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Sample records for assemblies transmembrane profiles

  1. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  2. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  3. Oxygen Permeation Profile in Lipid Membranes: Comparison with Transmembrane Polarity Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzikovski, Boris G.; Livshits, Vsevolod A.; Marsh, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Permeation of oxygen into membranes is relevant not only to physiological function, but also to depth determinations in membranes by site-directed spin labeling. Spin-lattice (T1) relaxation enhancements by air or molecular oxygen were determined for phosphatidylcholines spin labeled at positions (n = 4–14, 16) of the sn-2 chain in fluid membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, by using nonlinear continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Both progressive saturation and out-of-phase continuous-wave EPR measurements yield similar oxygen permeation profiles. With pure oxygen, the T2-relaxation enhancements determined from homogeneous linewidths of the linear EPR spectra are equal to the T1-relaxation enhancements determined by nonlinear EPR. This confirms that both relaxation enhancements occur by Heisenberg exchange, which requires direct contact between oxygen and spin label. Oxygen concentrates in the hydrophobic interior of phospholipid bilayer membranes with a sigmoidal permeation profile that is the inverse of the polarity profile established earlier for these spin-labeled lipids. The shape of the oxygen permeation profile in fluid lipid membranes is controlled partly by the penetration of water, via the transmembrane polarity profile. At the protein interface of the KcsA ion channel, the oxygen profile is more diffuse than that in fluid lipid bilayers. PMID:12885647

  4. Transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs through self-assembly of cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Bei; Xia, Fei; Xie, Yunchang; Jiang, Sifan; Su, Rui; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Breaking the natural barriers of cell membranes achieves fast entry of therapeutics, which leads to enhanced efficacy and helps overcome multiple drug resistance. Herein, transmembrane delivery of a series of small molecule anticancer drugs was achieved by the construction of artificial transmembrane nanochannels formed by self-assembly of cyclic peptide (cyclo[Gln-(d-Leu-Trp)4-d-Leu], CP) nanotubes (CPNTs) in the lipid bilayers. Our in vitro study in liposomes indicated that the transport of molecules with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm, which is the internal diameter of the CPNTs, could be significantly enhanced by CPNTs in a size-selective and dose-dependent manner. Facilitated uptake of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was also confirmed in the BEL7402 cell line. On the contrary, CPs could facilitate neither the transport across liposomal membranes nor the uptake by cell lines of cytarabine, a counterevidence drug with a size of 1.1 nm. CPs had a very weak anticancer efficacy, but could significantly reduce the IC50 of 5-FU in BEL7402, HeLa and S180 cell lines. Analysis by a q test revealed that a combination of 5-FU and CP had a synergistic effect in BEL7402 at all CP levels, in S180 at CP levels higher than 64 μg mL-1, but not in HeLa, where an additive effect was observed. Temporarily, intratumoral injection is believed to be the best way for CP administration. In vivo imaging using 125I radio-labelled CP confirmed that CPNPTs were completely localized in the tumor tissues, and translocation to other tissues was negligible. In vivo anticancer efficacy was studied in the grafted S180 solid tumor model in mice, and the results indicated that tumor growth was greatly inhibited by the combinatory use of 5-FU and CP, and a synergistic effect was observed at CP doses of 0.25 mg per kg bw. It is concluded that facilitated transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm was achieved, and the synergistic anticancer effect was confirmed both in cell lines

  5. Striated domains: self-organizing ordered assemblies of transmembrane alpha-helical peptides and lipids in bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette; Ganchev, Dragomir N; Rinia, Hilde A; Sparr, Emma

    2006-03-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge on striated domains, which are ordered assemblies of transmembrane peptides and lipids under gel-state conditions. The structure, mechanism of function and utility of this system as a model for domain formation is described, resulting in a molecular description of the domains and a discussion on the relevance of these insights for the function/formation and structure of similar domains in biological membranes. PMID:16542143

  6. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  7. Specially-Made Lipid-Based Assemblies for Improving Transmembrane Gene Delivery: Comparison of Basic Amino Acid Residue Rich Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; Yue, Dong; Nie, Yu; Xu, Xianghui; He, Yiyan; Zhang, Shiyong; Wagner, Ernst; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-01

    Cationic lipid based assemblies provide a promising platform for effective gene condensation into nanosized particles, and the peripheral properties of the assemblies are vital for complexation and interaction with physical barriers. Here, we report three cationic twin head lipids, and each of them contains a dioleoyl-glutamate hydrophobic tail and a twin polar head of lysine, arginine, or histidine. Such lipids were proven to self-assemble in aqueous solution with well-defined nanostructures and residual amino-, guanidine-, or imidazole-rich periphery, showing strong buffering capacity and good liquidity. The assemblies with arginine (RL) or lysine (KL) periphery exhibited positive charges (∼+35 mV) and complete condensation of pDNA into nanosized complexes (∼120 nm). In contrast, assemblies composed of histidine-rich lipids (HL) showed relatively low cationic electric potential (∼+10 mV) and poor DNA binding ability. As expected, the designed RL assemblies with guanidine-rich periphery enhanced the in vitro gene transfection up to 190-fold as compared with the golden standard PEI25k and Lipofectamine 2000, especially in the presence of serum. Meanwhile, interaction with cell and endo/lysosome membrane also revealed the superiority of RL complexes, that the guanidine-rich surface efficiently promoted transmembrane process in cellular internalization and endosomal disruption. More importantly, RL complexes also succeeded beyond others in vivo with significantly (∼7-fold) enhanced expression in HepG2 tumor xenografts in mice, as well as stronger green fluorescence protein imaging in isolated tumors and tumor frozen sections. PMID:27097286

  8. Probing the lateral composition profile of self-assembled islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply a selective etching procedure to probe the lateral composition profile of self-assembled SiGe pyramids on a Si(001) substrate surface. We find that the pyramids consist of highly Si intermixed corners, whereas the edges, the apex, and the center of the pyramids remain Ge rich. Our results cannot be explained by existing growth models that minimize strain energy. We use a model that includes surface interdiffusion during island growth, underlining the paramount importance of surface processes during the formation of self-assembled quantum dot heterostructures in many different material systems

  9. The conserved glycine residues in the transmembrane domain of the Semliki Forest virus fusion protein are not required for assembly and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. Both the E1 fusion peptide and transmembrane (TM) domain are essential for membrane fusion, but the functional requirements for the TM domain are poorly understood. Here we explored the role of the five TM domain glycine residues, including the highly conserved glycine pair at E1 residues 415/416. SFV mutants with alanine substitutions for individual or all five glycine residues (5G/A) showed growth kinetics and fusion pH dependence similar to those of wild-type SFV. Mutants with increasing substitution of glycine residues showed an increasingly more stringent requirement for cholesterol during fusion. The 5G/A mutant showed decreased fusion kinetics and extent in fluorescent lipid mixing assays. TM domain glycine residues thus are not required for efficient SFV fusion or assembly but can cause subtle effects on the properties of membrane fusion

  10. Insights into the coupling of duplication events and macroevolution from an age profile of animal transmembrane gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guohui; Kang, Jiuhong; Liu, Qi; Shi, Tieliu; Pei, Gang; Li, Yixue

    2006-08-11

    The evolution of new gene families subsequent to gene duplication may be coupled to the fluctuation of population and environment variables. Based upon that, we presented a systematic analysis of the animal transmembrane gene duplication events on a macroevolutionary scale by integrating the palaeontology repository. The age of duplication events was calculated by maximum likelihood method, and the age distribution was estimated by density histogram and normal kernel density estimation. We showed that the density of the duplicates displays a positive correlation with the estimates of maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, and the oxidation events played a key role in the major transitions of this density trace. Next, we focused on the Phanerozoic phase, during which more macroevolution data are available. The pulse mass extinction timepoints coincide with the local peaks of the age distribution, suggesting that the transmembrane gene duplicates fixed frequently when the environment changed dramatically. Moreover, a 61-million-year cycle is the most possible cycle in this phase by spectral analysis, which is consistent with the cycles recently detected in biodiversity. Our data thus elucidate a strong coupling of duplication events and macroevolution; furthermore, our method also provides a new way to address these questions. PMID:16895434

  11. Insights into the coupling of duplication events and macroevolution from an age profile of animal transmembrane gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Ding

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of new gene families subsequent to gene duplication may be coupled to the fluctuation of population and environment variables. Based upon that, we presented a systematic analysis of the animal transmembrane gene duplication events on a macroevolutionary scale by integrating the palaeontology repository. The age of duplication events was calculated by maximum likelihood method, and the age distribution was estimated by density histogram and normal kernel density estimation. We showed that the density of the duplicates displays a positive correlation with the estimates of maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, and the oxidation events played a key role in the major transitions of this density trace. Next, we focused on the Phanerozoic phase, during which more macroevolution data are available. The pulse mass extinction timepoints coincide with the local peaks of the age distribution, suggesting that the transmembrane gene duplicates fixed frequently when the environment changed dramatically. Moreover, a 61-million-year cycle is the most possible cycle in this phase by spectral analysis, which is consistent with the cycles recently detected in biodiversity. Our data thus elucidate a strong coupling of duplication events and macroevolution; furthermore, our method also provides a new way to address these questions.

  12. MOCAT2: a metagenomic assembly, annotation and profiling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultima, Jens Roat; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Li, Simone S.; Driessen, Marja; Voigt, Anita Yvonne; Zeller, Georg; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Summary: MOCAT2 is a software pipeline for metagenomic sequence assembly and gene prediction with novel features for taxonomic and functional abundance profiling. The automated generation and efficient annotation of non-redundant reference catalogs by propagating pre-computed assignments from 18 databases covering various functional categories allows for fast and comprehensive functional characterization of metagenomes. Availability and Implementation: MOCAT2 is implemented in Perl 5 and Python 2.7, designed for 64-bit UNIX systems and offers support for high-performance computer usage via LSF, PBS or SGE queuing systems; source code is freely available under the GPL3 license at http://mocat.embl.de. Contact: bork@embl.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153620

  13. Determining the optimal transmembrane gas pressure for nitrification in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors based on oxygen profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongchang; Xiao, Fan; Wang, Yanan; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of transmembrane gas pressure (P g) on the specific ammonium removal rate in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR). Our experimental results show that the specific ammonium removal rate increased from 4.98 to 9.26 gN m(-2) day(-1) when P g increased from 2 to 20 kPa in an MABR with a biofilm thickness of approximately 600 μm. However, this improvement was not linear; there was a threshold of P g separating the stronger and weaker effects of P g. The ammonium removal rate was improved less significantly when P g was over the threshold, indicating that there is an optimal threshold of P g for maximizing ammonium removal in an MABR. The change in oxygen penetration depth (d p) is less sensitive to P g in the ammonia-oxidizing active layer than in the inactive layer in membrane-aerated biofilm. The location of the P g threshold is at the same point as the thickness of the active layer on the curve of d p versus P g; thus, the active layer thickness and the optimal P g can be determined on the basis of the changes in the slope of d p to P g. PMID:27170321

  14. Calculation of coolant flow profile, pressure and temperature behind a blockage in a fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refinements of calculational technique for fluid profiles and pressure in fuel assemblies using the model of an anisotropic porous body are presented. Introduced are correction functions taking account of the dependence of components of resistance volume force on a local attack angle and anisotropy coefficient. By means of developed programs of calculating hydrodynamics and heat exchange behind a blockage determined are distributions of coolant Velocity, pressure and temperature when blocking the pass opening of the fuel assembly. Calculational results are presented in figures, where experimental curves are also given for comparison. The programs permit to determine coolant fluid profile with approximately 5 % accuracy, pressure profile with approximately 15 %, coolant temperature profile with approximately 10 %

  15. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. PMID:26661295

  16. Validation of subchannel code KAMUI: analysis of outlet temperature profiles of a 19-pin test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal hydraulic analysis of a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor test assembly has been performed by employing subchannel analysis code KAMUI. The code has been updated by incorporating some recent physical models for pressure drop and coolant mixing. Performance of several conventional flow resistance and mixing models was assessed, by comparing predicted outlet temperature profiles against available experimental data. The calculations were carried out for high, transitional, and low Reynolds number regions. The prediction capability of the code for a wire-wrapped bundle has been successfully demonstrated in this paper. (author)

  17. Self-assembled nanowire array capacitors: capacitance and interface state profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct characterization of the capacitance and interface states is very important for understanding the electronic properties of a nanowire transistor. However, the capacitance of a single nanowire is too small to precisely measure. In this work we have fabricated metal–oxide–semiconductor capacitors based on a large array of self-assembled Si nanowires. The capacitance and conductance of the nanowire array capacitors are directly measured and the interface state profile is determined by using the conductance method. We demonstrate that the nanowire array capacitor is an effective platform for studying the electronic properties of nanoscale interfaces. This approach provides a useful and efficient metrology for the study of the physics and device properties of nanoscale metal–oxide–semiconductor structures. (paper)

  18. Ion fluxes through nanopores and transmembrane channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, J. R.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.; Levin, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an implicit solvent Molecular Dynamics approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nanopores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nanopore recently obtained by Levin [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10240-4 76, 163 (2006)]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through an artificial transmembrane channel which mimics the antibacterial gramicidin A channel. Both current-voltage and current-concentration relations are calculated under various experimental conditions. We show that our results are comparable to the characteristics associated to the gramicidin A pore, especially the existence of two binding sites inside the pore and the observed saturation in the current-concentration profiles.

  19. Hydrophobic pulses predict transmembrane helix irregularities and channel transmembrane units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustres Mireille

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few high-resolution structures of integral membranes proteins are available, as crystallization of such proteins needs yet to overcome too many technical limitations. Nevertheless, prediction of their transmembrane (TM structure by bioinformatics tools provides interesting insights on the topology of these proteins. Methods We describe here how to extract new information from the analysis of hydrophobicity variations or hydrophobic pulses (HPulses in the sequence of integral membrane proteins using the Hydrophobic Pulse Predictor, a new tool we developed for this purpose. To analyze the primary sequence of 70 integral membrane proteins we defined two levels of analysis: G1-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 2 to 6 and G2-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 12 to 16. Results The G2-HPulse analysis of 541 transmembrane helices allowed the definition of the new concept of transmembrane unit (TMU that groups together transmembrane helices and segments with potential adjacent structures. In addition, the G1-HPulse analysis identified helix irregularities that corresponded to kinks, partial helices or unannotated structural events. These irregularities could represent key dynamic elements that are alternatively activated depending on the channel status as illustrated by the crystal structures of the lactose permease in different conformations. Conclusions Our results open a new way in the understanding of transmembrane secondary structures: hydrophobicity through hydrophobic pulses strongly impacts on such embedded structures and is not confined to define the transmembrane status of amino acids.

  20. Effect of processing methods on drug release profiles of anti-restenotic self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of anti-restenotic self-assembled monolayers (ARSAMs) has been previously demonstrated for delivering drugs from stents without polymeric carriers. ARSAMs have been prepared by coating an anti-restenotic drug (paclitaxel - PAT) on -COOH terminated phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) coated Co-Cr alloy specimens. This study investigates the effect of different processing methods on the percentage of drug release from ARSAMs. The different methods that were used in this study to process ARSAMs include room temperature (RT) treatment, heat treatment (HT), cold treatment (CT) and quenching. The changes in polymorphism, chemical structure, morphology, and distribution of PAT on SAMs coated specimens were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. DSC showed dihydrate, dehydrated dihydrate, semi-crystalline, and mixed (amorphous and dihydrate) forms of PAT for RT, HT, CT, and quenched specimens, respectively. FTIR showed that the chemical structure of PAT was unaltered in all the specimens processed by various methods employed in this study. SEM showed a mixture of spherical, ovoid, and bean-shaped morphologies of PAT on RT, HT, and CT while particle-like and needle-shaped morphologies of PAT were observed on quenched specimens. AFM showed PAT was uniformly distributed on RT, HT and CT specimens while particle-like PAT was well distributed and needle-shaped PAT was sparsely distributed on quenched specimens. CT specimens showed greater density of PAT crystals when compared to other methods. Thus, this study demonstrated that processing methods have significant influence on the polymorphism, morphology, and distribution of PAT on SAMs coated Co-Cr alloy specimens. The in vitro drug elution studies for up to 56 days showed sustained release for all the different groups of specimens. CT showed lesser

  1. Effect of processing methods on drug release profiles of anti-restenotic self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoebner, Susan E. [Biomedical Engineering Program, University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, SD 57107 (United States); Mani, Gopinath, E-mail: Gopinath.Mani@usd.edu [Biomedical Engineering Program, University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, SD 57107 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The use of anti-restenotic self-assembled monolayers (ARSAMs) has been previously demonstrated for delivering drugs from stents without polymeric carriers. ARSAMs have been prepared by coating an anti-restenotic drug (paclitaxel - PAT) on -COOH terminated phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) coated Co-Cr alloy specimens. This study investigates the effect of different processing methods on the percentage of drug release from ARSAMs. The different methods that were used in this study to process ARSAMs include room temperature (RT) treatment, heat treatment (HT), cold treatment (CT) and quenching. The changes in polymorphism, chemical structure, morphology, and distribution of PAT on SAMs coated specimens were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. DSC showed dihydrate, dehydrated dihydrate, semi-crystalline, and mixed (amorphous and dihydrate) forms of PAT for RT, HT, CT, and quenched specimens, respectively. FTIR showed that the chemical structure of PAT was unaltered in all the specimens processed by various methods employed in this study. SEM showed a mixture of spherical, ovoid, and bean-shaped morphologies of PAT on RT, HT, and CT while particle-like and needle-shaped morphologies of PAT were observed on quenched specimens. AFM showed PAT was uniformly distributed on RT, HT and CT specimens while particle-like PAT was well distributed and needle-shaped PAT was sparsely distributed on quenched specimens. CT specimens showed greater density of PAT crystals when compared to other methods. Thus, this study demonstrated that processing methods have significant influence on the polymorphism, morphology, and distribution of PAT on SAMs coated Co-Cr alloy specimens. The in vitro drug elution studies for up to 56 days showed sustained release for all the different groups of specimens. CT showed lesser

  2. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  3. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  4. Transfer of Assembly Operations to New Workpiece Poses by Adaptation to the Desired Force Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemec, Bojan; Abu-Dakka, Fares; Rytz, Jimmy Alison;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new algorithm that can be used for adaptation of robot trajectories in automated assembly tasks. Initial trajectories and forces are obtained by demonstration and iteratively adapted to the specific environment configuration. The algorithm adapts Cartesian space trajector...

  5. Simulation of IR, Raman and VCD amide I band profiles of self-assembled peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Measey, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is a suitable and convenient tool to probe the self-assembly of peptides, a biomedically and biotechnologically relevant process. Theoretical efforts to quantitatively analyze vibrational spectra of peptide aggregates have thus far focused on exploring the IR and to a lesser extent the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of rather small sized planar or nearly planar β-sheet structure. The current study utilizes an algorithm based on an excitonic coupling mode...

  6. Contamination profile on typical printed circuit board assemblies vs soldering process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper was to analyse typical printed circuit board assemblies (PCBAs) processed by reflow, wave or selective wave soldering for typical levels of process-related residues, resulting from a specific or combination of soldering processes. Typical solder flux residue...... structure was identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, while the concentration was measured using ion chromatography, and the electrical properties of the extracts were determined by measuring the leak current using a twin platinum electrode set-up. Localized extraction of residue was carried...

  7. Steady state temperature profiles in two simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature data from steady state tests in two parallel, simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications have been compared to determine the extent to which they agree. In general, good agreement was found in data at low flows and in bundle-center data at higher flows. Discrepancies in the data wre noted near the bundle edges at higher flows. An analysis of bundle thermal boundary conditions showed that the possible eccentric placement of one bundle within the housing could account for these discrepancies

  8. GenSeed-HMM: A Tool for Progressive Assembly Using Profile HMMs as Seeds and its Application in Alpavirinae Viral Discovery from Metagenomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, João M P; de Oliveira, André L; Sandberg, Tatiana O M; Moreno-Gallego, Jaime L; de Toledo, Marcelo A F; de Moura, Elisabeth M M; Oliveira, Liliane S; Durham, Alan M; Mehnert, Dolores U; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Reyes, Alejandro; Gruber, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    This work reports the development of GenSeed-HMM, a program that implements seed-driven progressive assembly, an approach to reconstruct specific sequences from unassembled data, starting from short nucleotide or protein seed sequences or profile Hidden Markov Models (HMM). The program can use any one of a number of sequence assemblers. Assembly is performed in multiple steps and relatively few reads are used in each cycle, consequently the program demands low computational resources. As a proof-of-concept and to demonstrate the power of HMM-driven progressive assemblies, GenSeed-HMM was applied to metagenomic datasets in the search for diverse ssDNA bacteriophages from the recently described Alpavirinae subfamily. Profile HMMs were built using Alpavirinae-specific regions from multiple sequence alignments (MSA) using either the viral protein 1 (VP1; major capsid protein) or VP4 (genome replication initiation protein). These profile HMMs were used by GenSeed-HMM (running Newbler assembler) as seeds to reconstruct viral genomes from sequencing datasets of human fecal samples. All contigs obtained were annotated and taxonomically classified using similarity searches and phylogenetic analyses. The most specific profile HMM seed enabled the reconstruction of 45 partial or complete Alpavirinae genomic sequences. A comparison with conventional (global) assembly of the same original dataset, using Newbler in a standalone execution, revealed that GenSeed-HMM outperformed global genomic assembly in several metrics employed. This approach is capable of detecting organisms that have not been used in the construction of the profile HMM, which opens up the possibility of diagnosing novel viruses, without previous specific information, constituting a de novo diagnosis. Additional applications include, but are not limited to, the specific assembly of extrachromosomal elements such as plastid and mitochondrial genomes from metagenomic data. Profile HMM seeds can also be used to

  9. Ribbon target assembly using carbon graphite for secondary emission type beam profile monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a secondary emission type beam profile monitor with graphite ribbons as a beam target. The graphite is excellent in endurance against heat load, and that they are thin as 1.6-2.0 micron and low z (=6) is advantage for reducing beam loss. Furthermore, since ribbons emits larger amount of electrons than ordinal metal wires because of larger surface, the monitor has higher sensitivity. On the other hands, in case of multi-ribbon type, uniformity of secondary electron emission is required for accurate measurement. For the uniform emission, not only surface homogeneity, but also evenness for each ribbon width is needed. A suitable manufacturing method to make ribbon target from graphite-foil, and emission uniformity has been studied. (author)

  10. Transcriptome assembly and expression profiling of molecular responses to cadmium toxicity in hepatopancreas of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Ting Li, Yi; Liu, Yang; Chin Lee, Shao; Wang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution is a serious global problem, which causes irreversible toxic effects on animals. Freshwater crab, Sinopotamon henanense, is a useful environmental indicator since it is widely distributed in benthic habitats whereby it tends to accumulate Cd and other toxicants. However, its molecular responses to Cd toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing and gene expression analyses of its hepatopancreas with and without Cd treatments. A total of 7.78 G clean reads were obtained from the pooled samples, and 68,648 unigenes with an average size of 622 bp were assembled, in which 5,436 were metabolism-associated and 2,728 were stimulus response-associated that include 380 immunity-related unigenes. Expression profile analysis demonstrated that most genes involved in macromolecular metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, detoxification and anti-oxidant defense were up-regulated by Cd exposure, whereas immunity-related genes were down-regulated, except the genes involved in phagocytosis were up-regulated. The current data indicate that Cd exposure alters gene expressions in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, our results provide the first comprehensive S.henanense transcriptome dataset, which is useful for biological and ecotoxicological studies on this crab and its related species at molecular level, and some key Cd-responsive genes may provide candidate biomarkers for monitoring aquatic pollution by heavy metals.

  11. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Nanogels Produced by Microfluidics-Facilitated Self-Assembly Improves the Safety Profile of the Cationic Host Defense Peptide Novicidin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit J; Kim, YongTae; Maltesen, Morten J;

    2015-01-01

    have hampered their commercial development. To overcome these challenges a novel nanogel-based drug delivery system was designed. METHOD: The peptide novicidin was self-assembled with an octenyl succinic anhydride-modified analogue of hyaluronic acid, and this formulation was optimized using a...... peptide loading of 36 ± 4%. The nanogels exhibited good colloidal stability under different ionic strength conditions and allowed complete release of the peptide over 14 days. Furthermore, self-assembly of novicidin with hyaluronic acid into nanogels significantly improved the safety profile at least five...

  12. Biophysical Aspects of Transmembrane Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovich, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Transmembrane signaling is one of the most significant cell biological events in the life and death of cells in general and lymphocytes in particular. Until recently biochemists and biophysicists were not accustomed to thinking of these processes from the side of a high number of complex biochemical events and an equally high number of physical changes at molecular and cellular levels at the same time. Both types of researchers were convinced that their findings are the most decisive, having higher importance than the findings of the other scientist population. Both casts were wrong. Life, even at cellular level, has a number of interacting physical and biochemical mechanisms, which finally build up the creation of an "excited" cell that will respond to particular signals from the outer or inner world. This book handles both aspects of the signalling events, and in some cases tries to unify our concepts and help understand the signals that govern the life and death of our cells. Not only the understanding, bu...

  13. Cooperative Transmembrane Penetration of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Ji, Qiuju; Huang, Changjin; Zhang, Sulin; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Physical penetration of lipid bilayer membranes presents an alternative pathway for cellular delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) besides endocytosis. NPs delivered through this pathway could reach the cytoplasm, thereby opening the possibility of organelle-specific targeting. Herein we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to elucidate the transmembrane penetration mechanisms of multiple NPs. Our simulations demonstrate that NPs’ translocation proceeds in a cooperative manner, where the interplay of the quantity and surface chemistry of the NPs regulates the translocation efficiency. For NPs with hydrophilic surfaces, the increase of particle quantity facilitates penetration, while for NPs with partly or totally hydrophobic surfaces, the opposite highly possibly holds. Moreover, a set of interesting cooperative ways, such as aggregation, aggregation-dispersion, and aggregation-dispersion-reaggregation of the NPs, are observed during the penetration process. We find that the penetration behaviors of multiple NPs are mostly dominated by the changes of the NP-membrane force components in the membrane plane direction, in addition to that in the penetration direction, suggesting a different interaction mechanism between the multiple NPs and the membrane compared with the one-NP case. These results provide a fundamental understanding in the underlying mechanisms of cooperative penetration of NPs, and shed light on the NP-based drug and gene delivery. PMID:26013284

  14. Whole-genome profiling and shotgun sequencing delivers an anchored, gene-decorated, physical map assembly of bread wheat chromosome 6A

    OpenAIRE

    Poursarebani, N.; Nussbaumer, T.; Šimková, H. (Hana); Šafář, J.; Witsenboer, H.; van Oeveren, J.; Doležel, J. (Jaroslav); Mayer, K. F. X.; N. Stein; Schnurbusch, T.

    2014-01-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the most important staple food crop for 35% of the world's population. International efforts are underway to facilitate an increase in wheat production, of which the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) plays an important role. As part of this effort, we have developed a sequence-based physical map of wheat chromosome 6A using whole-genome profiling (WGP (TM)). The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig assembly tools FINGERPRINT...

  15. Whole-genome profiling and shotgun sequencing delivers an anchored, gene-decorated, physical map assembly of bread wheat chromosome 6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursarebani, Naser; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Simková, Hana; Safář, Jan; Witsenboer, Hanneke; van Oeveren, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stein, Nils; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the most important staple food crop for 35% of the world's population. International efforts are underway to facilitate an increase in wheat production, of which the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) plays an important role. As part of this effort, we have developed a sequence-based physical map of wheat chromosome 6A using whole-genome profiling (WGP™). The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig assembly tools fingerprinted contig (fpc) and linear topological contig (ltc) were used and their contig assemblies were compared. A detailed investigation of the contigs structure revealed that ltc created a highly robust assembly compared with those formed by fpc. The ltc assemblies contained 1217 contigs for the short arm and 1113 contigs for the long arm, with an L50 of 1 Mb. To facilitate in silico anchoring, WGP™ tags underlying BAC contigs were extended by wheat and wheat progenitor genome sequence information. Sequence data were used for in silico anchoring against genetic markers with known sequences, of which almost 79% of the physical map could be anchored. Moreover, the assigned sequence information led to the 'decoration' of the respective physical map with 3359 anchored genes. Thus, this robust and genetically anchored physical map will serve as a framework for the sequencing of wheat chromosome 6A, and is of immediate use for map-based isolation of agronomically important genes/quantitative trait loci located on this chromosome. PMID:24813060

  16. Virus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  17. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth;

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  18. Structural organization of a full-length gp130/LIF-R cytokine receptor transmembrane complex

    OpenAIRE

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Lupardus, Patrick; Martick, Monika; Walz, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-Rα). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp13...

  19. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin (Trinity)

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  20. De novo transcriptome assembly and comprehensive expression profiling in Crocus sativus to gain insights into apocarotenoid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mukesh; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Verma, Mohit; Ghangal, Rajesh; Garg, Rohini

    2016-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is commonly known as world’s most expensive spice with rich source of apocarotenoids and possesses magnificent medicinal properties. To understand the molecular basis of apocarotenoid biosynthesis/accumulation, we performed transcriptome sequencing from five different tissues/organs of C. sativus using Illumina platform. After comprehensive optimization of de novo transcriptome assembly, a total of 105, 269 unique transcripts (average length of 1047 bp and N50 length of 1404 bp) were obtained from 206 million high-quality paired-end reads. Functional annotation led to the identification of many genes involved in various biological processes and molecular functions. In total, 54% of C. sativus transcripts could be functionally annotated using public databases. Transcriptome analysis of C. sativus revealed the presence of 16721 SSRs and 3819 transcription factor encoding transcripts. Differential expression analysis revealed preferential/specific expression of many transcripts involved in apocarotenoid biosynthesis in stigma. We have revealed the differential expression of transcripts encoding for transcription factors (MYB, MYB related, WRKY, C2C2-YABBY and bHLH) involved in secondary metabolism. Overall, these results will pave the way for understanding the molecular basis of apocarotenoid biosynthesis and other aspects of stigma development in C. sativus. PMID:26936416

  1. De novo transcriptome assembly and comprehensive expression profiling in Crocus sativus to gain insights into apocarotenoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mukesh; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Verma, Mohit; Ghangal, Rajesh; Garg, Rohini

    2016-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is commonly known as world's most expensive spice with rich source of apocarotenoids and possesses magnificent medicinal properties. To understand the molecular basis of apocarotenoid biosynthesis/accumulation, we performed transcriptome sequencing from five different tissues/organs of C. sativus using Illumina platform. After comprehensive optimization of de novo transcriptome assembly, a total of 105, 269 unique transcripts (average length of 1047 bp and N50 length of 1404 bp) were obtained from 206 million high-quality paired-end reads. Functional annotation led to the identification of many genes involved in various biological processes and molecular functions. In total, 54% of C. sativus transcripts could be functionally annotated using public databases. Transcriptome analysis of C. sativus revealed the presence of 16721 SSRs and 3819 transcription factor encoding transcripts. Differential expression analysis revealed preferential/specific expression of many transcripts involved in apocarotenoid biosynthesis in stigma. We have revealed the differential expression of transcripts encoding for transcription factors (MYB, MYB related, WRKY, C2C2-YABBY and bHLH) involved in secondary metabolism. Overall, these results will pave the way for understanding the molecular basis of apocarotenoid biosynthesis and other aspects of stigma development in C. sativus. PMID:26936416

  2. Evolution of vertebrate interferon inducible transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickford Danielle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs have diverse roles, including the control of cell proliferation, promotion of homotypic cell adhesion, protection against viral infection, promotion of bone matrix maturation and mineralisation, and mediating germ cell development. Most IFITMs have been well characterised in human and mouse but little published data exists for other animals. This study characterised IFITMs in two distantly related marsupial species, the Australian tammar wallaby and the South American grey short-tailed opossum, and analysed the phylogeny of the IFITM family in vertebrates. Results Five IFITM paralogues were identified in both the tammar and opossum. As in eutherians, most marsupial IFITM genes exist within a cluster, contain two exons and encode proteins with two transmembrane domains. Only two IFITM genes, IFITM5 and IFITM10, have orthologues in both marsupials and eutherians. IFITM5 arose in bony fish and IFITM10 in tetrapods. The bone-specific expression of IFITM5 appears to be restricted to therian mammals, suggesting that its specialised role in bone production is a recent adaptation specific to mammals. IFITM10 is the most highly conserved IFITM, sharing at least 85% amino acid identity between birds, reptiles and mammals and suggesting an important role for this presently uncharacterised protein. Conclusions Like eutherians, marsupials also have multiple IFITM genes that exist in a gene cluster. The differing expression patterns for many of the paralogues, together with poor sequence conservation between species, suggests that IFITM genes have acquired many different roles during vertebrate evolution.

  3. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaihara, Masanori; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Hirokazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Endo, Hitoshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishihama, Yasushi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Handa, Tetsurou [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3 Minami-Tamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan); Nakano, Minoru, E-mail: mnakano@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity.

  4. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity

  5. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  6. Are Aquaporins the Missing Transmembrane Osmosensors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A E; Shachar-Hill, Y

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of cell volume is central to homeostasis. It is assumed to begin with the detection of a change in water potential across the bounding membrane, but it is not clear how this is accomplished. While examples of general osmoreceptors (which sense osmotic pressure in one phase) and stretch-activated ion channels (which require swelling of a cell or organelle) are known, effective volume regulation requires true transmembrane osmosensors (TMOs) which directly detect a water potential difference spanning a membrane. At present, no TMO molecule has been unambiguously identified, and clear evidence for mammalian TMOs is notably lacking. In this paper, we set out a theory of TMOs which requires a water channel spanning the membrane that excludes the major osmotic solutes, responds directly without the need for any other process such as swelling, and signals to other molecules associated with the magnitude of changing osmotic differences. The most likely molecules that are fit for this purpose and which are also ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells are aquaporins (AQPs). We review experimental evidence from several systems which indicates that AQPs are essential elements in regulation and may be functioning as TMOs; i.e. the first step in an osmosensing sequence that signals osmotic imbalance in a cell or organelle. We extend this concept to several systems of current interest in which the cellular involvement of AQPs as simple water channels is puzzling or counter-intuitive. We suggest that, apart from regulatory volume changes in cells, AQPs may also be acting as TMOs in red cells, secretory granules and microorganisms. PMID:25791748

  7. TSSOM:Transmembrane Segments Prediction by Self—Organizing Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUQi; ZHUYisheng; WANGBaohua; LIYixue

    2003-01-01

    A novel method ealled TSSOM(Transmembrane segments prediction by self-organizing map)is presented in the paper.The main idea of the method lies in the application of self-organizing feature map together with special visualization techniques to classify the multivariate "time" series of transmembrane proteins into flve classes.Through the analysis of resulting trajectories on the map,frequent patterns of transmembrane segments are detected and even some kind of "new"knowledge about membrane insertion mechanism is acquired.The discovered patterns and the knowledge are then used to predict transmembrane segments for auery sequence.The prediction results not only show that the method is powerful,but also prove that the patterns and the knowledge about the interaction bwtween the patterns are effective and acceptable.

  8. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. PMID:26585312

  9. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhib...

  10. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  11. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  12. v-SNARE transmembrane domains function as catalysts for vesicle fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Makke, Mazen; Schindeldecker, Barbara; Schwarz, Yvonne; Shaaban, Ahmed; Sharma, Satyan; Böckmann, Rainer A; Lindau, Manfred; Mohrmann, Ralf; Bruns, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is mediated by an assembly of SNARE proteins between opposing membranes, but it is unknown whether transmembrane domains (TMDs) of SNARE proteins serve mechanistic functions that go beyond passive anchoring of the force-generating SNAREpin to the fusing membranes. Here, we show that conformational flexibility of synaptobrevin-2 TMD is essential for efficient Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis and actively promotes membrane fusion as well as fusion pore expansion. Specifically, the introduction of helix-stabilizing leucine residues within the TMD region spanning the vesicle's outer leaflet strongly impairs exocytosis and decelerates fusion pore dilation. In contrast, increasing the number of helix-destabilizing, ß-branched valine or isoleucine residues within the TMD restores normal secretion but accelerates fusion pore expansion beyond the rate found for the wildtype protein. These observations provide evidence that the synaptobrevin-2 TMD catalyzes the fusion process by its structural flexibility, actively setting the pace of fusion pore expansion. PMID:27343350

  13. Computational approaches to detect allosteric pathways in transmembrane molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Michino, Mayako; LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Many of the functions of transmembrane proteins involved in signal processing and transduction across the cell membrane are determined by allosteric couplings that propagate the functional effects well beyond the original site of activation. Data gathered from breakthroughs in biochemistry, crystallography, and single molecule fluorescence have established a rich basis of information for the study of molecular mechanisms in the allosteric couplings of such transmembrane proteins. The mechanistic details of these couplings, many of which have therapeutic implications, however, have only become accessible in synergy with molecular modeling and simulations. Here, we review some recent computational approaches that analyze allosteric coupling networks (ACNs) in transmembrane proteins, and in particular the recently developed Protein Interaction Analyzer (PIA) designed to study ACNs in the structural ensembles sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The power of these computational approaches in interrogating the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins is illustrated with selected examples of recent experimental and computational studies pursued synergistically in the investigation of secondary active transporters and GPCRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806157

  14. A hidden Markov model for prediction transmembrane helices in proteinsequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; von Heijne, Gunnar; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    constraints involved. Models were estimated both by maximum likelihood and a discriminative method, and a method for reassignment of the membrane helix boundaries were developed. In a cross validated test on single sequences, our transmembrane HMM, TMHMM, correctly predicts the entire topology for 77% of the...

  15. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T...

  16. Modelling of a transmembrane evaporation module for desalination of seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Caroliene M.; Rácz, Imre G.; Heuven, van Jan Willem; Reith, Tom; Haan, de André B.

    1999-01-01

    Transmembrane evaporation (often called membrane distillation) carried out in a countercurrent flow module, in which incoming cold seawater is heated by the condensing product water flow, is a promising technology for low-cost seawater desalination. This paper presents a model for preliminary design

  17. Identification of Transmembrane Protein 134 as a Novel LMP1-Binding Protein by Using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation and an Enhanced Retroviral Mutagen

    OpenAIRE

    Talaty, Pooja; Emery, Amanda; Holthusen, Kirsten; Everly, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus induces constitutive signaling in infected cells. LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization of LMP1 via its transmembrane domain, localization to lipid rafts in the membrane, and association of the LMP1 cytoplasmic domain to adaptor proteins, such as the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs). Protein complementation is a novel technique to examine protein-protein interaction through the assembly of functional fluorescent...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-04-14 (NODC Accession 0117483)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/18/2011 (NODC Accession 0074287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/17/2011 (NODC Accession 0072885)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/31/2011 (NODC Accession 0073246)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/02/2011 (NODC Accession 0073285)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/25/2011 (NODC Accession 0073119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/19/2011 (NODC Accession 0072913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/16/2011 (NODC Accession 0072849)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/15/2011 (NODC Accession 0082384)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/31/2012 (NODC Accession 0084676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/30/2012 (NODC Accession 0084675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 4/5/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001412)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-05-26 (NCEI Accession 0128471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/20/2012 (NODC Accession 0100509)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/20/2011 (NODC Accession 0082551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-09-11 (NODC Accession 0122094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-09-01 (NCEI Accession 0131205)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 7/11/2006 (NODC Accession 0002746)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-09-29 (NODC Accession 0122364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 11/03/2008 (NODC Accession 0047057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 9/22/2008 (NODC Accession 0045543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 10/06/2008 (NODC Accession 0046157)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 10/27/2008 (NODC Accession 0047056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 9/15/2008 (NODC Accession 0045491)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 9/08/2008 (NODC Accession 0045299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 9/29/2008 (NODC Accession 0045990)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 10/13/2008 (NODC Accession 0046426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 10/20/2008 (NODC Accession 0046619)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/03/2011 (NODC Accession 0079428)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/25/2013 (NODC Accession 0104298)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-20 (NODC Accession 0125417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-05 (NODC Accession 0126592)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/24/2011 (NODC Accession 0073088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/04/2012 (NODC Accession 0094831)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/11/2013 (NODC Accession 0104413)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/01/2011 (NODC Accession 0081799)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/16/2003 (NODC Accession 0001199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/12/2011 (NODC Accession 0074224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-04-15 (NODC Accession 0117492)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/30/2012 (NCEI Accession 0088994)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-26 (NODC Accession 0126440)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/10/2012 (NODC Accession 0098462)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-03-25 (NODC Accession 0117351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/21/2012 (NCEI Accession 0092103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-01-23 (NCEI Accession 0141103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/01/2012 (NCEI Accession 0088995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0156411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-14 (NODC Accession 0121262)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/14/2013 (NODC Accession 0103490)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-01 (NCEI Accession 0144840)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/03/2012 (NCEI Accession 0092329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/13/2011 (NCEI Accession 0073534)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-02 (NODC Accession 0125568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/09/2012 (NCEI Accession 0092471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-10 (NCEI Accession 0136661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-02-03 (NODC Accession 0116172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-05 (NCEI Accession 0146058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/19/2012 (NCEI Accession 0086806)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/27/2012 (NODC Accession 0097970)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-01-16 (NCEI Accession 0140831)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-03 (NCEI Accession 0138644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-08 (NCEI Accession 0138945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 28 June 2000 to 30 October 2000 (NODC Accession 0000326)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-06-01 (NCEI Accession 0128995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/27/2012 (NCEI Accession 0084629)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/07/2013 (NODC Accession 0101144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-03-27 (NODC Accession 0117353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-03 (NCEI Accession 0145015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/06/2011 (NCEI Accession 0078139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-01-30 (NCEI Accession 0141243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/27/2012 (NODC Accession 0099797)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-02 (NCEI Accession 0129841)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/25/2013 (NODC Accession 0101722)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-08-10 (NCEI Accession 0130692)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/22/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089647)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-28 (NCEI Accession 0127421)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-06-17 (NODC Accession 0119608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-08 (NODC Accession 0125045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0143274)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-12-17 (NODC Accession 0115399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-31 (NCEI Accession 0137473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-10-29 (NODC Accession 0113945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-11-13 (NODC Accession 0123254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-08 (NCEI Accession 0129536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/17/2012 (NODC Accession 0084007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-22 (NODC Accession 0114471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 3/1/2004 (NODC Accession 0001371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/31/2012 (NODC Accession 0090162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/24/2013 (NODC Accession 0109233)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/09/2013 (NODC Accession 0104407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0129889)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-16 (NCEI Accession 0147043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/23/2004 (NODC Accession 0001907)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 3/16/2004 (NODC Accession 0001391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-05-07 (NCEI Accession 0150387)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0129531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-03-10 (NODC Accession 0116975)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-16 (NODC Accession 0115892)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/12/2012 (NCEI Accession 0088062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/05/2012 (NCEI Accession 0087850)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-10-25 (NODC Accession 0113895)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/23/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089670)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-16 (NODC Accession 0115894)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-03 (NODC Accession 0119844)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/01/2011 (NCEI Accession 0075307)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-09-18 (NODC Accession 0122128)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/25/2012 (NODC Accession 0097922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-02 (NODC Accession 0126506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-26 (NODC Accession 0121512)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-15 (NCEI Accession 0139357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/06/2011 (NCEI Accession 0073286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-12-01 (NODC Accession 0123340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-14 (NCEI Accession 0136905)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/04/2012 (NCEI Accession 0092436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-24 (NODC Accession 0126390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-03-11 (NODC Accession 0117042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-01-09 (NCEI Accession 0140350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/25/2013 (NODC Accession 0104695)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/26/2013 (NODC Accession 0112417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/04/2012 (NCEI Accession 0090245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/29/2012 (NCEI Accession 0090108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 7/6/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001611)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 3/10/2008 (NCEI Accession 0039529)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 6/22/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001507)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/03/2013 (NODC Accession 0107711)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 04/20/2009 (NODC Accession 0053076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the month of December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/28/2013 (NODC Accession 0104323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/15/2012 (NODC Accession 0089366)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-05-01 (NODC Accession 0117970)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/26/2012 (NODC Accession 0088897)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-26 (NODC Accession 0126816)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/19/2011 (NODC Accession 0082521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/07/2013 (NODC Accession 0102341)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-30 (NODC Accession 0116125)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/12/2011 (NODC Accession 0076932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2009-03-02 (NODC Accession 0051616)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/29/2012 (NODC Accession 0099076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/23/2012 (NODC Accession 0084460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/30/2011 (NODC Accession 0073933)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-14 (NODC Accession 0120316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/04/2011 (NODC Accession 0074614)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/06/2012 (NODC Accession 0099240)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-09-09 (NCEI Accession 0131450)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-09 (NODC Accession 0125619)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-12 (NODC Accession 0125691)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/29/2013 (NODC Accession 0112561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/09/2011 (NODC Accession 0072669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-02-17 (NODC Accession 0116453)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-10-24 (NODC Accession 0113793)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the month of June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-05 (NODC Accession 0114226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-07 (NODC Accession 0119893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/14/2013 (NODC Accession 0104258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/14/2012 (NODC Accession 0093752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/15/2011 (NODC Accession 0081137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0141775)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/30/2013 (NODC Accession 0113483)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/31/2011 (NODC Accession 0078918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/07/2012 (NODC Accession 0090460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-06-05 (NODC Accession 0119184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/12/2011 (NODC Accession 0072758)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-11 (NCEI Accession 0142200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/15/2013 (NODC Accession 0111972)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/07/2013 (NODC Accession 0111785)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/12/2013 (NODC Accession 0111917)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/13/2013 (NODC Accession 0111941)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/08/2013 (NODC Accession 0111840)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/7/2005 (NODC Accession 0002425)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/18/2011 (NCEI Accession 0078565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-30 (NCEI Accession 0149399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-05-22 (NODC Accession 0118677)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and dates range from 25 April 2000 to 27 October 2000 (NODC Accession 0000327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-17 (NODC Accession 0126678)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-06 (NODC Accession 0124855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-03 (NODC Accession 0125572)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/18/2013 (NODC Accession 0108922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/19/2012 (NCEI Accession 0084149)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-09-16 (NODC Accession 0122114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-29 (NODC Accession 0125565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-09 (NODC Accession 0126645)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-10-07 (NODC Accession 0122516)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-16 (NCEI Accession 0139105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-05-19 (NCEI Accession 0128173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-05-21 (NCEI Accession 0128216)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-02-04 (NODC Accession 0116216)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-10-30 (NODC Accession 0123091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-12-12 (NODC Accession 0115397)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-05 (NODC Accession 0120759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/16/2013 (NODC Accession 0113815)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/24/2013 (NODC Accession 0113245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-01 (NODC Accession 0113982)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/08/2013 (NODC Accession 0101145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/16/2012 (NCEI Accession 0088416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/12/2013 (NODC Accession 0112888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/27/2011 (NCEI Accession 0077807)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-10-06 (NODC Accession 0122513)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/12/2013 (NODC Accession 0104239)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/17/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089504)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/24/2011 (NCEI Accession 0075186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-22 (NODC Accession 0120530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/16/2013 (NODC Accession 0104426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/25/2012 (NCEI Accession 0092104)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/19/2011 (NCEI Accession 0074371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/13/2012 (NCEI Accession 0086531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-05-03 (NCEI Accession 0149766)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/06/2013 (NODC Accession 0108127)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-04-28 (NODC Accession 0117905)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/07/2013 (NODC Accession 0106085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/30/2013 (NODC Accession 0105461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-02 (NCEI Accession 0145975)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/23/2012 (NCEI Accession 0085833)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-16 (NODC Accession 0126675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/28/2011 (NCEI Accession 0081692)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/29/2011 (NCEI Accession 0081743)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0131125)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-07 (NODC Accession 0127258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-02-13 (NODC Accession 0116406)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-28 (NODC Accession 0116095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-03 (NODC Accession 0126537)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-08 (NODC Accession 0127319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0127420)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-06-04 (NCEI Accession 0152501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-12-08 (NODC Accession 0123605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-21 (NODC Accession 0121309)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/21/2011 (NCEI Accession 0074375)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/25/2011 (NCEI Accession 0074471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/26/2011 (NCEI Accession 0077804)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/03/2011 (NCEI Accession 0077909)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-23 (NCEI Accession 0127394)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-06-18 (NCEI Accession 0153620)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/06/2011 (NCEI Accession 0075738)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-04 (NODC Accession 0114206)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/23/2013 (NODC Accession 0113241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-10 (NODC Accession 0125644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/18/2012 (NODC Accession 0100487)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-21 (NODC Accession 0115913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/28/2012 (NCEI Accession 0086083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/19/2013 (NODC Accession 0112162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-07-06 (NCEI Accession 0155487)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-31 (NODC Accession 0126983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-08-11 (NCEI Accession 0130928)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-11-13 (NCEI Accession 0137926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/08/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/16/2013 (NODC Accession 0106714)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0143330)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-24 (NCEI Accession 0145744)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/24/2012 (NCEI Accession 0084514)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-06 (NODC Accession 0120763)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-11-10 (NODC Accession 0123164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-14 (NODC Accession 0127357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 1/13/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/23/2004 (NODC Accession 0001950)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 9/8/2006 (NODC Accession 0002829)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 02/16/2009 (NODC Accession 0051084)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-16 (NODC Accession 0115893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/20/2013 (NODC Accession 0109116)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-28 (NODC Accession 0120678)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-08-20 (NCEI Accession 0131098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Prediction of the burial status of transmembrane residues of helical membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Sikander

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helical membrane proteins (HMPs play a crucial role in diverse cellular processes, yet it still remains extremely difficult to determine their structures by experimental techniques. Given this situation, it is highly desirable to develop sequence-based computational methods for predicting structural characteristics of HMPs. Results We have developed TMX (TransMembrane eXposure, a novel method for predicting the burial status (i.e. buried in the protein structure vs. exposed to the membrane of transmembrane (TM residues of HMPs. TMX derives positional scores of TM residues based on their profiles and conservation indices. Then, a support vector classifier is used for predicting their burial status. Its prediction accuracy is 78.71% on a benchmark data set, representing considerable improvements over 68.67% and 71.06% of previously proposed methods. Importantly, unlike the previous methods, TMX automatically yields confidence scores for the predictions made. In addition, a feature selection incorporated in TMX reveals interesting insights into the structural organization of HMPs. Conclusion A novel computational method, TMX, has been developed for predicting the burial status of TM residues of HMPs. Its prediction accuracy is much higher than that of previously proposed methods. It will be useful in elucidating structural characteristics of HMPs as an inexpensive, auxiliary tool. A web server for TMX is established at http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tmx and freely available to academic users, along with the data set used.

  18. Transport properties of simple organic molecules in a transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Fan, Jian Fen; Zhang, Ming Ming; Weng, Pei Pei; Lin, Hui Fang

    2016-05-01

    Multiple molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the transport properties of single methane, methanol, and ethanol molecules through the water-filled transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube (CPNT) of 8 × (WL)₄-POPE, as well as the potential application of this CPNT in the separation of an alcohol/water mixture. Molecular size and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity were found to significantly influence molecular diffusion behavior in the channel. Methane and ethanol display more explicit distributions in midplane regions, while methanol mainly occurs in α-plane zones. Methane and ethanol drift faster near an α-plane zone, whereas methanol diffuses uniformly throughout the whole transmembrane region. The dipole orientation of channel methanol is significantly affected by the bare carbonyl groups at the tube mouths and flips mainly in gap 4, whereas the rotation of ethanol is blocked. Ball-shaped hydrophobic methane experiences more flips in gap 4. The PMF (potential of mean force) profiles of the three organic molecules disclose their different diffusion behaviors in the CPNT. Amphiphilic alcohols are able to form direct H-bonds with channel water and the tube. Both single and double water bridges with the tube were observed in the methanol and ethanol systems. The different adsorption behaviors of the alcohols and water in the dehydrated CPNT may lead to the potential application of the CPNT as a means of separating alcohols from water. PMID:27083567

  19. Whole-genome profiling and shotgun sequencing delivers an anchored, gene-decorated, physical map assembly of bread wheat chromosome 6A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poursarebani, N.; Nussbaumer, T.; Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Witsenboer, H.; van Oeveren, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, K. F. X.; Stein, N.; Schnurbusch, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2 (2014), s. 334-347. ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : bread wheat chromosome 6A * whole -genome profiling * LINEAR TOPOLOGICAL CONTIGS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  20. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria;

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... plays an important role in processing the information generated by these methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current publicly available sequence assembly programs. We describe the basic principles of computational assembly along with the main concerns, such as repetitive sequences...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  1. Transcriptome Profile of the Asian Giant Hornet (Vespa mandarinia) Using Illumina HiSeq 4000 Sequencing: De Novo Assembly, Functional Annotation, and Discovery of SSR Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat Bhusan Patnaik; So Young Park; Se Won Kang; Hee-Ju Hwang; Tae Hun Wang; Eun Bi Park; Jong Min Chung; Dae Kwon Song; Changmu Kim; Soonok Kim; Jae Bong Lee; Heon Cheon Jeong; Hong Seog Park; Yeon Soo Han; Yong Seok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Vespa mandarinia found in the forests of East Asia, including Korea, occupies the highest rank in the arthropod food web within its geographical range. It serves as a source of nutrition in the form of Vespa amino acid mixture and is listed as a threatened species, although no conservation measures have been implemented. Here, we performed de novo assembly of the V. mandarinia transcriptome by Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing. Over 60 million raw reads and 59,184,811 clean reads were obtained. ...

  2. New insight into transmembrane topology of Staphylococcus aureus histidine kinase AgrC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Quan, Chunshan; Xiong, Wen; Qu, Xiaojing; Fan, Shengdi; Hu, Wenzhong

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus accessory gene regulator (agr) locus controls the expression of virulence factors through a classical two-component signal transduction system that consists of a receptor histidine protein kinase AgrC and a cytoplasmic response regulator AgrA. An autoinducing peptide (AIP) encoded by agr locus activates AgrC, which transduces extracellular signals into the cytoplasm. Despite extensive investigations to identify AgrC-AIP interaction sites, precise signal recognition mechanisms remain unknown. This study aims to clarify the membrane topology of AgrC by applying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion technique and the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). However, our findings were inconsistent with profile obtained previously by alkaline phosphatase. We report the topology of AgrC shows seven transmembrane segments, a periplasmic N-terminus, and a cytoplasmic C-terminus. PMID:24361366

  3. Deorphanizing the human transmembrane genome: A landscape of uncharacterized membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has fueled the last decade of work to functionally characterize genome content. An important subset of genes encodes membrane proteins, which are the targets of many drugs. They reside in lipid bilayers, restricting their endogenous activity to a relatively specialized biochemical environment. Without a reference phenotype, the application of systematic screens to profile candidate membrane proteins is not immediately possible. Bioinformatics has begun to show its effectiveness in focusing the functional characterization of orphan proteins of a particular functional class, such as channels or receptors. Here we discuss integration of experimental and bioinformatics approaches for characterizing the orphan membrane proteome. By analyzing the human genome, a landscape reference for the human transmembrane genome is provided. PMID:24241348

  4. Effect of pH on the structure and drug release profiles of layer-by-layer assembled films containing polyelectrolyte, micelles, and graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Uiyoung; Seo, Younghye; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    Layer by layer (lbl) assembled multilayer thin films are used in drug delivery systems with attractive advantages such as unlimited selection of building blocks and free modification of the film structure. In this paper, we report the fundamental properties of lbl films constructed from different substances such as PS-b-PAA amphiphilic block copolymer micelles (BCM) as nano-sized drug vehicles, 2D-shaped graphene oxide (GO), and branched polyethylenimine (bPEI). These films were fabricated by successive lbl assembly as a result of electrostatic interactions between the carboxyl group of BCM and amine group of functionalized GO or bPEI under various pH conditions. We also compared the thickness, roughness, morphology and degree of adsorption of the (bPEI/BCM) films to those in the (GO/BCM) films. The results showed significant difference because of the distinct pH dependence of each material. In addition, drug release rates of the GO/BCM film were more rapid those of the (bPEI/BCM) film in pH 7.4 and pH 2 PBS buffer solutions. In (bPEI/BCM/GO/BCM) film, the inserted GO layers into bPEI/BCM multilayer induced rapid drug release. We believe that these materials & pH dependent film properties allow developments in the control of coating techniques for biological and biomedical applications. PMID:27052827

  5. Transcriptome Profile of the Asian Giant Hornet (Vespa mandarinia) Using Illumina HiSeq 4000 Sequencing: De Novo Assembly, Functional Annotation, and Discovery of SSR Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Park, So Young; Kang, Se Won; Hwang, Hee-Ju; Wang, Tae Hun; Park, Eun Bi; Chung, Jong Min; Song, Dae Kwon; Kim, Changmu; Kim, Soonok; Lee, Jae Bong; Jeong, Heon Cheon; Park, Hong Seog; Han, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yong Seok

    2016-01-01

    Vespa mandarinia found in the forests of East Asia, including Korea, occupies the highest rank in the arthropod food web within its geographical range. It serves as a source of nutrition in the form of Vespa amino acid mixture and is listed as a threatened species, although no conservation measures have been implemented. Here, we performed de novo assembly of the V. mandarinia transcriptome by Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing. Over 60 million raw reads and 59,184,811 clean reads were obtained. After assembly, a total of 66,837 unigenes were clustered, 40,887, 44,455, and 22,390 of which showed homologous matches against the PANM, Unigene, and KOG databases, respectively. A total of 15,675 unigenes were assigned to Gene Ontology terms, and 5,132 unigenes were mapped to 115 KEGG pathways. The zinc finger domain (C2H2-like), serine/threonine/dual specificity protein kinase domain, and RNA recognition motif domain were among the top InterProScan domains predicted for V. mandarinia sequences. Among the unigenes, we identified 534,922 cDNA simple sequence repeats as potential markers. This is the first transcriptomic analysis of the wasp V. mandarinia using Illumina HiSeq 4000. The obtained datasets should promote the search for new genes to understand the physiological attributes of this wasp. PMID:26881195

  6. Transcriptome Profile of the Asian Giant Hornet (Vespa mandarinia Using Illumina HiSeq 4000 Sequencing: De Novo Assembly, Functional Annotation, and Discovery of SSR Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhusan Patnaik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vespa mandarinia found in the forests of East Asia, including Korea, occupies the highest rank in the arthropod food web within its geographical range. It serves as a source of nutrition in the form of Vespa amino acid mixture and is listed as a threatened species, although no conservation measures have been implemented. Here, we performed de novo assembly of the V. mandarinia transcriptome by Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing. Over 60 million raw reads and 59,184,811 clean reads were obtained. After assembly, a total of 66,837 unigenes were clustered, 40,887, 44,455, and 22,390 of which showed homologous matches against the PANM, Unigene, and KOG databases, respectively. A total of 15,675 unigenes were assigned to Gene Ontology terms, and 5,132 unigenes were mapped to 115 KEGG pathways. The zinc finger domain (C2H2-like, serine/threonine/dual specificity protein kinase domain, and RNA recognition motif domain were among the top InterProScan domains predicted for V. mandarinia sequences. Among the unigenes, we identified 534,922 cDNA simple sequence repeats as potential markers. This is the first transcriptomic analysis of the wasp V. mandarinia using Illumina HiSeq 4000. The obtained datasets should promote the search for new genes to understand the physiological attributes of this wasp.

  7. Effect of pH on the structure and drug release profiles of layer-by-layer assembled films containing polyelectrolyte, micelles, and graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Uiyoung; Seo, Younghye; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-04-01

    Layer by layer (lbl) assembled multilayer thin films are used in drug delivery systems with attractive advantages such as unlimited selection of building blocks and free modification of the film structure. In this paper, we report the fundamental properties of lbl films constructed from different substances such as PS-b-PAA amphiphilic block copolymer micelles (BCM) as nano-sized drug vehicles, 2D-shaped graphene oxide (GO), and branched polyethylenimine (bPEI). These films were fabricated by successive lbl assembly as a result of electrostatic interactions between the carboxyl group of BCM and amine group of functionalized GO or bPEI under various pH conditions. We also compared the thickness, roughness, morphology and degree of adsorption of the (bPEI/BCM) films to those in the (GO/BCM) films. The results showed significant difference because of the distinct pH dependence of each material. In addition, drug release rates of the GO/BCM film were more rapid those of the (bPEI/BCM) film in pH 7.4 and pH 2 PBS buffer solutions. In (bPEI/BCM/GO/BCM) film, the inserted GO layers into bPEI/BCM multilayer induced rapid drug release. We believe that these materials & pH dependent film properties allow developments in the control of coating techniques for biological and biomedical applications.

  8. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as $\\alpha$-helices and $\\beta$-sheets have different structural rigidity. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations in thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semi-flexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional tr...

  9. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G p...

  10. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/.

  11. A transmembrane inner nuclear membrane protein in the mitotic spindle

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Ricardo; Gudise, Santhosh; Larsson, Veronica; Hallberg, Einar

    2010-01-01

    We have recently characterized a novel transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane of mammalian cells. The protein has two very interesting features. First, despite being an integral membrane protein it is able to concentrate in the membranes colocalizing with the mitotic spindle in metaphase and anaphase. Hence, the protein was named Samp1, Spindle associated membrane protein 1. Secondly, it displays a functional connection to centrosomes. This article discusses various aspects of Sa...

  12. Surfactantlipid biosynthesis: Regulation of transmembrane transport of palmitate

    OpenAIRE

    Guthmann, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Considering the mechanisms by which antenatal maturation of lung can be induced, the role of long chain fatty acids as precursors of surfactant lipid synthesis has not been thoroughly investigated. To specifically increase surfactant synthesis during the fetal and/or neonatal period we studied the regulation of de novo phosphatidyl synthesis in type II pneumocytes. First, we characterised the transmembrane transport of palmitate, a long chain fatty acid prevalent in surfactant lipids, with...

  13. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Eric N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8. The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are

  14. EASAL: Efficient Atlasing, Analysis and Search of Molecular Assembly Landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Sitharam, Meera; Pence, James; Peters, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the structure of assembly configuration spaces, the EASAL software combines classical concepts, such as stratifications of semialgebraic sets, with recent algorithms for efficiently realizing geometric constraint systems, and theoretical advances concerning convex parametrization: in contrast to folding configuration spaces, most regions of assembly and packing configurations admit a convex parametrization. This allows for a novel, efficient and intuitive representation of configuration spaces so that the corresponding atlas can be efficiently generated and sampled. This paper describes the approach, theory, structure and algorithms underlying EASAL and outlines its use for generating atlases of dimeric assemblies of the AAV2 coat protein, and alpha helix packing in transmembrane proteins.

  15. High constitutive activity of a virus-encoded seven transmembrane receptor in the absence of the conserved DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) in transmembrane helix 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N; Schwartz, Thue W

    2005-01-01

    The highly conserved Arg in the so-called DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) at the intracellular end of transmembrane helix 3 is in general considered as an essential residue for G protein coupling in rhodopsin-like seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors. In the open reading frame 74 (ORF74) receptor encoded by...

  16. De novo assembly and analysis of tissue-specific transcriptomes revealed the tissue-specific genes and profile of immunity from Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yadong; Chang, Yaqing; Wang, Xiuli; Qiu, Xuemei; Liu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Strongylocentrotus intermedius is an important marine species in north China and Japan. Recent years, diseases are threating the sea urchin aquaculture industry seriously. To provide a genetic resource for S. intermedius as well as overview the immune-related genes of S. intermedius, we performed transcriptome sequencing of three cDNA libraries representing three tissues, coelomocytes, gut and peristomial membrane respectively. In total 138,421 contigs were assembled from all sequencing data. 96,764 contigs were annotated according to bioinformatics databases, including NT, nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG. 49,336 Contigs were annotated as CDS. In this study, we obtained 24,778 gene families from S. intermedius transcriptome. The gene expression analysis revealed that more genes were expressed in gut, more high expression level genes in coelomocytes when compared with other tissues. Specific expressed contigs in coelomocytes, gut, and peristomial membrane were 546, 1136, and 1012 respectively. Pathway analysis suggested 25, 17 and 36 potential specifically pathways may specific progressed in peristomial membrane, gut and coelomocytes respectively. Similarities and differences between S. intermedius and other echinoderms were analyzed. S. intermedius was more homology to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus than others sea urchin. Of 24,778 genes, 1074 genes are immune-related, immune genes were expressed with a higher level in coelomocytes than other tissues. Complement system may be the most important immune system in sea urchin. We also identified 2438 SSRs and 16,236 SNPs for S. intermedius. These results provide a transcriptome resource and foundation to study molecular mechanisms of sea urchin immune system. PMID:26253994

  17. SDS-facilitated in vitro formation of a transmembrane B-type cytochrome is mediated by changes in local pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, M.; Schneider, D.; Prodöhl, A.;

    2011-01-01

    The folding and stabilization of a-helical transmembrane proteins are still not well understood. Following cofactor binding to a membrane protein provides a convenient method to monitor the formation of appropriate native structures. We have analyzed the assembly and stability of the transmembrane...... dissociation. Surprisingly, absorption spectroscopy reveals that heme binding and cytochrome formation at pH 8.0 are optimal at intermediate SDS concentrations. Stopped-flow kinetics revealed that genuine conformational changes are involved in heme binding at these SDS concentrations. GPS (Global Protein...... potential of SDS lowers the local pH sufficiently to restore efficient heme binding, provided the amount of SDS needed for this does not denature the protein. Accordingly, the higher the pH value above 6-7, the more SDS is needed to improve heme binding, and this competes with the inherent tendency of SDS...

  18. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Khoshnood, Atefeh; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for the majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as α -helices and β -sheets have different structural rigidities. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations under thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch, which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semiflexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters, while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional triangular structure, we calculate the lipid density around protein clusters and find that the difference in lipid distribution around rigid and semiflexible proteins determines the one- or two-dimensional nature of aggregates. It is found that lipids move faster around semiflexible proteins than rigid ones. The aggregation mechanism suggested in this paper can be tested by current state-of-the-art experimental facilities.

  19. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  20. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  1. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine C. Klinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN.

  2. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Stine C; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer's disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  3. Transmembrane proteins--Mining the cattle tick transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Sabine A; Stutzer, Christian; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Managing the spread and load of pathogen-transmitting ticks is an important task worldwide. The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, not only impacts the economy through losses in dairy and meat production, but also raises concerns for human health in regards to the potential of certain transmitted pathogens becoming zoonotic. However, novel strategies to control R. microplus are hindered by lack of understanding tick biology and the discovery of suitable vaccine or acaricide targets. The importance of transmembrane proteins as vaccine targets are well known, as is the case in tick vaccines with Bm86 as antigen. In this study, we describe the localization and functional annotation of 878 putative transmembrane proteins. Thirty proteins could be confirmed in the R. microplus gut using LC-MS/MS analysis and their roles in tick biology are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, 19 targets have not been reported before in any proteomics study in various tick species and the possibility of using the identified proteins as targets for tick control are discussed. Although tissue expression of identified putative proteins through expansive proteomics is necessary, this study demonstrates the possibility of using bioinformatics for the identification of targets for further evaluation in tick control strategies. PMID:26096851

  4. Structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Morales

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Mutations in the CFTR gene may result in a defective processing of its protein and alter the function and regulation of this channel. Mutations are associated with different symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bile duct obstruction, infertility in males, high sweat Cl-, intestinal obstruction, nasal polyp formation, chronic sinusitis, mucus dehydration, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus lung infection, responsible for 90% of the mortality of CF patients. The gene responsible for the cellular defect in CF was cloned in 1989 and its protein product CFTR is activated by an increase of intracellular cAMP. The CFTR contains two membrane domains, each with six transmembrane domain segments, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, and a cytoplasmic domain. In this review we discuss the studies that have correlated the role of each CFTR domain in the protein function as a chloride channel and as a regulator of the outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs.

  5. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  6. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  7. v-SNARE transmembrane domains function as catalysts for vesicle fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Makke, Mazen; Schindeldecker, Barbara; Schwarz, Yvonne; Shaaban, Ahmed; Sharma, Satyan; Böckmann, Rainer A; Lindau, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is mediated by an assembly of SNARE proteins between opposing membranes, but it is unknown whether transmembrane domains (TMDs) of SNARE proteins serve mechanistic functions that go beyond passive anchoring of the force-generating SNAREpin to the fusing membranes. Here, we show that conformational flexibility of synaptobrevin-2 TMD is essential for efficient Ca2+-triggered exocytosis and actively promotes membrane fusion as well as fusion pore expansion. Specifically, the introduction of helix-stabilizing leucine residues within the TMD region spanning the vesicle’s outer leaflet strongly impairs exocytosis and decelerates fusion pore dilation. In contrast, increasing the number of helix-destabilizing, ß-branched valine or isoleucine residues within the TMD restores normal secretion but accelerates fusion pore expansion beyond the rate found for the wildtype protein. These observations provide evidence that the synaptobrevin-2 TMD catalyzes the fusion process by its structural flexibility, actively setting the pace of fusion pore expansion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17571.001 PMID:27343350

  8. Effects of La3+ on H+ Transmembrane Gradient and Membrane Potential in Rice Seedling Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海雷; 张春光; 赵中秋; 马建华; 李利

    2002-01-01

    The effects of LaCl3 on membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient for rice (Oryza sativa) seedling roots were studied. Highly purified plasma membrane was isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning method. Both the gradient of transmembrane proton and membrane potential were stimulated by certain low concentration of LaCl3 and depressed by high concentration of LaCl3. The optimal concentration of La3+ is around 40~60 μmolL-1 for transmembrane proton gradient and membrane potential. It shows that La3+ can influence the generations and maintenances of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in rice seedling roots.

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve the thermal and mechanical safety of fuel rods and structural components by making the local power coefficient of jointed fuel rods greater than that of other fuel rods in a fuel assembly. Constitution: In a fuel assembly comprising a plurality of fuel rods bundled by a spacer and held at the upper and the lower positions with tie plates for insertion into a channel, the degree of enrichment of uranium 235 for uranium dioxide fuel pellets charged in jointed fuel rods is adjusted such that the local power coefficient of the jointed fuel rods is made greater than that of the other fuel rods. In the case if the upper tie plate is moved upwardly by the extension of the jointed fuel rods, other fuel rods axially free from the upper tie plate receives no tension, whereby the safety of the fuel assembly can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Glycosylation and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Mary Catherine

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR has been known for the past 11 years to be a membrane glycoprotein with chloride channel activity. Only recently has the glycosylation of CFTR been examined in detail, by O'Riordan et al in Glycobiology. Using cells that overexpress wild-type (wtCFTR, the presence of polylactosamine was noted on the fully glycosylated form of CFTR. In the present commentary the results of that work are discussed in relation to the glycosylation phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF, and the cellular localization and processing of ΔF508 CFTR. The significance of the glycosylation will be known when endogenous CFTR from primary human tissue is examined.

  11. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  12. Synergistic transmembrane alignment of the antimicrobial heterodimer PGLa/magainin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremouilhac, Pierre; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-10-27

    The antimicrobial activity of amphipathic alpha-helical peptides is usually attributed to the formation of pores in bacterial membranes, but direct structural information about such a membrane-bound state is sparse. Solid state (2)H-NMR has previously shown that the antimicrobial peptide PGLa undergoes a concentration-dependent realignment from a surface-bound S-state to a tilted T-state. The corresponding change in helix tilt angle from 98 to 125 degrees was interpreted as the formation of PGLa/magainin heterodimers residing on the bilayer surface. Under no conditions so far, has an upright membrane-inserted I-state been observed in which a transmembrane helix alignment would be expected. Here, we have demonstrated that PGLa is able to assume such an I-state in a 1:1 mixture with magainin 2 at a peptide-to-lipid ratio as low as 1:100 in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol model membranes. This (2)H-NMR analysis is based on seven orientational constraints from Ala-3,3,3-d(3) substituted in a non-perturbing manner for four native Ala residues as well as two Ile and one Gly. The observed helix tilt of 158 degrees is rationalized by the formation of heterodimers. This structurally synergistic effect between the two related peptides from the skin of Xenopus laevis correlates very well with their known functional synergistic mode of action. To our knowledge, this example of PGLa is the first case where an alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide is directly shown to assume a transmembrane state that is compatible with the postulated toroidal wormhole pore structure. PMID:16877761

  13. Transmembrane protein topology prediction using support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane (TM proteins are involved in a wide range of important biological processes such as cell signaling, transport of membrane-impermeable molecules, cell-cell communication, cell recognition and cell adhesion. Many are also prime drug targets, and it has been estimated that more than half of all drugs currently on the market target membrane proteins. However, due to the experimental difficulties involved in obtaining high quality crystals, this class of protein is severely under-represented in structural databases. In the absence of structural data, sequence-based prediction methods allow TM protein topology to be investigated. Results We present a support vector machine-based (SVM TM protein topology predictor that integrates both signal peptide and re-entrant helix prediction, benchmarked with full cross-validation on a novel data set of 131 sequences with known crystal structures. The method achieves topology prediction accuracy of 89%, while signal peptides and re-entrant helices are predicted with 93% and 44% accuracy respectively. An additional SVM trained to discriminate between globular and TM proteins detected zero false positives, with a low false negative rate of 0.4%. We present the results of applying these tools to a number of complete genomes. Source code, data sets and a web server are freely available from http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/psipred/. Conclusion The high accuracy of TM topology prediction which includes detection of both signal peptides and re-entrant helices, combined with the ability to effectively discriminate between TM and globular proteins, make this method ideally suited to whole genome annotation of alpha-helical transmembrane proteins.

  14. Self assembly of peptides near or within membranes using coarse grained MD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coarse grain modeling has recently emerged as an alternative to classical atomistic simulations in the study of spontaneous self assembly and structural organization of complex molecular systems. For surfactant and lipid systems, it was shown to allow, under appropriate conditions, in-silico self assembly of a variety of architectures. Recently, this approach has been extended to peptides for which force fields allowing self assembly of mixed peptides-lipid systems were proposed. Here we introduce elements of a coarse grained force field that accurately describe self assembly of hydrophobic cyclic peptides [Trp-Leu]4 and their reorganization within lipid membranes to form transmembrane channels in agreement with experiments. Extension to hydrophobic helical transmembrane, and amphipatic helical antimicrobial peptides show that the model is robust enough to constitute a building block for more complete and appropriate force field describing peptide interactions with membranes.

  15. THE COMBINATION PREDICTION OF TRANSMEMBRANE REGIONS BASED ON DEMPSTER-SHAFER THEORY OF EVIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Xinyang; Xu Peida; Deng Yong

    2012-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins are some special and important proteins in cells.Because of their importance and specificity,the prediction of the transmembrane regions has very important theoretical and practical significance.At present,the prediction methods are mainly based on the physicochemical property and statistic analysis of amino acids.However,these methods are suitable for some environments but inapplicable for other environments.In this paper,the multi-sources information fusion theory has been introduced to predict the transmembrane regions.The proposed method is test on a data set of transmembrane proteins.The results show that the proposed method has the ability of predicting the transmembrane regions as a good performance and powerful tool.

  16. Mechanisms of YidC-mediated Insertion and Assembly of Multimeric Membrane Protein Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kol, Stefan; Nouwen, Nico; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The YidC protein fulfills a dual and essential role in the assembly of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli. Besides interacting with transmembrane segments of newly synthesized membrane proteins that insert into the membrane via the SecYEG complex, YidC also functions as an independent membrane protein insertase and assists in membrane protein folding. Here, we discuss the mechanisms of YidC substrate recognition and membrane insertion with emphasis on its role in the assembly of mult...

  17. Cell-free synthesis and assembly of connexins into functional gap junction membrane channels.

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, M M; Buehler, L K; Kumar, N.M.; Gilula, N B

    1997-01-01

    Several different gap junction channel subunit isotypes, known as connexins, were synthesized in a cell-free translation system supplemented with microsomal membranes to study the mechanisms involved in gap junction channel assembly. Previous results indicated that the connexins were synthesized as membrane proteins with their relevant transmembrane topology. An integrated biochemical and biophysical analysis indicated that the connexins assembled specifically with other connexin subunits. No...

  18. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  19. Characterisation of the salmon cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein for structural studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi L. Pollock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR is a chloride channel highly expressed in the gills of Salmo salar, with a role in osmoregulation. It shares 60% identity with the human CFTR channel, mutations to which can cause the common genetic disorder cystic fibrosis CF. The expression and localisation of salmon CFTR have been investigated, but the isolated protein has not been extensively characterised. Here we present a protocol for the purification of recombinant salmon CFTR, along with biophysical and structural characterisation of the purified protein. Salmon CFTR was overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, solubilised in the detergent LPG-14 and chromatographically purified by nickel-affinity and size-exclusion chromatography methods. Prior to size-exclusion chromatography samples of salmon CFTR had low purity, and contained large quantities of aggregated protein. Compared to size-exclusion chromatography profiles of other orthologues of CFTR, which had less evidence of aggregation, salmon CFTR appeared to have lower intrinsic stability than human and platypus CFTR. Nonetheless, repeated size-exclusion chromatography allowed monodisperse salmon CFTR to be isolated, and multi-angle light scattering was used to determine its oligomeric state. The monodispersity of the sample and its oligomeric state were confirmed using cryo-electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. These data were also processed to calculate a low-resolution structure of the salmon CFTR, which showed similar architecture to other ATP-binding cassette proteins.

  20. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedoldi, Sara; Paterson, Jennifer C; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Natkunam, Yasodha; Rüdiger, Thomas; Angelisova, Pavla; Du, Ming Q; Roberton, Helen; Roncador, Giovanna; Sanchez, Lydia; Pozzobon, Michela; Masir, Noraidah; Barry, Richard; Pileri, Stefano; Mason, David Y; Marafioti, Teresa; Horejsí, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (of which 7 have been identified so far) are involved in receptor signaling in immune cells. They have only a short extracellular region, with most of the molecule comprising a substantial intracytoplasmic region carrying multiple tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by Src- or Syk-family kinases. In this paper, we report an immunohistologic study of 6 of these molecules in normal and neoplastic human tissue sections and show that they are restricted to subpopulations of lymphoid cells, being present in either T cells (LAT, LIME, and TRIM), B cells (NTAL), or subsets of both cell types (PAG and SIT). Their expression in neoplastic lymphoid cells broadly reflects that of normal lymphoid tissue, including the positivity of plasma cells and myeloma/plasmacytoma for LIME, NTAL, PAG, and SIT. However, this study also revealed some reactions that may be of diagnostic/prognostic value. For example, lymphocytic lymphoma and mantle-cell lymphoma showed similar profiles but differed clearly from follicle-center lymphoma, whereas PAG tended to be selectively expressed in germinal center-derived subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These molecules represent a potentially important addition to the panel of immunophenotypic markers detectable in routine biopsies that can be used in hematopathologic studies. PMID:16160011

  1. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly is composed of a fuel bundle surrounded by a channel box. The fuel bundle comprises a large number of fuel rods and a water rod secured to upper and lower tie plate by way of a plurality of fuel spacers. Grooves (libretti) are formed in the direction along the flowing direction of coolants to at least one of the surface of the fuel rods, the inner surface of the channel box, the surface of the water rod and spacer constituting components. In this case, the lateral width of the libretto in the flowing direction is determined as the minimum thickness of the bottom layer of a layered flow determined by a coolant flow rate. With such a constitution, abrasion resistance relative to coolants is reduced to reduce the pressure loss of fuel assemblies. (I.N.)

  2. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  3. NMR studies of transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Electron transport systems exist in the plasma membranes of all cells. These systems appear to play a role in cell growth and proliferation, intracellular signalling, hormone responses, apoptotic events, cell defence and perhaps most importantly they enable the cell to respond to changes in the redox state of both the intra- and extracellular environments. Previously, 13C NMR has been used to study transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes, specifically the reduction of extracellular 13C-ferricyanide. NMR is a particularly useful tool for studying such systems as changes in the metabolic state of the cell can be observed concomitantly with extracellular reductase activity. We investigated the oxidation of extracellular NADH by human erythrocytes using 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Recent results for glucose-starved human erythrocytes indicate that, under these conditions, extracellular NADH can be oxidised at the plasma membrane with the electron transfer across the membrane resulting in reduction of intracellular NAD+. The activity is inhibited by known trans-plasma membrane electron transport inhibitors (capsaicin and atebrin) and is unaffected by inhibition of the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter. These results suggest that electron import from extracellular NADH allows the cell to re-establish a reducing environment after the normal redox balance is disturbed

  4. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Rat Ovary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei JIN; Ruiling TANG

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The protein expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, in ovarian stimulated premature female rat ovary during a cycle of follicle development and corpus luteum formation was investigated. Animals were injected with 10 U pregnant Mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and subsequently 10U hCG 48h later. Time-dependent immunohistochemistry and Western blotting experiments were performed before and 24, 48, 72h after hCG treatment. The immnnohistochemistry revealed that administration of PMSG stimulated the CFTR expression in theeal cell layer and granulosa cell layer of mature follicles 48 h post injection, coincident with the PMSG-induced peak in follicular estradiol. However, the expression of CFTR in the granuiose lutein cell layer and theeal lutein cell layer was time-dependently reduced following hCG injection, in accordance with the gradually increased progestogen level during luteum corpus formation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that rat ovarian tissue expressed the special CFTR band at 170kD. It is concluded that cAMP-dependent Cl- channels are involved in regulation of follicle development and luteum formation.

  5. Role of GxxxG Motifs in Transmembrane Domain Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teese, Mark G; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-08-25

    Transmembrane (TM) helices of integral membrane proteins can facilitate strong and specific noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis and structural analyses have revealed numerous examples in which the interaction between TM helices of single-pass membrane proteins is dependent on a GxxxG or (small)xxx(small) motif. It is therefore tempting to use the presence of these simple motifs as an indicator of TM helix interactions. In this Current Topic review, we point out that these motifs are quite common, with more than 50% of single-pass TM domains containing a (small)xxx(small) motif. However, the actual interaction strength of motif-containing helices depends strongly on sequence context and membrane properties. In addition, recent studies have revealed several GxxxG-containing TM domains that interact via alternative interfaces involving hydrophobic, polar, aromatic, or even ionizable residues that do not form recognizable motifs. In multipass membrane proteins, GxxxG motifs can be important for protein folding, and not just oligomerization. Our current knowledge thus suggests that the presence of a GxxxG motif alone is a weak predictor of protein dimerization in the membrane. PMID:26244771

  6. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  7. Membrane interaction and structure of the transmembrane domain of influenza hemagglutinin and its fusion peptide complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chi-Hui

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the organization and interaction with the fusion domain (or fusion peptide, FP of the transmembrane domain (TMD of influenza virus envelope glycoprotein for its role in membrane fusion which is also essential in the cellular trafficking of biomolecules and sperm-egg fusion. Results The fluorescence and gel electrophoresis experiments revealed a tight self-assembly of TMD in the model membrane. A weak but non-random interaction between TMD and FP in the membrane was found. In the complex, the central TMD oligomer was packed by FP in an antiparallel fashion. FP insertion into the membrane was altered by binding to TMD. An infrared study exhibited an enhanced membrane perturbation by the complex formation. A model was built to illustrate the role of TMD in the late stages of influenza virus-mediated membrane fusion reaction. Conclusion The TMD oligomer anchors the fusion protein in the membrane with minimal destabilization to the membrane. Upon associating with FP, the complex exerts a synergistic effect on the membrane perturbation. This effect is likely to contribute to the complete membrane fusion during the late phase of fusion protein-induced fusion cascade. The results presented in the work characterize the nature of the interaction of TMD with the membrane and TMD in a complex with FP in the steps leading to pore initiation and dilation during virus-induced fusion. Our data and proposed fusion model highlight the key role of TMD-FP interaction and have implications on the fusion reaction mediated by other type I viral fusion proteins. Understanding the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion may assist in the design of anti-viral drugs.

  8. Identification of transmembrane protein 134 as a novel LMP1-binding protein by using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and an enhanced retroviral mutagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaty, Pooja; Emery, Amanda; Holthusen, Kirsten; Everly, David N

    2012-10-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus induces constitutive signaling in infected cells. LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization of LMP1 via its transmembrane domain, localization to lipid rafts in the membrane, and association of the LMP1 cytoplasmic domain to adaptor proteins, such as the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs). Protein complementation is a novel technique to examine protein-protein interaction through the assembly of functional fluorescent proteins or enzymes from inactive fragments. A previous study in our lab demonstrated the use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) to study the assembly of the LMP1 signaling complexes within the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. In the present study, LMP1 was used as bait in a genome-wide BiFC screen with an enhanced retroviral mutagen to identify new LMP1-binding proteins. Our screen identified a novel LMP1-binding protein, transmembrane protein 134 (Tmem134). Tmem134 is a candidate oncogene that is amplified in breast cancer cell lines. Binding, colocalization, and cofractionation between LMP1 and Tmem134 were confirmed. Finally, Tmem134 affected LMP1-induced NF-κB induction. Together, these data suggest that BiFC is a unique and novel platform to identify proteins recruited to the LMP1-signaling complex. PMID:22855487

  9. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex

  10. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  11. Heater assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrical resistance heater, installed in the H1 borehole, is used to thermally perturb the rock mass through a controlled heating and cooling cycle. Heater power levels are controlled by a Variac power transformer and are measured by wattmeters. Temperatures are measured by thermocouples on the borehole wall and on the heater assembly. Power and temperature values are recorded by the DAS described in Chapter 12. The heater assembly consists of a 3.55-m (11.6-ft) long by 20.3-cm (8-in.) O.D., Type 304 stainless steel pipe, containing a tubular hairpin heating element. The element has a heated length of 3 m (9.84 ft). The power rating of the element is 10 kW; however, we plan to operate the unit at a maximum power of only 3 kW. The heater is positioned with its midpoint directly below the axis of the P2 borehole, as shown in the borehole configuration diagram. This heater midpoint position corresponds to a distance of approximately 8.5 m (27.9 ft) from the H1 borehole collar. A schematic of the heater assembly in the borehole is shown. The distance from the borehole collar to the closest point on the assembly (the front end) is 6.5 m (21.3 ft). A high-temperature inflatable packer, used to seal the borehole for moisture collection, is positioned 50 cm (19.7 in.) ahead of the heater front end. The heater is supported and centralized within the borehole by two skids, fabricated from 25-mm (1-in.) O.D. stainless steel pipe. Thermocouples are installed at a number of locations in the H1 borehole. Four thermocouples that are attached to the heater skin monitor temperatures on the outer surface of the can, while three thermocouples that are held in place by rock sections monitor borehole wall temperatures beneath the heater. Temperatures are also monitored at the heater terminal and on the packer hardware

  12. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies the i...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...

  13. Profiling under UNIX by patching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Matt

    1986-01-01

    Profiling under UNIX is done by inserting counters into programs either before or during the compilation or assembly phases. A fourth type of profiling involves monitoring the execution of a program, and gathering relevant statistics during the run. This method and an implementation of this method are examined, and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  14. Chemical synthesis of transmembrane peptide and its application for research on the transmembrane-juxtamembrane region of membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi

    2016-11-01

    Membrane proteins possess one or more hydrophobic regions that span the membrane and interact with the lipids that constitute the membrane. The interactions between the transmembrane (TM) region and lipids affect the structure and function of these membrane proteins. Molecular characterization of synthetic TM peptides in lipid bilayers helps to understand how the TM region participates in the formation of the structure and in the function of membrane proteins. The use of synthetic peptides enables site-specific labeling and modification and allows for designing of an artificial TM sequence. Research involving such samples has resulted in significant increase in the knowledge of the mechanisms that govern membrane biology. In this review, the chemical synthesis of TM peptides has been discussed. The preparation of synthetic TM peptides is still not trivial; however, the accumulated knowledge summarized here should provide a basis for preparing samples for spectroscopic analyses. The application of synthetic TM peptides for gaining insights into the mechanism of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has also been discussed. RTK is a single TM protein and is one of the difficult targets in structural biology as crystallization of the full-length receptor has not been successful. This review describes the structural characterization of the synthetic TM-juxtamembrane sequence and proposes a possible scheme for the structural changes in this region for the activation of ErbBs, the epidermal growth factor receptor family. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 613-621, 2016. PMID:26573237

  15. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  16. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  17. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section of a fuel assembly is divided to a first region containing corner portions at which channel fasteners are situated and a second region not containing corner portions. The average enrichment degree of plutonium in the first region is decreased than that of the second region, and the number of fuel rods containing burnable poisons is increased at the first region than that of the second region. In the first region of the fuel assembly, the effect of moderating neutrons is enhanced since the cross section of a moderator flow channel at the outer side of the channel box is large. Therefore, local power peaking is increased in the first region while it is decreased in the second region that opposes to a narrow gap. The average enrichment degree of plutonium in the first region is decreased and that in the second region is increased by so much, to flatten the power distribution. Then, the reduction of the reactivity worth of gadolinia, as burnable poisons, can be suppressed. (N.H.)

  19. Hatch assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor installation including means defining a fuel handling area and means defining a containment area separated from the fuel handling area and including a refuelling cavity; the improvement comprising: (a) a fuel transfer tube connecting the refuelling cavity with the fuel handling area; the fuel transfer tube having a first end in the fuel handling area and a second end in the refueling cavity; (b) valve means for opening and closing the first end; and (c) a hatch assembly mounted on the second end; the hatch assembly including (1) a hatch ring affixed to the fuel transfer tube at the second end the hatch ring has an integral annular seat surrounded by the hatch ring and defines a hatch opening in the second end of the fuel transfer tube; (2) a hatch cover adapts to be positioned on the annular seat for covering the hatch opening; (3) latching units are supported on the hatch ring about the hatch opening, each latching unit

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, and prevents aging change of flow rate of coolants leaked from a gap between a lower tie plate and a channel box. That is, in the fuel assembly, a great number of fuel rods and a plurality of water rods are bundled by a plurality of spacers, the upper and the lower ends thereof are supported by upper and lower tie plates, and they are contained in a channel box. Plate-like protrusions are disposed rotatably to the lower tie plate at a position corresponding to the lower end of the channel box. In addition, through holes are disposed on the side wall of the lower tie plate. With such a constitution, the protrusions rotate at a connection portion by hydraulic pressure of leaking coolants, and urge the channel box by the other end to control leakage of coolants. Further, since the through holes are disposed on the side wall of the lower tie plate, pressure difference is caused between the upper and the lower surfaces of the plate of the protrusion, to rotate the protrusions at the connection portion, and the other end of the protrusions presses the channel box to obtain the same effect. (I.S.)

  1. Functional characterization of transmembrane adenylyl cyclases from the honeybee brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Sabine; Ehling, Petra; Wachten, Sebastian; Jordan, Nadine; Erber, Joachim; Mujagic, Samir; Baumann, Arnd

    2012-06-01

    The second messenger cAMP has a pivotal role in animals' physiology and behavior. Intracellular concentrations of cAMP are balanced by cAMP-synthesizing adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cAMP-cleaving phosphodiesterases. Knowledge about ACs in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) is rather limited and only an ortholog of the vertebrate AC3 isoform has been functionally characterized, so far. Employing bioinformatics and functional expression we characterized two additional honeybee genes encoding membrane-bound (tm)ACs. The proteins were designated AmAC2t and AmAC8. Unlike the common structure of tmACs, AmAC2t lacks the first transmembrane domain. Despite this unusual topography, AmAC2t-activity could be stimulated by norepinephrine and NKH477 with EC(50s) of 0.07 μM and 3 μM. Both ligands stimulated AmAC8 with EC(50s) of 0.24 μM and 3.1 μM. In brain cryosections, intensive staining of mushroom bodies was observed with specific antibodies against AmAC8, an expression pattern highly reminiscent of the Drosophila rutabaga AC. In a current release of the honeybee genome database we identified three additional tmAC- and one soluble AC-encoding gene. These results suggest that (1) the AC-gene family in honeybees is comparably large as in other species, and (2) based on the restricted expression of AmAC8 in mushroom bodies, this enzyme might serve important functions in honeybee behavior. PMID:22426196

  2. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation. PMID:25896054

  3. Free energy barrier for melittin reorientation from a membrane-bound state to a transmembrane state

    OpenAIRE

    Irudayam, Sheeba J.; Pobandt, Tobias; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in a phospholipid membrane pore formation by melittin antimicrobial peptide is a reorientation of the peptide from a surface into a transmembrane conformation. In this work we perform umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for the reorientation of melittin from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane state and provide a molecular level insight into understanding peptide and lipid properties that influence the existence of the free energ...

  4. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Fluid Bilayers with Transmembrane Proteins: Structural Consequences of the Achondroplasia Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xue; Mihailescu, Mihaela; Hristova, Kalina

    2006-01-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism, is due to a G380R mutation in the transmembrane domain of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) in >97% of the studied cases. While the molecular mechanism of pathology induction is under debate, the structural consequences of the mutation have not been studied. Here we use neutron diffraction to determine the disposition of FGFR3 transmembrane domain in fluid lipid bilayers, and investigate whether the G380R mutation affects the t...

  5. Transmembrane Protein Diffusion in Gel-Supported Dual-Leaflet Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chih-Ying; Hill, Reghan J.

    2014-01-01

    Tools to measure transmembrane-protein diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes have advanced in recent decades, providing a need for predictive theoretical models that account for interleaflet leaflet friction on tracer mobility. Here we address the fully three-dimensional flows driven by a (nonprotruding) transmembrane protein embedded in a dual-leaflet membrane that is supported above and below by soft porous supports (e.g., hydrogel or extracellular matrix), each of which has a prescribed per...

  6. TMRPres2D: high quality visual representation of transmembrane protein models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos, Ioannis C; Liakopoulos, Theodore D; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2004-11-22

    The 'TransMembrane protein Re-Presentation in 2-Dimensions' (TMRPres2D) tool, automates the creation of uniform, two-dimensional, high analysis graphical images/models of alpha-helical or beta-barrel transmembrane proteins. Protein sequence data and structural information may be acquired from public protein knowledge bases, emanate from prediction algorithms, or even be defined by the user. Several important biological and physical sequence attributes can be embedded in the graphical representation. PMID:15201184

  7. Transmembrane Protease Serine 4 Promotes Thyroid Cancer Proliferation via CREB Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Hongyu; Liang, Weiwei; LIU, JUAN; Wei, Guohong; Li, Hai; Xiu, Lingling; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4), one of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs), is elevated in various cancers and is associated with multiple malignant phenotypes. However, the expression pattern and biologic significance of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer and assessed the pro-proliferative role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer.

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor comprises a rectangular parallelopiped channel box and fuel bundles contained in the channel box. The fuel bundle comprises an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate, a plurality of spacers a plurality of fuel rods and a water rod. In each fuel rod, the amount of fission products is reduced at upper and lower end regions of an effective fuel portion than that in other regions of the effective fuel region. In a portion of the fuel rods, fuel pellets containing burnable poisons are disposed at the upper and lower end regions. In addition, the upper and lower portions are constituted with natural uranium. Each of the upper and lower end regions is not greater than 15% of the effective fuel length. Since this can enhance reactivity control effect without worsening fuel economy, the control amount for excess reactivity upon long-term cycle operation can be increased. (I.N.)

  9. Assembly of spikes into coronavirus particles is mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of the spike protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godeke, G J; de Haan, C A; Rossen, J W; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    2000-01-01

    The type I glycoprotein S of coronavirus, trimers of which constitute the typical viral spikes, is assembled into virions through noncovalent interactions with the M protein. Here we demonstrate that incorporation is mediated by the short carboxy-terminal segment comprising the transmembrane and end

  10. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution of a fuel assembly in which short fuel rods vary greatly in the vicinity of a boundary where the distribution of uranium amount is different, the reading value of local power range monitors, having the detectors positioned in the vicinity of the boundary is varied. Then in the present invention, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rod is so made as not approaching with the detection position of the local power range monitor in a reactor core. Further, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rods in a 4 x 4 fuel rod lattice positioned at the corner on the side of the local power range monitor is so made as not approaching the detection position of the local power range monitor. As a result, the change of the neutron flux distribution and power distribution in the vicinity of the position where the detector of the local power range monitor is situated can be extremely reduced. Accordingly, there is no scattering and fluctuation for the reading value by the local power range monitor, to improve the monitoring performance for thermal characteristics in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  11. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reconstruct a BWR type reactor into a high conversion reactor with no substantial changes for the reactor inner structure such as control rod structure. Constitution: The horizontal cross sectional shape of a channel box is reformed into a square configuration and the arrangement of fuel rods is formed as a trigonal lattice-like configuration. As a method of improving the conversion ratio, there is considered to use a dense lattice by narrowing the distance between fuel rods and trigonal lattice arrangement for fuel rod is advantageous therefor. A square shape cross sectional configuration having equal length both in the lateral and longitudinal directions is suitable for the channel box as a guide upon movement of the control rod. Fuel rods can be arranged with no loss by the trigonal lattice configuration, by which it is possible to improve the neutron moderation, increase the reactor core reactivity and conduct effective fuel combustion. In this way, it is possible to attain the object by inserting the follower portion of the control rod at the earier half and extracting the same at the latter half during the operation period in the reactor core comprising fuel assemblies suitable to a high conversion BWR type reactor having average conversion ratio of about 0.8. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rods are arranged in a lattice-like structure by way of a plurality of spacers and the lower ends thereof are fixed to a lower tie plate for assembling a fuel rod bundle. The outer circumference is surrounded by a basket having a plurality of openings and the basket is surrounded by a channel box. The basket is connected to a handle at the upper end and to a lower tie plate at the lower end and, further, defined with a scraper at each of openings. Coolants flown from the lower tie plate to the channel box flow the channels between the channel box and the basket and a fuel rod bundle, uprise while forming a two-phase flow and flow out from the upper end of the channel box. Since no upper tie plate is present, pressure loss of coolants flow is reduced, and liquid membranes of coolants are peeled off by the scraper disposed at the opening of the basket, which contributes to the improvement of the limit power. In addition, fuel rods are inspected and cleaned easily. (N.H.)

  13. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of the present invention is to improve the hydrodynamic stability in the fuel channels of BWR type reactors and effectively utilize the coolant driving power corresponding to the reduction due to pressure loss. That is, in a fuel assembly having usual fuel rods and, in addition, water rods and short fuel rods, the structures of water rods, upper tie plates and the spacers are designed from a hydrodynamic point of view, to reduce the pressure loss. On the other hand, a lattice-like flow channel resistance member is disposed to a lower tie plate. The bundle flow rate is made uniform by the flow channel resistance member, and the pressure loss of the tie plate is increased by the reduction of the pressure loss by the arrangement of the short fuel rod and the reduction of the pressure loss described above. Since this increases the ratio of the single phase stream pressure loss in the total reactor core pressure loss, the hydrodynamic stability in the fuel channel is improved. (I.J.)

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  15. NMR-based approach to measure the free energy of transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineev, Konstantin S; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Usmanova, Dinara R; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the energetic parameters of transmembrane helix-helix interactions is necessary for the establishment of a structure-energy relationship for α-helical membrane domains. A number of techniques have been developed to measure the free energies of dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane α-helices, and all of these have their advantages and drawbacks. In this study we propose a methodology to determine the magnitudes of the free energy of interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent micelles. The suggested approach employs solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the population of the oligomeric states of the transmembrane domains and introduces a new formalism to describe the oligomerization equilibrium, which is based on the assumption that both the dimerization of the transmembrane domains and the dissociation of the dimer can occur only upon the collision of detergent micelles. The technique has three major advantages compared with other existing approaches: it may be used to analyze both weak and relatively strong dimerization/oligomerization processes, it works well for the analysis of complex equilibria, e.g. when monomer, dimer and high-order oligomer populations are simultaneously present in the solution, and it can simultaneously yield both structural and energetic characteristics of the helix-helix interaction under study. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate the oligomerization process of transmembrane domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and allowed the measurement of the free energy of dimerization of both of these objects. In addition the proposed method was able to describe the multi-state oligomerization process of the VEGFR2 transmembrane domain. PMID:24036227

  16. Hkat, a novel nutritionally regulated transmembrane protein in adipose tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Zhang

    2012-01-01

    White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ regulating many aspects of whole body physiology and pathology. Adipogenesis, a process in which premature cells differentiate into adipocytes, is a complex process that includes orchestrated changes in gene expression and cell morphology in response to various nutritional and hormonal stimuli. To profile transcriptome changes in response to nutritional stimulation, we performed RNA-seq on fat in mice treated with either a high-fat diet or fas...

  17. The Size of Activating and Inhibitory Killer Ig-like Receptor Nanoclusters Is Controlled by the Transmembrane Sequence and Affects Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oszmiana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy has revealed that immune cell receptors are organized in nanoscale clusters at cell surfaces and immune synapses. However, mechanisms and functions for this nanoscale organization remain unclear. Here, we used super-resolution microscopy to compare the surface organization of paired killer Ig-like receptors (KIR, KIR2DL1 and KIR2DS1, on human primary natural killer cells and cell lines. Activating KIR2DS1 assembled in clusters two-fold larger than its inhibitory counterpart KIR2DL1. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the size of nanoclusters is controlled by transmembrane amino acid 233, a lysine in KIR2DS1. Super-resolution microscopy also revealed two ways in which the nanoscale clustering of KIR affects signaling. First, KIR2DS1 and DAP12 nanoclusters are juxtaposed in the resting cell state but coalesce upon receptor ligation. Second, quantitative super-resolution microscopy revealed that phosphorylation of the kinase ZAP-70 or phosphatase SHP-1 is favored in larger KIR nanoclusters. Thus, the size of KIR nanoclusters depends on the transmembrane sequence and affects downstream signaling.

  18. Structural basis of typhod: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PilS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.; Saxena, A; Mok, H; Swaminathan, K

    2009-01-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein (PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 A, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  19. Structural basis of typhoid: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PiLS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.M.; Saxena, A.; Mok, H. Y.-K.; Swaminathan, K.

    2009-11-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein ({Delta}PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of {Delta}PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 {angstrom}, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  20. Structural Basis of Typhoid: Salmonella typhi Type IVb pilin (PilS) and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulatory Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.; Saxena, A; Mok, H; Swaminathan, K

    2009-01-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein (PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 A, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  1. Effects of crossflow velocity and transmembrane pressure on microfiltration of oil-in-water emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of oil removal from water using hydrophilic porous membranes. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through the membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of the oil phase. The effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure, which is required for the oil droplet entry into a circular pore of a given surface hydrophilicity, agrees well with analytical predictions based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing crossflow velocity, the shape of the oil droplet is strongly deformed near the pore entrance and the critical pressure of permeation increases. We determined numerically the phase diagram for the droplet rejection, permeation, and breakup depending of the transmembrane pressure and...

  2. Delayed CTD and XBT data assembled and submitted by the Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from 06/08/1979 - 05/25/2010 (NCEI Accession 0065272)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles for the world oceans and submits these data to the Global Temperature and...

  3. Delayed CTD and XBT data assembled and submitted by the Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from 08/04/1924 - 06/26/2006 (NODC Accession 0026420)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles for the world oceans and submits these data to the Global Temperature and...

  4. Re-introduction of transmembrane serine residues reduce the minimum pore diameter of channelrhodopsin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Richards

    Full Text Available Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 is a microbial-type rhodopsin found in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Under physiological conditions, ChR2 is an inwardly rectifying cation channel that permeates a wide range of mono- and divalent cations. Although this protein shares a high sequence homology with other microbial-type rhodopsins, which are ion pumps, ChR2 is an ion channel. A sequence alignment of ChR2 with bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump, reveals that ChR2 lacks specific motifs and residues, such as serine and threonine, known to contribute to non-covalent interactions within transmembrane domains. We hypothesized that reintroduction of the eight transmembrane serine residues present in bacteriorhodopsin, but not in ChR2, will restrict the conformational flexibility and reduce the pore diameter of ChR2. In this work, eight single serine mutations were created at homologous positions in ChR2. Additionally, an endogenous transmembrane serine was replaced with alanine. We measured kinetics, changes in reversal potential, and permeability ratios in different alkali metal solutions using two-electrode voltage clamp. Applying excluded volume theory, we calculated the minimum pore diameter of ChR2 constructs. An analysis of the results from our experiments show that reintroducing serine residues into the transmembrane domain of ChR2 can restrict the minimum pore diameter through inter- and intrahelical hydrogen bonds while the removal of a transmembrane serine results in a larger pore diameter. Therefore, multiple positions along the intracellular side of the transmembrane domains contribute to the cation permeability of ChR2.

  5. Structural and dynamic study of the transmembrane domain of the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhdin, K D; Bocharova, O V; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects people all over the world, regardless of nationality, gender or social status. An adequate study of the disease requires essential understanding of the molecular fundamentals of the pathogenesis. The amyloid β-peptide, which forms amyloid plaques in the brain of people with Alzheimer's disease, is the product of sequential cleavage of a single-span membrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). More than half of the APP mutations found to be associated with familial forms of Alzheimer's disease are located in its transmembrane domain. The pathogenic mutations presumably affect the structural-dynamic properties of the APP transmembrane domain by changing its conformational stability and/or lateral dimerization. In the present study, the structure and dynamics of the recombinant peptide corresponding to the APP fragment, Gln686-Lys726, which comprises the APP transmembrane domain with an adjacent N-terminal juxtamembrane sequence, were determined in the membrane mimetic environment composed of detergent micelles using NMR spectroscopy. The structure obtained in dodecylphosphocholine micelles consists of two α-helices: a short surface-associated juxtamembrane helix (Lys687-Asp694) and a long transmembrane helix (Gly700-Leu723), both connected via a mobile loop region. A minor bend of the transmembrane α-helix is observed near the paired residues Gly708-Gly709. A cholesterol-binding hydrophobic cavity is apparently formed under the loop region, where the juxtamembrane α-helix comes into contact with the membrane surface near the N-terminus of the transmembrane α-helix. PMID:22649674

  6. TMM@: a web application for the analysis of transmembrane helix mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonassen Inge

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the mechanism by which a protein transmits a signal through the cell membrane, an understanding of the flexibility of its transmembrane (TM region is essential. Normal Mode Analysis (NMA has become the method of choice to investigate the slowest motions in macromolecular systems. It has been widely used to study transmembrane channels and pumps. It relies on the hypothesis that the vibrational normal modes having the lowest frequencies (also named soft modes describe the largest movements in a protein and are the ones that are functionally relevant. In particular NMA can be used to study dynamics of TM regions, but no tool making this approach available for non-experts, has been available so far. Results We developed the web-application TMM@ (TransMembrane α-helical Mobility analyzer. It uses NMA to characterize the propensity of transmembrane α-helices to be displaced. Starting from a structure file at the PDB format, the server computes the normal modes of the protein and identifies which helices in the bundle are the most mobile. Each analysis is performed independently from the others and results can be visualized using only a web browser. No additional plug-in or software is required. For users who would like to further analyze the output data with their favourite software, raw results can also be downloaded. Conclusion We built a novel and unique tool, TMM@, to study the mobility of transmembrane α-helices. The tool can be applied to for example membrane transporters and provides biologists studying transmembrane proteins with an approach to investigate which α-helices are likely to undergo the largest displacements, and hence which helices are most likely to be involved in the transportation of molecules in and out of the cell.

  7. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  8. Inlet nozzle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Precechtel, Donald R.; Smith, Bob G.; Knight, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  9. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out...... that both the asymmetric distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids across a membrane and the asymmetric distribution of NaCl and KCl induce nonzero drops in the transmembrane potential. However, these potential drops are opposite in sign. As the PC leaflet faces...

  10. Mapping the Structural Requirements in the CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor Transmembrane Helix II for Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur, Ankur; Samaniego, Patrick; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Abood, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains of the CB1 receptor are important for ligand recognition and signal transduction. We used site-directed mutagenesis to identify the role of two novel and adjacent residues in the transmembrane helix II domain, Ile2.62 and Asp2.63. We investigated the role of the conserved, negatively charged aspartate at position 2.63 in cannabinoid receptor (CB1) function by substituting it with asparagine (D2.63N) and glutamate (D2.63E). In addition, the effe...

  11. Effects of several chinese crude drugs on 45Ca transmembrane influx in vascular smooth muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of several Chinese crude drugs including Crocus sativus, Carthamus tinctorius and Ginkgo biloba on Ca2+ transmembrane influx in rat aorta rings were studied. Resting 45Ca uptake was not markedly altered by these drugs, whereas the 45Ca influxes evoked by norepinephrine (1.2 μmol/L) and KCl (100 mmol/L) in rat aorta rings were significantly inhibited by Crocus and Carthamus in a concentration-dependent manner, not by Ginkgo. The results indicate that extracellular Ca2+ transmembrane influx through receptor-operated Ca2+ channels and potential-dependent Ca2+ channels can be blocked by Crocus and Carthamus

  12. RosettaTMH: a method for membrane protein structure elucidation combining EPR distance restraints with assembly of transmembrane helices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leaver-Fay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins make up approximately one third of all proteins, and they play key roles in a plethora of physiological processes. However, membrane proteins make up less than 2% of experimentally determined structures, despite significant advances in structure determination methods, such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy. One potential alternative means of structure elucidation is to combine computational methods with experimental EPR data. In 2011, Hirst and others introduced RosettaEPR and demonstrated that this approach could be successfully applied to fold soluble proteins. Furthermore, few computational methods for de novo folding of integral membrane proteins have been presented. In this work, we present RosettaTMH, a novel algorithm for structure prediction of helical membrane proteins. A benchmark set of 34 proteins, in which the proteins ranged in size from 91 to 565 residues, was used to compare RosettaTMH to Rosetta’s two existing membrane protein folding protocols: the published RosettaMembrane folding protocol (“MembraneAbinitio” and folding from an extended chain (“ExtendedChain”. When EPR distance restraints are used, RosettaTMH+EPR outperforms ExtendedChain+EPR for 11 proteins, including the largest six proteins tested. RosettaTMH+EPR is capable of achieving native-like folds for 30 of 34 proteins tested, including receptors and transporters. For example, the average RMSD100SSE relative to the crystal structure for rhodopsin was 6.1 ± 0.4 Å and 6.5 ± 0.6 Å for the 449-residue nitric oxide reductase subunit B, where the standard deviation reflects variance in RMSD100SSE values across ten different EPR distance restraint sets. The addition of RosettaTMH and RosettaTMH+EPR to the Rosetta family of de novo folding methods broadens the scope of helical membrane proteins that can be accurately modeled with this software suite.

  13. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  14. Membrane-Anchored Cytochrome P450 1A2-Cytochrome b5 Complex Features an X-Shaped Contact between Antiparallel Transmembrane Helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeřábek, Petr; Florián, Jan; Martínek, Václav

    2016-04-18

    Eukaryotic cytochromes P450 (P450) are membrane-bound enzymes oxidizing a broad spectrum of hydrophobic substrates, including xenobiotics. Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in this process. In particular, the formation of transient complexes of P450 with another protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, cytochrome b5 (cyt b5), dictates catalytic activities of several P450s. To lay a structural foundation for the investigation of these effects, we constructed a model of the membrane-bound full-length human P450 1A2-cyt b5 complex. The model was assembled from several parts using a multiscale modeling approach covering all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD). For soluble P450 1A2-cyt b5 complexes, these simulations yielded three stable binding modes (sAI, sAII, and sB). The membrane-spanning transmembrane domains were reconstituted with the phospholipid bilayer using self-assembly MD. The predicted full-length membrane-bound complexes (mAI and mB) featured a spontaneously formed X-shaped contact between antiparallel transmembrane domains, whereas the mAII mode was found to be unstable in the membrane environment. The mutual position of soluble domains in binding mode mAI was analogous to the sAI complex. Featuring the largest contact area, the least structural flexibility, the shortest electron transfer distance, and the highest number of interprotein salt bridges, mode mAI is the best candidate for the catalytically relevant full-length complex. PMID:26918755

  15. Formation of Raft-Like Assemblies within Clusters of Influenza Hemagglutinin Observed by MD Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Parton, Daniel L.; Tek, Alex; Baaden, Marc; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2013-01-01

    The association of hemagglutinin (HA) with lipid rafts in the plasma membrane is an important feature of the assembly process of influenza virus A. Lipid rafts are thought to be small, fluctuating patches of membrane enriched in saturated phospholipids, sphingolipids, cholesterol and certain types of protein. However, raft-associating transmembrane (TM) proteins generally partition into Ld domains in model membranes, which are enriched in unsaturated lipids and depleted in saturated lipids an...

  16. Burnup monitoring of VVER-440 spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the results of the experiments performed on spent VVER-440 fuel assemblies at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hungary. The fuel assemblies submerged in the service pit were examined by high-resolution gamma spectrometry (HRGS). The assemblies were moved to the front of a collimator tube built in the concrete wall of the pit in the reactor block at the NPP, and lifted down and up under water for scanning by the refueling machine. The HPGe detector was placed behind the collimator in an outside staircase. The measurements involved scanning of the assemblies along their length of all the 6 sides, at 5-12 measurement positions side by side. Axial and azimuthal burnup profiles were taken in this way. Assembly groups for measurements were selected according to their burnup (10–50 GWd/tU) and special positions (e. g. control assembly, neighbour of control assembly). Burnup differences were well observable between assembly sides looking towards the center of the core and opposite directions. Also, burnup profiles were different for control assemblies and normal (working) fuel assemblies. The ratio of the measured activities of Cs-134 and Cs-137 was evaluated by relative efficiency (intrinsic) calibration. Measurement uncertainty is around 3 %. Taking into account irradiation history and cooling time (i. e.the time elapsed since the discharge of the assembly out of the core), the activity ratio Cs-134/Cs-137 shows good correlation with the declared burnup.

  17. Structural assembly demonstration experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment is of an operational variety, designed to assess crew capability in Large Space System (LSS) assembly. The six Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment objectives include: (1) the establishment of a quantitative correlation between LSS neutral buoyancy simulation and on-orbit assembly operations in order to enhance the validity of those assembly simulations; (2) the quantitative study of the capabilities and mechanics of human assembly in an Extravehicular Activity environment; (3) the further corroboration of the LSS Assembly Analysis cost algorithm through the obtainment of hard data base information; (4) the verification of LSS assembly techniques and timeless, as well as the identification of crew imposed loads and assembly aid requirements and concepts; (5) verification of a Launch/Assembly Platform structure concept for other LSS missions; and (6) lastly, to advance thermal control concepts through a flexible heat pipe.

  18. Firearm trigger assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  19. Assembly plans for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assembly of ITER represents an extrapolation of a factor of two or more in size over existing large tokamaks. An assembly plan has been developed based on the ITER Outline Design. This plan was reviewed by technical experts and critical issues were identified. Alternate designs are being developed to address the most serious concerns and to minimize cost and assembly schedule. Because ITER has many characteristics of a full-scale nuclear reactor its assembly has challenges not faced previously by the fusion community. Careful assembly planning and well-designed tooling are required to insure success in the assembly of ITER

  20. Accelerated Profile HMM Searches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R Eddy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs and probabilistic inference methods have made important contributions to the theory of sequence database homology search. However, practical use of profile HMM methods has been hindered by the computational expense of existing software implementations. Here I describe an acceleration heuristic for profile HMMs, the "multiple segment Viterbi" (MSV algorithm. The MSV algorithm computes an optimal sum of multiple ungapped local alignment segments using a striped vector-parallel approach previously described for fast Smith/Waterman alignment. MSV scores follow the same statistical distribution as gapped optimal local alignment scores, allowing rapid evaluation of significance of an MSV score and thus facilitating its use as a heuristic filter. I also describe a 20-fold acceleration of the standard profile HMM Forward/Backward algorithms using a method I call "sparse rescaling". These methods are assembled in a pipeline in which high-scoring MSV hits are passed on for reanalysis with the full HMM Forward/Backward algorithm. This accelerated pipeline is implemented in the freely available HMMER3 software package. Performance benchmarks show that the use of the heuristic MSV filter sacrifices negligible sensitivity compared to unaccelerated profile HMM searches. HMMER3 is substantially more sensitive and 100- to 1000-fold faster than HMMER2. HMMER3 is now about as fast as BLAST for protein searches.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are loca

  2. Order parameters of a transmembrane helix in a fluid Bilayer: case study of a WALP peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.; Rougier, L.; Réat, V.; Jolibois, F.; Saurel, O.; Czaplicki, J.; Killian, J.A.; Milon, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new solid-state NMR-based strategy is established for the precise and efficient analysis of orientation and dynamics of transmembrane peptides in fluid bilayers. For this purpose, several dynamically averaged anisotropic constraints, including 13C and 15N chemical shift anisotropies and 13C-15N di

  3. The trans-membrane potential of biological membranes in computer simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melcr, Josef; Timr, Štěpán; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, Suppl 1 (2015), S170. ISSN 0175-7571. [EBSA European Biophysics Congress /10./. 18.07.2015-22.07.2015, Dresden] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * trans-membrane potential Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. Advantages of combined transmembrane topology and signal peptide prediction--the Phobius web server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    When using conventional transmembrane topology and signal peptide predictors, such as TMHMM and SignalP, there is a substantial overlap between these two types of predictions. Applying these methods to five complete proteomes, we found that 30-65% of all predicted signal peptides and 25-35% of al...

  5. Critical Role of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulation(CFTR)in Female Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiao Chang CHAN

    2003-01-01

    @@ Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, mutations of which are responsible for defective Cl- and/or HCO-3 secretions seen in cystic fibrosis (CF), a common lethal genetic disease affecting most exocrine glands/organs, including the lungs, intestine, pancreas and reproductive tracts of both sexes.

  6. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a...

  7. The transmembrane region is responsible for targeting of adaptor protein LAX into "heavy rafts''

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Otáhal, Pavel; Hořejší, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2012), e36330. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GEMEM/09/E011; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : LAX * transmembrane domain * DRM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  8. Exploiting hydrophobicity for efficient production of transmembrane helices for structure determination by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Steinocher, Helena; Brooks, Andrew J.;

    2015-01-01

    -labeled protein. In this work, we have exploited the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins to develop a simple and efficient production scheme for isotope-labeled single-pass transmembrane domains (TMDs) with or without intrinsically disordered regions. We have evaluated the applicability and limitations...... of single-pass TMDs, which are difficult to solve by other means....

  9. Intact transmembrane isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule are released from the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M; Krog, L; Edvardsen, K;

    1993-01-01

    density-gradient centrifugation it was shown that shed transmembrane NCAM-B was present in fractions of high, as well as low, density, indicating that a fraction of the shed NCAM is associated with minor plasma membrane fragments. Finally, it was shown that isolated soluble NCAM inhibited cell binding to......-s1 and NCAM-s2 and the function of soluble NCAM forms were investigated. It was shown that all three soluble forms could be released from brain membranes with M(r) values identical to the three major membrane-associated forms: the large transmembrane 190,000-M(r) form (NCAM-A), the smaller...... intact soluble form from membranes of cells transfected with this isoform. Thus, NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 probably represent intact released transmembrane NCAM-A and NCAM-B. The soluble transmembrane forms are likely to exist in vivo, as NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 were readily demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid. By...

  10. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tedoldi, S.; Paterson, J.C.; Hansmann, M.-L.; Natkunam, Y.; Rüdiger, T.; Angelisová, Pavla; Du, M.Q.; Roberton, H.; Roncador, G.; Sanchez, L.; Pozzobon, M.; Masir, N.; Barry, R.; Pileri, S.; Mason, D.Y.; Marafioti, T.; Hořejší, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2006), s. 213-221. ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : transmembrane adaptors * PAG * LIME Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.370, year: 2006

  11. The structure of monomeric components of self-assembling CXCR4 antagonists determines the architecture of resulting nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assembling peptides play increasingly important roles in the development of novel materials and drug delivery vehicles. Understanding mechanisms governing the assembly of nanoarchitectures is essential for the generation of peptide-based nanodevices. We find that a cone-shaped derivative of the second transmembrane domain of CXCR4 receptor, x4-2-6 self-assembles into nanospheres, while a related cylindrical peptide, x4-2-9 forms fibrils. Stronger intermolecular interactions in nanospheres than in fibrils result in slow rates of particle disassembly and protection against proteolytic degradation.

  12. Genetic Conservation in gp36 Transmembrane Sequences of Indian HIV Type 2 Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Sushama; Tripathy, Srikanth; Kulkarni, Smita; Chaturbhuj, Devidas; Ghare, Rucha; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Paranjape, Ramesh

    2011-12-01

    HIV-2 group A is predominant in different parts of the world, especially Africa, Portugal, Spain, France, the United Kingdom, the United States, Korea, and India. Among the Asian countries, India accounts for about 95% of all HIV-2 infections. The prevalence of HIV-2 has been reported from various states of India such as Maharashtra, Goa, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal, and Uttar Pradesh. In the present study, we analyzed transmembrane region (gp36) sequences of 10 HIV-2 group A Indian strains, isolated from Indian HIV-2-seropositive individuals. HIV Blast analysis for the 1.0-Kb region of the gp36 transmembrane region has shown that all these sequences belong to HIV-2 group A. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the sequences cluster with HIV-2 group A sequences of Cameroon and Senegal. The epitope found at position 645-656 (YELQKLNSWDVF), previously reported as a broadly neutralizing determinant, was very well conserved in all 10 study sequences. The percentage similarity between Indian and South African HIV-2 group A gp36 sequences was 90% (range 86-100, SD 2.8) and with other nonsubtype A clades was 84% (range 77-100, SD 6.06) indicating overall less variability among the reported HIV-2 sequences. Similarly, the consensus amino acid sequences of the envelope transmembrane region of HIV-1 (gp41) and HIV-2 (gp36) is quite synonymous, indicating 87% similarity; however, limited information is available about the gp36 transmembrane region of the prevalent HIV 2 group A Indian strain. The rate of synonymous substitutions reported in the gp105 region was significantly higher, suggesting lower virulence of HIV-2, which does translate into a lower rate of evolution, while the dN/dS ratio for the gp36 transmembrane region was less than one, indicating its conservation and significance (p<0.05) in structural and functional constraints. PMID:21453135

  13. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  14. Electrochemical Platform for the Detection of Transmembrane Proteins Reconstituted into Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Jan; Zatloukalova, Martina; Geleticova, Jaroslava; Kubala, Martin; Modriansky, Martin; Fekete, Ladislav; Masek, Josef; Hubatka, Frantisek; Turanek, Jaroslav

    2016-04-19

    The development of new methods and strategies for the investigation of membrane proteins is limited by poor solubility of these proteins in an aqueous environment and hindered by a number of other problems linked to the instability of the proteins outside lipid bilayers. Therefore, current research focuses on an analysis of membrane proteins incorporated into model lipid membrane, most frequently liposomes. In this work, we introduce a new electrochemical methodology for the analysis of transmembrane proteins reconstituted into a liposomal system. The proposed analytical approach is based on proteoliposomal sample adsorption on the surface of working electrodes followed by analysis of the anodic and cathodic signals of the reconstituted proteins. It works based on the fact that proteins are electroactive species, in contrast to the lipid components of the membranes under the given experimental conditions. Electroanalytical experiments were performed with two transmembrane proteins; the Na(+)/K(+)ATPase that contains transmembrane as well as large extramembraneous segments and the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1, which is a transmembrane protein essentially lacking extramembraneous segments. Electrochemical analyses of proteoliposomes were compared with analyses of both proteins solubilized with detergents (C12E8 and octyl-PoE) and supported by the following complementary methods: microscopy techniques, protein activity testing, molecular model visualizations, and immunochemical identification of both proteins. The label-free electrochemical platform presented here enables studies of reconstituted transmembrane proteins at the nanomolar level. Our results may contribute to the development of new electrochemical sensors and microarray systems applicable within the field of poorly water-soluble proteins. PMID:26980181

  15. Agents, assemblers, and ANTS: scheduling assembly with market and biological software mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Fejel, Tihamer T.

    2000-06-01

    Nanoscale assemblers will need robust, scalable, flexible, and well-understood mechanisms such as software agents to control them. This paper discusses assemblers and agents, and proposes a taxonomy of their possible interaction. Molecular assembly is seen as a special case of general assembly, subject to many of the same issues, such as the advantages of convergent assembly, and the problem of scheduling. This paper discusses the contract net architecture of ANTS, an agent-based scheduling application under development. It also describes an algorithm for least commitment scheduling, which uses probabilistic committed capacity profiles of resources over time, along with realistic costs, to provide an abstract search space over which the agents can wander to quickly find optimal solutions.

  16. Convergence on a Distinctive Assembly Mechanism by Unrelated Families of Activating Immune Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Jianwen; Garrity, David; Call, Matthew E.; Moffett, Howell; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2005-01-01

    Activating receptors in cells of hematopoetic origin include members of two unrelated protein families, the immunoglobulin (Ig) and C type lectins, which differ even in the orientation of the transmembrane (TM) domains. We examined assembly of four receptors with diverse function: the NK receptors KIR2DS and NKG2C/CD94, the Fc receptor for IgA, and the GPVI collagen receptor. For each of the four different receptors studied here, assembly results in the formation of a three-helix interface in...

  17. PheVI:09 (Phe6.44) as a sliding microswitch in seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M;

    2012-01-01

    In seven-transmembrane (7TM), G protein-coupled receptors, highly conserved residues function as microswitches, which alternate between different conformations and interaction partners in an extended allosteric interface between the transmembrane segments performing the large scale conformational...

  18. Lipid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  19. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  20. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  1. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  2. Karolinske psychodynamic profile (KAPP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Birgit Bork; Søgaard, Ulf

    psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil......psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil...

  3. Interactions between Transmembrane Helices within Monomers of the Aquaporin AtPIP2;1 Play a Crucial Role in Tetramer Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yun-Joo; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Han, Wonhee; Kim, Dae Heon; Lee, Myoung Hui; Jeon, Jouhyun; Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Junho; Lee, Yongjik; Lee, Juhun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Yunje; Han, Jin-Kwan; Hwang, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) is a water channel protein found in various subcellular membranes of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The physiological functions of AQPs have been elucidated in many organisms. However, understanding their biogenesis remains elusive, particularly regarding how they assemble into tetramers. Here, we investigated the amino acid residues involved in the tetramer formation of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane AQP AtPIP2;1 using extensive amino acid substitution mutagenesis. The mutant proteins V41A/E44A, F51A/L52A, F87A/I91A, F92A/I93A, V95A/Y96A, and H216A/L217A, harboring alanine substitutions in the transmembrane (TM) helices of AtPIP2;1 polymerized into multiple oligomeric complexes with a variable number of subunits greater than four. Moreover, these mutant proteins failed to traffic to the plasma membrane, instead of accumulating in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Structure-based modeling revealed that these residues are largely involved in interactions between TM helices within monomers. These results suggest that inter-TM interactions occurring both within and between monomers play crucial roles in tetramer formation in the AtPIP2;1 complex. Moreover, the assembly of AtPIP2;1 tetramers is critical for their trafficking from the ER to the plasma membrane, as well as water permeability. PMID:27142778

  4. Achondroplastic dog breeds have no mutations in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, S; Valdés, J; Alonso, R A

    2000-10-01

    One of the most common skeletal affections in humans is achondroplasia, a short-limbed dwarfism that is, in most cases, caused by mutations in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene. Due to the lack of sufficient radiological, genetic, and molecular studies, most types of skeletal anomalies in dogs are classified as achondroplasia. To initiate the molecular characterization of some osteochondrodysplastic dog breeds, we obtained the DNA sequence of the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene from the dachshund, basset hound, bulldog, and German shepherd dogs. All 4 breeds showed no mutation in the evaluated region. This indicates that the mutation responsible for the osteochondrodysplastic phenotype in the tested dog breeds lies either elsewhere in the FGFR-3 gene or in other ones involved in the formation and development of endochondral bone. PMID:11041504

  5. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26672896

  6. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras Gout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CFTR gene is unique within the ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein family, predominantly of transporters, by coding a chloride channel. The gating mechanism of ABC proteins has been characterized by the ATP Switch model in terms cycles of dimer formation and dissociation linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. It would be of interest to assess the extent that Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, a functional channel, fits the ATP Switch model for ABC transporters. Additional transporter mechanisms, namely those of Pgp and HlyB, are discussed for perspective. Literature search of databases selected key references in comparing and contrasting the gating mechanism. CFTR is a functional chloride channel facilitating transmembrane anion flow down electrochemical gradients. A dysfunctional CFTR protein results in cystic fibrosis, a fatal pleiotropic disease currently managed symptomatically. Understanding the gating mechanism will help target drug development aimed at alleviating and curing the disease.

  7. In Silico understanding of the cyclodextrin–phenanthrene hybrid assemblies in both aqueous medium and bacterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two hetero-assemblies, βCD1–Phe1, and βCD2–Phe1 were observed in water solution. • Distinct membrane-binding patterns for βCD, Phe, and their complexes were found. • Minor Phe trans-membrane energy barrier confirmed its membrane penetration ability. • Huge energy barriers for βCD-involved assemblies denied their membrane penetration. • Phe separation from βCD1–Phe1 was easier than that from βCD2–Phe1. - Abstract: The explicit-solvent molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and adaptive biased forces (ABF) methods were employed to systemically study the structural and thermodynamic nature of the β-cyclodextrin (βCD) monomer, phenanthrene (Phe) monomer, and their inclusion complexes in both the aqueous and membrane environments, aiming at clarifying the atomic-level mechanisms underlying in the CD-enhanced degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by bacteria. Simulations showed that βCD and Phe monomers could associate together to construct two distinctive assemblies, i.e, βCD1–Phe1 and βCD2–Phe1, respectively. The membrane-involved equilibrium simulations and the data of potential of mean forces (PMFs) further confirmed that Phe monomer was capable of penetrating through the membranes without confronting any large energy barrier, whereas, the single βCD and βCD-involved assemblies were unable to pass across the membranes. These observations clearly suggested that βCD only served as the carrier to enhance the bioavailability of Phe rather than the co-substrate in the Phe biodegradation process. The Phe-separation PMF profiles indicated that the maximum of the Phe uptake by bacteria would be achieved by the “optimal” βCD:Phe molar ratio, which facilitated the maximal formation of βCD1–Phe1 inclusion and the minimal construction of βCD2–Phe1 complex

  8. In Silico understanding of the cyclodextrin–phenanthrene hybrid assemblies in both aqueous medium and bacterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Baiping [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Gao, Huipeng; Cao, Yafeng [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China); Jia, Lingyun, E-mail: lyj81@dlut.edu.cn [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Two hetero-assemblies, βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1}, and βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1} were observed in water solution. • Distinct membrane-binding patterns for βCD, Phe, and their complexes were found. • Minor Phe trans-membrane energy barrier confirmed its membrane penetration ability. • Huge energy barriers for βCD-involved assemblies denied their membrane penetration. • Phe separation from βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1} was easier than that from βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1}. - Abstract: The explicit-solvent molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and adaptive biased forces (ABF) methods were employed to systemically study the structural and thermodynamic nature of the β-cyclodextrin (βCD) monomer, phenanthrene (Phe) monomer, and their inclusion complexes in both the aqueous and membrane environments, aiming at clarifying the atomic-level mechanisms underlying in the CD-enhanced degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by bacteria. Simulations showed that βCD and Phe monomers could associate together to construct two distinctive assemblies, i.e, βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1} and βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1}, respectively. The membrane-involved equilibrium simulations and the data of potential of mean forces (PMFs) further confirmed that Phe monomer was capable of penetrating through the membranes without confronting any large energy barrier, whereas, the single βCD and βCD-involved assemblies were unable to pass across the membranes. These observations clearly suggested that βCD only served as the carrier to enhance the bioavailability of Phe rather than the co-substrate in the Phe biodegradation process. The Phe-separation PMF profiles indicated that the maximum of the Phe uptake by bacteria would be achieved by the “optimal” βCD:Phe molar ratio, which facilitated the maximal formation of βCD{sub 1}–Phe{sub 1} inclusion and the minimal construction of βCD{sub 2}–Phe{sub 1} complex.

  9. Osmotic and pH transmembrane gradients control the lytic power of melittin.

    OpenAIRE

    Benachir, T; Lafleur, M

    1996-01-01

    Transmembrane osmotic gradients applied on large unilamellar 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine vesicles were used to modulate the potency of melittin to induce leakage. Melittin, an amphipathic peptide, changes the permeability of vesicles, as studied using the release of entrapped calcein, a fluorescent marker. A promotion of the ability of melittin to induce leakage was observed when a hyposomotic gradient (i.e., internal salt concentration higher than the external one) was imposed o...

  10. Transmembrane sodium and potassium gradients modulate histamine secretion induced by ionophore A23187.

    OpenAIRE

    Amellal, M.; Bronner, C.; Landry, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Histamine secretion was induced from rat peritoneal mast cells by calcium ionophore A23187 in the presence of various extracellular calcium concentrations. Transmembrane sodium and potassium gradients were altered by cold pretreatment of mast cells or through the inhibition of sodium-potassium ATPase by the use of ouabain or potassium-deprivation. Such pretreatments led to a parallel shift to the left of the extracellular calcium concentration-histamine secretion curve, i.e. to an apparent de...

  11. A Portable Lipid Bilayer System for Environmental Sensing with a Transmembrane Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuji Kawano; Yutaro Tsuji; Koki Kamiya; Taiga Kodama; Toshihisa Osaki; Norihisa Miki; Shoji Takeuchi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a portable measurement system for current signals of an ion channel that is composed of a planar lipid bilayer. A stable and reproducible lipid bilayer is formed in outdoor environments by using a droplet contact method with a micropipette. Using this system, we demonstrated that the single-channel recording of a transmembrane protein (alpha-hemolysin) was achieved in the field at a high-altitude (∼3623 m). This system would be broadly applicable for obtaining environment...

  12. Transmembrane Agrin Regulates Dendritic Filopodia and Synapse Formation in Mature Hippocampal Neuron Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    McCroskery, Seumas; Bailey, Allison; Lin, Lin; Daniels, Mathew P.

    2009-01-01

    The transmembrane isoform of agrin (Tm-agrin) is the predominant form expressed in the brain but its putative roles in brain development are not well understood. Recent reports have implicated Tm-agrin in the formation and stabilization of filopodia on neurites of immature central and peripheral neurons in culture. In maturing central neurons, dendritic filopodia are believed to facilitate synapse formation. In the present study we have investigated the role of Tm-agrin in regulation of dendr...

  13. Achondroplastic dog breeds have no mutations in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Martínez; Valdés, J; R. A. Alonso

    2000-01-01

    One of the most common skeletal affections in humans is achondroplasia, a short-limbed dwarfism that is, in most cases, caused by mutations in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene. Due to the lack of sufficient radiological, genetic, and molecular studies, most types of skeletal anomalies in dogs are classified as achondroplasia. To initiate the molecular characterization of some osteochondrodysplastic dog breeds, we obtained the DNA sequence of th...

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activation by Roflumilast Contributes to Therapeutic Benefit in Chronic Bronchitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, James A.; Raju, S. Vamsee; Tang, Li Ping; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Li, Yao; Courville, Clifford A.; Farris, Roopan F.; Coricor, George E.; Smoot, Lisa H.; Mazur, Marina M.; Dransfield, Mark T; Bolger, Graeme B.; Rowe, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and is associated with delayed mucociliary clearance and chronic bronchitis. Roflumilast is a clinically approved phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor that improves lung function in patients with chronic bronchitis. We hypothesized that its therapeutic benefit was related in part to activation of CFTR. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, Calu-3, and T84 monolayers were exposed to whol...

  15. Effects of crossflow velocity and transmembrane pressure on microfiltration of oil-in-water emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid; Priezjev, Nikolai V.

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of oil removal from water using hydrophilic porous membranes. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through the membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of the oil phase. The effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence...

  16. Order Parameters of a Transmembrane Helix in a Fluid Bilayer: Case Study of a WALP Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, Andrea; Rougier, Léa; Réat, Valérie; Jolibois, Franck; Saurel, Olivier; Czaplicki, Jerzy; Killian, J. Antoinette; Milon, Alain

    2010-01-01

    A new solid-state NMR-based strategy is established for the precise and efficient analysis of orientation and dynamics of transmembrane peptides in fluid bilayers. For this purpose, several dynamically averaged anisotropic constraints, including 13C and 15N chemical shift anisotropies and 13C-15N dipolar couplings, were determined from two different triple-isotope-labeled WALP23 peptides (2H, 13C, and 15N) and combined with previously published quadrupolar splittings of the same peptide. Chem...

  17. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Md. Kabir Uddin; Stone, Kyle A.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

  18. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins and AMPA receptor function in the cerebellum.

    OpenAIRE

    Coombs, I. D.; Cull-Candy, S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity among AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subtypes is thought to be one of the key postsynaptic factors giving rise to diversity in excitatory synaptic signaling in the CNS. Recently, compelling evidence has emerged that ancillary AMPAR subunits—the so-called transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs)—also play a vital role in influencing the variety of postsynaptic signaling. This TARP family of molecules controls both trafficking and functional properties of AMPARs at most, if ...

  19. Transmembrane Domain Lengths Serve as Signatures of Organismal Complexity and Viral Transport Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Snigdha Singh; Aditya Mittal

    2016-01-01

    It is known that membrane proteins are important in various secretory pathways, with a possible role of their transmembrane domains (TMDs) as sorting determinant factors. One key aspect of TMDs associated with various “checkposts” (i.e. organelles) of intracellular trafficking is their length. To explore possible linkages in organisms with varying “complexity” and differences in TMD lengths of membrane proteins associated with different organelles (such as Endoplasmic Reticulum, Golgi, Endoso...

  20. Down-Regulation of Cell Surface Receptors Is Modulated by Polar Residues within the Transmembrane Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Zaliauskiene, Lolita; Kang, Sunghyun; Brouillette, Christie G; Lebowitz, Jacob; Arani, Ramin B; Collawn, James F.

    2000-01-01

    How recycling receptors are segregated from down-regulated receptors in the endosome is unknown. In previous studies, we demonstrated that substitutions in the transferrin receptor (TR) transmembrane domain (TM) convert the protein from an efficiently recycling receptor to one that is rapidly down regulated. In this study, we demonstrate that the “signal” within the TM necessary and sufficient for down-regulation is Thr11Gln17Thr19 (numbering in TM). Transplant...

  1. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially...

  2. Defining the disease liability of variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene

    OpenAIRE

    Sosnay, Patrick R.; Siklosi, Karen R; Van Goor, Fredrick; Kaniecki, Kyle; Yu, Haihui; Sharma, Neeraj; Ramalho, Anabela S; Amaral, Margarida D.; Dorfman, Ruslan; Zielenski, Julian; Masica, David L.; Karchin, Rachel; Millen, Linda; Thomas, Philip J.; George P. Patrinos

    2013-01-01

    Allelic heterogeneity in disease-causing genes presents a substantial challenge to the translation of genomic variation to clinical practice. Few of the almost 2,000 variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have empirical evidence that they cause cystic fibrosis. To address this gap, we collected both genotype and phenotype data for 39,696 cystic fibrosis patients in registries and clinics in North America and Europe. Among these patients, 159 CFTR varia...

  3. Selective Activation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Cl- and HCO3- Conductances

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy MM; Quinton PM

    2001-01-01

    While cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is well known to function as a Cl(-) channel, some mutations in the channel protein causing cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupt another vital physiological function, HCO(3)(-) transport. Pathological implications of derailed HCO(3)(-) transport are clearly demonstrated by the pancreatic destruction that accompany certain mutations in CF. Despite the crucial role of HCO(3)(-) in buffering pH, little is known about the relationship betwe...

  4. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, P. W.; Hamosh, A.; Macek, M.; Greenberger, P. A.; MacLean, J; Walden, S M; Slavin, R G; Cutting, G R

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is not well understood. A clinical phenotype resembling the pulmonary disease seen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can occur in some individuals with ABPA. Reports of familial occurrence of ABPA and increased incidence in CF patients suggest a possible genetic basis for the disease. To test this possibility, the entire coding region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was analyzed in 11 individuals who met ...

  5. Expression and regulation of transmembrane transporters in healthy intestine and gastrointestinal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hruz, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Transmembrane transporters mediate energy dependent or independent translocation of drugs, potentially toxic compounds, and of various endogenous substrates such as bile acids and bilirubin across membranes. In this thesis the focus is on two classes of transporters, the ATPbinding cassette (ABC) transporters, which mediate ATP dependent transport and the solute carriers (SLC) which use electrochemical gradients for their transport. The transporters are expressed on membranes o...

  6. Human Amnion Epithelial Cells Induced to Express Functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Sean V.; Rebecca Lim; Philip Heraud; Marian Cholewa; Mark Le Gros; de Jonge, Martin D.; Howard, Daryl L.; David Paterson; Courtney McDonald; Anthony Atala; Graham Jenkin; Wallace, Euan M

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in a gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), remains a leading cause of childhood respiratory morbidity and mortality. The respiratory consequences of cystic fibrosis include the generation of thick, tenacious mucus that impairs lung clearance, predisposing the individual to repeated and persistent infections, progressive lung damage and shortened lifespan. Currently there is no cure fo...

  7. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikder, K. U.; Stone, K. A.; Kumar, P. B. S.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that...... microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC....

  8. An amphipathic motif at the transmembrane-cytoplasmic junction prevents autonomous activation of the thrombopoietin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Staerk, Judith; Lacout, Catherine; Sato, Takeshi; Smith, Steven O.; Vainchenker, William; Constantinescu, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding to the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is thought to impose a dimeric receptor conformation(s) leading to hematopoietic stem cell renewal, megakaryocyte differentiation, and platelet formation. Unlike other cytokine receptors, such as the erythropoietin receptor, TpoR contains an amphipathic KWQFP motif at the junction between the transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic domains. We show here that a mutant TpoR (delta5TpoR), where this sequence was deleted, is constitutively active. I...

  9. On the distribution of amino acid residues in transmembrane alpha-helix bundles.

    OpenAIRE

    Samatey, F A; Xu, C.; Popot, J L

    1995-01-01

    The periodic distribution of residues in the sequence of 469 putative transmembrane alpha-helices from eukaryotic plasma membrane polytopic proteins has been analyzed with correlation matrices. The method does not involve any a priori assumption about the secondary structure of the segments or about the physicochemical properties of individual amino acid residues. Maximal correlation is observed at 3.6 residues per period, characteristic of alpha-helices. A scale extracted from the data descr...

  10. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B andW 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001)

  11. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  12. Free energy barrier for melittin reorientation from a membrane-bound state to a transmembrane state

    CERN Document Server

    Irudayam, Sheeba J; Berkowitz, Max L

    2013-01-01

    An important step in a phospholipid membrane pore formation by melittin antimicrobial peptide is a reorientation of the peptide from a surface into a transmembrane conformation. In this work we perform umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for the reorientation of melittin from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane state and provide a molecular level insight into understanding peptide and lipid properties that influence the existence of the free energy barrier. The PMFs were calculated for a peptide to lipid (P/L) ratio of 1/128 and 4/128. We observe that the free energy barrier is reduced when the P/L ratio increased. In addition, we study the cooperative effect; specifically we investigate if the barrier is smaller for a second melittin reorientation, given that another neighboring melittin was already in the transmembrane state. We observe that indeed the barrier of the PMF curve is reduced in this case, thus confirming the presence of a cooperative effect.

  13. A negatively charged transmembrane aspartate residue controls activation of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-08-15

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide involved in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of its cognate receptor RXFP3, an A-class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In recent studies, a highly conserved ExxxD motif essential for binding of relaxin-3 has been identified at extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of RXFP3. For most of the A-class GPCRs, a highly conserved negatively charged Asp residue (Asp(2.50) using Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering and Asp128 in human RXFP3) is present at the middle of TMD2. To elucidate function of the conserved transmembrane Asp128, in the present work we replaced it with other residues and the resultant RXFP3 mutants all retained quite high ligand-binding potency, but their activation and agonist-induced internalization were abolished or drastically decreased. Thus, the negatively charged transmembrane Asp128 controlled transduction of agonist-binding information from the extracellular region to the intracellular region through maintaining RXFP3 in a metastable state for efficient conformational change induced by binding of an agonist. PMID:27353281

  14. Photo-crosslinking analysis of preferential interactions between a transmembrane peptide and matching lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Anja N J A; Spelbrink, Robin E J; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; Brunner, Josef; Heck, Albert J R; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette

    2004-04-20

    In this study, a novel method is presented by which the molecular environment of a transmembrane peptide can be investigated directly. This was achieved by incorporating a photoactivatable crosslinking probe in the hydrophobic segment of a model transmembrane peptide. When this peptide was incorporated into lipid bilayers and irradiated with UV light, a covalent bond was formed between the crosslinking probe and a lipid. This crosslinking reaction could be visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the resulting product could be characterized by mass spectrometry. By use of phospholipases, it was demonstrated that the peptide crosslinks to both acyl chains of the lipids. The peptide showed a clear preference to partition into fluid lipids and was excluded from lipids in the gel phase. However, when the peptide was incorporated into bilayers containing two lipid species with different acyl chain lengths, molecular sorting of the lipids around the peptide based on hydrophobic matching was not observed. It is proposed that the size of the transmembrane part plays an important role in the dynamic interactions of membrane proteins with the surrounding lipids and hence in determining whether molecular sorting can occur. PMID:15078094

  15. Assembler for de novo assembly of large genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Te-Chin; Lu, Chen-Hua; Liu, Tsunglin; Lee, Greg C.; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh

    2013-01-01

    Assembling a large genome faces three challenges: assembly quality, computer memory requirement, and execution time. Our developed assembler, JR-Assembler, uses (a) a strategy that selects good seeds for contig construction, (b) an extension strategy that uses whole sequencing reads to increase the chance to jump over repeats and to expedite extension, and (c) detecting misassemblies by remapping reads to assembled sequences. Compared with current assemblers, JR-Assembler achieves a better ov...

  16. Assembly tool design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor core of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is assembled with a number of large and asymmetric components within a tight tolerance in order to assure the structural integrity for various loads and to provide the tritium confinement. In addition, the assembly procedure should be compatible with remote operation since the core structures will be activated by 14-MeV neutrons once it starts operation and thus personal access will be prohibited. Accordingly, the assembly procedure and tool design are quite essential and should be designed from the beginning to facilitate remote operation. According to the ITER Design Task Agreement, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has performed design study to develop the assembly procedures and associated tool design for the ITER tokamak assembly. This report describes outlines of the assembly tools and the remaining issues obtained in this design study. (author)

  17. Effect of [Ca2+]i and Neuronal Mitochondria Transmembrane Potentials in Hippocampus of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infected Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; WEN Liangzhen; CHENG Biheng

    2006-01-01

    To explore the effect of [Ca2+]I and neuronal mitochondria transmembrane potentials in hippocampus of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infected mice, newborn Balb/c mice were randomly divided into two groups: a virus inoculated group and a control group. After 56 days, single cell of hippocampus was isolated, and mitochondria transmembrane potentials and the intracellular free calcium level [Ca2+ ]I in hippocampus were measured by means of flow cytometry (FCM).Compared with the control group, the mitochondria transmembrane potentials was decreased (P<0.01) and the intracellular free calcium level [Ca2+]I was increased (P<0.01) in inoculated group.The dysfunction of [Ca2+ ]I and mitochondria transmembrane potentials in hippocampus may play an important role in the functional disorders in CMV-infected CNS.

  18. New tools for generation IV assemblies modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In the framework of the development of generation IV concepts, the need of new assembly modelling tools arises. These concepts present more geometrical and spectral heterogeneities (radially and axially). Moreover thermal-hydraulics and neutronics aspects are so closely related that coupled computations are necessary. That raises the need for more precise and flexible tools presenting 3D features. The 3D-coupling of the thermal-hydraulic code FLICA4 with the Monte-Carlo neutronics code TRIPOLI4 was developed in that frame. This new tool enables for the first time to obtain realistic axial and radial power profiles with real feedback effects in an assembly where thermal-hydraulics and neutronics effects are closely related. The BWR is the existing concept presenting the closest heterogeneous characteristics to the various new proposed concepts. This assembly design is thus chosen to compare this new tool, presenting real 3D characteristics, to the existing ones. For design studies, the evaluation of the assembly behavior, currently necessitate a depletion scheme using a 3D thermal-hydraulics assembly calculation coupled with a 1D axial neutronics deterministic calculation (or an axial power profile chosen as a function of the assembly averaged burn-up). The 3D neutronics code (CRONOS2) uses neutronic data built by 2D deterministic assembly calculations without feedback. These cross section libraries enable to take feedbacks into account via parameters such as fuel temperature, moderator density and temperature (history parameters such as void and control rod are not useful in design evaluation). Recently, the libraries build-up has been replaced by on line multi-2D deterministic assembly calculations performed by a cell code (APOLLO2). That avoids interpolation between pre-determined parameters in the cross-section data used by the 1D axial neutronics calculation and enable to give a radial power map to the 3D thermal

  19. Insights into the Coupling of Duplication Events and Macroevolution from an Age Profile of Animal Transmembrane Gene Families

    OpenAIRE

    Guohui Ding; Jiuhong Kang; Qi Liu; Tieliu Shi; Gang Pei; Yixue Li

    2006-01-01

    Synopsis The interplay of information-processing life and force-driven environment has characterized Earth's evolutionary history since its beginning some 4 billion years ago. The study of macroevolution has seen a growing appreciation of this interplay. Previously, a large-scale effort was mounted to collect and analyze the paleontological and geochemical data. In the meantime, more and more genomes have been sequenced. The growing molecular sequence database with these paleontological data ...

  20. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  1. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  2. Assembly of ISX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, N.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Impurity Study Experiment, a moderate size tokamak, was recently assembled at ORNL. Demountable toroidal field coils allowed for the assembly of major components at remote locations and rapid installation into ISX. A discharge cleaning plasma was generated in ISX six weeks after the arrival of the final toroidal field coil. A chronological summary of the assembly is presented, emphasizing features designed to aid in assembly and maintenance. A cross-section of the machine showing the major mechanical components to be discussed is given.

  3. Genistein-induced fluid accumulation in ovariectomised rats' uteri is associated with increased cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Chinigarzadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High genistein doses have been reported to induce fluid accumulation in the uteri of ovariectomised rats, although the mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. Because genistein binds to the oestrogen receptor and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator mediates uterine fluid secretion, we hypothesised that this genistein effect involves both the oestrogen receptor and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. METHODS: Ovariectomised adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg/day genistein for three consecutive days with and without the ER antagonist ICI 182780. One day after the final drug injection, the animals were humanely sacrificed, and the uteri were removed for histology and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator mRNA and protein expression analysis using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein distribution was analysed visually by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The histological analysis revealed an increase in the circumference of the uterine lumen with increasing doses of genistein, which was suggestive of fluid accumulation. Moreover, genistein stimulated a dose-dependent increase in the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein and mRNA, and high-intensity cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator immunostaining was observed at the apical membrane of the luminal epithelium following 50 and 100 mg/kg/day genistein treatment. The genistein-induced increase in uterine luminal circumference and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator expression was antagonised by treatment with ICI 182780. CONCLUSION: Genistein-induced luminal fluid accumulation in ovariectomised rats' uteri involves the oestrogen receptor and up-regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator expression, and these findings reveal the mechanism underlying the effect of this compound on changes in fluid volume in

  4. Constitutive activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 by the transmembrane domain point mutation found in achondroplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, M K; Donoghue, D J

    1996-01-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common genetic form of dwarfism, is an autosomal dominant disorder whose underlying mechanism is a defect in the maturation of the cartilage growth plate of long bones. Achondroplasia has recently been shown to result from a Gly to Arg substitution in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), although the molecular consequences of this mutation have not been investigated. By substituting the transmembrane domain of the Neu receptor t...

  5. Xander: employing a novel method for efficient gene-targeted metagenomic assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qiong; Fish, Jordan A.; Gilman, Mariah; Sun, Yanni; Brown, C. Titus; Tiedje, James M; Cole, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Metagenomics can provide important insight into microbial communities. However, assembling metagenomic datasets has proven to be computationally challenging. Current methods often assemble only fragmented partial genes. Results We present a novel method for targeting assembly of specific protein-coding genes. This method combines a de Bruijn graph, as used in standard assembly approaches, and a protein profile hidden Markov model (HMM) for the gene of interest, as used in standard ...

  6. Method of assembling nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films are formed to the surface of a fuel rod for preventing the occurrence of injuries at the surface of the fuel rod. That is, in a method of assembling a nuclear fuel assembly by inserting fuel rods into lattice cells of a support lattice, thin films of polyvinyl alcohol are formed to a predetermined thickness at the surface of each of the fuel rods and, after insertion of the fuel rods into the lattice cells, the nuclear fuel assemblies are dipped into water or steams to dissolve and remove the thin films. Since polyvinyl alcohol is noncombustible and not containing nuclear inhibitive material as the ingredient, they cause no undesired effects on plant facilities even if not completely removed from the fuel rods. The polyvinyl alcohol thin films have high strength and can sufficiently protect the fuel rod. Further, scraping damages caused by support members of the support lattice upon insertion can also be prevented. (T.M.)

  7. Profile detectors of GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design phase of GANIL, which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beam lines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The profile detectors are unavoidable tools in displaying the GANIL beams for adaptation and adjustment of the beam line optics. The installed detector assembly (about 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beams extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beams (VHIB), secondary ion beams emitted by LISE and SPEG spectrometers targets, different lines of SPIRAL project (HE, BE, ME): This detector assembly must meet the following standard requirements: flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; identical analog electronics for all the detectors with networking; unique visualization system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (the beam profile and ion packet length allow an in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability

  8. Results of VVER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the WWER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12,2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the twenty third cycle of the Paks NPPs Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. In this benchmark, the same fuel assemblies are investigated by the participants thus the results calculated with different codes and models can be compared with each other. Aims of benchmark was comparison of participants results with each other and with in-core measurement data of the Paks NPP in order to test the different Computational Fluid Dynamics codes and applied Computational Fluid Dynamics models. This paper contains OKB 'GIDROPRESSs' results of Computational Fluid Dynamics calculations this benchmark. Results are:-In-core thermocouple signals above the selected assemblies;-Deviations between the in- ore thermocouple signals and the outlet average coolant temperatures of the assemblies;-Axial velocity and temperature profiles along three diameters at the level of the thermocouple;- Axial velocity and temperature distributions in the cross section at the level of the thermocouple;-Axial velocity and temperature

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR allelic variants relate to shifts in faecal microbiota of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Schippa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF. CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. METHODS: Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. RESULTS: Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1 presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2 disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a 'systemic disease', linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis.

  10. Influence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator on expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Luis EN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. Infections of the respiratory tract are a hallmark in CF. The host immune responses in CF are not adequate to eradicate pathogens, such as P. aeruginosa. Dendritic cells (DC are crucial in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Changes in DC function could contribute to abnormal immune responses on multiple levels. The role of DC in CF lung disease remains unknown. Methods This study investigated the expression of CFTR gene in bone marrow-derived DC. We compared the differentiation and maturation profile of DC from CF and wild type (WT mice. We analyzed the gene expression levels in DC from naive CF and WT mice or following P. aeruginosa infection. Results CFTR is expressed in DC with lower level compared to lung tissue. DC from CF mice showed a delayed in the early phase of differentiation. Gene expression analysis in DC generated from naive CF and WT mice revealed decreased expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav1, a membrane lipid raft protein, in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Consistently, protein and activity levels of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, a negative regulator of Cav1 expression, were increased in CF DC. Following exposure to P. aeruginosa, expression of 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2, two enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism that are also regulated by SREBP, was less decreased in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Conclusion These results suggest that CFTR dysfunction in DC affects factors involved in membrane structure and lipid-metabolism, which may contribute to the abnormal inflammatory and immune response characteristic of CF.

  11. Cleavage specificity analysis of six type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs using PICS with proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Barré

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS. Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P and C-terminal prime (P' sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1' position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. CONCLUSIONS: Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1' positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity.

  12. Reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of an improved spacer grid for a nuclear fuel assembly comprising fuel rods in a matrix wherein each rod is adapted to be enclosed by a spacer ''cell'' for positioning thereof relative to adjacent rods in the fuel assembly. 7 claims, 12 drawing figures

  13. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz;

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  14. Laser bottom hole assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  15. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  16. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  17. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis

  18. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendy, Robert F., E-mail: rfmelendy@liberty.edu [School of Engineering and Computational Sciences, Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia 24515 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  19. A Novel Topology of Proline-rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Pia; Sterlini, Bruno; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marte, Antonella; Onofri, Franco; Valtorta, Flavia; Maragliano, Luca; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as the single causative gene for a group of paroxysmal syndromes of infancy, including epilepsy, paroxysmal movement disorders, and migraine. On the basis of topology predictions, PRRT2 has been assigned to the recently characterized family of Dispanins, whose members share the two-transmembrane domain topology with a large N terminus and short C terminus oriented toward the outside of the cell. Because PRRT2 plays a role at the synapse, it is important to confirm the exact orientation of its N and C termini with respect to the plasma membrane to get clues regarding its possible function. Using a combination of different experimental approaches, including live immunolabeling, immunogold electron microscopy, surface biotinylation and computational modeling, we demonstrate a novel topology for this protein. PRRT2 is a type II transmembrane protein in which only the second hydrophobic segment spans the plasma membrane, whereas the first one is associated with the internal surface of the membrane and forms a helix-loop-helix structure without crossing it. Most importantly, the large proline-rich N-terminal domain is not exposed to the extracellular space but is localized intracellularly, and only the short C terminus is extracellular (Ncyt/Cexo topology). Accordingly, we show that PRRT2 interacts with the Src homology 3 domain-bearing protein Intersectin 1, an intracellular protein involved in synaptic vesicle cycling. These findings will contribute to the clarification of the role of PRRT2 at the synapse and the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms on the basis of PRRT2-related neurological disorders. PMID:26797119

  20. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.