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Sample records for assess 3d bone

  1. Microstructural Assessment of Cancellous Bone Using 3D Microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva A M H; Alves J M; Da Silva O L; Silva Junior N F; Gazziro M; Pereira J C; Lasso P R O; Vaz C M P; Pereira C A M; Leiva T P; Guarniero R

    2011-01-01

    Cancellous bones have a porous microstructure and can be modeled as linear elastic solid, heterogeneous and anisotropic. Few studies regarding the morphometric analysis of trabecular bone samples with 3D microtomography have been published so far. The technique has spread worldwide for the characterization of trabecular structures in studies related to bone quality and its relationship with metabolic diseases bone like osteoporosis. In our study cancellous bone samples with cubic and cylindrical geometry were extracted from bovine femur were used to investigate the structural arrangement of bone through high resolution x-ray 3D microtomography (μCT). Four trabecular microstructural parameters (tissue volume, bone volume, bone volume fraction and tissue surface) were measured by 2D (stereological method) and 3D morphometric analysis using the software CTan Analyser supplied by the manufacturer of the microtomograph (SkyScan, model 1172, Belgium). The measurements were done in three main directions (superior-inferior, medial-lateral and anterior-posterior) to investigate the correlation between the 2D and 3D morphometric analysis. The results show a high correlation between the analysis. The x-ray 3D microtomography technique has a great potential for the assessment of bone quality.

  2. A procedure for the evaluation of 2D radiographic texture analysis to assess 3D bone micro-architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, L.; Peyrin, F.; Yot, S.; Basset, O.; Odet, Ch.; Apostal, L.; Peyrin, F.; Boller, E.; Tabary, J.; Dinten, J.M.; Boudousq, V.; Kotzki, P.O.

    2004-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of osteoporosis is mainly based on Dual X-ray Absorptiometry, it has been shown that trabecular bone micro-architecture is also an important factor in regards of fracture risk, which can be efficiently assessed in vitro using three-dimensional x-ray microtomography (μCT). In vivo, techniques based on high-resolution x-ray radiography associated to texture analysis have been proposed to investigate bone micro-architecture, but their relevance for giving pertinent 3D information is unclear. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for evaluating the relationships between 3D micro-architecture and 2D texture parameters, and optimizing the conditions for radiographic imaging. Bone sample images taken from cortical to cortical were acquired using 3D-synchrotron x-ray μCT at the ESRF. The 3D digital images were further used for two purposes: 1) quantification of three-dimensional bone micro-architecture, 2) simulation of realistic x-ray radiographs under different acquisition conditions. Texture analysis was then applied to these 2D radiographs using a large variety of methods (co-occurrence, spectrum, fractal...). First results of the statistical analysis between 2D and 3D parameters allowed identifying the most relevant 2D texture parameters. (authors)

  3. 3D printed phantoms mimicking cortical bone for the assessment of ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Robba; Manton, David; Jameson, Michael G; Josan, Sonal; Barton, Michael B; Holloway, Lois C; Liney, Gary P

    2018-02-01

    Human cortical bone has a rapid T2∗ decay, and it can be visualized using ultrashort echo time (UTE) techniques in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These sequences operate at the limits of gradient and transmit-receive signal performance. Development of multicompartment anthropomorphic phantoms that can mimic human cortical bone can assist with quality assurance and optimization of UTE sequences. The aims of this study were to (a) characterize the MRI signal properties of a photopolymer resin that can be 3D printed, (b) develop multicompartment phantoms based on the resin, and (c) demonstrate the feasibility of using these phantoms to mimic human anatomy in the assessment of UTE sequences. A photopolymer resin (Prismlab China Ltd, Shanghai, China) was imaged on a 3 Tesla MRI system (Siemens Skyra) to characterize its MRI properties with emphasis on T2∗ signal and longevity. Two anthropomorphic phantoms, using the 3D printed resin to simulate skeletal anatomy, were developed and imaged using UTE sequences. A skull phantom was developed and used to assess the feasibility of using the resin to develop a complex model with realistic morphological human characteristics. A tibia model was also developed to assess the suitability of the resin at mimicking a simple multicompartment anatomical model and imaged using a three-dimensional UTE sequence (PETRA). Image quality measurements of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast factor were calculated and these were compared to in vivo values. The T2∗ and T 1 (mean ± standard deviation) of the photopolymer resin was found to be 411 ± 19 μs and 74.39 ± 13.88 ms, respectively, and demonstrated no statistically significant change during 4 months of monitoring. The resin had a similar T2∗ decay to human cortical bone; however, had lower T 1 properties. The bone water concentration of the resin was 59% relative to an external water reference phantom, and this was higher than in vivo values reported for human cortical

  4. CT and MRI assessment and characterization using segmentation and 3D modeling techniques: applications to muscle, bone and brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the novel use of CT and MRI data and image processing tools to segment and reconstruct tissue images in 3D to determine characteristics of muscle, bone and brain.This to study and simulate the structural changes occurring in healthy and pathological conditions as well as in response to clinical treatments. Here we report the application of this methodology to evaluate and quantify: 1. progression of atrophy in human muscle subsequent to permanent lower motor neuron (LMN denervation, 2. muscle recovery as induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES, 3. bone quality in patients undergoing total hip replacement and 4. to model the electrical activity of the brain. Study 1: CT data and segmentation techniques were used to quantify changes in muscle density and composition by associating the Hounsfield unit values of muscle, adipose and fibrous connective tissue with different colors. This method was employed to monitor patients who have permanent muscle LMN denervation in the lower extremities under two different conditions: permanent LMN denervated not electrically stimulated and stimulated. Study 2: CT data and segmentation techniques were employed, however, in this work we assessed bone and muscle conditions in the pre-operative CT scans of patients scheduled to undergo total hip replacement. In this work, the overall anatomical structure, the bone mineral density (BMD and compactness of quadriceps muscles and proximal femoral was computed to provide a more complete view for surgeons when deciding which implant technology to use. Further, a Finite element analysis provided a map of the strains around the proximal femur socket when solicited by typical stresses caused by an implant press fitting. Study 3 describes a method to model the electrical behavior of human brain using segmented MR images. The aim of the work is to use these models to predict the electrical activity of the human brain under normal and pathological

  5. Orientation-weighted local Minkowski functionals in 3D for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone structure in the hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, H. F.; Bitterling, H.; Weber, C.; Kuhn, V.; Eckstein, F.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Fragility fractures or pathologic fractures of the hip, i.e. fractures with no apparent trauma, represent the worst complication in osteoporosis with a mortality close to 25% during the first post-traumatic year. Over 90% of hip fractures result from falls from standing height. A substantial number of femoral fractures are initiated in the femoral neck or the trochanteric regions which contain an internal architecture of trabeculae that are functionally highly specialized to withstand the complex pattern of external and internal forces associated with human gait. Prediction of the mechanical strength of bone tissue can be achieved by dedicated texture analysis of data obtained by high resolution imaging modalities, e.g. computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Since in the case of the proximal femur, the connectivity, regional distribution and - most of all - the preferred orientation of individual trabeculae change considerably within narrow spatial limits, it seems most reasonable to evaluate the femoral bone structure on an orientation-weighted, local scale. In past studies, we could demonstrate the advantages of topological analysis of bone structure using the Minkowski Functionals in 3D on a global and on a local scale. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the prediction of the mechanical competence of the proximal femur by a new algorithm considering orientational changes of topological properties in the trabecular architecture is feasible and better suited than conventional methods based on the measurement of the mineral density of bone tissue (BMD).

  6. A new technique for the assessment of the 3D spatial distribution of the calcium/phosphorus ratio in bone apatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipanteli, A; Kourkoumelis, N; Fromme, P; Olivo, A; Huang, J; Speller, R

    2013-11-01

    The value and distribution of calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio in bone vary between healthy and osteoporotic bone. The purpose of this study was the development of a technique for the assessment of the 3D spatial distribution of Ca/P ratio in bone apatite, which could eventually be implemented through a conventional computed tomography (CT) system. A three-material mass-fraction decomposition CT dual energy analysis was optimized. The technique was validated using ten bone phantoms of different, known Ca/P ratio. Their measured average Ca/P ratio showed a mean/maximum deviation from the expected Ca/P ratio of 0.24/0.35. Additionally, three healthy and three inflammation-mediated osteoporotic (IMO) collagen-free rabbit tibia bone samples were assessed, providing promising preliminary results on real bone tissue. The average Ca/P ratios in all IMO samples (1.64-1.65) were found to be lower than in healthy samples (1.67-1.68). Osteoporotic regions in IMO samples were located using Ca/P ratio colour maps and Ca/P ratio values as low as 1.40 ± 0.26 were found. The low Ca/P ratio volume proportion in IMO samples (12.8%-13.9%) was found to be higher than in healthy (5.8%-8.3%) samples. A region growing technique showed a higher homogeneity of Ca/P ratio in healthy than in IMO bone samples.

  7. In situ repair of bone and cartilage defects using 3D scanning and 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Jianping; Shen, Sheng; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-08-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a rapidly emerging technology that promises to transform tissue engineering into a commercially successful biomedical industry. However, the use of robotic bioprinters alone is not sufficient for disease treatment. This study aimed to report the combined application of 3D scanning and 3D printing for treating bone and cartilage defects. Three different kinds of defect models were created to mimic three orthopedic diseases: large segmental defects of long bones, free-form fracture of femoral condyle, and International Cartilage Repair Society grade IV chondral lesion. Feasibility of in situ 3D bioprinting for these diseases was explored. The 3D digital models of samples with defects and corresponding healthy parts were obtained using high-resolution 3D scanning. The Boolean operation was used to achieve the shape of the defects, and then the target geometries were imported in a 3D bioprinter. Two kinds of photopolymerized hydrogels were synthesized as bioinks. Finally, the defects of bone and cartilage were restored perfectly in situ using 3D bioprinting. The results of this study suggested that 3D scanning and 3D bioprinting could provide another strategy for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  8. In situ repair of bone and cartilage defects using 3D scanning and 3D printing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Jianping; Shen, Sheng; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a rapidly emerging technology that promises to transform tissue engineering into a commercially successful biomedical industry. However, the use of robotic bioprinters alone is not sufficient for disease treatment. This study aimed to report the combined application of 3D scanning and 3D printing for treating bone and cartilage defects. Three different kinds of defect models were created to mimic three orthopedic diseases: large segmental defects of long bon...

  9. 3D Printed Pediatric Temporal Bone: A Novel Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfield, Evan A; Brickman, Todd M; Jeyakumar, Anita

    2015-06-01

    Temporal bone dissection is a fundamental element of otologic training. Cadaveric temporal bones (CTB) are the gold standard surgical training model; however, many institutions do not have ready access to them and their cost can be significant: $300 to $500. Furthermore, pediatric cadaveric temporal bones are not readily available. Our objective is to develop a pediatric temporal bone model. Temporal bone model. Tertiary Children's Hospital. Pediatric patient model. We describe the novel use of a 3D printer for the generation of a plaster training model from a pediatric high- resolution CT temporal bone scan of a normal pediatric temporal bone. Three models were produced and were evaluated. The models utilized multiple colors (white for bone, yellow for the facial nerve) and were of high quality. Two models were drilled as a proof of concept and found to be an acceptable facsimile of the patient's anatomy, rendering all necessary surgical landmarks accurately. The only negative comments pertaining to the 3D printed temporal bone as a training model were the lack of variation in hardness between cortical and cancellous bone, noting a tactile variation from cadaveric temporal bones. Our novel pediatric 3D temporal bone training model is a viable, low-cost training option for previously inaccessible pediatric temporal bone training. Our hope is that, as 3D printers become commonplace, these models could be rapidly reproduced, allowing for trainees to print models of patients before performing surgery on the living patient.

  10. Detectors in 3D available for assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Re, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    This deliverable reports on 3D devices resulting from the vertical integration of pixel sensors and readout electronics. After 3D integration steps such as etching of through-silicon vias and backside metallization of readout integrated circuits, ASICs and sensors are interconnected to form a 3D pixel detector. Various 3D detectors have been devised in AIDA WP3 and their status and performance is assessed here.

  11. Analysis of the of bones through 3D computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, I.; Lopes, R.T.; Oliveira, L.F.; Alves, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This work shows the analysis of the internal structure of the bones samples through 3D micro tomography technique (3D-μTC). The comprehension of the bone structure is particularly important when related to osteoporosis diagnosis because this implies in a deterioration of the trabecular bone architecture, which increases the fragility and the possibility to have bone fractures. Two bone samples (human calcaneous and Wistar rat femur) were used, and the method was a radiographic system in real time with an X Ray microfocus tube. The quantifications parameters are based on stereological principles and they are five: a bone volume fraction, trabecular number, the ratio between surface and bone volume, the trabecular thickness and the trabecular separation. The quantifications were done with a program developed especially for this purpose in Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory - COPPE/UFRJ. This program uses as input the 3D reconstructions images and generates a table with the quantifications. The results of the human calcaneous quantifications are presented in tables 1 and 2, and the 3D reconstructions are illustrated in Figure 5. The Figure 6 illustrate the 2D reconstructed image and the Figure 7 the 3D visualization respectively of the Wistar femur sample. The obtained results show that the 3D-μTC is a powerful technique that can be used to analyze bone microstructures. (author)

  12. Rapid prototyping for tissue-engineered bone scaffold by 3D printing and biocompatibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui-Yu; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Mi, Xue; Hu, Yang; Gu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold (calcined goat spongy bone-biphasic ceramic composite/PVA gel) by 3D printing was performed, and the biocompatibility of the fabricated bone scaffold was studied. Pre-designed STL file was imported into the GXYZ303010-XYLE 3D printing system, and the tissue-engineered bone scaffold was fabricated by 3D printing using gel extrusion. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in vitro and then inoculated to the sterilized bone scaffold obtained by 3D printing. The growth of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold was observed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of the tissue-engineered bone scaffold on the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs using MTT assay. Universal testing machine was adopted to test the tensile strength of the bone scaffold. The leachate of the bone scaffold was prepared and injected into the New Zealand rabbits. Cytotoxicity test, acute toxicity test, pyrogenic test and intracutaneous stimulation test were performed to assess the biocompatibility of the bone scaffold. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing had uniform pore size with the porosity of about 68.3%. The pores were well interconnected, and the bone scaffold showed excellent mechanical property. Rabbit BMSCs grew and proliferated on the surface of the bone scaffold after adherence. MTT assay indicated that the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold did not differ significantly from that of the cells in the control. In vivo experiments proved that the bone scaffold fabricated by 3D printing had no acute toxicity, pyrogenic reaction or stimulation. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing allows the rabbit BMSCs to adhere, grow and proliferate and exhibits excellent biomechanical property and high biocompatibility. 3D printing has a good application prospect in the prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold.

  13. 3D printed hyperelastic "bone" scaffolds and regional gene therapy: A novel approach to bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Ram; Jakus, Adam; Bougioukli, Sofia; Pannell, William; Sugiyama, Osamu; Tang, Amy; Shah, Ramille; Lieberman, Jay R

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the viability of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transduced with a lentiviral (LV) vector to overexpress bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) loaded onto a novel 3D printed scaffold. Human ADSCs were transduced with a LV vector carrying the cDNA for BMP-2. The transduced cells were loaded onto a 3D printed Hyperelastic "Bone" (HB) scaffold. In vitro BMP-2 production was assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. The ability of ADSCs loaded on the HB scaffold to induce in vivo bone formation in a hind limb muscle pouch model was assessed in the following groups: ADSCs transduced with LV-BMP-2, LV-green fluorescent protein, ADSCs alone, and empty HB scaffolds. Bone formation was assessed using radiographs, histology and histomorphometry. Transduced ADSCs BMP-2 production on the HB scaffold at 24 hours was similar on 3D printed HB scaffolds versus control wells with transduced cells alone, and continued to increase after 1 and 2 weeks of culture. Bone formation was noted in LV-BMP-2 animals on plain radiographs at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation; no bone formation was noted in the other groups. Histology demonstrated that the LV-BMP-2 group was the only group that formed woven bone and the mean bone area/tissue area was significantly greater when compared with the other groups. 3D printed HB scaffolds are effective carriers for transduced ADSCs to promote bone repair. The combination of gene therapy and tissue engineered scaffolds is a promising multidisciplinary approach to bone repair with significant clinical potential. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 1104-1110, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Surgeon-Based 3D Printing for Microvascular Bone Flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-07-01

    Background  Three-dimensional (3D) printing has developed as a revolutionary technology with the capacity to design accurate physical models in preoperative planning. We present our experience in surgeon-based design of 3D models, using home 3D software and printing technology for use as an adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Methods  Home 3D printing techniques were used in the design and execution of vascularized bone flap transfers to the upper extremity. Open source imaging software was used to convert preoperative computed tomography scans and create 3D models. These were printed in the surgeon's office as 3D models for the planned reconstruction. Vascularized bone flaps were designed intraoperatively based on the 3D printed models. Results  Three-dimensional models were created for intraoperative use in vascularized bone flaps, including (1) medial femoral trochlea (MFT) flap for scaphoid avascular necrosis and nonunion, (2) MFT flap for lunate avascular necrosis and nonunion, (3) medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap for wrist arthrodesis, and (4) free fibula osteocutaneous flap for distal radius septic nonunion. Templates based on the 3D models allowed for the precise and rapid contouring of well-vascularized bone flaps in situ, prior to ligating the donor pedicle. Conclusions  Surgeon-based 3D printing is a feasible, innovative technology that allows for the precise and rapid contouring of models that can be created in various configurations for pre- and intraoperative planning. The technology is easy to use, convenient, and highly economical as compared with traditional send-out manufacturing. Surgeon-based 3D printing is a useful adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Level of Evidence  Level IV. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. A Novel Temporal Bone Simulation Model Using 3D Printing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowry, Sarah E; Jammal, Hachem; Myer, Charles; Solares, Clementino Arturo; Weinberger, Paul

    2015-09-01

    An inexpensive temporal bone model for use in a temporal bone dissection laboratory setting can be made using a commercially available, consumer-grade 3D printer. Several models for a simulated temporal bone have been described but use commercial-grade printers and materials to produce these models. The goal of this project was to produce a plastic simulated temporal bone on an inexpensive 3D printer that recreates the visual and haptic experience associated with drilling a human temporal bone. Images from a high-resolution CT of a normal temporal bone were converted into stereolithography files via commercially available software, with image conversion and print settings adjusted to achieve optimal print quality. The temporal bone model was printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic filament on a MakerBot 2x 3D printer. Simulated temporal bones were drilled by seven expert temporal bone surgeons, assessing the fidelity of the model as compared with a human cadaveric temporal bone. Using a four-point scale, the simulated bones were assessed for haptic experience and recreation of the temporal bone anatomy. The created model was felt to be an accurate representation of a human temporal bone. All raters felt strongly this would be a good training model for junior residents or to simulate difficult surgical anatomy. Material cost for each model was $1.92. A realistic, inexpensive, and easily reproducible temporal bone model can be created on a consumer-grade desktop 3D printer.

  16. 3D printing of octacalcium phosphate bone substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. Komlev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible calcium phosphate ceramic grafts are able of supporting new bone formation in appropriate environment. The major limitation of these materials usage for medical implants is the absence of accessible methods for their patient-specific fabrication. 3D printing methodology is an excellent approach to overcome the limitation supporting effective and fast fabrication of individual complex bone substitutes. Here we proposed a relatively simple route for 3D printing of octacalcium phosphates in complexly shaped structures by the combination of inkjet printing with post-treatment methodology. The printed octacalcium phosphate blocks were further implanted in the developed cranial bone defect followed by histological evaluation. The obtained result confirmed the potential of the developed octacalcium phosphates bone substitutes, which allowed 2.5-time reducing of defect’s diameter at 6.5 months in a region where native bone repair is extremely inefficient.

  17. A procedure for the evaluation of 2D radiographic texture analysis to assess 3D bone micro-architecture; Evaluation de l'analyse de la texture de radiographies 2D pour evaluer les micro architecture 3D d'os

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostol, L.; Peyrin, F.; Yot, S.; Basset, O.; Odet, Ch. [CREATIS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (UMR CNRS 5515), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Apostal, L.; Boller, E. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France); Tabary, J.; Dinten, J.M. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique (LETI), 38 (France); Boudousq, V.; Kotzki, P.O. [Faculte de Medecine, Lab. de Biophysique Medicale, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2004-07-01

    Although the diagnosis of osteoporosis is mainly based on Dual X-ray Absorptiometry, it has been shown that trabecular bone micro-architecture is also an important factor in regards of fracture risk, which can be efficiently assessed in vitro using three-dimensional x-ray microtomography ({mu}CT). In vivo, techniques based on high-resolution x-ray radiography associated to texture analysis have been proposed to investigate bone micro-architecture, but their relevance for giving pertinent 3D information is unclear. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for evaluating the relationships between 3D micro-architecture and 2D texture parameters, and optimizing the conditions for radiographic imaging. Bone sample images taken from cortical to cortical were acquired using 3D-synchrotron x-ray {mu}CT at the ESRF. The 3D digital images were further used for two purposes: 1) quantification of three-dimensional bone micro-architecture, 2) simulation of realistic x-ray radiographs under different acquisition conditions. Texture analysis was then applied to these 2D radiographs using a large variety of methods (co-occurrence, spectrum, fractal...). First results of the statistical analysis between 2D and 3D parameters allowed identifying the most relevant 2D texture parameters. (authors)

  18. Hybrid 3D-2D printing for bone scaffolds fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2017-02-01

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  19. Feasibility of fabricating personalized 3D-printed bone grafts guided by high-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Abigail L.; Newman, Benjamin T.; Khalid, Arbab; Teter, Olivia M.; Kobe, Elizabeth A.; Shukurova, Malika; Shinde, Rohit; Sipzner, Daniel; Pignolo, Robert J.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Rajapakse, Chamith S.

    2017-03-01

    Current methods of bone graft treatment for critical size bone defects can give way to several clinical complications such as limited available bone for autografts, non-matching bone structure, lack of strength which can compromise a patient's skeletal system, and sterilization processes that can prevent osteogenesis in the case of allografts. We intend to overcome these disadvantages by generating a patient-specific 3D printed bone graft guided by high-resolution medical imaging. Our synthetic model allows us to customize the graft for the patients' macro- and microstructure and correct any structural deficiencies in the re-meshing process. These 3D-printed models can presumptively serve as the scaffolding for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) engraftment in order to facilitate bone growth. We performed highresolution CT imaging of a cadaveric human proximal femur at 0.030-mm isotropic voxels. We used these images to generate a 3D computer model that mimics bone geometry from micro to macro scale represented by STereoLithography (STL) format. These models were then reformatted to a format that can be interpreted by the 3D printer. To assess how much of the microstructure was replicated, 3D-printed models were re-imaged using micro-CT at 0.025-mm isotropic voxels and compared to original high-resolution CT images used to generate the 3D model in 32 sub-regions. We found a strong correlation between 3D-printed bone volume and volume of bone in the original images used for 3D printing (R2 = 0.97). We expect to further refine our approach with additional testing to create a viable synthetic bone graft with clinical functionality.

  20. Mechanical Properties of 3d Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deividas Mizeras

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges in modern tissue engineering is a creation 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. Until now, in order to restore bone defects are used various bone substitutes (autologous and allogeneic, however, their usage is limited because is required additional surgery, possible complications, also limited their use is associated with ethical point of view. In this work we aim to determine the mechanical properties of 3D printed PLA objects having various orientation woodpile microarchitectures. In this work we chose three different 3D microarchitectures: woodpile BCC (each layer consists of parallel logs which are rotated 90 deg every next layer, woodpile FCC (every layer is additionally shifted half of the period in respect to the previous parallel log layer and a rotating woodpile 60 deg (each layer is rotated 60 deg in respect to the previous one. Compressive and bending tests were carried out with TIRAtest2300 universal testing machine. We found that 60 deg rotating woodpile geometry had the highest mechanical values which were approximately about 3 times higher than the BCC or FCC microstructures.

  1. Development of a 3D bone marrow adipose tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Heather; Falank, Carolyne; Farrell, Mariah; Vary, Calvin; Boucher, Joshua M; Driscoll, Heather; Liaw, Lucy; Rosen, Clifford J; Reagan, Michaela R

    2018-01-26

    Over the past twenty years, evidence has accumulated that biochemically and spatially defined networks of extracellular matrix, cellular components, and interactions dictate cellular differentiation, proliferation, and function in a variety of tissue and diseases. Modeling in vivo systems in vitro has been undeniably necessary, but when simplified 2D conditions rather than 3D in vitro models are used, the reliability and usefulness of the data derived from these models decreases. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop and validate reliable in vitro models to reproduce specific tissue-like structures and mimic functions and responses of cells in a more realistic manner for both drug screening/disease modeling and tissue regeneration applications. In adipose biology and cancer research, these models serve as physiologically relevant 3D platforms to bridge the divide between 2D cultures and in vivo models, bringing about more reliable and translationally useful data to accelerate benchtop to bedside research. Currently, no model has been developed for bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), a novel adipose depot that has previously been overlooked as "filler tissue" but has more recently been recognized as endocrine-signaling and systemically relevant. Herein we describe the development of the first 3D, BMAT model derived from either human or mouse bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We found that BMAT models can be stably cultured for at least 3 months in vitro, and that myeloma cells (5TGM1, OPM2 and MM1S cells) can be cultured on these for at least 2 weeks. Upon tumor cell co-culture, delipidation occurred in BMAT adipocytes, suggesting a bidirectional relationship between these two important cell types in the malignant BM niche. Overall, our studies suggest that 3D BMAT represents a "healthier," more realistic tissue model that may be useful for elucidating the effects of MAT on tumor cells, and tumor cells on MAT, to identify novel therapeutic

  2. Utility of 3D printed temporal bones in pre-surgical planning for complex BoneBridge cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Payal; Cheng, Kai; Flanagan, Sean; Greenberg, Simon

    2017-08-01

    With the advent of single-sided hearing loss increasingly being treated with cochlear implantation, bone conduction implants are reserved for cases of conductive and mixed hearing loss with greater complexity. The BoneBridge (BB, MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) is an active fully implantable device with no attenuation of sound energy through soft tissue. However, the floating mass transducer (FMT) part of the device is very bulky, which limits insertion in complicated ears. In this study, 3D printed temporal bones of patients were used to study its utility in preoperative planning on complicated cases. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 16 ears were used to 3D print their temporal bones. Three otologists graded the use of routine preoperative planning provided by MED-EL and that of operating on the 3D printed bone of the patient. Data were collated to assess the advantage and disadvantage of the technology. There was a statistically significant benefit in using 3D printed temporal bones to plan surgery for difficult cases of BoneBridge surgery compared to the current standard. Surgeons preferred to have the printed bones in theatre to plan their drill sites and make the transition of the planning to the patient's operation more precise. 3D printing is an innovative use of technology in the use of preoperative planning for complex ear surgery. Surgical planning can be done on the patient's own anatomy which may help to decrease operating time, reduce cost, increase surgical precision and thus reduce complications.

  3. 3D Tissue Scaffold Printing On Custom Artificial Bone Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül ALDEMİR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of defect-matching scaffolds is the most critical step in custom artificial bone applications. Three dimensional printing (3DP is one of the best techniques particularly for custom designs on artificial bone applications because of the high controllability and design independency. Our long-term aim is to implant an artificial custom bone that is cultured with patient's own mesenchymal stem cells after determining defect architecture on patient's bone by using CT-scan and printing that defect-matching 3D scaffold with appropriate nontoxic materials. In this study, preliminary results of strength and cytotoxicity measurements of 3D printed scaffolds with modified calcium sulfate compositepowder (MCSCP were presented. CAD designs were created and MCSCP were printed by a 3D printer (3DS, Visijet, PXL Core. Some samples were covered with salt solution in order to harden the samples. MCSCP and salt coated MCSCP were the two experimental groups in this study. Cytotoxicity and mechanical experiments were performed after surface examination withscanning electron microscope (SEM and light microscope. Tension tests were performed for MCSCP and salt coated MCSCP samples. The 3D scaffolds were sterilized with ethylene oxide gas sterilizer, ventilated and conditioned with DMEM (10% FBS. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were cultured on scaffolds (3 repetitive and cell viability was determined using MTT analysis. According to the mechanical results, the MCSCP group stands until average 71,305 N, while salt coated MCSCP group stands until 21,328N. Although the strength difference between two groups is statistically significant (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U, elastic modulus is not (MCSCP=1,186Pa, salt coated MCSCP=1,169Pa, p=0.445. Cell viability (MTT analysis results on day 1, 3, and 5 demonstrated thatscaffolds hadno toxic effect to the L929 mouse fibroblast cells. Consequently, 3D printed samples with MCSCP could potentially be a strong alternative

  4. Analysis of the of bones through 3D computerized tomography; Analise de estrutura ossea atraves de microtomografia computadorizada 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I.; Lopes, R.T. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Oliveira, L.F. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica; Alves, J.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2009-03-15

    This work shows the analysis of the internal structure of the bones samples through 3D micro tomography technique (3D-{mu}TC). The comprehension of the bone structure is particularly important when related to osteoporosis diagnosis because this implies in a deterioration of the trabecular bone architecture, which increases the fragility and the possibility to have bone fractures. Two bone samples (human calcaneous and Wistar rat femur) were used, and the method was a radiographic system in real time with an X Ray microfocus tube. The quantifications parameters are based on stereological principles and they are five: a bone volume fraction, trabecular number, the ratio between surface and bone volume, the trabecular thickness and the trabecular separation. The quantifications were done with a program developed especially for this purpose in Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory - COPPE/UFRJ. This program uses as input the 3D reconstructions images and generates a table with the quantifications. The results of the human calcaneous quantifications are presented in tables 1 and 2, and the 3D reconstructions are illustrated in Figure 5. The Figure 6 illustrate the 2D reconstructed image and the Figure 7 the 3D visualization respectively of the Wistar femur sample. The obtained results show that the 3D-{mu}TC is a powerful technique that can be used to analyze bone microstructures. (author)

  5. Expansion of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Perfused 3D Ceramic Scaffolds Enhances In Vivo Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Allison I; Duhr, Ralph; Di Maggio, Nunzia; Mehrkens, Arne; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David

    2017-12-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC), when expanded directly within 3D ceramic scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, more reproducibly form bone when implanted in vivo as compared to conventional expansion on 2D polystyrene dishes/flasks. Since the bioreactor-based expansion on 3D ceramic scaffolds encompasses multiple aspects that are inherently different from expansion on 2D polystyrene, we aimed to decouple the effects of specific parameters among these two model systems. We assessed the effects of the: 1) 3D scaffold vs. 2D surface; 2) ceramic vs. polystyrene materials; and 3) BMSC niche established within the ceramic pores during in vitro culture, on subsequent in vivo bone formation. While BMSC expanded on 3D polystyrene scaffolds in the bioreactor could maintain their in vivo osteogenic potential, results were similar as BMSC expanded in monolayer on 2D polystyrene, suggesting little influence of the scaffold 3D environment. Bone formation was most reproducible when BMSC are expanded on 3D ceramic, highlighting the influence of the ceramic substrate. The presence of a pre-formed niche within the scaffold pores had negligible effects on the in vivo bone formation. The results of this study allow a greater understanding of the parameters required for perfusion bioreactor-based manufacturing of osteogenic grafts for clinical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahini A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aref Shahini,1 Mostafa Yazdimamaghani,2 Kenneth J Walker,2 Margaret A Eastman,3 Hamed Hatami-Marbini,4 Brenda J Smith,5 John L Ricci,6 Sundar V Madihally,2 Daryoosh Vashaee,1 Lobat Tayebi2,7 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, 2School of Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Chemistry, 4School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 6Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA Abstract: Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene poly(4-styrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS, in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent

  7. 3D Reconstruction of human bones based on dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binkai; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Xiao; Zheng, Jinjin

    2017-11-01

    An effective method for reconstructing a 3D model of human bones from computed tomography (CT) image data based on dictionary learning is proposed. In this study, the dictionary comprises the vertices of triangular meshes, and the sparse coefficient matrix indicates the connectivity information. For better reconstruction performance, we proposed a balance coefficient between the approximation and regularisation terms and a method for optimisation. Moreover, we applied a local updating strategy and a mesh-optimisation method to update the dictionary and the sparse matrix, respectively. The two updating steps are iterated alternately until the objective function converges. Thus, a reconstructed mesh could be obtained with high accuracy and regularisation. The experimental results show that the proposed method has the potential to obtain high precision and high-quality triangular meshes for rapid prototyping, medical diagnosis, and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of 3D MR reconstructions in the evaluation of glenoid bone loss: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Beltran, Luis S.; Yemin, Avner; Recht, Michael P.; Strauss, Eric; Meislin, Robert; Jazrawi, Laith

    2014-01-01

    To assess the ability of 3D MR shoulder reconstructions to accurately quantify glenoid bone loss in the clinical setting using findings at the time of arthroscopy as the gold standard. Retrospective review of patients with MR shoulder studies that included 3D MR reconstructions (3D MR) produced using an axial Dixon 3D-T1W-FLASH sequence at our institution was conducted with the following inclusion criteria: history of anterior shoulder dislocation, arthroscopy (OR) performed within 6 months of the MRI, and an estimate of glenoid bone loss made in the OR using the bare-spot method. Two musculoskeletal radiologists produced estimates of bone loss along the glenoid width, measured in mm and %, on 3D MR using the best-fit circle method, which were then compared to the OR measurements. There were a total of 15 patients (13 men, two women; mean age, 28, range, 19-51 years). There was no significant difference, on average, between the MRI (mean 3.4 mm/12.6 %; range, 0-30 %) and OR (mean, 12.7 %; range, 0-30 %) measurements of glenoid bone loss (p = 0.767). A 95 % confidence interval for the mean absolute error extended from 0.45-2.21 %, implying that, when averaged over all patients, the true mean absolute error of the MRI measurements relative to the OR measurements is expected to be less than 2.21 %. Inter-reader agreement between the two readers had an IC of 0.92 and CC of 0.90 in terms of percentage of bone loss. 3D MR reconstructions of the shoulder can be used to accurately measure glenoid bone loss. (orig.)

  9. Use of 3D MR reconstructions in the evaluation of glenoid bone loss: a clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Beltran, Luis S.; Yemin, Avner; Recht, Michael P. [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Strauss, Eric; Meislin, Robert; Jazrawi, Laith [NYU Langone Medical Center, Center for Musculoskeletal Care, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-02-15

    To assess the ability of 3D MR shoulder reconstructions to accurately quantify glenoid bone loss in the clinical setting using findings at the time of arthroscopy as the gold standard. Retrospective review of patients with MR shoulder studies that included 3D MR reconstructions (3D MR) produced using an axial Dixon 3D-T1W-FLASH sequence at our institution was conducted with the following inclusion criteria: history of anterior shoulder dislocation, arthroscopy (OR) performed within 6 months of the MRI, and an estimate of glenoid bone loss made in the OR using the bare-spot method. Two musculoskeletal radiologists produced estimates of bone loss along the glenoid width, measured in mm and %, on 3D MR using the best-fit circle method, which were then compared to the OR measurements. There were a total of 15 patients (13 men, two women; mean age, 28, range, 19-51 years). There was no significant difference, on average, between the MRI (mean 3.4 mm/12.6 %; range, 0-30 %) and OR (mean, 12.7 %; range, 0-30 %) measurements of glenoid bone loss (p = 0.767). A 95 % confidence interval for the mean absolute error extended from 0.45-2.21 %, implying that, when averaged over all patients, the true mean absolute error of the MRI measurements relative to the OR measurements is expected to be less than 2.21 %. Inter-reader agreement between the two readers had an IC of 0.92 and CC of 0.90 in terms of percentage of bone loss. 3D MR reconstructions of the shoulder can be used to accurately measure glenoid bone loss. (orig.)

  10. ASSESSING 3D PHOTOGRAMMETRY TECHNIQUES IN CRANIOMETRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Moshobane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc® three-dimensional (3D modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model’s accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  11. Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Vanderburgh, Joseph P.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Review Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical. Recent Findings 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. Summary 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes. PMID:28646444

  12. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, Tom D; Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Fotiadou, Anastasia F; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2016-07-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K&L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. • CT is being increasingly used to assess bony involvement in osteoarthritis • CBM provides accurate and reliable quantitative analysis of cortical bone thickness • Cortical bone is thicker at the superior femoral head-neck with worse osteoarthritis • Regions of increased thickness co-locate with impingement and osteophyte formation • Quantitative 3D bone analysis could enable clinical disease prediction and therapy development.

  13. 3D printed porous ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu; Xun, Sun; Haoye, Meng; Baichuan, Sun; Peng, Chen; Xuejian, Liu; Kaihong, Zhang; Xuan, Yang; Jiang, Peng; Shibi, Lu

    2017-08-22

    This study summarizes the recent research status and development of three-dimensional (3D)-printed porous ceramic scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. Recent literature on 3D-printed porous ceramic scaffolds was reviewed. Compared with traditional processing and manufacturing technologies, 3D-printed porous ceramic scaffolds have obvious advantages, such as enhancement of the controllability of the structure or improvement of the production efficiency. More sophisticated scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology. 3D printed bioceramics have broad application prospects in bone tissue engineering. Through understanding the advantages and limitations of different 3D-printing approaches, new classes of bone graft substitutes can be developed.

  14. 3D Powder Printed Bioglass and β-Tricalcium Phosphate Bone Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seidenstuecker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of both bioglass (BG and β tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP for bone replacement applications has been studied extensively due to the materials’ high biocompatibility and ability to resorb when implanted in the body. 3D printing has been explored as a fast and versatile technique for the fabrication of porous bone scaffolds. This project investigates the effects of using different combinations of a composite BG and β-TCP powder for 3D printing of porous bone scaffolds. Porous 3D powder printed bone scaffolds of BG, β-TCP, 50/50 BG/β-TCP and 70/30 BG/β-TCP compositions were subject to a variety of characterization and biocompatibility tests. The porosity characteristics, surface roughness, mechanical strength, viability for cell proliferation, material cytotoxicity and in vitro bioactivity were assessed. The results show that the scaffolds can support osteoblast-like MG-63 cells growth both on the surface of and within the scaffold material and do not show alarming cytotoxicity; the porosity and surface characteristics of the scaffolds are appropriate. Of the two tested composite materials, the 70/30 BG/β-TCP scaffold proved to be superior in terms of biocompatibility and mechanical strength. The mechanical strength of the scaffolds makes them unsuitable for load bearing applications. However, they can be useful for other applications such as bone fillers.

  15. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheol Bae

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, % but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results.

  16. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jin-Ju; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Keun-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Bae, Eun-Bin; Choi, Jae-Won; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM) scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT) to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, %) but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %). Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results. PMID:29258172

  17. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jin-Ju; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Keun-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Bae, Eun-Bin; Choi, Jae-Won; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM) scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent an...

  18. Biomechanical properties of 3D-printed bone scaffolds are improved by treatment with CRFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helguero, Carlos G; Mustahsan, Vamiq M; Parmar, Sunjit; Pentyala, Sahana; Pfail, John L; Kao, Imin; Komatsu, David E; Pentyala, Srinivas

    2017-12-22

    One of the major challenges in orthopedics is to develop implants that overcome current postoperative problems such as osteointegration, proper load bearing, and stress shielding. Current implant techniques such as allografts or endoprostheses never reach full bone integration, and the risk of fracture due to stress shielding is a major concern. To overcome this, a novel technique of reverse engineering to create artificial scaffolds was designed and tested. The purpose of the study is to create a new generation of implants that are both biocompatible and biomimetic. 3D-printed scaffolds based on physiological trabecular bone patterning were printed. MC3T3 cells were cultured on these scaffolds in osteogenic media, with and without the addition of Calcitonin Receptor Fragment Peptide (CRFP) in order to assess bone formation on the surfaces of the scaffolds. Integrity of these cell-seeded bone-coated scaffolds was tested for their mechanical strength. The results show that cellular proliferation and bone matrix formation are both supported by our 3D-printed scaffolds. The mechanical strength of the scaffolds was enhanced by trabecular patterning in the order of 20% for compression strength and 60% for compressive modulus. Furthermore, cell-seeded trabecular scaffolds modulus increased fourfold when treated with CRFP. Upon mineralization, the cell-seeded trabecular implants treated with osteo-inductive agents and pretreated with CRFP showed a significant increase in the compressive modulus. This work will lead to creating 3D structures that can be used in the replacement of not only bone segments, but entire bones.

  19. Quantitative 3D analysis of bone in hip osteoarthritis using clinical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turmezei, Tom D.; Treece, Graham M.; Gee, Andrew H.; Fotiadou, Anastasia F.; Poole, Kenneth E.S.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship between proximal femoral cortical bone thickness and radiological hip osteoarthritis using quantitative 3D analysis of clinical computed tomography (CT) data. Image analysis was performed on clinical CT imaging data from 203 female volunteers with a technique called cortical bone mapping (CBM). Colour thickness maps were created for each proximal femur. Statistical parametric mapping was performed to identify statistically significant differences in cortical bone thickness that corresponded with the severity of radiological hip osteoarthritis. Kellgren and Lawrence (K and L) grade, minimum joint space width (JSW) and a novel CT-based osteophyte score were also blindly assessed from the CT data. For each increase in K and L grade, cortical thickness increased by up to 25 % in distinct areas of the superolateral femoral head-neck junction and superior subchondral bone plate. For increasing severity of CT osteophytes, the increase in cortical thickness was more circumferential, involving a wider portion of the head-neck junction, with up to a 7 % increase in cortical thickness per increment in score. Results were not significant for minimum JSW. These findings indicate that quantitative 3D analysis of the proximal femur can identify changes in cortical bone thickness relevant to structural hip osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  20. 3D artificial bones for bone repair prepared by computed tomography-guided fused deposition modeling for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Ye, Xiaojian; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Yuyun; Xu, Guohua; He, Dannong

    2014-09-10

    The medical community has expressed significant interest in the development of new types of artificial bones that mimic natural bones. In this study, computed tomography (CT)-guided fused deposition modeling (FDM) was employed to fabricate polycaprolactone (PCL)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and PCL 3D artificial bones to mimic natural goat femurs. The in vitro mechanical properties, in vitro cell biocompatibility, and in vivo performance of the artificial bones in a long load-bearing goat femur bone segmental defect model were studied. All of the results indicate that CT-guided FDM is a simple, convenient, relatively low-cost method that is suitable for fabricating natural bonelike artificial bones. Moreover, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones prepared by CT-guided FDM have more close mechanics to natural bone, good in vitro cell biocompatibility, biodegradation ability, and appropriate in vivo new bone formation ability. Therefore, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones could be potentially be of use in the treatment of patients with clinical bone defects.

  1. "3D fusion" echocardiography improves 3D left ventricular assessment: comparison with 2D contrast echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Daniel; Yaqub, Mohammad; Szmigielski, Cezary; Lima, Eduardo; Petersen, Steffen E; Becher, Harald; Noble, J Alison; Leeson, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional fusion echocardiography (3DFE) is a novel postprocessing approach that utilizes imaging data acquired from multiple 3D acquisitions. We assessed image quality, endocardial border definition, and cardiac wall motion in patients using 3DFE compared to standard 3D images (3D) and results obtained with contrast echocardiography (2DC). Twenty-four patients (mean age 66.9 ± 13 years, 17 males, 7 females) undergoing 2DC had three, noncontrast, 3D apical volumes acquired at rest. Images were fused using an automated image fusion approach. Quality of the 3DFE was compared to both 3D and 2DC based on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and endocardial border definition. We then compared clinical wall-motion score index (WMSI) calculated from 3DFE and 3D to those obtained from 2DC images. Fused 3D volumes had significantly improved CNR (8.92 ± 1.35 vs. 6.59 ± 1.19, P echocardiography (1.06 ± 0.09 vs. 1.07 ± 0.15, P = 0.69), whereas unfused images produced significantly more variable results (1.19 ± 0.30). This was confirmed by a better intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.72; 95% CI 0.32-0.88) relative to comparisons with unfused images (ICC 0.56; 95% CI 0.02-0.81). 3DFE significantly improves left ventricular image quality compared to unfused 3D in a patient population and allows noncontrast assessment of wall motion that approaches that achieved with 2D contrast echocardiography. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Design and production of sintered β-tricalcium phosphate 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Carlos F.L.; Silva, Abílio P.; Lopes, Luís; Pires, Inês; Correia, Ilidio J.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of sintered β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds produced by 3D printing were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, uniaxial compression tests and cytotoxicity tests, using human osteoblast cells. The results reported include details of the β-TCP scaffolds' porosity, density, phase stability, mechanical behavior and cytotoxic profile. Collectively, these properties are fundamental for the future application of these scaffolds as bone substitutes for individualized therapy. Highlights: ► β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) 3D scaffolds were produced by rapid prototyping. ► Scaffold properties were assessed by SEM, FTIR, XRD and by mechanical tests. ► The cytotoxic profile of the scaffolds was characterized by in vitro assays. ► Scaffolds have good properties for its application as bone substitutes for individualized therapy.

  3. Design and production of sintered {beta}-tricalcium phosphate 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Carlos F.L. [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Silva, Abilio P. [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespaciais, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Lopes, Luis [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Pires, Ines [Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica - Lisboa (IDMEC Lisboa/IST/UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, Ilidio J., E-mail: icorreia@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal)

    2012-07-01

    The characteristics of sintered {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) scaffolds produced by 3D printing were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, uniaxial compression tests and cytotoxicity tests, using human osteoblast cells. The results reported include details of the {beta}-TCP scaffolds' porosity, density, phase stability, mechanical behavior and cytotoxic profile. Collectively, these properties are fundamental for the future application of these scaffolds as bone substitutes for individualized therapy. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) 3D scaffolds were produced by rapid prototyping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scaffold properties were assessed by SEM, FTIR, XRD and by mechanical tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cytotoxic profile of the scaffolds was characterized by in vitro assays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scaffolds have good properties for its application as bone substitutes for individualized therapy.

  4. The Mechanical Properties and Biometrical Effect of 3D Preformed Titanium Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration on Alveolar Bone Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hyoun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of three-dimensional preformed titanium membrane (3D-PFTM to enhance mechanical properties and ability of bone regeneration on the peri-implant bone defect. 3D-PFTMs by new mechanically compressive molding technology and manually shaped- (MS- PFTMs by hand manipulation were applied in artificial peri-implant bone defect model for static compressive load test and cyclic fatigue load test. In 12 implants installed in the mandibular of three beagle dogs, six 3D-PFTMs, and six collagen membranes (CM randomly were applied to 2.5 mm peri-implant buccal bone defect with particulate bone graft materials for guided bone regeneration (GBR. The 3D-PFTM group showed about 7.4 times higher mechanical stiffness and 5 times higher fatigue resistance than the MS-PFTM group. The levels of the new bone area (NBA, %, the bone-to-implant contact (BIC, %, distance from the new bone to the old bone (NB-OB, %, and distance from the osseointegration to the old bone (OI-OB, % were significantly higher in the 3D-PFTM group than the CM group (p<.001. It was verified that the 3D-PFTM increased mechanical properties which were effective in supporting the space maintenance ability and stabilizing the particulate bone grafts, which led to highly efficient bone regeneration.

  5. Engineering anatomically shaped vascularized bone grafts with hASCs and 3D-printed PCL scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Joshua P; Hutton, Daphne L; Hung, Ben P; Huri, Pinar Yilgor; Cook, Colin A; Kondragunta, Renu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Grayson, Warren L

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of large craniomaxillofacial bone defects is clinically challenging due to the limited availability of transplantable autologous bone grafts and the complex geometry of the bones. The ability to regenerate new bone tissues that faithfully replicate the anatomy would revolutionize treatment options. Advances in the field of bone tissue engineering over the past few decades offer promising new treatment alternatives using biocompatible scaffold materials and autologous cells. This approach combined with recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies may soon allow the generation of large, bioartificial bone grafts with custom, patient-specific architecture. In this study, we use a custom-built 3D printer to develop anatomically shaped polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with varying internal porosities. These scaffolds are assessed for their ability to support induction of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) to form vasculature and bone, two essential components of functional bone tissue. The development of functional tissues is assessed in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate the ability to print large mandibular and maxillary bone scaffolds that replicate fine details extracted from patient's computed tomography scans. The findings of this study illustrate the capabilities and potential of 3D printed scaffolds to be used for engineering autologous, anatomically shaped, vascularized bone grafts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. "Black Bone" MRI: a novel imaging technique for 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Karen A; Watt-Smith, Stephen R; Golding, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensionally printed anatomical models are rapidly becoming an integral part of pre-operative planning of complex surgical cases. We have previously reported the "Black Bone" MRI technique as a non-ionizing alternative to CT. Segmentation of bone becomes possible by minimizing soft tissue contrast to enhance the bone-soft tissue boundary. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the potential of utilizing this technique to produce three-dimensional (3D) printed models. "Black Bone" MRI acquired from adult volunteers and infants with craniosynostosis were 3D rendered and 3D printed. A custom phantom provided a surrogate marker of accuracy permitting comparison between direct measurements and 3D printed models created by segmenting both CT and "Black Bone" MRI data sets using two different software packages. "Black Bone" MRI was successfully utilized to produce 3D models of the craniofacial skeleton in both adults and an infant. Measurements of the cube phantom and 3D printed models demonstrated submillimetre discrepancy. In this novel preliminary study exploring the potential of 3D printing from "Black Bone" MRI data, the feasibility of producing anatomical 3D models has been demonstrated, thus offering a potential non-ionizing alterative to CT for the craniofacial skeleton.

  7. Bone architecture analyses of rat femur with 3D microtomographics images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, I.C.B.; Lopes, R.T.; Oliveira, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    One of the great 3D micro tomography (3D-μCT) applications in the medical area is the characterization of bone architecture, especially when it is spoken in osteoporosis because, among other factors, is characterized by the deterioration of the architecture. This work shows the 3D quantification, based on stereological concepts, of the bone tissue through 3D-μCT in real time. The analyses were carried out in femur rat and the 3D visualizations helped to understand bones morphology. The results showed the potential of this computational technique to verify the capability of characterization of the internal bone structures and the importance of the threshold level in the binarization process. (author)

  8. Quantification of spatial structure of human proximal tibial bone biopsies using 3D measures of complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saparin, Peter I.; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Prohaska, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    3D data sets of human tibia bone biopsies acquired by a micro-CT scanner. In order to justify the newly proposed approach, the measures of complexity of the bone architecture were compared with the results of traditional 2D bone histomorphometry. The proposed technique is able to quantify...

  9. Deep learning for objective quality assessment of 3D images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocanu, D.C.; Exarchakos, G.; Liotta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Improving the users' Quality of Experience (QoE) in modern 3D Multimedia Systems is a challenging proposition, mainly due to our limited knowledge of 3D image Quality Assessment algorithms. While subjective QoE methods would better reflect the nature of human perception, these are not suitable in

  10. Functionalization of PCL-3D Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Improved BMP2-Induced Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszuk, Jacob M; Xu, Tao; Yao, Qingqing; Fang, Fang; Childs, Josh D; Hong, Zhongkui; Tao, Jianning; Fong, Hao; Sun, Hongli

    2018-03-01

    Bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) is a key growth factor for bone regeneration, possessing FDA approval for orthopedic applications. BMP2 is often required in supratherapeutic doses clinically, yielding adverse side effects and substantial treatment costs. Considering the crucial role of materials for BMPs delivery and cell osteogenic differentiation, we devote to engineering an innovative bone-matrix mimicking niche to improve low dose of BMP2-induced bone formation. Our previous work describes a novel technique, named thermally induced nanofiber self-agglomeration (TISA), for generating 3D electrospun nanofibrous (NF) polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds. TISA process could readily blend PCL with PLA, leading to increased osteogenic capabilities in vitro , however, these bio-inert synthetic polymers produced limited BMP2-induced bone formation in vivo. We therefore hypothesize that functionalization of NF 3D PCL scaffolds with bone-like hydroxyapatite (HA) and BMP2 signaling activator phenamil will provide a favorable osteogenic niche for bone formation at low doses of BMP2. Compared to PCL-3D scaffolds, PCL/HA-3D scaffolds demonstrated synergistically enhanced osteogenic differentiation capabilities of C2C12 cells with phenamil. Importantly, in vivo studies showed this synergism was able to generate significantly increased new bone in an ectopic mouse model, suggesting PCL/HA-3D scaffolds act as a favorable synthetic extracellular matrix for bone regeneration.

  11. Rabbit Calvarial Defect Model for Customized 3D-Printed Bone Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Gon; Lee, Kang-Sik; Kang, Yu-Jeoung; Hwang, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Hwan; Park, Sang-Hyug; Park, Yongdoo; Cho, Young-Sam; Lee, Bu-Kyu

    2018-05-01

    Bone graft materials are commonly used to regenerate various bone defects, but their application is often limited because of the complex defect shape in various clinical conditions. Hence, customized bone grafts using three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques have been developed. However, conventional simple bone defect models are limited for evaluating the benefits and manufacturing accuracy of 3D-printed customized bone grafts. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a complex-shaped bone defect model. We designed an 8-shaped bony defect that consists of two simple circles attached to the rabbit calvarium. To determine the critical-sized defect (CSD) of the 8-shaped defects, 5.6- and 7-mm-diameter trephine burs were tested, and the 7-mm-diameter bur could successfully create a CSD, which was easily reproducible on the rabbit calvarium. The rate of new bone formation was 28.65% ± 8.63% at 16 weeks following creation of the defect. To confirm its efficacy for clinical use, the 8-shaped defect was created on a rabbit calvarium and 3D computed tomography (CT) was performed. A stereolithography file was produced using the CT data, and a 3D-printed polycaprolactone graft was fabricated. Using our 8-shaped defect model, we were able to modify the tolerances of the bone graft and calvarial defect to fabricate a more precise bone graft. Customized characteristics of the bone graft were then used to improve the accuracy of the bone graft. In addition, we confirmed the fitting ability of the 3D-printed graft during implantation of the graft. Our 8-shaped defect model on the rabbit calvarium using a 7.0-mm trephine bur may be a useful CSD model for evaluating 3D-printed graft materials.

  12. Bioactive polymeric–ceramic hybrid 3D scaffold for application in bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, A.L.; Gaspar, V.M.; Serra, I.R.; Diogo, G.S.; Fradique, R. [CICS-UBI — Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Av. Infante D. Henrique, 6200-506 Covilhã (Portugal); Silva, A.P. [CAST-UBI — Centre for Aerospace Science and Technologies, University of Beira Interior, Calçada Fonte do Lameiro, 6201-001 Covilhã (Portugal); Correia, I.J., E-mail: icorreia@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI — Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Av. Infante D. Henrique, 6200-506 Covilhã (Portugal)

    2013-10-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains a challenging scenario from a therapeutic point of view. In fact, the currently available bone substitutes are often limited by poor tissue integration and severe host inflammatory responses, which eventually lead to surgical removal. In an attempt to address these issues, herein we evaluated the importance of alginate incorporation in the production of improved and tunable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds to be used as temporary templates for bone regeneration. Different bioceramic combinations were tested in order to investigate optimal scaffold architectures. Additionally, 3D β-TCP/HA vacuum-coated with alginate, presented improved compressive strength, fracture toughness and Young's modulus, to values similar to those of native bone. The hybrid 3D polymeric–bioceramic scaffolds also supported osteoblast adhesion, maturation and proliferation, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that a 3D scaffold produced with this combination of biomaterials is described. Altogether, our results emphasize that this hybrid scaffold presents promising characteristics for its future application in bone regeneration. - Graphical abstract: B-TCP:HA–alginate hybrid 3D porous scaffolds for application in bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The produced hybrid 3D scaffolds are prone to be applied in bone tissue engineering. • Alginate coated 3D scaffolds present high mechanical and biological properties. • In vitro assays for evaluation of human osteoblast cell attachment in the presence of the scaffolds • The hybrid 3D scaffolds present suitable mechanical and biological properties for use in bone regenerative medicine.

  13. Bioactive polymeric–ceramic hybrid 3D scaffold for application in bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.L.; Gaspar, V.M.; Serra, I.R.; Diogo, G.S.; Fradique, R.; Silva, A.P.; Correia, I.J.

    2013-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains a challenging scenario from a therapeutic point of view. In fact, the currently available bone substitutes are often limited by poor tissue integration and severe host inflammatory responses, which eventually lead to surgical removal. In an attempt to address these issues, herein we evaluated the importance of alginate incorporation in the production of improved and tunable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds to be used as temporary templates for bone regeneration. Different bioceramic combinations were tested in order to investigate optimal scaffold architectures. Additionally, 3D β-TCP/HA vacuum-coated with alginate, presented improved compressive strength, fracture toughness and Young's modulus, to values similar to those of native bone. The hybrid 3D polymeric–bioceramic scaffolds also supported osteoblast adhesion, maturation and proliferation, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that a 3D scaffold produced with this combination of biomaterials is described. Altogether, our results emphasize that this hybrid scaffold presents promising characteristics for its future application in bone regeneration. - Graphical abstract: B-TCP:HA–alginate hybrid 3D porous scaffolds for application in bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The produced hybrid 3D scaffolds are prone to be applied in bone tissue engineering. • Alginate coated 3D scaffolds present high mechanical and biological properties. • In vitro assays for evaluation of human osteoblast cell attachment in the presence of the scaffolds • The hybrid 3D scaffolds present suitable mechanical and biological properties for use in bone regenerative medicine

  14. Creating an Optimal 3D Printed Model for Temporal Bone Dissection Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Morita, Yuka; Ohshima, Shinsuke; Izumi, Shuji; Kubota, Yamato; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Takahashi, Sugata; Horii, Arata

    2017-07-01

    Making a 3-dimensional (3D) temporal bone model is simple using a plaster powder bed and an inkjet printer. However, it is difficult to reproduce air-containing spaces and precise middle ear structures. The objective of this study was to overcome these problems and create a temporal bone model that would be useful both as a training tool and for preoperative simulation. Drainage holes were made to remove excess materials from air-containing spaces, ossicle ligaments were manually changed to bony structures, and small and/or soft tissue structures were colored differently while designing the 3D models. The outcomes were evaluated by 3 procedures: macroscopic and endoscopic inspection of the model, comparison of computed tomography (CT) images of the model to the original CT, and assessment of tactile sensation and reproducibility by 20 surgeons performing surgery on the model. Macroscopic and endoscopic inspection, CT images, and assessment by surgeons were in agreement in terms of reproducibility of model structures. Most structures could be reproduced, but the stapes, tympanic sinus, and mastoid air cells were unsatisfactory. Perioperative tactile sensation of the model was excellent. Although this model still does not embody perfect reproducibility, it proved sufficiently practical for use in surgical training.

  15. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa'ad, Farah; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  16. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Asa’ad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration.

  17. New concept of 3D printed bone clip (polylactic acid/hydroxyapatite/silk composite) for internal fixation of bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Yeung Kyu; Park, Hae Sang; Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Ji Seung; Lee, Young Jin; Sultan, Md Tipu; Seo, Ye Bin; Lee, Ok Joo; Kim, Soon Hee; Park, Chan Hum

    Open reduction with internal fixation is commonly used for the treatment of bone fractures. However, postoperative infection associated with internal fixation devices (intramedullary nails, plates, and screws) remains a significant complication, and it is technically difficult to fix multiple fragmented bony fractures using internal fixation devices. In addition, drilling in the bone to install devices can lead to secondary fracture, bone necrosis associated with postoperative infection. In this study, we developed bone clip type internal fixation device using three- dimensional (3D) printing technology. Standard 3D model of the bone clip was generated based on computed tomography (CT) scan of the femur in the rat. Polylacticacid (PLA), hydroxyapatite (HA), and silk were used for bone clip material. The purpose of this study was to characterize 3D printed PLA, PLA/HA, and PLA/HA/Silk composite bone clip and evaluate the feasibility of these bone clips as an internal fixation device. Based on the results, PLA/HA/Silk composite bone clip showed similar mechanical property, and superior biocompatibility compared to other types of the bone clip. PLA/HA/Silk composite bone clip demonstrated excellent alignment of the bony segments across the femur fracture site with well-positioned bone clip in an animal study. Our 3D printed bone clips have several advantages: (1) relatively noninvasive (drilling in the bone is not necessary), (2) patient-specific design (3) mechanically stable device, and (4) it provides high biocompatibility. Therefore, we suggest that our 3D printed PLA/HA/Silk composite bone clip is a possible internal fixation device.

  18. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  19. Automated quality characterization of 3D printed bone scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Liang Bill Tseng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of design is an important step in obtaining tissue engineering scaffolds with appropriate shapes and inner microstructures. Different shapes and sizes of scaffolds are modeled using UGS NX 6.0 software with variable pore sizes. The quality issue we are concerned is the scaffold porosity, which is mainly caused by the fabrication inaccuracies. Bone scaffolds are usually characterized using a scanning electron microscope, but this study presents a new automated inspection and classification technique. Due to many numbers and size variations for the pores, the manual inspection of the fabricated scaffolds tends to be error-prone and costly. Manual inspection also raises the chance of contamination. Thus, non-contact, precise inspection is preferred. In this study, the critical dimensions are automatically measured by the vision camera. The measured data are analyzed to classify the quality characteristics. The automated inspection and classification techniques developed in this study are expected to improve the quality of the fabricated scaffolds and reduce the overall cost of manufacturing.

  20. 3D histomorphometric quantification of trabecular bones by computed microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Barroso, R C; Oliveira, L F; Pinheiro, C J G; Dreossi, D; Tromba, G

    2010-12-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-invasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify the bone structure at different skeletal sites as well as to investigate the effects of bone diseases on quantitative understanding of bone architecture. The images were obtained at Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility, Italy. Concerning the obtained results for normal and pathological bones from same skeletal sites and individuals, from our results, a certain declining bone volume fraction was achieved. The results obtained could be used in forming the basis for comparison of the bone microarchitecture and can be a valuable tool for predicting bone fragility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro characterization of 3D printed scaffolds aimed at bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boga, João C; Miguel, Sónia P; de Melo-Diogo, Duarte; Mendonça, António G; Louro, Ricardo O; Correia, Ilídio J

    2018-05-01

    The incidence of fractures and bone-related diseases like osteoporosis has been increasing due to aging of the world's population. Up to now, grafts and titanium implants have been the principal therapeutic approaches used for bone repair/regeneration. However, these types of treatment have several shortcomings, like limited availability, risk of donor-to-recipient infection and tissue morbidity. To overcome these handicaps, new 3D templates, capable of replicating the features of the native tissue, are currently being developed by researchers from the area of tissue engineering. These 3D constructs are able to provide a temporary matrix on which host cells can adhere, proliferate and differentiate. Herein, 3D cylindrical scaffolds were designed to mimic the natural architecture of hollow bones, and to allow nutrient exchange and bone neovascularization. 3D scaffolds were produced with tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/alginic acid (AA) using a Fab@home 3D printer. Furthermore, graphene oxide (GO) was incorporated into the structure of some scaffolds to further enhance their mechanical properties. The results revealed that the scaffolds incorporating GO displayed greater porosity, without impairing their mechanical properties. These scaffolds also presented a controlled swelling profile, enhanced biomineralization capacity and were able to increase the Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) activity. Such characteristics make TCP/AA scaffolds functionalized with GO promising 3D constructs for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pre-operative simulation of pediatric mastoid surgery with 3D-printed temporal bone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Austin S; Webster, Caroline E; Harrysson, Ola L A; Formeister, Eric J; Rawal, Rounak B; Iseli, Claire E

    2015-05-01

    As the process of additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3D) printing, has become more practical and affordable, a number of applications for the technology in the field of pediatric otolaryngology have been considered. One area of promise is temporal bone surgical simulation. Having previously developed a model for temporal bone surgical training using 3D printing, we sought to produce a patient-specific model for pre-operative simulation in pediatric otologic surgery. Our hypothesis was that the creation and pre-operative dissection of such a model was possible, and would demonstrate potential benefits in cases of abnormal temporal bone anatomy. In the case presented, an 11-year-old boy underwent a planned canal-wall-down (CWD) tympano-mastoidectomy for recurrent cholesteatoma preceded by a pre-operative surgical simulation using 3D-printed models of the temporal bone. The models were based on the child's pre-operative clinical CT scan and printed using multiple materials to simulate both bone and soft tissue structures. To help confirm the models as accurate representations of the child's anatomy, distances between various anatomic landmarks were measured and compared to the temporal bone CT scan and the 3D model. The simulation allowed the surgical team to appreciate the child's unusual temporal bone anatomy as well as any challenges that might arise in the safety of the temporal bone laboratory, prior to actual surgery in the operating room (OR). There was minimal variability, in terms of absolute distance (mm) and relative distance (%), in measurements between anatomic landmarks obtained from the patient intra-operatively, the pre-operative CT scan and the 3D-printed models. Accurate 3D temporal bone models can be rapidly produced based on clinical CT scans for pre-operative simulation of specific challenging otologic cases in children, potentially reducing medical errors and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  3. A safety assessment approach using coupled NEAR3D and CHAN3D - Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Gylling, Bjoern (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    Safety assessment calculations for the Forsmark site were performed using a new code, which couples the far-field code CHAN3D and the near-field code NEAR3D. In addition, the package has a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a code that governs the simulations (Coupling). The simulations were performed for 90 different canister locations, which were randomly chosen. Deterministic data were used for tunnels, deposition holes, and shafts. The background fractures were stochastically generated in two HRD realizations. The F-ratio and the water travel time distributions were used to study the performance of the simulations. Near-field calculations were not performed for the Forsmark site using the new coded presented in the prevailing report. However, the obtained results in this study are compared with the results from the Task 2 model of the ConnectFlow report /Joyce et al. 2010/. Although the results cannot be compared directly, a reasonably good agreement is obtained for the F-ratio

  4. A QUALITY ASSESSMENT METHOD FOR 3D ROAD POLYGON OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the economy, the fast and accurate extraction of the city road is significant for GIS data collection and update, remote sensing images interpretation, mapping and spatial database updating etc. 3D GIS has attracted more and more attentions from academics, industries and governments with the increase of requirements for interoperability and integration of different sources of data. The quality of 3D geographic objects is very important for spatial analysis and decision-making. This paper presents a method for the quality assessment of the 3D road polygon objects which is created by integrating 2D Road Polygon data with LiDAR point cloud and other height information such as Spot Height data in Hong Kong Island. The quality of the created 3D road polygon data set is evaluated by the vertical accuracy, geometric and attribute accuracy, connectivity error, undulation error and completeness error and the final results are presented.

  5. Multifunctional pH sensitive 3D scaffolds for treatment and prevention of bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicuéndez, Mónica; Doadrio, Juan C; Hernández, Ana; Portolés, M Teresa; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2018-01-01

    Multifunctional-therapeutic three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds have been prepared. These biomaterials are able to destroy the S. aureus bacterial biofilm and to allow bone regeneration at the same time. The present study is focused on the design of pH sensitive 3D hierarchical meso-macroporous 3D scaffolds based on MGHA nanocomposite formed by a mesostructured glassy network with embedded hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, whose mesopores have been loaded with levofloxacin (Levo) as antibacterial agent. These 3D platforms exhibit controlled and pH-dependent Levo release, sustained over time at physiological pH (7.4) and notably increased at infection pH (6.7 and 5.5), which is due to the different interaction rate between diverse Levo species and the silica matrix. These 3D systems are able to inhibit the S. aureus growth and to destroy the bacterial biofilm without cytotoxic effects on human osteoblasts and allowing an adequate colonization and differentiation of preosteoblastic cells on their surface. These findings suggest promising applications of these hierarchical MGHA nanocomposite 3D scaffolds for the treatment and prevention of bone infection. Multifunctional 3D nanocomposite scaffolds with the ability for loading and sustained delivery of an antimicrobial agent, to eliminate and prevent bone infection and at the same time to contribute to bone regeneration process without cytotoxic effects on the surrounding tissue has been proposed. These 3D scaffolds exhibit a sustained levofloxacin delivery at physiological pH (pH 7.4), which increasing notably when pH decreases to characteristic values of bone infection process (pH 6.7 and pH 5.5). In vitro competitive assays between preosteoblastic and bacteria onto the 3D scaffold surface demonstrated an adequate osteoblast colonization in entire scaffold surface together with the ability to eliminate bacteria contamination. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication of a customized bone scaffold using a homemade medical 3D printer for comminuted fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Shin, Han-Back; Kim, Moo-Sub; Choe, Bo-Young; Kim, Sunmi; Suh, Tae Suk; Lee, Keum Sil; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to show a 3D printed reconstruction model of a bone destroyed by a comminuted fracture. After a thoracic limb of a cow with a comminuted fracture was scanned by using computed tomography, a scaffold was designed by using a 3D modeling tool for its reconstruction and fabricated by using a homemade medical 3D printer. The homemade medical 3D printer was designed for medical use. In order to reconstruct the geometry of the destroyed bone, we use the geometry of a similar section (reference geometry) of normal bone in the 3D modeling process. The missing part between the destroyed ridge and the reference geometry was filled with an effective space by using a manual interpolation. Inexpensive materials and free software were used to construct the medical 3D printer system. The fabrication of the scaffold progressed according to the design of reconstructed bone by using this medical 3D printer. The material of the scaffold was biodegradable material, and could be transplanted into the human body. The fabricated scaffold was correctly inserted into the fractured bone in place of the destroyed portion, with good agreement. According to physical stress test results, the performance of printing resolution was 0.1 mm. The average geometrical error of the scaffold was below 0.3 mm. The reconstructed bone by using the fabricated scaffold was able to support the weight of the human body. No process used to obtain the result was complex or required many resources. The methods and results in this study show several possible clinical applications in fields such as orthopedics or oncology without a need to purchase high-price instruments for 3D printing.

  7. 3D printed microchannel networks to direct vascularisation during endochondral bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Andrew C; Pitacco, Pierluca; Nulty, Jessica; Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Kelly, Daniel J

    2018-04-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies that recapitulate the developmental process of endochondral ossification offer a promising route to bone repair. Clinical translation of such endochondral tissue engineering strategies will require overcoming a number of challenges, including the engineering of large and often anatomically complex cartilage grafts, as well as the persistence of core regions of avascular cartilage following their implantation into large bone defects. Here 3D printing technology is utilized to develop a versatile and scalable approach to guide vascularisation during endochondral bone repair. First, a sacrificial pluronic ink was used to 3D print interconnected microchannel networks in a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) laden gelatin-methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel. These constructs (with and without microchannels) were next chondrogenically primed in vitro and then implanted into critically sized femoral bone defects in rats. The solid and microchanneled cartilage templates enhanced bone repair compared to untreated controls, with the solid cartilage templates (without microchannels) supporting the highest levels of total bone formation. However, the inclusion of 3D printed microchannels was found to promote osteoclast/immune cell invasion, hydrogel degradation, and vascularisation following implantation. In addition, the endochondral bone tissue engineering strategy was found to support comparable levels of bone healing to BMP-2 delivery, whilst promoting lower levels of heterotopic bone formation, with the microchanneled templates supporting the lowest levels of heterotopic bone formation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 3D printed hypertrophic cartilage grafts represent a promising approach for the repair of complex bone fractures, particularly for larger defects where vascularisation will be a key challenge. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance and Cognitive Assessment in 3-D Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrer, Nolan E.; Ernst, Jeremy V.; Branoff, Theodore J.; Clark, Aaron C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate identifiable differences between performance and cognitive assessment scores in a 3-D modeling unit of an engineering drafting course curriculum. The study aimed to provide further investigation of the need of skill-based assessments in engineering/technical graphics courses to potentially increase…

  9. A novel use of 3D printing model demonstrates the effects of deteriorated trabecular bone structure on bone stiffness and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Meir Max; Black, Margaret Arielle

    2018-02-01

    Trabecular bone structure is crucial to normal mechanical behavior of bones. Studies have shown that osteoporosis negatively affects trabecular bone structure, mainly by reducing bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and thus increasing fracture risk. One major limitation in assessing and quantifying the effect of this structural deterioration is that no two trabecular structures are identical. Thus, when we compare a group of healthy bones against a different group of bones that experienced resorption (i.e. decreased BV/TV) we only discover an "average" mechanical effect. It is impossible to quantify the mechanical effect of individual structural deterioration for each sample, simply because we never have the same sample in both states (intact and deteriorated structure). 3D printing is a new technology that can assist in overcoming this issue. Here we report a preliminary study that compares a healthy 3D printed trabecular bone model with the same model after bone resorption was simulated. Since the deteriorated structural bone model is derived from the healthy one, it is possible to directly estimate (percentage wise) the decrease of tissue stiffness and strength as a result of bone resorption for this specific structure. Our results demonstrate that a relatively small decrease in BV/TV (about 8%) leads to a dramatic decrease in structural strength (24%) and structural stiffness (17%), (P printing is a novel and valuable tool for quantifying the effect of structural deterioration on the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. In the future, this approach may help us attain better personal fracture risk assessments by CT scanning, 3D printing and mechanically testing individual bone replicas from patients suffering excessive bone resorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of 3D printing system for human bone model manufacturing using medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Wang Kyun

    2017-01-01

    The 3D printing selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereo lithography apparatus (SLA) method used for bone model production has good precision and resolution, but the printers are expensive and need professional knowledge for operation. The program that converts computed tomography digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) file into STL (stereolithography) file is also expensive so requesting 3D printing companies takes a lot of time and cost, which is why they are not generally utilized in surgery. To produce bone models of fractured patients, the use of 3D imaging conversion program and 3D printing system should be convenient, and the cost of device and operation should be low. Besides, they should be able to produce big size bone models for application to surgery. Therefore, by using an fused deposition modeling (FDM) method 3D printer that uses thermoplastic materials such as DICOM Viewer OsiriX and plastic wires, this study developed 3D printing system for Fracture surgery Patients customized bone model production for many clinics to use for surgery of fracture patients by universalizing with no limit in printing sizes and low maintenance and production cost. It is expected to be widely applied to the overall areas of orthopedics' education, research and clinic. It is also expected to be conveniently used in not only university hospitals but also regular general hospitals

  11. Development of 3D printing system for human bone model manufacturing using medical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Wang Kyun [Dept. of Radiology, Chungcheongbuk-do Cheongju Medical Center, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The 3D printing selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereo lithography apparatus (SLA) method used for bone model production has good precision and resolution, but the printers are expensive and need professional knowledge for operation. The program that converts computed tomography digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) file into STL (stereolithography) file is also expensive so requesting 3D printing companies takes a lot of time and cost, which is why they are not generally utilized in surgery. To produce bone models of fractured patients, the use of 3D imaging conversion program and 3D printing system should be convenient, and the cost of device and operation should be low. Besides, they should be able to produce big size bone models for application to surgery. Therefore, by using an fused deposition modeling (FDM) method 3D printer that uses thermoplastic materials such as DICOM Viewer OsiriX and plastic wires, this study developed 3D printing system for Fracture surgery Patients customized bone model production for many clinics to use for surgery of fracture patients by universalizing with no limit in printing sizes and low maintenance and production cost. It is expected to be widely applied to the overall areas of orthopedics' education, research and clinic. It is also expected to be conveniently used in not only university hospitals but also regular general hospitals.

  12. Histomorphometric quantification of human pathological bones from synchrotron radiation 3D computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Liebert P.; Braz, Delson

    2011-01-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify pathological samples of human bone. Samples of human bones were cut into small blocks (8 mm x 8 mm x 10 mm) with a precision saw and then imaged. The computed microtomographies were obtained at SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Italy). The obtained 3D images yielded excellent resolution and details of intra-trabecular bone structures, including marrow present inside trabeculae. Histomorphometric quantification was compared to literature as well. (author)

  13. 3D printing of mineral-polymer bone substitutes based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Aleksey A; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Mironov, Anton V; Komlev, Vladimir S; Popov, Vladimir K; Zobkov, Yury V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a relatively simple route for three-dimensional (3D) printing of complex-shaped biocompatible structures based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate (CP) for bone tissue engineering. The fabrication of 3D composite structures was performed through the synthesis of inorganic particles within a biopolymer macromolecular network during 3D printing process. The formation of a new CP phase was studied through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Both the phase composition and the diameter of the CP particles depend on the concentration of a liquid component (i.e., the "ink"). The 3D printed structures were fabricated and found to have large interconnected porous systems (mean diameter ≈800 μm) and were found to possess compressive strengths from 0.45 to 1.0 MPa. This new approach can be effectively applied for fabrication of biocompatible scaffolds for bone tissue engineering constructions.

  14. 3D printing of mineral–polymer bone substitutes based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey A. Egorov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a relatively simple route for three-dimensional (3D printing of complex-shaped biocompatible structures based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate (CP for bone tissue engineering. The fabrication of 3D composite structures was performed through the synthesis of inorganic particles within a biopolymer macromolecular network during 3D printing process. The formation of a new CP phase was studied through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Both the phase composition and the diameter of the CP particles depend on the concentration of a liquid component (i.e., the “ink”. The 3D printed structures were fabricated and found to have large interconnected porous systems (mean diameter ≈800 μm and were found to possess compressive strengths from 0.45 to 1.0 MPa. This new approach can be effectively applied for fabrication of biocompatible scaffolds for bone tissue engineering constructions.

  15. Effects of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone/β-Tricalcium Phosphate Membranes on Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Won, Joo-Yun; Park, Jung-Hyung; Bae, Ji-Hyeon; Ahn, Geunseon; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Lim, Dong-Hyuk; Cho, Dong-Woo; Yun, Won-Soo; Bae, Eun-Bin; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-04-25

    This study was conducted to compare 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL) and polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP) membranes with a conventional commercial collagen membrane in terms of their abilities to facilitate guided bone regeneration (GBR). Fabricated membranes were tested for dry and wet mechanical properties. Fibroblasts and preosteoblasts were seeded into the membranes and rates and patterns of proliferation were analyzed using a kit-8 assay and by scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified by alizarin red S and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. An in vivo experiment was performed using an alveolar bone defect beagle model, in which defects in three dogs were covered with different membranes. CT and histological analyses at eight weeks after surgery revealed that 3D-printed PCL/β-TCP membranes were more effective than 3D-printed PCL, and substantially better than conventional collagen membranes in terms of biocompatibility and bone regeneration and, thus, at facilitating GBR.

  16. Use of 3D Printed Bone Plate in Novel Technique to Surgically Correct Hallux Valgus Deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Blair, Jeremy; Buratti, Dawn; Zeetser, Vladimir; Callahan, Ryan; Lin, Jason; Gall, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing offers many potential advantages in designing and manufacturing plating systems for foot and ankle procedures that involve small, geometrically complex bony anatomy. Here, we describe the design and clinical use of a Ti-6Al-4V ELI bone plate (FastForward™ Bone Tether Plate, MedShape, Inc., Atlanta, GA) manufactured through 3-D printing processes. The plate protects the second metatarsal when tethering suture tape between the first and second metatarsals and is a part of a new procedure that corrects hallux valgus (bunion) deformities without relying on doing an osteotomy or fusion procedure. The surgical technique and two clinical cases describing the use of this procedure with the 3-D printed bone plate are presented within. PMID:28337049

  17. Comparative Efficacies of Collagen-Based 3D Printed PCL/PLGA/?-TCP Composite Block Bone Grafts and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Bone Substitute for Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Kyoung-Sub; Choi, Jae-Won; Kim, Jae-Hun; Chung, Ho Yun; Jin, Songwan; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Yun, Won-Soo; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare bone regeneration and space maintaining ability of three-dimensional (3D) printed bone grafts with conventional biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP). After mixing polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) in a 4:4:2 ratio, PCL/PLGA/?-TCP particulate bone grafts were fabricated using 3D printing technology. Fabricated particulate bone grafts were mixed with atelocollagen to produce collagen-based PCL/P...

  18. Design and properties of 3D scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, S; Vlad, M D; López, J; Fernández, E

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the Voronoi tessellation method has been used to design novel bone like three dimension (3D) porous scaffolds. The Voronoi method has been processed with computer design software to obtain 3D virtual isotropic porous interconnected models, exactly matching the main histomorphometric indices of trabecular bone (trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number, bone volume to total volume ratio, bone surface to bone volume ratio, etc.). These bone like models have been further computed for mechanical (elastic modulus) and fluid mass transport (permeability) properties. The results show that the final properties of the scaffolds can be controlled during their microstructure and histomorphometric initial design stage. It is also shown that final properties can be tuned during the design stage to exactly match those of trabecular natural bone. Moreover, identical total porosity models can be designed with quite different specific bone surface area and thus, this specific microstructural feature can be used to favour cell adhesion, migration and, ultimately, new bone apposition (i.e. osteoconduction). Once the virtual models are fully characterized and optimized, these can be easily 3D printed by additive manufacturing and/or stereolitography technologies. The significance of this article goes far beyond the specific objectives on which it is focussed. In fact, it shows, in a guided way, the entire novel process that can be followed to design graded porous implants, whatever its external shape and geometry, but internally tuned to the exact histomorphometric indices needed to match natural human tissues microstructures and, consequently, their mechanical and fluid properties, among others. The significance is even more relevant nowadays thanks to the available new computing and design software that is easily linked to the 3D printing new technologies. It is this transversality, at the frontier of different disciplines, the main characteristic

  19. Prevascularization of 3D printed bone scaffolds by bioactive hydrogels and cell co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Mitchell A; Wu, Shaohua; Wang, Ying; Untrauer, Jason B; Li, Wenlong; Lim, Jung Yul; Duan, Bin

    2017-09-13

    Vascularization is a fundamental prerequisite for large bone construct development and remains one of the main challenges of bone tissue engineering. Our current study presents the combination of 3D printing technique with a hydrogel-based prevascularization strategy to generate prevascularized bone constructs. Human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were encapsulated within our bioactive hydrogels, and the effects of culture conditions on in vitro vascularization were determined. We further generated composite constructs by forming 3D printed polycaprolactone/hydroxyapatite scaffolds coated with cell-laden hydrogels and determined how the co-culture affected vascularization and osteogenesis. It was demonstrated that 3D co-cultured ADMSC-HUVEC generated capillary-like networks within the porous 3D printed scaffold. The co-culture systems promoted in vitro vascularization, but had no significant effects on osteogenesis. The prevascularized constructs were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice to evaluate the in vivo vascularization capacity and the functionality of engineered vessels. The hydrogel systems facilitated microvessel and lumen formation and promoted anastomosis of vascular networks of human origin with host murine vasculature. These findings demonstrate the potential of prevascularized 3D printed scaffolds with anatomical shape for the healing of larger bone defects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Multi-material 3D Models for Temporal Bone Surgical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Austin S; Kimbell, Julia S; Webster, Caroline E; Harrysson, Ola L A; Formeister, Eric J; Buchman, Craig A

    2015-07-01

    A simulated, multicolor, multi-material temporal bone model can be created using 3-dimensional (3D) printing that will prove both safe and beneficial in training for actual temporal bone surgical cases. As the process of additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has become more practical and affordable, a number of applications for the technology in the field of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery have been considered. One area of promise is temporal bone surgical simulation. Three-dimensional representations of human temporal bones were created from temporal bone computed tomography (CT) scans using biomedical image processing software. Multi-material models were then printed and dissected in a temporal bone laboratory by attending and resident otolaryngologists. A 5-point Likert scale was used to grade the models for their anatomical accuracy and suitability as a simulation of cadaveric and operative temporal bone drilling. The models produced for this study demonstrate significant anatomic detail and a likeness to human cadaver specimens for drilling and dissection. Simulated temporal bones created by this process have potential benefit in surgical training, preoperative simulation for challenging otologic cases, and the standardized testing of temporal bone surgical skills. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. The fabrication of bioresorbable implants for bone defects replacement using computer tomogram and 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. G.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Goreninskii, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Popkov, A. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the possibility of production of personalized implants from bioresorbable polymers designed for replacement of bone defects. The stages of creating a personalized implant are described, which include the obtaining of 3D model from a computer tomogram, development of the model with respect to shape of bone fitment bore using Autodesk Meshmixer software, and 3D printing process from bioresorbable polymers. The results of bioresorbable polymer scaffolds implantation in pre-clinical tests on laboratory animals are shown. The biological properties of new bioresorbable polymers based on poly(lactic acid) were studied during their subcutaneous, intramuscular, bone and intraosseous implantation in laboratory animals. In all cases, there was a lack of a fibrous capsule formation around the bioresorbable polymer over time. Also, during the performed study, conclusions were made on osteogenesis intensity depending on the initial state of bone tissue.

  2. Potential of 3D City Models to assess flood vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Kai; Bochow, Mathias; Schüttig, Martin; Nagel, Claus; Ross, Lutz; Kreibich, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Vulnerability, as the product of exposure and susceptibility, is a key factor of the flood risk equation. Furthermore, the estimation of flood loss is very sensitive to the choice of the vulnerability model. Still, in contrast to elaborate hazard simulations, vulnerability is often considered in a simplified manner concerning the spatial resolution and geo-location of exposed objects as well as the susceptibility of these objects at risk. Usually, area specific potential flood loss is quantified on the level of aggregated land-use classes, and both hazard intensity and resistance characteristics of affected objects are represented in highly simplified terms. We investigate the potential of 3D City Models and spatial features derived from remote sensing data to improve the differentiation of vulnerability in flood risk assessment. 3D City Models are based on CityGML, an application scheme of the Geography Markup Language (GML), which represents the 3D geometry, 3D topology, semantics and appearance of objects on different levels of detail. As such, 3D City Models offer detailed spatial information which is useful to describe the exposure and to characterize the susceptibility of residential buildings at risk. This information is further consolidated with spatial features of the building stock derived from remote sensing data. Using this database a spatially detailed flood vulnerability model is developed by means of data-mining. Empirical flood damage data are used to derive and to validate flood susceptibility models for individual objects. We present first results from a prototype application in the city of Dresden, Germany. The vulnerability modeling based on 3D City Models and remote sensing data is compared i) to the generally accepted good engineering practice based on area specific loss potential and ii) to a highly detailed representation of flood vulnerability based on a building typology using urban structure types. Comparisons are drawn in terms of

  3. Phage nanofibers induce vascularized osteogenesis in 3D printed bone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianglin; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Lin; Tomsia, Antoni P; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-08-06

    A virus-activated matrix is developed to overcome the challenge of forming vascularized bone tissue. It is generated by filling a 3D printed bioceramic scaffold with phage nanofibers displaying high-density RGD peptide. After it is seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and implanted into a bone defect, the phage nanofibers induce osteogenesis and angiogenesis by activating endothelialization and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Computerized determination of 3-D connectivity density in human iliac crest bone biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J.S.; Mosekilde, Li.; Barlach, J.

    1996-01-01

    Combining the physical disector principle with an algorithm for automatic non-linear alignment of disector pairs we have developed a software system for direct measurement of 3D connectivity densities in iliac crest bone biopsies. The method was applied to biopsies from 14 non-selected autopsy...... cases: 7 men (age range 20-84 yr) and 7 women (age range 20-86 yr). The study reveals decreases in both trabecular bone mass and connectivity density with age in women....

  5. Production of new 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradique, R; Correia, T R; Miguel, S P; de Sá, K D; Figueira, D R; Mendonça, A G; Correia, I J

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of bone disorders, whether due to trauma or pathology, has been trending upward with the aging of the worldwide population. The currently available treatments for bone injuries are rather limited, involving mainly bone grafts and implants. A particularly promising approach for bone regeneration uses rapid prototyping (RP) technologies to produce 3D scaffolds with highly controlled structure and orientation, based on computer-aided design models or medical data. Herein, tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/alginate scaffolds were produced using RP and subsequently their physicochemical, mechanical and biological properties were characterized. The results showed that 60/40 of TCP and alginate formulation was able to match the compression and present a similar Young modulus to that of trabecular bone while presenting an adequate biocompatibility. Moreover, the biomineralization ability, roughness and macro and microporosity of scaffolds allowed cell anchoring and proliferation at their surface, as well as cell migration to its interior, processes that are fundamental for osteointegration and bone regeneration.

  6. 3D video-based deformation measurement of the pelvis bone under dynamic cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freslier Marie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic three-dimensional (3D deformation of the pelvic bones is a crucial factor in the successful design and longevity of complex orthopaedic oncological implants. The current solutions are often not very promising for the patient; thus it would be interesting to measure the dynamic 3D-deformation of the whole pelvic bone in order to get a more realistic dataset for a better implant design. Therefore we hypothesis if it would be possible to combine a material testing machine with a 3D video motion capturing system, used in clinical gait analysis, to measure the sub millimetre deformation of a whole pelvis specimen. Method A pelvis specimen was placed in a standing position on a material testing machine. Passive reflective markers, traceable by the 3D video motion capturing system, were fixed to the bony surface of the pelvis specimen. While applying a dynamic sinusoidal load the 3D-movement of the markers was recorded by the cameras and afterwards the 3D-deformation of the pelvis specimen was computed. The accuracy of the 3D-movement of the markers was verified with 3D-displacement curve with a step function using a manual driven 3D micro-motion-stage. Results The resulting accuracy of the measurement system depended on the number of cameras tracking a marker. The noise level for a marker seen by two cameras was during the stationary phase of the calibration procedure ± 0.036 mm, and ± 0.022 mm if tracked by 6 cameras. The detectable 3D-movement performed by the 3D-micro-motion-stage was smaller than the noise level of the 3D-video motion capturing system. Therefore the limiting factor of the setup was the noise level, which resulted in a measurement accuracy for the dynamic test setup of ± 0.036 mm. Conclusion This 3D test setup opens new possibilities in dynamic testing of wide range materials, like anatomical specimens, biomaterials, and its combinations. The resulting 3D-deformation dataset can be used for a better

  7. 3D cardiac wall thickening assessment for acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Chan, B. T.; Lim, E.; Liew, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the most severe form of coronary artery disease leading to localized myocardial injury and therefore irregularities in the cardiac wall contractility. Studies have found very limited differences in global indices (such as ejection fraction, myocardial mass and volume) between healthy subjects and AMI patients, and therefore suggested regional assessment. Regional index, specifically cardiac wall thickness (WT) and thickening is closely related to cardiac function and could reveal regional abnormality due to AMI. In this study, we developed a 3D wall thickening assessment method to identify regional wall contractility dysfunction due to localized myocardial injury from infarction. Wall thickness and thickening were assessed from 3D personalized cardiac models reconstructed from cine MRI images by fitting inscribed sphere between endocardial and epicardial wall. The thickening analysis was performed in 5 patients and 3 healthy subjects and the results were compared against the gold standard 2D late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images for infarct localization. The notable finding of this study is the highly accurate estimation and visual representation of the infarct size and location in 3D. This study provides clinicians with an intuitive way to visually and qualitatively assess regional cardiac wall dysfunction due to infarction in AMI patients.

  8. Fabrication of Trabecular Bone-Templated Tissue-Engineered Constructs by 3D Inkjet Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderburgh, Joseph P; Fernando, Shanik J; Merkel, Alyssa R; Sterling, Julie A; Guelcher, Scott A

    2017-11-01

    3D printing enables the creation of scaffolds with precisely controlled morphometric properties for multiple tissue types, including musculoskeletal tissues such as cartilage and bone. Computed tomography (CT) imaging has been combined with 3D printing to fabricate anatomically scaled patient-specific scaffolds for bone regeneration. However, anatomically scaled scaffolds typically lack sufficient resolution to recapitulate the 3D constructs are fabricated via a new micro-CT/3D inkjet printing process. It is shown that this process reproducibly fabricates bone-templated constructs that recapitulate the anatomic site-specific morphometric properties of trabecular bone. A significant correlation is observed between the structure model index (a morphometric parameter related to surface curvature) and the degree of mineralization of human mesenchymal stem cells, with more concave surfaces promoting more extensive osteoblast differentiation and mineralization compared to predominately convex surfaces. These findings highlight the significant effects of trabecular architecture on osteoblast function. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Application of quality by design for 3D printed bone prostheses and scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marquez, Daniel; Mirnajafizadeh, Ali; Carty, Christopher P; Stewart, Rodney A

    2018-01-01

    3D printing is an emergent manufacturing technology recently being applied in the medical field for the development of custom bone prostheses and scaffolds. However, successful industry transformation to this new design and manufacturing approach requires technology integration, concurrent multi-disciplinary collaboration, and a robust quality management framework. This latter change enabler is the focus of this study. While a number of comprehensive quality frameworks have been developed in recent decades to ensure that the manufacturing of medical devices produces reliable products, they are centred on the traditional context of standardised manufacturing techniques. The advent of 3D printing technologies and the prospects for mass customisation provides significant market opportunities, but also presents a serious challenge to regulatory bodies tasked with managing and assuring product quality and safety. Before 3D printing bone prostheses and scaffolds can gain traction, industry stakeholders, such as regulators, clients, medical practitioners, insurers, lawyers, and manufacturers, would all require a high degree of confidence that customised manufacturing can achieve the same quality outcomes as standardised manufacturing. A Quality by Design (QbD) approach to custom 3D printed prostheses can help to ensure that products are designed and manufactured correctly from the beginning without errors. This paper reports on the adaptation of the QbD approach for the development process of 3D printed custom bone prosthesis and scaffolds. This was achieved through the identification of the Critical Quality Attributes of such products, and an extensive review of different design and fabrication methods for 3D printed bone prostheses. Research outcomes include the development of a comprehensive design and fabrication process flow diagram, and categorised risks associated with the design and fabrication processes of such products. An extensive systematic literature review

  10. Application of quality by design for 3D printed bone prostheses and scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marquez, Daniel; Mirnajafizadeh, Ali; Carty, Christopher P.

    2018-01-01

    3D printing is an emergent manufacturing technology recently being applied in the medical field for the development of custom bone prostheses and scaffolds. However, successful industry transformation to this new design and manufacturing approach requires technology integration, concurrent multi-disciplinary collaboration, and a robust quality management framework. This latter change enabler is the focus of this study. While a number of comprehensive quality frameworks have been developed in recent decades to ensure that the manufacturing of medical devices produces reliable products, they are centred on the traditional context of standardised manufacturing techniques. The advent of 3D printing technologies and the prospects for mass customisation provides significant market opportunities, but also presents a serious challenge to regulatory bodies tasked with managing and assuring product quality and safety. Before 3D printing bone prostheses and scaffolds can gain traction, industry stakeholders, such as regulators, clients, medical practitioners, insurers, lawyers, and manufacturers, would all require a high degree of confidence that customised manufacturing can achieve the same quality outcomes as standardised manufacturing. A Quality by Design (QbD) approach to custom 3D printed prostheses can help to ensure that products are designed and manufactured correctly from the beginning without errors. This paper reports on the adaptation of the QbD approach for the development process of 3D printed custom bone prosthesis and scaffolds. This was achieved through the identification of the Critical Quality Attributes of such products, and an extensive review of different design and fabrication methods for 3D printed bone prostheses. Research outcomes include the development of a comprehensive design and fabrication process flow diagram, and categorised risks associated with the design and fabrication processes of such products. An extensive systematic literature review

  11. Materials and scaffolds in medical 3D printing and bioprinting in the context of bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Martin; Bauer, Heide-Katharina; Goetze, Elisabeth; Gielisch, Matthias; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Moncal, Kazim K; Rizk, Elias; Seitz, Hermann; Gelinsky, Michael; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong H; Müller, Werner E G; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    The structural and functional repair of lost bone is still one of the biggest challenges in regenerative medicine. In many cases, autologous bone is used for the reconstruction of bone tissue; however, the availability of autologous material is limited, which always means additional stress to the patient. Due to this, more and more frequently various biocompatible materials are being used instead for bone augmentation. In this context, in order to ensure the structural function of the bone, scaffolds are implanted and fixed into the bone defect, depending on the medical indication. Nevertheless, for the surgeon, every individual clinical condition in which standardized scaffolds have to be aligned is challenging, and in many cases the alignment is not possible without limitations. Therefore, in the last decades, 3D printing (3DP) or additive manufacturing (AM) of scaffolds has become one of the most innovative approaches in surgery to individualize and improve the treatment of patients. Numerous biocompatible materials are available for 3DP, and various printing techniques can be applied, depending on the process conditions of these materials. Besides these conventional printing techniques, another promising approach in the context of medical AM is 3D bioprinting, a technique which makes it possible to print human cells embedded in special carrier substances to generate functional tissues. Even the direct printing into bone defects or lesions becomes possible. 3DP is already improving the treatment of patients, and has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine in future.

  12. Creation of a 3D printed temporal bone model from clinical CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joss; Reyes, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    Generate and describe the process of creating a 3D printed, rapid prototype temporal bone model from clinical quality CT images. We describe a technique to create an accurate, alterable, and reproducible rapid prototype temporal bone model using freely available software to segment clinical CT data and generate three different 3D models composed of ABS plastic. Each model was evaluated based on the appearance and size of anatomical structures and response to surgical drilling. Mastoid air cells had retained scaffolding material in the initial versions. This required modifying the model to allow drainage of the scaffolding material. External auditory canal dimensions were similar to those measured from the clinical data. Malleus, incus, oval window, round window, promontory, horizontal semicircular canal, and mastoid segment of the facial nerve canal were identified in all models. The stapes was only partially formed in two models and absent in the third. Qualitative feel of the ABS plastic was softer than bone. The pate produced by drilling was similar to bone dust when appropriate irrigation was used. We present a rapid prototype temporal bone model made based on clinical CT data using 3D printing technology. The model can be made quickly and inexpensively enough to have potential applications for educational training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 3D printing of high-strength bioscaffolds for the synergistic treatment of bone cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongshi; Li, Tao; Huan, Zhiguang; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Zezheng; Wang, Jinwu; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2018-04-01

    The challenges in bone tumor therapy are how to repair the large bone defects induced by surgery and kill all possible residual tumor cells. Compared to cancellous bone defect regeneration, cortical bone defect regeneration has a higher demand for bone substitute materials. To the best of our knowledge, there are currently few bifunctional biomaterials with an ultra-high strength for both tumor therapy and cortical bone regeneration. Here, we designed Fe-CaSiO3 composite scaffolds (30CS) via 3D printing technique. First, the 30CS composite scaffolds possessed a high compressive strength that provided sufficient mechanical support in bone cortical defects; second, synergistic photothermal and ROS therapies achieved an enhanced tumor therapeutic effect in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the presence of CaSiO3 in the composite scaffolds improved the degradation performance, stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of rBMSCs, and further promoted bone formation in vivo. Such 30CS scaffolds with a high compressive strength can function as versatile and efficient biomaterials for the future regeneration of cortical bone defects and the treatment of bone cancer.

  14. Printing bone : the application of 3D fiber deposition for bone tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorovich, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    Bone chips are used by orthopaedic surgeons for treating spinal trauma and to augment large bone defects. A potential alternative to autologous bone is regeneration of bone tissue in the lab by developing hybrid implants consisting of osteogenic (stem) cells seeded on supportive matrices.

  15. 3D-CT of the temporal bone area with high-speed processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Taku

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimentional (3D)-CT was introduced to represent abnormal findings in the temporal bone area utilizing a SOMATOM DRH CT scanner with accessory 3D reconstruction software and an exclusive high-speed 3D processing system, VOXEL FLINGER. In a patient with eosinophilic granuloma, a defect in the squamous part of the temporal bone was demonstrated suggesting exposure of the dura mater during surgery. In a patient with a normal ear, well-developed mastoid cavity, a part of the handle and the head of the malleus, the incudomalleal joint, the short limb, body and a part of the long limb of the incus and the round window niche were demonstrated. In a case of chronic otitis media, poorly developed mastoid cavity and a possible defect of the tip of the long limb of the incus were demonstrated, in contrast to the patient with the normal ear. 3D-CT yields objective and solid images which are useful for diagnosis, treatment planning and explanation of the pathology to patients and their family. To obtain convincing 3D images, physicians themselves have to choose exact rotation angles. It is not adequate to reconstruct original CT data using a CT computer with accessory 3D software whose processing capability is not good enough for this purpose. The conclusion is as follows: 1) it is necessary and effective to transfer original CT data into the memory of the exclusive high-speed 3D processing system and 2) process the data by the voxel memory method to establish a clinically valuable 3D-CT imaging system. (author)

  16. 3D Printing of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Ryan; Inzana, Jason A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, has emerged over the past 3 decades as a disruptive technology for rapid prototyping and manufacturing. Vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, material extrusion, and binder jetting are distinct technologies of additive manufacturing, which have been used in a wide variety of fields, including biomedical research and tissue engineering. The ability to print biocompatible, patient-specific geometries with controlled macro- and micro-pores, and to incorporate cells, drugs and proteins has made 3D-printing ideal for orthopaedic applications, such as bone grafting. Herein, we performed a systematic review examining the fabrication of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics by 3D printing, their biocompatibility in vitro, and their bone regenerative potential in vivo, as well as their use in localized delivery of bioactive molecules or cells. Understanding the advantages and limitations of the different 3D printing approaches, CaP materials, and bioactive additives through critical evaluation of in vitro and in vivo evidence of efficacy is essential for developing new classes of bone graft substitutes that can perform as well as autografts and allografts or even surpass the performance of these clinical standards.

  17. 3D Printing of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Ryan; Inzana, Jason A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, has emerged over the past 3 decades as a disruptive technology for rapid prototyping and manufacturing. Vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, material extrusion, and binder jetting are distinct technologies of additive manufacturing, which have been used in a wide variety of fields, including biomedical research and tissue engineering. The ability to print biocompatible, patient-specific geometries with controlled macro- and micropores, and to incorporate cells, drugs and proteins has made 3D-printing ideal for orthopaedic applications, such as bone grafting. Herein, we performed a systematic review examining the fabrication of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics by 3D printing, their biocompatibility in vitro, and their bone regenerative potential in vivo, as well as their use in localized delivery of bioactive molecules or cells. Understanding the advantages and limitations of the different 3D printing approaches, CaP materials, and bioactive additives through critical evaluation of in vitro and in vivo evidence of efficacy is essential for developing new classes of bone graft substitutes that can perform as well as autografts and allografts or even surpass the performance of these clinical standards. PMID:27324800

  18. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Perceived crosstalk assessment on patterned retarder 3D display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bochao; Liu, Yue; Huang, Yi; Wang, Yongtian

    2014-03-01

    CONTEXT: Nowadays, almost all stereoscopic displays suffer from crosstalk, which is one of the most dominant degradation factors of image quality and visual comfort for 3D display devices. To deal with such problems, it is worthy to quantify the amount of perceived crosstalk OBJECTIVE: Crosstalk measurements are usually based on some certain test patterns, but scene content effects are ignored. To evaluate the perceived crosstalk level for various scenes, subjective test may bring a more correct evaluation. However, it is a time consuming approach and is unsuitable for real­ time applications. Therefore, an objective metric that can reliably predict the perceived crosstalk is needed. A correct objective assessment of crosstalk for different scene contents would be beneficial to the development of crosstalk minimization and cancellation algorithms which could be used to bring a good quality of experience to viewers. METHOD: A patterned retarder 3D display is used to present 3D images in our experiment. By considering the mechanism of this kind of devices, an appropriate simulation of crosstalk is realized by image processing techniques to assign different values of crosstalk to each other between image pairs. It can be seen from the literature that the structures of scenes have a significant impact on the perceived crosstalk, so we first extract the differences of the structural information between original and distorted image pairs through Structural SIMilarity (SSIM) algorithm, which could directly evaluate the structural changes between two complex-structured signals. Then the structural changes of left view and right view are computed respectively and combined to an overall distortion map. Under 3D viewing condition, because of the added value of depth, the crosstalk of pop-out objects may be more perceptible. To model this effect, the depth map of a stereo pair is generated and the depth information is filtered by the distortion map. Moreover, human attention

  20. A Bioactive Hydrogel and 3D Printed Polycaprolactone System for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Hernandez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a hybrid system consisting of 3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL filled with hydrogel was developed as an application for reconstruction of long bone defects, which are innately difficult to repair due to large missing segments of bone. A 3D printed gyroid scaffold of PCL allowed a larger amount of hydrogel to be loaded within the scaffolds as compared to 3D printed mesh and honeycomb scaffolds of similar volumes and strut thicknesses. The hydrogel was a mixture of alginate, gelatin, and nano-hydroxyapatite, infiltrated with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC to enhance the osteoconductivity and biocompatibility of the system. Adhesion and viability of hMSC in the PCL/hydrogel system confirmed its cytocompatibility. Biomineralization tests in simulated body fluid (SBF showed the nucleation and growth of apatite crystals, which confirmed the bioactivity of the PCL/hydrogel system. Moreover, dissolution studies, in SBF revealed a sustained dissolution of the hydrogel with time. Overall, the present study provides a new approach in bone tissue engineering to repair bone defects with a bioactive hybrid system consisting of a polymeric scaffold, hydrogel, and hMSC.

  1. A Bioactive Hydrogel and 3D Printed Polycaprolactone System for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ivan; Kumar, Alok; Joddar, Binata

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a hybrid system consisting of 3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL) filled with hydrogel was developed as an application for reconstruction of long bone defects, which are innately difficult to repair due to large missing segments of bone. A 3D printed gyroid scaffold of PCL allowed a larger amount of hydrogel to be loaded within the scaffolds as compared to 3D printed mesh and honeycomb scaffolds of similar volumes and strut thicknesses. The hydrogel was a mixture of alginate, gelatin, and nano-hydroxyapatite, infiltrated with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to enhance the osteoconductivity and biocompatibility of the system. Adhesion and viability of hMSC in the PCL/hydrogel system confirmed its cytocompatibility. Biomineralization tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed the nucleation and growth of apatite crystals, which confirmed the bioactivity of the PCL/hydrogel system. Moreover, dissolution studies, in SBF revealed a sustained dissolution of the hydrogel with time. Overall, the present study provides a new approach in bone tissue engineering to repair bone defects with a bioactive hybrid system consisting of a polymeric scaffold, hydrogel, and hMSC.

  2. Toward quality assessment of 3D printed oral dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markl, Daniel; Zeitler, Axel; Rades, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The additive manufacturing industry achieved a corporate annual growth rate of 25.9% according to the Forbes analysis of the Wohlers Report 2016. This high growth rate is placed in perspective when looking at the past 27 years where the corporate annual growth rate has averaged 26.2% each year in...... methods to assess the quality of the 3D printed geometries. This will be especially important for pharmaceutical products where a sub-standard quality of the final product can have detrimental consequences for patient health and safety....

  3. 3D silicon doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds decorated with Elastin-like Recombinamers for bone regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Mercedes; García, Ana; Girotti, Alessandra; Alonso, Matilde; Rodríguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth; Buján, Julia; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Vallet-Regí, María

    2016-11-01

    The current study reports on the manufacturing by rapid prototyping technique of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds based on silicon substituted hydroxyapatite with Elastin-like Recombinamers (ELRs) functionalized surfaces. Silicon doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA), with Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 5.7 (SiO 4 ) 0.3 (OH) 1.7 h 0.3 nominal formula, was surface functionalized with two different types of polymers designed by genetic engineering: ELR-RGD that contain cell attachment specific sequences and ELR-SN A 15/RGD with both hydroxyapatite and cells domains that interact with the inorganic phase and with the cells, respectively. These hybrid materials were subjected to in vitro assays in order to clarify if the ELRs coating improved the well-known biocompatible and bone regeneration properties of calcium phosphates materials. The in vitro tests showed that there was a total and homogeneous colonization of the 3D scaffolds by Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs). In addition, the BMSCs were viable and able to proliferate and differentiate into osteoblasts. Bone tissue engineering is an area of increasing interest because its main applications are directly related to the rising life expectancy of the population, which promotes higher rates of several bone pathologies, so innovative strategies are needed for bone tissue regeneration therapies. Here we use the rapid prototyping technology to allow moulding ceramic 3D scaffolds and we use different bio-polymers for the functionalization of their surfaces in order to enhance the biological response. Combining the ceramic material (silicon doped hydroxyapatite, Si-HA) and the Elastin like Recombinamers (ELRs) polymers with the presence of the integrin-mediate adhesion domain alone or in combination with SNA15 peptide that possess high affinity for hydroxyapatite, provided an improved Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs) differentiation into osteoblastic linkage. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier

  4. Development of a Three-Dimensional (3D) Printed Biodegradable Cage to Convert Morselized Corticocancellous Bone Chips into a Structured Cortical Bone Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Lee, Demei; Chang, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Liu, Shih-Jung; Ueng, Steve Wen-Neng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new biodegradable polymeric cage to convert corticocancellous bone chips into a structured strut graft for treating segmental bone defects. A total of 24 adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent a left femoral segmental bone defect creation. Twelve rabbits in group A underwent three-dimensional (3D) printed cage insertion, corticocancellous chips implantation, and Kirschner-wire (K-wire) fixation, while the other 12 rabbits in group B received bone chips implantation and K-wire fixation only. All rabbits received a one-week activity assessment and the initial image study at postoperative 1 week. The final image study was repeated at postoperative 12 or 24 weeks before the rabbit scarification procedure on schedule. After the animals were sacrificed, both femurs of all the rabbits were prepared for leg length ratios and 3-point bending tests. The rabbits in group A showed an increase of activities during the first week postoperatively and decreased anterior cortical disruptions in the postoperative image assessments. Additionally, higher leg length ratios and 3-point bending strengths demonstrated improved final bony ingrowths within the bone defects for rabbits in group A. In conclusion, through this bone graft converting technique, orthopedic surgeons can treat segmental bone defects by using bone chips but with imitate characters of structured cortical bone graft. PMID:27104525

  5. Development of a Three-Dimensional (3D Printed Biodegradable Cage to Convert Morselized Corticocancellous Bone Chips into a Structured Cortical Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chao Chou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a new biodegradable polymeric cage to convert corticocancellous bone chips into a structured strut graft for treating segmental bone defects. A total of 24 adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent a left femoral segmental bone defect creation. Twelve rabbits in group A underwent three-dimensional (3D printed cage insertion, corticocancellous chips implantation, and Kirschner-wire (K-wire fixation, while the other 12 rabbits in group B received bone chips implantation and K-wire fixation only. All rabbits received a one-week activity assessment and the initial image study at postoperative 1 week. The final image study was repeated at postoperative 12 or 24 weeks before the rabbit scarification procedure on schedule. After the animals were sacrificed, both femurs of all the rabbits were prepared for leg length ratios and 3-point bending tests. The rabbits in group A showed an increase of activities during the first week postoperatively and decreased anterior cortical disruptions in the postoperative image assessments. Additionally, higher leg length ratios and 3-point bending strengths demonstrated improved final bony ingrowths within the bone defects for rabbits in group A. In conclusion, through this bone graft converting technique, orthopedic surgeons can treat segmental bone defects by using bone chips but with imitate characters of structured cortical bone graft.

  6. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Atul Kumar; Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sinha, Neeraj; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  7. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Atul Kumar [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo [Tissue Bank, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400012 (India); Rai, Ratan Kumar [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Khan, Mohd Parvez [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Singh, Chandan [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Barbhuyan, Tarun [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Vijayalakshmi, S. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Sinha, Neeraj, E-mail: neerajcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh R., E-mail: jb@iitb.ac.in [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  8. Preparation and characterization of cockle shell aragonite nanocomposite porous 3D scaffolds for bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saffanah Khuder Mahmood

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The demands for applicable tissue-engineered scaffolds that can be used to repair load-bearing segmental bone defects (SBDs is vital and in increasing demand. In this study, seven different combinations of 3 dimensional (3D novel nanocomposite porous structured scaffolds were fabricated to rebuild SBDs using an extraordinary blend of cockle shells (CaCo3 nanoparticles (CCN, gelatin, dextran and dextrin to structure an ideal bone scaffold with adequate degradation rate using the Freeze Drying Method (FDM and labeled as 5211, 5400, 6211, 6300, 7101, 7200 and 8100. The micron sized cockle shells powder obtained (75 µm was made into nanoparticles using mechano-chemical, top-down method of nanoparticles synthesis with the presence of the surfactant BS-12 (dodecyl dimethyl bataine. The phase purity and crystallographic structures, the chemical functionality and the thermal characterization of the scaffolds’ powder were recognized using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrophotometer and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC respectively. Characterizations of the scaffolds were assessed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Degradation Manner, Water Absorption Test, Swelling Test, Mechanical Test and Porosity Test. Top-down method produced cockle shell nanoparticles having averagely range 37.8±3–55.2±9 nm in size, which were determined using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM. A mainly aragonite form of calcium carbonate was identified in both XRD and FTIR for all scaffolds, while the melting (Tm and transition (Tg temperatures were identified using DSC with the range of Tm 62.4–75.5 °C and of Tg 230.6–232.5 °C. The newly prepared scaffolds were with the following characteristics: (i good biocompatibility and biodegradability, (ii appropriate surface chemistry and (iii highly porous, with interconnected pore network. Engineering analyses showed that scaffold 5211 possessed 3D interconnected homogenous

  9. Effects of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone/?-Tricalcium Phosphate Membranes on Guided Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Won, Joo-Yun; Park, Jung-Hyung; Bae, Ji-Hyeon; Ahn, Geunseon; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Lim, Dong-Hyuk; Cho, Dong-Woo; Yun, Won-Soo; Bae, Eun-Bin; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL) and polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP) membranes with a conventional commercial collagen membrane in terms of their abilities to facilitate guided bone regeneration (GBR). Fabricated membranes were tested for dry and wet mechanical properties. Fibroblasts and preosteoblasts were seeded into the membranes and rates and patterns of proliferation were analyzed using a kit-8 assay and by scanning electron micro...

  10. Effects of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone/β-Tricalcium Phosphate Membranes on Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyung Shim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to compare 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL and polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP membranes with a conventional commercial collagen membrane in terms of their abilities to facilitate guided bone regeneration (GBR. Fabricated membranes were tested for dry and wet mechanical properties. Fibroblasts and preosteoblasts were seeded into the membranes and rates and patterns of proliferation were analyzed using a kit-8 assay and by scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified by alizarin red S and alkaline phosphatase (ALP staining. An in vivo experiment was performed using an alveolar bone defect beagle model, in which defects in three dogs were covered with different membranes. CT and histological analyses at eight weeks after surgery revealed that 3D-printed PCL/β-TCP membranes were more effective than 3D-printed PCL, and substantially better than conventional collagen membranes in terms of biocompatibility and bone regeneration and, thus, at facilitating GBR.

  11. Quantification and visualization of alveolar bone resorption from 3D dental CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Jiro; Mori, Kensaku; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Suenaga, Yasuhito [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya (Japan); Yamada, Shohzoh; Naitoh, Munetaka [Aichi-Gakuin University, School of Dentistry, Nagoya (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose A computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for quantifying and visualizing alveolar bone resorption caused by periodontitis was developed based on three-dimensional (3D) image processing of dental CT images. Methods The proposed system enables visualization and quantification of resorption of alveolar bone surrounding and between the roots of teeth. It has the following functions: (1) vertical measurement of the depth of resorption surrounding the tooth in 3D images, avoiding physical obstruction; (2) quantification of the amount of resorption in the furcation area; and (3) visualization of quantification results by pseudo-color maps, graphs, and motion pictures. The resorption measurement accuracy in the area surrounding teeth was evaluated by comparing with dentist's recognition on five real patient CT images, giving average absolute difference of 0.87 mm. An artificial image with mathematical truth was also used for measurement evaluation. Results The average absolute difference was 0.36 and 0.10 mm for surrounding and furcation areas, respectively. The system provides an intuitive presentation of the measurement results. Conclusion Computer aided diagnosis of 3D dental CT scans is feasible and the technique is a promising new tool for the quantitative evaluation of periodontal bone loss. (orig.)

  12. Quantification and visualization of alveolar bone resorption from 3D dental CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Jiro; Mori, Kensaku; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Yamada, Shohzoh; Naitoh, Munetaka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for quantifying and visualizing alveolar bone resorption caused by periodontitis was developed based on three-dimensional (3D) image processing of dental CT images. Methods The proposed system enables visualization and quantification of resorption of alveolar bone surrounding and between the roots of teeth. It has the following functions: (1) vertical measurement of the depth of resorption surrounding the tooth in 3D images, avoiding physical obstruction; (2) quantification of the amount of resorption in the furcation area; and (3) visualization of quantification results by pseudo-color maps, graphs, and motion pictures. The resorption measurement accuracy in the area surrounding teeth was evaluated by comparing with dentist's recognition on five real patient CT images, giving average absolute difference of 0.87 mm. An artificial image with mathematical truth was also used for measurement evaluation. Results The average absolute difference was 0.36 and 0.10 mm for surrounding and furcation areas, respectively. The system provides an intuitive presentation of the measurement results. Conclusion Computer aided diagnosis of 3D dental CT scans is feasible and the technique is a promising new tool for the quantitative evaluation of periodontal bone loss. (orig.)

  13. 3D-CT evaluation of secondary alveolar bone grafts in alveolar clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naitoh, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yoshihiko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Yamawaki, Yoshiroh [Kyoto Katsura Hospital (Japan); Morimoto, Naoki [Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    From 1994 to 2000, we treated 116 patients with cleft alveolus by secondary alveolar bone grafts, and 48 of them were evaluated morphologically with 3D-CT. The frequency of successful bony bridging was significantly higher in the group whose grafts were completely enveloped (including the anterior alveolar ridge) with a mucoperiosteal flap. The frequency was also significantly higher in the group who underwent bone grafts at the age of 13 or less, and canine eruptions did not influence the ratio. Some cases showed such an improved growth pattern of grafted bone that the shape of the affected maxilla resembled that of the normal side, after long-term follow-up observations. The growth increment was remarkable in anterior maxillary height. Orthodontic management guides the canine or incisor into the reconstructed area of the previous cleft. We surmise that the new occlusal position puts pressure on the grafted bone and promotes further osteogenesis. These findings show that it is important to produce sufficient bony bridge to guide the canine or incisor, not the volume of grafted bone, in secondary alveolar bone grafts. Long-term follow-up observation, after more than 2-3 years, is also necessary to evaluate secondary alveolar bone grafts. (author)

  14. 3D printed bioceramics for dual antibiotic delivery to treat implant-associated bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzana, J A; Trombetta, R P; Schwarz, E M; Kates, S L; Awad, H A

    2015-11-04

    Surgical implant-associated bone infections (osteomyelitis) have severe clinical and socioeconomic consequences. Treatment of chronic bone infections often involves antibiotics given systemically and locally to the affected site in poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement. Given the high antibiotic concentrations required to affect bacteria in biofilm, local delivery is important to achieve high doses at the infection site. PMMA is not suitable to locally-deliver some biofilm-specific antibiotics, including rifampin, due to interference with PMMA polymerisation. To examine the efficacy of localised, combinational antibiotic delivery compared to PMMA standards, we fabricated rifampin- and vancomycin-laden calcium phosphate scaffolds (CPS) by three-dimensional (3D) printing to treat an implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus bone infection in a murine model. All vancomycin- and rifampin-laden CPS treatments significantly reduced the bacterial burden compared with vancomycin-laden PMMA. The bones were bacteria culture negative in 50 % of the mice that received sustained release vancomycin- and rifampin-laden CPS. In contrast, 100 % of the bones treated with vancomycin monotherapy using PMMA or CPS were culture positive. Yet, the monotherapy CPS significantly reduced the bacterial metabolic load following revision compared to PMMA. Biofilm persisted on the fixation hardware, but the infection-induced bone destruction was significantly reduced by local rifampin delivery. These data demonstrate that, despite the challenging implant-retaining infection model, co-delivery of rifampin and vancomycin from 3D printed CPS, which is not possible with PMMA, significantly improved the outcomes of implant-associated osteomyelitis. However, biofilm persistence on the fixation hardware reaffirms the importance of implant exchange or other biofilm eradication strategies to complement local antibiotics.

  15. 3D printed bioceramics for dual antibiotic delivery to treat implant-associated bone infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Inzana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surgical implant-associated bone infections (osteomyelitis have severe clinical and socioeconomic consequences. Treatment of chronic bone infections often involves antibiotics given systemically and locally to the affected site in poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA bone cement. Given the high antibiotic concentrations required to affect bacteria in biofilm, local delivery is important to achieve high doses at the infection site. PMMA is not suitable to locally-deliver some biofilm-specific antibiotics, including rifampin, due to interference with PMMA polymerisation. To examine the efficacy of localised, combinational antibiotic delivery compared to PMMA standards, we fabricated rifampin- and vancomycin-laden calcium phosphate scaffolds (CPS by three-dimensional (3D printing to treat an implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus bone infection in a murine model. All vancomycin- and rifampin-laden CPS treatments significantly reduced the bacterial burden compared with vancomycin-laden PMMA. The bones were bacteria culture negative in 50 % of the mice that received sustained release vancomycin- and rifampin-laden CPS. In contrast, 100 % of the bones treated with vancomycin monotherapy using PMMA or CPS were culture positive. Yet, the monotherapy CPS significantly reduced the bacterial metabolic load following revision compared to PMMA. Biofilm persisted on the fixation hardware, but the infection-induced bone destruction was significantly reduced by local rifampin delivery. These data demonstrate that, despite the challenging implant-retaining infection model, co-delivery of rifampin and vancomycin from 3D printed CPS, which is not possible with PMMA, significantly improved the outcomes of implant-associated osteomyelitis. However, biofilm persistence on the fixation hardware reaffirms the importance of implant exchange or other biofilm eradication strategies to complement local antibiotics.

  16. GEMA3D - landscape modelling for dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, Richard

    2010-08-01

    Concerns have been raised about SKB's interpretation of landscape objects in their radiological assessment models, specifically in relation to the size of the objects represented - leading to excessive volumetric dilution - and to the interpretation of local hydrology - leading to non-conservative hydrologic dilution. Developed from the Generic Ecosystem Modelling Approach, GEMA3D is an attempt to address these issues in a simple radiological assessment landscape model. In GEMA3D landscape features are model led as landscape elements (lels) based on a three compartment structure which is able to represent both terrestrial and aquatic lels. The area of the lels can be chosen to coincide with the bedrock fracture from which radionuclides are assumed to be released and the dispersion of radionuclides through out the landscape can be traced. Result indicate that released contaminants remain localised close to the release location and follow the main flow axis of the surface drainage system. This is true even for relatively weakly sorbing species. An interpretation of the size of landscape elements suitable to represent dilution in the biosphere for radiological assessment purposes is suggested, though the concept remains flexible. For reference purposes an agricultural area of one hectare is the baseline. The Quaternary deposits (QD) at the Forsmark site are only a few metres thick above the crystalline bedrock in which the planned repository for spent fuel will be constructed. The biosphere model is assumed to be the upper one metre of the QD. A further model has been implemented for advective - dispersive transport in the deeper QD. The effects of chemical zonation have been briefly investigated. The results confirm the importance of retention close to the release point from the bedrock and clearly indicate that there is a need for a better description of the hydrology of the QD on the spatial scales relevant to the lels required for radiological assessments

  17. GEMA3D - landscape modelling for dose assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, Richard (Aleksandria Sciences (United Kingdom))

    2010-08-15

    Concerns have been raised about SKB's interpretation of landscape objects in their radiological assessment models, specifically in relation to the size of the objects represented - leading to excessive volumetric dilution - and to the interpretation of local hydrology - leading to non-conservative hydrologic dilution. Developed from the Generic Ecosystem Modelling Approach, GEMA3D is an attempt to address these issues in a simple radiological assessment landscape model. In GEMA3D landscape features are model led as landscape elements (lels) based on a three compartment structure which is able to represent both terrestrial and aquatic lels. The area of the lels can be chosen to coincide with the bedrock fracture from which radionuclides are assumed to be released and the dispersion of radionuclides through out the landscape can be traced. Result indicate that released contaminants remain localised close to the release location and follow the main flow axis of the surface drainage system. This is true even for relatively weakly sorbing species. An interpretation of the size of landscape elements suitable to represent dilution in the biosphere for radiological assessment purposes is suggested, though the concept remains flexible. For reference purposes an agricultural area of one hectare is the baseline. The Quaternary deposits (QD) at the Forsmark site are only a few metres thick above the crystalline bedrock in which the planned repository for spent fuel will be constructed. The biosphere model is assumed to be the upper one metre of the QD. A further model has been implemented for advective - dispersive transport in the deeper QD. The effects of chemical zonation have been briefly investigated. The results confirm the importance of retention close to the release point from the bedrock and clearly indicate that there is a need for a better description of the hydrology of the QD on the spatial scales relevant to the lels required for radiological assessments

  18. Fabrication and characterization of strontium incorporated 3-D bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue from biosilica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özarslan, Ali Can, E-mail: alicanozarslan@gmail.com; Yücel, Sevil, E-mail: syucel@yildiz.edu.tr

    2016-11-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds that contain silica are high viable biomaterials as bone supporters for bone tissue engineering due to their bioactive behaviour in simulated body fluid (SBF). In the human body, these materials help inorganic bone structure formation due to a combination of the particular ratio of elements such as silicon (Si), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na) and phosphorus (P), and the doping of strontium (Sr) into the scaffold structure increases their bioactive behaviour. In this study, bioactive glass scaffolds were produced by using rice hull ash (RHA) silica and commercial silica based bioactive glasses. The structural properties of scaffolds such as pore size, porosity and also the bioactive behaviour were investigated. The results showed that undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds have better bioactivity than that of commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds. Moreover, undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds will be able to be used instead of undoped and Sr-doped commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds for bone regeneration applications. Scaffolds that are produced from undoped or Sr-doped RHA silica have high potential to form new bone for bone defects in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Production of 3-D bioactive glass scaffolds from different silica sources • The effect of biosilica from rice hull ash on the bioactive glass scaffold • Sr additive impact on the bioactivity and biodegradability properties of scaffolds.

  19. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  20. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) surface nanomodified 3D printed polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Favi, Pelagie; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Golshan, Negar H; Ziemer, Katherine S; Keidar, Michael; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a new fabrication method for tissue engineering which can precisely control scaffold architecture at the micron-scale. However, scaffolds not only need 3D biocompatible structures that mimic the micron structure of natural tissues, they also require mimicking of the nano-scale extracellular matrix properties of the tissue they intend to replace. In order to achieve this, the objective of the present in vitro study was to use cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a quick and inexpensive way to modify the nano-scale roughness and chemical composition of a 3D printed scaffold surface. Water contact angles of a normal 3D printed poly-lactic-acid (PLA) scaffold dramatically dropped after CAP treatment from 70±2° to 24±2°. In addition, the nano-scale surface roughness (Rq) of the untreated 3D PLA scaffolds drastically increased (up to 250%) after 1, 3, and 5min of CAP treatment from 1.20nm to 10.50nm, 22.90nm, and 27.60nm, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the ratio of oxygen to carbon significantly increased after CAP treatment, which indicated that the CAP treatment of PLA not only changed nano-scale roughness but also chemistry. Both changes in hydrophilicity and nano-scale roughness demonstrated a very efficient plasma treatment, which in turn significantly promoted both osteoblast (bone forming cells) and mesenchymal stem cell attachment and proliferation. These promising results suggest that CAP surface modification may have potential applications for enhancing 3D printed PLA bone tissue engineering materials (and all 3D printed materials) in a quick and an inexpensive manner and, thus, should be further studied. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a new fabrication method for tissue engineering which can precisely control scaffold architecture at the micron-scale. Although their success is related to their ability to exactly mimic the structure of natural tissues and control mechanical

  1. The application of 3D printed surgical guides in resection and reconstruction of malignant bone tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengping; Zhu, Jun; Peng, Xuejun; Su, Jing

    2017-10-01

    The clinical value of 3D printed surgical guides in resection and reconstruction of malignant bone tumor around the knee joint were studied. For this purpose, a sample of 66 patients from October 2013 to October 2015 were randomly selected and further divided into control group and observation group, each group consisted of 33 cases. The control group was treated by conventional tumor resection whereas, in the observation group, the tumor was resected with 3D printed surgical guide. However, reconstruction of tumor-type hinge prosthesis was performed in both groups and then the clinical effect was compared. Results show that there was no significant difference in the operation time between the two groups (p>0.05). However, the blood loss, resection length and complication rate were found significantly lower in the observation group than in the control group (p0.05) between two groups were statistically the same (p>0.05), whereas the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score of the knee joint in the observation group was significantly better than that of the control group (p3D printed surgical guides can significantly improve the postoperative joint function after resection and reconstruction of malignant bone tumor around the knee joint and can reduce the incidence of complications.

  2. Bone histomorphometric quantification by X-ray phase contrast and transmission 3D SR microcomputed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, L.P.; Pinheiro, C.J.G.; Braz, D.; Oliveira, L.F.; Barroso, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Conventional histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed tomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices. In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. Looking for better resolutions and visualization of soft tissues, X-ray phase contrast imaging technique was developed. The objective of this work was to perform histomorphometric quantification of human cancellous bone using 3D synchrotron X ray computed microtomography, using two distinct techniques: transmission and phase contrast, in order to compare the results and evaluate the viability of applying the same methodology of quantification for both technique. All experiments were performed at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Trieste (Italy). MicroCT data sets were collected using the CT set-up on the SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics) beamline. Results showed that there is a better correlation between histomorphometric parameters of both techniques when morphological filters had been used. However, using these filters, some important information given by phase contrast are lost and they shall be explored by new techniques of quantification

  3. 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carson, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This project is to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with breast cancer through development and evaluation of 3D ultrasound imaging and quantification techniques emphasizing vascularity...

  4. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head–neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone–cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation. (paper)

  5. Rigorous accuracy assessment for 3D reconstruction using time-series Dual Fluoroscopy (DF) image pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Durgham, Kaleel; Lichti, Derek D.; Kuntze, Gregor; Ronsky, Janet

    2017-06-01

    High-speed biplanar videoradiography, or clinically referred to as dual fluoroscopy (DF), imaging systems are being used increasingly for skeletal kinematics analysis. Typically, a DF system comprises two X-ray sources, two image intensifiers and two high-speed video cameras. The combination of these elements provides time-series image pairs of articulating bones of a joint, which permits the measurement of bony rotation and translation in 3D at high temporal resolution (e.g., 120-250 Hz). Assessment of the accuracy of 3D measurements derived from DF imaging has been the subject of recent research efforts by several groups, however with methodological limitations. This paper presents a novel and simple accuracy assessment procedure based on using precise photogrammetric tools. We address the fundamental photogrammetry principles for the accuracy evaluation of an imaging system. Bundle adjustment with selfcalibration is used for the estimation of the system parameters. The bundle adjustment calibration uses an appropriate sensor model and applies free-network constraints and relative orientation stability constraints for a precise estimation of the system parameters. A photogrammetric intersection of time-series image pairs is used for the 3D reconstruction of a rotating planar object. A point-based registration method is used to combine the 3D coordinates from the intersection and independently surveyed coordinates. The final DF accuracy measure is reported as the distance between 3D coordinates from image intersection and the independently surveyed coordinates. The accuracy assessment procedure is designed to evaluate the accuracy over the full DF image format and a wide range of object rotation. Experiment of reconstruction of a rotating planar object reported an average positional error of 0.44 +/- 0.2 mm in the derived 3D coordinates (minimum 0.05 and maximum 1.2 mm).

  6. Variation and diversity in Homo erectus: a 3D geometric morphometric analysis of the temporal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Claire E; Kimbel, William H; Lockwood, Charles A

    2007-07-01

    Although the level of taxonomic diversity within the fossil hominin species Homo erectus (sensu lato) is continually debated, there have been relatively few studies aiming to quantify the morphology of this species. Instead, most researchers have relied on qualitative descriptions or the evaluation of nonmetric characters, which in many cases display continuous variation. Also, only a few studies have used quantitative data to formally test hypotheses regarding the taxonomic composition of the "erectus" hypodigm. Despite these previous analyses, however, and perhaps in part due to these varied approaches for assessing variation within specimens typically referred to H. erectus (sensu lato) and the general lack of rigorous statistical testing of how variation within this taxon is partitioned, there is currently little consensus regarding whether this group is a single species, or whether it should instead be split into separate temporal or geographically delimited taxa. In order to evaluate possible explanations for variation within H. erectus, we tested the general hypothesis that variation within the temporal bone morphology of H. erectus is consistent with that of a single species, using great apes and humans as comparative taxa. Eighteen three-dimensional (3D) landmarks of the temporal bone were digitized on a total of 520 extant and fossil hominid crania. Landmarks were registered by Generalized Procrustes Analysis, and Procrustes distances were calculated for comparisons of individuals within and between the extant taxa. Distances between fossil specimens and between a priori groupings of fossils were then compared to the distances calculated within the extant taxa to assess the variation within the H. erectus sample relative to that of known species, subspecies, and populations. Results of these analyses indicate that shape variation within the entire H. erectus sample is generally higher than extant hominid intraspecific variation, and putative H. ergaster

  7. Clinical Application of Solid Model Based on Trabecular Tibia Bone CT Images Created by 3D Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaemo; Park, Chan-Soo; Kim, Yeoun-Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to use a 3D solid model to predict the mechanical loads of human bone fracture risk associated with bone disease conditions according to biomechanical engineering parameters. We used special image processing tools for image segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction to generate meshes, which are necessary for the production of a solid model with a 3D printer from computed tomography (CT) images of the human tibia's trabecular and cortical bones. We examined the defects of the mechanism for the tibia's trabecular bones. Image processing tools and segmentation techniques were used to analyze bone structures and produce a solid model with a 3D printer. These days, bio-imaging (CT and magnetic resonance imaging) devices are able to display and reconstruct 3D anatomical details, and diagnostics are becoming increasingly vital to the quality of patient treatment planning and clinical treatment. Furthermore, radiographic images are being used to study biomechanical systems with several aims, namely, to describe and simulate the mechanical behavior of certain anatomical systems, to analyze pathological bone conditions, to study tissues structure and properties, and to create a solid model using a 3D printer to support surgical planning and reduce experimental costs. These days, research using image processing tools and segmentation techniques to analyze bone structures to produce a solid model with a 3D printer is rapidly becoming very important.

  8. 3D Printing and Electrospinning of Composite Hydrogels for Cartilage and Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna De Mori

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Injuries of bone and cartilage constitute important health issues costing the National Health Service billions of pounds annually, in the UK only. Moreover, these damages can become cause of disability and loss of function for the patients with associated social costs and diminished quality of life. The biomechanical properties of these two tissues are massively different from each other and they are not uniform within the same tissue due to the specific anatomic location and function. In this perspective, tissue engineering (TE has emerged as a promising approach to address the complexities associated with bone and cartilage regeneration. Tissue engineering aims at developing temporary three-dimensional multicomponent constructs to promote the natural healing process. Biomaterials, such as hydrogels, are currently extensively studied for their ability to reproduce both the ideal 3D extracellular environment for tissue growth and to have adequate mechanical properties for load bearing. This review will focus on the use of two manufacturing techniques, namely electrospinning and 3D printing, that present promise in the fabrication of complex composite gels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering applications.

  9. Chitosan porous 3D scaffolds embedded with resolvin D1 to improve in vivo bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Daniela P; Costa, Madalena; Neves, Nuno; Teixeira, José H; Vasconcelos, Daniel M; Santos, Susana G; Águas, Artur P; Barbosa, Mário A; Barbosa, Judite N

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect chitosan (Ch) porous 3D scaffolds embedded with resolvin D1 (RvD1), an endogenous pro-resolving lipid mediator, on bone tissue healing. These scaffolds previous developed by us have demonstrated to have immunomodulatory properties namely in the modulation of the macrophage inflammatory phenotypic profile in an in vivo model of inflammation. Herein, results obtained in an in vivo rat femoral defect model demonstrated that two months after Ch + RvD1 scaffolds implantation, an increase in new bone formation, in bone trabecular thickness, and in collagen type I and Coll I/Coll III ratio were observed. These results suggest that Ch scaffolds embedded with RvD1 were able to lead to the formation of new bone with improvement of trabecular thickness. This study shows that the presence of RvD1 in the acute phase of the inflammatory response to the implanted biomaterial had a positive role in the subsequent bone tissue repair, thus demonstrating the importance of innovative approaches for the control of immune responses to biomedical implants in the design of advanced strategies for regenerative medicine. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 1626-1633, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 3D Scaffolds with Different Stiffness but the Same Microstructure for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guobao; Dong, Chanjuan; Yang, Li; Lv, Yonggang

    2015-07-29

    A growing body of evidence has shown that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness can modulate stem cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and signaling. Stem cells can feel and respond sensitively to the mechanical microenvironment of the ECM. However, most studies have focused on classical two-dimensional (2D) or quasi-three-dimensional environments, which cannot represent the real situation in vivo. Furthermore, most of the current methods used to generate different mechanical properties invariably change the fundamental structural properties of the scaffolds (such as morphology, porosity, pore size, and pore interconnectivity). In this study, we have developed novel three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with different degrees of stiffness but the same 3D microstructure that was maintained by using decellularized cancellous bone. Mixtures of collagen and hydroxyapatite [HA: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] with different proportions were coated on decellularized cancellous bone to vary the stiffness (local stiffness, 13.00 ± 5.55 kPa, 13.87 ± 1.51 kPa, and 37.7 ± 19.6 kPa; bulk stiffness, 6.74 ± 1.16 kPa, 8.82 ± 2.12 kPa, and 23.61 ± 8.06 kPa). Microcomputed tomography (μ-CT) assay proved that there was no statistically significant difference in the architecture of the scaffolds before or after coating. Cell viability, osteogenic differentiation, cell recruitment, and angiogenesis were determined to characterize the scaffolds and evaluate their biological responses in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results indicate that the scaffolds developed in this study could sustain adhesion and growth of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and promote their osteogenic differentiation. The in vivo results further demonstrated that these scaffolds could help to recruit MSCs from subcutaneous tissue, induce them to differentiate into osteoblasts, and provide the 3D environment for angiogenesis. These findings showed that the method we developed can build scaffolds with

  11. Modifications to a 3D-printed temporal bone model for augmented stapes fixation surgery teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yann; Mamelle, Elisabeth; De Seta, Daniele; Sterkers, Olivier; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Torres, Renato

    2017-07-01

    Functional outcomes and complications in otosclerosis surgery are governed by the surgeon's experience. Thus, teaching the procedure to residents to guide them through the learning process as quickly as possible is challenging. Artificial 3D-printed temporal bones are replacing cadaver specimens in many institutions to learn mastoidectomy, but these are not suitable for middle ear surgery training. The goal of this work was to adapt such an artificial temporal bone to aid the teaching of otosclerosis surgery and to evaluate this tool. We have modified a commercially available 3D-printed temporal bone by replacing the incus and stapes of the model with in-house 3D-printed ossicles. The incus could be attached to a 6-axis force sensor. The stapes footplate was fenestrated and attached to a 1-axis force sensor. Six junior surgeons (residents) and seven senior surgeons (fellows or consultants) were enrolled to perform piston prosthesis placement and crimping as performed during otosclerosis surgery. The time required to perform the tasks and the forces applied to the incus and stapes were collected and analyzed. No statistically significant differences were observed between the junior and senior groups for time taken to perform the tasks and the forces applied to the incus during crimping and placement of the prosthesis. However, significantly lower forces were applied to the stapes by the senior surgeons in comparison with the junior surgeons during prosthesis placement (junior vs senior group, 328 ± 202.9 vs 80 ± 99.6 mN, p = 0.008) and during prosthesis crimping (junior vs senior group, 565 ± 233 vs 66 ± 48.6 mN, p = 0.02). We have described a new teaching tool for otosclerosis surgery based on the modification of a 3D-printed temporal bone to implement force sensors on the incus and stapes. This tool could be used as a training tool to help the residents to self-evaluate their progress with recording of objective measurements.

  12. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sophie C.; Thornby, John A.; Gibbons, Gregory J., E-mail: G.J.Gibbons@warwick.ac.uk; Williams, Mark A.; Mallick, Kajal K.

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6 h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). - Highlights: • Flowability of HA and PVOH powders corresponded to scaffold printability. • Anisotropic behaviour of 3D printed scaffolds was highlighted by compressive tests. • Maximum compressive strength of 3D printed 55% porous scaffolds was 0.88 MPa. • Imperfect packing of precursors resulted in a rough surface and microporosity. • A CT method was designed and used to quantify designed and non-designed porosity.

  13. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Sophie C.; Thornby, John A.; Gibbons, Gregory J.; Williams, Mark A.; Mallick, Kajal K.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6 h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). - Highlights: • Flowability of HA and PVOH powders corresponded to scaffold printability. • Anisotropic behaviour of 3D printed scaffolds was highlighted by compressive tests. • Maximum compressive strength of 3D printed 55% porous scaffolds was 0.88 MPa. • Imperfect packing of precursors resulted in a rough surface and microporosity. • A CT method was designed and used to quantify designed and non-designed porosity

  14. Assessment of Delft3D Morphodynamic Model During Duck94

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welsch, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    ... over a wide range of conditions. The Delfi3D 2- DH model utilizes shallow water equations to phase resolve the mean and infragravity motions in combination with an advection diffusion equation for the sediment transport...

  15. Bioprinted Osteogenic and Vasculogenic Patterns for Engineering 3D Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byambaa, Batzaya; Annabi, Nasim; Yue, Kan; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Jia, Weitao; Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Shin, Su Ryon; Tamayol, Ali; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Fabricating 3D large-scale bone tissue constructs with functional vasculature has been a particular challenge in engineering tissues suitable for repairing large bone defects. To address this challenge, an extrusion-based direct-writing bioprinting strategy is utilized to fabricate microstructured bone-like tissue constructs containing a perfusable vascular lumen. The bioprinted constructs are used as biomimetic in vitro matrices to co-culture human umbilical vein endothelial cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells in a naturally derived hydrogel. To form the perfusable blood vessel inside the bioprinted construct, a central cylinder with 5% gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel at low methacryloyl substitution (GelMA LOW ) was printed. We also develop cell-laden cylinder elements made of GelMA hydrogel loaded with silicate nanoplatelets to induce osteogenesis, and synthesized hydrogel formulations with chemically conjugated vascular endothelial growth factor to promote vascular spreading. It was found that the engineered construct is able to support cell survival and proliferation during maturation in vitro. Additionally, the whole construct demonstrates high structural stability during the in vitro culture for 21 days. This method enables the local control of physical and chemical microniches and the establishment of gradients in the bioprinted constructs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Spontaneous gene transfection of human bone cells using 3D mineralized alginate-chitosan macrocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of nonviral gene therapy remains uncertain because of low transfection efficiencies and high toxicities compared with viral-based strategies. We describe a simple system for transient transfection of continuous human cell lines, with low toxicity, using mineral-coated chitosan and alginate capsules. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate transfection of Saos-2 and MG63 human osteosarcoma continuous cell lines with gfp, LacZ reporter genes, and a Sox-9 carrying plasmid, to illustrate expression of a functional gene with therapeutic relevance. We show that continuous cell lines transfect with significant efficiency of up to 65% possibly through the interplay between chitosan and DNA complexation and calcium/phosphate-induced translocation into cells entrapped within the 3D polysaccharide based environment, as evidenced by an absence of transfection in unmineralized and chitosan-free capsules. We demonstrated that our transfection system was equally effective at transfection of primary human bone marrow stromal cells. To illustrate, the Sox-9, DNA plasmid was spontaneously expressed in primary human bone marrow stromal cells at 7 days with up to 90% efficiency in two repeats. Mineralized polysaccharide macrocapsules are gene delivery vehicles with a number of biological and practical advantages. They are highly efficient at self-transfecting primary bone cells, with programmable spatial and temporal delivery prospects, premineralized bone-like environments, and have no cytotoxic effects, as compared with many other nonviral systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Han, Arum; Righetti, Raffaella [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dwight Look College of Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Sabonghy, Eric P [OneOrtho Orthopedic Surgery Clinic, Houston, TX (United States); Tasciotti, Ennio; Ferrari, Mauro [Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Weiner, Bradley K, E-mail: righetti@ece.tamu.ed [Division of Spinal Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 {mu}m to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  18. Accurate 3-D Profile Extraction of Skull Bone Using an Ultrasound Matrix Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian, Mehdi; Gaspar, Robert; Maev, Roman Gr

    2017-12-01

    The present study investigates the feasibility, accuracy, and precision of 3-D profile extraction of the human skull bone using a custom-designed ultrasound matrix transducer in Pulse-Echo. Due to the attenuative scattering properties of the skull, the backscattered echoes from the inner surface of the skull are severely degraded, attenuated, and at some points overlapped. Furthermore, the speed of sound (SOS) in the skull varies significantly in different zones and also from case to case; if considered constant, it introduces significant error to the profile measurement. A new method for simultaneous estimation of the skull profiles and the sound speed value is presented. The proposed method is a two-folded procedure: first, the arrival times of the backscattered echoes from the skull bone are estimated using multi-lag phase delay (MLPD) and modified space alternating generalized expectation maximization (SAGE) algorithms. Next, these arrival times are fed into an adaptive sound speed estimation algorithm to compute the optimal SOS value and subsequently, the skull bone thickness. For quantitative evaluation, the estimated bone phantom thicknesses were compared with the mechanical measurements. The accuracies of the bone thickness measurements using MLPD and modified SAGE algorithms combined with the adaptive SOS estimation were 7.93% and 4.21%, respectively. These values were 14.44% and 10.75% for the autocorrelation and cross-correlation methods. Additionally, the Bland-Altman plots showed the modified SAGE outperformed the other methods with -0.35 and 0.44 mm limits of agreement. No systematic error that could be related to the skull bone thickness was observed for this method.

  19. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sophie C; Thornby, John A; Gibbons, Gregory J; Williams, Mark A; Mallick, Kajal K

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High-resolution T1-weighted 3D real IR imaging of the temporal bone using triple-dose contrast material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Koshikawa, Tokiko; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Shouwa-ku, 466-8550, Nagoya (Japan); Aoki, Ikuo [Medical System Company, Toshiba Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    The small structures in the temporal bone are surrounded by bone and air. The objectives of this study were (a) to compare contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images acquired by fast spin-echo-based three-dimensional real inversion recovery (3D rIR) against those acquired by gradient echo-based 3D SPGR in the visualization of the enhancement of small structures in the temporal bone, and (b) to determine whether either 3D rIR or 3D SPGR is useful for visualizing enhancement of the cochlear lymph fluid. Seven healthy men (age range 27-46 years) volunteered to participate in this study. All MR imaging was performed using a dedicated bilateral quadrature surface phased-array coil for temporal bone imaging at 1.5 T (Visart EX, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). The 3D rIR images (TR/TE/TI: 1800 ms/10 ms/500 ms) and flow-compensated 3D SPGR images (TR/TE/FA: 23 ms/10 ms/25 ) were obtained with a reconstructed voxel size of 0.6 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm{sup 3}. Images were acquired before and 1, 90, 180, and 270 min after the administration of triple-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (0.3 mmol/kg). In post-contrast MR images, the degree of enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct, endolymphatic sac, subarcuate artery, geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve, and cochlear lymph fluid space was assessed by two radiologists. The degree of enhancement was scored as follows: 0 (no enhancement); 1 (slight enhancement); 2 (intermediate between 1 and 3); and 3 (enhancement similar to that of vessels). Enhancement scores for the endolymphatic sac, subarcuate artery, and geniculate ganglion were higher in 3D rIR than in 3D SPGR. Washout of enhancement in the endolymphatic sac appeared to be delayed compared with that in the subarcuate artery, suggesting that the enhancement in the endolymphatic sac may have been due in part to non-vascular tissue enhancement. Enhancement of the cochlear lymph space was not observed in any of the subjects in 3D rIR and 3D SPGR. The 3D rIR sequence may be more sensitive than the 3D SPGR sequence in

  1. Spiral-structured, nanofibrous, 3D scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junping; Valmikinathan, Chandra M; Liu, Wei; Laurencin, Cato T; Yu, Xiaojun

    2010-05-01

    Polymeric nanofiber matrices have already been widely used in tissue engineering. However, the fabrication of nanofibers into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures is restricted due to current manufacturing techniques. To overcome this limitation, we have incorporated nanofibers onto spiral-structured 3D scaffolds made of poly (epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL). The spiral structure with open geometries, large surface areas, and porosity will be helpful for improving nutrient transport and cell penetration into the scaffolds, which are otherwise limited in conventional tissue-engineered scaffolds for large bone defects repair. To investigate the effect of structure and fiber coating on the performance of the scaffolds, three groups of scaffolds including cylindrical PCL scaffolds, spiral PCL scaffolds (without fiber coating), and spiral-structured fibrous PCL scaffolds (with fiber coating) have been prepared. The morphology, porosity, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds have been characterized. Furthermore, human osteoblast cells are seeded on these scaffolds, and the cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralized matrix deposition on the scaffolds are evaluated. The results indicated that the spiral scaffolds possess porosities within the range of human trabecular bone and an appropriate pore structure for cell growth, and significantly lower compressive modulus and strength than cylindrical scaffolds. When compared with the cylindrical scaffolds, the spiral-structured scaffolds demonstrated enhanced cell proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization and allowed better cellular growth and penetration. The incorporation of nanofibers onto spiral scaffolds further enhanced cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. These studies suggest that spiral-structured nanofibrous scaffolds may serve as promising alternatives for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Using titanium LPW-TI64-GD23-TYPE5 in the individual contour grafting of bone defects with 3D implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazlov, V. A.; Mamuladze, T. Z.; Pavlov, V. V.; Prohorenko, V. M.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Fomichev, N. G.; Efimenko, M. V.; Mamonova, E. V.; Aronov, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper proposed a method of replacement of bone defects of a basin with individual 3D-printed implants of medical titanium LPW-TI64-GD23-TYPE5 ASTM F136. The design of the implant was carried out in view of determining the density of the surrounding bone tissue by Hounsfield's scale. We used the method of volume printing by type multiselecting laser sintering. A clinical example of using the method of individual contouring of the defect of bones of a basin with the assessment of bone density by Hounsfield's scale was given. The method of individual contouring of the defect of the basin bones with the assessment of bone density by Hounsfield's scale enables the surgeon to more accurately determine the tactics of surgical intervention: opting for bone grafting or the use of augmented. In the case of manufacturing an individual 3D augment, this method gives the possibility to adjust its geometry taking into account the density of the bone tissue, thereby giving it additional stability. If there is a need for screws—we can preadjust the length and direction of stroke so that the main part of the screw might pass in the support ability area of the bone tissue. We believe that the software and the approach to preoperative planning we have used can make surgery more convenient for the surgeon and personnel of the medical institution.

  3. 2D/3D Quantification of bone morphometric parameter changes using X-ray microtomograpphy with different pixel sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, F.; Assis, J.T. de; Lopes, R.T.; Lima, I.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, bone quantification led to a deeper knowledge of the 3D microarchitecture. In this study the bone architecture of rats was investigated based on 2D/3D morphometric analysis using microcomputed tomography, aiming at determining the effect of the image acquisition pixel on the quality of some 2D/3D morphometric parameters, such as porosity and trabecular density. Six pairs of bone samples were used and the scans were carried out using high microcomputed tomography system, operating at three different pixel sizes of 33.3 μm, 15.0 μm and 9.5 μm. The results showed 2D parameters values lower than those obtained in the 3D analysis, mainly for trabecular density, separation and thickness. - Highlights: ► Bone quantification led to a deeper knowledge of the 3D microarchitecture. ► μCT was used in order to investigate condyles bone in 03 different pixel sizes. ► The results showed 2D parameters values lower than those obtained in the 3D analysis. ► The parameters trabecular density, separation and thickness were the most affected

  4. How 3D patient-specific instruments improve accuracy of pelvic bone tumour resection in a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallent, A; Vicente, M; Reverté, M M; Lopez, A; Rodríguez-Baeza, A; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Velez, R

    2017-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of patient-specific instruments (PSIs) versus standard manual technique and the precision of computer-assisted planning and PSI-guided osteotomies in pelvic tumour resection. CT scans were obtained from five female cadaveric pelvises. Five osteotomies were designed using Mimics software: sacroiliac, biplanar supra-acetabular, two parallel iliopubic and ischial. For cases of the left hemipelvis, PSIs were designed to guide standard oscillating saw osteotomies and later manufactured using 3D printing. Osteotomies were performed using the standard manual technique in cases of the right hemipelvis. Post-resection CT scans were quantitatively analysed. Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney U test were used. Compared with the manual technique, PSI-guided osteotomies improved accuracy by a mean 9.6 mm (p 5 mm and 27% (n = 8) were > 10 mm. In the PSI cases, deviations were 10% (n = 3) and 0 % (n = 0), respectively. For angular deviation from pre-operative plans, we observed a mean improvement of 7.06° (p Cite this article : A. Sallent, M. Vicente, M. M. Reverté, A. Lopez, A. Rodríguez-Baeza, M. Pérez-Domínguez, R. Velez. How 3D patient-specific instruments improve accuracy of pelvic bone tumour resection in a cadaveric study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:577-583. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.610.BJR-2017-0094.R1. © 2017 Sallent et al.

  5. Morphological features of the macerated cranial bones registered by the 3D vision system for potential use in forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzat, Janusz; Sioma, Andrzej; Kozerska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present potential usage of the 3D vision system for registering features of the macerated cranial bones. Applied 3D vision system collects height profiles of the object surface and from that data builds a three-dimensional image of the surface. This method appeared to be accurate enough to capture anatomical details of the macerated bones. With the aid of the 3D vision system we generated images of the surface of the human calvaria which was used for testing the system. Performed reconstruction visualized the imprints of the dural vascular system, cranial sutures, and the three-layer structure of the cranial bones observed in the cross-section. We figure out that the 3D vision system may deliver data which can enhance estimation of sex from the osteological material.

  6. Direct 3D powder printing of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for substitution of complex bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castilho, Miguel; Pires, Inês; Moseke, Claus; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Teßmar, Jörg; Vorndran, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The 3D printing technique based on cement powders is an excellent method for the fabrication of individual and complex bone substitutes even in the case of large defects. The outstanding bone remodeling capacity of biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) containing hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in varying ratios makes the adaption of powder systems resulting in BCP materials to this fabrication technique a desirable aim. This study presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel powder system for the 3D printing process, intended for the production of complexly shaped BCP scaffolds by a hydraulic setting reaction of calcium carbonate and TCP with phosphoric acid. The HA/TCP ratio in the specimens could be tailored by the calcium/phosphate ratio of the starting powder. The scaffolds could be fabricated with a dimensional accuracy of >96.5% and a minimal macro pore size of 300 µm. Independent of the phase composition the printed specimens showed a microporosity of approximately 68%, while the compressive strength strongly depended on the chemical composition and increased with rising TCP content in the scaffolds to a maximum of 1.81 MPa. Post-treatment of the scaffolds with a polylactic-co-glycolic acid-solution enhanced the mechanical properties by a factor of 8. In vitro studies showed that all BCP scaffolds were cytocompatible and enhanced the cell viability as well as the cell proliferation, as compared with pure TCP. Cell proliferation is even better on BCP when compared to HA and cell viability is in a similar range on these materials. (paper)

  7. Composite PLA/PEG/nHA/Dexamethasone Scaffold Prepared by 3D Printing for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zigui; Qi, Yanxin; Li, Linlong; Zhang, Peibiao; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2018-04-24

    3D printing has become an essential part of bone tissue engineering and attracts great attention for the fabrication of bioactive scaffolds. Combining this rapid manufacturing technique with chemical precipitation, biodegradable 3D scaffold composed of polymer matrix (polylactic acid and polyethylene glycol), ceramics (nano hydroxyapatite), and drugs (dexamethasone (Dex)) is prepared. Results of water contact angle, differential scanning calorimeter, and mechanical tests confirm that incorporation of Dex leads to significantly improved wettability, higher crystallinity degree, and tunable degradation rates. In vitro experiment with mouse MC3T3-E1 cells implies that Dex released from scaffolds is not beneficial for early cell proliferation, but it improves late alkaline phosphatase secretion and mineralization significantly. Anti-inflammation assay of murine RAW 264.7 cells proves that Dex released from all the scaffolds successfully suppresses lipopolysaccharide induced interleukin-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase secretion by M1 macrophages. Further in vivo experiment on rat calvarial defects indicates that scaffolds containing Dex promote osteoinduction and osteogenic response and would be promising candidates for clinical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effects of the 3D bone-to-implant contact and bone stiffness on the initial stability of a dental implant: micro-CT and resonance frequency analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, J T; Huang, H L; Tsai, M T; Wu, A Y J; Tu, M G; Fuh, L J

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of bone stiffness (elastic modulus) and three-dimensional (3D) bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC%) on the primary stabilities of dental implants using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and resonance frequency analyses. Artificial sawbone models with five values of elastic modulus (137, 123, 47.5, 22, and 12.4 MPa) comprising two types of trabecular structure (solid-rigid and cellular-rigid) were investigated for initial implant stability quotient (ISQ), measured using the wireless Osstell resonance frequency analyzer. Bone specimens were attached to 2 mm fibre-filled epoxy sheets mimicking the cortical shell. ISQ was measured after placing a dental implant into the bone specimen. Each bone specimen with an implant was subjected to micro-CT scanning to calculate the 3D BIC% values. The similarity of the cellular type of artificial bone to the trabecular structure might make it more appropriate for obtaining accurate values of primary implant stability than solid-bone blocks. For the cellular-rigid bone models, the ISQ increased with the elastic modulus of cancellous bone. The regression correlation coefficient was 0.96 for correlations of the ISQ with the elasticity of cancellous bone and with the 3D BIC%. The initial implant stability was moderately positively correlated with the elasticity of cancellous bone and with the 3D BIC%. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelatin-Chitosan-Nanobioglass 3D Porous Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan Maji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize bioglass-natural biopolymer based composite scaffold and evaluate its bone regeneration ability. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (58S in the size range of 20–30 nm were synthesized using sol-gel method. Porous scaffolds with varying bioglass composition from 10 to 30 wt% in chitosan, gelatin matrix were fabricated using the method of freeze drying of its slurry at 40 wt% solids loading. Samples were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to obtain interconnected porous 3D microstructure with improved mechanical strength. The prepared scaffolds exhibited >80% porosity with a mean pore size range between 100 and 300 microns. Scaffold containing 30 wt% bioglass (GCB 30 showed a maximum compressive strength of 2.2±0.1 MPa. Swelling and degradation studies showed that the scaffold had excellent properties of hydrophilicity and biodegradability. GCB 30 scaffold was shown to be noncytotoxic and supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation as indicated by MTT assay and RUNX-2 expression. Higher cellular activity was observed in GCB 30 scaffold as compared to GCB 0 scaffold suggesting the fact that 58S bioglass nanoparticles addition into the scaffold promoted better cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, the study showed that the developed composite scaffolds are potential candidates for regenerating damaged bone tissue.

  10. 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Boehm, T., Shing, Y ., Fdkai, N., Vasios, G., Lane, 29. Parke, A., Bhattacherjee, P., Palmer, R. M., and Lazarus , N. R. W. S., Flynn, E., Birkhead, J...P. L. Utility of 3D ultrasound in the R. A., Moses, M., Lane, W. S., Cao, Y ., Sage, E. H., and Folkman , J. discrimination and detection of breast...References/Appendices 7), (Abstracts y (mm) (min/set) 6,7,9,10,18); 5) expanding the field of view 5x5x5 subvols. 0.17 5.3 by combining several partially

  11. 3D Synchrotron μ-x-ray fluorescence analysis on human bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoeger, N.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.; Chinea-Cano, E.; Wegrzynek, D.; Roschger, P.; Simon, R.; Staub, S.; Falkenberg, G.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison between μ-x-ray fluorescence tomography and confocal μ-x-ray fluorescence analysis (μ-XRF) will be presented. These techniques were used to study the three dimensional (3D) elemental distribution in human bone. Since bone shows very strong inhomogeneities in structure as well as in distribution of the chemical elements, two dimensional (2D) analysis (element mapping) of the samples always led to difficulties in interpreting the results and assigning elemental distributions to microscopic structures. Tomography scans in fluorescence and absorption mode have been carried out simultaneously at the fluo-topo beamline at ANKA, Karlsruhe, to determine the distribution of the elements over the depth of the previously prepared sample from human patella. A monochromatized x-ray beam (17 keV) from a bending magnet station focused by a compound refractive lens to a beamsize of 10 x 5 μm was used to perform the measurements. The transmitted beam signal measured with the SD detector was utilized to apply a simplified absorption correction to XRF tomographic images. Based on the XRF sinograms the elemental distribution within the object cross-section was reconstructed by means of filtered backprojection. The same section of human bone has been analyzed by confocal μ-XRF at HASYLAB, Hamburg, Germany beamline L. With this experiment two polycapillary half lenses were used; one for focusing the previously monochromatized primary x-ray beam onto the sample and the second half lens in front of a Si(Li) detector to get a small inspected area. By overlapping the two foci of the lenses a very well defined volume of investigation could be defined. Scanning the sample up- and downstream it was possible to determine the elemental distribution in depth of the sample. An absorption correction has been applied to get a corrected fluorescence image of the sample. Both methods showed consistent results and allowed a precise localization of the elements of interest. (author)

  12. Validation of an in vitro 3D bone culture model with perfused and mechanically stressed ceramic scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bouet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An engineered three dimensional (3D in vitro cell culture system was designed with the goal of inducing and controlling in vitro osteogenesis in a reproducible manner under conditions more similar to the in vivo bone microenvironment than traditional two-dimensional (2D models. This bioreactor allows efficient mechanical loading and perfusion of an original cubic calcium phosphate bioceramic of highly controlled composition and structure. This bioceramic comprises an internal portion containing homogeneously interconnected macropores surrounded by a dense layer, which minimises fluid flow bypass around the scaffold. This dense and flat layer permits the application of a homogeneous loading on the bioceramic while also enhancing its mechanical strength. Numerical modelling of constraints shows that the system provides direct mechanical stimulation of cells within the scaffold. Experimental results establish that under perfusion at a steady flow of 2 µL/min, corresponding to 3 ≤ Medium velocity ≤ 23 µm/s, mouse calvarial cells grow and differentiate as osteoblasts in a reproducible manner, and lay down a mineralised matrix. Moreover, cells respond to mechanical loading by increasing C-fos expression, which demonstrates the effective mechanical stimulation of the culture within the scaffold. In summary, we provide a “proof-of-concept” for osteoblastic cell culture in a controlled 3D culture system under perfusion and mechanical loading. This model will be a tool to analyse bone cell functions in vivo, and will provide a bench testing system for the clinical assessment of bioactive bone-targeting molecules under load.

  13. Evaluation of the 3D spatial distribution of the Calcium/Phosphorus ratio in bone using computed-tomography dual-energy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipanteli, A; Kourkoumelis, N; Fromme, P; Huang, J; Speller, R D

    2016-01-01

    The Calcium/Phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio was shown to vary between healthy bones and bones with osteoporotic symptoms. The relation of the Ca/P ratio to bone quality remains under investigation. To study this relation and determine if the ratio can be used to predict bone fractures, a non-invasive 3D imaging technique is required. The first aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a computed-tomography dual-energy analysis (CT-DEA) technique developed to assess the Ca/P ratio in bone apatite (collagen-free bone) in identifying differences between healthy and inflammation-mediated osteoporotic (IMO) bones. The second aim was to extend the above technique for its application to a more complex structure, intact bone, that could potentially lead to clinical use. For the first aim, healthy and IMO rabbit cortical bone apatite samples were assessed. For the second aim, some changes were made to the technique, which was applied to healthy and IMO intact bone samples. Statistically significant differences between healthy and IMO bone apatite were found for the bulk Ca/P ratio, low Ca/P ratio proportion and interconnected low Ca/P ratio proportion. For the intact bone samples, the bulk Ca/P ratio was found to be significantly different between healthy and IMO. Results show that the CT-DEA technique can be used to identify differences in the Ca/P ratio between healthy and osteoporotic, in both bone apatite and intact bone. With quantitative imaging becoming an increasingly important advancement in medical imaging, CT-DEA for bone decomposition could potentially have several applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. 3D-Printed Bioactive Ca3SiO5 Bone Cement Scaffolds with Nano Surface Structure for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Wang, Xiaoya; Ma, Bing; Zhu, Haibo; Huan, Zhiguang; Ma, Nan; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2017-02-22

    Silicate bioactive materials have been widely studied for bone regeneration because of their eminent physicochemical properties and outstanding osteogenic bioactivity, and different methods have been developed to prepare porous silicate bioactive ceramics scaffolds for bone-tissue engineering applications. Among all of these methods, the 3D-printing technique is obviously the most efficient way to control the porous structure. However, 3D-printed bioceramic porous scaffolds need high-temperature sintering, which will cause volume shrinkage and reduce the controllability of the pore structure accuracy. Unlike silicate bioceramic, bioactive silicate cements such as tricalcium silicate (Ca 3 SiO 5 and C 3 S) can be self-set in water to obtain high mechanical strength under mild conditions. Another advantage of using C 3 S to prepare 3D scaffolds is the possibility of simultaneous drug loading. Herein, we, for the first time, demonstrated successful preparation of uniform 3D-printed C 3 S bone cement scaffolds with controllable 3D structure at room temperature. The scaffolds were loaded with two model drugs and showed a loading location controllable drug-release profile. In addition, we developed a surface modification process to create controllable nanotopography on the surface of pore wall of the scaffolds, which showed activity to enhance rat bone-marrow stem cells (rBMSCs) attachment, spreading, and ALP activities. The in vivo experiments revealed that the 3D-printed C 3 S bone cement scaffolds with nanoneedle-structured surfaces significantly improved bone regeneration, as compared to pure C 3 S bone cement scaffolds, suggesting that 3D-printed C 3 S bone cement scaffolds with controllable nanotopography surface are bioactive implantable biomaterials for bone repair.

  15. The relationship between 3D bone architectural parameters and elastic moduli of three orthogonal directions predicted from finite elements analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwan Soo; Lee, Sam Sun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Wan Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between 3D bone architectural parameters and direction-related elastic moduli of cancellous bone of mandibular condyle. Two micro-pigs (Micro-pigR, PWG Genetics Korea) were used. Each pig was about 12 months old and weighing around 44 kg. 31 cylindrical bone specimen were obtained from cancellous bone of condyles for 3D analysis and measured by micro-computed tomography. Six parameters were trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), bone specific surface (BS/BV), percent bone volume (BV/TV), structure model index (SMI), degree of anisotropy (DA) and 3-dimensional fractal dimension (3DFD). Elastic moduli of three orthogonal directions (superiorinferior (SI), medial-lateral (ML), andterior-posterior (AP) direction) were calculated through finite element analysis. Elastic modulus of superior-inferior direction was higher than those of other directions. Elastic moduli of 3 orthogonal directions showed different correlation with 3D architectural parameters. Elastic moduli of SI and ML directions showed significant strong to moderate correlation with BV/TV, SMI and 3DFD. Elastic modulus of cancellous bone of pig mandibular condyle was highest in the SI direction and it was supposed that the change into plate-like structure of trabeculae was mainly affected by increase of trabeculae of SI and ML directions.

  16. Planning for corrective osteotomy of the femoral bone using 3D-modeling. Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey G Baindurashvili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In standard planning for corrective hip osteotomy, a surgical intervention scheme is created on a uniplanar paper medium on the basis of X-ray images. However, uniplanar skiagrams are unable to render real spatial configuration of the femoral bone. When combining three-dimensional and uniplanar models of bone, human errors inevitably occur, causing the distortion of preset parameters, which may lead to glaring errors and, as a result, to repeated operations. Aims. To develop a new three-dimensional method for planning and performing corrective osteotomy of the femoral bone, using visualizing computer technologies. Materials and methods. A new method of planning for corrective hip osteotomy in children with various hip joint pathologies was developed. We examined the method using 27 patients [aged 5–18 years (32 hip joints] with congenital and acquired femoral bone deformation. The efficiency of the proposed method was assessed in comparison with uniplanar planning using roentgenograms. Conclusions. Computerized operation planning using three-dimensional modeling improves treatment results by minimizing the likelihood of human errors and increasing planning and surgical intervention  accuracy.

  17. Age-related changes in vertebral and iliac crest 3D bone microstructure-differences and similarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Jensen, Michael Vinkel; Niklassen, Andreas Steenholt

    2015-01-01

    Summary Age-related changes of vertebra and iliac crest 3D microstructure were investigated, and we showed that they were in general similar. The 95th percentile of vertebral trabecular thickness distribution increased with age for women. Surprisingly, vertebral and iliac crest bone microstructure...... was only weakly correlated (r = 0.38 to 0.75), despite the overall similar age-related changes.Introduction The purposes of the study were to determine the age-related changes in iliac and vertebral bone microstructure for women and men over a large age range and to investigate the relationship between...... the bone microstructure at these skeletal sites.Methods Matched sets of transiliac crest bone biopsies and lumbar vertebral body (L2) specimens from 41 women (19–96 years) and 39 men (23–95 years) were micro-computed tomography (μCT) scanned, and the 3D microstructure was quantified.Results For both women...

  18. Paracrine interactions between LNCaP prostate cancer cells and bioengineered bone in 3D in vitro culture reflect molecular changes during bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, Shirly; Taubenberger, Anna V; Lehman, Melanie L; Clements, Judith A; Nelson, Colleen C; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-06-01

    As microenvironmental factors such as three-dimensionality and cell-matrix interactions are increasingly being acknowledged by cancer biologists, more complex 3D in vitro models are being developed to study tumorigenesis and cancer progression. To better understand the pathophysiology of bone metastasis, we have established and validated a 3D indirect co-culture model to investigate the paracrine interactions between prostate cancer (PCa) cells and human osteoblasts. Co-culture of the human PCa, LNCaP cells embedded within polyethylene glycol hydrogels with human osteoblasts in the form of a tissue engineered bone construct (TEB), resulted in reduced proliferation of LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells in both monoculture and co-culture were responsive to the androgen analog, R1881, as indicated by an increase in the expression (mRNA and/or protein induction) of androgen-regulated genes including prostate specific antigen and fatty acid synthase. Microarray gene expression analysis further revealed an up-regulation of bone markers and other genes associated with skeletal and vasculature development and a significant activation of transforming growth factor β1 downstream genes in LNCaP cells after co-culture with TEB. LNCaP cells co-cultured with TEB also unexpectedly showed similar changes in classical androgen-responsive genes under androgen-deprived conditions not seen in LNCaP monocultures. The molecular changes of LNCaP cells after co-culturing with TEBs suggest that osteoblasts exert a paracrine effect that may promote osteomimicry and modulate the expression of androgen-responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Taken together, we have presented a novel 3D in vitro model that allows the study of cellular and molecular changes occurring in PCa cells and osteoblasts that are relevant to metastatic colonization of bone. This unique in vitro model could also facilitate cancer biologists to dissect specific biological hypotheses via extensive genomic or proteomic assessments to

  19. Designing of PLA scaffolds for bone tissue replacement fabricated by ordinary commercial 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Aleš; Filová, Eva; Novák, Martin; Kronek, Jakub; Chlup, Hynek; Buzgo, Matěj; Blahnová, Veronika; Lukášová, Věra; Bartoš, Martin; Nečas, Alois; Hošek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of Tissue engineering is a regeneration or replacement of tissues or organs damaged by disease, injury, or congenital anomalies. At present, Tissue engineering repairs damaged tissues and organs with artificial supporting structures called scaffolds. These are used for attachment and subsequent growth of appropriate cells. During the cell growth gradual biodegradation of the scaffold occurs and the final product is a new tissue with the desired shape and properties. In recent years, research workplaces are focused on developing scaffold by bio-fabrication techniques to achieve fast, precise and cheap automatic manufacturing of these structures. Most promising techniques seem to be Rapid prototyping due to its high level of precision and controlling. However, this technique is still to solve various issues before it is easily used for scaffold fabrication. In this article we tested printing of clinically applicable scaffolds with use of commercially available devices and materials. Research presented in this article is in general focused on "scaffolding" on a field of bone tissue replacement. Commercially available 3D printer and Polylactic acid were used to create originally designed and possibly suitable scaffold structures for bone tissue engineering. We tested printing of scaffolds with different geometrical structures. Based on the osteosarcoma cells proliferation experiment and mechanical testing of designed scaffold samples, it will be stated that it is likely not necessary to keep the recommended porosity of the scaffold for bone tissue replacement at about 90%, and it will also be clarified why this fact eliminates mechanical properties issue. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the size of an individual pore could be double the size of the recommended range between 0.2-0.35 mm without affecting the cell proliferation. Rapid prototyping technique based on Fused deposition modelling was used for the fabrication of designed scaffold

  20. Type I Collagen and Strontium-Containing Mesoporous Glass Particles as Hybrid Material for 3D Printing of Bone-Like Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, Giorgia; Fiorilli, Sonia; Caneschi, Andrea; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2018-04-28

    Bone tissue engineering offers an alternative promising solution to treat a large number of bone injuries with special focus on pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis. In this scenario, the bone tissue regeneration may be promoted using bioactive and biomimetic materials able to direct cell response, while the desired scaffold architecture can be tailored by means of 3D printing technologies. In this context, our study aimed to develop a hybrid bioactive material suitable for 3D printing of scaffolds mimicking the natural composition and structure of healthy bone. Type I collagen and strontium-containing mesoporous bioactive glasses were combined to obtain suspensions able to perform a sol-gel transition under physiological conditions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analyses confirmed the formation of fibrous nanostructures homogeneously embedding inorganic particles, whereas bioactivity studies demonstrated the large calcium phosphate deposition. The high-water content promoted the strontium ion release from the embedded glass particles, potentially enhancing the osteogenic behaviour of the composite. Furthermore, the suspension printability was assessed by means of rheological studies and preliminary extrusion tests, showing shear thinning and fast material recovery upon deposition. In conclusion, the reported results suggest that promising hybrid systems suitable for 3D printing of bioactive scaffolds for bone tissue engineering have been developed.

  1. Hierarchical Fabrication of Engineered Vascularized Bone Biphasic Constructs via Dual 3D Bioprinting: Integrating Regional Bioactive Factors into Architectural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Zhou, Xuan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-01

    A biphasic artificial vascularized bone construct with regional bioactive factors is presented using dual 3D bioprinting platform technique, thereby forming a large functional bone grafts with organized vascular networks. Biocompatible mussel-inspired chemistry and "thiol-ene" click reaction are used to regionally immobilize bioactive factors during construct fabrication for modulating or improving cellular events. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A systematic review on in vitro 3D bone metastases models: A new horizon to recapitulate the native clinical scenario?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanna, Francesca; Contartese, Deyanira; Maglio, Melania; Fini, Milena

    2016-07-12

    While the skeleton is not the only organ where metastasis can occur, it is one of the preferred sites, with a significant impact in patients' quality of life. With the aim of delineating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone metastasis, numerous studies have been employed to identify any contributing factors that trigger cancer progression. One of the major limitations of studying cancer-bone metastasis is the multifaceted nature of the native bone environment and the lack of reliable, simple, and not expensive models that strictly mimic the biological processes occurring in vivo allowing a correct translation of results. Currently, with the growing acceptance of in vitro models as effective tools for studying cancer biology, three-dimensional (3D) models have emerged as a compromise between two-dimensional cultures of isolated cancer cells and the complexity of human cancer xenografts in immunocompromised animal hosts. This descriptive systematic literature review summarizes the current status of advanced and alternative 3D in vitro bone metastases models. We have also reviewed the strategies employed by researchers to set-up these models with special reference to recent promising developments trying to better replicate the complexity and heterogeneity of a human metastasis in situ, with an outlook at their use in medicine. All these aspects will greatly contribute to the existing knowledge on bone metastases, providing a specific link to clinical scenarios and thus making 3D in vitro bone metastasis models an attractive tool for multidisciplinary experts.

  3. 3D-based visual physical activity assessment of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maile S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, an alarming rise in prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has been observed which is partly attributed to a lack in physical activity and has started to become a public health concern. Therefore, the necessity for accurate physical activity assessment has become more and more apparent. Physical activity can be assessed objectively using accelerometers or combined devices. The application of such devices is sometimes complex and wearing the device may influence the behaviour of the test person. Therefore, assessment without any worn device would be an advantage.

  4. Classification of micro-CT images using 3D characterization of bone canal patterns in human osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Jameson, John; Molthen, Robert; Wismüller, Axel

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have analyzed the microstructural properties of bone in cases of Osteogenenis Imperfecta (OI), or `brittle bone disease'. Current approaches mainly focus on bone mineral density measurements as an indirect indicator of bone strength and quality. It has been shown that bone strength would depend not only on composition but also structural organization. This study aims to characterize 3D structure of the cortical bone in high-resolution micro CT images. A total of 40 bone fragments from 28 subjects (13 with OI and 15 healthy controls) were imaged using micro tomography using a synchrotron light source (SRµCT). Minkowski functionals - volume, surface, curvature, and Euler characteristics - describing the topological organization of the bone were computed from the images. The features were used in a machine learning task to classify between healthy and OI bone. The best classification performance (mean AUC - 0.96) was achieved with a combined 4-dimensional feature of all Minkowski functionals. Individually, the best feature performance was seen using curvature (mean AUC - 0.85), which characterizes the edges within a binary object. These results show that quantitative analysis of cortical bone microstructure, in a computer-aided diagnostics framework, can be used to distinguish between healthy and OI bone with high accuracy.

  5. Objective and subjective quality assessment of geometry compression of reconstructed 3D Humans in a 3D virtual room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Mekuria (Rufael); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); A. Frisiello (Antonella); I. Doumanis (Ioannis)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractCompression of 3D object based video is relevant for 3D Immersive applications. Nevertheless, the perceptual aspects of the degradation introduced by codecs for meshes and point clouds are not well understood. In this paper we evaluate the subjective and objective degradations introduced

  6. Is 3D-CT reformation using free software applicable to diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Gerhardt de Oliveira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the agreement of computed tomography (CT imaging using 3D reformations (3DR with shaded surface display (SSD and maximum intensity projection (MIP in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and compared findings with multiplanar reformation (MPR images, used as the criterion standard. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Axial CT images of 44 temporomandibular joints (TMJs of 22 patients with RA were used. Images were recorded in DICOM format and assessed using free software (ImageJ. Each sample had its 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP results compared in pairs with the MPR results. RESULTS: Slight agreement (k = 0.0374 was found in almost all comparisons. The level of agreement showed that 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP yielded a number of false-negative results that was statistically significant when compared with MPR. CONCLUSIONS: 3DR-SSD or 3DR-MIP should only be used as adjuvant techniques to MPR in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles.

  7. Objective and subjective quality assessment of geometry compression of reconstructed 3D humans in a 3D virtual room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekuria, Rufael; Cesar, Pablo; Doumanis, Ioannis; Frisiello, Antonella

    2015-09-01

    Compression of 3D object based video is relevant for 3D Immersive applications. Nevertheless, the perceptual aspects of the degradation introduced by codecs for meshes and point clouds are not well understood. In this paper we evaluate the subjective and objective degradations introduced by such codecs in a state of art 3D immersive virtual room. In the 3D immersive virtual room, users are captured with multiple cameras, and their surfaces are reconstructed as photorealistic colored/textured 3D meshes or point clouds. To test the perceptual effect of compression and transmission, we render degraded versions with different frame rates in different contexts (near/far) in the scene. A quantitative subjective study with 16 users shows that negligible distortion of decoded surfaces compared to the original reconstructions can be achieved in the 3D virtual room. In addition, a qualitative task based analysis in a full prototype field trial shows increased presence, emotion, user and state recognition of the reconstructed 3D Human representation compared to animated computer avatars.

  8. 3D Architecture of Trabecular Bone in the Pig Mandible and Femur: Inter-Trabecular Angle Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Yehonatan; Reznikov, Natalie; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Cancellous bone is an intricate network of interconnected trabeculae, to which analysis of network topology can be applied. The inter-trabecular angle (ITA) analysis - an analysis of network topological parameters and regularity of network-forming nodes, was previously carried out on human proximal femora and showed that trabecular bone follows two main principles: sparsity of the network connectedness (prevalence of nodes with low connectivity in the network) and maximal space spanning (angular offset of connected elements is maximal for their number and approximates the values of geometrically symmetric shapes). These observations suggest that 3D organization of trabecular bone, irrespective of size and shape of individual elements, reflects a tradeoff between minimal metabolic cost of maintenance and maximal network stability under conditions of multidirectional loading. In this study we validate the ITA application using additional 3D structures (cork and 3D-printed metal lattices), analyze the ITA parameters in porcine proximal femora and mandibles and carry out a spatial analysis of the most common node type in the porcine mandibular condyle. The validation shows that the ITA application reliably detects designed or evolved topological parameters. The ITA parameters of porcine trabecular bones are similar to those of human bones. We demonstrate functional adaptation in the pig mandibular condyle by showing that the planar nodes with 3 edges are preferentially aligned in relation to the muscle forces that are applied to the condyle. We conclude that the ITA topological parameters are remarkable conserved, but locally do adapt to applied stresses.

  9. Comparison of bone-implant contact and bone-implant volume between 2D-histological sections and 3D-SRµCT slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Bernhardt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Histological imaging is still considered the gold standard for analysing bone formation around metallic implants. Generally, a limited number of histological sections per sample are used for the approximation of mean values of peri-implant bone formation. In this study we compared statistically the results of bone-implant contact (BIC and bone-implant volume (BIV obtained by histological sections, with those obtained by X-ray absorption images from synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SRµCT using osseointegrated screw-shaped implants from a mini-pig study. Comparing the BIC results of 3-4 histological sections per implant sample with the appropriate 3-4 SRµCT slices showed a non-significant difference of 1.9 % (p = 0.703. The contact area assessed by the whole 3D information from the SRµCT measurement in comparison to the histomorphometric results showed a non-significant difference in BIC of 4.9 % (p = 0.171. The amount of the bone-implant volume in the histological sections and the appropriate SRµCT slices showed a non-significant difference by only 1.4 % (p = 0.736 and also remains non-significant with 2.6 % (p = 0.323 using the volumetric SRµCT information. We conclude that for a clinical evaluation of implant osseointegration with histological imaging at least 3-4 sections per sample are sufficient to represent the BIC or BIV for a sample. Due to the fact that in this study we have found a significant intra-sample variation in BIC of up to ± 35 % the selection of only one or two histological sections per sample may strongly influence the determined BIC.

  10. 3D printed constructs with antibacterial or antitumor activity for surgical treatment of bone defects in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, N. S.; Sviridova, I. K.; Komlev, V. S.; Karalkin, P. A.; Kirsanova, V. A.; Akhmedova, S. A.; Shanskij, Ya. D.; Kuvshinova, E. A.; Fedotov, A. Yu.; Teterina, A. Yu.; Barinov, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    The concept of functionalization with bioactive molecules and drugs is one of the most advanced areas of modern bone tissue biomaterial science in terms of enhancement of their osteoconductive and therapeutic properties. The purpose of this study was to develop the approaches for 3D printing of sodium alginate /gelatin /octacalcium phosphate-based constructs with antibacterial and antitumor activity intended for bone defects replacement in the patients with malignant diseases. In this work, we evaluated the drug release kinetic and physicochemical characteristics of the constructs, as well as their specific activity, biocompatibility and osteoplastic properties in in vitro and in vivo tests. The experimental results proved the principal possibility of creating the biocompatible bone substitutes with antibacterial/antitumor activity and maintaining osteoconductive properties by means of 3D printing method.

  11. Spatial relationship between bone formation and mechanical stimulus within cortical bone: Combining 3D fluorochrome mapping and poroelastic finite element modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieroa, A; Pereirab, A F; Wilson, A J; Castagno, S; Javaheri, B; Pitsillides, A A; Marenzana, M; Shefelbine, S J

    2018-06-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue and adapts its architecture in response to biological and mechanical factors. Here we investigate how cortical bone formation is spatially controlled by the local mechanical environment in the murine tibia axial loading model (C57BL/6). We obtained 3D locations of new bone formation by performing 'slice and view' 3D fluorochrome mapping of the entire bone and compared these sites with the regions of high fluid velocity or strain energy density estimated using a finite element model, validated with ex-vivo bone surface strain map acquired ex-vivo using digital image correlation. For the comparison, 2D maps of the average bone formation and peak mechanical stimulus on the tibial endosteal and periosteal surface across the entire cortical surface were created. Results showed that bone formed on the periosteal and endosteal surface in regions of high fluid flow. Peak strain energy density predicted only the formation of bone periosteally. Understanding how the mechanical stimuli spatially relates with regions of cortical bone formation in response to loading will eventually guide loading regime therapies to maintain or restore bone mass in specific sites in skeletal pathologies.

  12. Stereological measures of trabecular bone structure: comparison of 3D micro computed tomography with 2D histological sections in human proximal tibial bone biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Laib, A.; Koller, B.

    2005-01-01

    Stereology applied on histological sections is the 'gold standard' for obtaining quantitative information on cancellous bone structure. Recent advances in micro computed tomography (microCT) have made it possible to acquire three-dimensional (3D) data non-destructively. However, before the 3D...... methods can be used as a substitute for the current 'gold standard' they have to be verified against the existing standard. The aim of this study was to compare bone structural measures obtained from 3D microCT data sets with those obtained by stereology performed on conventional histological sections...... tibial metaphysis. The biopsies were embedded in methylmetacrylate before microCT scanning in a Scanco microCT 40 scanner at a resolution of 20 x 20 x 20 microm3, and the 3D data sets were analysed with a computer program. After microCT scanning, 16 sections were cut from the central 2 mm of each biopsy...

  13. The use of an Ossis custom 3D-printed tri-flanged acetabular implant for major bone loss: minimum 2-year follow-up: Short title: Ossis custom 3D-Printed tri-flanged acetabular implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, David C; Ailabouni, Ramez; Kieser, Sandra C J; Wyatt, Michael C; Armour, Paul C; Coates, Mark H; Hooper, Gary J

    2018-05-01

    Custom 3D-printed acetabular implants are a new technology used in hip surgery with ever-increasing frequency. They offer patient-specific implants to optimise filling of bone defects and implant-bone contact, without the need for excessive bone resection. This is a retrospective cohort study of 46 consecutive patients who underwent an Ossis unilateral custom 3D-printed acetabular implant. Clinical (Oxford Hip Score OHS-60), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Harris Hip Score (HHS) and radiological (restoration of biomechanical hip centre, osteointegration, wear, heterotrophic ossification) results were assessed. Patient mean age was 68 years and follow-up was 38 months (minimum 24 months). 10 patients were excluded from the outcome analysis; 2 patients died, 1 required revision for deep infection and 7 were lost to follow-up. Of the 36 patients included, 21 had severe osteolysis. 7 were revised for infection, 3 for tumoural defects, 3 for metallosis, 1 for dysplasia and 1 for trauma (Paprosky 2a [n=6], 2b [n=2], 2c [n=5], 3a [n=6], 3b [n=11], pelvic dissociation [n=6]). OHS significantly improved postoperatively (16-8-48.4 p=0.027). Postoperative functional scores were good (WOMAC 98; HHS 79). The biomechanical hip centre was restored in all patients. 1 patient had early implant migration with subsequent stabilisation. 2 patients had radiographs concerning for failure of osteointegration. 1 patient had recurrent dislocations. The mid-term results of the Ossis custom 3D-printed tri-flanged acetabular implant for the management of severe acetabular defects are encouraging. The improvement in functional scores and radiographic outcomes are comparable to similar designs. In addition, no cases have required revision for aseptic loosening.

  14. Development and validation of technique for in-vivo 3D analysis of cranial bone graft survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Mark P.; Caldwell, Curtis B.; Antonyshyn, Oleh M.; Ma, Karen; Cooper, Perry W.; Ehrlich, Lisa E.

    1997-05-01

    Bone autografts are routinely employed in the reconstruction of facial deformities resulting from trauma, tumor ablation or congenital malformations. The combined use of post- operative 3D CT and SPECT imaging provides a means for quantitative in vivo evaluation of bone graft volume and osteoblastic activity. The specific objectives of this study were: (1) Determine the reliability and accuracy of interactive computer-assisted analysis of bone graft volumes based on 3D CT scans; (2) Determine the error in CT/SPECT multimodality image registration; (3) Determine the error in SPECT/SPECT image registration; and (4) Determine the reliability and accuracy of CT-guided SPECT uptake measurements in cranial bone grafts. Five human cadaver heads served as anthropomorphic models for all experiments. Four cranial defects were created in each specimen with inlay and onlay split skull bone grafts and reconstructed to skull and malar recipient sites. To acquire all images, each specimen was CT scanned and coated with Technetium doped paint. For purposes of validation, skulls were landmarked with 1/16-inch ball-bearings and Indium. This study provides a new technique relating anatomy and physiology for the analysis of cranial bone graft survival.

  15. [Accuracy of morphological simulation for orthognatic surgery. Assessment of a 3D image fusion software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic, A; Schouman, T; Scolozzi, P

    2013-08-06

    The CT/CBCT data allows for 3D reconstruction of skeletal and untextured soft tissue volume. 3D stereophotogrammetry technology has strongly improved the quality of facial soft tissue surface texture. The combination of these two technologies allows for an accurate and complete reconstruction. The 3D virtual head may be used for orthognatic surgical planning, virtual surgery, and morphological simulation obtained with a software dedicated to the fusion of 3D photogrammetric and radiological images. The imaging material include: a multi-slice CT scan or broad field CBCT scan, a 3D photogrammetric camera. The operative image processing protocol includes the following steps: 1) pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT scan and 3D photogrammetric image acquisition; 2) 3D image segmentation and fusion of untextured CT/CBCT skin with the preoperative textured facial soft tissue surface of the 3D photogrammetric scan; 3) image fusion of the pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT data set virtual osteotomies, and 3D photogrammetric soft tissue virtual simulation; 4) fusion of virtual simulated 3D photogrammetric and real postoperative images, and assessment of accuracy using a color-coded scale to measure the differences between the two surfaces. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of secondary alveolar bone grafts in cleft lip and palate patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Fumio; Akai, Hidemi; Hosaka, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    Alveolar bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate has becomes a routine part of most treatment regimes. This study was undertaken to estimate how much bone needs to be grafted into the cleft cavity and to evaluate the grafted bone using 3-DCT over a period from the early postoperative stage to after one year. Seventy-five patients divided into four groups according to the type of cleft were studied. All patients underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting using particulate cancellous bone from the anterior iliac crest. The bone graft areas were divided into two regions: the extra-cleft region and the intra-cleft region. The weight and the volume of the grafted bone were correlated and the average density was 1.5 g/ml regardless of the cleft type. The bone in the extra-cleft region could be seen in almost all slices of the CT scans, from the lower alveolar process to the piriform aperture. The extra-cleft graft ratio of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate is higher than that of cleft lip and alveolus. The extra-cleft grafting is necessary to restore facial symmetry. The grafted bone was decreased in both height and volume following three months and adequate bone bridging was maintained for one year. We concluded that 3-DCT findings are one of the most valuable methods to evaluate postoperative conditions after alveolar bone grafting. (author)

  17. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of secondary alveolar bone grafts in cleft lip and palate patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Fumio; Akai, Hidemi; Hosaka, Yoshiaki [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    Alveolar bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate has becomes a routine part of most treatment regimes. This study was undertaken to estimate how much bone needs to be grafted into the cleft cavity and to evaluate the grafted bone using 3-DCT over a period from the early postoperative stage to after one year. Seventy-five patients divided into four groups according to the type of cleft were studied. All patients underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting using particulate cancellous bone from the anterior iliac crest. The bone graft areas were divided into two regions: the extra-cleft region and the intra-cleft region. The weight and the volume of the grafted bone were correlated and the average density was 1.5 g/ml regardless of the cleft type. The bone in the extra-cleft region could be seen in almost all slices of the CT scans, from the lower alveolar process to the piriform aperture. The extra-cleft graft ratio of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate is higher than that of cleft lip and alveolus. The extra-cleft grafting is necessary to restore facial symmetry. The grafted bone was decreased in both height and volume following three months and adequate bone bridging was maintained for one year. We concluded that 3-DCT findings are one of the most valuable methods to evaluate postoperative conditions after alveolar bone grafting. (author)

  18. 3D osteocyte lacunar morphometric properties and distributions in human femoral cortical bone using synchrotron radiation micro-CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pei; Haupert, Sylvain; Hesse, Bernhard; Langer, Max; Gouttenoire, Pierre-Jean; Bousson, Valérie; Peyrin, Françoise

    2014-03-01

    Osteocytes, the most numerous bone cells, are thought to be actively involved in the bone modeling and remodeling processes. The morphology of osteocyte is hypothesized to adapt according to the physiological mechanical loading. Three-dimensional micro-CT has recently been used to study osteocyte lacunae. In this work, we proposed a computationally efficient and validated automated image analysis method to quantify the 3D shape descriptors of osteocyte lacunae and their distribution in human femurs. Thirteen samples were imaged using Synchrotron Radiation (SR) micro-CT at ID19 of the ESRF with 1.4μm isotropic voxel resolution. With a field of view of about 2.9×2.9×1.4mm(3), the 3D images include several tens of thousands of osteocyte lacunae. We designed an automated quantification method to segment and extract 3D cell descriptors from osteocyte lacunae. An image moment-based approach was used to calculate the volume, length, width, height and anisotropy of each osteocyte lacuna. We employed a fast algorithm to further efficiently calculate the surface area, the Euler number and the structure model index (SMI) of each lacuna. We also introduced the 3D lacunar density map to directly visualize the lacunar density variation over a large field of view. We reported the lacunar morphometric properties and distributions as well as cortical bone histomorphometric indices on the 13 bone samples. The mean volume and surface were found to be 409.5±149.7μm(3) and 336.2±94.5μm(2). The average dimensions were of 18.9±4.9μm in length, 9.2±2.1μm in width and 4.8±1.1μm in depth. We found lacunar number density and six osteocyte lacunar descriptors, three axis lengths, two anisotropy ratios and SMI, that are significantly correlated to bone porosity at a same local region. The proposed method allowed an automatic and efficient direct 3D analysis of a large population of bone cells and is expected to provide reliable biological information for better understanding the

  19. Evaluating 3D-printed biomaterials as scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Martha O; Vorwald, Charlotte E; Dreher, Maureen L; Mott, Eric J; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Cinar, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Hamidreza; Somo, Sami; Dean, David; Brey, Eric M; Fisher, John P

    2015-01-07

    There is an unmet need for a consistent set of tools for the evaluation of 3D-printed constructs. A toolbox developed to design, characterize, and evaluate 3D-printed poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds is proposed for vascularized engineered tissues. This toolbox combines modular design and non-destructive fabricated design evaluation, evaluates biocompatibility and mechanical properties, and models angiogenesis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Design and Validation of 3D Printed Complex Bone Models with Internal Anatomic Fidelity for Surgical Training and Rehearsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Bertram J; Kraut, Jay; Rhodes, Charlotte; Hochman, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Physical models of complex bony structures can be used for surgical skills training. Current models focus on surface rendering but suffer from a lack of internal accuracy due to limitations in the manufacturing process. We describe a technique for generating internally accurate rapid-prototyped anatomical models with solid and hollow structures from clinical and microCT data using a 3D printer. In a face validation experiment, otolaryngology residents drilled a cadaveric bone and its corresponding printed model. The printed bone models were deemed highly realistic representations across all measured parameters and the educational value of the models was strongly appreciated.

  1. The quantification of glenoid bone loss in anterior shoulder instability; MR-arthro compared to 3D-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markenstein, Jeroen E.; Jaspars, Kjell C.C.J.; Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Willems, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate if magnetic resonance imaging with intra-articular contrast (MR-arthro) is as reliable as three-dimensionally reconstructed computed tomography imaging (3D-CT) in quantifying the glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior shoulder instability. Thirty-five patients were included. Sagittal MR-arthro and 3D-CT images of the glenoid surface were obtained pre-operatively. Two observers measured these images twice with OsiriX software in a randomized and blinded way. The intraclass correlations (ICC) of the intra- and inter-observer reliability within one method and an additional Bland-Altman plot for calculating agreement between the two methods were obtained. The joint estimates of the intra-observer reliability, taking into account the data from both observer A and B, for 3D-CT and MR-arthro were good to excellent. The intra-observer reliability was 0.938 (95 % CI: 0.879, 0.968) for 3D-CT and 0.799 (95 % CI: 0.639, 0.837) for MR-arthro. The inter-observer reliability between the two observers within one method (3D-CT or MR-arthro) was moderate to good. 3D-CT: 0.724 (95 % CI: 0.236, 0.886) and MR-arthro: 0.534 (95 % CI: 0.128, 0.762). Comparing both the 3D-CT and MR-arthro method, a Bland-Altman plot showed satisfying differences with the majority of outcomes (89 %) within 1 SD. Good to excellent intra- and moderate to good inter-observer correlations and a satisfying Bland-Altman plot when compared to 3D-CT show tendencies that MR-arthro is reliable and valid for measuring bony defects of the glenoid. (orig.)

  2. The quantification of glenoid bone loss in anterior shoulder instability; MR-arthro compared to 3D-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markenstein, Jeroen E. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 95500, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jaspars, Kjell C.C.J. [Van Weel-Bethesda Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Dirksland (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Postbox 95500, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willems, W.J. [Delairesse Kliniek, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate if magnetic resonance imaging with intra-articular contrast (MR-arthro) is as reliable as three-dimensionally reconstructed computed tomography imaging (3D-CT) in quantifying the glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior shoulder instability. Thirty-five patients were included. Sagittal MR-arthro and 3D-CT images of the glenoid surface were obtained pre-operatively. Two observers measured these images twice with OsiriX software in a randomized and blinded way. The intraclass correlations (ICC) of the intra- and inter-observer reliability within one method and an additional Bland-Altman plot for calculating agreement between the two methods were obtained. The joint estimates of the intra-observer reliability, taking into account the data from both observer A and B, for 3D-CT and MR-arthro were good to excellent. The intra-observer reliability was 0.938 (95 % CI: 0.879, 0.968) for 3D-CT and 0.799 (95 % CI: 0.639, 0.837) for MR-arthro. The inter-observer reliability between the two observers within one method (3D-CT or MR-arthro) was moderate to good. 3D-CT: 0.724 (95 % CI: 0.236, 0.886) and MR-arthro: 0.534 (95 % CI: 0.128, 0.762). Comparing both the 3D-CT and MR-arthro method, a Bland-Altman plot showed satisfying differences with the majority of outcomes (89 %) within 1 SD. Good to excellent intra- and moderate to good inter-observer correlations and a satisfying Bland-Altman plot when compared to 3D-CT show tendencies that MR-arthro is reliable and valid for measuring bony defects of the glenoid. (orig.)

  3. 3D- Printed Poly(ε-caprolactone) Scaffold Integrated with Cell-laden Chitosan Hydrogels for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Shao-Jie; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Yu-Fang; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic polymeric scaffolds are commonly used in bone tissue engineering (BTE) due to their biocompatibility and adequate mechanical properties. However, their hydrophobicity and the lack of specific cell recognition sites confined their practical application. In this study, to improve the cell seeding efficiency and osteoinductivity, an injectable thermo-sensitive chitosan hydrogel (CSG) was incorporated into a 3D-printed poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold to form a hybrid scaffold. To de...

  4. Three-dimensional image technology in forensic anthropology: Assessing the validity of biological profiles derived from CT-3D images of the skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Leon Valenzuela, Maria Julia

    This project explores the reliability of building a biological profile for an unknown individual based on three-dimensional (3D) images of the individual's skeleton. 3D imaging technology has been widely researched for medical and engineering applications, and it is increasingly being used as a tool for anthropological inquiry. While the question of whether a biological profile can be derived from 3D images of a skeleton with the same accuracy as achieved when using dry bones has been explored, bigger sample sizes, a standardized scanning protocol and more interobserver error data are needed before 3D methods can become widely and confidently used in forensic anthropology. 3D images of Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from 130 innominate bones from Boston University's skeletal collection (School of Medicine). For each bone, both 3D images and original bones were assessed using the Phenice and Suchey-Brooks methods. Statistical analysis was used to determine the agreement between 3D image assessment versus traditional assessment. A pool of six individuals with varying experience in the field of forensic anthropology scored a subsample (n = 20) to explore interobserver error. While a high agreement was found for age and sex estimation for specimens scored by the author, the interobserver study shows that observers found it difficult to apply standard methods to 3D images. Higher levels of experience did not result in higher agreement between observers, as would be expected. Thus, a need for training in 3D visualization before applying anthropological methods to 3D bones is suggested. Future research should explore interobserver error using a larger sample size in order to test the hypothesis that training in 3D visualization will result in a higher agreement between scores. The need for the development of a standard scanning protocol focusing on the optimization of 3D image resolution is highlighted. Applications for this research include the possibility

  5. Self-assembled composite matrix in a hierarchical 3-D scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Muwan; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Baatrup, Anette

    2011-01-01

    It is of high clinical relevance in bone tissue engineering that scaffolds promote a high seeding efficiency of cells capable of osteogenic differentiation, such as human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We evaluated the effects of a novel polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold on h...

  6. 3D Architecture of Trabecular Bone in the Pig Mandible and Femur: Inter-Trabecular Angle Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehonatan Ben-Zvi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancellous bone is an intricate network of interconnected trabeculae, to which analysis of network topology can be applied. The inter-trabecular angle (ITA analysis—an analysis of network topological parameters and regularity of network-forming nodes—was previously carried out on human proximal femora and showed that trabecular bone follows two main principles: sparsity of the network connectedness (prevalence of nodes with low connectivity in the network and maximal space spanning (angular offset of connected elements is maximal for their number and approximates the values of geometrically symmetric shapes. These observations suggest that 3D organization of trabecular bone, irrespective of size and shape of individual elements, reflects a tradeoff between minimal metabolic cost of maintenance and maximal network stability under conditions of multidirectional loading. In this study, we validate the ITA application using additional 3D structures (cork and 3D-printed metal lattices, analyze the ITA parameters in porcine proximal femora and mandibles, and carry out a spatial analysis of the most common node type in the porcine mandibular condyle. The validation shows that the ITA application reliably detects designed or evolved topological parameters. The ITA parameters of porcine trabecular bones are similar to those of human bones. We demonstrate functional adaptation in the pig mandibular condyle by showing that the planar nodes with three edges are preferentially aligned in relation to the muscle forces that are applied to the condyle. We conclude that the ITA topological parameters are remarkably conserved, but locally do adapt to applied stresses.

  7. Mesoporous silicate nanoparticles/3D nanofibrous scaffold-mediated dual-drug delivery for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingqing; Liu, Yangxi; Selvaratnam, Balaranjan; Koodali, Ranjit T; Sun, Hongli

    2018-04-09

    Controlled delivery systems play a critical role in the success of bone morphogenetic proteins (i.e., BMP2 and BMP7) for challenged bone repair. Instead of single-drug release that is currently and commonly prevalent, dual-drug delivery strategies are highly desired to achieve effective bone regeneration because natural bone repair process is driven by multiple factors. Particularly, angiogenesis is essential for osteogenesis and requires more than just one factor (e.g., Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, VEGF). Therefore, we developed a novel mesoporous silicate nanoparticles (MSNs) incorporated-3D nanofibrous gelatin (GF) scaffold for dual-delivery of BMP2 and deferoxamine (DFO). DFO is a hypoxia-mimetic drug that can activate hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and trigger subsequent angiogenesis. Sustained BMP2 release system was achieved through encapsulation into large-pored MSNs, while the relative short-term release of DFO was engineered through covalent conjugation with chitosan to reduce its cytotoxicity and elongate its half-life. Both MSNs and DFO were incorporated onto a porous 3D GF scaffold to serve as a biomimetic osteogenic microenvironment. Our data indicated that DFO and BMP2 were released from a scaffold at different release rates (10 vs 28 days) yet maintained their angiogenic and osteogenic ability, respectively. Importantly, our data indicated that the released DFO significantly improved BMP2-induced osteogenic differentiation where the dose/duration was important for its effects in both mouse and human stem cell models. Thus, we developed a novel and tunable MSNs/GF 3D scaffold-mediated dual-drug delivery system and studied the potential application of the both FDA-approved DFO and BMP2 for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D Assessment of Features Associated With Transvalvular Aortic Regurgitation After TAVR: A Real-Time 3D TEE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Kentaro; Mihara, Hirotsugu; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Berdejo, Javier; Harada, Kenji; Itabashi, Yuji; Siegel, Robert; Makkar, Raj R; Shiota, Takahiro

    2016-02-01

    This study of 3-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) aimed to demonstrate features associated with transvalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and to confirm the fact that a gap between the native aortic annulus and prosthesis is associated with paravalvular AR. The mechanism of AR after TAVR, particularly that of transvalvular AR, has not been evaluated adequately. All patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR with the Sapien device (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) had 3D TEE of the pre-procedural native aortic annulus and the post-procedural prosthetic valve. In the 201 patients studied, the total AR was mild in 67 patients (33%), moderate in 21 patients (10%), and severe in no patients. There were 20 patients with transvalvular AR and 82 patients with paravalvular AR. Fourteen patients had both transvalvular and paravalvular AR. Patients with transvalvular AR had larger prosthetic expansion (p prosthetic shape at the prosthetic commissure level (p prosthetic commissures in relation to the native commissures, than the patients without transvalvular AR. Age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01 to 1.09; p 3D TEE successfully demonstrated the features associated with transvalvular AR, such as large prosthetic expansion, elliptical prosthetic shape, and anti-anatomical position of prosthesis. Additionally, effective area oversizing was associated with paravalvular AR. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physicochemical and osteoplastic characteristics of 3D printed bone grafts based on synthetic calcium phosphates and natural polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhurina, E. K.; Karalkin, P. A.; Komlev, V. S.; Sviridova, I. K.; Kirsanova, V. A.; Akhmedova, S. A.; Shanskiy, Ya D.; Fedotov, A. Yu; Barinov, S. M.; Sergeeva, N. S.

    2018-04-01

    A creation of personalized implants for regeneration of bone tissue seems to be a very promising biomedical technological approach. We have studied the physicochemical characteristics, cyto- and biocompatibility of three-dimensional constructs based on sodium alginate and gelatin in combination with 2 types of calcium phosphate (tricalcium phosphate or octacalcium phosphate) obtained by inkjet 3D printing. In our experiments, we have studied the physical and chemical properties of the constructs – their porosity, chemical composition, microarchitecture of the surface and mechanical elasticity. The cytocompatibility of 3D constructs and matrix-for-cell properties were investigated in vitro on a model of human osteosarcoma MG-63 cell line by means of MTT assay. The biocompatibility of 3D constructs was studied on the model of subcutaneous implantation in mice up to 12 weeks. All types of 3D constructs were cytocompatible in vitro, demonstrated good matrix-for-cells properties, and had supported cell proliferation for 2 weeks. In results of subcutaneous in vivo test all constructs demonstrated biocompatibility with slow bioresorption of organic and inorganic components. Osteogenesis proceeded more actively in rat tibia model defects (marginal excision), substituted by 3D printed 3-component implants based on alginate, gelatin and octacalcium phosphate.

  10. An in vitro 3D bone metastasis model by using a human bone tissue culture and human sex-related cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanna, Francesca; Borsari, Veronica; Brogini, Silvia; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Cepollaro, Simona; Cadossi, Matteo; Martini, Lucia; Mazzotti, Antonio; Fini, Milena

    2016-11-22

    One of the main limitations, when studying cancer-bone metastasis, is the complex nature of the native bone environment and the lack of reliable, simple, inexpensive models that closely mimic the biological processes occurring in patients and allowing the correct translation of results. To enhance the understanding of the mechanisms underlying human bone metastases and in order to find new therapies, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) cancer-bone metastasis model by culturing human breast or prostate cancer cells with human bone tissue isolated from female and male patients, respectively. Bone tissue discarded from total hip replacement surgery was cultured in a rolling apparatus system in a normoxic or hypoxic environment. Gene expression profile, protein levels, histological, immunohistochemical and four-dimensional (4D) micro-CT analyses showed a noticeable specificity of breast and prostate cancer cells for bone colonization and ingrowth, thus highlighting the species-specific and sex-specific osteotropism and the need to widen the current knowledge on cancer-bone metastasis spread in human bone tissues. The results of this study support the application of this model in preclinical studies on bone metastases and also follow the 3R principles, the guiding principles, aimed at replacing/reducing/refining (3R) animal use and their suffering for scientific purposes.

  11. Chitosan-Graphene Oxide 3D scaffolds as Promising Tools for Bone Regeneration in Critical-Size Mouse Calvarial Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenean, Anca; Codreanu, Ada; Herman, Hildegard; Balta, Cornel; Rosu, Marcel; Mihali, Ciprian Valentin; Ivan, Alexandra; Dinescu, Sorina; Ionita, Mariana; Costache, Marieta

    2017-11-30

    Limited self-regenerating capacity of human skeleton makes the reconstruction of critical size bone defect a significant challenge for clinical practice. Aimed for regenerating bone tissues, this study was designed to investigate osteogenic differentiation, along with bone repair capacity of 3D chitosan (CHT) scaffolds enriched with graphene oxide (GO) in critical-sized mouse calvarial defect. Histopathological/histomorphometry and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) analysis of the implants revealed larger amount of new bone in the CHT/GO-filled defects compared with CHT alone (p < 0.001). When combined with GO, CHT scaffolds synergistically promoted the increase of alkaline phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo experiments. This enhanced osteogenesis was corroborated with increased expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Runx-2 up to week 4 post-implantation, which showed that GO facilitates the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. Meanwhile, osteogenesis was promoted by GO at the late stage as well, as indicated by the up-regulation of osteopontin and osteocalcin at week 8 and overexpressed at week 18, for both markers. Our data suggest that CHT/GO biomaterial could represent a promising tool for the reconstruction of large bone defects, without using exogenous living cells or growth factors.

  12. Production of Composite Scaffold Containing Silk Fibroin, Chitosan, and Gelatin for 3D Cell Culture and Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqing; Wang, Qiuke; Gu, Yebo; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Liang; Chen, Yunfeng

    2017-11-08

    BACKGROUND Bone tissue engineering, a powerful tool to treat bone defects, is highly dependent on use of scaffolds. Both silk fibroin (SF) and chitosan (Cs) are biocompatible and actively studied for reconstruction of tissue engineering. Gelatin (Gel) is also widely applied in the biomedical field due to its low antigenicity and physicochemical stability. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this study, 4 different types of scaffolds were constructed - SF, SF/Cs, SF/Gel, and SF/Cs/Gel - and we compared their physical and chemical properties as well as biological characterization of these scaffolds to determine the most suitable scaffold for use in bone regeneration. First, these scaffolds were produced via chemical cross-linking method and freeze-drying technique. Next, the characterization of internal structure was studied using scanning electron microscopy and the porosity was evaluated by liquid displacement method. Then, we compared physicochemical properties such as water absorption rate and degradation property. Finally, MC3T3-E1 cells were inoculated on the scaffolds to study the biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in vitro. RESULTS The composite scaffold formed by all 3 components was the best for use in bone regeneration. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that the best scaffold among the 4 studied for MC3T3-E1 cells is our SF/Cs/Gel scaffold, suggesting a new choice for bone regeneration that can be used to treat bone defects or fractures in clinical practice.

  13. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Asa'ad, Farah; Pagni, Giorgio; Pilipchuk, Sophia P.; Giann?, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the qu...

  14. The ModFOLD4 server for the quality assessment of 3D protein models

    OpenAIRE

    McGuffin, Liam J.; Buenavista, Maria T.; Roche, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Once you have generated a 3D model of a protein,\\ud how do you know whether it bears any resemblance\\ud to the actual structure? To determine the usefulness\\ud of 3D models of proteins, they must be assessed in\\ud terms of their quality by methods that predict their\\ud similarity to the native structure. The ModFOLD4\\ud server is the latest version of our leading independent\\ud server for the estimation of both the global and\\ud local (per-residue) quality of 3D protein models. The\\ud server ...

  15. Comparison of 3D-Printed Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Scaffolds Functionalized with Tricalcium Phosphate, Hydroxyapatite, Bio-Oss, or Decellularized Bone Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Ethan; Rindone, Alexandra; Dorafshar, Amir; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-printing facilitates rapid, custom manufacturing of bone scaffolds with a wide range of material choices. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential for 3D-printing bioactive (i.e., osteo-inductive) scaffolds for use in bone regeneration applications. In this study, we 3D-printed porous poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds using a fused deposition modeling (FDM) process and functionalized them with mineral additives that have been widely used commercially and clinically: tricalcium phosphate (TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), Bio-Oss (BO), or decellularized bone matrix (DCB). We assessed the "print quality" of the composite scaffolds and found that the print quality of PCL-TCP, PCL-BO, and PCL-DCB measured ∼0.7 and was statistically lower than PCL and PCL-HA scaffolds (∼0.8). We found that the incorporation of mineral particles did not significantly decrease the compressive modulus of the graft, which was on the order of 260 MPa for solid blocks and ranged from 32 to 83 MPa for porous scaffolds. Raman spectroscopy revealed the surfaces of the scaffolds maintained the chemical profile of their dopants following the printing process. We evaluated the osteo-inductive properties of each scaffold composite by culturing adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in vitro and assessing their differentiation into osteoblasts. The calcium content (normalized to DNA) increased significantly in PCL-TCP (p  0.05). Collagen 1 expression was 10-fold greater than PCL in PCL-BO and PCL-DCB (p < 0.05) and osteocalcin expression was 10-fold greater in PCL-BO and PCL-DCB (p < 0.05) as measured by quantitative-real time-polymerase chain reaction. This study suggests that PCL-BO and PCL-DCB hybrid material may be advantageous for bone healing applications over PCL-HA or PCL-TCP blends.

  16. Study of proximal femoral bone perfusion with 3D T1 dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzik, Jean-Francois [Groupe Hospitalier de l' Institut Catholique de Lille / Faculte Libre de Medecine, Service d' Imagerie Medicale, Lille (France); Centre de Consultation et d' Imagerie de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Lille (France); Universite Catholique de Lille, Lille (France); Universite Nord de France, Lille (France); EA 4490 PMOI (Physiopathologie des Maladies Osseuses Inflammatoires) IFR 114 PRES Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Lefebvre, Guillaume; El Rafei, Mazen [Centre de Consultation et d' Imagerie de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Lille (France); Universite Nord de France, Lille (France); CHU Lille, Lille (France); Forzy, Gerard [Universite Catholique de Lille, Lille (France); Universite Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe Hospitalier de l' Institut Catholique de Lille, Laboratoire de Biologie, Departement de Biostatistiques, Lille (France); Chechin, David [Philips Medical Systems, Suresnes (France); Cotten, Anne [Centre de Consultation et d' Imagerie de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Lille (France); Universite Nord de France, Lille (France); EA 4490 PMOI (Physiopathologie des Maladies Osseuses Inflammatoires) IFR 114 PRES Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); CHU Lille, Lille (France)

    2014-12-15

    The objective of this study was to compare measurements of semi-quantitative and pharmacokinetic parameters in areas of red (RBM) and yellow bone marrow (YBM) of the hip, using an in-house high-resolution DCE T1 sequence, and to assess intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of these measurements. The right hips of 21 adult patients under 50 years of age were studied. Spatial resolution was 1.8 x 1.8 x 1.8 mm{sup 3}, and temporal resolution was 13.5 seconds. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently processed DCE images and measured semi-quantitative and pharmacokinetic parameters in areas of YBM and RBM. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed. Area under the curve (AUC) and initial slope (IS) were significantly greater for RBM than for YBM (p < 0.05). K{sup trans} and k{sub ep} were also significantly greater for RBM (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in time to peak between the regions (p < 0.05). SNR, CNR, and intra- and inter-observer reproducibility were all good. DCE study of the whole hip is feasible with high spatial resolution using a 3D T1 sequence. Measures were possible even in low vascularized areas of the femoral head. K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, AUC, and IS values were significantly different between red and yellow marrow, whereas TTP values were not. (orig.)

  17. Transparent model of temporal bone and vestibulocochlear organ made by 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Taniguchi, Naoto; Uchida, Fujio; Ishizawa, Akimitsu; Kanatsu, Yoshinori; Zhou, Ming; Funakoshi, Kodai; Akashi, Hideo; Abe, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    The vestibulocochlear organ is composed of tiny complex structures embedded in the petrous part of the temporal bone. Landmarks on the temporal bone surface provide the only orientation guide for dissection, but these need to be removed during the course of dissection, making it difficult to grasp the underlying three-dimensional structures, especially for beginners during gross anatomy classes. We report herein an attempt to produce a transparent three-dimensional-printed model of the human ear. En bloc samples of the temporal bone from donated cadavers were subjected to computed tomography (CT) scanning, and on the basis of the data, the surface temporal bone was reconstructed with transparent resin and the vestibulocochlear organ with white resin to create a 1:1.5 scale model. The carotid canal was stuffed with red cotton, and the sigmoid sinus and internal jugular vein were filled with blue clay. In the inner ear, the internal acoustic meatus, cochlea, and semicircular canals were well reconstructed in detail with white resin. The three-dimensional relationships of the semicircular canals, spiral turns of the cochlea, and internal acoustic meatus were well recognizable from every direction through the transparent surface resin. The anterior semicircular canal was obvious immediately beneath the arcuate eminence, and the topographical relationships of the vestibulocochlear organ and adjacent great vessels were easily discernible. We consider that this transparent temporal bone model will be a very useful aid for better understanding of the gross anatomy of the vestibulocochlear organ.

  18. 3D-printed scaffolds based on PLA/HA nanocomposites for trabecular bone reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niaza, K V; Senatov, F S; Kaloshkin, S D; Maksimkin, A V; Chukov, D I

    2016-01-01

    In the present work porous PLA scaffolds filled with micro- and nano- HA were studied. Both composites with micro- and nano-HA were obtained by extrusion in the same conditions. Scaffolds were obtained by 3D-printing by fused filament fabrication method. Structure of porous scaffolds was pre-modeled by computer software. Compression and three - point flexural tests were used to study mechanical properties of the scaffolds. (paper)

  19. 3D-printed scaffolds based on PLA/HA nanocomposites for trabecular bone reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaza, K. V.; Senatov, F. S.; Kaloshkin, S. D.; Maksimkin, A. V.; Chukov, D. I.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work porous PLA scaffolds filled with micro- and nano- HA were studied. Both composites with micro- and nano-HA were obtained by extrusion in the same conditions. Scaffolds were obtained by 3D-printing by fused filament fabrication method. Structure of porous scaffolds was pre-modeled by computer software. Compression and three - point flexural tests were used to study mechanical properties of the scaffolds.

  20. Cryogenic 3D printing for producing hierarchical porous and rhBMP-2-loaded Ca-P/PLLA nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Zhao, Qilong; Wang, Min

    2017-06-07

    The performance of bone tissue engineering scaffolds can be assessed through cell responses to scaffolds, including cell attachment, infiltration, morphogenesis, proliferation, differentiation, etc, which are determined or heavily influenced by the composition, structure, mechanical properties, and biological properties (e.g. osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity) of scaffolds. Although some promising 3D printing techniques such as fused deposition modeling and selective laser sintering could be employed to produce biodegradable bone tissue engineering scaffolds with customized shapes and tailored interconnected pores, effective methods for fabricating scaffolds with well-designed hierarchical porous structure (both interconnected macropores and surface micropores) and tunable osteoconductivity/osteoinductivity still need to be developed. In this investigation, a novel cryogenic 3D printing technique was investigated and developed for producing hierarchical porous and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-loaded calcium phosphate (Ca-P) nanoparticle/poly(L-lactic acid) nanocomposite scaffolds, in which the Ca-P nanoparticle-incorporated scaffold layer and rhBMP-2-encapsulated scaffold layer were deposited alternatingly using different types of emulsions as printing inks. The mechanical properties of the as-printed scaffolds were comparable to those of human cancellous bone. Sustained releases of Ca 2+ ions and rhBMP-2 were achieved and the biological activity of rhBMP-2 was well-preserved. Scaffolds with a desirable hierarchical porous structure and dual delivery of Ca 2+ ions and rhBMP-2 exhibited superior performance in directing the behaviors of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and caused improved cell viability, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation, which has suggested their great potential for bone tissue engineering.

  1. 3D perfusion bioreactor-activated porous granules on implant fixation and early bone formation in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Snoek Henriksen, Susan; Martinetti, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    allograft, granules, granules with bone marrow aspirate or bioreactor-activated graft material. Following an observation time of 6 weeks, early implant fixation and bone formation were assessed by micro-CT scanning, mechanical testing, and histomorphometry. Bone formations were seen in all groups, while......, bone formation was observed in all groups, while the bioreactor-activated graft material did not reveal additional effects on early implant fixation comparable to allograft in this model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016....

  2. Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Coated with Freeze-Dried Platelet-Rich Plasma for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional printing is one of the most promising techniques for the manufacturing of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. However, a pure scaffold is limited by its biological properties. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been shown to have the potential to improve the osteogenic effect. In this study, we improved the biological properties of scaffolds by coating 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds with freeze-dried and traditionally prepared PRP, and we evaluated these scaffolds through in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, we evaluated the interaction between dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and the scaffolds by measuring cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and osteogenic differentiation. The results showed that freeze-dried PRP significantly enhanced ALP activity and the mRNA expression levels of osteogenic genes (ALP, RUNX2 (runt-related gene-2, OCN (osteocalcin, OPN (osteopontin of DPSCs (p < 0.05. In vivo, 5 mm calvarial defects were created, and the PRP-PCL scaffolds were implanted. The data showed that compared with traditional PRP-PCL scaffolds or bare PCL scaffolds, the freeze-dried PRP-PCL scaffolds induced significantly greater bone formation (p < 0.05. All these data suggest that coating 3D-printed PCL scaffolds with freeze-dried PRP can promote greater osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs and induce more bone formation, which may have great potential in future clinical applications.

  3. Biomimetic 3D in vitro model of biofilm triggered osteomyelitis for investigating hematopoiesis during bone marrow infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raic, Annamarija; Riedel, Sophie; Kemmling, Elena; Bieback, Karen; Overhage, Joerg; Lee-Thedieck, Cornelia

    2018-04-18

    In this work, we define the requirements for a human-based osteomyelitis model which overcomes the limitations of state of the art animal models. Osteomyelitis is a severe and difficult to treat infection of the bone that develops rapidly, making it difficult to study in humans. We have developed a 3D in vitro model of the bone marrow, comprising a macroporous material, human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Inclusion of biofilms grown on an implant into the model system allowed us to study the effects of postoperative osteomyelitis-inducing bacteria on the bone marrow. The bacteria influenced the myeloid differentiation of HSPCs as well as MSC cytokine expression and the MSC ability to support HSPC maintenance. In conclusion, we provide a new 3D in vitro model which meets all the requirements for investigating the impact of osteomyelitis. Implant associated-osteomyelitis is a persistent bacterial infection of the bone which occurs in many implant patients and can result in functional impairments or even entire loss of the extremity. Nevertheless, surprisingly little is known on the triangle interaction between implant material, bacterial biofilm and affected bone tissue. Closing this gap of knowledge would be crucial for the fundamental understanding of the disease and the development of novel treatment strategies. For this purpose, we developed the first biomaterial-based system that is able to mimic implant-associated osteomyelitis outside of the body, thus, opening the avenue to study this fatal disease in the laboratory. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocultivation: 3D printed customized porous scaffolds for heterotopic bone induction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, S.T.; Bolte, H.; Krapf, O.; Seitz, H.; Douglas, T.E.L.; Sivananthan, S.; Wiltfang, J.; Sherry, E.; Warnke, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of computer assisted designed (CAD) synthetic hydroxyapatite and tricalciumphosphate blocks to serve as precise scaffolds for intramuscular bone induction in a rat model. A central channel to allow for vessel pedicle or nerve integration was added.

  5. Age-related changes in vertebral and iliac crest 3D bone microstructure--differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, J S; Jensen, M V; Niklassen, A S; Ebbesen, E N; Brüel, A

    2015-01-01

    Age-related changes of vertebra and iliac crest 3D microstructure were investigated, and we showed that they were in general similar. The 95th percentile of vertebral trabecular thickness distribution increased with age for women. Surprisingly, vertebral and iliac crest bone microstructure was only weakly correlated (r = 0.38 to 0.75), despite the overall similar age-related changes. The purposes of the study were to determine the age-related changes in iliac and vertebral bone microstructure for women and men over a large age range and to investigate the relationship between the bone microstructure at these skeletal sites. Matched sets of transiliac crest bone biopsies and lumbar vertebral body (L2) specimens from 41 women (19-96 years) and 39 men (23-95 years) were micro-computed tomography (μCT) scanned, and the 3D microstructure was quantified. For both women and men, bone volume per total volume (BV/TV), connectivity density (CD), and trabecular number (Tb.N) decreased significantly, while structure model index (SMI) and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increased significantly with age at either skeletal site. Vertebral trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) was independent of age for both women and men, while iliac Tb.Th decreased significantly with age for men, but not for women. In general, the vertebral and iliac age-related changes were similar. The 95th percentile of the Tb.Th distribution increased significantly with age for women but was independent of age for men at the vertebral body, while it was independent of age for either sex at the iliac crest. The Tb.Th probability density functions at the two skeletal sites became significantly more similar with age for women, but not for men. The microstructural parameters at the iliac crest and the vertebral bodies were only moderately correlated from r = 0.38 for SMI in women to r = 0.75 for Tb.Sp in men. Age-related changes in vertebral and iliac bone microstructure were in general similar. The iliac

  6. The relationship between clinical characteristics, radiographic osteoarthritis and 3D bone area: data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, A J; Dube, B; Hensor, E M A; Kingsbury, S R; Peat, G; Bowes, M A; Conaghan, P G

    2014-10-01

    Radiographic measures of osteoarthritis (OA) are based upon two dimensional projection images. Active appearance modelling (AAM) of knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables accurate, 3D quantification of joint structures in large cohorts. This cross-sectional study explored the relationship between clinical characteristics, radiographic measures of OA and 3D bone area (tAB). Clinical data and baseline paired radiographic and MRI data, from the medial compartment of one knee of 2588 participants were obtained from the NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). The medial femur (MF) and tibia (MT) tAB were calculated using AAM. 'OA-attributable' tAB (OA-tAB) was calculated using data from regression models of tAB of knees without OA. Associations between OA-tAB and radiographic measures of OA were investigated using linear regression. In univariable analyses, height, weight, and age in female knees without OA explained 43.1%, 32.1% and 0.1% of the MF tAB variance individually and 54.4% when included simultaneously in a multivariable model. Joint space width (JSW), osteophytes and sclerosis explained just 5.3%, 14.9% and 10.1% of the variance of MF OA-tAB individually and 17.4% when combined. Kellgren Lawrence (KL) grade explained approximately 20% of MF OA-tAB individually. Similar results were seen for MT OA-tAB. Height explained the majority of variance in tAB, confirming an allometric relationship between body and joint size. Radiographic measures of OA, derived from a single radiographic projection, accounted for only a small amount of variation in 3D knee OA-tAB. The additional structural information provided by 3D bone area may explain the lack of a substantive relationship with these radiographic OA measures. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Fabrication of 3D porous SF/β-TCP hybrid scaffolds for bone tissue reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jung; Min, Kyung Dan; Lee, Min Chae; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Lee, Jung Min; Park, Ye Ri; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-07-01

    Bio-ceramic is a biomaterial actively studied in the field of bone tissue engineering. But, only certain ceramic materials can resolve the corrosion problem and possess the biological affinity of conventional metal biomaterials. Therefore, the recent development of composites of hybrid composites and polymers has been widely studied. In this study, we aimed to select the best scaffold of silk fibroin and β-TCP hybrid for bone tissue engineering. We fabricated three groups of scaffold such as SF (silk fibroin scaffold), GS (silk fibroin/small granule size of β-TCP scaffold) and GM (silk fibroin/medium granule size of β-TCP scaffold), and we compared the characteristics of each group. During characterization of the scaffold, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for structural analysis. We compared the physiological properties of the scaffold regarding the swelling ratio, water uptake and porosity. To evaluate the mechanical properties, we examined the compressive strength of the scaffold. During in vitro testing, we evaluated cell attachment and cell proliferation (CCK-8). Finally, we confirmed in vivo new bone regeneration from the implanted scaffolds using histological staining and micro-CT. From these evaluations, the fabricated scaffold demonstrated high porosity with good inter-pore connectivity, showed good biocompatibility and high compressive strength and modulus. In particular, the present study indicates that the GM scaffold using β-TCP accelerates new bone regeneration of implanted scaffolds. Accordingly, our scaffold is expected to act a useful application in the field of bone tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1779-1787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. 3D registration method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using spectral reflectance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobe, Kazuki; Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Takahashi, Hideya

    2018-02-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. One of the major factors for FGID is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. We have proposed a system for assessing the function of gastric motility using a 3D endoscope. In this previous study, we established a method for estimating characteristics of contraction wave extracted from a 3D shape include contraction wave obtained from stereo endoscope. Because it is difficult to fix the tip position of the endoscope during the examination, estimation of the 3D position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment. Then, we have proposed a motion compensation method using 3D scene flow. However, since mucosa has few feature points, it is difficult to obtain 3D scene flow from RGB images. So, we focused on spectral imaging that can enhance visualization of mucosal structure. Spectral image can be obtained without switching optical filters by using technique to estimate spectral reflectance by image processing. In this paper, we propose registration method of measured 3D shape in time series using estimated spectral image. The spectral image is estimated from the RGB image for each frame. 3D scene flow of feature points, that is, enhanced mucosal structure calculated by spectral images in a time series. The position change between the endoscope and gastric wall is estimated by 3D scene flow. We experimented to confirm the validity of the proposed method using papers with a grid of colors close to the background color.

  9. 3D visualization and quantification of bone and teeth mineralization for the study of osteo/dentinogenesis in mice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchadier, A.; Vidal, C.; Ordureau, S.; Lédée, R.; Léger, C.; Young, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2011-03-01

    Research on bone and teeth mineralization in animal models is critical for understanding human pathologies. Genetically modified mice represent highly valuable models for the study of osteo/dentinogenesis defects and osteoporosis. Current investigations on mice dental and skeletal phenotype use destructive and time consuming methods such as histology and scanning microscopy. Micro-CT imaging is quicker and provides high resolution qualitative phenotypic description. However reliable quantification of mineralization processes in mouse bone and teeth are still lacking. We have established novel CT imaging-based software for accurate qualitative and quantitative analysis of mouse mandibular bone and molars. Data were obtained from mandibles of mice lacking the Fibromodulin gene which is involved in mineralization processes. Mandibles were imaged with a micro-CT originally devoted to industrial applications (Viscom, X8060 NDT). 3D advanced visualization was performed using the VoxBox software (UsefulProgress) with ray casting algorithms. Comparison between control and defective mice mandibles was made by applying the same transfer function for each 3D data, thus allowing to detect shape, colour and density discrepencies. The 2D images of transverse slices of mandible and teeth were similar and even more accurate than those obtained with scanning electron microscopy. Image processing of the molars allowed the 3D reconstruction of the pulp chamber, providing a unique tool for the quantitative evaluation of dentinogenesis. This new method is highly powerful for the study of oro-facial mineralizations defects in mice models, complementary and even competitive to current histological and scanning microscopy appoaches.

  10. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo.

  11. 3D spiral CT imaging of bone anomalies in a case of diastematomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalej, Martin; Duffner, Frank; Stefanou, Alexander; Petersen, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    The case of a 48-year-old woman, suffering from a diastematomyelia, is presented. This case and the diagnostic findings are used to demonstrate the demands on imaging methods with respect to a new classification of split cord malformations (SCMs) recently published. Although MRI is the method of choice for imaging of the spinal cord generally, only X-ray methods and especially conventional computer tomography provide the information necessary for correct classification of SCMs. Additional 3D-reconstructions from suitable CT-data are helpful in visualizing complex anomalies of bony structures found in most cases of SCM

  12. 3D printed porous polycaprolactone/oyster shell powder (PCL/OSP) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenfeng; Zhang, Shuangying; Lan, Yuewei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Chao; Lai, Xuexu; Chen, Hanwei; Ao, Ningjian

    2018-04-01

    In this work, oyster shell powder (OSP) was used as the bio-filler and combined with polycaprolactone (PCL) through melt blending methodology. The PCL and PCL/OSP scaffolds were prepared using additive manufacturing process. All the 3D printed scaffolds hold a highly porosity and interconnected pore structures. OSP particles are dispersed in the polymer matrix, which helped to improve the degree of crystallinity and mineralization ability of the scaffolds. There was no significant cytotoxicity of the prepared scaffolds towards MG-63 cells, and all the scaffolds showed a well ALP activity. Therefore, PCL/OSP scaffolds had a high potential to be employed in the bone tissue engineering.

  13. SU-C-213-01: 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantom Composed of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitute Plastics for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Higgins, P [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 3D printed phantoms constructed of multiple tissue approximating materials could be useful in both clinical and research aspects of radiotherapy. This work describes a 3D printed phantom constructed with tissue substitute plastics for both bone and soft tissue; air cavities were included as well. Methods: 3D models of an anonymized nasopharynx patient were generated for air cavities, soft tissues, and bone, which were segmented by Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholds. HU thresholds were chosen to define air-to-soft tissue boundaries of 0.65 g/cc and soft tissue-to-bone boundaries of 1.18 g/cc based on clinical HU to density tables. After evaluation of several composite plastics, a bone tissue substitute was identified as an acceptable material for typical radiotherapy x-ray energies, composed of iron and PLA plastic. PET plastic was determined to be an acceptable soft tissue substitute. 3D printing was performed on a consumer grade dual extrusion fused deposition model 3D printer. Results: MVCT scans of the 3D printed heterogeneous phantom were acquired. Rigid image registration of the patient and the 3D printed phantom scans was performed. The average physical density of the soft tissue and bone regions was 1.02 ± 0.08 g/cc and 1.39 ± 0.14 g/cc, respectively, for the patient kVCT scan. In the 3D printed phantom MVCT scan, the average density of the soft tissue and bone was 1.01 ± 0.09 g/cc and 1.44 ± 0.12 g/cc, respectively. Conclusion: A patient specific phantom, constructed of heterogeneous tissue substitute materials was constructed by 3D printing. MVCT of the 3D printed phantom showed realistic tissue densities were recreated by the 3D printing materials. Funding provided by intra-department grant by University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  14. SU-C-213-01: 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantom Composed of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitute Plastics for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Higgins, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: 3D printed phantoms constructed of multiple tissue approximating materials could be useful in both clinical and research aspects of radiotherapy. This work describes a 3D printed phantom constructed with tissue substitute plastics for both bone and soft tissue; air cavities were included as well. Methods: 3D models of an anonymized nasopharynx patient were generated for air cavities, soft tissues, and bone, which were segmented by Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholds. HU thresholds were chosen to define air-to-soft tissue boundaries of 0.65 g/cc and soft tissue-to-bone boundaries of 1.18 g/cc based on clinical HU to density tables. After evaluation of several composite plastics, a bone tissue substitute was identified as an acceptable material for typical radiotherapy x-ray energies, composed of iron and PLA plastic. PET plastic was determined to be an acceptable soft tissue substitute. 3D printing was performed on a consumer grade dual extrusion fused deposition model 3D printer. Results: MVCT scans of the 3D printed heterogeneous phantom were acquired. Rigid image registration of the patient and the 3D printed phantom scans was performed. The average physical density of the soft tissue and bone regions was 1.02 ± 0.08 g/cc and 1.39 ± 0.14 g/cc, respectively, for the patient kVCT scan. In the 3D printed phantom MVCT scan, the average density of the soft tissue and bone was 1.01 ± 0.09 g/cc and 1.44 ± 0.12 g/cc, respectively. Conclusion: A patient specific phantom, constructed of heterogeneous tissue substitute materials was constructed by 3D printing. MVCT of the 3D printed phantom showed realistic tissue densities were recreated by the 3D printing materials. Funding provided by intra-department grant by University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology

  15. Cell and protein compatible 3D bioprinting of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawkins, M J; Mistry, P; Shakesheff, K M; Yang, J; Brown, B N; Bonassar, L J

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping of bone tissue engineering constructs often utilizes elevated temperatures, organic solvents and/or UV light for materials processing. These harsh conditions may prevent the incorporation of cells and therapeutic proteins in the fabrication processes. Here we developed a method for using bioprinting to produce constructs from a thermoresponsive microparticulate material based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) at ambient conditions. These constructs could be engineered with yield stresses of up to 1.22 MPa and Young’s moduli of up to 57.3 MPa which are within the range of properties of human cancellous bone. Further study showed that protein-releasing microspheres could be incorporated into the bioprinted constructs. The release of the model protein lysozyme from bioprinted constructs was sustainted for a period of 15 days and a high degree of protein activity could be measured up to day 9. This work suggests that bioprinting is a viable route to the production of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair under mild conditions which allow the inclusion of viable cells and active proteins. (paper)

  16. 2D-3D Registration of CT Vertebra Volume to Fluoroscopy Projection: A Calibration Model Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bifulco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study extends a previous research concerning intervertebral motion registration by means of 2D dynamic fluoroscopy to obtain a more comprehensive 3D description of vertebral kinematics. The problem of estimating the 3D rigid pose of a CT volume of a vertebra from its 2D X-ray fluoroscopy projection is addressed. 2D-3D registration is obtained maximising a measure of similarity between Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (obtained from the CT volume and real fluoroscopic projection. X-ray energy correction was performed. To assess the method a calibration model was realised a sheep dry vertebra was rigidly fixed to a frame of reference including metallic markers. Accurate measurement of 3D orientation was obtained via single-camera calibration of the markers and held as true 3D vertebra position; then, vertebra 3D pose was estimated and results compared. Error analysis revealed accuracy of the order of 0.1 degree for the rotation angles of about 1 mm for displacements parallel to the fluoroscopic plane, and of order of 10 mm for the orthogonal displacement.

  17. 3D- Printed Poly(ε-caprolactone) Scaffold Integrated with Cell-laden Chitosan Hydrogels for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Shao-Jie; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Yu-Fang; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2017-10-17

    Synthetic polymeric scaffolds are commonly used in bone tissue engineering (BTE) due to their biocompatibility and adequate mechanical properties. However, their hydrophobicity and the lack of specific cell recognition sites confined their practical application. In this study, to improve the cell seeding efficiency and osteoinductivity, an injectable thermo-sensitive chitosan hydrogel (CSG) was incorporated into a 3D-printed poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold to form a hybrid scaffold. To demonstrate the feasibility of this hybrid system for BTE application, rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were encapsulated in CSG. Pure PCL scaffolds were used as controls. Cell proliferation and viability were investigated. Osteogenic gene expressions of BMMSCs in various scaffolds were determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Growth factor releasing profile and mechanical tests were performed. CCK-8 assay confirmed greater cell retention and proliferation in chitosan and hybrid groups. Confocal microscopy showed even distribution of cells in the hybrid system. After 2-week osteogenic culture in vitro, BMMSCs in hybrid and chitosan scaffolds showed stronger osteogenesis and bone-matrix formation. To conclude, chitosan/PCL hybrid scaffolds are a favorable platform for BTE due to its capacity to carry cells and drugs, and excellent mechanical strength.

  18. Effects of flow configuration on bone tissue engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells in 3D chitosan composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellgren, Katelyn L; Ma, Teng

    2015-08-01

    Perfusion bioreactor plays important role in supporting 3D bone construct development. Scaffolds of chitosan composites have been studied to support bone tissue regeneration from osteogenic progenitor cells including human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). In this study, porous scaffolds of hydroxyapatite (H), chitosan (C), and gelatin (G) were fabricated by phase-separation and press-fitted in the perfusion bioreactor system where media flow is configured either parallel or transverse with respect to the scaffolds to investigate the impact of flow configuration on hMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The in vitro results showed that the interstitial flow in the transverse flow (TF) constructs reduced cell growth during the first week of culture but improved spatial cell distribution and early onset of osteogenic differentiation measured by alkaline phosphatase and expression of osteogenic genes. After 14 days of bioreactor culture, the TF constructs have comparable cell number but higher expression of bone markers genes and proteins compared to the parallel flow constructs. To evaluate ectopic bone formation, the HCG constructs seeded with hMSCs pre-cultured under two flow configurations for 7 days were implanted in CD-1 nude mice. While Masson's Trichrom staining revealed bone formation in both constructs, the TF constructs have improved spatial cell and osteoid distribution throughout the 2.0 mm constructs. The results highlight the divergent effects of media flow over the course of construct development and suggest that the flow configuration is an important parameter regulating the cellular events leading to bone construct formation in the HCG scaffolds. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Demineralized bone matrix fibers formable as general and custom 3D printed mold-based implants for promoting bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rudy U; Kemper, Nathan; Breathwaite, Erick; Dutta, Sucharita M; Hsu, Erin L; Hsu, Wellington K; Francis, Michael P

    2016-07-26

    Bone repair frequently requires time-consuming implant construction, particularly when using un-formed implants with poor handling properties. We therefore developed osteoinductive, micro-fibrous surface patterned demineralized bone matrix (DBM) fibers for engineering both defect-matched and general three-dimensional implants. Implant molds were filled with demineralized human cortical bone fibers there were compressed and lyophilized, forming mechanically strong shaped DBM scaffolds. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays and mass spectrometry confirmed that DBM fibers contained abundant osteogenic growth factors (bone morphogenetic proteins, insulin-like growth factor-I) and extracellular matrix proteins. Mercury porosimetry and mechanical testing showed interconnected pores within the mechanically stable, custom DBM fiber scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells readily attached to the DBM and showed increasing metabolic activity over time. DBM fibers further increased alkaline phosphatase activity in C2C12 cells. In vivo, DBM implants elicited osteoinductive potential in a mouse muscle pouch, and also promoted spine fusion in a rat arthrodesis model. DBM fibers can be engineered into custom-shaped, osteoinductive and osteoconductive implants with potential for repairing osseous defects with precise fitment, potentially reducing operating time. By providing pre-formed and custom implants, this regenerative allograft may improve patient outcomes following surgical bone repair, while further advancing personalized orthopedic and craniomaxillofacial medicine using three-dimensional-printed tissue molds.

  20. Preparation and Evaluation of Gelatin-Chitosan-Nanobioglass 3D Porous Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Pramanik, Krishna; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and characterize bioglass-natural biopolymer based composite scaffold and evaluate its bone regeneration ability. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (58S) in the size range of 20?30?nm were synthesized using sol-gel method. Porous scaffolds with varying bioglass composition from 10 to 30?wt% in chitosan, gelatin matrix were fabricated using the method of freeze drying of its slurry at 40?wt% solids loading. Samples were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde t...

  1. Interactive 3D imaging technologies: application in advanced methods of jaw bone reconstruction using stem cells/pre-osteoblasts in oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Jodko, Monika; Perek, Jan; Popowski, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Cone beam computed tomography has created a specific revolution in maxillofacial imaging, facilitating the transition of diagnosis from 2D to 3D, and expanded the role of imaging from diagnosis to the possibility of actual planning. There are many varieties of cone beam computed tomography-related software available, from basic DICOM viewers to very advanced planning modules, such as InVivo Anatomage, and SimPlant (Materialise Dental). Through the use of these programs scans can be processed into a three-dimensional high-quality simulation which enables planning of the overall treatment. In this article methods of visualization are demonstrated and compared, in the example of 2 cases of reconstruction of advanced jaw bone defects using tissue engineering. Advanced imaging methods allow one to plan a miniinvasive treatment, including assessment of the bone defect's shape and localization, planning a surgical approach and individual graft preparation.

  2. In Vivo Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffold Implantation Combined with β-TCP Powder for Alveolar Bone Augmentation in a Beagle Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su A. Park

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient bone volume is one of the major challenges encountered by dentists after dental implant placement. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a customized three-dimensional polycaprolactone (3D PCL scaffold implant fabricated with a 3D bio-printing system to facilitate rapid alveolar bone regeneration. Saddle-type bone defects were surgically created on the healed site after extracting premolars from the mandibles of four beagle dogs. The defects were radiologically examined using computed tomography for designing a customized 3D PCL scaffold block to fit the defect site. After fabricating 3D PCL scaffolds using rapid prototyping, the scaffolds were implanted into the alveolar bone defects along with β-tricalcium phosphate powder. In vivo analysis showed that the PCL blocks maintained the physical space and bone conductivity around the defects. In addition, no inflammatory infiltrates were observed around the scaffolds. However, new bone formation occurred adjacent to the scaffolds, rather than directly in contact with them. More new bone was observed around PCL blocks with 400/1200 lattices than around blocks with 400/400 lattices, but the difference was not significant. These results indicated the potential of 3D-printed porous PCL scaffolds to promote alveolar bone regeneration for defect healing in dentistry.

  3. 3D Bioprinting of Developmentally Inspired Templates for Whole Bone Organ Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Andrew C; Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Sathy, Binulal N; Jeon, Oju; Alsberg, Eben; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    The ability to print defined patterns of cells and extracellular-matrix components in three dimensions has enabled the engineering of simple biological tissues; however, bioprinting functional solid organs is beyond the capabilities of current biofabrication technologies. An alternative approach would be to bioprint the developmental precursor to an adult organ, using this engineered rudiment as a template for subsequent organogenesis in vivo. This study demonstrates that developmentally inspired hypertrophic cartilage templates can be engineered in vitro using stem cells within a supporting gamma-irradiated alginate bioink incorporating Arg-Gly-Asp adhesion peptides. Furthermore, these soft tissue templates can be reinforced with a network of printed polycaprolactone fibers, resulting in a ≈350 fold increase in construct compressive modulus providing the necessary stiffness to implant such immature cartilaginous rudiments into load bearing locations. As a proof-of-principal, multiple-tool biofabrication is used to engineer a mechanically reinforced cartilaginous template mimicking the geometry of a vertebral body, which in vivo supported the development of a vascularized bone organ containing trabecular-like endochondral bone with a supporting marrow structure. Such developmental engineering approaches could be applied to the biofabrication of other solid organs by bioprinting precursors that have the capacity to mature into their adult counterparts over time in vivo. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Development and Characterization of Novel Porous 3D Alginate-Cockle Shell Powder Nanobiocomposite Bone Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hemabarathy Bharatham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects.

  5. Effect of Chemistry on Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis Towards Bone Tissue Engineering Using 3D Printed Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2017-01-01

    The functionality or survival of tissue engineering constructs depends on the adequate vascularization through oxygen transport and metabolic waste removal at the core. This study reports the presence of magnesium and silicon in direct three dimensional printed (3DP) tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds promotes in vivo osteogenesis and angiogenesis when tested in rat distal femoral defect model. Scaffolds with three different interconnected macro pore sizes were fabricated using direct three dimensional printing. In vitro ion release in phosphate buffer for 30 days showed sustained Mg 2+  and Si 4+  release from these scaffolds. Histolomorphology and histomorphometric analysis from the histology tissue sections revealed a significantly higher bone formation, between 14 and 20% for 4-16 weeks, and blood vessel formation, between 3 and 6% for 4-12 weeks, due to the presence of magnesium and silicon in TCP scaffolds compared to bare TCP scaffolds. The presence of magnesium in these 3DP TCP scaffolds also caused delayed TRAP activity. These results show that magnesium and silicon incorporated 3DP TCP scaffolds with multiscale porosity have huge potential for bone tissue repair and regeneration.

  6. 3D printed Ti6Al4V implant surface promotes bone maturation and retains a higher density of less aged osteocytes at the bone-implant interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Furqan A; Snis, Anders; Matic, Aleksandar; Thomsen, Peter; Palmquist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    For load-bearing orthopaedic applications, metal implants having an interconnected pore structure exhibit the potential to facilitate bone ingrowth and the possibility for reducing the stiffness mismatch between the implant and bone, thus eliminating stress-shielding effects. 3D printed solid and macro-porous Ti6Al4V implants were evaluated after six-months healing in adult sheep femora. The ultrastructural composition of the bone-implant interface was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy, in a correlative manner. The mineral crystallinity and the mineral-to-matrix ratios of the interfacial tissue and the native bone were found to be similar. However, lower Ca/P ratios, lower carbonate content, but higher proline, phenylalanine and tyrosine levels indicated that the interfacial tissue remained less mature. Bone healing was more advanced at the porous implant surface (vs. the solid implant surface) based on the interfacial tissue ν1 CO3(2-)/ν2 PO4(3-) ratio, phenylalanine and tyrosine levels approaching those of the native bone. The mechanosensing infrastructure in bone, the osteocyte lacuno-canalicular network, retained ∼40% more canaliculi per osteocyte lacuna, i.e., a 'less aged' morphology at the interface. The osteocyte density per mineralised surface area was ∼36-71% higher at the interface after extended healing periods. In osseointegration research, the success of an implant surface or design is commonly determined by quantifying the amount of new bone, rather than its maturation, composition and structure. This work describes a novel correlative methodology to investigate the ultrastructure and composition of bone formed around and within 3D printed Ti6Al4V implants having an interconnected open-pore structure. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that the molecular composition of the interfacial tissue at different implant surfaces may vary, suggesting differences in the extent to which bone maturation occurs even after long

  7. Computational and experimental analysis of supersonic air ejector: Turbulence modeling and assessment of 3D effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzelli, Federico; Little, Adrienne B.; Garimella, Srinivas; Bartosiewicz, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational and experimental assessment of computational techniques for ejector flows. • Comparisons to 2D/3D (k–ε, k–ε realizable, k–ω SST, and stress–ω RSM) turbulence models. • k–ω SST model performs best while ε-based models more accurate at low motive pressures. • Good on-design agreement across 2D and 3D models; off-design needs 3D simulations. - Abstract: Numerical and experimental analyses are performed on a supersonic air ejector to evaluate the effectiveness of commonly-used computational techniques when predicting ejector flow characteristics. Three series of experimental curves at different operating conditions are compared with 2D and 3D simulations using RANS, steady, wall-resolved models. Four different turbulence models are tested: k–ε, k–ε realizable, k–ω SST, and the stress–ω Reynolds Stress Model. An extensive analysis is performed to interpret the differences between numerical and experimental results. The results show that while differences between turbulence models are typically small with respect to the prediction of global parameters such as ejector inlet mass flow rates and Mass Entrainment Ratio (MER), the k–ω SST model generally performs best whereas ε-based models are more accurate at low motive pressures. Good agreement is found across all 2D and 3D models at on-design conditions. However, prediction at off-design conditions is only acceptable with 3D models, making 3D simulations mandatory to correctly predict the critical pressure and achieve reasonable results at off-design conditions. This may partly depend on the specific geometry under consideration, which in the present study has a rectangular cross section with low aspect ratio.

  8. A Graphic Overlay Method for Selection of Osteotomy Site in Chronic Radial Head Dislocation: An Evaluation of 3D-printed Bone Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui Taek; Ahn, Tae Young; Jang, Jae Hoon; Kim, Kang Hee; Lee, Sung Jae; Jung, Duk Young

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography imaging is now being used to generate 3D models for planning orthopaedic surgery, but the process remains time consuming and expensive. For chronic radial head dislocation, we have designed a graphic overlay approach that employs selected 3D computer images and widely available software to simplify the process of osteotomy site selection. We studied 5 patients (2 traumatic and 3 congenital) with unilateral radial head dislocation. These patients were treated with surgery based on traditional radiographs, but they also had full sets of 3D CT imaging done both before and after their surgery: these 3D CT images form the basis for this study. From the 3D CT images, each patient generated 3 sets of 3D-printed bone models: 2 copies of the preoperative condition, and 1 copy of the postoperative condition. One set of the preoperative models was then actually osteotomized and fixed in the manner suggested by our graphic technique. Arcs of rotation of the 3 sets of 3D-printed bone models were then compared. Arcs of rotation of the 3 groups of bone models were significantly different, with the models osteotomized accordingly to our graphic technique having the widest arcs. For chronic radial head dislocation, our graphic overlay approach simplifies the selection of the osteotomy site(s). Three-dimensional-printed bone models suggest that this approach could improve range of motion of the forearm in actual surgical practice. Level IV-therapeutic study.

  9. 3D gait assessment in young and elderly subjects using foot-worn inertial sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariani, B.; Hoskovec, C.; Rochat, S.; Büla, C.; Penders, J.; Aminian, K.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the validation of a new wearable system for assessment of 3D spatial parameters of gait. The new method is based on the detection of temporal parameters, coupled to optimized fusion and de-drifted integration of inertial signals. Composed of two wirelesses inertial modules

  10. Laser-direct writing by two-photon polymerization of 3D honeycomb-like structures for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Mihailescu, Mona; Dinescu, Maria; Popescu, Andrei; Chioibasu, Diana; Soproniy, Mihai; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo

    2018-02-05

    A major limitation of existing 3D implantable structures for bone tissue engineering is that most of the cells rapidly attach on the outer edges of the structure, restricting the cells penetration into the inner parts and causing the formation of a necrotic core. Furthermore, these structures generally possess a random spatial arrangement and do not preserve the isotropy on the whole volume. Here, we report on the fabrication and testing of an innovative 3D hierarchical, honeycomb-like structure (HS), with reproducible and isotropic arhitecture, that allows in 'volume' migration of osteoblasts. In particular, we demonstrate the possibility to control the 3D spatial cells growth inside these complex architectures by adjusting the free spaces inside the structures. The structures were made of vertical microtubes arranged in a mulitlayered configuration, fabricated via laser direct writing by two photons polymerization of the IP-L780 photopolymer. In vitro tests performed in MG-63 osteoblast-like cells demonstrated that the cells migration inside the 3D structures is conducted by the separation space between the microtubes layers. Specifically, for layers separation between 2 and 10 μm, the cells gradually penetrated between the microtubes. Furthermore, these structures induced the strongest cells osteogenic differentiation and mineralization, with ALP activity 1.5 times stronger, amount of calcified minerals 1.3 times higher and osteocalcin secretion increased by 2.3 times compared to the other structures. On the opposite, for layers separation less than 2 μm and above 10 μm, the cells were not able to make interconnections and exhibited poor mineralization ability.

  11. Assessing 3D Virtual World Disaster Training Through Adult Learning Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Taylor-Nelms

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As role-play, virtual reality, and simulated environments gain popularity through virtual worlds such as Second Life, the importance of identifying best practices for education and emergency management training becomes necessary. Using a formal needs assessment approach, we examined the extent to which 3D virtual tornado simulation trainings follow the principles of adult learning theory employed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA National Training and Education Division. Through a three-fold methodology of observation, interviews, and reflection on action, 3D virtual world tornado trainings were analyzed for congruence to adult learning theory.

  12. Development and assessment of a new 3D neuroanatomy teaching tool for MRI training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, Zachary A; Lindgren, Kristen A; Lopez, Michael J; Stabio, Maureen E

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in which 3D objects are overlaid onto the 2D MRI slices, all while rotating the brain in any direction and advancing through coronal, sagittal, or axial planes. The efficacy of this tool was assessed by comparing scores from an MRI identification quiz and survey in two groups of first-year medical students. The first group was taught using this new 3D teaching tool, and the second group was taught the same content for the same amount of time but with traditional methods, including 2D images of brain MRI slices and 3D models from widely used textbooks and online sources. Students from the experimental group performed marginally better than the control group on overall test score (P = 0.07) and significantly better on test scores extracted from questions involving C-shaped internal brain structures (P teaching tool is an effective way to train medical students to read an MRI of the brain and is particularly effective for teaching C-shaped internal brain structures. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Art care: A multi-modality coronary 3D reconstruction and hemodynamic status assessment software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siogkas, Panagiotis K; Stefanou, Kostas A; Athanasiou, Lambros S; Papafaklis, Michail I; Michalis, Lampros K; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2018-01-01

    Due to the incremental increase of clinical interest in the development of software that allows the 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and the functional assessment of the coronary vasculature, several software packages have been developed and are available today. Taking this into consideration, we have developed an innovative suite of software modules that perform 3D reconstruction of coronary arterial segments using different coronary imaging modalities such as IntraVascular UltraSound (IVUS) and invasive coronary angiography images (ICA), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and ICA images, or plain ICA images and can safely and accurately assess the hemodynamic status of the artery of interest. The user can perform automated or manual segmentation of the IVUS or OCT images, visualize in 3D the reconstructed vessel and export it to formats, which are compatible with other Computer Aided Design (CAD) software systems. We employ finite elements to provide the capability to assess the hemodynamic functionality of the reconstructed vessels by calculating the virtual functional assessment index (vFAI), an index that corresponds and has been shown to correlate well to the actual fractional flow reserve (FFR) value. All the modules of the proposed system have been thoroughly validated. In brief, the 3D-QCA module, compared to a successful commercial software of the same genre, presented very good correlation using several validation metrics, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient (R) for the calculated volumes, vFAI, length and minimum lumen diameter of 0.99, 0.99, 0.99 and 0.88, respectively. Moreover, the automatic lumen detection modules for IVUS and OCT presented very high accuracy compared to the annotations by medical experts with the Pearson's correlation coefficient reaching the values of 0.94 and 0.99, respectively. In this study, we have presented a user-friendly software for the 3D reconstruction of coronary arterial segments and the accurate hemodynamic

  14. μCT-based, in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry allows 3D evaluation of the early responses of bone resorption and formation to PTH and alendronate combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bakker, Chantal M J; Altman, Allison R; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Tribble, Mary Beth; Li, Connie; Chandra, Abhishek; Qin, Ling; Liu, X Sherry

    2015-04-01

    Current osteoporosis treatments improve bone mass by increasing net bone formation: anti-resorptive drugs such as bisphosphonates block osteoclast activity, while anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) increase bone remodeling, with a greater effect on formation. Although these drugs are widely used, their role in modulating formation and resorption is not fully understood, due in part to technical limitations in the ability to longitudinally assess bone remodeling. Importantly, it is not known whether or not PTH-induced bone formation is independent of resorption, resulting in controversy over the effectiveness of combination therapies that use both PTH and an anti-resorptive. In this study, we developed a μCT-based, in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry technique for rat tibiae, and applied this method to longitudinally track changes in bone resorption and formation as a result of treatment with alendronate (ALN), PTH, or combination therapy of both PTH and ALN (PTH+ALN). Correlations between our μCT-based measures of bone formation and measures of bone formation based on calcein-labeled histology (r=0.72-0.83) confirm the accuracy of this method. Bone remodeling parameters measured through μCT-based in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry indicate an increased rate of bone formation in rats treated with PTH and PTH+ALN, together with a decrease in bone resorption measures in rats treated with ALN and PTH+ALN. These results were further supported by traditional histology-based measurements, suggesting that PTH was able to induce bone formation while bone resorption was suppressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Generating 3D tissue constructs with mesenchymal stem cells and a cancellous bone graft for orthopaedic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arca, Turkan; Genever, Paul; Proffitt, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Bone matrix (BM) is an acellular crosslinked porcine-derived cancellous bone graft, and therefore may provide advantages over other synthetic and naturally derived materials for use in orthopaedic surgery. Here, we analysed the potential of BM to support the growth and differentiation of primary human multipotent stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in order to predict in vivo bone regeneration events. Imaging with laser scanning confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that 1 day after static seeding, a dense population of viable MSCs could be achieved on scaffolds suggesting they could be used for in vivo delivery of cells to the implant site. Long-term growth analysis by confocal imaging and histology demonstrated that BM was permissive to the growth and the 3D population of primary MSCs and an enhanced green fluorescent protein expressing osteosarcoma cell line, eGFP.MG63s, over several days in culture. Measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and mRNA expression levels of osteogenic markers (Runx-2, ALP, collagen type I, osteonectin, osteocalcin and osteopontin) indicated that BM supported osteogenesis of MSCs when supplemented with osteogenic stimulants. Upregulation of some of these osteogenic markers on BM, but not on tissue culture plastic, under non-osteogenic conditions suggested that BM also had osteoinductive capacities.

  16. Generating 3D tissue constructs with mesenchymal stem cells and a cancellous bone graft for orthopaedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arca, Turkan; Genever, Paul [Department of Biology, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Proffitt, Joanne, E-mail: paul.genever@york.ac.uk [TSL Centre of Biologics, Covidien, Allerton Bywater, Castleford, WF10 2DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Bone matrix (BM) is an acellular crosslinked porcine-derived cancellous bone graft, and therefore may provide advantages over other synthetic and naturally derived materials for use in orthopaedic surgery. Here, we analysed the potential of BM to support the growth and differentiation of primary human multipotent stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in order to predict in vivo bone regeneration events. Imaging with laser scanning confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that 1 day after static seeding, a dense population of viable MSCs could be achieved on scaffolds suggesting they could be used for in vivo delivery of cells to the implant site. Long-term growth analysis by confocal imaging and histology demonstrated that BM was permissive to the growth and the 3D population of primary MSCs and an enhanced green fluorescent protein expressing osteosarcoma cell line, eGFP.MG63s, over several days in culture. Measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and mRNA expression levels of osteogenic markers (Runx-2, ALP, collagen type I, osteonectin, osteocalcin and osteopontin) indicated that BM supported osteogenesis of MSCs when supplemented with osteogenic stimulants. Upregulation of some of these osteogenic markers on BM, but not on tissue culture plastic, under non-osteogenic conditions suggested that BM also had osteoinductive capacities.

  17. Assessment of glioma response to radiotherapy using 3D pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling and 3D segmented volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jianrui; Diao, Qiang; Lin, YuanKai; Zhang, Jun; Li, Lin; Yang, Gang; Fang, Xiaokun; Li, Xie; Chen, YingQi; Zheng, Ling, E-mail: lingzheng1989@yeah.net; Lu, Guangming, E-mail: guangminglu1905@163.com

    2016-11-15

    Background: Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in adults, in some cases, radiotherapy may be the preferred treatment option especially for elderly people who cannot endure surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy on glioma. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MR imaging technique that allows for a quantitative determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. Tumor volume is still an important determinant for evaluating treatment response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the tumor perfusion parameters and tumor volume and assess the effects of radiotherapy on glioma using pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) technique. Methods: 35 patients with gliomas, histologically classified as low-grade group (n = 16) and high-grade group (n = 19), treated with radiotherapy only or before using other therapies were included in this study. MR examinations, including T1 weighted image and pcASL, were performed before and 4, 8, 12, 16 weeks after radiotherapy. Regional CBF of normal tissue, mean tumor blood flow (TBF{sub mean}), maximum tumor blood flow (TBF{sub max}), and tumor volume were evaluated at each time point. Both the percentage change in CBF (CBF ratio), TBF{sub mean} (TBF{sub mean} ratio), TBF{sub max} (TBF{sub max} ratio) and the percentage change in tumor volume (volume ratio) were calculated using values obtained before and after radiotherapy. The correlation between the volume ratio and CBF ratio, TBF{sub mean} ratio, TBF{sub max} ratio was assessed using linear regression analysis and Pearson’s correlation. Results: The TBF{sub mean} and TBF{sub max} of high-grade gliomas were significantly higher than that of low-grade group. In high-grade group, a strong correlation was demonstrated between the tumor volume and the TBF{sub max} before radiotherapy (R{sup 2} = 0.35, r{sub s} = 0.59, p < 0.05). There was also a significant correlation between the TBF

  18. Creating a normative database of age-specific 3D geometrical data, bone density, and bone thickness of the developing skull: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delye, Hans; Clijmans, Tim; Mommaerts, Maurice Yves; Sloten, Jos Vnder; Goffin, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) of the head are used to study the biomechanics of traumatic brain injury and depend heavily on the use of accurate material properties and head geometry. Any FEM aimed at investigating traumatic head injury in children should therefore use age-specific dimensions of the head, as well as age-specific material properties of the different tissues. In this study, the authors built a database of age-corrected skull geometry, skull thickness, and bone density of the developing skull to aid in the development of an age-specific FEM of a child's head. Such a database, containing age-corrected normative skull geometry data, can also be used for preoperative surgical planning and postoperative long-term follow-up of craniosynostosis surgery results. Computed tomography data were processed for 187 patients (age range 0-20 years old). A 3D surface model was calculated from segmented skull surfaces. Skull models, reference points, and sutures were processed into a MATLAB-supported database. This process included automatic calculation of 2D measurements as well as 3D measurements: length of the coronal suture, length of the lambdoid suture, and the 3D anterior-posterior length, defined as the sum of the metopic and sagittal suture. Skull thickness and skull bone density calculations were included. Cephalic length, cephalic width, intercoronal distance, lateral orbital distance, intertemporal distance, and 3D measurements were obtained, confirming the well-established general growth pattern of the skull. Skull thickness increases rapidly in the first year of life, slowing down during the second year of life, while skull density increases with a fast but steady pace during the first 3 years of life. Both skull thickness and density continue to increase up to adulthood. This is the first report of normative data on 2D and 3D measurements, skull bone thickness, and skull bone density for children aged 0-20 years. This database can help build an age

  19. Arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery as a complication of posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting: 3D-CT angiography and arterial embolization

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Park, Jong-Beom; Won, Yoo-Dong; Riew, K. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Superior gluteal artery injuries are rare, but potentially serious complications that occur during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting. The authors reported an arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery, which occurred as a complication during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting and was diagnosed with 3D-CT angiography, then treated with arterial embolization.

  20. Multimodal-3D imaging based on μMRI and μCT techniques bridges the gap with histology in visualization of the bone regeneration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, R; Conti, A; Sinjari, B; Spadone, S; Pecci, R; Palombo, M; Komlev, V S; Ortore, M G; Tromba, G; Capuani, S; Guidotti, R; De Luca, F; Caputi, S; Traini, T; Della Penna, S

    2018-03-01

    Bone repair/regeneration is usually investigated through X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) supported by histology of extracted samples, to analyse biomaterial structure and new bone formation processes. Magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) shows a richer tissue contrast than μCT, despite at lower resolution, and could be combined with μCT in the perspective of conducting non-destructive 3D investigations of bone. A pipeline designed to combine μMRI and μCT images of bone samples is here described and applied on samples of extracted human jawbone core following bone graft. We optimized the coregistration procedure between μCT and μMRI images to avoid bias due to the different resolutions and contrasts. Furthermore, we used an Adaptive Multivariate Clustering, grouping homologous voxels in the coregistered images, to visualize different tissue types within a fused 3D metastructure. The tissue grouping matched the 2D histology applied only on 1 slice, thus extending the histology labelling in 3D. Specifically, in all samples, we could separate and map 2 types of regenerated bone, calcified tissue, soft tissues, and/or fat and marrow space. Remarkably, μMRI and μCT alone were not able to separate the 2 types of regenerated bone. Finally, we computed volumes of each tissue in the 3D metastructures, which might be exploited by quantitative simulation. The 3D metastructure obtained through our pipeline represents a first step to bridge the gap between the quality of information obtained from 2D optical microscopy and the 3D mapping of the bone tissue heterogeneity and could allow researchers and clinicians to non-destructively characterize and follow-up bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. 3D printing of hybrid biomaterials for bone tissue engineering: Calcium-polyphosphate microparticles encapsulated by polycaprolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong; Wang, Shunfeng; Steffen, Renate; Ackermann, Maximilian; Haep, Natalie D; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2017-12-01

    Here we describe the formulation of a morphogenetically active bio-ink consisting of amorphous microparticles (MP) prepared from Ca 2+ and the physiological inorganic polymer, polyphosphate (polyP). Those MP had been fortified by mixing with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) to allow 3D-bioprinting. The resulting granular PCL/Ca-polyP-MP hybrid material, liquefied by short-time heating to 100 °C, was used for the 3D-printing of tissue-like scaffolds formed by strands with a thickness of 400 µm and a stacked architecture leaving ≈0.5 mm 2 -sized open holes enabling cell migration. The printed composite scaffold turned out to combine suitable biomechanical properties (Young's modulus of 1.60 ± 0.1 GPa; Martens hardness of 153 ± 28 MPa), matching those of cortical and trabecular bone, with morphogenetic activity. This scaffold was capable of attracting and promoting the growth of human bone-related SaOS-2 cells as demonstrated by staining for cell viability (Calcein AM), cell density (DRAQ5) and SEM studies. Furthermore, the hybrid material was demonstrated to upregulate the steady-state-expression of the cell migration-inducing chemokine SDF-1α. EDX analysis and FTIR measurements revealed the presence of hydroxyapatite in the mineral deposits formed on the scaffold surface. Based on the results we conclude that granular PCL/Ca-polyP-MP hybrid material is suitable for the fabrication of bioprintable scaffold which comprises not only biomechanical stability but also morphogenetic potential. In present-day regenerative engineering efforts, biomaterial- and cell-based strategies are proposed that meet the required functional and spatial characteristics and variations, especially in the transition regions between soft (cartilage, tendon or ligament) and hard (bone) tissues. In a biomimetic approach we succeeded to fabricate amorphous Ca-polyP nanoparticles/microparticles which are highly biocompatible. Together with polycaprolactone (PCL), polyP can be

  2. Imaging the 3D structure of secondary osteons in human cortical bone using phase-retrieval tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arhatari, B D; Peele, A G [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Cooper, D M L [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G [Melbourne Dental School, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-08-21

    By applying a phase-retrieval step before carrying out standard filtered back-projection reconstructions in tomographic imaging, we were able to resolve structures with small differences in density within a densely absorbing sample. This phase-retrieval tomography is particularly suited for the three-dimensional segmentation of secondary osteons (roughly cylindrical structures) which are superimposed upon an existing cortical bone structure through the process of turnover known as remodelling. The resulting images make possible the analysis of the secondary osteon structure and the relationship between an osteon and the surrounding tissue. Our observations have revealed many different and complex 3D structures of osteons that could not be studied using previous methods. This work was carried out using a laboratory-based x-ray source, which makes obtaining these sorts of images readily accessible.

  3. In vitro cytocompatibility evaluation of chitosan/graphene oxide 3D scaffold composites designed for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinescu, Sorina; Ionita, Mariana; Pandele, Andreea Madalina; Galateanu, Bianca; Iovu, Horia; Ardelean, Aurel; Costache, Marieta; Hermenean, Anca

    2014-01-01

    Extensively studied nowadays, graphene oxide (GO) has a benefic effect on cell proliferation and differentiation, thus holding promise for bone tissue engineering (BTE) approaches. The aim of this study was not only to design a chitosan 3D scaffold improved with GO for optimal BTE, but also to analyze its physicochemical properties and to evaluate its cytocompatibility and ability to support cell metabolic activity and proliferation. Overall results show that the addition of GO in the scaffold's composition improved mechanical properties and pore formation and enhanced the bioactivity of the scaffold material for tissue engineering. The new developed CHT/GO 3 wt% scaffold could be a potential candidate for further in vitro and in vivo osteogenesis studies and BTE approaches.

  4. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation’s lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers. IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors. (paper)

  5. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors.

  6. 3D perfusion bioreactor-activated porous granules on implant fixation and early bone formation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ming; Henriksen, Susan S; Martinetti, Roberta; Overgaard, Søren

    2017-11-01

    Early fixation of total joint arthroplasties is crucial for ensuring implant survival. An alternative bone graft material in revision surgery is needed to replace the current gold standard, allograft, seeing that the latter is associated with several disadvantages. The incubation of such a construct in a perfusion bioreactor has been shown to produce viable bone graft materials. This study aimed at producing larger amounts of viable bone graft material (hydroxyapatite 70% and β-tricalcium-phosphate 30%) in a novel perfusion bioreactor. The abilities of the bioreactor-activated graft material to induce early implant fixation were tested in a bilateral implant defect model in sheep, with allograft as the control group. Defects were bilaterally created in the distal femurs of the animals, and titanium implants were inserted. The concentric gaps around the implants were randomly filled with either allograft, granules, granules with bone marrow aspirate or bioreactor-activated graft material. Following an observation time of 6 weeks, early implant fixation and bone formation were assessed by micro-CT scanning, mechanical testing, and histomorphometry. Bone formations were seen in all groups, while no significant differences between groups were found regarding early implant fixation. The microarchitecture of the bone formed by the synthetic graft materials resembled that of allograft. Histomorphometry revealed that allograft induced significantly more bone and less fibrous tissue (p formation was observed in all groups, while the bioreactor-activated graft material did not reveal additional effects on early implant fixation comparable to allograft in this model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2465-2476, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Feature relevance assessment for the semantic interpretation of 3D point cloud data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Weinmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The automatic analysis of large 3D point clouds represents a crucial task in photogrammetry, remote sensing and computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new methodology for the semantic interpretation of such point clouds which involves feature relevance assessment in order to reduce both processing time and memory consumption. Given a standard benchmark dataset with 1.3 million 3D points, we first extract a set of 21 geometric 3D and 2D features. Subsequently, we apply a classifier-independent ranking procedure which involves a general relevance metric in order to derive compact and robust subsets of versatile features which are generally applicable for a large variety of subsequent tasks. This metric is based on 7 different feature selection strategies and thus addresses different intrinsic properties of the given data. For the example of semantically interpreting 3D point cloud data, we demonstrate the great potential of smaller subsets consisting of only the most relevant features with 4 different state-of-the-art classifiers. The results reveal that, instead of including as many features as possible in order to compensate for lack of knowledge, a crucial task such as scene interpretation can be carried out with only few versatile features and even improved accuracy.

  8. A 3D co-culture microtissue model of the human placenta for nanotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muoth, Carina; Wichser, Adrian; Monopoli, Marco; Correia, Manuel; Ehrlich, Nicky; Loeschner, Katrin; Gallud, Audrey; Kucki, Melanie; Diener, Liliane; Manser, Pius; Jochum, Wolfram; Wick, Peter; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina

    2016-10-06

    There is increasing evidence that certain nanoparticles (NPs) can overcome the placental barrier, raising concerns on potential adverse effects on the growing fetus. But even in the absence of placental transfer, NPs may pose a risk to proper fetal development if they interfere with the viability and functionality of the placental tissue. The effects of NPs on the human placenta are not well studied or understood, and predictive in vitro placenta models to achieve mechanistic insights on NP-placenta interactions are essentially lacking. Using the scaffold-free hanging drop technology, we developed a well-organized and highly reproducible 3D co-culture microtissue (MT) model consisting of a core of placental fibroblasts surrounded by a trophoblast cell layer, which resembles the structure of the in vivo placental tissue. We could show that secretion levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were significantly higher in 3D than in 2D cell cultures, which indicates an enhanced differentiation of trophoblasts grown on 3D MTs. NP toxicity assessment revealed that cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper oxide (CuO) NPs but not titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) NPs decreased MT viability and reduced the release of hCG. NP acute toxicity was significantly reduced in 3D co-culture MTs compared to 2D monocultures. Taken together, 3D placental MTs provide a new and promising model for the fast generation of tissue-relevant acute NP toxicity data, which are indispensable for the safe development of NPs for industrial, commercial and medical applications.

  9. SR 97. Alternative models project. Channel network modelling of Aberg. Performance assessment using CHAN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gylling, B.; Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-06-01

    In earlier papers, discussions of the mechanisms which are important in performance assessment in fractured media are given. The influence of the mechanisms have been demonstrated using CHAN3D. In this study CHAN3D has been used to simulate production of input data to COMP23 and FARF31. CHAN3D has been integrated with COMP23 in earlier studies, but it has not been used before to calculate input data to FARF31. In the normal use of CHAN3D, the transport part of the concept simulates far field migration. The task in this study was to produce input data according to a specification and using a defined hypothetical repository located at Aespoe HRL as a platform. During the process of applying CHAN3D to the site, the scaling of conductivity was studied, using both data from Aespoe HRL and synthetic data. From the realisations performed, ensemble statistics of water travel time, flux at repository scale, flow-wetted surface and F-ratio values were calculated. Two typical realisations were studied in more detail. The results for three specified canister positions were also highlighted. Exit locations for the released particles were studied. In each realisation statistics were calculated over the entities. The values were post-processed to obtain performance measures of higher order. From the averaging over all the realisations it can be concluded that the Monte Carlo stability is reached for the ensemble statistics. The presence of fracture zones has a large influence on flow and transport in the rock. However, for a single canister the result may be very different between realisations. In some realisations there may be a fast path to a fracture zone whereas in other realisations the opposite may be valid. From the calculation of the flow over the boundaries between the regional model and the smaller local model the consistency seem to be acceptable considering that a perfect match of properties is hard to obtain

  10. Combination of photogrammetric and geoelectric methods to assess 3d structures associated to natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargier, Yannick; Dore, Ludovic; Antoine, Raphael; Palma Lopes, Sérgio; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2016-04-01

    The extraction of subsurface materials is a key element for the economy of a nation. However, natural degradation of underground quarries is a major issue from an economic and public safety point of view. Consequently, the quarries stakeholders require relevant tools to define hazards associated to these structures. Safety assessment methods of underground quarries are recent and mainly based on rock physical properties. This kind of method leads to a certain homogeneity assumption of pillar internal properties that can cause an underestimation of the risk. Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) is a widely used method that possesses two advantages to overcome this limitation. The first is to provide a qualitative understanding for the detection and monitoring of anomalies in the pillar body (e.g. faults). The second is to provide a quantitative description of the electrical resistivity distribution inside the pillar. This quantitative description can be interpreted with constitutive laws to help decision support (water content decreases the mechanical resistance of a chalk). However, conventional 2D and 3D Imaging techniques are usually applied to flat surface surveys or to surfaces with moderate topography. A 3D inversion of more complex media (case of the pillar) requires a full consideration of the geometry that was never taken into account before. The Photogrammetric technique presents a cost effective solution to obtain an accurate description of the external geometry of a complex media. However, this method has never been fully coupled with a geophysical method to enhance/improve the inversion process. Consequently we developed a complete procedure showing that photogrammetric and ERI tools can be efficiently combined to assess a complex 3D structure. This procedure includes in a first part a photogrammetric survey, a processing stage with an open source software and a post-processing stage finalizing a 3D surface model. The second part necessitates the

  11. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Ying; Chandra, Shekhar S; Crozier, Stuart; Fripp, Jurgen; Walker, Duncan; Engstrom, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint.Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18–49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system.High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  <  0.01, p  =  0.98).Our automatic 3D method analysed MR images of the hip joints to generate alpha angle measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the

  12. 3D-Printed Atsttrin-Incorporated Alginate/Hydroxyapatite Scaffold Promotes Bone Defect Regeneration with TNF/TNFR Signaling Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Xia, Qingqing; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wen, Feiqiu; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang; Heng, Boon Chin; He, Yong; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2015-08-05

    High expression levels of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α within bone defects can decelerate and impair bone regeneration. However, there are few available bone scaffolds with anti-inflammatory function. The progranulin (PGRN)-derived engineered protein, Atsttrin, is known to exert antagonistic effects on the TNF-α function. Hence, this study investigates whether 3D-printed Atsttrin-incorporated alginate(Alg)/hydroxyapatite(nHAp) scaffolds can facilitate bone healing through affecting the TNF/TNFR signaling. A 3D bioprinting system is used to fabricate Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp composite scaffolds, and the Atsttrin release from this scaffold is characterized, followed by evaluation of its efficacy on bone regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold exhibits a precisely defined structure, can sustain Atsttrin release for at least 5 days, has negligible cytotoxicity, and supports cell adhesion. Atsttrin can also attenuate the suppressive effects of TNF-α on BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold significantly reduces the number of TNF-α positive cells within wound sites, 7 days after post-calvarial defect surgery. Additionally, histological staining and X-ray scanning results also show that the 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold enhances the regeneration of mice calvarial bone defects. These findings thus demonstrate that the precise structure and anti-inflammatory properties of 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffolds may promote bone defect repair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. An example of the validation of DYNA3D for nuclear plant safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, J.C.; Neilson, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    Although the design of AGR on-load refuelling equipment is such that dropped fuel-assembly faults are virtually incredible in practice, consideration of the safety consequences of such events is necessary. A short programme of drop tests has been conducted by the CEGB to verify computer codes used in the safety assessment. The tests involved dropping solid steel billets onto typical steel standpipes. This paper presents a comparison of experimental results and pre-test DYNA3D predictions carried out at Winfrith, for an experiment in which a 3-d response of the standpipe was generated. The overall response, in terms of standpipe displacements and billet accelerations, was correctly predicted. However, local surface strains on the standpipe were overestimated in some regions as a result of minor inaccuracies in material properties and impact location. (author)

  14. Preparation of high bioactivity multilayered bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets for myocardial infarction using a 3D-dynamic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingwei; Zhang, Jianhua; Qin, Zixi; Fan, Zepei; Lu, Cheng; Chen, Baoxin; Zhao, Jupeng; Li, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Fei; Lin, Xi; Wu, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    Cell sheet techniques offer a promising future for myocardial infarction (MI) therapy; however, insufficient nutrition supply remains the major limitation in maintaining stem cell bioactivity in vitro. In order to enhance cell sheet mechanical strength and bioactivity, a decellularized porcine pericardium (DPP) scaffold was prepared by the phospholipase A2 method, and aspartic acid was used as a spacer arm to improve the vascular endothelial growth factor crosslink efficiency on the DPP scaffold. Based on this scaffold, multilayered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets were rapidly constructed, using RAD16-I peptide hydrogel as a temporary 3D scaffold, and cell sheets were cultured in either the 3D-dynamic system (DCcs) or the traditional static condition (SCcs). The multilayered structure, stem cell bioactivity, and ultrastructure of DCcs and SCcs were assessed. The DCcs exhibited lower apoptosis, lower differentiation, and an improved paracrine effect after a 48 h culture in vitro compared to the SCcs. Four groups were set to evaluate the cell sheet effect in rat MI model: sham group, MI control group, DCcs group, and SCcs group. The DCcs group improved cardiac function and decreased the infarcted area compared to the MI control group, while no significant improvements were observed in the SCcs group. Improved cell survival, angiogenesis, and Sca-1 + cell and c-kit + cell amounts were observed in the DCcs group. In conclusion, the DCcs maintained higher stem cell bioactivity by using the 3D-dynamic system to provide sufficient nutrition, and transplanting DCcs significantly improved the cardiac function and angiogenesis. This study provides an efficient method to prepare vascular endothelial growth factor covalent decellularized pericardium scaffold with aspartic acid, and a multilayered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheet is constructed on it using a 3D-dynamic system. The dynamic nutrition supply showed a significant benefit on BMSC bioactivity

  15. Assessment of Eye Fatigue Caused by 3D Displays Based on Multimodal Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jae Won; Heo, Hwan; Choi, Jong-Suk; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2014-01-01

    With the development of 3D displays, user's eye fatigue has been an important issue when viewing these displays. There have been previous studies conducted on eye fatigue related to 3D display use, however, most of these have employed a limited number of modalities for measurements, such as electroencephalograms (EEGs), biomedical signals, and eye responses. In this paper, we propose a new assessment of eye fatigue related to 3D display use based on multimodal measurements. compared to previous works Our research is novel in the following four ways: first, to enhance the accuracy of assessment of eye fatigue, we measure EEG signals, eye blinking rate (BR), facial temperature (FT), and a subjective evaluation (SE) score before and after a user watches a 3D display; second, in order to accurately measure BR in a manner that is convenient for the user, we implement a remote gaze-tracking system using a high speed (mega-pixel) camera that measures eye blinks of both eyes; thirdly, changes in the FT are measured using a remote thermal camera, which can enhance the measurement of eye fatigue, and fourth, we perform various statistical analyses to evaluate the correlation between the EEG signal, eye BR, FT, and the SE score based on the T-test, correlation matrix, and effect size. Results show that the correlation of the SE with other data (FT, BR, and EEG) is the highest, while those of the FT, BR, and EEG with other data are second, third, and fourth highest, respectively. PMID:25192315

  16. Assessment of Eye Fatigue Caused by 3D Displays Based on Multimodal Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Bang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the development of 3D displays, user’s eye fatigue has been an important issue when viewing these displays. There have been previous studies conducted on eye fatigue related to 3D display use, however, most of these have employed a limited number of modalities for measurements, such as electroencephalograms (EEGs, biomedical signals, and eye responses. In this paper, we propose a new assessment of eye fatigue related to 3D display use based on multimodal measurements. compared to previous works Our research is novel in the following four ways: first, to enhance the accuracy of assessment of eye fatigue, we measure EEG signals, eye blinking rate (BR, facial temperature (FT, and a subjective evaluation (SE score before and after a user watches a 3D display; second, in order to accurately measure BR in a manner that is convenient for the user, we implement a remote gaze-tracking system using a high speed (mega-pixel camera that measures eye blinks of both eyes; thirdly, changes in the FT are measured using a remote thermal camera, which can enhance the measurement of eye fatigue, and fourth, we perform various statistical analyses to evaluate the correlation between the EEG signal, eye BR, FT, and the SE score based on the T-test, correlation matrix, and effect size. Results show that the correlation of the SE with other data (FT, BR, and EEG is the highest, while those of the FT, BR, and EEG with other data are second, third, and fourth highest, respectively.

  17. Bioconductive 3D nano-composite constructs with tunable elasticity to initiate stem cell growth and induce bone mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Nitin [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Khanna, Kunal [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Sardesai, Varda S. [National Institute of Research in Reproductive Health, Mumbai 400012 (India); Singh, Atul K. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Temgire, Mayur; Kalita, Mridula Phukan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Kadam, Sachin S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Malkapur, Karad 415539, Dist. Satara, Maharashtra (India); Soni, Vivek P. [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bhartiya, Deepa [National Institute of Research in Reproductive Health, Mumbai 400012 (India); Bellare, Jayesh R., E-mail: jb@iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Wadhwani Research Center for Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-12-01

    Bioactive 3D composites play an important role in advanced biomaterial design to provide molecular coupling and improve integrity with the cellular environment of the native bone. In the present study, a hybrid lyophilized polymer composite blend of anionic charged sodium salt of carboxymethyl chitin and gelatin (CMCh{sub Na}-GEL) reinforced with nano-rod agglomerated hydroxyapatite (nHA) has been developed with enhanced biocompatibility and tunable elasticity. The scaffolds have an open, uniform and interconnected porous structure with an average pore diameter of 157 ± 30 μm and 89.47 + 0.03% with four dimensional X-ray. The aspect ratio of ellipsoidal pores decrease from 4.4 to 1.2 with increase in gelatin concentration; and from 2.14 to 1.93 with decrease in gelling temperature. The samples were resilient with elastic stain at 1.2 MPa of stress also decreased from 0.33 to 0.23 with increase in gelatin concentration. The crosslinker HMDI (hexamethylene diisocyanate) yielded more resilient samples at 1.2 MPa in comparison to glutaraldehyde. Increased crosslinking time from 2 to 4 h in continuous compression cycle show no improvement in maximum elastic stain of 1.2 MPa stress. This surface elasticity of the scaffold enables the capacity of these materials for adherent self renewal and cultivation of the NTERA-2 cL.D1 (NT2/D1), pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell with biomechanical surface, as is shown here. Proliferation with MG-63, ALP activity and Alizarin red mineralization assay on optimized scaffold demonstrated ***p < 0.001 between different time points thus showing its potential for bone healing. In pre-clinical study histological bone response of the scaffold construct displayed improved activity of bone regeneration in comparison to self healing of control groups (sham) up to week 07 after implantation in rabbit tibia critical-size defect. Therefore, this nHA-CMCh{sub Na}-GEL scaffold composite exhibits inherent and efficient physicochemical, mechanical

  18. Bioconductive 3D nano-composite constructs with tunable elasticity to initiate stem cell growth and induce bone mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Nitin; Khanna, Kunal; Sardesai, Varda S.; Singh, Atul K.; Temgire, Mayur; Kalita, Mridula Phukan; Kadam, Sachin S.; Soni, Vivek P.; Bhartiya, Deepa; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive 3D composites play an important role in advanced biomaterial design to provide molecular coupling and improve integrity with the cellular environment of the native bone. In the present study, a hybrid lyophilized polymer composite blend of anionic charged sodium salt of carboxymethyl chitin and gelatin (CMCh Na -GEL) reinforced with nano-rod agglomerated hydroxyapatite (nHA) has been developed with enhanced biocompatibility and tunable elasticity. The scaffolds have an open, uniform and interconnected porous structure with an average pore diameter of 157 ± 30 μm and 89.47 + 0.03% with four dimensional X-ray. The aspect ratio of ellipsoidal pores decrease from 4.4 to 1.2 with increase in gelatin concentration; and from 2.14 to 1.93 with decrease in gelling temperature. The samples were resilient with elastic stain at 1.2 MPa of stress also decreased from 0.33 to 0.23 with increase in gelatin concentration. The crosslinker HMDI (hexamethylene diisocyanate) yielded more resilient samples at 1.2 MPa in comparison to glutaraldehyde. Increased crosslinking time from 2 to 4 h in continuous compression cycle show no improvement in maximum elastic stain of 1.2 MPa stress. This surface elasticity of the scaffold enables the capacity of these materials for adherent self renewal and cultivation of the NTERA-2 cL.D1 (NT2/D1), pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell with biomechanical surface, as is shown here. Proliferation with MG-63, ALP activity and Alizarin red mineralization assay on optimized scaffold demonstrated ***p < 0.001 between different time points thus showing its potential for bone healing. In pre-clinical study histological bone response of the scaffold construct displayed improved activity of bone regeneration in comparison to self healing of control groups (sham) up to week 07 after implantation in rabbit tibia critical-size defect. Therefore, this nHA-CMCh Na -GEL scaffold composite exhibits inherent and efficient physicochemical, mechanical and

  19. Osseointegration of dental implants in 3D-printed synthetic onlay grafts customized according to bone metabolic activity in recipient site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Al-Abedalla, Khadijeh; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique; Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Bassett, David C; Gbureck, Uwe; Barralet, Jake E

    2014-07-01

    Onlay grafts made of monolithic microporous monetite bioresorbable bioceramics have the capacity to conduct bone augmentation. However, there is heterogeneity in the graft behaviour in vivo that seems to correlate with the host anatomy. In this study, we sought to investigate the metabolic activity of the regenerated bone in monolithic monetite onlays by using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in rats. This information was used to optimize the design of monetite onlays with different macroporous architecture that were then fabricated using a 3D-printing technique. In vivo, bone augmentation was attempted with these customized onlays in rabbits. PET-CT findings demonstrated that bone metabolism in the calvarial bone showed higher activity in the inferior and lateral areas of the onlays. Histological observations revealed higher bone volume (up to 47%), less heterogeneity and more implant osseointegration (up to 38%) in the augmented bone with the customized monetite onlays. Our results demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to achieve osseointegration of dental implants in bone augmented with 3D-printed synthetic onlays. It was also observed that designing the macropore geometry according to the bone metabolic activity was a key parameter in increasing the volume of bone augmented within monetite onlays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. No-Reference Video Quality Assessment Based on Statistical Analysis in 3D-DCT Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelong; Guo, Qun; Lu, Xiaoqiang

    2016-05-13

    It is an important task to design models for universal no-reference video quality assessment (NR-VQA) in multiple video processing and computer vision applications. However, most existing NR-VQA metrics are designed for specific distortion types which are not often aware in practical applications. A further deficiency is that the spatial and temporal information of videos is hardly considered simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a new NR-VQA metric based on the spatiotemporal natural video statistics (NVS) in 3D discrete cosine transform (3D-DCT) domain. In the proposed method, a set of features are firstly extracted based on the statistical analysis of 3D-DCT coefficients to characterize the spatiotemporal statistics of videos in different views. These features are used to predict the perceived video quality via the efficient linear support vector regression (SVR) model afterwards. The contributions of this paper are: 1) we explore the spatiotemporal statistics of videos in 3DDCT domain which has the inherent spatiotemporal encoding advantage over other widely used 2D transformations; 2) we extract a small set of simple but effective statistical features for video visual quality prediction; 3) the proposed method is universal for multiple types of distortions and robust to different databases. The proposed method is tested on four widely used video databases. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is competitive with the state-of-art NR-VQA metrics and the top-performing FR-VQA and RR-VQA metrics.

  1. Reconstruction Accuracy Assessment of Surface and Underwater 3D Motion Analysis: A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed accuracy of surface and underwater 3D reconstruction of a calibration volume with and without homography. A calibration volume (6000 × 2000 × 2500 mm with 236 markers (64 above and 88 underwater control points—with 8 common points at water surface—and 92 validation points was positioned on a 25 m swimming pool and recorded with two surface and four underwater cameras. Planar homography estimation for each calibration plane was computed to perform image rectification. Direct linear transformation algorithm for 3D reconstruction was applied, using 1600000 different combinations of 32 and 44 points out of the 64 and 88 control points for surface and underwater markers (resp.. Root Mean Square (RMS error with homography of control and validations points was lower than without it for surface and underwater cameras (P≤0.03. With homography, RMS errors of control and validation points were similar between surface and underwater cameras (P≥0.47. Without homography, RMS error of control points was greater for underwater than surface cameras (P≤0.04 and the opposite was observed for validation points (P≤0.04. It is recommended that future studies using 3D reconstruction should include homography to improve swimming movement analysis accuracy.

  2. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    In the Mediterranean basin, terracing is a common element of agricultural lands. Terraces retained by dry-stone walls are used to conserve arable soil, delay erosion processes and retain rainfall runoff. Currently, agricultural land abandonment is widespread in the Mediterranean region leading to terrace wall failure due to lack of maintenance and consequently an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to test the applicability of digital 3D documentation on mountainous agricultural areas for assessing changes in terrace wall geometry, including terrace wall failures and associated soil erosion. The study area is located at 800-1100 m above sea level, in the Ophiolite complex of the Troodos Mountains in Cyprus. Average annual precipitation is 750 mm. Two sites with dry-stone terraces were selected for this study. The first site had a sequence of three terrace walls that were surveyed. The uppermost terrace wall was collapsed at several locations; the middle at few locations; and the lowest was still intact. Three fieldwork campaigns were conducted at this site: during the dry season (initial conditions), the middle and end of the wet season. The second site had one terrace wall that was almost completely collapsed. This terrace was restored during a communal terrace rehabilitation event. Two fieldwork campaigns were conducted for this terrace: before and after the terrace wall restoration. Terrace walls were documented with a set of digital images, and transformed into a 3D point cloud (using web-based services and commercial software - Autodesk 123D catch and Menci Software uMap, respectively). A set of points, registered with the total station and geo-referenced with a GPS, enabled the scaling of the 3D model and aligning the terrace walls within the same reference system. The density (distance between each point) of the reconstructed point clouds is 0.005 m by Umap and 0.025 m by 123D Catch. On the first site, the model analysis identified wall

  3. Using Anisotropic 3D Minkowski Functionals for Trabecular Bone Characterization and Biomechanical Strength Prediction in Proximal Femur Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; De, Titas; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria; Eckstein, Felix; Wismüller, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The ability of Anisotropic Minkowski Functionals (AMFs) to capture local anisotropy while evaluating topological properties of the underlying gray-level structures has been previously demonstrated. We evaluate the ability of this approach to characterize local structure properties of trabecular bone micro-architecture in ex vivo proximal femur specimens, as visualized on multi-detector CT, for purposes of biomechanical bone strength prediction. To this end, volumetric AMFs were computed locally for each voxel of volumes of interest (VOI) extracted from the femoral head of 146 specimens. The local anisotropy captured by such AMFs was quantified using a fractional anisotropy measure; the magnitude and direction of anisotropy at every pixel was stored in histograms that served as a feature vectors that characterized the VOIs. A linear multi-regression analysis algorithm was used to predict the failure load (FL) from the feature sets; the predicted FL was compared to the true FL determined through biomechanical testing. The prediction performance was measured by the root mean square error (RMSE) for each feature set. The best prediction performance was obtained from the fractional anisotropy histogram of AMF Euler Characteristic (RMSE = 1.01 ± 0.13), which was significantly better than MDCT-derived mean BMD (RMSE = 1.12 ± 0.16, p<0.05). We conclude that such anisotropic Minkowski Functionals can capture valuable information regarding regional trabecular bone quality and contribute to improved bone strength prediction, which is important for improving the clinical assessment of osteoporotic fracture risk. PMID:29170581

  4. Synthesized view comparison method for no-reference 3D image quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fangzhou; Lin, Chaoyi; Gu, Xiaodong; Ma, Xiaojun

    2018-04-01

    We develop a no-reference image quality assessment metric to evaluate the quality of synthesized view rendered from the Multi-view Video plus Depth (MVD) format. Our metric is named Synthesized View Comparison (SVC), which is designed for real-time quality monitoring at the receiver side in a 3D-TV system. The metric utilizes the virtual views in the middle which are warped from left and right views by Depth-image-based rendering algorithm (DIBR), and compares the difference between the virtual views rendered from different cameras by Structural SIMilarity (SSIM), a popular 2D full-reference image quality assessment metric. The experimental results indicate that our no-reference quality assessment metric for the synthesized images has competitive prediction performance compared with some classic full-reference image quality assessment metrics.

  5. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds. (paper)

  6. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-02-01

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds.

  7. Global and 3D spatial assessment of neuroinflammation in rodent models of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a progressive autoimmune inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. T cells play a key role in the progression of neuroinflammation in MS and also in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE animal models for the disease. A technology for quantitative and 3 dimensional (3D spatial assessment of inflammation in this and other CNS inflammatory conditions is much needed. Here we present a procedure for 3D spatial assessment and global quantification of the development of neuroinflammation based on Optical Projection Tomography (OPT. Applying this approach to the analysis of rodent models of MS, we provide global quantitative data of the major inflammatory component as a function of the clinical course. Our data demonstrates a strong correlation between the development and progression of neuroinflammation and clinical disease in several mouse and a rat model of MS refining the information regarding the spatial dynamics of the inflammatory component in EAE. This method provides a powerful tool to investigate the effect of environmental and genetic forces and for assessing the therapeutic effects of drug therapy in animal models of MS and other neuroinflammatory/neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Effect of oxygen plasma etching on pore size-controlled 3D polycaprolactone scaffolds for enhancing the early new bone formation in rabbit calvaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Min-Suk; Roh, Hee-Sang; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2018-05-02

    This study was to investigate the effects of O 2 plasma-etching of the 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold surface on preosteoblast cell proliferation and differentiation, and early new bone formation. The PCL scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. After O 2 plasma treatment, surface characterizations were examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle. MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation. To investigate the early new bone formation, rabbits were sacrificed at 2 weeks for histological analyses. As the O 2 plasma etching time is increased, roughness and hydrophilicity of the PCL scaffold surface increased. The cell proliferation and differentiation on plasma-etched samples was significantly increased than on untreated samples. At 2 weeks, early new bone formation in O 2 plasma-etched PCL scaffolds was the higher than that of untreated scaffolds. The O 2 plasma-etched PCL scaffolds showed increased preosteoblast differentiation as well as increased new bone formation.

  9. Contrast-enhanced MR 3D angiography in the assessment of brain AVMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, Ercument; Temizoz, Osman; Albayram, Sait; Genchellac, Hakan; Hamamcioglu, M. Kemal; Kurt, Imran; Demir, M. Kemal

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the current reference standard for the diagnosis, assessment, and management of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic utility of three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and contrast-enhanced 3D MRA in patients with intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in different sizes and locations. The AVM diagnosis was proved via DSA and almost half of the patients had also hematoma. Materials and methods: Two radiologists, experienced on neurovascular imaging and independent from each other, retrospectively reviewed two MRA techniques and DSA with regard to the assessment of feeding arteries, AVM nidus, and venous drainage patterns on 20 patients with 23 examinations by scoring system. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: An excellent agreement between contrast-enhanced MRA and DSA was found in order to assess the numbers of arterial feeders and draining veins (Spearman r = 0.913, P < 0.001). The average scores in contrast-enhanced MRA for feeders, nidi, and drainers were respectively 2.26, 2.69, and 2.48, while in TOF-MRA they are 1.96, 1.35, and 0.89, respectively. Conclusion: Compared to TOF-MRA, 3D contrast-enhanced MRA is useful for visualization by subtraction technique of malformation components presented by hematoma or by haem product. On the other hand, for the cases presented by slow or complex flow that is especially in around or nidi or around the venous portion is also advantageous because of the independence from flow-related enhancement. Therapeutic effects were clearly demonstrated in three follow-up patients. A major limitation of this technique is the low spatial resolution. Since there is such a limitation, arterial feeder of a case with micro-AVM is not detected by contrast-enhanced MRA and nidus for the same case was observed retrospectively. In this respect, we

  10. Contrast-enhanced MR 3D angiography in the assessment of brain AVMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unlu, Ercument [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey)]. E-mail: drercument@yahoo.com; Temizoz, Osman [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Albayram, Sait [Department of Radiology, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medicine School, Istanbul (Turkey); Genchellac, Hakan [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Hamamcioglu, M. Kemal [Department of Neurosurgery, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Kurt, Imran [Department of Biostatistics, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Demir, M. Kemal [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey)

    2006-12-15

    Background and purpose: Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the current reference standard for the diagnosis, assessment, and management of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic utility of three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and contrast-enhanced 3D MRA in patients with intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in different sizes and locations. The AVM diagnosis was proved via DSA and almost half of the patients had also hematoma. Materials and methods: Two radiologists, experienced on neurovascular imaging and independent from each other, retrospectively reviewed two MRA techniques and DSA with regard to the assessment of feeding arteries, AVM nidus, and venous drainage patterns on 20 patients with 23 examinations by scoring system. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: An excellent agreement between contrast-enhanced MRA and DSA was found in order to assess the numbers of arterial feeders and draining veins (Spearman r = 0.913, P < 0.001). The average scores in contrast-enhanced MRA for feeders, nidi, and drainers were respectively 2.26, 2.69, and 2.48, while in TOF-MRA they are 1.96, 1.35, and 0.89, respectively. Conclusion: Compared to TOF-MRA, 3D contrast-enhanced MRA is useful for visualization by subtraction technique of malformation components presented by hematoma or by haem product. On the other hand, for the cases presented by slow or complex flow that is especially in around or nidi or around the venous portion is also advantageous because of the independence from flow-related enhancement. Therapeutic effects were clearly demonstrated in three follow-up patients. A major limitation of this technique is the low spatial resolution. Since there is such a limitation, arterial feeder of a case with micro-AVM is not detected by contrast-enhanced MRA and nidus for the same case was observed retrospectively. In this respect, we

  11. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    Full Text Available Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is

  12. The 3D Elevation Program—Landslide recognition, hazard assessment, and mitigation support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Vicki; Carswell, Jr., William J.

    2017-01-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program conducts landslide hazard assessments, pursues landslide investigations and forecasts, provides technical assistance to respond to landslide emergencies, and engages in outreach. All of these activities benefit from the availability of high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) elevation information in the form of light detection and ranging (lidar) data and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) data. Research on landslide processes addresses critical questions of where and when landslides are likely to occur as well as their size, speed, and effects. This understanding informs the development of methods and tools for hazard assessment and situational awareness used to guide efforts to avoid or mitigate landslide impacts. Such research is essential for the USGS to provide improved information on landslide potential associated with severe storms, earthquakes, volcanic activity, coastal wave erosion, and wildfire burn areas.Decisionmakers in government and the private sector increasingly depend on information the USGS provides before, during, and following disasters so that communities can live, work, travel, and build safely. The USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) provides the programmatic infrastructure to generate and supply lidar-derived superior terrain data to address landslide applications and a wide range of other urgent needs nationwide. By providing data to users, 3DEP reduces users’ costs and risks and allows them to concentrate on their mission objectives. 3DEP includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms, (3) technical expertise, lidar data standards, and specifications, and (4) most important, public access to high-quality 3D elevation data.

  13. Local seismic hazard assessment in explosive volcanic settings by 3D numerical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzano, Roberto; Pagliaroli, Alessandro; Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Avalle, Alessandra; Giallini, Silvia; Marcini, Marco; Polpetta, Federica; Simionato, Maurizio; Sirianni, Pietro; Sottili, Gianluca; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Bellanova, Jessica; Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Piscitelli, Sabatino

    2017-04-01

    This work deals with the assessment of local seismic response in the explosive volcanic settings by reconstructing the subsoil model of the Stracciacappa maar (Sabatini Volcanic District, central Italy), whose pyroclastic succession records eruptive phases ended about 0.09 Ma ago. Heterogeneous characteristics of the Stracciacappa maar (stratification, structural setting, lithotypes, and thickness variation of depositional units) make it an ideal case history for understanding mechanisms and processes leading to modifications of amplitude-frequency-duration of seismic waves generated at earthquake sources and propagating through volcanic settings. New geological map and cross sections, constrained with recently acquired geotechnical and geophysical data, illustrate the complex geometric relationships among different depositional units forming the maar. A composite interfingering between internal lacustrine sediments and epiclastic debris, sourced from the rim, fills the crater floor; a 45 meters thick continuous coring borehole was drilled in the maar with sampling of undisturbed samples. Electrical Resistivity Tomography surveys and 2D passive seismic arrays were also carried out for constraining the geological model and the velocity profile of the S-waves, respectively. Single station noise measurements were collected in order to define natural amplification frequencies. Finally, the nonlinear cyclic soil behaviour was investigated through simple shear tests on the undisturbed samples. The collected dataset was used to define the subsoil model for 3D finite difference site response numerical analyses by using FLAC 3D software (ITASCA). Moreover, 1D and 2D numerical analyses were carried out for comparison purposes. Two different scenarios were selected as input motions: a moderate magnitude (volcanic event) and a high magnitude (tectonic event). Both earthquake scenarios revealed significant ground motion amplification (up to 15 in terms of spectral acceleration

  14. 3D Registration of mpMRI for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Focal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orczyk, Clément; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mikheev, Artem; Villers, Arnauld; Bernaudin, Myriam; Taneja, Samir S; Valable, Samuel; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to assess a novel method of three-dimensional (3D) co-registration of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations performed before and after prostate cancer focal therapy. We developed a software platform for automatic 3D deformable co-registration of prostate MRI at different time points and applied this method to 10 patients who underwent focal ablative therapy. MRI examinations were performed preoperatively, as well as 1 week and 6 months post treatment. Rigid registration served as reference for assessing co-registration accuracy and precision. Segmentation of preoperative and postoperative prostate revealed a significant postoperative volume decrease of the gland that averaged 6.49 cc (P = .017). Applying deformable transformation based on mutual information from 120 pairs of MRI slices, we refined by 2.9 mm (max. 6.25 mm) the alignment of the ablation zone, segmented from contrast-enhanced images on the 1-week postoperative examination, to the 6-month postoperative T2-weighted images. This represented a 500% improvement over the rigid approach (P = .001), corrected by volume. The dissimilarity by Dice index of the mapped ablation zone using deformable transformation vs rigid control was significantly (P = .04) higher at the ablation site than in the whole gland. Our findings illustrate our method's ability to correct for deformation at the ablation site. The preliminary analysis suggests that deformable transformation computed from mutual information of preoperative and follow-up MRI is accurate in co-registration of MRI examinations performed before and after focal therapy. The ability to localize the previously ablated tissue in 3D space may improve targeting for image-guided follow-up biopsy within focal therapy protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals’ Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs’ behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals’ quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog’s shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  16. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  17. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Mishra, Pankaj, E-mail: wcai@lroc.harvard.edu, E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Lewis, John H., E-mail: wcai@lroc.harvard.edu, E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Seco, Joao [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    reconstructed from kV and MV projections compared to the ground truth, which is clinically comparable to 4DCT (0.093%). For the second XCAT phantom that has an irregular breathing pattern, the errors are 0.81% and 1.75% for kV and MV reconstructions, both of which are better than that of 4DCT (4.01%). In the case of real patient, although it is impossible to obtain the actual delivered dose, the dose estimation is clinically reasonable and demonstrates differences between 4DCT and MV reconstruction-based dose estimates. Conclusions: With the availability of kV or MV projection images, the proposed approach is able to assess delivered doses for all respiratory phases during treatment. Compared to the planning dose based on 4DCT, the dose estimation using reconstructed 3D fluoroscopic images was as good as 4DCT for regular respiratory pattern and was a better dose estimation for the irregular respiratory pattern.

  18. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Mishra, Pankaj; Lewis, John H.; Seco, Joao

    2015-01-01

    reconstructed from kV and MV projections compared to the ground truth, which is clinically comparable to 4DCT (0.093%). For the second XCAT phantom that has an irregular breathing pattern, the errors are 0.81% and 1.75% for kV and MV reconstructions, both of which are better than that of 4DCT (4.01%). In the case of real patient, although it is impossible to obtain the actual delivered dose, the dose estimation is clinically reasonable and demonstrates differences between 4DCT and MV reconstruction-based dose estimates. Conclusions: With the availability of kV or MV projection images, the proposed approach is able to assess delivered doses for all respiratory phases during treatment. Compared to the planning dose based on 4DCT, the dose estimation using reconstructed 3D fluoroscopic images was as good as 4DCT for regular respiratory pattern and was a better dose estimation for the irregular respiratory pattern

  19. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Walker, Duncan; Crozier, Stuart; Engstrom, Craig

    2015-10-01

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint. Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18-49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system. High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  hip joints to generate alpha angle measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the potential to improve analyses of cam-type lesions of the FHN junction for large

  20. Quantitative assessment for pneumoconiosis severity diagnosis using 3D CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Koki; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Kato, Katsuya; Kishimoto, Takumi; Ashizawa, Kazuto

    2018-02-01

    Pneumoconiosis is an occupational respiratory illness that occur by inhaling dust to the lungs. 240,000 participants are screened for diagnosis of pneumoconiosis every year in Japan. Radiograph is used for staging of severity rate in pneumoconiosis worldwide. CT imaging is useful for the differentiation of requirements for industrial accident approval because it can detect small lesions in comparison with radiograph. In this paper, we extracted lung nodules from 3D pneumoconiosis CT images by two manual processes and automatic process, and created a database of pneumoconiosis CT images. We used the database to analyze, compare, and evaluate visual diagnostic results of radiographs and quantitative assessment (number, size and volume) of lung nodules. This method was applied to twenty pneumoconiosis patients. Initial results showed that the proposed method can assess severity rate in pneumoconiosis quantitatively. This study demonstrates effectiveness on diagnosis and prognosis of pneumoconiosis in CT screening.

  1. 3D SURVEYING AND GEOMETRIC ASSESSMENT OF A GOTHIC NAVE VAULTING FROM POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa-Jover

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of massive data captures techniques (MDC in recent years, such as the Terrestrial laser Scanner (TLS, raises the possibility of developing new assessment procedures for architectural heritage. The 3D models that it is able to obtain is a great potential tool, both for conservation purposes and for historical and architectural studies. The paper proposes a simple, non-invasive methodology for the assessment of masonry vaults from point clouds which makes it possible to obtain relevant data about the formal anomalies. The methodology is tested in Tortosa’s Gothic Cathedral’s vaults, where the geometrical differences between vaults, a priori equal, are identified and related with the partially known construction phases. The procedure can be easily used on any other vaulted construction of any kind, but is especially useful to deal with the complex geometry of Gothic masonry vaults.

  2. Application of 3D reconstruction system in diabetic foot ulcer injury assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Li; Li, Tianjian; Liang, Xiaoyao

    2018-04-01

    To deal with the considerable deviation of transparency tracing method and digital planimetry method used in current clinical diabetic foot ulcer injury assessment, this paper proposes a 3D reconstruction system which can be used to get foot model with good quality texture, then injury assessment is done by measuring the reconstructed model. The system uses the Intel RealSense SR300 depth camera which is based on infrared structured-light as input device, the required data from different view is collected by moving the camera around the scanned object. The geometry model is reconstructed by fusing the collected data, then the mesh is sub-divided to increase the number of mesh vertices and the color of each vertex is determined using a non-linear optimization, all colored vertices compose the surface texture of the reconstructed model. Experimental results indicate that the reconstructed model has millimeter-level geometric accuracy and texture with few artificial effect.

  3. Visualizing Angiogenesis by Multiphoton Microscopy In Vivo in Genetically Modified 3D-PLGA/nHAp Scaffold for Calvarial Critical Bone Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Jahr, Holger; Zheng, Wei; Ren, Pei-Gen

    2017-09-07

    The reconstruction of critically sized bone defects remains a serious clinical problem because of poor angiogenesis within tissue-engineered scaffolds during repair, which gives rise to a lack of sufficient blood supply and causes necrosis of the new tissues. Rapid vascularization is a vital prerequisite for new tissue survival and integration with existing host tissue. The de novo generation of vasculature in scaffolds is one of the most important steps in making bone regeneration more efficient, allowing repairing tissue to grow into a scaffold. To tackle this problem, the genetic modification of a biomaterial scaffold is used to accelerate angiogenesis and osteogenesis. However, visualizing and tracking in vivo blood vessel formation in real-time and in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds or new bone tissue is still an obstacle for bone tissue engineering. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a novel bio-imaging modality that can acquire volumetric data from biological structures in a high-resolution and minimally-invasive manner. The objective of this study was to visualize angiogenesis with multiphoton microscopy in vivo in a genetically modified 3D-PLGA/nHAp scaffold for calvarial critical bone defect repair. PLGA/nHAp scaffolds were functionalized for the sustained delivery of a growth factor pdgf-b gene carrying lentiviral vectors (LV-pdgfb) in order to facilitate angiogenesis and to enhance bone regeneration. In a scaffold-implanted calvarial critical bone defect mouse model, the blood vessel areas (BVAs) in PHp scaffolds were significantly higher than in PH scaffolds. Additionally, the expression of pdgf-b and angiogenesis-related genes, vWF and VEGFR2, increased correspondingly. MicroCT analysis indicated that the new bone formation in the PHp group dramatically improved compared to the other groups. To our knowledge, this is the first time multiphoton microscopy was used in bone tissue-engineering to investigate angiogenesis in a 3D bio-degradable scaffold in

  4. Detection of the carpal bone contours from 3-D MR images of the wrist using a planar radial scale-space snake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J. G.; Venema, H. W.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problems encountered when applying snake models to detect the contours of the carpal bones in 3-D MR images of the wrist. In order to improve the performance of the original snake model introduced by Kass [1], we propose a new image force based on one-dimensional (1-D)

  5. The effects of bone remodeling inhibition by alendronate on 3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone tissues in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Hvid, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    We assess whether increase of subchondral bone density enhances cartilage stress during impact loading leading to progressive cartilage degeneration and accelerated osteoarthrosis (OA) progression.               Sixty-six male guinea pigs were randomly divided into 6 groups. During a 9-week...

  6. 3D power Doppler ultrasound assessment of placental perfusion during uterine contraction in labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Miki; Noguchi, Junko; Mashima, Masato; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Hata, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    To assess placental perfusion during spontaneous or induced uterine contraction in labor at term using placental vascular sonobiopsy (PVS) by 3D power Doppler ultrasound with the VOCAL imaging analysis program. PVS was performed in 50 normal pregnancies (32 in spontaneous labor group [SLG], and 18 in induced labor group with oxytocin or prostaglandin F2α [ILG]) at 37-41 weeks of gestation to assess placental perfusion during uterine contraction in labor. Only pregnancies with an entirely visualized anterior placenta were included in the study. Data acquisition was performed before, during (at the peak of contraction), and after uterine contraction. 3D power Doppler indices such as the vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), and vascularization flow index (VFI) were calculated in each placenta. There were no abnormal fetal heart rate tracings during contraction in either group. VI and VFI values were significantly reduced during uterine contraction in both groups (SLG, -33.4% [-97.0-15.2%], and ILG, -49.6% [-78.2--4.0%]), respectively (P power Doppler indices (VI, FI, and VFI) during uterine contraction (at the peak of contraction) showed a correlation greater than 0.7, with good intra- and inter-observer agreements. Our findings suggest that uterine contraction in both spontaneous and induced labors causes a significant reduction in placental perfusion. Reduced placental blood flow in induced uterine contraction has a tendency to be marked compared with that in spontaneous uterine contraction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the non-invasive assessment of placental perfusion during uterine contraction in labor using 3D power Doppler ultrasound. However, the data and their interpretation in the present study should be taken with some degree of caution because of the small number of subjects studied. Further studies involving a larger sample size are needed to assess placental perfusion and vascularity using PVS during normal and

  7. Usability of aerial video footage for 3-D scene reconstruction and structural damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusicanqui, Johnny; Kerle, Norman; Nex, Francesco

    2018-06-01

    Remote sensing has evolved into the most efficient approach to assess post-disaster structural damage, in extensively affected areas through the use of spaceborne data. For smaller, and in particular, complex urban disaster scenes, multi-perspective aerial imagery obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles and derived dense color 3-D models are increasingly being used. These type of data allow the direct and automated recognition of damage-related features, supporting an effective post-disaster structural damage assessment. However, the rapid collection and sharing of multi-perspective aerial imagery is still limited due to tight or lacking regulations and legal frameworks. A potential alternative is aerial video footage, which is typically acquired and shared by civil protection institutions or news media and which tends to be the first type of airborne data available. Nevertheless, inherent artifacts and the lack of suitable processing means have long limited its potential use in structural damage assessment and other post-disaster activities. In this research the usability of modern aerial video data was evaluated based on a comparative quality and application analysis of video data and multi-perspective imagery (photos), and their derivative 3-D point clouds created using current photogrammetric techniques. Additionally, the effects of external factors, such as topography and the presence of smoke and moving objects, were determined by analyzing two different earthquake-affected sites: Tainan (Taiwan) and Pescara del Tronto (Italy). Results demonstrated similar usabilities for video and photos. This is shown by the short 2 cm of difference between the accuracies of video- and photo-based 3-D point clouds. Despite the low video resolution, the usability of these data was compensated for by a small ground sampling distance. Instead of video characteristics, low quality and application resulted from non-data-related factors, such as changes in the scene, lack of

  8. 3D Tree Dimensionality Assessment Using Photogrammetry and Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatziolis, Demetrios; Lienard, Jean F; Vogs, Andre; Strigul, Nikolay S

    2015-01-01

    Detailed, precise, three-dimensional (3D) representations of individual trees are a prerequisite for an accurate assessment of tree competition, growth, and morphological plasticity. Until recently, our ability to measure the dimensionality, spatial arrangement, shape of trees, and shape of tree components with precision has been constrained by technological and logistical limitations and cost. Traditional methods of forest biometrics provide only partial measurements and are labor intensive. Active remote technologies such as LiDAR operated from airborne platforms provide only partial crown reconstructions. The use of terrestrial LiDAR is laborious, has portability limitations and high cost. In this work we capitalized on recent improvements in the capabilities and availability of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), light and inexpensive cameras, and developed an affordable method for obtaining precise and comprehensive 3D models of trees and small groups of trees. The method employs slow-moving UAVs that acquire images along predefined trajectories near and around targeted trees, and computer vision-based approaches that process the images to obtain detailed tree reconstructions. After we confirmed the potential of the methodology via simulation we evaluated several UAV platforms, strategies for image acquisition, and image processing algorithms. We present an original, step-by-step workflow which utilizes open source programs and original software. We anticipate that future development and applications of our method will improve our understanding of forest self-organization emerging from the competition among trees, and will lead to a refined generation of individual-tree-based forest models.

  9. The feasibility assessment of radiation dose of movement 3D NIPAM gel by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Leung, Joseph Hang; Ng, Yu-Bun; Cheng, Chih-Wu; Sun, Jung-Chang; Lin, Ping-Chin; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    NIPAM dosimeter is widely accepted and recommended for its 3D distribution and accuracy in dose absorption. Up to the moment, most research works on dose measurement are based on a fixed irradiation target without the consideration of the effect from physiological motion. We present a study to construct a respiratory motion simulating patient anatomical and dosimetry model for the study of dosimetic effect of organ motion. The dose on fixed and motion targets was measured by MRI after a dose adminstration of 1, 2, 5, 8, and 10 Gy from linear accelerator. Comparison of two situations is made. The average sensitivity of fixed NIPAM was 0.1356 s −1 /Gy with linearity R 2 =0.998. The average sensitivity of movement NIPAM was 0.1366 s −1 /Gy with linearity R 2 =0.998 both having only 0.001 of the sensitivity difference. The difference between the two based on dose rate dependency, position and depth was not significant. There was thus no apparent impact on NIPAM dosimeter from physiological motion. The high sensitivity, linearity and stability of NIPAM dosimeter proved to be an ideal apparatus in the dose measurement in these circumstances. - Highlights: • Feasibility assessment of a dynamic 3D NIPAM gel dosimeter. • MRI to evaluate NIPAM dosimeter and compared its static and dynamic irradiation. • NIPAM dosimeter could be used to simulate organ movements in the future.

  10. Some applications of 2-D and 3-D photogrammetry during laboratory experiments for hydrogeological risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scaioni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scaled-down flume tests are largely used to support investigations for the assessment of hydrogeological risk. Achieved outcomes can be integrated to numerical analyses for the study of unstable slope collapse, debris transport, and hydrological models in general. In the set-up of such simulation platforms, a relevant role has to be given to the Spatial Sensor Network (SSN which is in charge of collecting geo-referenced, quantitative information during experiments. Photogrammetry (including 3-D imaging sensors can play an important role in SSN because of its capability of collecting information covering wide surfaces without any contact. The aim of this paper is to give an overview and some examples of the potential of photogrammetry in hydrogeological simulation experiments. After a general introduction on a few preliminary issues (sensors, calibration, ground reference, usage of imaging or ranging sensors, potential applications are classified into 2-D and 3-D categories. Examples are focused on a scaled-down landslide simulation platform, which has been developed at Tongji University (Shanghai, P.R. China.

  11. The dark side of photovoltaic — 3D simulation of glare assessing risk and discomfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Thomas; Wollert, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems form an important force in the implementation of renewable energies, but as we all know, the force has always its dark side. Besides efficiency considerations and discussions about architectures of power distribution networks, the increasing numbers of installations of PV systems for implementing renewable energies have secondary effects. PV systems can generate glare due to optical reflections and hence might be a serious concern. On the one hand, glare could affect safety, e.g. regarding traffic. On the other hand, glare is a constant source of discomfort in vicinities of PV systems. Hence, assessment of glare is decisive for the success of renewable energies near municipalities and traffic zones for the success of solar power. Several courts decided on the change of PV systems and even on their de-installation because of glare effects. Thus, location-based assessments are required to limit potential reflections and to avoid risks for public infrastructure or discomfort of residents. The question arises on how to calculate reflections accurately according to the environment's topography. Our approach is founded in a 3D-based simulation methodology to calculate and visualize reflections based on the geometry of the environment of PV systems. This computational model is implemented by an interactive tool for simulation and visualization. Hence, project planners receive flexible assistance for adjusting the parameters of solar panels amid the planning process and in particular before the installation of a PV system. - Highlights: • Solar panels cause glare that impacts neighborhoods and traffic infrastructures. • Glare might cause disability and discomfort. • 3D environment for the calculation of glare • Interactive tool to simulate and visualize reflections • Impact assessment of solar power plant farms

  12. The dark side of photovoltaic — 3D simulation of glare assessing risk and discomfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Thomas; Wollert, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems form an important force in the implementation of renewable energies, but as we all know, the force has always its dark side. Besides efficiency considerations and discussions about architectures of power distribution networks, the increasing numbers of installations of PV systems for implementing renewable energies have secondary effects. PV systems can generate glare due to optical reflections and hence might be a serious concern. On the one hand, glare could affect safety, e.g. regarding traffic. On the other hand, glare is a constant source of discomfort in vicinities of PV systems. Hence, assessment of glare is decisive for the success of renewable energies near municipalities and traffic zones for the success of solar power. Several courts decided on the change of PV systems and even on their de-installation because of glare effects. Thus, location-based assessments are required to limit potential reflections and to avoid risks for public infrastructure or discomfort of residents. The question arises on how to calculate reflections accurately according to the environment's topography. Our approach is founded in a 3D-based simulation methodology to calculate and visualize reflections based on the geometry of the environment of PV systems. This computational model is implemented by an interactive tool for simulation and visualization. Hence, project planners receive flexible assistance for adjusting the parameters of solar panels amid the planning process and in particular before the installation of a PV system. - Highlights: • Solar panels cause glare that impacts neighborhoods and traffic infrastructures. • Glare might cause disability and discomfort. • 3D environment for the calculation of glare • Interactive tool to simulate and visualize reflections • Impact assessment of solar power plant farms.

  13. Comparative Efficacies of a 3D-Printed PCL/PLGA/β-TCP Membrane and a Titanium Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyung Shim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a 3D-printed resorbable polycaprolactone/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane on bone regeneration and osseointegration in areas surrounding implants and to compare results with those of a non-resorbable titanium mesh membrane. After preparation of PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes using extrusion-based 3D printing technology; mechanical tensile testing and in vitro cell proliferation testing were performed. Implant surgery and guided bone regeneration were performed randomly in three groups (a no membrane group, a titanium membrane group, and a PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane group (n = 8 per group. Histological and histometric analyses were conducted to evaluate effects on bone regeneration and osseointegration. Using the results of mechanical testing; a PCL/PLGA/β-TCP ratio of 2:6:2 was selected. The new bone areas (% in buccal defects around implants were highest in the PCL/PLGA/β-TCP group and significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.05. Bone-to-implant contact ratios (% were also significantly higher in the PCL/PLGA/β-TCP and titanium groups than in the control group (p < 0.05. When the guided bone regeneration procedure was performed using the PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane; new bone formation around the implant and osseointegration were not inferior to those of the non-resorbable pre-formed titanium mesh membrane.

  14. A New Bone Substitute Developed from 3D-Prints of Polylactide (PLA Loaded with Collagen I: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Ritz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although a lot of research has been performed, large segmental bone defects caused by trauma, infection, bone tumors or revision surgeries still represent big challenges for trauma surgeons. New and innovative bone substitutes are needed. Three-dimensional (3D printing is a novel procedure to create 3D porous scaffolds that can be used for bone tissue engineering. In the present study, solid discs as well as porous cage-like 3D prints made of polylactide (PLA are coated or filled with collagen, respectively, and tested for biocompatibility and endotoxin contamination. Microscopic analyses as well as proliferation assays were performed using various cell types on PLA discs. Stromal-derived factor (SDF-1 release from cages filled with collagen was analyzed and the effect on endothelial cells tested. This study confirms the biocompatibility of PLA and demonstrates an endotoxin contamination clearly below the FDA (Food and Drug Administration limit. Cells of various cell types (osteoblasts, osteoblast-like cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells grow, spread and proliferate on PLA-printed discs. PLA cages loaded with SDF-1 collagen display a steady SDF-1 release, support cell growth of endothelial cells and induce neo-vessel formation. These results demonstrate the potential for PLA scaffolds printed with an inexpensive desktop printer in medical applications, for example, in bone tissue engineering.

  15. Enhanced In Vivo Bone and Blood Vessel Formation by Iron Oxide and Silica Doped 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Banerjee, Dishary; Robertson, Samuel; Vahabzadeh, Sahar

    2018-05-04

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics show significant promise towards bone graft applications because of the compositional similarity to inorganic materials of bone. With 3D printing, it is possible to create ceramic implants that closely mimic the geometry of human bone and can be custom-designed for unusual injuries or anatomical sites. The objective of the study was to optimize the 3D-printing parameters for the fabrication of scaffolds, with complex geometry, made from synthesized tricalcium phosphate (TCP) powder. This study was also intended to elucidate the mechanical and biological effects of the addition of Fe +3 and Si +4 in TCP implants in a rat distal femur model for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Doped with Fe +3 and Si +4 TCP scaffolds with 3D interconnected channels were fabricated to provide channels for micronutrients delivery and improved cell-material interactions through bioactive fixation. Addition of Fe +3 into TCP enhanced early-stage new bone formation by increasing type I collagen production. Neovascularization was observed in the Si +4 doped samples after 12 weeks. These findings emphasize that the additive manufacturing of scaffolds with complex geometry from synthesized ceramic powder with modified chemistry is feasible and may serve as a potential candidate to introduce angiogenic and osteogenic properties to CaPs, leading to accelerated bone defect healing.

  16. A New Bone Substitute Developed from 3D-Prints of Polylactide (PLA) Loaded with Collagen I: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Ulrike; Gerke, Rebekka; Götz, Hermann; Stein, Stefan; Rommens, Pol Maria

    2017-11-29

    Although a lot of research has been performed, large segmental bone defects caused by trauma, infection, bone tumors or revision surgeries still represent big challenges for trauma surgeons. New and innovative bone substitutes are needed. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a novel procedure to create 3D porous scaffolds that can be used for bone tissue engineering. In the present study, solid discs as well as porous cage-like 3D prints made of polylactide (PLA) are coated or filled with collagen, respectively, and tested for biocompatibility and endotoxin contamination. Microscopic analyses as well as proliferation assays were performed using various cell types on PLA discs. Stromal-derived factor (SDF-1) release from cages filled with collagen was analyzed and the effect on endothelial cells tested. This study confirms the biocompatibility of PLA and demonstrates an endotoxin contamination clearly below the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) limit. Cells of various cell types (osteoblasts, osteoblast-like cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells) grow, spread and proliferate on PLA-printed discs. PLA cages loaded with SDF-1 collagen display a steady SDF-1 release, support cell growth of endothelial cells and induce neo-vessel formation. These results demonstrate the potential for PLA scaffolds printed with an inexpensive desktop printer in medical applications, for example, in bone tissue engineering.

  17. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  18. Therapeutic response assessment using 3D ultrasound for hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer: Application of a personalized, 3D-printed tumor model using CT images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ra Choi

    Full Text Available To evaluate accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US for response evaluation of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRC using a personalized 3D-printed tumor model.Twenty patients with liver metastasis from CRC who underwent baseline and after chemotherapy CT, were retrospectively included. Personalized 3D-printed tumor models using CT were fabricated. Two radiologists measured volume of each 3D printing model using 3D US. With CT as a reference, we compared difference between CT and US tumor volume. The response evaluation was based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST criteria.3D US tumor volume showed no significant difference from CT volume (7.18 ± 5.44 mL, 8.31 ± 6.32 mL vs 7.42 ± 5.76 mL in CT, p>0.05. 3D US provided a high correlation coefficient with CT (r = 0.953, r = 0.97 as well as a high inter-observer intraclass correlation (0.978; 0.958-0.988. Regarding response, 3D US was in agreement with CT in 17 and 18 out of 20 patients for observer 1 and 2 with excellent agreement (κ = 0.961.3D US tumor volume using a personalized 3D-printed model is an accurate and reliable method for the response evaluation in comparison with CT tumor volume.

  19. Efficiency assessment of runoff harvesting techniques using a 3D coupled surface-subsurface hydrological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbist, K.; Cronelis, W. M.; McLaren, R.; Gabriels, D.; Soto, G.

    2009-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid zones runoff harvesting techniques are often applied to increase the water retention and infiltration on steep slopes. Additionally, they act as an erosion control measure to reduce land degradation hazards. Both in literature and in the field, a large variety of runoff collecting systems are found, as well as large variations in design and dimensions. Therefore, detailed measurements were performed on a semi-arid slope in central Chile to allow identification of the effect of a simple water harvesting technique on soil water availability. For this purpose, twenty two TDR-probes were installed and were monitored continuously during and after a simulated rainfall event. These data were used to calibrate the 3D distributed flow model HydroGeoSphere, to assess the runoff components and soil water retention as influenced by the water harvesting technique, both under simulated and natural rainfall conditions. (Author) 6 refs.

  20. Assessment of geometrically necessary dislocation levels derived by 3D EBSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijnenberg, P.J.; Zaefferer, S.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Existing alternatives for the calculation of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities from orientation fields are discussed. Importantly, we highlight the role of reference frames and consider different sources of error. A well-controlled micro cantilever bending experiment on a copper bicrystal has been analyzed by 3-dimensional electron back scatter diffraction (3D EBSD). The GND density is determined experimentally by two different approaches and assessed theoretically, assuming a homogeneous bending of the cantilever. Experiment and theory agree very well. It is further shown that the deformation is accommodated mainly by GNDs, which carry and store lattice rotation, and not (only) by mobile dislocations that leave a crystal portion inspected, without lattice rotations. A detailed GND analysis reveals a local density minimum close to the grain boundary and a distinct difference in edge to screw ratios for both grains

  1. QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF 3D RECONSTRUCTION USING FISHEYE AND PERSPECTIVE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Strecha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent mathematical advances, growing alongside the use of unmanned aerial vehicles, have not only overcome the restriction of roll and pitch angles during flight but also enabled us to apply non-metric cameras in photogrammetric method, providing more flexibility for sensor selection. Fisheye cameras, for example, advantageously provide images with wide coverage; however, these images are extremely distorted and their non-uniform resolutions make them more difficult to use for mapping or terrestrial 3D modelling. In this paper, we compare the usability of different camera-lens combinations, using the complete workflow implemented in Pix4Dmapper to achieve the final terrestrial reconstruction result of a well-known historical site in Switzerland: the Chillon Castle. We assess the accuracy of the outcome acquired by consumer cameras with perspective and fisheye lenses, comparing the results to a laser scanner point cloud.

  2. In vitro study of 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP composite scaffolds with etched oxygen plasma surface modification in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Hee-Sang [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sang-Chul [Department of Environmental Engineering, Sunchon National University, 255 Jungang-ro, Sunchon 57922 (Korea, Republic of); Kook, Min-Suk [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61452 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • PLGA and PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds were successfully fabricated by 3D printing. • Oxygen plasma etching increases the wettability and surface roughness. • Bioceramics and oxygen plasma etching and could be used to improve the cell affinity. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds have many advantageous properties for bone tissue engineering application, due to its controllable properties such as pore size, structural shape and interconnectivity. In this study, effects on oxygen plasma surface modification and adding of nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAp) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds for improving preosteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, proliferation and differentiation were investigated. The 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds were fabricated by 3D Bio-Extruder equipment. The 3D scaffolds were prepared with 0°/90° architecture and pore size of approximately 300 μm. In addition 3D scaffolds surface were etched by oxygen plasma to enhance the hydrophilic property and surface roughness. After oxygen plasma treatment, the surface chemistry and morphology were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. And also hydrophilic property was measured by contact angle. The MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and differentiation were investigated by MTT assay and ALP activity. In present work, the 3D PLGA/HAp/beta-TCP composite scaffold with suitable structure for the growth of osteoblast cells was successfully fabricated by 3D rapid prototyping technique. The surface hydrophilicity and roughness of 3D scaffold increased by oxygen plasma treatment had a positive effect on cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell was significantly enhanced by adding of n-HAp and β-TCP on 3D PLGA scaffold. As a result, combination of bioceramics and oxygen plasma treatment showed a synergistic effect on

  3. 3D MODELLING AND ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF GRANITE QUARRY USING UNMMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. González-Aguilera

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs are automated systems whose main characteristic is that can be remotely piloted. This property is especially interesting in those civil engineering works in which the accuracy of the model is not reachable by common aerial or satellite systems, there is a difficult accessibility to the infrastructure due to location and geometry aspects, and the economic resources are limited. This paper aims to show the research, development and application of a UAV that will generate georeferenced spatial information at low cost, high quality, and high availability. In particular, a 3D modelling and accuracy assessment of granite quarry using UAV is applied. With regard to the image-based modelling pipeline, an automatic approach supported by open source tools is performed. The process encloses the well-known image-based modelling steps: calibration, extraction and matching of features; relative and absolute orientation of images and point cloud and surface generation. Beside this, an assessment of the final model accuracy is carried out by means of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS, imaging total station (ITS and global navigation satellite system (GNSS in order to ensure its validity. This step follows a twofold approach: (i firstly, using singular check points to provide a dimensional control of the model and (ii secondly, analyzing the level of agreement between the realitybased 3D model obtained from UAV and the generated with TLS. The main goal is to establish and validate an image-based modelling workflow using UAV technology which can be applied in the surveying and monitoring of different quarries.

  4. 3D laser scanning and open source GIS for solar potential assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochem, A.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing demand among home owners and operators of commercial and public facilities to reduce energy costs, the reliance on declining fossil fuel resources and the impact on the environment. Therefore, cost effective sustainable energy production such as biomass, wind power and solar energy must play a major role in the energy supply chain. The latter is in the focus of this thesis. Solar thermal and photovoltaic conversion systems can be mounted on both, roof planes and building facades in order to produce heat and electricity and thus to increase renewable energy supply. The amount of the incoming solar energy on building areas can be assessed by using e.g. solar radiation models that are implemented in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). However, this requires detailed information about the three dimensional representation of the buildings of interest as well as of their surrounding objects that may cast shadows in order to find suitable areas for the installation of solar based renewable energy technologies. In recent years Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), also referred to as laser scanning, has established as a standard technology for highly accurate three dimensional data acquisition of object surfaces. The geometrical information of the scanned surface is stored as 3D point cloud (xyz-triples). Each point is tagged with additional information such as strength of backscatter (intensity), timestamp and scan angle. Most solar radiation models that are implemented in standard GIS software operate on 2.5D raster data and cannot be combined with 3D point cloud data. Hence, an aggregation and simplification of the 3D point cloud to 2.5D raster cells is required leading to an irreversible loss of the third dimension. This procedure reduces the amount of point cloud data significantly and processing such simple data models is less time consuming because the complexity of the third dimension has not to be considered anymore. Although 3D shapes

  5. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  6. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen [Hematology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Crete (Greece); Farsari, Maria [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Vamvakaki, Maria [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece)

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  7. Assessing extraterrestrial regolith material simulants for in-situ resource utilization based 3D printing

    OpenAIRE

    Goulas, A; Binner, JGP; Harris, RA; Friel, RJ

    2017-01-01

    This research paper investigates the suitability of ceramic multi-component materials, which are found on the Martian and Lunar surfaces, for 3D printing (aka Additive Manufacturing) of solid structures. 3D printing is a promising solution as part of the cutting edge field of future in situ space manufacturing applications. 3D printing of physical assets from simulated Martian and Lunar regolith was successfully performed during this work by utilising laser-based powder bed fusion equipment. ...

  8. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nillesen, M M; Lopata, R G P; Gerrits, I H; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L [Clinical Physics Laboratory-833, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); De Boode, W P [Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huisman, H J [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kapusta, L [Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.m.nillesen@cukz.umcn.nl

    2009-04-07

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  9. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nillesen, M M; Lopata, R G P; Gerrits, I H; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L; De Boode, W P; Huisman, H J; Kapusta, L

    2009-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  10. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  11. Medium-Term Function of a 3D Printed TCP/HA Structure as a New Osteoconductive Scaffold for Vertical Bone Augmentation: A Simulation by BMP-2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Moussa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A 3D-printed construct made of orthogonally layered strands of tricalcium phosphate (TCP and hydroxyapatite has recently become available. The material provides excellent osteoconductivity. We simulated a medium-term experiment in a sheep calvarial model by priming the blocks with BMP-2. Vertical bone growth/maturation and material resorption were evaluated. Materials and methods: Titanium hemispherical caps were filled with either bare- or BMP-2 primed constructs and placed onto the calvaria of adult sheep (n = 8. Histomorphometry was performed after 8 and 16 weeks. Results: After 8 weeks, relative to bare constructs, BMP-2 stimulation led to a two-fold increase in bone volume (Bare: 22% ± 2.1%; BMP-2 primed: 50% ± 3% and a 3-fold decrease in substitute volume (Bare: 47% ± 5%; BMP-2 primed: 18% ± 2%. These rates were still observed at 16 weeks. The new bone grew and matured to a haversian-like structure while the substitute material resorbed via cell- and chemical-mediation. Conclusion: By priming the 3D construct with BMP-2, bone metabolism was physiologically accelerated, that is, enhancing vertical bone growth and maturation as well as material bioresorption. The scaffolding function of the block was maintained, leaving time for the bone to grow and mature to a haversian-like structure. In parallel, the material resorbed via cell-mediated and chemical processes. These promising results must be confirmed in clinical tests.

  12. Osteogenic medium is superior to growth factors in differentiation of human adipose stem cells towards bone-forming cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Tirkkonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose stem cells (hASCs have been recently used to treat bone defects in clinical practice. Yet there is a need for more optimal scaffolds and cost-effective approaches to induce osteogenic differentiation of hASCs. Therefore, we compared the efficiency of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2 and BMP-7, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and osteogenic medium (OM for the osteo-induction of hASCs in 3D culture. In addition, growth factors were tested in combination with OM. Commercially available bioactive glass scaffolds (BioRestore and biphasic calcium phosphate granules (BoneCeramic were evaluated as prospective carriers for hASCs. Both biomaterials supported hASC-viability, but BioRestore resulted in higher cell number than BoneCeramic, whereas BoneCeramic supported more significant collagen production. The most efficient osteo-induction was achieved with plain OM, promoting higher alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen production than growth factors. In fact, treatment with BMP-2 or VEGF did not increase osteogenic differentiation or cell number significantly more than maintenance medium with either biomaterial. Moreover, BMP-7 treatment consistently inhibited proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hASCs. Interestingly, there was no benefit from growth factors added to OM. This is the first study to demonstrate that OM enhances hASC-differentiation towards bone-forming cells significantly more than growth factors in 3D culture.

  13. Analyzing Structure and Function of Vascularization in Engineered Bone Tissue by Video-Rate Intravital Microscopy and 3D Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yonggang; Tsigkou, Olga; Spencer, Joel A; Lin, Charles P; Neville, Craig; Grottkau, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Vascularization is a key challenge in tissue engineering. Three-dimensional structure and microcirculation are two fundamental parameters for evaluating vascularization. Microscopic techniques with cellular level resolution, fast continuous observation, and robust 3D postimage processing are essential for evaluation, but have not been applied previously because of technical difficulties. In this study, we report novel video-rate confocal microscopy and 3D postimage processing techniques to accomplish this goal. In an immune-deficient mouse model, vascularized bone tissue was successfully engineered using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold. Video-rate (30 FPS) intravital confocal microscopy was applied in vitro and in vivo to visualize the vascular structure in the engineered bone and the microcirculation of the blood cells. Postimage processing was applied to perform 3D image reconstruction, by analyzing microvascular networks and calculating blood cell viscosity. The 3D volume reconstructed images show that the hMSCs served as pericytes stabilizing the microvascular network formed by HUVECs. Using orthogonal imaging reconstruction and transparency adjustment, both the vessel structure and blood cells within the vessel lumen were visualized. Network length, network intersections, and intersection densities were successfully computed using our custom-developed software. Viscosity analysis of the blood cells provided functional evaluation of the microcirculation. These results show that by 8 weeks, the blood vessels in peripheral areas function quite similarly to the host vessels. However, the viscosity drops about fourfold where it is only 0.8 mm away from the host. In summary, we developed novel techniques combining intravital microscopy and 3D image processing to analyze the vascularization in engineered bone. These techniques have broad

  14. 3D Tree Dimensionality Assessment Using Photogrammetry and Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios Gatziolis

    Full Text Available Detailed, precise, three-dimensional (3D representations of individual trees are a prerequisite for an accurate assessment of tree competition, growth, and morphological plasticity. Until recently, our ability to measure the dimensionality, spatial arrangement, shape of trees, and shape of tree components with precision has been constrained by technological and logistical limitations and cost. Traditional methods of forest biometrics provide only partial measurements and are labor intensive. Active remote technologies such as LiDAR operated from airborne platforms provide only partial crown reconstructions. The use of terrestrial LiDAR is laborious, has portability limitations and high cost. In this work we capitalized on recent improvements in the capabilities and availability of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, light and inexpensive cameras, and developed an affordable method for obtaining precise and comprehensive 3D models of trees and small groups of trees. The method employs slow-moving UAVs that acquire images along predefined trajectories near and around targeted trees, and computer vision-based approaches that process the images to obtain detailed tree reconstructions. After we confirmed the potential of the methodology via simulation we evaluated several UAV platforms, strategies for image acquisition, and image processing algorithms. We present an original, step-by-step workflow which utilizes open source programs and original software. We anticipate that future development and applications of our method will improve our understanding of forest self-organization emerging from the competition among trees, and will lead to a refined generation of individual-tree-based forest models.

  15. 3D printed alendronate-releasing poly(caprolactone) porous scaffolds enhance osteogenic differentiation and bone formation in rat tibial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Yun, Young-Pil; Shim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Hak-Jun; Park, Kyeongsoon; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2016-09-29

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro osteogenic effects and in vivo new bone formation of three-dimensional (3D) printed alendronate (Aln)-releasing poly(caprolactone) (PCL) (Aln/PCL) scaffolds in rat tibial defect models. 3D printed Aln/PCL scaffolds were fabricated via layer-by-layer deposition. The fabricated Aln/PCL scaffolds had high porosity and an interconnected pore structure and showed sustained Aln release. In vitro studies showed that MG-63 cells seeded on the Aln/PCL scaffolds displayed increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium content in a dose-dependent manner when compared with cell cultures in PCL scaffolds. In addition, in vivo animal studies and histologic evaluation showed that Aln/PCL scaffolds implanted in a rat tibial defect model markedly increased new bone formation and mineralized bone tissues in a dose-dependent manner compared to PCL-only scaffolds. Our results show that 3D printed Aln/PCL scaffolds are promising templates for bone tissue engineering applications.

  16. Comparison of 3D turbo spin-echo SPACE sequences with conventional 2D MRI sequences to assess the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, Jost Karsten, E-mail: jost.kloth@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Winterstein, Marianne, E-mail: marianne.winterstein@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Akbar, Michael, E-mail: michael.akbar@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstraße 200a, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Meyer, Esther, E-mail: esther.meyer@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Paul, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.paul@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Kauczor, Haus-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, Marc-André, E-mail: marcandre.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • 3D SPACE and conventional 2D TSE MRI for assessment of the shoulder joint were compared. • Concordance for most pathologys was substantial to almost perfect. • Examination time could be reduced up to 8 min (27%). • Regarding rotator cuff injuries an additional sagittal T2w TSE sequence in 3D protocol is recommended. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional (3D) T1- and proton density (PD)-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolution (SPACE) compared with conventional 2D sequences in assessment of the shoulder-joint. Materials and methods: Ninety-three subjects were examined on a 3-T MRI system with both conventional 2D-TSE sequences in T1-, T2- and PD-weighting and 3D SPACE sequences in T1- and PD-weighting. All examinations were assessed independently by two reviewers for common pathologies of the shoulder-joint. Agreement between 2D- and 3D-sequences and inter-observer-agreement was evaluated using kappa-statistics. Results: Using conventional 2D TSE sequences as standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 3D SPACE were 81.8%, 95.1%, and 93.5% for injuries of the supraspinatus-tendon (SSP), 81.3%, 93.5%, and 91.4% for the cartilage layer and 82.4%, 98.5%, and 97.5% for the long biceps tendon. Concordance between 2D and 3D was almost perfect for tendinopathies of the SSP (κ = 0.85), osteoarthritis (κ = 1), luxation of the biceps tendon (κ = 1) and adjacent bone marrow (κ = 0.92). Inter-observer-agreement was generally higher for conventional 2D TSE sequences (κ, 0.23–1.0), when compared to 3D SPACE sequences (κ, −0.33 to 1.0) except for disorders of the long biceps tendon and supraspinatus tendon rupture. Conclusion: Because of substantial and almost perfect concordance with conventional 2D TSE sequences for common shoulder pathologies, MRI examination-time can be reduced by nearly 40

  17. Development and Assessment of a New 3D Neuroanatomy Teaching Tool for MRI Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, Zachary A.; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Lopez, Michael J.; Stabio, Maureen E.

    2015-01-01

    A computerized three-dimensional (3D) neuroanatomy teaching tool was developed for training medical students to identify subcortical structures on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) series of the human brain. This program allows the user to transition rapidly between two-dimensional (2D) MRI slices, 3D object composites, and a combined model in…

  18. Oxygen Plasma Treatment on 3D-Printed Chitosan/Gelatin/Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Min; Yang, Seong-Won; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    The 3D hydroxyapatite/gelatin/chitosan composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. The scaffolds were treated by oxygen plasma to improve the bioactivity and its surface characterization and in vitro cell culture were investigated. The scaffolds exhibited the good porosity and interconnectivity of pores. After oxygen plasma etching, roughness and wettability on the scaffolds surface are increased. Plasma treated scaffolds showed higher proliferation than that of untreated scaffolds. Oxygen plasma treatment could be used as potential tool to enhance the biocompatibility on the 3D composite scaffolds.

  19. Intraosseous rotation of the scaphoid: assessment by using a 3D CT model - an anatomic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidle, Gernot; Gabl, Markus [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Trauma Surgery, Innsbruck (Austria); Rieger, Michael [Regional Hospital Hall, Department of Radiology, Hall in Tirol (Austria); Klauser, Andrea Sabine; Thauerer, Michael [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Hoermann, Romed [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology-Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess intraosseous rotation as the third dimension of scaphoid anatomy on a 3D CT model using common volume rendering software to impact anatomical reconstruction of scaphoid fractures. CT images of 13 cadaver wrist pairs were acquired. Reference axes for the alignment of distal and proximal scaphoid poles were defined three-dimensionally. Two methods for rotation measurement - the reference axis method (RAM) and the scapho-trapezio-trapezoidal joint method (STTM) - were developed and compared by three independent observers. Rotation measured by the RAM averaged 66.9 ± 7 for the right and 67.2 ± 5.8 for the left wrists. Using the STTM there was a mean rotation of 68.6 ± 6.6 for the right and 68.6 ± 6.8 for the left wrists. The overall results showed a significant variability of the measured values between different specimens (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between left and right wrists of the same specimen, neither for the RAM (P = 0.268) nor for the STTM (P = 0.774). Repeatability coefficients between the observers were low, indicating good repeatability. The presented methods are practical tools to quantify intraosseous rotation between distal and proximal scaphoid poles using common volume rendering software. For clinical application the opposite side provides the best reference values to assess malrotation in scaphoid fracture cases. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of statistical agreement of three techniques for the study of cut marks: 3D digital microscope, laser scanning confocal microscopy and micro-photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-González, Miguel Ángel; Aramendi, Julia; Yravedra, José; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; González-Aguilera, Diego; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    In the last few years, the study of cut marks on bone surfaces has become fundamental for the interpretation of prehistoric butchery practices. Due to the difficulties in the correct identification of cut marks, many criteria for their description and classification have been suggested. Different techniques, such as three-dimensional digital microscope (3D DM), laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and micro-photogrammetry (M-PG) have been recently applied to the study of cut marks. Although the 3D DM and LSCM microscopic techniques are the most commonly used for the 3D identification of cut marks, M-PG has also proved to be very efficient and a low-cost method. M-PG is a noninvasive technique that allows the study of the cortical surface without any previous preparation of the samples, and that generates high-resolution models. Despite the current application of microscopic and micro-photogrammetric techniques to taphonomy, their reliability has never been tested. In this paper, we compare 3D DM, LSCM and M-PG in order to assess their resolution and results. In this study, we analyse 26 experimental cut marks generated with a metal knife. The quantitative and qualitative information registered is analysed by means of standard multivariate statistics and geometric morphometrics to assess the similarities and differences obtained with the different methodologies. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. A Proposed Methodology to Assess the Accuracy of 3D Scanners and Casts and Monitor Tooth Wear Progression in Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khaled E; Whitters, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Pierce, S Gareth; MacLeod, Charles N; Murray, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detail and assess the capability of a novel methodology to 3D-quantify tooth wear progression in a patient over a period of 12 months. A calibrated stainless steel model was used to identify the accuracy of the scanning system by assessing the accuracy and precision of the contact scanner and the dimensional accuracy and stability of casts fabricated from three different types of impression materials. Thereafter, the overall accuracy of the 3D scanning system (scanner and casts) was ascertained. Clinically, polyether impressions were made of the patient's dentition at the initial examination and at the 12-month review, then poured in type IV dental stone to assess the tooth wear. The anterior teeth on the resultant casts were scanned, and images were analyzed using 3D matching software to detect dimensional variations between the patient's impressions. The accuracy of the 3D scanning system was established to be 33 μm. 3D clinical analysis demonstrated localized wear on the incisal and palatal surfaces of the patient's maxillary central incisors. The identified wear extended to a depth of 500 μm with a distribution of 4% to 7% of affected tooth surfaces. The newly developed 3D scanning methodology was found to be capable of assessing and accounting for the various factors affecting tooth wear scanning. Initial clinical evaluation of the methodology demonstrates successful monitoring of tooth wear progression. However, further clinical assessment is needed.

  2. Assessing the permeability of engineered capillary networks in a 3D culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Grainger

    Full Text Available Many pathologies are characterized by poor blood vessel growth and reduced nutrient delivery to the surrounding tissue, introducing a need for tissue engineered blood vessels. Our lab has developed a 3D co-culture method to grow interconnected networks of pericyte-invested capillaries, which can anastamose with host vasculature following implantation to restore blood flow to ischemic tissues. However, if the engineered vessels contain endothelial cells (ECs that are misaligned or contain wide junctional gaps, they may function improperly and behave more like the pathologic vessels that nourish tumors. The purpose of this study was to test the resistance to permeability of these networks in vitro, grown with different stromal cell types, as a metric of vessel functionality. A fluorescent dextran tracer was used to visualize transport across the endothelium and the pixel intensity was quantified using a customized MATLAB algorithm. In fibroblast-EC co-cultures, the dextran tracer easily penetrated through the vessel wall and permeability was high through the first 5 days of culture, indicative of vessel immaturity. Beyond day 5, dextran accumulated at the periphery of the vessel, with very little transported across the endothelium. Quantitatively, permeability dropped from initial levels of 61% to 39% after 7 days, and to 7% after 2 weeks. When ECs were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or adipose-derived stem cells (AdSCs, much tighter control of permeability was achieved. Relative to the EC-fibroblast co-cultures, permeabilities were reduced 41% for the EC-MSC co-cultures and 50% for the EC-AdSC co-cultures after 3 days of culture. By day 14, these permeabilities decreased by 68% and 77% over the EC-fibroblast cultures. Co-cultures containing stem cells exhibit elevated VE-cadherin levels and more prominent EC-EC junctional complexes when compared to cultures containing fibroblasts. These data suggest the stromal

  3. Postoperative assessment of surgical results using three dimensional surface reconstruction CT (3D-CT) in a craniofacial anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Jiro; Sato, Kaoru; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Tsukiyama, Takashi; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa; Akagawa, Tetsuya.

    1988-01-01

    In 1983, Michael W. Vannier and Jeffrey L. Marsh developed a computer method that reconstructs three dimensional (3D) born and soft tissue surfaces, given a high resolution CT scan-series of the facial skeleton. This method has been applied to craniofacial anomalies, basal encephaloceles, and musculoskeletal anomalies. In this study, a postoperative assessment of the craniofacial surgical results has been accomplished using this 3D-CT in 2 children with craniofacial dysmorphism. The authors discuss the advantages of this 3D-CT imaging method in the postoperative assessments of craniofacial anomalies. Results are detailed in the following listing : 1) a postoperative 3D-CT reveals the anatomical details corrected by the craniofacial surgery more precisely and stereographically than conventional radiological methods ; 2) secondary changes of the cranium after the surgery, such as bony formation in the area of the osteotomy and postoperative asymmetric deformities, are detected early by the 3D-CT imaging technique, and, 3) 3D-CT mid-sagittal and top axial views of the intracranial skull base are most useful in postoperative assessments of the surgical results. Basesd on our experience, we expect that three dimensional surface reconstructions from CT scans will become to be used widely in the postoperative assessments of the surgical results of craniofacial anomalies. (author)

  4. Clinical usefulness of dental X-ray computed tomography for postoperative assessment of secondary alveolar bone grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Kazuhide; Hamada, Yoshiki; Kondoh, Toshirou; Ishii, Hiroaki; Sonoyama, Tomoo; Kawarada, Takashi; Seto, Kanichi

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the clinical usefulness of dental X-ray computed tomography (CT) for postoperative assessment of secondary alveolar bone grafting was investigated. Nineteen bone-grafted alveolar clefts in 15 patients with cleft lip and palate were studied. All bone bridges were examined by dental three-dimensional (3D)-CT (PSR 9000: Asahi Roentgen, Kyoto, Japan). The postoperative 3D morphology of the bone bridges was easily recognized. Dental 3D-CT images were suggested to be useful for assessment before installation of dental implants in bone bridges. In addition, the status of bone surrounding the installed dental implants and the periodontal space of teeth adjacent to the cleft could be clearly evaluated. In conclusion, dental 3D-CT provides clinically valuable information for the postoperative assessment of secondary alveolar bone grafting. (author)

  5. Are 3D ultrasound and office hysteroscopy useful for the assessment of uterine cavity after late foetal loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thellier, E; Levaillant, J-M; Pourcelot, A-G; Houllier, M; Fernandez, H; Capmas, P

    2018-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of office hysteroscopy and 3D ultrasound for the diagnostic of uterine anomalies after late foetal loss. This retrospective observational study took place in the gynaecologic unit of a teaching hospital from 2009 to 2014. Women with late foetal loss (<22 weeks of gestation) had an office hysteroscopy and 3D ultrasound within three months after delivery. The results of the ultrasound and hysteroscopy were recorded and compared. Eighty women were included with a mean age of 29.8 years (28.2-31.4). Forty-seven women had both hysteroscopy and 3D ultrasound, and a uterine cavity's anomaly (bicornuate uterus, T-Shape uterus and septate uterus) was found in ten women (21%) at 3D sonography and in 13 women (28%) at office hysteroscopy. Concordance between the two exams was very good with a kappa at 0.83. In three cases, a uterine cavity's anomaly was found at hysteroscopy whereas sonography was normal. Anomalies at ultrasound (uterine cavity's anomaly, myometrium anomaly or ovarian anomaly) were found in 27.6% of cases. Both 3D ultrasound and office hysteroscopy are useful for assessment of the uterine cavity after late foetal loss. The application of these two exams is important, as hysteroscopy is generally used for assessment of the uterine cavity and endometrium, while 3D ultrasound is generally used to identify the precise type of uterine malformation and for the examination of the myometrium and annexes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Incorporating simvastatin/poloxamer 407 hydrogel into 3D-printed porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds for the promotion of angiogenesis, osseointegration and bone ingrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Wei; Liu, Can; Tan, Jie; Wang, Hong; Hai, Bao; Cai, Hong; Leng, Hui-Jie; Liu, Zhong-Jun; Song, Chun-Li

    2016-10-27

    Three-dimensional porous titanium alloys printed via electron beam melting have low stiffness similar to that of cortical bone and are promising scaffolds for orthopedic applications. However, the bio-inert nature of titanium alloy is poorly compatible with bone ingrowth. We previously observed that simvastatin/poloxamer 407 thermosensitive hydrogel induces endogenous angiogenic/osteogenic growth factors and promotes angiogenesis and osteogenesis, but the mechanical properties of this hydrogel are poor. The purpose of this study was to construct 3D-printed porous titanium scaffolds (pTi scaffolds) filled with simvastatin/hydrogel and evaluate the effects of this composite on osseointegration, bone ingrowth and neovascularization using a tibial defect rabbit model. Four and eight weeks after implantation, the bone volume, bone mineral density, mineral apposition rate, and push-in maximum force of the pTi scaffolds filled with simvastatin/hydrogel were significantly higher than those without simvastatin (p bone and neovascularization (p bone ingrowth.

  7. 3D porous architecture of stacks of β-TCP granules compared with that of trabecular bone: a microCT, vector analysis and compression study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eCHAPPARD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The 3D arrangement of porous granular biomaterials usable to fill bone defects has received little study. Granular biomaterials occupy 3D space when packed together in a manner that creates a porosity suitable for the invasion of vascular and bone cells. Granules of β-TCP were prepared with either 12.5 or 25g of β-TCP powder in the same volume of slurry. When the granules were placed in a test tube, this produced 3D stacks with a high (HP or low porosity (LP, respectively. Stacks of granules mimic the filling of a bone defect by a surgeon. The aim of this study was to compare the porosity of stacks of β-TCP granules with that of cores of trabecular bone. Biomechanical compression tests were done on the granules stacks. Bone cylinders were prepared from calf tibia plateau, constituted high density (HD blocks. Low density (LD blocks were harvested from aged cadaver tibias. Microcomputed tomography was used on the β-TCP granule stacks and the trabecular bone cores to determine porosity and specific surface. A vector projection algorithm was used to image porosity employing a frontal plane image which was constructed line by line from all images of a microCT stack. Stacks of HP granules had porosity (75.3 ± 0.4% and fractal lacunarity (0.043 ± 0.007 intermediate between that of HD (resp. 69.1 ± 6.4%, p<0.05 and 0.087 ± 0.045, p<0.05 and LD bones (resp. 88.8 ± 1.57% and 0.037 ± 0.014 but exhibited a higher surface density (5.56 ± 0.11 mm2/mm3 vs. 2.06 ± 0.26 for LD, p<0.05. LP granular arrangements created large pores coexisting with dense areas of material. Frontal plane analysis evidenced a more regular arrangement of β-TCP granules than bone trabeculae. Stacks of HP granules represent a scaffold that resembles trabecular bone in its porous microarchitecture.

  8. Age-related changes of vertical and horizontal lumbar vertebral trabecular 3D bone microstructure is different in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Niklassen, Andreas Steenholt; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Brüel, Annemarie

    2013-11-01

    The study presents a 3D method for subdividing a trabecular network into horizontal and vertical oriented bone. This method was used to investigate the age related changes of the bone volume fraction and thickness of horizontal and vertical trabeculae in human lumbar vertebral bone estimated with unbiased 3D methods in women and men over a large age-range. The study comprised second lumbar vertebral body bone samples from 40 women (aged 21.7-96.4years, median 56.6years) and 39 men (aged 22.6-94.6years, median 55.6years). The bone samples were μCT scanned and the 3D microstructure was quantified. A voxel based algorithm inspecting the local neighborhood is presented and used to segment the trabecular network into horizontal and vertical oriented bone. For both women and men BV/TV decreased significantly with age, Tb.Th* was independent of age, while SMI increased significantly with age. Vertical (BV.vert/TV) and horizontal (BV.horz/TV) bone volume fraction decreased significantly with age for both sexes. BV.vert/TV decreased significantly faster with age for women than for men. Vertical (Tb.Th*.vert) and horizontal (Tb.Th*.horz) trabecular thickness were independent of age, while Tb.Th*.horz/Tb.Th*.vert decreased significantly with age for both sexes. Additionally, the 95th percentile of the trabecular thickness distribution increased significantly with age for vertical trabeculae in women, whereas it was independent of age in men. In conclusion, we have shown that vertical and horizontal oriented bone density decreases with age in both women and men, and that vertical oriented bone is lost more quickly in women than in men. Furthermore, vertical and horizontal trabecular thickness were independent of age, whereas the horizontal to vertical trabecular thickness ratio decreased significantly with age indicating a relatively more pronounced thinning of horizontal trabeculae. Finally, the age-related loss of trabecular elements appeared to result in a compensatory

  9. Comparing the Use of 3D Photogrammetry and Computed Tomography in Assessing the Severity of Single-Suture Nonsyndromic Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Olivia A; Saber, Nikoo; Stephens, Derek; Clausen, April; Drake, James; Forrest, Christopher; Phillips, John

    2017-05-01

    Single-suture nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is diagnosed using clinical assessment and computed tomography (CT). With increasing awareness of the associated risks of radiation exposure, the use of CT is particularly concerning in patients with craniosynostosis since they are exposed at a younger age and more frequently than the average child. Three-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry is advantageous-it involves no radiation, is conveniently obtainable within clinic, and does not require general anaesthesia. This study aims to assess how 3D photogrammetry compares to CT in the assessment of craniosynostosis severity, to quantify surgical outcomes, and analyze the validity of 3D photogrammetry in craniosynostosis. Computed tomography images and 3D photographs of patients who underwent craniosynostosis surgery were assessed and aligned to best fit. The intervening area between the CT and 3D photogrammetry curves at the supraorbital bar (bandeau) level in axial view was calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t test. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were determined and equivalence margins were applied. In total, 41 pairs of CTs and 3D photographs were analyzed. The 95% confidence interval was 198.16 to 264.18 mm 2 and the mean was 231.17 mm 2 . When comparisons were made in the same bandeau region omitting the temporalis muscle, the 95% confidence interval was 108.94 to 147.38 mm 2 , and the mean was 128.16 mm 2 . Although statistically significant difference between the modalities was found, they can be attributable to the dampening effect of soft tissue. Within certain error margins, 3D photogrammetry is comparable to CT in assessing the severity of single-suture nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. However, a dampening effect can be attributable to the soft tissue. Three-dimensional photogrammetry may be more applicable for severe cases of craniosynostosis but not milder deformity. It may also be beneficial for assessing the overall appearance and

  10. i3Drefine software for protein 3D structure refinement and its assessment in CASP10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure refinement refers to the process of improving the qualities of protein structures during structure modeling processes to bring them closer to their native states. Structure refinement has been drawing increasing attention in the community-wide Critical Assessment of techniques for Protein Structure prediction (CASP) experiments since its addition in 8(th) CASP experiment. During the 9(th) and recently concluded 10(th) CASP experiments, a consistent growth in number of refinement targets and participating groups has been witnessed. Yet, protein structure refinement still remains a largely unsolved problem with majority of participating groups in CASP refinement category failed to consistently improve the quality of structures issued for refinement. In order to alleviate this need, we developed a completely automated and computationally efficient protein 3D structure refinement method, i3Drefine, based on an iterative and highly convergent energy minimization algorithm with a powerful all-atom composite physics and knowledge-based force fields and hydrogen bonding (HB) network optimization technique. In the recent community-wide blind experiment, CASP10, i3Drefine (as 'MULTICOM-CONSTRUCT') was ranked as the best method in the server section as per the official assessment of CASP10 experiment. Here we provide the community with free access to i3Drefine software and systematically analyse the performance of i3Drefine in strict blind mode on the refinement targets issued in CASP10 refinement category and compare with other state-of-the-art refinement methods participating in CASP10. Our analysis demonstrates that i3Drefine is only fully-automated server participating in CASP10 exhibiting consistent improvement over the initial structures in both global and local structural quality metrics. Executable version of i3Drefine is freely available at http://protein.rnet.missouri.edu/i3drefine/.

  11. i3Drefine Software for Protein 3D Structure Refinement and Its Assessment in CASP10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure refinement refers to the process of improving the qualities of protein structures during structure modeling processes to bring them closer to their native states. Structure refinement has been drawing increasing attention in the community-wide Critical Assessment of techniques for Protein Structure prediction (CASP) experiments since its addition in 8th CASP experiment. During the 9th and recently concluded 10th CASP experiments, a consistent growth in number of refinement targets and participating groups has been witnessed. Yet, protein structure refinement still remains a largely unsolved problem with majority of participating groups in CASP refinement category failed to consistently improve the quality of structures issued for refinement. In order to alleviate this need, we developed a completely automated and computationally efficient protein 3D structure refinement method, i3Drefine, based on an iterative and highly convergent energy minimization algorithm with a powerful all-atom composite physics and knowledge-based force fields and hydrogen bonding (HB) network optimization technique. In the recent community-wide blind experiment, CASP10, i3Drefine (as ‘MULTICOM-CONSTRUCT’) was ranked as the best method in the server section as per the official assessment of CASP10 experiment. Here we provide the community with free access to i3Drefine software and systematically analyse the performance of i3Drefine in strict blind mode on the refinement targets issued in CASP10 refinement category and compare with other state-of-the-art refinement methods participating in CASP10. Our analysis demonstrates that i3Drefine is only fully-automated server participating in CASP10 exhibiting consistent improvement over the initial structures in both global and local structural quality metrics. Executable version of i3Drefine is freely available at http://protein.rnet.missouri.edu/i3drefine/. PMID:23894517

  12. Osteoplasty of the maxilla in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate by a mandibular bone graft with the use of 3D computer modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    (mean, 1.32 ± 0.54 cm3. According to Bergland and Chelsea scales, good results of osteoplasty were obtained in 83% (25 / 30 of the cases. The regenerated bone thickness was good in 94% (28 / 30 of the patients. The edge of the foramen piriformis was well shaped in 90% (27 / 30 of them. After surgery, the volumes of the defects in the patients with incomplete cleft lip, palate and alveolar process were significantly smaller than those in the patients with complete cleft and partial ossification of the posterior hard palate (on average, by 0.8 cm3, p = 0.0071. In all cases, where cortical mandible grafts were taken, it was possible to obtain cortical blocks of the needed size, starting from the age of 7, without any risk of damage to the immature permanent teeth. Graft formation from the mandible body was not associated with any local complications in any patient. Conclusion: Our method of 3D modeling to determine the volume of mandible defects is a truly 3D approach, which allows for a highly accurate quantitative assessment of the defects. The use of the combination grafts from the mandible body and the Bio-Oss xenografts for osteoplasty helps to replace the maxillary defect irrespective of the patient's age and the defect volume. Cortical grafts can be taken from the mandible starting from the age of 7 without any risk of damage to the immature permanent teeth. Irrespective of the clinical situation, the osteoplasty results are influenced predominantly by adherence to the surgical technique and to post-operative recommendations.

  13. Sonographic Assessment of Parotid and Submandibular Glands in Patients Undergoing 3D Conformal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johari M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate sonographic changes in parotid and submandibular salivary glands in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies. In addition, salivary changes subsequent to radiotherapy were evaluated objectively and subjectively. Twenty patients(13males and 7females with head and neck malignancies, who had been referred to the Radiotherapy/Oncology Department of the Shahid Madani Hospital in Tabriz, Iran, were included in the study. Length, width, echotexture, echogenicity and margins of parotid and submandibular glands were evaluated before and after radiotherapy using sonography. Peak-systolic velocity(PSV,end-diastolic velocity(EDV and resistive index(RI were also assessed by Doppler sonography. Xerostomia subsequent to radiotherapy was evaluated with the use of two techniques: patients’ self-reported scoring and objective measurement of resting saliva. There was a significant decrease in the width of the parotid gland after radiotherapy compared to baseline(P=0.005.Although the length of the parotid gland and the dimensions of submandibular gland decrease, the differences were not significant. In addition, the echogenicity, echotexture and the margin of the glands change to hypoechoic, heterogenic and irregular, respectively, subsequent to radiotherapy. The Doppler technique showed decrease in PSV and RI and an increase in EDV; however, only the decrease in RI in the submandibular gland was statistically significant(P=0.002.The results showed a significant decrease in salivary flow after radiotherapy(P<0.001.In addition, based on the patients reports, the severity of xerostomia increased significantly after radiotherapy(P<0.001. Songraphic changes of parotid and submandibular glands after radiotherapy should be considered in ultrasound examinations. The damages to the parotid and submandibular glands had significant influence in patient post 3D-CRT.

  14. Leak-Before-Break assessment of a welded piping based on 3D finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Mingya; Yu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhilin; Qian, Guian; Lu, Feng; Xue, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of load reduction, strength match, welding width, load level, crack size and constraint are studied. • The results show that the LBB margin is dependent on the load level. • The results show that higher strength-match of WPJs will have higher crack-front constraints. • The results show that the engineering method has a high precision only if the width of weld is comparable to the crack depth. - Abstract: The paper studies the effects of the load reduction (discrepancy between designing and real loadings), strength match of the welded piping joint (WPJ), welding width, crack size and crack tip constraint on the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment of a welded piping. The 3D finite element (FE) method is used in the study of a surge line of the steam generator in a nuclear power plant. It is demonstrated that the LBB margin is dependent on the loading level and the load reduction effect should be considered. When the loading is high enough, there is a quite large deviation between the J-integral calculated based on the real material property of WPJ and that calculated based on the engineering method, e.g. Zahoor handbook of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The engineering method assumes that the whole piping is made of the unique welding material in the calculation. As the influence of the strength matching and welding width is ignored in the engineering method for J-integral calculation, the engineering method has a sufficient precision only if the width of welding is comparable to the crack depth. Narrower welding width leads to higher constraint of the plastic deformation in the welding and larger high stress areas in the base for the low strength-match WPJ. Higher strength matching of WPJs has higher crack-front constraints.

  15. An assessment of finite element synthesis model using 3D FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannathan, V.; Rastogi, B.P

    1983-01-01

    For the solution of multigroup diffusion theory equations a code system called FEMSYN has been developed. The code FEMSYN incorporates a finite difference (FD) module, a finite element (FE) module and one module based on single channel flux synthesis (SCFS) method, which uses trial functions generated by either FD or FE method. The 3D problems can be tackled by all the three modules. The 3D FE solutions are cheaper in comparison with fine mesh FD computations and are quite accurate. The accuracy is improved by proper choice of rectangular and triangular right prismatic elements and polynomial order in case of 3D FE analyses. Synthesis method using FE trial functions provides the fastest means of solution for 3D problems. In this paper, the FE synthesis method has been compared with 3D FE technique for the case of IAEA PWR benchmark problem. It is concluded from the above comparison that FE synthesis method can give at negligible computational efforts, accurate eigenvalue estimates and satisfactory prediction of reactor core power profiles

  16. 3D printed scaffolds of calcium silicate-doped β-TCP synergize with co-cultured endothelial and stromal cells to promote vascularization and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuan; Jiang, Chuan; Li, Cuidi; Li, Tao; Peng, Mingzheng; Wang, Jinwu; Dai, Kerong

    2017-07-17

    Synthetic bone scaffolds have potential application in repairing large bone defects, however, inefficient vascularization after implantation remains the major issue of graft failure. Herein, porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds with calcium silicate (CS) were 3D printed, and pre-seeded with co-cultured human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to construct tissue engineering scaffolds with accelerated vascularization and better bone formation. Results showed that in vitro β-TCP scaffolds doped with 5% CS (5%CS/β-TCP) were biocompatible, and stimulated angiogenesis and osteogenesis. The results also showed that 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds not only stimulated co-cultured cells angiogenesis on Matrigel, but also stimulated co-cultured cells to form microcapillary-like structures on scaffolds, and promoted migration of BMSCs by stimulating co-cultured cells to secrete PDGF-BB and CXCL12 into the surrounding environment. Moreover, 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds enhanced vascularization and osteoinduction in comparison with β-TCP, and synergized with co-cultured cells to further increase early vessel formation, which was accompanied by earlier and better ectopic bone formation when implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Thus, our findings suggest that porous 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with co-cultured cells provide new strategy for accelerating tissue engineering scaffolds vascularization and osteogenesis, and show potential as treatment for large bone defects.

  17. Locally delivered ethyl-2,5-dihydroxybenzoate using 3D printed bone implant for promotion of bone regeneration in a osteoporotic animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B-J Kwon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass, most commonly caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not matched by sufficient bone formation. The most common complications of postmenopausal osteoporosis are bone-related defects and fractures. Fracture healing is a multifactorial bone regeneration process, influenced by both biological and mechanical factors related to age, osteoporosis and stability of the osteosynthesis. During the treatment of bone defects in osteoporotic conditions, imbalanced bone remodeling is the leading cause for implant failure. To overcome these problems, ethyl-2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (E-2,5-DHB, a drug that promotes bone formation and inhibits bone resorption, was used. E-2,5-DHB-incorporating titanium (Ti implants using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA coating for local delivery of E-2,5-DHB were developed and the effects on bone healing of femoral defects were evaluated in an osteoporotic model. The release of E-2,5-DHB resulted in decreased bone resorption and increased bone formation around the implant. Thus, it was confirmed that, in the osteoporotic model, bone healing was increased and implant fixation was enhanced. These results suggested that E-2,5-DHB-coated Ti implants have great potential as an ultimate local drug delivery system for bone tissue scaffolds.

  18. Project Photofly: New 3d Modeling Online Web Service (case Studies and Assessments)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, D.; Furini, G.; Migliori, S.; Pierattini, S.

    2011-09-01

    During summer 2010, Autodesk has released a still ongoing project called Project Photofly, freely downloadable from AutodeskLab web site until August 1 2011. Project Photofly based on computer-vision and photogrammetric principles, exploiting the power of cloud computing, is a web service able to convert collections of photographs into 3D models. Aim of our research was to evaluate the Project Photofly, through different case studies, for 3D modeling of cultural heritage monuments and objects, mostly to identify for which goals and objects it is suitable. The automatic approach will be mainly analyzed.

  19. Assessing deep-seated landslide susceptibility using 3-D groundwater and slope-stability analyses, southwestern Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, Dianne L.; Reid, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    In Seattle, Washington, deep-seated landslides on bluffs along Puget Sound have historically caused extensive damage to land and structures. These large failures are controlled by three-dimensional (3-D) variations in strength and pore-water pressures. We assess the slope stability of part of southwestern Seattle using a 3-D limit-equilibrium analysis coupled with a 3-D groundwater flow model. Our analyses use a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) combined with assignment of strength and hydraulic properties based on geologic units. The hydrogeology of the Seattle area consists of a layer of permeable glacial outwash sand that overlies less permeable glacial lacustrine silty clay. Using a 3-D groundwater model, MODFLOW-2000, we simulate a water table above the less permeable units and calibrate the model to observed conditions. The simulated pore-pressure distribution is then used in a 3-D slope-stability analysis, SCOOPS, to quantify the stability of the coastal bluffs. For wet winter conditions, our analyses predict that the least stable areas are steep hillslopes above Puget Sound, where pore pressures are elevated in the outwash sand. Groundwater flow converges in coastal reentrants, resulting in elevated pore pressures and destabilization of slopes. Regions predicted to be least stable include the areas in or adjacent to three mapped historically active deep-seated landslides. The results of our 3-D analyses differ significantly from a slope map or results from one-dimensional (1-D) analyses.

  20. Assessing the performance of commercial Agisoft PhotoScan software to deliver reliable data for accurate3D modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebur Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D models delivered from digital photogrammetric techniques have massively increased and developed to meet the requirements of many applications. The reliability of these models is basically dependent on the data processing cycle and the adopted tool solution in addition to data quality. Agisoft PhotoScan is a professional image-based 3D modelling software, which seeks to create orderly, precise n 3D content from fixed images. It works with arbitrary images those qualified in both controlled and uncontrolled conditions. Following the recommendations of many users all around the globe, Agisoft PhotoScan, has become an important source to generate precise 3D data for different applications. How reliable is this data for accurate 3D modelling applications is the current question that needs an answer. Therefore; in this paper, the performance of the Agisoft PhotoScan software was assessed and analyzed to show the potential of the software for accurate 3D modelling applications. To investigate this, a study was carried out in the University of Baghdad / Al-Jaderia campus using data collected from airborne metric camera with 457m flying height. The Agisoft results show potential according to the research objective and the dataset quality following statistical and validation shape analysis.

  1. Facilitating tumor functional assessment by spatially relating 3D tumor histology and in vivo MRI: image registration approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Alic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, together with histology, is widely used to diagnose and to monitor treatment in oncology. Spatial correspondence between these modalities provides information about the ability of MRI to characterize cancerous tissue. However, registration is complicated by deformations during pathological processing, and differences in scale and information content. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study proposes a methodology for establishing an accurate 3D relation between histological sections and high resolution in vivo MRI tumor data. The key features of the methodology are: 1 standardized acquisition and processing, 2 use of an intermediate ex vivo MRI, 3 use of a reference cutting plane, 4 dense histological sampling, 5 elastic registration, and 6 use of complete 3D data sets. Five rat pancreatic tumors imaged by T2*-w MRI were used to evaluate the proposed methodology. The registration accuracy was assessed by root mean squared (RMS distances between manually annotated landmark points in both modalities. After elastic registration the average RMS distance decreased from 1.4 to 0.7 mm. The intermediate ex vivo MRI and the reference cutting plane shared by all three 3D images (in vivo MRI, ex vivo MRI, and 3D histology data were found to be crucial for the accurate co-registration between the 3D histological data set and in vivo MRI. The MR intensity in necrotic regions, as manually annotated in 3D histology, was significantly different from other histologically confirmed regions (i.e., viable and hemorrhagic. However, the viable and the hemorrhagic regions showed a large overlap in T2(*-w MRI signal intensity. CONCLUSIONS: The established 3D correspondence between tumor histology and in vivo MRI enables extraction of MRI characteristics for histologically confirmed regions. The proposed methodology allows the creation of a tumor database of spatially registered multi-spectral MR images and multi-stained 3D

  2. 3D DIGITIZATION OF AN HERITAGE MASTERPIECE - A CRITICAL ANALYSIS ON QUALITY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Menna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite being perceived as interchangeable when properly applied, close-range photogrammetry and range imaging have both their pros and limitations that can be overcome using suitable procedures. Even if the two techniques have been frequently cross-compared, critical analysis discussing all sub-phases of a complex digitization project are quite rare. Comparisons taking into account the digitization of a cultural masterpiece, such as the Etruscan Sarcophagus of the Spouses (Figure 1 discussed in this paper, are even less common. The final 3D model of the Sarcophagus shows impressive spatial and texture resolution, in the order of tenths of millimetre for both digitization techniques, making it a large 3D digital model even though the physical size of the artwork is quite limited. The paper presents the survey of the Sarcophagus, a late 6th century BC Etruscan anthropoid Sarcophagus. Photogrammetry and laser scanning were used for its 3D digitization in two different times only few days apart from each other. The very short time available for the digitization was a crucial constraint for the surveying operations (due to constraints imposed us by the museum curators. Despite very high-resolution and detailed 3D models have been produced, a metric comparison between the two models shows intrinsic limitations of each technique that should be overcome through suitable onsite metric verification procedures as well as a proper processing workflow.

  3. The use of 3D surface scanning for the measurement and assessment of the human foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telfer Scott

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of surface scanning systems with the ability to quickly and easily obtain 3D digital representations of the foot are now commercially available. This review aims to present a summary of the reported use of these technologies in footwear development, the design of customised orthotics, and investigations for other ergonomic purposes related to the foot. Methods The PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were searched. Reference lists and experts in the field were also consulted to identify additional articles. Studies in English which had 3D surface scanning of the foot as an integral element of their protocol were included in the review. Results Thirty-eight articles meeting the search criteria were included. Advantages and disadvantages of using 3D surface scanning systems are highlighted. A meta-analysis of studies using scanners to investigate the changes in foot dimensions during varying levels of weight bearing was carried out. Conclusions Modern 3D surface scanning systems can obtain accurate and repeatable digital representations of the foot shape and have been successfully used in medical, ergonomic and footwear development applications. The increasing affordability of these systems presents opportunities for researchers investigating the foot and for manufacturers of foot related apparel and devices, particularly those interested in producing items that are customised to the individual. Suggestions are made for future areas of research and for the standardization of the protocols used to produce foot scans.

  4. Qualitative Assessment of a 3D Simulation Program: Faculty, Students, and Bio-Organic Reaction Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günersel, Adalet B.; Fleming, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that computer-based simulations and animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry where concepts are abstract and cannot be directly observed. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA) is a freely available 3D visualization software program developed to help students understand the chemistry of biomolecular events.…

  5. On the stress assessment and verification of 3D finite element models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, M.M.; Miranda, C.A.J.; Cruz, J.R.B.; Bezerra, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation of components using three dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) does not generally fall into the shell type verification. Consequently, the demonstration that the modes of failure are avoided sometimes is not straightforward. Elastic rules, developed by limit load theory, require the computation of the shell type through wall membrane and bending stresses. How to calculate these stresses from 3D FEA is not necessarily self-evident. One approach to be considered is to develop recommendations in a case-by-case basis for the most common pressure vessel geometries and loads based on comparison between the results of elastic and also plastic FEA. In this paper the case of a complex geometry -- lugs attached to a cylindrical pressure vessel wall -- is examined and discussed. This case is typically a three-dimensional (3D) configuration where it is not a simple task to check the requirements of the ASME code. From the comparison of the results of 3D elastic and elastic-plastic FEA some conclusions are addressed

  6. A novel foot plate to assess 3D range of motion of the hindfoot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijthof, G. J. M.; Pontesilli, M.; van der Zwaag, H.; Jonges, R.; de Geer, S. G. van; Maas, M.; Blankevoort, L.

    2012-01-01

    Careful diagnosis of ankle joints with suspected ligamentous trauma is necessary to decide on adequate therapy. Accurate 3D stress test techniques can assist in diagnosis. However, the devices used to stress the foot relative to the lower leg are inapt for clinical application as they are not

  7. Guiding histological assessment of uterine lesions using 3D in vitro ultrasonography and stereotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandermeulen, Liselore; Cornelis, Ann; Rasmussen, Christina Kjærgaard

    2017-01-01

    , the uterus was re-evaluated by 3D in vitro ultrasonography and in vitro gel instillation sonography (iGIS). The lesion of interest was pinpointed by inserting an intramuscular injection needle using a free-hand 2D-ultrasound guided technique to focus the macroscopic and the microscopic examination...

  8. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of 3D poly-ε-caprolactone matrices for bone tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalova, A.; Bliznakova, I.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Ostrowska, B.; Trifonov, A.; Buchvarov, I.; Avramov, L.; Husinsky, W.

    2018-03-01

    Fibrous 3D matrices were fabricated from poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) by fused deposition modeling. Femtosecond laser irradiation was then used to demonstrate the possibility to affect the porosity of the 3D PCL fiber meshes. The surface characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. The interrelationship was examined between the laser processing parameters (number of pulses, pulse energy applied) and the response of the biomaterial. The formation was demonstrated of well-defined micropores, while the original fiber structure was retained. The study of cells cultivation on the laser-modified scaffolds showed good adhesion compared to a non-modified scaffold. The results obtained showed that femtosecond laser processing can be used as an alternative non-contact tool in enhancing the porosity of artificial constructs, thus influencing the cell adhesion into fibrous meshes.

  9. Poly(dopamine) coating of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Chia-Hung [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Fang, Hsin-Yuan [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, College of Medicine, College of Public Health, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-01

    3D printing is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized 3D printed poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffolds and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared PLA 3D scaffolds coated with polydopamine (PDA). The chemical composition and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation, and cell cycle of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. In addition, the collagen I secreted from cells was increased and promoted cell attachment and cell cycle progression were depended on the PDA content. In osteogenesis assay, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on pure PLA scaffolds. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs. - Highlights: • A simple method of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffold coated with PDA • Promoted proliferation of hADSCs on PDA/PLA scaffolds • Increased collagen I, cell cycle, and cell adhesion with a high PDA content • Up-regulation of angiogenic and osteogenic of hADSCs • A promising method for bioinspired surface modification on PLA using PDA.

  10. Poly(dopamine) coating of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Lin, Chi-Chang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Chia-Hung; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized 3D printed poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffolds and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared PLA 3D scaffolds coated with polydopamine (PDA). The chemical composition and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation, and cell cycle of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. In addition, the collagen I secreted from cells was increased and promoted cell attachment and cell cycle progression were depended on the PDA content. In osteogenesis assay, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on pure PLA scaffolds. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs. - Highlights: • A simple method of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffold coated with PDA • Promoted proliferation of hADSCs on PDA/PLA scaffolds • Increased collagen I, cell cycle, and cell adhesion with a high PDA content • Up-regulation of angiogenic and osteogenic of hADSCs • A promising method for bioinspired surface modification on PLA using PDA

  11. Altering the Microenvironment to Promote Dormancy of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell in a 3D Bone Culture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    of the collagen -rich extracellular matrix . Further addition of metastatic breast cancer cells to the co-culture mimicked the vicious cycle; there was...biodegradable polymers to type I collagen or matrix derived from native extracellular matrix following decellularization. Papadimitropoulos et al., presents a...metastasis, 3D model, osteoblasts, cytokines, extracellular matrix 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a

  12. Assessment of engineered surfaces roughness by high-resolution 3D SEM photogrammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontard, L.C., E-mail: lionelcg@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11510 (Spain); López-Castro, J.D.; González-Rovira, L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Química Inorgánica, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Laboratorio de Corrosión, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11519 (Spain); Vázquez-Martínez, J.M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Diseño Industrial, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11519 (Spain); Varela-Feria, F.M. [Servicio de Microscopía Centro de Investigación, Tecnología e Innovación (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4b, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Marcos, M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Diseño Industrial, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real 11519 (Spain); and others

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • We describe a method to acquire a high-angle tilt series of SEM images that is symmetrical respect to the zero tilt of the sample stage. The method can be applied in any SEM microscope. • Using the method, high-resolution 3D SEM photogrammetry can be applied on planar surfaces. • 3D models of three surfaces patterned with grooves are reconstructed with high resolution using multi-view freeware photogrammetry software as described in LC Gontard et al. Ultramicroscopy, 2016. • From the 3D models roughness parameters are measured • 3D SEM high-resolution photogrammetry is compared with two conventional methods used for roughness characetrization: stereophotogrammetry and contact profilometry. • It provides three-dimensional information with high-resolution that is out of reach for any other metrological technique. - Abstract: We describe a methodology to obtain three-dimensional models of engineered surfaces using scanning electron microscopy and multi-view photogrammetry (3DSEM). For the reconstruction of the 3D models of the surfaces we used freeware available in the cloud. The method was applied to study the surface roughness of metallic samples patterned with parallel grooves by means of laser. The results are compared with measurements obtained using stylus profilometry (PR) and SEM stereo-photogrammetry (SP). The application of 3DSEM is more time demanding than PR or SP, but it provides a more accurate representation of the surfaces. The results obtained with the three techniques are compared by investigating the influence of sampling step on roughness parameters.

  13. Efficacy of rhBMP-2 Loaded PCL/β-TCP/bdECM Scaffold Fabricated by 3D Printing Technology on Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Bin Bae

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of 3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffold containing bone demineralized and decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM and human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 on bone regeneration. Scaffolds were divided into PCL/β-TCP, PCL/β-TCP/bdECM, and PCL/β-TCP/bdECM/BMP groups. In vitro release kinetics of rhBMP-2 were determined with respect to cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. These three reconstructive materials were implanted into 8 mm diameter calvarial bone defect in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after implantation for micro-CT, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses. The findings obtained were used to calculate new bone volumes (mm3 and new bone areas (%. Excellent cell bioactivity was observed in the PCL/β-TCP/bdECM and PCL/β-TCP/bdECM/BMP groups, and new bone volume and area were significantly higher in the PCL/β-TCP/bdECM/BMP group than in the other groups (p<.05. Within the limitations of this study, bdECM printed PCL/β-TCP scaffolds can reproduce microenvironment for cells and promote adhering and proliferating the cells onto scaffolds. Furthermore, in the rat calvarial defect model, the scaffold which printed rhBMP-2 loaded bdECM stably carries rhBMP-2 and enhances bone regeneration confirming the possibility of bdECM as rhBMP-2 carrier.

  14. Simulated radiographic bone and joint modeling from 3D ankle MRI: feasibility and comparison with radiographs and 2D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordeck, Shaun M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical College, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Koerper, Conrad E.; Adler, Aaron [University of Texas Southwestern Medical College, Dallas, TX (United States); Malhotra, Vidur; Xi, Yin [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Liu, George T. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this work is to simulate radiographs from isotropic 3D MRI data, compare relationship of angle and joint space measurements on simulated radiographs with corresponding 2D MRIs and real radiographs (XR), and compare measurement times among the three modalities. Twenty-four consecutive ankles were included, eight males and 16 females, with a mean age of 46 years. Segmented joint models simulating radiographs were created from 3D MRI data sets. Three readers independently performed blinded angle and joint space measurements on the models, corresponding 2D MRIs, and XRs at two time points. Linear mixed models and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was ascertained, with p values less than 0.05 considered significant. Simulated radiograph models were successfully created in all cases. Good agreement (ICC > 0.65) was noted among all readers across all modalities and among most measurements. Absolute measurement values differed between modalities. Measurement time was significantly greater (p < 0.05) on 2D versus simulated radiographs for most measurements and on XR versus simulated radiographs (p < 0.05) for nearly half the measurements. Simulated radiographs can be successfully generated from 3D MRI data; however, measurements differ. Good inter-reader and moderate-to-good intra-reader reliability was observed and measurements obtained on simulated radiograph models took significantly less time compared to measurements with 2D and generally less time than XR. (orig.)

  15. Poly(dopamine) coating of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Lin, Chi-Chang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Chia-Hung; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-11-01

    3D printing is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized 3D printed poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffolds and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared PLA 3D scaffolds coated with polydopamine (PDA). The chemical composition and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation, and cell cycle of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. In addition, the collagen I secreted from cells was increased and promoted cell attachment and cell cycle progression were depended on the PDA content. In osteogenesis assay, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on pure PLA scaffolds. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparation, characterization and biological test of 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan, fibroin and hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Paulo Autran Leite; Resende, Cristiane Xavier; Dulce de Almeida Soares, Glória; Anselme, Karine; Almeida, Luís Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of porous 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan (CHI), chitosan/silk fibroin (CHI/SF) and chitosan/silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (CHI/SF/HA) by freeze drying. The biomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, studies of porosity, pore size, contact angle and biological response of SaOs-2osteoblastic cells were performed. The CHI scaffolds have a porosity of 94.2 ± 0.9%, which is statistically higher than the one presented by CHI/SF/HA scaffolds, 89.7 ± 2.6%. Although all scaffolds were able to promote adhesion, growth and maintenance of osteogenic differentiation of SaOs-2 cells, the new 3D-scaffold based on CHI/SF/HA showed a significantly higher cell growth at 7 days and 21 days and the level of alkaline phosphatase at 14 and 21 days was statistically superior compared to other tested materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of 3D-scaffolds based on CHI, with or without addition of SF and HA. • Scaffolds exhibited interconnected porous structure (pore size superior to 50 μm). • The tripolyphosphate did not induce any significant cytotoxic response. • The CHI/SF/HA composite showed a higher cell growth and ALP activity

  17. 3D photography is a reliable burn wound area assessment tool compared to digital planimetry in very young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, E L; Kimble, R M; Stockton, K A

    2015-09-01

    Reliability and validity of 3D photography (3D LifeViz™ System) compared to digital planimetry (Visitrak™) has been established in a compliant cohort of children with acute burns. Further research is required to investigate these assessment tools in children representative of the general pediatric burns population, specifically children under the age of three years. To determine if 3D photography is a reliable wound assessment tool compared to Visitrak™ in children of all ages with acute burns ≤10% TBSA. Ninety-six children (median age 1 year 9 months) who presented to the Royal Children's Hospital Brisbane with an acute burn ≤10% TBSA were recruited into the study. Wounds were measured at the first dressing change using the Visitrak™ system and 3D photography. All measurements were completed by one investigator and level of agreement between wound surface area measurements was calculated. Wound surface area measurements were complete (i.e. participants had measurements from both techniques) for 75 participants. Level of agreement between wound surface area measurements calculated using an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was excellent (ICC 0.96, 95% CI 0.93, 0.97). Visitrak™ tracings could not be completed in 19 participants with 16 aged less than two years. 3D photography could not be completed for one participant. Barriers to completing tracings were: excessive movement, pain, young age or wound location (e.g. face or perineum). This study has confirmed 3D photography as a reliable alternative to digital planimetry in children of all ages with acute burns ≤10% TBSA. In addition, 3D photography is more suitable for very young children given its non-invasive nature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantifying the degradation of degradable implants and bone formation in the femoral condyle using micro-CT 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichi; Meng, Haoye; Yin, Heyong; Sun, Zhen; Peng, Jiang; Xu, Xiaolong; Guo, Quanyi; Xu, Wenjing; Yu, Xiaoming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shuyun; Lu, Shibi; Wang, Zhaoxu; Wang, Aiyuan

    2018-01-01

    Degradation limits the application of magnesium alloys, and evaluation methods for non-traumatic in vivo quantification of implant degradation and bone formation are imperfect. In the present study, a micro-arc-oxidized AZ31 magnesium alloy was used to evaluate the degradation of implants and new bone formation in 60 male New Zealand white rabbits. Degradation was monitored by weighing the implants prior to and following implantation, and by performing micro-computed tomography (CT) scans and histological analysis after 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks of implantation. The results indicated that the implants underwent slow degradation in the first 4 weeks, with negligible degradation in the first week, followed by significantly increased degradation during weeks 12-24 (Pformation increased as the implant degraded. The findings concluded that micro-CT, which is useful for providing non-traumatic, in vivo , quantitative and precise data, has great value for exploring the degradation of implants and novel bone formation.

  19. Quantification of the 3D relative movement of external marker sets vs. bones based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeux, M; Marin, F; Charleux, F; Dürselen, L; Ho Ba Tho, M C

    2006-11-01

    Most in vivo knee kinematic analyses are based on external markers attached to the shank and the thigh. Literature data show that markers positioning and soft tissues artifacts affect the kinematic parameters of the bones true movement. Most of the techniques of quantification used were invasive. The aim of the present study was to develop and apply a non-invasive methodology to compute the relative movement between the bones and the markers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were performed on the right knee of eleven volunteers without knee injury. The subjects were equipped with external magnetic resonance imaging-compatible marker sets. A foot drive device allowed the subjects to perform an actively loaded knee extension. The whole volume of the subject's knee was processed for four sequentially held knee flexion positions during the knee movement. The bones and external marker sets geometry were reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging images. Then a registration algorithm was applied to the bones and the relative movement of the thigh and shank marker sets with respect to their underlying bones was computed. The protocol resulted in a good geometrical accuracy and reproducibility. Marker sets movement differ from that of the bones with a maximum of 22 mm in translation and 15 degrees in rotation and it affects the knee kinematics. Marker sets relative movement modify the knee movement finite helical axes direction (range 10-35 degrees ) and localization (range 0-40 mm). The methodology developed can evaluate external marker set system to be used for kinematic analysis in a clinical environment.

  20. Separate visualization of endolymphatic space, perilymphatic space and bone by a single pulse sequence; 3D-inversion recovery imaging utilizing real reconstruction after intratympanic Gd-DTPA administration at 3 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Minako; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-four hours after intratympanic administration of gadolinium contrast material (Gd), the Gd was distributed mainly in the perilymphatic space. Three-dimensional FLAIR can differentiate endolymphatic space from perilymphatic space, but not from surrounding bone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether 3D inversion-recovery turbo spin echo (3D-IR TSE) with real reconstruction could separate the signals of perilymphatic space (positive value), endolymphatic space (negative value) and bone (near zero) by setting the inversion time between the null point of Gd-containing perilymph fluid and that of the endolymph fluid without Gd. Thirteen patients with clinically suspected endolymphatic hydrops underwent intratympanic Gd injection and were scanned at 3 T. A 3D FLAIR and 3D-IR TSE with real reconstruction were obtained. In all patients, low signal of endolymphatic space in the labyrinth on 3D FLAIR was observed in the anatomically appropriate position, and it showed negative signal on 3D-IR TSE. The low signal area of surrounding bone on 3D FLAIR showed near zero signal on 3D-IR TSE. Gd-containing perilymphatic space showed high signal on 3D-IR TSE. In conclusion, by optimizing the inversion time, endolymphatic space, perilymphatic space and surrounding bone can be separately visualized on a single image using a 3D-IR TSE with real reconstruction. (orig.)

  1. Adipose-derived stem cells and BMP-2 delivery in chitosan-based 3D constructs to enhance bone regeneration in a rat mandibular defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiabing; Park, Hyejin; Lee, Matthew K; Bezouglaia, Olga; Fartash, Armita; Kim, Jinku; Aghaloo, Tara; Lee, Min

    2014-08-01

    Reconstructing segmental mandiblular defects remains a challenge in the clinic. Tissue engineering strategies provide an alternative option to resolve this problem. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and bone morphogenetic proteins-2 (BMP-2) in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds on mandibular repair in a small animal model. Noggin expression levels in ASCs were downregulated by a lentiviral short hairpin RNA strategy to enhance ASC osteogenesis (ASCs(Nog-)). Chitosan (CH) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), natural polysaccharides, were fabricated into 3D porous scaffolds, which were further modified with apatite coatings for enhanced cellular responses and efficient delivery of BMP-2. The efficacy of 3D apatite-coated CH/CS scaffolds supplemented with ASCs(Nog-) and BMP-2 were evaluated in a rat critical-sized mandibular defect model. After 8 weeks postimplantation, the scaffolds treated with ASCs(Nog-) and BMP-2 significantly promoted rat mandibular regeneration as demonstrated by micro-computerized tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry, compared with the groups treated with ASCs(Nog-) or BMP-2 alone. These results suggest that our combinatorial strategy of ASCs(Nog-)+BMP-2 in 3D apatite microenvironments can significantly promote mandibular regeneration, and these may provide a potential tissue engineering approach to repair large bony defects.

  2. The advantage of the three dimensional computed tomographic (3 D-CT for ensuring accurate bone incision in sagittal split ramus osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional and aesthetic dysgnathia surgery requires accurate pre-surgical planning, including the surgical technique to be used related with the difference of anatomical structures amongst individuals. Programs that simulate the surgery become increasingly important. This can be mediated by using a surgical model, conventional x-rays as panoramic, cephalometric projections and another sophisticated method such as a three dimensional computed tomography (3 D-CT. A patient who had undergone double jaw surgeries with difficult anatomical landmarks was presented. In this case the mandible foramens were seen highly relatively related to the sigmoid notches. Therefore, ensuring the bone incisions in sagittal split was presumed to be difficult. A 3D-CT was made and considered to be very helpful in supporting the pre-operative diagnostic.

  3. Ice crystallization in porous building materials: assessing damage using real-time 3D monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Maxim; De Kock, Tim; De Schutter, Geert; Cnudde, Veerle

    2017-04-01

    Frost action is one of the main causes of deterioration of porous building materials in regions at middle to high latitudes. Damage will occur when the internal stresses due to ice formation become larger than the strength of the material. Hence, the sensitivity of the material to frost damage is partly defined by the structure of the solid body. On the other hand, the size, shape and interconnection of pores manages the water distribution in the building material and, therefore, the characteristics of the pore space control potential to form ice crystals (Ruedrich et al., 2011). In order to assess the damage to building materials by ice crystallization, lot of effort was put into identifying the mechanisms behind the stress build up. First of all, volumetric expansion of 9% (Hirschwald, 1908) during the transition of water to ice should be mentioned. Under natural circumstances, however, water saturation degrees within natural rocks or concrete cannot reach a damaging value. Therefore, linear growth pressure (Scherer, 1999), as well as several mechanisms triggered by water redistribution during freezing (Powers and Helmuth, 1953; Everett, 1961) are more likely responsible for damage due to freezing. Nevertheless, these theories are based on indirect observations and models and, thus, direct evidence that reveals the exact damage mechanism under certain conditions is still lacking. To obtain this proof, in-situ information needs to be acquired while a freezing process is performed. X-ray computed tomography has proven to be of great value in material research. Recent advances at the Ghent University Centre for Tomography (UGCT) have already allowed to dynamically 3D image crack growth in natural rock during freeze-thaw cycles (De Kock et al., 2015). A great potential to evaluate the different stress build-up mechanisms can be found in this imaging technique consequently. It is required to cover a range of materials with different petrophysical properties to achieve

  4. Assessment of void fraction prediction using the RETRAN-3d and CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aounallah, Y.; Coddington, P.; Gantner, U.

    2000-01-01

    A review of wide-range void fraction correlations against an extensive database has been undertaken to identify the correlations best suited for nuclear safety applications. Only those based on the drift-flux model have been considered. The survey confirmed the application range of the Chexal-Lellouche correlation, and the database was also used to obtain new parameters for the Inoue drift-flux correlation, which was also found suitable. A void fraction validation study has also been undertaken for the codes RETRAN-3D and CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 at the assembly and sub-assembly levels. The study showed the impact of the RETRAN-03 user options on the predicted void fraction, and the RETRAN-3D limitation at very low fluid velocity. At the sub-assembly level, CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 substantially underestimates the void in regions with low power-to-flow ratios. Otherwise, a generally good predictive performance was obtained with both RETRAN-3D and CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02. (authors)

  5. Assessment of void fraction prediction using the RETRAN-3d and CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aounallah, Y.; Coddington, P.; Gantner, U

    2000-07-01

    A review of wide-range void fraction correlations against an extensive database has been undertaken to identify the correlations best suited for nuclear safety applications. Only those based on the drift-flux model have been considered. The survey confirmed the application range of the Chexal-Lellouche correlation, and the database was also used to obtain new parameters for the Inoue drift-flux correlation, which was also found suitable. A void fraction validation study has also been undertaken for the codes RETRAN-3D and CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 at the assembly and sub-assembly levels. The study showed the impact of the RETRAN-03 user options on the predicted void fraction, and the RETRAN-3D limitation at very low fluid velocity. At the sub-assembly level, CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 substantially underestimates the void in regions with low power-to-flow ratios. Otherwise, a generally good predictive performance was obtained with both RETRAN-3D and CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02. (authors)

  6. Assessing the Applicability of 3D Holographic Technology as an Enhanced Technology for Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kalansooriya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Distance learning has provided an excellent platform for students in geographically remote locations while enabling them to learn at their own pace and convenience. A number of technologies are currently being utilized to conceptualize, design, enhance and foster distance learning. Teleconferences, electronic field trips, podcasts, webinars, video conferencing and online courses are among such technologies used in providing distance learning opportunities. However limitations in those existing technologies have affected to the increase of distance learners dropout rates. As an attempt to overcome the limitations in the currently adopted distance learning practices, the study aims to utilize 3D Hologram Technology (3DHT in the Engineering discipline. 3D hologram facilitates live and life size 3D telepresence that can interact with remote audiences. A survey had been conducted, using Delphi Technique to gather data from the experts in the field to evaluate the potential of 3DHT over existing technologies. Results of the survey suggested that 3DHT as a good distance learning technology and have the potential of overcoming existing limitations. Lack of infrastructure, High initial cost of infrastructure and Lack of technical know how are the main encounters identified by the experts in the sample. It is expected to develop a classroom environment with 3DHT and to evaluate its effectiveness for the distance learning in the next stage of the study.

  7. Virtual reality 3D echocardiography in the assessment of tricuspid valve function after surgical closure of ventricular septal defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Bol-Raap (Goris); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); T.V. Scohy (Thierry); A.D.J. ten Harkel (Arend); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. This study was done to investigate the potential additional role of virtual reality, using three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic holograms, in the postoperative assessment of tricuspid valve function after surgical closure of ventricular septal defect (VSD). Methods. 12

  8. Assessment of Photodynamic Inactivation against Periodontal Bacteria Mediated by a Chitosan Hydrogel in a 3D Gingival Model

    OpenAIRE

    Po-Chun Peng; Chien-Ming Hsieh; Chueh-Pin Chen; Tsuimin Tsai; Chin-Tin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan hydrogels containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and toluidine blue O were prepared and assessed for their mucoadhesive property and antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Increased HPMC content in the hydrogels resulted in increased mucoadhesiveness. Furthermore, we developed a simple In Vitro 3D gingival model resembling the oral periodontal pocket to culture the biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. ac...

  9. RELAP5-3D developmental assessment: Comparison of version 4.2.1i on Linux and Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.2i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  10. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment. Comparison of Version 4.3.4i on Linux and Windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayless, Paul David

    2015-01-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.3i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  11. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: 3D bioprinting, surface modification, nano/micro-technology and clinical aspects in tissue engineering of cartilage and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cen; Bang, Sumi; Cho, Younghak; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Inseop; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses about biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, after previous scientific commentary of the invitation-based, Korea-China joint symposium on biomimetic medical materials, which was held in Seoul, Korea, from October 22 to 26, 2015. The contents of this review were evolved from the presentations of that symposium. Four topics of biomimetic medical materials were discussed from different research groups here: 1) 3D bioprinting medical materials, 2) nano/micro-technology, 3) surface modification of biomaterials for their interactions with cells and 4) clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage focusing on cells, scaffolds and cytokines.

  12. Uncertainty assessment of 3D instantaneous velocity model from stack velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele Maesano, Francesco; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    3D modelling is a powerful tool that is experiencing increasing applications in data analysis and dissemination. At the same time the need of quantitative uncertainty evaluation is strongly requested in many aspects of the geological sciences and by the stakeholders. In many cases the starting point for 3D model building is the interpretation of seismic profiles that provide indirect information about the geology of the subsurface in the domain of time. The most problematic step in the 3D modelling construction is the conversion of the horizons and faults interpreted in time domain to the depth domain. In this step the dominant variable that could lead to significantly different results is the velocity. The knowledge of the subsurface velocities is related mainly to punctual data (sonic logs) that are often sparsely distributed in the areas covered by the seismic interpretation. The extrapolation of velocity information to wide extended horizons is thus a critical step to obtain a 3D model in depth that can be used for predictive purpose. In the EU-funded GeoMol Project, the availability of a dense network of seismic lines (confidentially provided by ENI S.p.A.) in the Central Po Plain, is paired with the presence of 136 well logs, but few of them have sonic logs and in some portion of the area the wells are very widely spaced. The depth conversion of the 3D model in time domain has been performed testing different strategies for the use and the interpolation of velocity data. The final model has been obtained using a 4 layer cake 3D instantaneous velocity model that considers both the initial velocity (v0) in every reference horizon and the gradient of velocity variation with depth (k). Using this method it is possible to consider the geological constraint given by the geometries of the horizons and the geo-statistical approach to the interpolation of velocities and gradient. Here we present an experiment based on the use of set of pseudo-wells obtained from the

  13. Preparation, characterization and biological test of 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan, fibroin and hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo Autran Leite; Resende, Cristiane Xavier; Soares, Glória Dulce de Almeida; Anselme, Karine; Almeida, Luís Eduardo

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of porous 3D-scaffolds based on chitosan (CHI), chitosan/silk fibroin (CHI/SF) and chitosan/silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (CHI/SF/HA) by freeze drying. The biomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, studies of porosity, pore size, contact angle and biological response of SaOs-2osteoblastic cells were performed. The CHI scaffolds have a porosity of 94.2±0.9%, which is statistically higher than the one presented by CHI/SF/HA scaffolds, 89.7±2.6%. Although all scaffolds were able to promote adhesion, growth and maintenance of osteogenic differentiation of SaOs-2 cells, the new 3D-scaffold based on CHI/SF/HA showed a significantly higher cell growth at 7 days and 21 days and the level of alkaline phosphatase at 14 and 21 days was statistically superior compared to other tested materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Frequency and types of fractures in maxillofacial traumas. Assessment using MDCT with multiplanar and 3D reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomich, G.; Baigorria, P.; Orlando, N.; Mejico, M.; Costamagna, C.; Villavicencio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Maxillofacial trauma (MFT) is a common reason for attendance at Emergency Departments. The complex anatomy of the facial bones requires multiplanar imaging techniques for a proper evaluation. Objectives. To describe frequency and types of fractures in a series of patients with MFT evaluated by multi-slice computed tomography (MDCT) with multiplanar and 3D reconstructions. Materials and Methods: Facial bone CTs ordered for MFT by the Emergency Department from June 2008 to December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The following data were obtained: age, gender, cause of trauma, presence and type of fractures. Patients were evaluated with an 8-channel MDCT. Multiplanar reconstructions were performed in all cases using high resolution bone window and soft tissue window, as well as 3D reconstructions. Results: One-hundred and thirty-seven CTs were performed for MFT: 78 (57%) showed 131 fractures. Of these 78 patients, 52 (66%) were males and 26 (34%) were females; mean age 33 years old (range: 14-90 yrs.). Causes: 58 % were injuries from traffic accidents; 24% were injuries from fights; 13% were sport injuries; and 7% were due to miscellaneous etiologies. Type and frequency of fractures: 18.3% were orbital floor fractures, 16% were maxillary sinus fractures, 15.3% were nasal fractures, 13% were jaw fractures, 9.2% were orbital fractures, and 12.3% were fractures of the zygomatic-malar complex; two cases of Le Fort II-III fractures were also observed. Conclusions: Fractures were more common in males, in the age range from 15 to 35 years old. Most fractures, and the most complex ones, were caused by traffic accidents. The most common fracture, either isolated or associated with other fractures, was the orbital floor fracture. (authors)

  15. Variable flip angle 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) T1 mapping of mouse lung: A repeatability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamidi, Daniel F; Smailagic, Amir; Bidar, Abdel W; Parker, Nicole S; Olsson, Marita; Hockings, Paul D; Lagerstrand, Kerstin M; Olsson, Lars E

    2018-03-08

    Lung T 1 is a potential translational biomarker of lung disease. The precision and repeatability of variable flip angle (VFA) T 1 mapping using modern 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging of the whole lung needs to be established before it can be used to assess response to disease and therapy. To evaluate the feasibility of regional lung T 1 quantification with VFA 3D-UTE and to investigate long- and short-term T 1 repeatability in the lungs of naive mice. Prospective preclinical animal study. Eight naive mice and phantoms. 3D free-breathing radial UTE (8 μs) at 4.7T. VFA 3D-UTE T 1 calculations were validated against T 1 values measured with inversion recovery (IR) in phantoms. Lung T 1 and proton density (S 0 ) measurements of whole lung and muscle were repeated five times over 1 month in free-breathing naive mice. Two consecutive T 1 measurements were performed during one of the imaging sessions. Agreement in T 1 between VFA 3D-UTE and IR in phantoms was assessed using Bland-Altman and Pearson 's correlation analysis. The T 1 repeatability in mice was evaluated using coefficient of variation (CV), repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and paired t-test. Good T 1 agreement between the VFA 3D-UTE and IR methods was found in phantoms. T 1 in lung and muscle showed a 5% and 3% CV (1255 ± 63 msec and 1432 ± 42 msec, respectively, mean ± SD) with no changes in T 1 or S 0 over a month. Consecutive measurements resulted in an increase of 2% in both lung T 1 and S 0 . VFA 3D-UTE shows promise as a reliable T 1 mapping method that enables full lung coverage, high signal-to-noise ratio (∼25), and spatial resolution (300 μm) in freely breathing animals. The precision of the VFA 3D-UTE method will enable better design and powering of studies. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Turnover Time in the Hyporheic Zone as Assessed by 3D Geophysical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, B.; Hall, R. O., Jr.; Carr, B.

    2017-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is a region of interest in stream hydrology and ecology, however, its heterogeneity across small spatial scales and difficulty to directly measure has hampered researchers' efforts to understand its specific contribution to processes such as solute transport and nutrient retention and removal. In recent years researchers have combined geophysical imaging, such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), with tracer additions to directly measure exchange between surface waters and the HZ without physically disrupting natural subsurface flow paths. We conducted constant-rate tracer additions in two small headwater mountain streams while collecting 3D ERT images downstream before, during, after each tracer addition to yield spatially comprehensive models of solute exchange with the HZ through time. From our 3D HZ models, we calculated the active volume of the HZ, normalized to the maximum measured size, for each time step giving a breakthrough curve of tracer abundance in the HZ through time. We then described the tracer's turnover time in the HZ by applying exponential and power decay models to the breakthrough curve of HZ volume in a similar manner that one would for a tracer breakthrough curve in surface waters. Our models suggest that the flushing of solutes from the HZ exhibit multi-domain behavior, where advective and diffusive exchange between HZ and surface waters occur simultaneously and operate at distinctly different rates.

  17. Assessment of Vert-3D repeatability and reproducibility for evaluating the scoliosis of children with different nutritional profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Adami Sedrez

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Vert-3D is a radiation-free system which offers a three-dimensional view of the back’s surface, providing a quantitative assessment of spinal curvatures. Objective: To verify the repeatability, inter-rater reproducibility, and correlation between Cobb angles and the results of the Vert-3D system version 1 in the evaluation of the front curvatures of the spine in children with different nutritional profiles. Methods: The sample was composed of 115 children who underwent posterior-anterior panoramic digital radiography of the spine and five evaluations with the Vert-3D system by three trained raters. Results: Version 1 of the Vert-3D system showed: (1 significant and moderate correlations of repeatability for arrows on the left (ICC between .54 to .83 and significant and moderate correlations for arrows on the right (ICC between .55 to .60 for only normal BMI; (2 significant correlations of inter-rater reproducibility for left arrows (ICC between .47 to .65, weak to moderate correlations for right arrows (ICC between .29 to .60, and no significance for obese samples; and (3 significant correlations ranging between .31 and .60 on the left side and non-significant correlations to the right side between Cobb angles and scoliosis arrows. Conclusion: High correlation levels solely on the left side decrease the possibility of system-use for the assessment of scoliosis.

  18. Evaluation of 3D-human skin equivalents for assessment of human dermal absorption of some brominated flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Pawar, Gopal; Harrad, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Ethical and technical difficulties inherent to studies in human tissues are impeding assessment of the dermal bioavailability of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). This is further complicated by increasing restrictions on the use of animals in toxicity testing, and the uncertainties associated with extrapolating data from animal studies to humans due to inter-species variations. To overcome these difficulties, we evaluate 3D-human skin equivalents (3D-HSE) as a novel in vitro alternative to human and animal testing for assessment of dermal absorption of BFRs. The percutaneous penetration of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A) through two commercially available 3D-HSE models was studied and compared to data obtained for human ex vivo skin according to a standard protocol. No statistically significant differences were observed between the results obtained using 3D-HSE and human ex vivo skin at two exposure levels. The absorbed dose was low (less than 7%) and was significantly correlated with log Kow of the tested BFR. Permeability coefficient values showed increasing dermal resistance to the penetration of γ-HBCD>β-HBCD>α-HBCD>TBBPA. The estimated long lag times (>30 min) suggests that frequent hand washing may reduce human exposure to HBCDs and TBBPA via dermal contact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of mechanical and biological properties of 3-D scaffolds reinforced with zinc oxide for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Feng

    Full Text Available A scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have highly interconnected porous structure, appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this work, we fabricated well-interconnected porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffolds via selective laser sintering (SLS. We found that the mechanical and biological properties of the scaffolds were improved by doping of zinc oxide (ZnO. Our data showed that the fracture toughness increased from 1.09 to 1.40 MPam(1/2, and the compressive strength increased from 3.01 to 17.89 MPa when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. It is hypothesized that the increase of ZnO would lead to a reduction in grain size and an increase in density of the strut. However, the fracture toughness and compressive strength decreased with further increasing of ZnO content, which may be due to the sharp increase in grain size. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was investigated by analyzing the adhesion and the morphology of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells cultured on the surfaces of the scaffolds. The scaffolds exhibited better and better ability to support cell attachment and proliferation when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. Moreover, a bone like apatite layer formed on the surfaces of the scaffolds after incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF, indicating an ability of osteoinduction and osteoconduction. In summary, interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds doped with ZnO were successfully fabricated and revealed good mechanical and biological properties, which may be used for bone repair and replacement potentially.

  20. Assessment of erosion hazard after recurrence fires with the RUSLE 3D MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecín-Arias, Daniel; Palencia, Covadonga; Fernández Raga, María

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this work is to calculate if there is more soil erosion after the recurrence of several forest fires on an area. To that end, it has been studied an area of 22 130 ha because has a high frequency of fires. This area is located in the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula. The assessment of erosion hazard was calculated in several times using Geographic Information Systems (GIS).The area have been divided into several plots according to the number of times they have been burnt in the past 15 years. Due to the complexity that has to make a detailed study of a so large field and that there are not information available anually, it is necessary to select the more interesting moments. In august 2012 it happened the most agressive and extensive fire of the area. So the study was focused on the erosion hazard for 2011 and 2014, because they are the date before and after from the fire of 2012 in which there are orthophotos available. RUSLE3D model (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation) was used to calculate maps erosion losses. This model improves the traditional USLE (Wischmeier and D., 1965) because it studies the influence of the concavity / convexity (Renard et al., 1997), and improves the estimation of the slope factor LS (Renard et al., 1991). It is also one of the most commonly used models in literatura (Mitasova et al., 1996; Terranova et al., 2009). The tools used are free and accessible, using GIS "gvSIG" (http://www.gvsig.com/es) and the metadata were taken from Spatial Data Infrastructure of Spain webpage (IDEE, 2016). However the RUSLE model has many critics as some authors who suggest that only serves to carry out comparisons between areas, and not for the calculation of absolute soil loss data. These authors argue that in field measurements the actual recovered eroded soil can suppose about one-third of the values obtained with the model (Šúri et al., 2002). The study of the area shows that the error detected by the critics could come from

  1. Atmospheric Motion Vectors from INSAT-3D: Initial quality assessment and its impact on track forecast of cyclonic storm NANAUK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, S. K.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Kumar, Prashant; Kiran Kumar, A. S.; Pal, P. K.; Kaushik, Nitesh; Sangar, Ghansham

    2016-03-01

    The advanced Indian meteorological geostationary satellite INSAT-3D was launched on 26 July 2013 with an improved imager and an infrared sounder and is placed at 82°E over the Indian Ocean region. With the advancement in retrieval techniques of different atmospheric parameters and with improved imager data have enhanced the scope for better understanding of the different tropical atmospheric processes over this region. The retrieval techniques and accuracy of one such parameter, Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV) has improved significantly with the availability of improved spatial resolution data along with more options of spectral channels in the INSAT-3D imager. The present work is mainly focused on providing brief descriptions of INSAT-3D data and AMV derivation processes using these data. It also discussed the initial quality assessment of INSAT-3D AMVs for a period of six months starting from 01 February 2014 to 31 July 2014 with other independent observations: i) Meteosat-7 AMVs available over this region, ii) in-situ radiosonde wind measurements, iii) cloud tracked winds from Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and iv) numerical model analysis. It is observed from this study that the qualities of newly derived INSAT-3D AMVs are comparable with existing two versions of Meteosat-7 AMVs over this region. To demonstrate its initial application, INSAT-3D AMVs are assimilated in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and it is found that the assimilation of newly derived AMVs has helped in reduction of track forecast errors of the recent cyclonic storm NANAUK over the Arabian Sea. Though, the present study is limited to its application to one case study, however, it will provide some guidance to the operational agencies for implementation of this new AMV dataset for future applications in the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) over the south Asia region.

  2. p38 MAPK mediated in compressive stress-induced chondrogenesis of rat bone marrow MSCs in 3D alginate scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Zhihe; Yang, Jingyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yurong

    2009-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known to have the capability to form bone and cartilage, and chondrogenesis derived from MSCs is reported to be affected by mechanical stimuli. This research was aimed to study the effects of cyclic compressive stress on the chondrogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs) which were encapsulated in alginate scaffolds and cultured with or without chondrogenic medium, and to investigate the role of p38 MAPK phospho-relay cascade in this process. The results show that the gene expression of chondrocyte-specific markers of Col2alpha1, aggrecan, Sox9, Runx2, and Ihh was upregulated by dynamic compressive stress introduced at the 8th day of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro. The p38 MAPK was activated by chondrogenic cytokines in a slow and lagged way, but activated by cyclic compressive stimulation in a rapid and transient manner. And inhibition of p38 activity with SB203580 suppressed gene expression of chondrocyte-specific genes stimulated by chondrogenic medium and (or) cyclic compressive stress. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK signal acts as an essential mediator in the mechano-biochemical transduction and subsequent transcriptional regulation in the process of chondrogenesis.

  3. 3D Modelling and monitoring of denervated muscle under Functional Electrical Stimulation treatment and associated bone structural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical rehabilitation method for patients who have permanent and non recoverable muscle denervation in the legs was developed in the frame of the European Project RISE. The technique is based on FES and the project results shows, in these severely disabled patients, restoration of muscle tissue and function. This study propose novel methods based on image processing technique and medical modelling to monitor growth in denervated muscle treated with FES. Geometrical and structural changes in muscle and bone are studied and modelled. Secondary effects on the bone mineral density produced by the stimulation treatment and due the elicited muscle contraction are also investigated. The restoration process in DDM is an important object of discussion since there isn’t yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms regulating growth in denervated muscle. This study approaches the problem from a macroscopic point of view, developing 3-dimensional models of the whole stimulated muscles and following changes in volume, geometry and density very accurately. The method is based on the acquisition of high resolution Spiral CT scans from patients who have long-term flaccid paraplegia and the use of special image processing tools allowing tissue discriminations and muscle segmentation. Three patients were measured at different points of time during 4 years of electrical stimulation treatment. In this study is quantitatively demonstrated the influences of FES treatment on the different quadriceps bellies. The rectus femoris muscle is positioned in the middle of the quadriceps and responds (in general better to stimulation. In a patient with abundant adipose tissue surrounding the quadriceps, rectus femoris almost doubled the volume during the FES treatment while in the other bellies the changes measured were minimal. The analysis of the density shows clearly a restoration of the muscular structure in the growing muscle. The remarkable increase of

  4. Reconstruction of Thoracic Spine Using a Personalized 3D-Printed Vertebral Body in Adolescent with T9 Primary Bone Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Wen Jie; Mobbs, Ralph J; Wilcox, Ben; Phan, Steven; Phan, Kevin; Sutterlin, Chester E

    2017-09-01

    Neurosurgery and spine surgery have the potential to benefit from the use of 3-dimensional printing (3DP) technology due to complex anatomic considerations and the delicate nature of surrounding structures. We report a procedure that uses a 3D-printed titanium T9 vertebral body implant post T9 vertebrectomy for a primary bone tumor. A 14-year-old female presented with progressive kyphoscoliosis and a pathologic fracture of the T9 vertebra with sagittal and coronal deformity due to a destructive primary bone tumor. Surgical resection and reconstruction was performed in combination with a 3D-printed, patient-specific implant. Custom design features included porous titanium end plates, corrective angulation of the implant to restore sagittal balance, and pedicle screw holes in the 3D implant to assist with insertion of the device. In addition, attachment of the anterior column construct to the posterior pedicle screw construct was possible due to the customized features of the patient-specific implant. An advantage of 3DP is the ability to manufacture patient-specific implants, as in the current case example. Additionally, the use of 3DP has been able to reduce operative time significantly. Surgical procedures can be preplanned using 3DP patient-specific models. Surgeons can train before performing complex procedures, which enhances their presurgical planning in order to maximize patient outcomes. When considering implants and prostheses, the use of 3DP allows a superior anatomic fit for the patient, with the potential to improve restoration of anatomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High-frequency 3D echodentographic imaging modality for early assessment of periodontal diseases: in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2009-02-01

    The use of ultrasound in dentistry is still an open growing area of research. Currently, there is a lack of imaging modalities to accurately predict minute structures and defects in the jawbone. In particular, the inability of 2D radiographic images to detect bony periodontal defects resulted from infection of the periodontium. This study investigates the feasibility of high frequency ultrasound to reconstruct high resolution 3D surface images of human jawbone. Methods: A dentate and non-dentate mandibles were used in this study. The system employs high frequency single-element ultrasound focused transducers (15-30 MHz) for scanning. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high precision two-dimensional stage positioning system of +/-1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate and quantitative measurements of the mandible in vitro. Radio frequency (RF) signals are acquired laterally 44-45.5 μm apart for each frame. Different frames are reconstructed 500 μm apart for the 3D reconstruction. Signal processing algorithms are applied on the received ultrasound signals for filtering, focusing, and envelope detection before frame reconstruction. Furthermore, an edge detection technique is adopted to detect the bone surface in each frame. Finally, all edges are combined together in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. Major anatomical landmarks on the resultant images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles to show the efficacy of the system. Comparison were also made with conventional 2D radiographs to show the superiority of the ultrasound imaging system in diagnosing small defects in the lateral, axial and elevation planes of space. Results: The landmarks on all ultrasound images matched with those on the mandible, indicating the efficacy of the system in detecting small structures in human jaw bones. Comparison with conventional 2D radiographic images of the same mandible showed superiority of

  6. Development of a 3-D x-ray micro-tomography system and its application to trabecular bone/cement interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Yong Ki; Cho, Gyuseong

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, the interface analysis of micro-structure based objects is an important research in osteoporosis, vascular imaging since a 3-D X-ray micro-tomography system was developed. However, the micro-tomographic image shows the white-out appearance in case of imaging of similar density objects with low energy X-ray. Therefore these images must be analyzed about the interface between microstructure based objects for its application to biomechanical study. Many published studies suggested approximately assumed model of interface and predicted mechanical failure by means of Finite Element Method (FEM) but these FEM analysis has not used for modeling the real structure and interface between objects such as roughness, voids and pores of objects. We developed micro-tomography system and suggest the application of micro-tomographic image for predicting mechanical failure at the interface. The micro-tomography system consists of a 5 μm micro-focus X-ray tube, a CMOS-based image sensor and a rotating sample holder controlled by a precision motor. CMOS image sensor has 62x62 mm 2 sensing area and uses optical lenses system for increasing resolution. The sample which was manufactured by implanting cement in a pig hip bone was used and its fracture is considered to be an important cause of loosening of hip joint replacement in orthopedic implants. A Feldkamp's cone-beam reconstruction algorithm on the equispatial detector case was used for bone/cement 3D volume data and the analysis of a trabecular bone/cement interface containing white-out appearance was performed by using multiple criterion segmentation of region and volume. Finally, the segmented data can be used for fracture prediction of FEM by determining node of hexahedron meshing. In this paper, we present development of a 3-D cone beam micro-tomographic system with CMOS image sensor and its application to a complex structure of a trabecular bone and implanted cement for predicting the failure mechanism of

  7. Assessment of engineered surfaces roughness by high-resolution 3D SEM photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontard, L C; López-Castro, J D; González-Rovira, L; Vázquez-Martínez, J M; Varela-Feria, F M; Marcos, M; Calvino, J J

    2017-06-01

    We describe a methodology to obtain three-dimensional models of engineered surfaces using scanning electron microscopy and multi-view photogrammetry (3DSEM). For the reconstruction of the 3D models of the surfaces we used freeware available in the cloud. The method was applied to study the surface roughness of metallic samples patterned with parallel grooves by means of laser. The results are compared with measurements obtained using stylus profilometry (PR) and SEM stereo-photogrammetry (SP). The application of 3DSEM is more time demanding than PR or SP, but it provides a more accurate representation of the surfaces. The results obtained with the three techniques are compared by investigating the influence of sampling step on roughness parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. New Challenges in Tribology: Wear Assessment Using 3D Optical Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valigi, Maria Cristina; Logozzo, Silvia; Affatato, Saverio

    2017-05-18

    Wear is a significant mechanical and clinical problem. To acquire further knowledge on the tribological phenomena that involve freeform mechanical components or medical prostheses, wear tests are performed on biomedical and industrial materials in order to solve or reduce failures or malfunctions due to material loss. Scientific and technological advances in the field of optical scanning allow the application of innovative devices for wear measurements, leading to improvements that were unimaginable until a few years ago. It is therefore important to develop techniques, based on new instrumentations, for more accurate and reproducible measurements of wear. The aim of this work is to discuss the use of innovative 3D optical scanners and an experimental procedure to detect and evaluate wear, comparing this technique with other wear evaluation methods for industrial components and biomedical devices.

  9. Fall Prevention Self-Assessments Via Mobile 3D Visualization Technologies: Community Dwelling Older Adults' Perceptions of Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Julian; Money, Arthur; Atwal, Anita

    2017-06-19

    In the field of occupational therapy, the assistive equipment provision process (AEPP) is a prominent preventive strategy used to promote independent living and to identify and alleviate fall risk factors via the provision of assistive equipment within the home environment. Current practice involves the use of paper-based forms that include 2D measurement guidance diagrams that aim to communicate the precise points and dimensions that must be measured in order to make AEPP assessments. There are, however, issues such as "poor fit" of equipment due to inaccurate measurements taken and recorded, resulting in more than 50% of equipment installed within the home being abandoned by patients. This paper presents a novel 3D measurement aid prototype (3D-MAP) that provides enhanced measurement and assessment guidance to patients via the use of 3D visualization technologies. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of older adults with regard to the barriers and opportunities of using the 3D-MAP application as a tool that enables patient self-delivery of the AEPP. Thirty-three community-dwelling older adults participated in interactive sessions with a bespoke 3D-MAP application utilizing the retrospective think-aloud protocol and semistructured focus group discussions. The system usability scale (SUS) questionnaire was used to evaluate the application's usability. Thematic template analysis was carried out on the SUS item discussions, think-aloud, and semistructured focus group data. The quantitative SUS results revealed that the application may be described as having "marginal-high" and "good" levels of usability, along with strong agreement with items relating to the usability (P=.004) and learnability (Putility with regards to effectiveness, efficiency, accuracy, and reliability of measurements that are recorded using the application and to compare it with 2D measurement guidance leaflets. ©Julian Hamm, Arthur Money, Anita Atwal. Originally published in

  10. The effect of CT dose on glenohumeral joint congruency measurements using 3D reconstructed patient-specific bone models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalone, Emily A; Fox, Anne-Marie V; Jenkyn, Thomas R; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A; Peters, Terry M; Kedgley, Angela E; Athwal, George S

    2011-01-01

    The study of joint congruency at the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder using computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of joint surfaces is an area of significant clinical interest. However, ionizing radiation delivered to patients during CT examinations is much higher than other types of radiological imaging. The shoulder represents a significant challenge for this modality as it is adjacent to the thyroid gland and breast tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning techniques that would minimize radiation dose while accurately quantifying joint congruency of the shoulder. The results suggest that only one-tenth of the standard applied total current (mA) and a pitch ratio of 1.375:1 was necessary to produce joint congruency values consistent with that of the higher dose scans. Using the CT scanning techniques examined in this study, the effective dose applied to the shoulder to quantify joint congruency was reduced by 88.9% compared to standard clinical CT imaging techniques.

  11. 2D and 3D assessment of sustentaculum tali screw fixation with or without Screw Targeting Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, A Siebe; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Vellekoop, Leonie; Knops, Simon P; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-12-01

    Precise placement of sustentaculum tali screw(s) is essential for restoring anatomy and biomechanical stability of the calcaneus. This can be challenging due to the small target area and presence of neurovascular structures on the medial side. The aim was to evaluate the precision of positioning of the subchondral posterior facet screw and processus anterior calcanei screw with or without a Screw Targeting Clamp. The secondary aim was to evaluate the added value of peroperative 3D imaging over 2D radiographs alone. Twenty Anubifix™ embalmed, human anatomic lower limb specimens were used. A subchondral posterior facet screw and a processus anterior calcanei screw were placed using an extended lateral approach. A senior orthopedic trauma surgeon experienced in calcaneal fracture surgery and a senior resident with limited experience in calcaneal surgery performed screw fixation in five specimens with and in five specimens without the clamp. 2D lateral and axial radiographs and a 3D recording were obtained postoperatively. Anatomical dissection was performed postoperatively as a diagnostic golden standard in order to obtain the factual screw positions. Blinded assessment of quality of fixation was performed by two surgeons. In 2D, eight screws were considered malpositioned when placed with the targeting device versus nine placed freehand. In 3D recordings, two additional screws were malpositioned in each group as compared to the golden standard. As opposed to the senior surgeon, the senior resident seemed to get the best results using the Screw Targeting Clamp (number of malpositioned screws using freehand was eight, and using the targeting clamp five). In nine out of 20 specimens 3D images provided additional information concerning target area and intra-articular placement. Based on the 3D assessment, five additional screws would have required repositioning. Except for one, all screw positions were rated equally after dissection when compared with 3D examinations

  12. Accuracy Assessment of a Complex Building 3d Model Reconstructed from Images Acquired with a Low-Cost Uas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniga, E.; Chirilă, C.; Stătescu, F.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) are a wide used technique for acquisition in order to create buildings 3D models, providing the acquisition of a high number of images at very high resolution or video sequences, in a very short time. Since low-cost UASs are preferred, the accuracy of a building 3D model created using this platforms must be evaluated. To achieve results, the dean's office building from the Faculty of "Hydrotechnical Engineering, Geodesy and Environmental Engineering" of Iasi, Romania, has been chosen, which is a complex shape building with the roof formed of two hyperbolic paraboloids. Seven points were placed on the ground around the building, three of them being used as GCPs, while the remaining four as Check points (CPs) for accuracy assessment. Additionally, the coordinates of 10 natural CPs representing the building characteristic points were measured with a Leica TCR 405 total station. The building 3D model was created as a point cloud which was automatically generated based on digital images acquired with the low-cost UASs, using the image matching algorithm and different software like 3DF Zephyr, Visual SfM, PhotoModeler Scanner and Drone2Map for ArcGIS. Except for the PhotoModeler Scanner software, the interior and exterior orientation parameters were determined simultaneously by solving a self-calibrating bundle adjustment. Based on the UAS point clouds, automatically generated by using the above mentioned software and GNSS data respectively, the parameters of the east side hyperbolic paraboloid were calculated using the least squares method and a statistical blunder detection. Then, in order to assess the accuracy of the building 3D model, several comparisons were made for the facades and the roof with reference data, considered with minimum errors: TLS mesh for the facades and GNSS mesh for the roof. Finally, the front facade of the building was created in 3D based on its characteristic points using the PhotoModeler Scanner

  13. Model-based measurement of food portion size for image-based dietary assessment using 3D/2D registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yue, Yaofeng; Sun, Mingui; Jia, Wenyan; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-01-01

    Dietary assessment is important in health maintenance and intervention in many chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, there is currently a lack of convenient methods for measuring the volume of food (portion size) in real-life settings. We present a computational method to estimate food volume from a single photographic image of food contained on a typical dining plate. First, we calculate the food location with respect to a 3D camera coordinate system using the plate as a scale reference. Then, the food is segmented automatically from the background in the image. Adaptive thresholding and snake modeling are implemented based on several image features, such as color contrast, regional color homogeneity and curve bending degree. Next, a 3D model representing the general shape of the food (e.g., a cylinder, a sphere, etc) is selected from a pre-constructed shape model library. The position, orientation and scale of the selected shape model are determined by registering the projected 3D model and the food contour in the image, where the properties of the reference are used as constraints. Experimental results using various realistically shaped foods with known volumes demonstrated satisfactory performance of our image-based food volume measurement method even if the 3D geometric surface of the food is not completely represented in the input image. (paper)

  14. Evaluation of 3D printed PCL/PLGA/β-TCP versus collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration in a beagle implant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, J-Y; Park, C-Y; Bae, J-H; Ahn, G; Kim, C; Lim, D-H; Cho, D-W; Yun, W-S; Shim, J-H; Huh, J-B

    2016-10-07

    Here, we compared 3D-printed polycaprolactone/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/PLGA/β-TCP) membranes with the widely used collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration (GBR) in beagle implant models. For mechanical property comparison in dry and wet conditions and cytocompatibility determination, we analyzed the rate and pattern of cell proliferation of seeded fibroblasts and preosteoblasts using the cell counting kit-8 assay and scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified using alizarin red S staining. At 8 weeks following implantation in vivo using beagle dogs, computed tomography and histological analyses were performed after sacrifice. Cell proliferation rates in vitro indicated that early cell attachment was higher in collagen than in PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes; however, the difference subsided by day 7. Similar outcomes were found for osteogenic differentiation, with approximately 2.5 times greater staining in collagen than PCL/PLGA/β-TCP, but without significant difference by day 14. In vivo, bone regeneration in the defect area, represented by new bone formation and bone-to-implant contact, paralleled those associated with collagen membranes. However, tensile testing revealed that whereas the PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane mechanical properties were conserved in both wet and dry states, the tensile property of collagen was reduced by 99% under wet conditions. Our results demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes have similar levels of biocompatibility and bone regeneration as collagen membranes. In particular, considering that GBR is always applied to a wet environment (e.g. blood, saliva), we demonstrated that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes maintained their form more reliably than collagen membranes in a wet setting, confirming their appropriateness as a GBR membrane.

  15. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100?150?MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110?MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1?10?MPa compressive...

  16. Development of a 3D workspace shoulder assessment tool incorporating electromyography and an inertial measurement unit-a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Navid; Noroozi, Siamak; Davenport, Philip; Hartley, Richard; Dupac, Mihai; Sewell, Philip

    2018-06-01

    Traditional shoulder range of movement (ROM) measurement tools suffer from inaccuracy or from long experimental setup times. Recently, it has been demonstrated that relatively low-cost wearable inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensors can overcome many of the limitations of traditional motion tracking systems. The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a single IMU combined with an electromyography (EMG) sensor to monitor the 3D reachable workspace with simultaneous measurement of deltoid muscle activity across the shoulder ROM. Six volunteer subjects with healthy shoulders and one participant with a 'frozen' shoulder were recruited to the study. Arm movement in 3D space was plotted in spherical coordinates while the relative EMG intensity of any arm position is presented graphically. The results showed that there was an average ROM surface area of 27291 ± 538 deg 2 among all six healthy individuals and a ROM surface area of 13571 ± 308 deg 2 for the subject with frozen shoulder. All three sections of the deltoid show greater EMG activity at higher elevation angles. Using such tools enables individuals, surgeons and physiotherapists to measure the maximum envelope of motion in conjunction with muscle activity in order to provide an objective assessment of shoulder performance in the voluntary 3D workspace. Graphical abstract The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a single IMU combined with an electromyography (EMG) sensor to monitor the 3D reachable workspace with simultaneous measurement of deltoid muscle activity across the shoulder ROM. The assessment tool consists of an IMU sensor, an EMG sensor, a microcontroller and a Bluetooth module. The assessment tool was attached to subjects arm. Individuals were instructed to move their arms with the elbow fully extended. They were then asked to provide the maximal voluntary elevation envelope of the arm in 3D space in multiple attempts starting from a small movement envelope going to the biggest

  17. Assessment of Color Changes in Vita 3D-Master Shade Guide after Sterilization and Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dashti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:Dental shade guides are commonly used for color determination and should be disinfected and sterilized. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color change of Vita 3D Master shade tabs after disinfection and sterilization. Material and methods:Overall, 98 samples (shade tabs were randomly selected from 14 new, unused Vita 3D sets, including the following shades: 2M1, 3L1.5, 3M1, 3M2, 3M3, 3R1.5 and 4M1. In each set, values of 2, 3 and 4, chroma of 1, 2 and 3 and hue were selected for the comparison of different shades. All tabs were measured using the Vita Easyshade device at baseline. The first group was disinfected with Deconex and the second group was sterilized by autoclaving in a simulated annual application. All the tabs were measured again using the same device. This process was repeated to simulate 2 and 3 years of usage. Statistical analysis was conducted by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA and independent t-test and paired sample t-test. Results:In the disinfected group, we observed significant differences in value and chroma in all periods (p˂0.001. However, hue showed no significant difference after the first year of simulated treatment (p=0.527, though it was significantly different in the second and third simulations (p˂0.001. In the sterilized group, all variables showed a significant difference for each year (p˂0.05. Considering total color difference (ΔE, there was a significant difference between the two groups in the first, second and third simulated years; ΔE increased in the sterilized group more than in the disinfected samples (p˂0.001.  Conclusions:  The color change of shade tabs was significant both after disinfection by a chemical solution and by sterilization through autoclaving. However, although disinfectants may not have a clinically important effect, sterilization should be considered as an interfering factor during color-matching procedure.

  18. Alginate/nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds with designed core/shell structures fabricated by 3D plotting and in situ mineralization for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongxiang; Lode, Anja; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Composite scaffolds, especially polymer/hydroxyapatite (HAP) composite scaffolds with predesigned structures, are promising materials for bone tissue engineering. Various methods including direct mixing of HAP powder with polymers or incubating polymer scaffolds in simulated body fluid for preparing polymer/HAP composite scaffolds are either uncontrolled or require long times of incubation. In this work, alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with designed pore parameters and core/shell structures were fabricated using 3D plotting technique and in situ mineralization under mild conditions (at room temperature and without the use of any organic solvents). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microcomputer tomography, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied to characterize the fabricated scaffolds. Mechanical properties and protein delivery of the scaffolds were evaluated, as well as the cell response to the scaffolds by culturing human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC). The obtained data indicate that this method is suitable to fabricate alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with a layer of nano-HAP, coating the surface of the alginate strands homogeneously and completely. The surface mineralization enhanced the mechanical properties and improved the cell attachment and spreading, as well as supported sustaining protein release, compared to pure alginate scaffolds without nano-HAP shell layer. The results demonstrated that the method provides an interesting option for bone tissue engineering application.

  19. Trabecular bone structure parameters from 3D image processing of clinical multi-slice and cone-beam computed tomography data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klintstroem, Eva; Smedby, Oerjan [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); UHL County Council of Oestergoetland, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH)/Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Moreno, Rodrigo [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH)/Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Brismar, Torkel B. [KUS Huddinge, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet and Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-02-15

    Bone strength depends on both mineral content and bone structure. The aim of this in vitro study was to develop a method of quantitatively assessing trabecular bone structure by applying three-dimensional image processing to data acquired with multi-slice and cone-beam computed tomography using micro-computed tomography as a reference. Fifteen bone samples from the radius were examined. After segmentation, quantitative measures of bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number, trabecular nodes, and trabecular termini were obtained. The clinical machines overestimated bone volume and trabecular thickness and underestimated trabecular nodes and number, but cone-beam CT to a lesser extent. Parameters obtained from cone beam CT were strongly correlated with μCT, with correlation coefficients between 0.93 and 0.98 for all parameters except trabecular termini. The high correlation between cone-beam CT and micro-CT suggest the possibility of quantifying and monitoring changes of trabecular bone microarchitecture in vivo using cone beam CT. (orig.)

  20. Intraoral 3D Scanning or Dental Impressions for the Assessment of Dental Arch Relationships in Cleft Care: Which is Superior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, E V; McIntyre, G T; Wang, W; Gillgrass, T; Martin, C B; Mossey, P A

    2016-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate intraoral 3D scans for assessing dental arch relationships and obtain patient/parent perceptions of impressions and intraoral 3D scanning. Forty-three subjects with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) had impressions taken for plaster models. These and the teeth were scanned using the R700 Orthodontic Study Model Scanner and Trios® Digital Impressions Scanner (3Shape A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark) to create indirect and direct digital models. All model formats were scored by three observers on two occasions using the GOSLON and modified Huddart Bodenham (MHB) indices. Participants and parents scored their perceptions of impressions and scanning from 1 (very good) to 5 (very bad). Intra- and interexaminer reliability were tested using GOSLON and MHB data (Cronbach's Alpha >0.9). Bland and Altman plots were created for MHB data, with each model medium (one-sample t tests, P 0.9) were good for all formats with the direct digital models having the lowest interexaminer differences. Participants had higher ratings for scanning comfort (84.8%) than impressions (44.2%) (P impressions (51.2%) (P > .05). None disliked scanning, but 16.3% disliked impressions. Data for parents and children positively correlated (P 3D scans was superior to indirect digital and to plaster models; Subjects with UCLP preferred intra-oral 3D scanning to dental impressions, mirrored by parents/carers; This study supports the replacement of conventional impressions with intra-oral 3D scans in longitudinal evaluations of the outcomes of cleft care.

  1. Energetic fitness: Field metabolic rates assessed via 3D accelerometry complement conventional fitness metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grémillet, David; Lescroël, Amelie; Ballard, Grant; Dugger, Katie M.; Massaro, Melanie; Porzig, Elizabeth L.; Ainley, David G.

    2018-01-01

    Evaluating the fitness of organisms is an essential step towards understanding their responses to environmental change. Connections between energy expenditure and fitness have been postulated for nearly a century. However, testing this premise among wild animals is constrained by difficulties in measuring energy expenditure while simultaneously monitoring conventional fitness metrics such as survival and reproductive output.We addressed this issue by exploring the functional links between field metabolic rate (FMR), body condition, sex, age and reproductive performance in a wild population.We deployed 3D accelerometers on 115 Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae during four breeding seasons at one of the largest colonies of this species, Cape Crozier, on Ross Island, Antarctica. The demography of this population has been studied for the past 18 years. From accelerometry recordings, collected for birds of known age and breeding history, we determined the vector of the dynamic body acceleration (VeDBA) and used it as a proxy for FMR.This allowed us to demonstrate relationships among FMR, a breeding quality index (BQI) and body condition. Notably, we found a significant quadratic relationship between mean VeDBA during foraging and BQI for experienced breeders, and individuals in better body condition showed lower rates of energy expenditure.We conclude that using FMR as a fitness component complementary to more conventional fitness metrics will yield greater understanding of evolutionary and conservation physiology.

  2. Systematic Standardized and Individualized Assessment of Masticatory Cycles Using Electromagnetic 3D Articulography and Computer Scripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Fuentes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory movements are studied for decades in odontology; a better understanding of them could improve dental treatments. The aim of this study was to describe an innovative, accurate, and systematic method of analyzing masticatory cycles, generating comparable quantitative data. The masticatory cycles of 5 volunteers (Class I, 19 ± 1.7 years without articular or dental occlusion problems were evaluated using 3D electromagnetic articulography supported by MATLAB software. The method allows the trajectory morphology of the set of chewing cycles to be analyzed from different views and angles. It was also possible to individualize the trajectory of each cycle providing accurate quantitative data, such as number of cycles, cycle areas in frontal view, and the ratio between each cycle area and the frontal mandibular border movement area. There was a moderate negative correlation (−0.61 between the area and the number of cycles: the greater the cycle area, the smaller the number of repetitions. Finally it was possible to evaluate the area of the cycles through time, which did not reveal a standardized behavior. The proposed method provided reproducible, intelligible, and accurate quantitative and graphical data, suggesting that it is promising and may be applied in different clinical situations and treatments.

  3. Assessing the precision of gaze following using a stereoscopic 3D virtual reality setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaki, Artin; Marciniak, Karolina; Dicke, Peter W; Thier, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Despite the ecological importance of gaze following, little is known about the underlying neuronal processes, which allow us to extract gaze direction from the geometric features of the eye and head of a conspecific. In order to understand the neuronal mechanisms underlying this ability, a careful description of the capacity and the limitations of gaze following at the behavioral level is needed. Previous studies of gaze following, which relied on naturalistic settings have the disadvantage of allowing only very limited control of potentially relevant visual features guiding gaze following, such as the contrast of iris and sclera, the shape of the eyelids and--in the case of photographs--they lack depth. Hence, in order to get full control of potentially relevant features we decided to study gaze following of human observers guided by the gaze of a human avatar seen stereoscopically. To this end we established a stereoscopic 3D virtual reality setup, in which we tested human subjects' abilities to detect at which target a human avatar was looking at. Following the gaze of the avatar showed all the features of the gaze following of a natural person, namely a substantial degree of precision associated with a consistent pattern of systematic deviations from the target. Poor stereo vision affected performance surprisingly little (only in certain experimental conditions). Only gaze following guided by targets at larger downward eccentricities exhibited a differential effect of the presence or absence of accompanying movements of the avatar's eyelids and eyebrows. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhancing the Hydrophilicity and Cell Attachment of 3D Printed PCL/Graphene Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguang; Caetano, Guilherme; Ambler, William Stephen; Blaker, Jonny James; Frade, Marco Andrey; Mandal, Parthasarathi; Diver, Carl; Bártolo, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolds are physical substrates for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, ultimately leading to the regeneration of tissues. They must be designed according to specific biomechanical requirements, i.e., certain standards in terms of mechanical properties, surface characteristics, porosity, degradability, and biocompatibility. The optimal design of a scaffold for a specific tissue strongly depends on both materials and manufacturing processes, as well as surface treatment. Polymeric scaffolds reinforced with electro-active particles could play a key role in tissue engineering by modulating cell proliferation and differentiation. This paper investigates the use of an extrusion-based additive manufacturing system to produce poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/pristine graphene scaffolds for bone tissue applications and the influence of chemical surface modification on their biological behaviour. Scaffolds with the same architecture but different concentrations of pristine graphene were evaluated from surface property and biological points of view. Results show that the addition of pristine graphene had a positive impact on cell viability and proliferation, and that surface modification leads to improved cell response. PMID:28774112

  5. Enhancing the Hydrophilicity and Cell Attachment of 3D Printed PCL/Graphene Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguang Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds are physical substrates for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, ultimately leading to the regeneration of tissues. They must be designed according to specific biomechanical requirements, i.e., certain standards in terms of mechanical properties, surface characteristics, porosity, degradability, and biocompatibility. The optimal design of a scaffold for a specific tissue strongly depends on both materials and manufacturing processes, as well as surface treatment. Polymeric scaffolds reinforced with electro-active particles could play a key role in tissue engineering by modulating cell proliferation and differentiation. This paper investigates the use of an extrusion-based additive manufacturing system to produce poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL/pristine graphene scaffolds for bone tissue applications and the influence of chemical surface modification on their biological behaviour. Scaffolds with the same architecture but different concentrations of pristine graphene were evaluated from surface property and biological points of view. Results show that the addition of pristine graphene had a positive impact on cell viability and proliferation, and that surface modification leads to improved cell response.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of wrist MRI at 3.0T - Comparison between isotropic 3D turbo spin echo and isotropic 3D fast field echo and 2D turbo spin echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jin Young; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to various joints. However, comparison for image quality between isotropic 3D MRI and two-dimensional (2D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence of the wrist at a 3T MR system has not been investigated. Purpose: To compare the image quality of isotropic 3D MRI including TSE intermediate-weighted (VISTA) sequence and fast field echo (FFE) sequence with 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequence of the wrist joint at 3.0 T. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in 10 wrists of 10 healthy volunteers with isotropic 3D sequences (VISTA and FFE) and 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequences at 3.0 T. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained by imaging phantom and noise-only image. Contrast ratios (CRs) were calculated between fluid and cartilage, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and the