing the timing of application of electroporation.

  17. Dynamic Probing of Nanoparticle Stability In Vivo: A Liposomal Model Assessed Using In Situ Microdialysis and Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chung Jeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and controlled release has been a vigorous research area in contemporary nanomedicine. The in vivo stability of nanoparticle delivered on site is a prerequisite for the design of drug-controlled release by any means. In this study, the first methodology comprised of microdialysis and optical imaging to assess the liposome stability in vivo is reported. Macroscopically, we demonstrated the DPPG liposomes with negative surface charge fast accumulated in the rat liver upon their i.v. administration using optical imaging. Microscopically, the concurrent analysis of fluorescent molecules leaching from the liposomes, in situ sampled using microdialysis probe, provides the dynamic information of stability of DPPG liposomes locus in quo. The current combination of in situ microdialysis and optical imaging possesses a great potential for use as a platform technology to evaluate the nanoparticle stability and the bioavailability of drug payload released on targeted site in vivo.

  18. Development of HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene assays in human cells for assessing the oxidative damage induced by silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lili; Wang, Jianshu; Zhang, Leshuai W; Che, Bizhong; Dong, Guangzhu; Fan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Kaiming

    2016-08-01

    The exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products requires novel tools for rapid and cost-effective toxicology screening. In order to assess the oxidative damage induced by nanoparticles, toxicity test systems based on a human HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter in HepG2, LO2, A549, and HBE cells were established. After treated with heat shock and a group of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different primary particle sizes, the cell viability, oxidative damage, and luciferase activity were determined. The time-dependent Ag(+) ions release from AgNPs in cell medium was also evaluated. Our results showed that heat shock produced a strong time-dependent induction of relative luciferase activity in the four luciferase reporter cells. Surprisingly, at 4h of recovery, the relative luciferase activity was >98× the control level in HepG2-luciferase cells. Exposure to different sizes of AgNPs resulted in activation of the HSPA1A promoter in a dose-dependent manner, even at low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic doses. The smaller (5nm) AgNPs were more potent in luciferase induction than the larger (50 and 75nm) AgNPs. These results were generally in accordance with the oxidative damage indicated by malondialdehyde concentration, reactive oxygen species induction and glutathione depletion, and Ag(+) ions release in cell medium. Compared with the other three luciferase reporter cells, the luciferase signal in HepG2-luciferase cells is obviously more sensitive and stable. We conclude that the luciferase reporter cells, especially the HepG2-luciferase cells, could provide a valuable tool for rapid screening of the oxidative damage induced by AgNPs.

  19. Interactions of metal-based engineered nanoparticles with aquatic higher plants: A review of the state of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwala, Melusi; Klaine, Stephen J; Musee, Ndeke

    2016-07-01

    The rising potential for the release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into aquatic environments requires evaluation of risks to protect ecological health. The present review examines knowledge pertaining to the interactions of metal-based ENPs with aquatic higher plants, identifies information gaps, and raises considerations for future research to advance knowledge on the subject. The discussion focuses on ENPs' bioaccessibility; uptake, adsorption, translocation, and bioaccumulation; and toxicity effects on aquatic higher plants. An information deficit surrounds the uptake of ENPs and associated dynamics, because the influence of ENP characteristics and water quality conditions has not been well documented. Dissolution appears to be a key mechanism driving bioaccumulation of ENPs, whereas nanoparticulates often adsorb to plant surfaces with minimal internalization. However, few reports document the internalization of ENPs by plants; thus, the role of nanoparticulates' internalization in bioaccumulation and toxicity remains unclear, requiring further investigation. The toxicities of metal-based ENPs mainly have been associated with dissolution as a predominant mechanism, although nano toxicity has also been reported. To advance knowledge in this domain, future investigations need to integrate the influence of ENP characteristics and water physicochemical parameters, as their interplay determines ENP bioaccessibility and influences their risk to health of aquatic higher plants. Furthermore, harmonization of test protocols is recommended for fast tracking the generation of comparable data. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1677-1694. © 2016 SETAC.

  20. Intraparticle Molecular Orbital Engineering of Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles as Amplified Theranostics for in Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yan; Fang, Yuan; Miao, Qingqing; Zhen, Xu; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2016-04-26

    Optical theranostic nanoagents that seamlessly and synergistically integrate light-generated signals with photothermal or photodynamic therapy can provide opportunities for cost-effective precision medicine, while the potential for clinical translation requires them to have good biocompatibility and high imaging/therapy performance. We herein report an intraparticle molecular orbital engineering approach to simultaneously enhance photoacoustic brightness and photothermal therapy efficacy of semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) for in vivo imaging and treatment of cancer. The theranostic SPNs have a binary optical component nanostructure, wherein a near-infrared absorbing semiconducting polymer and an ultrasmall carbon dot (fullerene) interact with each other to induce photoinduced electron transfer upon light irradiation. Such an intraparticle optoelectronic interaction augments heat generation and consequently enhances the photoacoustic signal and maximum photothermal temperature of SPNs by 2.6- and 1.3-fold, respectively. With the use of the amplified SPN as the theranostic nanoagent, it permits enhanced photoacoustic imaging and photothermal ablation of tumor in living mice. Our study thus not only introduces a category of purely organic optical theranostics but also highlights a molecular guideline to amplify the effectiveness of light-intensive imaging and therapeutic nanosystems.

  1. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  2. Behavior and Potential Impacts of Metal-Based Engineered Nanoparticles in Aquatic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific properties of metal-based nanoparticles (NPs have not only led to rapidly increasing applications in various industrial and commercial products, but also caused environmental concerns due to the inevitable release of NPs and their unpredictable biological/ecological impacts. This review discusses the environmental behavior of metal-based NPs with an in-depth analysis of the mechanisms and kinetics. The focus is on knowledge gaps in the interaction of NPs with aquatic organisms, which can influence the fate, transport and toxicity of NPs in the aquatic environment. Aggregation transforms NPs into micrometer-sized clusters in the aqueous environment, whereas dissolution also alters the size distribution and surface reactivity of metal-based NPs. A unique toxicity mechanism of metal-based NPs is related to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the subsequent ROS-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, aggregation, dissolution and ROS generation could influence each other and also be influenced by many factors, including the sizes, shapes and surface charge of NPs, as well as the pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter and experimental conditions. Bioaccumulation of NPs in single organism species, such as aquatic plants, zooplankton, fish and benthos, is summarized and compared. Moreover, the trophic transfer and/or biomagnification of metal-based NPs in an aquatic ecosystem are discussed. In addition, genetic effects could result from direct or indirect interactions between DNA and NPs. Finally, several challenges facing us are put forward in the review.

  3. Occupational exposure to airborne nanomaterials: An assessment of worker exposure to aerosolized metal oxide nanoparticles in a semiconductor fab and subfab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Sara A; Neu-Baker, Nicole M; Caglayan, Cihan; Zurbenko, Igor G

    2016-09-01

    This occupational exposure assessment study characterized potential inhalation exposures of workers to engineered nanomaterials associated with chemical mechanical planarization wafer polishing processes in a semiconductor research and development facility. Air sampling methodology was designed to capture airborne metal oxide nanoparticles for characterization. The research team obtained air samples in the fab and subfab areas using a combination of filter-based capture methods to determine particle morphology and elemental composition and real-time direct-reading instruments to determine airborne particle counts. Filter-based samples were analyzed by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy while real-time particle counting data underwent statistical analysis. Sampling was conducted during worker tasks associated with preventive maintenance and quality control that were identified as having medium to high potential for inhalation exposure based on qualitative assessments. For each sampling event, data was collected for comparison between the background, task area, and personal breathing zone. Sampling conducted over nine months included five discrete sampling series events in coordination with on-site employees under real working conditions. The number of filter-based samples captured was: eight from worker personal breathing zones; seven from task areas; and five from backgrounds. A complementary suite of direct-reading instruments collected data for seven sample collection periods in the task area and six in the background. Engineered nanomaterials of interest (Si, Al, Ce) were identified in filter-based samples from all areas of collection, existing as agglomerates (>500 nm) and nanoparticles (100-500 nm). Particle counts showed an increase in number concentration above background during a subset of the job tasks, but particle counts in the task areas were otherwise not significantly higher than background. Additional data is needed to

  4. Engineering assessment and certification of integrity of the 141-R1U1 tank system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graser, D.A. (Science Applications International Corp. (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of retention tank 141-R1U1 is in response to the requirements of 40 CFR 265.191 for an existing tank system that stores hazardous waste and does not have secondary containment. This technical assessment has been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California registered professional engineer, who has certified the tank system to be adequately designed and compatible with the stored waste so that it will not collapse rupture, or fail. This document will be kept on file at the facility. Onground retention tanks 141-R1O1 and 141-R1O2, which are also part of the 141-R1 retention tank system, do not have secondary containment; consequently, certification documentation for these tanks is not included in this assessment. A discussion of the onground tanks, however, is included in this report to provide a complete description of the 141-R1 retention tank system. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Dendrimer, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and PLGA nanoparticles: one platform assessment of drug delivery potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Nishi; Tekade, Rakesh Kumar; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Chopdey, Prashant; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Liposomes (LIP), nanoparticles (NP), dendrimers (DEN), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), represent eminent classes of drug delivery devices. A study was carried out herewith by employing docetaxel (DTX) as model drug to assess their comparative drug delivery potentials. Under optimized conditions, highest entrapment of DTX was observed in CNT-based formulation (DTX-CNTs, 74.70 ± 4.9%) followed by nanoparticles (DTX-NP, 62.34 ± 1.5%), liposome (49.2 ± 1.51%), and dendrimers (28.26 ± 1.74%). All the formulations were found to be of nanometric size. In vitro release studies were carried out in PBS (pH 7.0 and 4.0), wherein all the formulations showed biphasic release pattern. Cytotoxicity assay in human cervical cancer SiHa cells inferred lowest IC50 value of 1,235.09 ± 41.93 nM with DTX-CNTs, followed by DTX-DEN, DTX-LIP, DTX-NP with IC50 values of 1,571.22 ± 151.27, 1,653.98 ± 72.89, 1,922.75 ± 75.15 nM, respectively. Plain DTX showed higher hemolytic toxicity of 22.48 ± 0.94%, however loading of DTX inside nanocarriers drastically reduced its hemolytic toxicity (DTX-DEN, 17.22 ± 0.48%; DTX-LIP, 4.13 ± 0.19%; DTX-NP, 6.43 ± 0.44%; DTX-CNTs, 14.87 ± 1.69%).

  6. Genotoxicity assessment of intravenously injected titanium dioxide nanoparticles in gpt delta transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Miura, Nobuhiko; Hojo, Rieko; Yanagiba, Yukie; Suda, Megumi; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly manufactured in large amounts for use in industrial applications such as cosmetics, pigments, foods, and as photo-catalysts. Many in vitro studies have examined the genotoxicity of TiO2 nanomaterials; some of these studies suggest that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are genotoxic. Several in vivo studies have also been reported recently, but the results are inconsistent. In this study, we investigated, using several genotoxicity endpoints, the effects of dispersed TiO2 suspensions following multiple intravenous injections in mice. Male gpt Delta C57BL/6J mice were administered TiO2 NPs at doses of 2, 10 or 50mg/kg body weight per week for 4 consecutive weeks. Genotoxic effects were then analyzed by the Pig-a gene mutation assay and the micronucleus assay on peripheral blood, and by the alkaline comet, gpt mutation, and Spi(-) mutation assays on the liver. We also assessed the localization of TiO2 NPs in the liver, by transmission electron microscopy. Administration of TiO2 NPs did not significantly increase any of the following endpoints: frequency of Pig-a mutants (erythrocytes); frequency of micronuclei (reticulocytes); level of DNA damage (liver); frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutants (liver). Most TiO2 NPs in the liver were found in the sinuses and inside Kupffer cells, although some were occasionally observed in liver parenchymal cells. These results indicate that TiO2 NPs do not have genotoxic effects on mouse liver or bone marrow.

  7. Development and assessment of kerateine nanoparticles for use as a hemostatic agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tiantian [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Hao, Shilei, E-mail: shilei_hao@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chen, Xiaoliang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institution of Chongqing Cancer, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wang, Ju; Yang, Qian; Wang, Yazhou; Weng, Yulan; Wei, Huimin; Zhou, Jin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wang, Bochu, E-mail: wangbc2000@126.com [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Uncontrolled bleeding frequently occurs in some emergencies which can result in severe injury and even death. Keratin hydrogel has been found that it had good ahemostatic efficacy in the previous studies. However, an ideal hemostatic agent should not require mixing or preparation in advance, and hydrogel is not easy to store and carry. In the present study, the kerateine was firstly extracted from human hair, and then was prepared nanoparticles by a modified emulsion diffusion method. The synthesized nanoparticles showed spherical morphology with an average diameter of approximately 200 nm. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that the chemical structure of kerateine did not change but the crystal form may be transformed in the nanoparticles. In addition, kerateine nanoparticles displayed a faster clotting time in vitro study than the kerateine extracts. Furthermore, kerateine nanoparticles significantly reduced the blood loss and coagulation time in the liver puncture and tail amputation in rat models. Our results indicated that kerateine nanoparticles could quickly form a high viscosity gel onto the wound and accelerate the blood coagulation based on their high specific surface area. Therefore, kerateine nanoparticles have great potential for hemostatic application. - Highlights: • The kerateine nanoparticles were prepared via modified ultrasonic solidification method. • The kerateine nanoparticle can stop the tail and liver bleeding within 2 min and 1 min, respectively. • The kerateine nanoparticles showed a stronger hemostatic efficacy than powders because of higher specific surface area.

  8. [The Health Technology Assessment Engine of the Academic Hospital of Udine: first appraisal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The Health Technology Assessment Engine (HTAE) of the Academic Hospital of Udine aggregates about one hundred of health technology assessment websites. It was born thanks to Google technology in 2008 and after about four years of testing it became public for everybody from the Homepage of the Italian Society of Health Technology Assessment (SIHTA). In this paper the first results obtained with this resource are reported. The role of the scientific librarian is examined not only as a support specialist in bibliographic search but also as a creative expert in managing new technologies for the community.

  9. Materials technology assessment for a 1050 K Stirling Space Engine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuermann, C.M.; Dreshfield, R.L.; Gaydosh, D.J.; Kiser, J.D.; MacKay, R.A.; McDanels, D.L.; Petrasek, D.W.; Vannucci, R.D.; Bowles, K.J.; Watson, G.K.

    1988-10-01

    An assessment of materials technology and proposed materials selection was made for the 1050 K (superalloy) Stirling Space Engine design. The objectives of this assessment were to evaluate previously proposed materials selections, evaluate the current state-of-the-art materials, propose potential alternate materials selections and identify research and development efforts needed to provide materials that can meet the stringent system requirements. This assessment generally reaffirmed the choices made by the contractor; however, in many cases alternative choices were described and suggestions for needed materials and fabrication research and development were made.

  10. Combining Capability Assessment and Value Engineering: a New Two-dimensional Method for Software Process Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Ojala

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades software process improvement (SPI has been recognized as a usable possibility to increase the quality of software development. Implemented SPI investments have often indicated increased process capabilities as well. Recently more attention has been focused on the costs of SPI as well as on the cost-effectiveness and productivity of software development, although the roots of economic-driven software engineering originate from the very early days of software engineering research. This research combines Value Engineering and capability assessment into usable new method in order to better respond to the challenges that cost-effectiveness and productivity has brought to software companies. This is done in part by defining the concepts of value, worth and cost and in part by defining the Value Engineering process and different enhancements it has seen to offer to software assessment. The practical industrial cases show that proposed two-dimensional method works in practise and is useful to assessed companies.

  11. Surface engineering of gold nanoparticles for in vitro siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Enyu; Zhao, Zhixia; Wang, Jiancheng; Yang, Chunhui; Chen, Chengjun; Gao, Lingyan; Feng, Qiang; Hou, Wenjie; Gao, Mingyuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-07-01

    Cellular uptake, endosomal/lysosomal escape, and the effective dissociation from the carrier are a series of hurdles for specific genes to be delivered both in vitro and in vivo. To construct siRNA delivery systems, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and siRNA were alternately assembled on the surface of 11.8 +/- 0.9 nm Au nanoparticles (GNP), stabilized by denatured bovine serum albumin, by the ionic layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method. By manipulating the outmost PAH layer, GNP-PAH vectors with different surface electric potentials were prepared. Then, the surface potential-dependent cytotoxicity of the resultant GNP-PAH particles was evaluated via sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay, while the surface potential-dependent cellular uptake efficiency was quantitatively analyzed by using the flow cytometry method based on carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled siRNA. It was revealed that the GNP-PAH particles with surface potential of +25 mV exhibited the optimal cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity for human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Following these results, two more positively charged polyelectrolytes with different protonating abilities in comparison with PAH, i.e., polyethylenimine (PEI), and poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDA), were chosen to fabricate similarly structured vectors. Confocal fluorescence microscopy studies indicated that siRNA delivered by GNP-PAH and GNP-PEI systems was better released than that delivered by the GNP-PDDA system. Further flow cytometric assays based on immunofluorescence staining of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) revealed that EGFR siRNA delivered by GNP-PAH and GNP-PEI exhibited similar down-regulation effects on EGFR expression in MCF-7 cells. The following dual fluorescence flow cytometry assays by co-staining phosphatidylserine and DNA suggested the EGFR siRNA delivered by GNP-PAH exhibited an improved silencing effect in comparison with that delivered by the commercial transfection reagent

  12. Augmented cellular trafficking and endosomal escape of porous silicon nanoparticles via zwitterionic bilayer polymer surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Almeida, Patrick V; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-08-01

    The development of a stable vehicle with low toxicity, high cellular internalization, efficient endosomal escape, and optimal drug release profile is a key bottleneck in nanomedicine. To overcome all these problems, we have developed a successful layer-by-layer method to covalently conjugate polyethyleneimine (PEI) and poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE-MA) copolymer on the surface of undecylenic acid functionalized thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs), forming a bilayer zwitterionic nanocomposite containing free positive charge groups of hyper-branched PEI disguised by the PMVE-MA polymer. The surface smoothness, charge and hydrophilicity of the developed NPs considerably improved the colloidal and plasma stabilities via enhanced suspensibility and charge repulsion. Furthermore, despite the surface negative charge of the bilayer polymer-conjugated NPs, the cellular trafficking and endosomal escape were significantly increased in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we also showed that the conjugation of surface free amine groups of the highly toxic UnTHCPSi-PEI (Un-P) NPs to the carboxylic groups of PMVE-MA renders acceptable safety features to the system and preserves the endosomal escape properties via proton sponge mechanism of the free available amine groups located inside the hyper-branched PEI layer. Moreover, the double layer protection not only controlled the aggregation of the NPs and reduced the toxicity, but also sustained the drug release of an anticancer drug, methotrexate, with further improved cytotoxicity profile of the drug-loaded particles. These results provide a proof-of-concept evidence that such zwitterionic polymer-based PSi nanocomposites can be extensively used as a promising candidate for cytosolic drug delivery.

  13. Assessment of shaft safety and management system of controlling engineering information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Rui-xin; Xu Yan-chun [Yanzhou Mining Group Ltd., Zoucheng (China)

    2008-02-15

    Evaluating shaft safety and establishing a system for controlling engineering information is very important because more than 90 shafts in thick alluvial areas suddenly have shaft wall fracturing or breaking problems and there are more than a few hundred shafts of similar geologic conditions. Taking shaft control in the Yangzhou Coal Mining Group as an example, an assessment and management system and related software were established. This system includes basic information of the mine, measurement results and analysis, and functions of empirical and theoretical forecasting and finite element analysis, which are confirmed to be very effective for guiding shaft well control engineering in practice. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Quantitatively probing propensity for structural transitions in engineered virus nanoparticles by single-molecule mechanical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Milagros; Carrillo, Pablo J. P.; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2015-03-01

    Viruses are increasingly being studied from the perspective of fundamental physics at the nanoscale as biologically evolved nanodevices with many technological applications. In viral particles of the minute virus of mice (MVM), folded segments of the single-stranded DNA genome are bound to the capsid inner wall and act as molecular buttresses that increase locally the mechanical stiffness of the particle. We have explored whether a quantitative linkage exists in MVM particles between their DNA-mediated stiffening and impairment of a heat-induced, virus-inactivating structural change. A series of structurally modified virus particles with disrupted capsid-DNA interactions and/or distorted capsid cavities close to the DNA-binding sites were engineered and characterized, both in classic kinetics assays and by single-molecule mechanical analysis using atomic force microscopy. The rate constant of the virus inactivation reaction was found to decrease exponentially with the increase in elastic constant (stiffness) of the regions closer to DNA-binding sites. The application of transition state theory suggests that the height of the free energy barrier of the virus-inactivating structural transition increases linearly with local mechanical stiffness. From a virological perspective, the results indicate that infectious MVM particles may have acquired the biological advantage of increased survival under thermal stress by evolving architectural elements that rigidify the particle and impair non-productive structural changes. From a nanotechnological perspective, this study provides proof of principle that determination of mechanical stiffness and its manipulation by protein engineering may be applied for quantitatively probing and tuning the conformational dynamics of virus-based and other protein-based nanoassemblies.Viruses are increasingly being studied from the perspective of fundamental physics at the nanoscale as biologically evolved nanodevices with many technological

  15. Analytical assessment about the simultaneous quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles in tap water and domestic waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystek, Petra; Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Kooij, Pascal J F

    2015-03-15

    For pharmaceutical applications, the use of inorganic engineered nanoparticles is of growing interest while silver (Ag) and gold (Au) are the most relevant elements. A few methods were developed recently but the validation and the application testing were quite limited. Therefore, a routinely suitable multi element method for the identification of nanoparticles of different sizes below 100 nm and elemental composition by applying asymmetric flow field flow fraction (AF4) - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) is developed. A complete validation model of the quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles based on Ag and Au is presented for the most relevant aqueous matrices of tap water and domestic waste water. The samples are originated from locations in the Netherlands and it is of great interest to study the unwanted presence of Ag and Au as nanoparticle residues due to possible health and environmental risks. During method development, instability effects are observed for 60 nm and 70 nm Ag ENPs with different capping agents. These effects are studied more closely in relation to matrix effects. Besides the methodological aspects, the obtained analytical results and relevant performance characteristics (e.g. measuring range, limit of detection, repeatability, reproducibility, trueness, and expanded uncertainty of measurement) are determined and discussed. For the chosen aqueous matrices, the results of the performance characteristics are significantly better for Au ENPs in comparison to Ag ENPs; e.g. repeatability and reproducibility are below 10% for all Au ENPs respectively maximal 27% repeatability for larger Ag ENPs. The method is a promising tool for the simultaneous determination of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles.

  16. Nanoparticles at the interface between atmosphere and hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Huckele, S.; Niessner, R.

    2012-04-01

    In the light of increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and reports of reports of adverse effects of nanoparticles on aquatic ecosystems and possible health issues, assessment of the transport of nanoparticles is of high importance. In this study we address the transport of airborne nanoparticles through the unsaturated zone in an urban environment. Aquifers and soils are the primary filter systems to remove engineered nanoparticles. These effects are used e.g., for bank filtration. Recent flooding events, on the other hand, show the limited capacity of this filter. While engineered nanoparticles are tailored to specific applications, one has to assume that they nonetheless interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in surface water and top soil in larger quantities. A coating with DOM has a stabilizing effect on most nanoparticles. Thus, a transport of engineered nanoparticles through the soil seems likely. A monitoring program was performed at the Munich vadose zone field laboratory, a shaft reaching from the top soil to the groundwater table at 10 m below the ground surface. Wet and dry deposition were collected and analyzed to assess the input function. Seepage water was collected and analyzed in nine depths to assess the transport of nanoparticles. For all samples the size distribution and the elemental composition of the particles was measured using ultrafiltration, AF4, and ICP/MS. Nanoparticles deposited during dry periods may accumulate on the plant leaves and on the top soil. Here a first interaction with organic matter occurs. Heavy rainfall after a dry period will mobilize the nanoparticles. Through cracks in the top soil, preferential flow can transport the surface modified particles to the groundwater. During winter, particles are deposited on the snow cover. Sublimation of snow may lead to relatively high concentrations in the remaining snow. Cracks in the top soil caused by freezing ease the transport of nanoparticles together with the

  17. Assessing antibacterial effect of filter media coated with silver nanoparticles against Bacillus spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Nafisi Bahabadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nanotechnology is a field of applied science and technology covering a broad range of topics. Use of nanotechnology and especially silver nanoparticles in control of bacterial diseases and infections has been studied in the recent years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antibacterial effect of filter media coated with silver nanoparticles against Bacillus spp. Materials and methods: In this research, first, the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles against mentioned bacteria were evaluated by microdilution method in Broth medium. After confidence of inhibitory effect of colloidal silver nanoparticles, antibacterial effect of filter media coated with silver nanoparticles was evaluated via in vitro microbiology tests (zone of inhibition test and test tube test. Results: Present study showed that colloidal silver nanoparticles have good antimicrobial effects against tested bacteria, so that MIC and MBC of silver nanoparticles for Bacillus spp. were calculated 3.9 and 31.25 mg/L, respectively. Also significant decrease was observed in bacterial growth after exposure to filter media coated with silver nanoparticles in test tube test and  zone of inhibition test (P≤ 5%. Conclusion: The results of this research indicate that filter media coated with silver nanoparticles have considerable antimicrobial effects; therefore they could possibly be used as excellent antibacterial water filters and would have several applications in other sectors.

  18. Adipose tissue engineering in three-dimensional levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Souza, Glauco R; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-05-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is becoming widely used in regenerative medicine/cell therapy applications, and its physiological and pathological importance is increasingly appreciated. WAT is a complex organ composed of differentiated adipocytes, stromal mesenchymal progenitors known as adipose stromal cells (ASC), as well as endothelial vascular cells and infiltrating leukocytes. Two-dimensional (2D) culture that has been typically used for studying adipose cells does not adequately recapitulate WAT complexity. Improved methods for reconstruction of functional WAT ex vivo are instrumental for understanding of physiological interactions between the composing cell populations. Here, we used a three-dimensional (3D) levitation tissue culture system based on magnetic nanoparticle assembly to model WAT development and growth in organoids termed adipospheres. We show that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes remain viable in spheroids for a long period of time, while in 2D culture, they lose adherence and die after reaching confluence. Upon adipogenesis induction in 3T3-L1 adipospheres, cells efficiently formed large lipid droplets typical of white adipocytes in vivo, while only smaller lipid droplet formation is achievable in 2D. Adiposphere-based coculture of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with murine endothelial bEND.3 cells led to a vascular-like network assembly concomitantly with lipogenesis in perivascular cells. Adipocyte-depleted stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of mouse WAT cultured in 3D underwent assembly into organoids with vascular-like structures containing luminal endothelial and perivascular stromal cell layers. Adipospheres made from primary WAT cells displayed robust proliferation and complex hierarchical organization reflected by a matricellular gradient incorporating ASC, endothelial cells, and leukocytes, while ASC quickly outgrew other cell types in adherent culture. Upon adipogenesis induction, adipospheres derived from the SVF displayed more efficient lipid droplet

  19. Implementation and student perceptions of e-assessment in a Chemical Engineering module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Eva

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes work carried out at the Department of Chemical Engineering at UCL into the use of e-assessment in a second year module and, in particular, the student perceptions of this mode of assessment. Three quizzes were implemented in Moodle, the first two as formative assessment and the final quiz as summative assessment. The results were very encouraging and practically all students engaged with the process. An online survey was delivered to all students after the module, which showed that the students felt that e-assessment added value to their learning and they would like to see it implemented in other modules. The quizzes were intended to be mainly beneficial to the weaker students as it gave them an opportunity to go over key aspects of the material in their own time. Interestingly, the stronger students were even more in favour of e-learning than the weaker students, for whom the quizzes were originally designed.

  20. Legionellae in engineered systems and use of quantitative microbial risk assessment to predict exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Helen Y; Schoen, Mary E; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2012-03-15

    While it is well-established that Legionella are able to colonize engineered water systems, the number of interacting factors contributing to their occurrence, proliferation, and persistence are unclear. This review summarizes current methods used to detect and quantify legionellae as well as the current knowledge of engineered water system characteristics that both favour and promote legionellae growth. Furthermore, the use of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) models to predict potentially critical human exposures to legionellae are also discussed. Understanding the conditions favouring Legionella occurrence in engineered systems and their overall ecology (growth in these systems/biofilms, biotic interactions and release) will aid in developing new treatment technologies and/or systems that minimize or eliminate human exposure to potentially pathogenic legionellae.

  1. Modeling In Vivo Interactions of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Pulmonary Alveolar Lining Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs in consumer products may result in widespread human inhalation exposures. Due to their high surface area per unit mass, inhaled ENMs interact with multiple components of the pulmonary system, and these interactions affect their ultimate fate in the body. Modeling of ENM transport and clearance in vivo has traditionally treated tissues as well-mixed compartments, without consideration of nanoscale interaction and transformation mechanisms. ENM agglomeration, dissolution and transport, along with adsorption of biomolecules, such as surfactant lipids and proteins, cause irreversible changes to ENM morphology and surface properties. The model presented in this article quantifies ENM transformation and transport in the alveolar air to liquid interface and estimates eventual alveolar cell dosimetry. This formulation brings together established concepts from colloidal and surface science, physics, and biochemistry to provide a stochastic framework capable of capturing essential in vivo processes in the pulmonary alveolar lining layer. The model has been implemented for in vitro solutions with parameters estimated from relevant published in vitro measurements and has been extended here to in vivo systems simulating human inhalation exposures. Applications are presented for four different ENMs, and relevant kinetic rates are estimated, demonstrating an approach for improving human in vivo pulmonary dosimetry.

  2. Assessment of Radiated Fan Noise Prediction Capabilities Using Static Engine Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nark, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes further assessment of the CDUCT-LaRC code via comparison with static engine test data. In an effort to improve confidence in the use of CDUCT-LaRC for liner optimization studies addressing realistic three-dimensional geometries, inlet radiated fan noise predictions were performed at 54% and 87% engine speed settings. Predictions were then compared with far-field measurements to assess the approach and implementation. The particular configurations were chosen to exercise the three-dimensional capability of CDUCT-LaRC and it s applicability to realistic configurations and conditions. At the 54% engine speed setting, the predictions capture the general directivity and acoustic treatment effects quite well. Comparisons of the predicted and measured directivity at the 87% power setting were more problematic. This was likely due in part to the difficulties in source specification and possibly the nonlinear nature of buzz-saw tones at this engine operating condition. Overall, the approach captured the basic trends and provided a conservative estimate of liner effects from which relative performance metrics could be inferred.

  3. Streptomycin-loaded PLGA-alginate nanoparticles: preparation, characterization, and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Asadollah

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate and characterize streptomycin-loaded PLGA-alginate nanoparticles for their potential therapeutic use in Salmonella subsp. enterica ATCC 14028 infections. The streptomycin nanoparticle was prepared by solvent diffusion method, and the other properties such as size, zeta potential, loading efficacy, release kinetics, and antimicrobial strength were evaluated. The survey shows that nanoparticles may serve as a carrier of streptomycin and may provide localized antibacterial activity in the treatment of Salmonellosis. Electron microscopy showed spherical particles with indentations. The average size of the nanoparticles was 90 nm. At pH 7.2, the release kinetics of streptomycin from the nanoparticles was successfully illustrated as an initial burst defined by a first order equation that after this stage, it has a drastic tendency to obtain steady state. Nevertheless, nanoparticles showed loading efficacy nearly about 70-75 %. In addition, the tendency of concentration of streptomycin released from nanoparticles to reach antibacterial activity was similar to that of free streptomycin against PLGA-alginate, but it had threefold more antimicrobial strength in comparison with free streptomycin. This work shows the potential use of streptomycin-loaded PLGA-alginate nanoparticles and its capability.

  4. Toxicological risk assessment of elemental gold following oral exposure to sheets and nanoparticles – A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Poulsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    . In addition, gold released from dental restorations has been reported to increase the risk of developing gold hypersensitivity. Regarding genotoxicity, in vitro studies indicate that gold nanoparticles induce DNA damage in mammalian cells. In vivo, gold nanoparticles induce genotoxic effects in Drosophila...

  5. Transformation of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles from a Diesel Fuel Additive during Combustion in a Diesel Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, James G; Cox, Steven S; Vance, Marina E; Marr, Linsey C; Hochella, Michael F

    2017-02-21

    Nanoscale cerium oxide is used as a diesel fuel additive to reduce particulate matter emissions and increase fuel economy, but its fate in the environment has not been established. Cerium oxide released as a result of the combustion of diesel fuel containing the additive Envirox, which utilizes suspended nanoscale cerium oxide to reduce particulate matter emissions and increase fuel economy, was captured from the exhaust stream of a diesel engine and was characterized using a combination of bulk analytical techniques and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The combustion process induced significant changes in the size and morphology of the particles; ∼15 nm aggregates consisting of 5-7 nm faceted crystals in the fuel additive became 50-300 nm, near-spherical, single crystals in the exhaust. Electron diffraction identified the original cerium oxide particles as cerium(IV) oxide (CeO2, standard FCC structure) with no detectable quantities of Ce(III), whereas in the exhaust the ceria particles had additional electron diffraction reflections indicative of a CeO2 superstructure containing ordered oxygen vacancies. The surfactant coating present on the cerium oxide particles in the additive was lost during combustion, but in roughly 30% of the observed particles in the exhaust, a new surface coating formed, approximately 2-5 nm thick. The results of this study suggest that pristine, laboratory-produced, nanoscale cerium oxide is not a good substitute for the cerium oxide released from fuel-borne catalyst applications and that future toxicity experiments and modeling will require the use/consideration of more realistic materials.

  6. Army Corps of Engineers: Efforts to Assess the Impact of Extreme Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    southern California dam, which allowed the Corps to retain rainwater to help respond to the state’s extreme drought conditions . The Corps has assessed...anticipate, prepare for, respond to, and adapt to changing conditions and to withstand and recover rapidly from disruptions with minimal damage. As directed... Extreme Weather Events in the Planning Process Page 16 GAO-15-660 Army Corps of Engineers adapting projects to this projected change.27

  7. Systems Engineering Technology Readiness Assessment of Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Tactical Wheeled Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Department of Energy. 2007. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. “Freedom CAR and vehicle technology program; Plug-In hybrid- electric vehicle R&D Plan...ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID- ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FOR TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLES by Eddie E. McCown September 2014 Thesis...HYBRID- ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FOR TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Eddie E. McCown 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  8. Drosophotoxicology: An Emerging Research Area for Assessing Nanoparticles Interaction with Living Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Carmen Chifiriuc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of nanotechnology allowed the fabrication of a wide range of different nanomaterials, raising many questions about their safety and potential risks for the human health and environment. Most of the current nanotoxicology research is not standardized, hampering any comparison or reproducibility of the obtained results. Drosophotoxicology encompasses the plethora of methodological approaches addressing the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a choice organism in toxicology studies. Drosophila melanogaster model offers several important advantages, such as a relatively simple genome structure, short lifespan, low maintenance cost, readiness of experimental manipulation comparative to vertebrate models from both ethical and technical points of view, relevant gene homology with higher organisms, and ease of obtaining mutant phenotypes. The molecular pathways, as well as multiple behavioral and developmental parameters, can be evaluated using this model in lower, medium or high throughput type assays, allowing a systematic classification of the toxicity levels of different nanomaterials. The purpose of this paper is to review the current research on the applications of Drosophila melanogaster model for the in vivo assessment of nanoparticles toxicity and to reveal the huge potential of this model system to provide results that could enable a proper selection of different nanostructures for a certain biomedical application.

  9. Injected nanoparticles: the combination of experimental systems to assess cardiovascular adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Maria A; Tarasova, Olga S; Riikonen, Joakim; Raula, Janne; Lobach, Anatoly S; Borzykh, Anna A; Smirin, Boris V; Kauppinen, Esko I; Eletskii, Alexander V; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Salonen, Jarno; Tavi, Pasi; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2014-05-01

    When nanocarriers are used for drug delivery they can often achieve superior therapeutic outcomes over standard drug formulations. However, concerns about their adverse effects are growing due to the association between exposure to certain nanosized particles and cardiovascular events. Here we examine the impact of intravenously injected drug-free nanocarriers on the cardiovasculature at both the systemic and organ levels. We combine in vivo and in vitro methods to enable monitoring of hemodynamic parameters in conscious rats, assessments of the function of the vessels after sub-chronic systemic exposure to nanocarriers and evaluation of the direct effect of nanocarriers on vascular tone. We demonstrate that nanocarriers can decrease blood pressure and increase heart rate in vivo via various mechanisms. Depending on the type, nanocarriers induce the dilation of the resistance arteries and/or change the responses induced by vasoconstrictor or vasodilator drugs. No direct correlation between physicochemical properties and cardiovascular effects of nanoparticles was observed. The proposed combination of methods empowers the studies of cardiovascular adverse effects of the nanocarriers.

  10. Behavior of Endogenous Tumor-Associated Macrophages Assessed In Vivo Using a Functionalized Nanoparticle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Leimgruber

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs invade the tumor stroma in many cancers, yet their role is incompletely understood. To visualize and better understand these critical cells in tumor progression, we screened a portfolio of rationally selected, injectable agents to image endogenous TAMs ubiquitously in three different cancer models (colon carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and soft tissue sarcoma. AMTA680, a functionally derivatized magneto-fluorescent nanoparticle, labeled a subset of myeloid cells with an “M2” macrophage phenotype, whereas other neighboring cells, including tumor cells and a variety of other leukocytes, remained unlabeled. We further show that AMTA680-labeled endogenous TAMs are not altered and can be tracked noninvasively at different resolutions and using various imaging modalities, e.g., fluorescence molecular tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and multiphoton and confocal intravital microscopy. Quantitative assessment of TAM distribution and activity in vivo identified that these cells cluster in delimited foci within tumors, show relatively low motility, and extend cytoplasmic protrusions for prolonged physical interactions with neighboring tumor cells. Noninvasive imaging can also be used to monitor TAM-depleting regimen quantitatively. Thus, AMTA680 or related cell-targeting agents represent appropriate injectable vehicles for in vivo analysis of the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  12. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Spook site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings 48 mi northeast of Casper, in Converse County, Wyoming. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 187,000 tons of tailings at the Spook site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover makes and gamma densitometers for measuring cross-sectionally averaged mass velocity in steady steam-water flow are presented. The results are interpreted ntation.

  13. Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of the 490-Q1 tank system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, W.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gee, C.W.; Graser, D.A. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (US)

    1993-07-01

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of used freon storage tanks 490-Q1A1 and 490-Q1A2 has been prepared in response to 40 CFR 265.192(a) and 22 CCR 66265.192(a) for new tank systems that store hazardous waste and have secondary containment. The regulations require that this assessment be completed and certified by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer before the tank system is placed in use as a hazardous waste storage tank system. The technical assessments for the 490-Q1A1 and 490-Q1A2 tank systems have been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer, who has certified that the tank systems have sufficient structural integrity, are acceptable for transferring and storing hazardous waste, are compatible with the stored waste, and the tanks and containment system are suitably designed to achieve the requirements of the applicable regulations so they will not collapse, rupture, or fail.

  14. Developing and assessing a holistic living-learning community for engineering and science freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Jennifer

    Learning communities and their strategies for enrolling cohort groups of students in a common set of classes organized around a theme or linked with residence life have come to light over the past twenty years. However, living-learning communities (LLC) and their role in retention, engagement, and intellectual development for engineering and science students have yet to be fully explored. What aspects of a LLC are most beneficial to science and engineering students? What are the learning needs of engineering and science students that are best met with LLCs? These questions were the basis for assessment of a new LLC program developed at Washington State University specifically to increase retention, academic achievement, and engagement of engineering and science students. A first-year semester-long pilot LLC program was developed at Washington State University specifically for entering engineering majors. The program was expanded the following year to include biotech science majors. The first LLC had 55 self-selected engineering participants. Students were housed in the same residence hall, registered for three common classes, and participated in a non-credit bearing weekly peer-facilitated study group. The second year 81 students self-selected into the program; 59 engineering and 22 biotech majors. Students were housed in a common residence hall and registered for three common classes. Students participated in a two-credit freshman seminar class instead of the once-weekly study group used the previous year. Results indicate students were engaged with peers and in college activities, had mixed academic improvement, and engineering students were retained at higher rates in their major when compared to non-participating peers and biotech participants. Second year LLC students had higher grade averages than comparison peers despite lower incoming preparedness. Higher engagement levels were confirmed by triangulation with national survey comparisons, observations, focus

  15. Magnetically labeled cells with surface-modified fe3 o4 spherical and rod-shaped magnetic nanoparticles for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Sara; Correia, Clara R; Mano, João F

    2015-04-22

    Magnetically targeted cells with internalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) could allow the success of cell transplantation and cell-based therapies, overcoming low cell retention that occurs when delivering cells by intravenous or local injection. Upon magnetization, these cells could then accumulate and stimulate the regeneration of the tissue in situ. Magnetic targeting of cells requires a detailed knowledge between interactions of engineered nanomaterials and cells, in particular the influence of shape and surface functionalization of MNPs. For the first time, cellular internalization of amino surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles of two different shapes (nanospheres or nanorods) is studied. MNPs show high cellular uptake and labeled cells could exhibit a strong reaction with external magnetic fields. Compared to nanorods, nanospheres show better internalization efficiency, and labeled cells exhibit strong transportation reaction with external magnetic fields. Contiguous viable cell-sheets are developed by magnetic-force-based tissue engineering. The results confirm that the developed magnetic-responsive nano-biomaterials have potential applicability in tissue engineering or cellular therapies.

  16. Assessment of the adjuvant activity of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in recombinant Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Gomes Virginio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjuvant potential of two mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs, SBa-15 and SBa-16, was assessed in combination with a recombinant HSP70 surface polypeptide domain from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the etiological agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia (PEP. The recombinant antigen (HSP70212-600, previously shown as immunogenic in formulation with classic adjuvants, was used to immunize BALB/c mice in combination with SBa-15 or SBa-16 MSNs, and the effects obtained with these formulations were compared to those obtained with alum, the adjuvant traditionally used in anti-PEP bacterins. The HSP70212-600 + SBa-15 vaccine elicited a strong humoral immune response, with high serum total IgG levels, comparable to those obtained using HSP70212-600 + alum. The HSP70212-600 + SBa-16 vaccine elicited a moderate humoral immune response, with lower levels of total IgG. The cellular immune response was assessed by the detection of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 in splenocyte culture supernatants. The HSP70212-600 + SBa-15 vaccine increased IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 levels, while no stimulation was detected with the HSP70212-600 + SBa-16 vaccine. The HSP70212-600 + SBa-15 vaccine induced a mixed Th1/Th2-type response, with an additional IL-10 mediated anti-inflammatory effect, both of relevance for an anti-PEP vaccine. Alum adjuvant controls stimulated an unspecific cellular immune response, with similar levels of cytokines detected in mice immunized either with HSP70212-600 + alum or with the adjuvant alone. The better humoral and cellular immune responses elicited in mice indicated that SBa-15 has adjuvant potential, and can be considered as an alternative to the use of alum in veterinary vaccines. The use of SBa-15 with HSP70212-600 is also promising as a potential anti-PEP subunit vaccine formulation.

  17. Toxicity assessment of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in zebrafish embryos under different exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Z., E-mail: zairaclemente@yahoo.com.br [Laboratório de Ecotoxicologia e Biossegurança, Embrapa CNPMA, Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia Funcional e Molecular, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Castro, V.L.S.S. [Laboratório de Ecotoxicologia e Biossegurança, Embrapa CNPMA, Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Moura, M.A.M. [Laboratório da Ciência das Plantas Daninhas, Instituto Biológico, APTA/SAA, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Jonsson, C.M. [Laboratório de Ecotoxicologia e Biossegurança, Embrapa CNPMA, Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Fraceto, L.F. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia Funcional e Molecular, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Ambiental, UNESP, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    factors involved in the toxicity of these nanoparticles, as well as to the establishment of protocols for risk assessments of nanotechnology.

  18. 环境中工程纳米二氧化钛颗粒的表征与测定%Measurement and characterization of engineered titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuan-xi LUO; Zhen-hong WANG; Bin XU; Ionnis L.SARAKIOTIS; Gijs DU LAING; Chang-zhou YAN

    2014-01-01

      重要结论:环境中工程纳米二氧化钛的表征与测定方法仍需深入的研究,其可靠性需要现有各种分析技术的相互验证、良好的样品预处理技术和参考物质、以及稳定同位素与稀有元素技术示踪的配合。%Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are common components used in sunscreens, cosmetics, industrial ap-plications, and many other products. Concerning their high production and widespread applications, characterization and quanti-fication of TiO2-NPs in various matrixes is a topic of great interest for researchers studying their potential environmental and health impacts. Validated and easily applicable analytical tools are required to develop and implement regulatory frameworks and an appropriate risk assessment for engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). Herein, we provide a critical review of the current knowledge available on world-wide production and measured environmental concentrations as well as on available techniques to measure and characterize these ENPs in the environment.

  19. Heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles and nanoparticles of pyrolyzed biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heteroaggregation with indigenous particles is an important process controlling the mobility of engineered nanomaterials in the environment. We studied heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles (n-CeO2), which are widely used commercially, with nanoparticles of pyrogenic carbonaceous material ...

  20. Area 2. Use Of Engineered Nanoparticle-Stabilized CO2 Foams To Improve Volumetric Sweep Of CO2 EOR Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCarlo, David [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Huh, Chun [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Johnston, Keith P. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-01-31

    The goal of this project was to develop a new CO2 injection enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) process using engineered nanoparticles with optimized surface coatings that has better volumetric sweep efficiency and a wider application range than conventional CO2-EOR processes. The main objectives of this project were to (1) identify the characteristics of the optimal nanoparticles that generate extremely stable CO2 foams in situ in reservoir regions without oil; (2) develop a novel method of mobility control using “self-guiding” foams with smart nanoparticles; and (3) extend the applicability of the new method to reservoirs having a wide range of salinity, temperatures, and heterogeneity. Concurrent with our experimental effort to understand the foam generation and transport processes and foam-induced mobility reduction, we also developed mathematical models to explain the underlying processes and mechanisms that govern the fate of nanoparticle-stabilized CO2 foams in porous media and applied these models to (1) simulate the results of foam generation and transport experiments conducted in beadpack and sandstone core systems, (2) analyze CO2 injection data received from a field operator, and (3) aid with the design of a foam injection pilot test. Our simulator is applicable to near-injection well field-scale foam injection problems and accounts for the effects due to layered heterogeneity in permeability field, foam stabilizing agents effects, oil presence, and shear-thinning on the generation and transport of nanoparticle-stabilized C/W foams. This report presents the details of our experimental and numerical modeling work and outlines the highlights of our findings.

  1. Full factorial design, physicochemical characterisation and biological assessment of cyclosporine A loaded cationic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kris; Van den Plas, Dave; Everaert, Arnout; Weyenberg, Wim; Ludwig, Annick

    2012-09-01

    Cyclosporine A loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles coated with chitosan were prepared using the o/w emulsification solvent evaporation method. A 2(3) full factorial design was used to investigate the effect of 3 preparation parameters on the particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and drug release. In vitro experiments were performed in order to evaluate the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of the developed nanoparticles. Particle sizes varied from 156 nm to 314 nm, and polydispersity index values of 0.07-0.56 were obtained depending on the different preparation parameters. All nanoparticles showed positive zeta potential values. Nanoparticles prepared with the highest concentration chitosan retained a positive zeta potential after dispersion in simulated lachrymal fluid, which supports the possibility of an electrostatic interaction between these particles and the negatively charged mucus layer at the eye. The in vitro release profile of cyclosporine A from the chitosan-coated nanoparticles was strongly dependent on the release medium used. None of the cationic nanoparticle formulations showed significant cytotoxicity compared to the negative control using human epithelial cells (HaCaT). Cyclosporine A encapsulated in the various nanoparticle formulations remained anti-inflammatory active as significant suppression of interleukine-2 secretion in concanavalin A stimulated Jurkat T cells was observed.

  2. Development and assessment of kerateine nanoparticles for use as a hemostatic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tiantian; Hao, Shilei; Chen, Xiaoliang; Wang, Ju; Yang, Qian; Wang, Yazhou; Weng, Yulan; Wei, Huimin; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Bochu

    2016-06-01

    Uncontrolled bleeding frequently occurs in some emergencies which can result in severe injury and even death. Keratin hydrogel has been found that it had good ahemostatic efficacy in the previous studies. However, an ideal hemostatic agent should not require mixing or preparation in advance, and hydrogel is not easy to store and carry. In the present study, the kerateine was firstly extracted from human hair, and then was prepared nanoparticles by a modified emulsion diffusion method. The synthesized nanoparticles showed spherical morphology with an average diameter of approximately 200 nm. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that the chemical structure of kerateine did not change but the crystal form may be transformed in the nanoparticles. In addition, kerateine nanoparticles displayed a faster clotting time in vitro study than the kerateine extracts. Furthermore, kerateine nanoparticles significantly reduced the blood loss and coagulation time in the liver puncture and tail amputation in rat models. Our results indicated that kerateine nanoparticles could quickly form a high viscosity gel onto the wound and accelerate the blood coagulation based on their high specific surface area. Therefore, kerateine nanoparticles have great potential for hemostatic application.

  3. Methodology for risk assessment and reliability applied for pipeline engineering design and industrial valves operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Dierci [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia Industrial e Metalurgia. Lab. de Sistemas de Producao e Petroleo e Gas], e-mail: dsilveira@metal.eeimvr.uff.br; Batista, Fabiano [CICERO, Rio das Ostras, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Two kinds of situations may be distinguished for estimating the operating reliability when maneuvering industrial valves and the probability of undesired events in pipelines and industrial plants: situations in which the risk is identified in repetitive cycles of operations and situations in which there is a permanent hazard due to project configurations introduced by decisions during the engineering design definition stage. The estimation of reliability based on the influence of design options requires the choice of a numerical index, which may include a composite of human operating parameters based on biomechanics and ergonomics data. We first consider the design conditions under which the plant or pipeline operator reliability concepts can be applied when operating industrial valves, and then describe in details the ergonomics and biomechanics risks that would lend itself to engineering design database development and human reliability modeling and assessment. This engineering design database development and reliability modeling is based on a group of engineering design and biomechanics parameters likely to lead to over-exertion forces and working postures, which are themselves associated with the functioning of a particular plant or pipeline. This approach to construct based on ergonomics and biomechanics for a more common industrial valve positioning in the plant layout is proposed through the development of a methodology to assess physical efforts and operator reach, combining various elementary operations situations. These procedures can be combined with the genetic algorithm modeling and four elements of the man-machine systems: the individual, the task, the machinery and the environment. The proposed methodology should be viewed not as competing to traditional reliability and risk assessment bur rather as complementary, since it provides parameters related to physical efforts values for valves operation and workspace design and usability. (author)

  4. Assessing students' genre knowledge in an engineering writing center: An analysis of sophomore lab reports in electrical and computer engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kristin Wilds Davidson

    As discipline-specific writing centers continue to increase in number, writing center consultants must determine ways to help their clients acquire discipline-specific and course-specific literacy. One way to achieve this goal is through genre analysis. This study focuses on the genre of EECE 201 (Tools and Techniques for Electrical and Computer Engineers) lab reports and strategies writing center consultants can implement to teach students communication skills necessary for discipline-specific literacy. Beginning with a discussion of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Writing Center's history, the methodological foundations of this study, and an historical overview of genre theory from classical times to the present, this study surveys the history and debates surrounding teaching genres to students. The role of assessment in analyzing and teaching genre is discussed as well, with application specifically to the sophomore-level EECE 201 course within ECE at the University of South Carolina. The study itself consists of analyzing four students' lab reports written for the EECE 201 course. Using a list of eleven characteristics developed with experienced communicators within this discipline, I analyzed each report (there is a total of 14), determining to what extent the characteristics appeared in the reports. At the end of each student's analysis, a table summarizes the information gathered from the reports, and overall conclusions are drawn for each student. The end of the study chapter presents generic writing trends exhibited by the students during the semester, such as inability to show evidence of inductive/deductive reasoning and difficulties with conceptualizing audience and applying formatting skills. The study concludes by recommending strategies that ECE Writing Center consultants can implement to help the sophomore students acquire discipline-specific knowledge. Going beyond the ECE Writing Center's context, however, the study also suggests

  5. Industrial process system assessment: bridging process engineering and life cycle assessment through multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Industrial Process System Assessment (IPSA) methodology is a multiple step allocation approach for connecting information from the production line level up to the facility level and vice versa using a multiscale model of process systems. The allocation procedure assigns inpu...

  6. Assessing Boundary Film Forming Behavior of Phosphonium Ionic Liquids as Engine Lubricant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Anand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of friction and wear losses in boundary lubrication regime of a piston ring-cylinder liner tribo-system has always been a challenge for engine and lubricant manufacturers. One way is to use lubricant additives, which can form boundary film quickly and reduce the direct contact between asperities. This article focuses on the assessment of boundary film forming behavior of two phosphonium-based ionic liquids (ILs as additives in engine-aged lubricant to further improve its film forming capabilities and hence reduce friction and wear of contacting surfaces. A reciprocating piston ring segment-on-flat coupon under fully flooded lubrication conditions at room temperature (approx. 25 °C was employed. The trihexyltetradecyl phosphonium bis(2-ethylhexyl phosphate and trihexyltetradecyl phosphonium bis(2,4,4-tri-methylpentyl phosphinate ionic liquids were used as additives in 6 vol. % quantity. Benchmark tests were conducted using fully formulated new lubricant of same grade (with and without ILs. Results revealed that the addition of phosphonium ILs to engine-aged lubricant led to quicker initiation of boundary film forming process. In addition, friction and wear performance of engine-aged lubricant improved by the addition of both ILs and these mixtures outperformed the fresh fully formulated oil. Chemical analysis showed higher concentration of phosphorus element on the worn surface indicating presence of ILs in the formed tribofilms.

  7. A Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Approach to Making Informed Decisions about Engineered Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    the name of the Materia l? Is the process top down or bottom up (e.g ., bulk mate ria l vs. seed process)? What is the chemical composition and...gram of fina l materia l produced (o n mass basis)? How much raw material, ingredients a re used annua lly? Cancel ] [ Ok I I I + BUILDING

  8. Providing Formative Assessment to Students Solving Multipath Engineering Problems with Complex Arrangements of Interacting Parts: An Intelligent Tutor Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steif, Paul S.; Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak

    2016-01-01

    Problems faced by engineering students involve multiple pathways to solution. Students rarely receive effective formative feedback on handwritten homework. This paper examines the potential for computer-based formative assessment of student solutions to multipath engineering problems. In particular, an intelligent tutor approach is adopted and…

  9. Green Chemistry and Engineering Opportunity Assessment (GC&EOA) to US Army. A Case Study in Sustainable Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    Number 0469, " Green Chemistry and Engineering Opportunity Assessment (GC&EOA) for U.S. Army". This report presents the sustainability frameworks of... Green Chemistry and Green Engineering and uses them as a basis to identify opportunities for environmental improvement and innovation within the U.S

  10. Developing Instruments to Assess and Compare the Quality of Engineering Education: The Case of China and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardanova, Elena; Loyalka, Prashant; Chirikov, Igor; Liu, Lydia; Li, Guirong; Wang, Huan; Enchikova, Ekaterina; Shi, Henry; Johnson, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about differences in the quality of engineering education within and across countries because of the lack of valid instruments that allow for the assessment and comparison of engineering students' skill gains. The purpose of our study is to develop and validate instruments that can be used to compare student skill gains…

  11. Assessing the Value-Added by the Environmental Testing Process with the Aide of Physics/Engineering of Failure Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford, S.; Gibbel, M.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Code QT Test Effectiveness Program is funding a series of applied research activities focused on utilizing the principles of physics and engineering of failure and those of engineering economics to assess and improve the value-added by the various validation and verification activities to organizations.

  12. Assessment Engineering Task Model Maps, Task Models and Templates as a New Way to Develop and Implement Test Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecht, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment engineering is a new way to design and implement scalable, sustainable and ideally lower-cost solutions to the complexities of designing and developing tests. It represents a merger of sorts between cognitive task modeling and engineering design principles--a merger that requires some new thinking about the nature of score scales, item…

  13. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  14. Collaborative-Large scale Engineering Assessment Networks for Environmental Research: The Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moo-Young, H.

    2004-05-01

    A networked infrastructure for engineering solutions and policy alternatives is necessary to assess, manage, and protect complex, anthropogenic ally stressed environmental resources effectively. Reductionist and discrete disciplinary methodologies are no longer adequate to evaluate and model complex environmental systems and anthropogenic stresses. While the reductonist approach provides important information regarding individual mechanisms, it cannot provide complete information about how multiple processes are related. Therefore, it is not possible to make accurate predictions about system responses to engineering interventions and the effectiveness of policy options. For example, experts cannot agree on best management strategies for contaminated sediments in riverine and estuarine systems. This is due, in part to the fact that existing models do not accurately capture integrated system dynamics. In addition, infrastructure is not available for investigators to exchange and archive data, to collaborate on new investigative methods, and to synthesize these results to develop engineering solutions and policy alternatives. Our vision for the future is to create a network comprising field facilities and a collaboration of engineers, scientists, policy makers, and community groups. This will allow integration across disciplines, across different temporal and spatial scales, surface and subsurface geographies, and air sheds and watersheds. Benefits include fast response to changes in system health, real-time decision making, and continuous data collection that can be used to anticipate future problems, and to develop sound engineering solutions and management decisions. CLEANER encompasses four general aspects: 1) A Network of environmental field facilities instrumented for the acquisition and analysis of environmental data; 2) A Virtual Repository of Data and information technology for engineering modeling, analysis and visualization of data, i.e. an environmental

  15. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  16. Web-based Peer Assessment: A Case Study with Civil Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Cruz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peer-assessed online collaborative writing is of growing importance for higher education. Based on the quantitative and qualitative analysis of collected data, this work presents the results of a case study in a graduate civil engineering course at the University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal. After an overall presentation of the learning activity, it examines students’ attitudes towards web-based peer assessment and identifies which factors are related to students’ use and appreciation of feedback. In addition, an analysis of the type of feedback is presented in an attempt to evaluate students’  written communication skills. The results of this study provide indications on how to improve the design and implementation of future web-based peer assessment tasks and raise questions on the effectiveness of peer/teacher grading in the use of feedback.

  17. Assessment of Carbon- and Metal-Based Nanoparticle DNA Damage with Microfluidic Electrophoretic Separation Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Amanda M; Powell, Thomas; Robertson, Tiffany; Hussain, Saber M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we examined the feasibility of extracting DNA from whole cell lysates exposed to nanoparticles using two different methodologies for evaluation of fragmentation with microfluidic electrophoretic separation. Human lung macrophages were exposed to five different carbon- and metal-based nanoparticles at two different time points (2 h, 24 h) and two different doses (5 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml). The primary difference in the banding patterns after 2 h of nanoparticle exposure is more DNA fragmentation at the higher NP concentration when examining cells exposed to nanoparticles of the same composition. However, higher doses of carbon and silver nanoparticles at both short and long dosing periods can contribute to erroneous or incomplete data with this technique. Also comparing DNA isolation methodologies, we recommend the centrifugation extraction technique, which provides more consistent banding patterns in the control samples compared to the spooling technique. Here we demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes, 15 nm silver nanoparticles and the positive control cadmium oxide cause similar DNA fragmentation at the short time point of 2 h with the centrifugation extraction technique. Therefore, the results of these studies contribute to elucidating the relationship between nanoparticle physicochemical properties and DNA fragmentation results while providing the pros and cons of altering the DNA isolation methodology. Overall, this technique provides a high throughput way to analyze subcellular alterations in DNA profiles of cells exposed to nanomaterials to aid in understanding the consequences of exposure and mechanistic effects. Future studies in microfluidic electrophoretic separation technologies should be investigated to determine the utility of protein or other assays applicable to cellular systems exposed to nanoparticles.

  18. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles by Marine Invertebrate (Polychaete and Assessment of Its Efficacy against Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by chemical and physical method makes the process often cumbersome due the usage of toxic and expensive chemicals. The present study reports the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using marine invertebrate (polychaete extract at room temperature. The ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed the formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs by exhibiting the typical surface plasmon absorption maximum at 418–420 nm. Structure and composition of AgNPs were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM. Average particle size of AgNPs ranged from 40 to 90 nm, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX of the nanoparticles dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver signal, whereas X-ray diffraction (XRD substantiated the crystalline nature of synthesized nanoparticle. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR spectral analysis showed the presence of amides phenols, ethers, and fatty acids as major biomolecules responsible for the reduction of silver ions. The possible mechanism responsible for the synthesis of AgNPs by these biomolecules was also illustrated by chemical reactions. The synthesized AgNPs showed comparatively good antibacterial activity against the tested human pathogens. This study advocates that not only plants and microbes but also marine invertebrates do have potential for synthesizing nanoparticles by a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach.

  19. Cationic Albumin Nanoparticles for Enhanced Drug Delivery to Treat Breast Cancer: Preparation and In Vitro Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anticancer drugs are greatly limited by the serious side effects that they cause. Doxorubicin (DOX is an antineoplastic agent, commonly used against breast cancer. However, it may lead to irreversible cardiotoxicity, which could even result in congestive heart failure. In order to avoid these harmful side effects to the patients and to improve the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin, we developed DOX-loaded polyethylenimine- (PEI- enhanced human serum albumin (HSA nanoparticles. The formed nanoparticles were ~137 nm in size with a surface zeta potential of ~+15 mV, prepared using 20 μg of PEI added per mg of HSA. Cytotoxicity was not observed with empty PEI-enhanced HSA nanoparticles, formed with low-molecular weight (25 kDa PEI, indicating biocompatibility and safety of the nanoparticle formulation. Under optimized transfection conditions, approximately 80% of cells were transfected with HSA nanoparticles containing tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated bovine serum albumin. Conclusively, PEI-enhanced HSA nanoparticles show potential for developing into an effective carrier for anticancer drugs.

  20. Physical sciences and engineering advances in life sciences and oncology a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Daniel; Gerecht, Sharon; Levine, Ross; Mallick, Parag; McCarty, Owen; Munn, Lance; Reinhart-King, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering Advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION) by a panel of experts. It covers the status and trends of applying physical sciences and engineering principles to oncology research in leading laboratories and organizations in Europe and Asia. The book elaborates on the six topics identified by the panel that have the greatest potential to advance understanding and treatment of cancer, each covered by a chapter in the book. The study was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institute of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the NIH in the US under a cooperative agreement with the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC).

  1. Assessment of the potential of slow-running Stirling engine; Potentialabschaetzung eines langsam laufenden Stirlingmotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeckh, P. von [Fachhochschule beider Basel, Muttenz (Switzerland); Zumsteg, H.; Gaegauf, Ch. [Oekozentrum Langenbruck, Langenbruck (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) assesses the potential of a slow-running Stirling engine developed by the BSR Solar Research company as the basis for a production model running as heat pump. A critical appraisal of the results provided by the manufacturer is made and their applicability to a planned series-production machine is examined. The data are also compared with those of a Stirling machine manufactured by the SIG company. The efficiency of the Stirling engine is discussed and various measures are proposed for its optimisation. Several points that are to be looked at critically during the further development of the machine are listed. According to the authors, the use of this Stirling machine as a heat pump can only be realised as two separate Stirlings (drive and heat pump) or as an electrically driven Stirling heat pump, whereby no advantages over the cold vapour process can be found.

  2. Hyperspectral microscopy for characterization of gold nanoparticles in biological media and cells for toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabinski, Christin; Schlager, John; Hussain, Saber

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being implemented in a wide range of applications, and it is critical to proactively investigate their toxicity. Due to the extensive range of NPs being produced, in vitro studies are a valuable approach for toxicity screening. Key information required to support in vitro toxicity assessments include NP stability in biologically relevant media and fate once exposed to cells. Hyperspectral microscopy is a sensitive, real-time technique that combines the use of microscopy and spectroscopy for the measurement of the reflectance spectrum at individual pixels in a micrograph. This method has been used extensively for molecular imaging with plasmonic NPs as contrast agents (Aaron et al., Opt Express 16:2153-2167, 2008; Kumar et al., Nano Lett 7:1338-1343, 2007; Wax and Sokolov, Laser Photon Rev 3:146-158, 2009; Curry et al., Opt Express 14:6535-6542, 2006; Curry et al., J Biomed Opt 13:014022, 2008; Cognet et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:11350-11355, 2003; Sokolov et al., Cancer Res 63:1999-2004, 2003; Sönnichsen et al., Nat Biotechnol 23:741-745, 2005; Nusz et al., Anal Chem 80:984-989, 2008) and/or sensors (Nusz et al., Anal Chem 80:984-989, 2008; Ungureanu et al., Sens Actuators B 150:529-536, 2010; McFarland and Van Duyne, Nano Lett 3:1057-1062, 2003; Galush et al., Nano Lett 9:2077-2082, 2009; El-Sayed et al., Nano Lett 5:829-834, 2005). Here we describe an approach for using hyperspectral microscopy to characterize the agglomeration and stability of plasmonic NPs in biological media and their interactions with cells.

  3. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating.

  4. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-24

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating.

  5. The Use of MIVES as a Sustainability Assessment MCDM Method for Architecture and Civil Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Pons

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental and sustainability assessment tools have an important role in moving towards a better world, bringing knowledge and raising awareness. In the architecture and civil engineering sector, these assessment tools help in moving forward to constructions that have less economic, environmental and social impacts. At present, there are numerous assessment tools and methods with different approaches and scopes that have been analyzed in numerous technical reviews. However, there is no agreement about which method should be used for each evaluation case. This research paper synthetically analyzes the main sustainability assessment methods for the construction sector, comparing their strengths and weaknesses in order to present the challenges of the Spanish Integrated Value Model for Sustainability Assessment (MIVES. MIVES is a Multi-Criteria Decision Making method based on the value function concept and the Seminars of experts. Then, this article analyzes MIVES advantages and weak points by going through its methodology and two representative applications. At the end, the area of application of MIVES is described in detail along with the general application cases of the main types of assessment tools and methods.

  6. Engineered nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TIO2): Uptake and biological effects in a sea bass cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchietti, S; Bernini, C; Stocchi, V; Taddei, A R; Meschini, R; Fausto, A M; Rocco, L; Buonocore, F; Cervia, D; Scapigliati, G

    2017-02-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology there has been a corresponding increase in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) in various consumer and industrial products, consequently their potential health hazards and environmental effects are considered an aspect of great concern. In the present study, in order to assess the impact of TiO2-NPs in the marine environment, the biological effects of TiO2-NPs on a sea bass cell line (DLEC) were investigated. Cells were exposed for 24 h to different concentrations of TiO2-NPs (1, 8, 40, 200 and 1000 μg/ml) or co-exposed with CdCl2 (Cd). The effects of UV light irradiation were also investigated in cells treated with TiO2-NPs and/or Cd. The internalization of TiO2-NPs and the morphological cell modifications induced by the treatments were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, this latter coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle element detection. In addition, the effects of controlled exposures were studied evaluating the cytotoxicity, the DNA damage and the expression of inflammatory genes. Our study indicates that TiO2-NPs were localized on the cell surface mainly as agglomerates revealed by EDS analysis and that they were uptaken by the cells inducing morphological changes. Photoactivation of TiO2-NPs and/or co-exposure with Cd affects ATP levels and it contributes to induce acute cellular toxicity in DLEC cells dependent on Ti concentration. The inflammatory potential and the DNA damage, this latter displayed through a caspase-3 independent apoptotic process, were also demonstrated. Overall our data suggest that the interaction of TiO2-NPs with marine water contaminants, such as cadmium, and the UV irradiation, may be an additional threat to marine organisms.

  7. Effects of aqueous suspensions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Artemia salina: assessment of nanoparticle aggregation, accumulation, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Mehmet; Daniels, James; Arslan, Zikri; Farah, Ibrahim O

    2013-04-01

    Aquatic stability and impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 10-30 nm) were investigated using Artemia salina. Acute exposure was conducted on nauplii (larvae) and adults in seawater in a concentration range from 10 to 100 mg/L TiO2 NPs for 24 and 96 h. Rapid aggregation occurred in all suspensions of TiO2 NPs to form micrometer size particles. Yet, both nauplii and adults accumulated the aggregates significantly. Average TiO2 content in nauplii ranged from 0.47 to 3.19 and from 1.29 to 4.43 mg/g in 24 and 96 h, respectively. Accumulation in adults was higher ranging from 2.30 to 4.19 and from 4.38 to 6.20 mg/g in 24 and 96 h, respectively. Phase contrast microscopy images revealed that Artemia were unable to excrete the particles. Thus, the TiO2 aggregates filled inside the guts. No significant mortality or toxicity occurred within 24 h at any dose. Lipid peroxidation levels characterized with malondialdehyde concentrations were not statistically different from those of the controls (p > 0.05). These results suggested that suspensions of the TiO2 NPs were nontoxic to Artemia, most likely due to the formation of benign TiO2 aggregates in water. In contrast, both mortality and lipid peroxidation increased in extended exposure to 96 h. Highest mortality occurred in 100 mg/L TiO2 NP suspensions; 18 % for nauplii and 14 % for adults (LC50 > 100 mg/L). These effects were attributed to the particle loading inside the guts leading to oxidative stress as a result of impaired food uptake for a long period of time.

  8. An integrated tool to support engineers for WMSDs risk assessment during the assembly line balancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Raffaele; Fanti, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This paper wants to present an integrated approach to Line Balancing and Risk Assessment and a Software Tool named ErgoAnalysis that makes it easy to control the whole production process and produces a Risk Index for the actual work tasks in an Assembly Line. Assembly Line Balancing, or simply Line Balancing, is the problem of assigning operations to workstations along an assembly line, in such a way that the assignment be optimal in some sense. Assembly lines are characterized by production constraints and restrictions due to several aspects such as the nature of the product and the flow of orders. To be able to respond effectively to the needs of production, companies need to frequently change the workload and production models. Each manufacturing process might be quite different from another. To optimize very specific operations, assembly line balancing might utilize a number of methods and the Engineer must consider ergonomic constraints, in order to reduce the risk of WMDSs. Risk Assessment may result very expensive because the Engineer must evaluate it at every change. ErgoAnalysis can reduce cost and improve effectiveness in Risk Assessment during the Line Balancing.

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Shiprock site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.5 million dry tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The eight alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $13,400,000 for stabilization in place to about $37,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 miles. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Shiprock tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $230/lb by heap leach and $250/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive.

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Maybell site in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to disposal of the tailings in a nearby open pit mine and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $11,700,000 for stabilization in-place and about $22,700,000 for disposal within a distance of 2 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Maybell tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $125 and $165/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present.

  12. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the Maintenance Engineering Department (Organization 8513).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Anastasia Dawn

    2003-04-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Maintenance Engineering Department (85 13) in September and October of 2002. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist 8513 in reducing the generation of waste and increasing the purchase of environmentally preferable products. This report contains a summary of the information collected, the analyses performed, and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Pollution Prevention Group will continue to work with 8513 to implement the recommendations.

  13. The Role of Alternative Testing Strategies in Environmental Risk Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Holden, Patricia; Hansen, Steffen Foss;

    2017-01-01

    chemicals are challenged. Nonetheless, standardized whole organism animal testing is still considered the gold standard for environmental risk assessment. Advancing risk analysis of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) through ATS was discussed in September 2014 at an international Society for Risk Analysis (SRA...... “selective ignorance” and that, through an iterative process with low-tier and high-tier testing, data-generation can be validated to ensure relevant endpoints. Furthermore, simplified screening of ENMs could enable early decision-making on material design, while complex multispecies studies should...

  14. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, John S

    2003-04-01

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  15. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment - April 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, J.S.

    2003-04-30

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  16. Updating the biomedical engineering curriculum: Inclusion of Health Technology Assessment subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Licona, Fabiola; Urbina, Edmundo Gerardo; Azpiroz-Leehan, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the work being carried out at Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM) in Mexico City with regard to the continuous evaluation and updating of the Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum. In particular the courses regarded as part of the BME basic branch are reduced and new sets of elective subjects are proposed in order to bring closer the research work at UAM with the subjects in the BME curriculum. Special emphasis is placed on subjects dealing with Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Health economics, as this branch of the BME discipline is quite promising in Mexico, but there are very few professionals in the field with adequate qualifications.

  17. Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, low-level and mixed waste processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0843, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level and mixed waste processing. The original proposed action, as reviewed in this EA, was (1) to incinerate INEL`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF); (2) reduce the volume of INEL generated low-level waste (LLW) through sizing, compaction, and stabilization at the WERF; and (3) to ship INEL LLW to a commercial incinerator for supplemental LLW volume reduction.

  18. Surface engineering of macrophages with nanoparticles to generate a cell–nanoparticle hybrid vehicle for hypoxia-targeted drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Christopher A Holden1, Quan Yuan1, W Andrew Yeudall2,3, Deborah A Lebman3,4, Hu Yang11Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, 2Philips Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Molecular Biology, School of Dentistry, 3Massey Cancer Center, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USAAbstract: Tumors frequently contain hypoxic regions that result from a shortage of oxygen due to poorly organized tumor vasculat...

  19. The impact of aminated surface ligands and silica shells on the stability, uptake, and toxicity of engineered silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonventre, Josephine A.; Pryor, Joseph B.; Harper, Bryan J.; Harper, Stacey L., E-mail: stacey.harper@oregonstate.edu [Oregon State University, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Inherent nanomaterial characteristics, composition, surface chemistry, and primary particle size, are known to impact particle stability, uptake, and toxicity. Nanocomposites challenge our ability to predict nanoparticle reactivity in biological systems if they are composed of materials with contrasting relative toxicities. We hypothesized that toxicity would be dominated by the nanoparticle surface (shell vs core), and that modulating the surface ligands would have a direct impact on uptake. We exposed developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) to a series of ∼70 nm amine-terminated silver nanoparticles with silica shells (AgSi NPs) to investigate the relative influence of surface amination, composition, and size on toxicity. Like-sized aminated AgSi and Si NPs were more toxic than paired hydroxyl-terminated nanoparticles; however, both AgSi NPs were more toxic than the Si NPs, indicating a significant contribution of the silver core to the toxicity. Incremental increases in surface amination did not linearly increase uptake and toxicity, but did have a marked impact on dispersion stability. Mass-based exposure metrics initially supported the hypothesis that smaller nanoparticles (20 nm) would be more toxic than larger particles (70 nm). However, surface area-based metrics revealed that toxicity was independent of size. Our studies suggest that nanoparticle surfaces play a critical role in the uptake and toxicity of AgSi NPs, while the impact of size may be a function of the exposure metric used. Overall, uptake and toxicity can be dramatically altered by small changes in surface functionalization or exposure media. Only after understanding the magnitude of these changes, can we begin to understand the biologically available dose following nanoparticle exposure.

  20. Qualitative assessment of silver and gold nanoparticle synthesis in various plants: a photobiological approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekharreddy, Pala; Usha Rani, Pathipati, E-mail: purani@iict.res.i [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Biology and Biotechnology Division (India); Sreedhar, Bojja [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory (India)

    2010-06-15

    The development of rapid and ecofriendly processes for the synthesis of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) nanoparticles is of great importance in the field of nanotechnology. In this study, the extracellular production of Ag and Au nanoparticles was carried out from the leaves of the plants, Tridax procumbens L. (Coat buttons), Jatropa curcas L. (Barbados nut), Calotropis gigantea L. (Calotropis), Solanum melongena L. (Eggplant), Datura metel L. (Datura), Carica papaya L. (Papaya) and Citrus aurantium L. (Bitter orange) by the sunlight exposure method. Qualitative comparisons of the synthesized nanoparticles between the plants were measured. Among these T. procumbens, J. curcas and C. gigantea plants synthesized <20 nm sized and spherical-shaped Ag particles, whereas C. papaya, D. metel and S. melongena produced <20 nm sized monodispersed Au particles. The amount of nanoparticles synthesized and its qualitative characterization was done by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used for structural confirmation. Further analysis carried out by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), provided evidence for the presence of amino groups, which increased the stability of the synthesized nanoparticles.