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Sample records for assembled fluorescent spion-peptide

  1. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  2. An Assemblable, Multi-Angle Fluorescence and Ellipsometric Microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Nguyen

    Full Text Available We introduce a multi-functional microscope for research laboratories that have significant cost and space limitations. The microscope pivots around the sample, operating in upright, inverted, side-on and oblique geometries. At these geometries it is able to perform bright-field, fluorescence and qualitative ellipsometric imaging. It is the first single instrument in the literature to be able to perform all of these functionalities. The system can be assembled by two undergraduate students from a provided manual in less than a day, from off-the-shelf and 3D printed components, which together cost approximately $16k at 2016 market prices. We include a highly specified assembly manual, a summary of design methodologies, and all associated 3D-printing files in hopes that the utility of the design outlives the current component market. This open design approach prepares readers to customize the instrument to specific needs and applications. We also discuss how to select household LEDs as low-cost light sources for fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate the utility of the microscope in varied geometries and functionalities, with particular emphasis on studying hydrated, solid-supported lipid films and wet biological samples.

  3. Latent pH-responsive ratiometric fluorescent cluster based on self-assembled photoactivated SNARF derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata, Eiji; Yukimachi, Yoshihiro; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Morii, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a self-assembled fluorescent cluster comprising a seminaphthorhodafluor (SNARF) derivative protected by a photoremovable o-nitrobenzyl group. Prior to UV irradiation, a colorless and nonfluorescent cluster was spontaneously assembled in aqueous solution. After UV irradiation, the self-assembled cluster remained intact and showed a large enhancement in pH-responsive fluorescence. The unique pH responsive fluorescent cluster could be used as a dual-emissive ratiometri...

  4. Control of stilbene conformation and fluorescence in self-assembled capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ams, Mark R; Ajami, Dariush; Craig, Stephen L; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2009-01-01

    Summary The extensively studied trans-stilbene molecule is known to give only weak fluorescence in solution and inside loosely-fitting synthetic capsules. However, trans-stilbene has been recently studied in the context of antibody interiors, where binding results in strong blue fluorescence. The present research was undertaken to understand the spatial factors that influence stilbene fluorescence. trans-Stilbene was encapsulated in the snug, self-assembled complex 1.1 and exhibited fluorescence quenching due to the distortion of its ground-state geometry. When the complex is elongated by incorporating glycouril spacers, trans-stilbene is allowed to adapt a fully coplanar arrangement and fluorescence returns. PMID:20300499

  5. Self-assembled nanocomposite film with tunable enhanced fluorescence for the detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Wang, Xiaoyu; He, Fang; Tang, Fu; Li, Lidong

    2015-01-21

    In this study, a simple and environmentally friendly, silver nanocomposite film was prepared via the in situ reduction of silver ions in self-assembled chitosan (CS)/sodium alginate film matrixes. Negatively charged DNA containing the fluorescent intercalator acriflavine (Acf) was assembled on the surface of the silver nanocomposite film, to facilitate the detection of DNA. A tunable fluorescence enhancement was achieved for the Acf in the silver nanocomposite film simply by changing the thickness of the interlayer between the DNA and the silver nanocomposite film. Using the interlayer prepared by an assembly of poly(acrylic acid) and CS, a significant enhancement in the fluorescence of Acf was obtained. Owing to the ability of Acf to intercalate into DNA, this hybrid system with an enhanced Acf fluorescence could be used to monitor the template-independent DNA elongation process in a facile, high-efficiency, label-free fashion.

  6. Controllable self-assembly of NaREF4 upconversion nanoparticles and their distinctive fluorescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Ni, Yaru; Zhu, Cheng; Fang, Liang; Kou, Jiahui; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the growth of hexagonal NaYF4:Yb3+, Tm3+ nanocrystals with tunable sizes induced by different contents of doped Yb3+ ions (10%-99.5%) using the thermal decomposition method. These nanoparticles, which have different sizes, are then self-assembled at the interface of cyclohexane and ethylene and transferred onto a normal glass slide. It is found that the size of nanoparticles directs their self-assembly. Due to the appropriate size of 40.5 nm, 15% Yb3+ ions doped nanoparticles are able to be self-assembled into an ordered inorganic monolayer membrane with a large area of about 10 × 10 μm2. More importantly, the obvious short-wave (300-500 nm) fluorescence improvement of the ordered 2D self-assembly structure is observed to be relative to disordered nanoparticles, which is because intrinsic absorption and scattering of upconversion nanoparticles leads to the self-loss of fluorescence, especially the short-wave fluorescence inside the disordered structure, and the relative emission of short-wave fluorescence is reduced. The construction of a 2D self-assembly structure can effectively avoid this and improve the radiated short-wave fluorescence, especially UV photons, and is able to direct the design of new types of solid-state optical materials in many fields.

  7. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Rubenstein, Francis M.; Whitman, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

  8. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

    1992-12-29

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

  9. Analyzing receptor assemblies in the cell membrane using fluorescence anisotropy imaging with TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Miklos; Simon, Joseph; Barnard, Eric A; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2014-01-01

    Signaling within and between animal cells is controlled by the many receptor proteins in their membrane. They variously operate as trans-membrane monomers and homo- or hetero-dimers, and may assemble with ion-channels: analyses thereof are needed in studies of receptor actions in tissue physiology and pathology. Interactions between membrane proteins are detectable when pre-labeled with fluorophores, but a much fuller analysis is achievable via advanced optical techniques on living cells. In this context, the measurement of polarization anisotropy in the emitted fluorescence has been the least exploited. Here we demonstrate its methodology and particular advantages in the study of receptor protein assembly. Through excitation in both TIRF and EPI fluorescence illumination modes we are able to quantify and suppress contributions to the signal from extraneous intra-cellular fluorescence, and we show that the loss of fluorescence-polarization measured in membrane proteins reports on receptor protein assembly in real time. Receptor monomers and homo-dimers in the cell membrane can be analyzed quantitatively and for homo-dimers only a single fluorescent marker is needed, thus suppressing ambiguities that arise in alternative assays, which require multiple label moieties and which are thus subject to stoichiometric uncertainty.

  10. Analyzing receptor assemblies in the cell membrane using fluorescence anisotropy imaging with TIRF microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklos Erdelyi

    Full Text Available Signaling within and between animal cells is controlled by the many receptor proteins in their membrane. They variously operate as trans-membrane monomers and homo- or hetero-dimers, and may assemble with ion-channels: analyses thereof are needed in studies of receptor actions in tissue physiology and pathology. Interactions between membrane proteins are detectable when pre-labeled with fluorophores, but a much fuller analysis is achievable via advanced optical techniques on living cells. In this context, the measurement of polarization anisotropy in the emitted fluorescence has been the least exploited. Here we demonstrate its methodology and particular advantages in the study of receptor protein assembly. Through excitation in both TIRF and EPI fluorescence illumination modes we are able to quantify and suppress contributions to the signal from extraneous intra-cellular fluorescence, and we show that the loss of fluorescence-polarization measured in membrane proteins reports on receptor protein assembly in real time. Receptor monomers and homo-dimers in the cell membrane can be analyzed quantitatively and for homo-dimers only a single fluorescent marker is needed, thus suppressing ambiguities that arise in alternative assays, which require multiple label moieties and which are thus subject to stoichiometric uncertainty.

  11. Fluorescent Phthalocyanine Assembly Distinguishes Chiral Isomers of Different Types of Amino Acids and Sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuying; Liu, Chenxi; Wang, Xiqian; Wang, Tianyu; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2017-07-25

    The functions of some natural supramolecular architectures, such as ribosomes, are dependent on the recognition of different types of chiral biomolecules. However, the recognition of different types of chiral molecules (multiobject chiral recognition), such as amino acids and sugars, by independent and identically artificial supramolecular assembly, was rarely achieved. In this article, simple amphiphilic achiral phthalocyanine was found to form supramolecular chiral assemblies with charged water-soluble polymers upon host-guest interactions at the air/water interface. Among these systems, one identical phthalocyanine/poly(l-lysine) assembly not only can distinguish enantiomers of different amino acids but also can recognize several epimers of monose. The chiral recognitions were achieved by comparing either the steady-state fluorescence intensity or fluorescence quenching rate of phthalocyanine/poly(l-lysine) assemblies, before and after interaction with different small chiral molecules. It was demonstrated that the interactions between poly(l-lysine) and different small chiral molecules could change the aggregation of phthalocyanines. And the sensitivity of fluorescence and the excellent multiobject chiral recognition properties of the phthalocyanine/poly(l-lysine) assembly are dependent on the subtle molecular packing mode and the cooperation of different noncovalent interactions.

  12. Validation of a fluorescence-based screening concept to identify ribosome assembly defects in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schloemer, Renate; Schmidt, Sabine; Mueller, Silke; Heubach, Anja; Deuerling, Elke

    2014-07-01

    While the structure of mature ribosomes is analyzed in atomic detail considerably less is known about their assembly process in living cells. This is mainly due to technical and conceptual hurdles. To analyze ribosome assembly in vivo, we designed and engineered an Escherichiacoli strain--using chromosomal gene knock-in techniques--that harbors large and small ribosomal subunits labeled with the fluorescent proteins EGFP and mCherry, respectively. A thorough characterization of this reporter strain revealed that its growth properties and translation apparatus were wild-type like. Alterations in the ratio of EGFP over mCherry fluorescence are supposed to indicate ribosome assembly defects. To provide proof of principle, subunit specific assembly defects were provoked and could be identified by both manual and fully automated fluorometric in vivo assays. This is to our knowledge the first methodology that directly detects ribosome assembly defects in vivo in a high-throughput compatible format. Screening of knock-out collections and small molecule libraries will allow identification of new ribosome assembly factors and possible inhibitors. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Fluorescent monitoring of RNA assembly and processing using the split-spinach aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tucker A; Andrews, Grant E; Jaeger, Luc; Grabow, Wade W

    2015-02-20

    As insights into RNA's many diverse cellular roles continue to be gained, interest and applications in RNA self-assembly and dynamics remain at the forefront of structural biology. The bifurcation of functional molecules into nonfunctional fragments provides a useful strategy for controlling and monitoring cellular RNA processes and functionalities. Herein we present the bifurcation of the preexisting Spinach aptamer and demonstrate its utility as a novel split aptamer system for monitoring RNA self-assembly as well as the processing of pre-short interfering substrates. We show for the first time that the Spinach aptamer can be divided into two nonfunctional halves that, once assembled, restore the original fluorescent signal characteristic of the unabridged aptamer. In this regard, the split-Spinach aptamer is represented as a potential tool for monitoring the self-assembly of artificial and/or natural RNAs.

  14. Multicolor, large-area fluorescence sensing through oligothiophene-self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Manuela; Zambianchi, Massimo; Favaretto, Laura; Palermo, Vincenzo; Treossi, Emanuele; Montalti, Marco; Bonacchi, Sara; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2011-02-14

    We present a new strategy to realize self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on quartz and silicon with a multicolour fluorescence pattern starting from a single, proton sensitive oligothiophene dye exposed at a defined pH. Fine tuning of the SAMs emission color over the entire visible range, including white, is demonstrated. Finally, integration of SAMs in patterned thin layer cells (TLCs) is exploited to demonstrate cation sensing potential in real devices.

  15. Fluorescent nanoparticles based on self-assembled pi-conjugated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Adrien; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2010-07-27

    pi-Conjugated molecules are interesting components to prepare fluorescent nanoparticles. From the use of polymer chains that form small aggregates in water to the self-assembly of small chromophoric segments into highly ordered structures, the preparation of these materials allows to develop systems with applications as sensors or biolabels. The potential functionalization of the nanoparticles can lead to specific probing. This progress report describes the recent advances in the preparation of such emittive organic nanoparticles.

  16. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as fluorescent turn-on sensor for ultrasensitive Lipopolysaccharide (Endotoxin detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seng Koon Lim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin, a major component in the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is a very powerful and toxic inflammatory stimulator, resulting in sepsis or septic shock, a significant medical problem affecting about 700 000 patients and causing 250 000 casualties annually in the United States itself. The detection of LPS is highly importance. However, the currently used enzymatic limulus amebocyte lysate assay is highly susceptible to changes in temperature and pH, interference factors, and requires cumbersome sample preparation. A more cost-effective, sensitive and robust detection method is needed. Objective: To design and develop biosensor for LPS detection by assembling a LPS-binding peptide (as LPS receptor with graphene oxide (GO, as fluorescence quencher. Methods: GO was synthesized using a modified Hummer’s method. A synthetic LPS-binding peptide was designed, fluorescent labelled, and assembled with GO in PBS buffer solution. The fluorescence recovery of the peptide-GO was measured upon addition of LPS from Gram negative bacteria: E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Samonella Thyphosa, P. aeruginosa, as well as living pathogenic bacteria. Specificity tests were conducted with various biological molecules to evaluate the sensing performance. Results & Discussion: Specific binding of LPS with peptide release the peptides from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery, allowing ultrasensitive detection of LPS with the limit of detection of 130 pM, the most sensitive synthetic LPS sensors to-date. The LPS sensor is highly selective to LPS than other biological species. Conclusion: We developed a peptide-GO assembled fluorescence sensor for ultrasensitive and specific LPS/endotoxin detection. This is the most sensitive synthetic LPS sensor reported in the world.

  17. Hierarchical self-assembly of a fluorescence emission-enhanced organogelator and its multiple stimuli-responsive behaviors.

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    Ren, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Zheng; Li, Guoqiang; Huang, Junhai; Fan, Xiaotian; Xu, Lin

    2017-01-03

    A discrete hexagonal metallacycle 1 decorated with tetraphenylethylene, amide groups and long hydrophobic alkyl chains was constructed via [3 + 3] coordination-driven self-assembly, from which the fluorescence emission-enhanced organogelator with multiple stimuli-responsiveness was successfully prepared via hierarchical self-assembly.

  18. Hydrangea-like magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles through thiol-inducing assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Zhang, Junjun; Song, Shaokun; Xiong, Chuanxi; Dong, Lijie

    2017-01-01

    Magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), recognized as an emerging class of materials, have drawn much attention because of their potential applications. Due to surface functionalization and thiol-metal bonds, a simple method has been put forward for fabricating hydrangea-like magneto-fluorescent Fe3O4-SH@QD NPs, through assembling thiol-modified Fe3O4 NPs with sub-size multi-layer core/shell CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs. After a refined but controllable silane hydrolysis process, thiol-modified Fe3O4 was fabricated, resulting in Fe3O4-SH@QD NPs with QDs, while preventing the quenching of the QDs. As a result, the core Fe3O4 NPs were 18 nm in diameter, while the scattered CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs were 7 nm in diameter. The resultant magneto-fluorescent Fe3O4-SH@QD NPs exhibit efficient fluorescence, superparamagnetism at room temperature, and rapid response to the external field, which make them ideal candidates for difunctional probes in MRI and bio-labels, targeting and photodynamic therapy, and cell tracking and separation.

  19. Self-assembly of conjugated polymer-Ag@SiO2 hybrid fluorescent nanoparticles for application to cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fu; He, Fang; Cheng, Huicong; Li, Lidong

    2010-07-20

    A novel fluorescent nanoparticle was prepared via a simple self-assembly technique based on water-soluble conjugated polymers (CPs) and Ag@SiO(2) core-shell nanoparticles. Core-shell nanoparticles with silver NPs core show a unique property referred to as metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF). In the present work, the cationic conjugated polymer poly[9,9'-bis(6''-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)-hexyl) fluorene-2,7-ylenevinylene-co-alt-1,4-phenylene dibromide] (PFV) was hybridized with Ag@SiO(2) NPs via simple self-assembly procedure, and given high stability, monodispersity. The fluorescence intensity of PFV after assembling on Ag@SiO(2) core-shell NPs is enhanced 1.3-fold compared with the fluorescence intensity of PFV assembled on silica NPs without silver cores for the MEF property of the Ag@SiO(2) nanostructure. Nanocomposite with bright fluorescence was obtained. Moreover, the nanocomposition exhibits good monodispersity and low cytotoxicity, which promote their application in cellular imaging. Furthermore, fluorescent nanoparticles with amendable peripheral surfaces can also be potentially obtained because of the easy modification property of CPs and give potential application in selective biological sensing and imaging.

  20. Engineering of fluorescent emission of silk fibroin composite materials by material assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Naibo; Meng, Zhaohui; Toh, Guoyang William; Zhen, Yang; Diao, Yingying; Xu, Hongyao; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2015-03-01

    This novel materials assembly technology endows the designated materials with additional/enhanced performance by fixing "functional components" into the materials. Such functional components are molecularly recognized and accommodated by the designated materials. In this regard, two-photon fluorescence (TPF) organic molecules and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) are adopted as functional components to functionalize silk fibers and films. TPF organic molecules, such as, 2,7-bis[2-(4-nitrophenyl) ethenyl]-9,9-dibutylfluorene (NM), exhibit TPF emission quenching because of the molecular stacking that leads to aggregation in the solid form. The specific recognition between -NO2 in the annealed fluorescent molecules and the -NH groups in the silk fibroin molecules decouples the aggregated molecules. This gives rise to a significant increase in the TPF quantum yields of the silk fibers. Similarly, as another type of functional components, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were also adopted in the silk functionalization method. Compared to QDs in solution the fluorescence properties of functionalized silk materials display a long stability at room temperature. As the functional materials are well dispersed at high quantum yields in the biocompatible silk a TPF microscope can be used to pursue 3D high-resolution imaging in real time of the TPF-silk scaffold. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Controlled assembly of SNAP-PNA-fluorophore systems on DNA templates to produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Zahra; Hanley, Quentin

    2014-10-15

    The SNAP protein is a widely used self-labeling tag that can be used for tracking protein localization and trafficking in living systems. A model system providing controlled alignment of SNAP-tag units can provide a new way to study clustering of fusion proteins. In this work, fluorescent SNAP-PNA conjugates were controllably assembled on DNA frameworks, forming dimers, trimers, and tetramers. Modification of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with the O(6)-benzyl guanine (BG) group allowed the generation of site-selective covalent links between PNA and the SNAP protein. The modified BG-PNAs were labeled with fluorescent Atto dyes and subsequently chemo-selectively conjugated to SNAP protein. Efficient assembly into dimer and oligomer forms was verified via size exclusion chromatography (SEC), electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and fluorescence spectroscopy. DNA-directed assembly of homo- and heterodimers of SNAP-PNA constructs induced homo- and hetero-FRET, respectively. Longer DNA scaffolds controllably aligned similar fluorescent SNAP-PNA constructs into higher oligomers exhibiting homo-FRET. The combined SEC and homo-FRET studies indicated the 1:1 and saturated assemblies of SNAP-PNA-fluorophore:DNA formed preferentially in this system. This suggested a kinetic/stoichiometric model of assembly rather than binomially distributed products. These BG-PNA-fluorophore building blocks allow facile introduction of fluorophores and/or assembly directing moieties onto any protein containing SNAP. Template-directed assembly of PNA-modified SNAP proteins may be used to investigate clustering behavior both with and without fluorescent labels, which may find use in the study of assembly processes in cells.

  2. Multicomponent assembly of fluorescent-tag functionalized ligands in metal-organic frameworks for sensing explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, Bappaditya; Bar, Arun Kumar; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2014-10-06

    Detection of trace amounts of explosive materials is significantly important for security concerns and pollution control. Four multicomponent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs-12, 13, 23, and 123) have been synthesized by employing ligands embedded with fluorescent tags. The multicomponent assembly of the ligands was utilized to acquire a diverse electronic behavior of the MOFs and the fluorescent tags were strategically chosen to enhance the electron density in the MOFs. The phase purity of the MOFs was established by PXRD, NMR spectroscopy, and finally by single-crystal XRD. Single-crystal structures of the MOFs-12 and 13 showed the formation of three-dimensional porous networks with the aromatic tags projecting inwardly into the pores. These electron-rich MOFs were utilized for detection of explosive nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) through fluorescence quenching with high selectivity and sensitivity. The rate of fluorescence quenching for all the MOFs follows the order of electron deficiency of the NACs. We also showed the detection of picric acid (PA) by luminescent MOFs is not always reliable and can be misleading. This attracts our attention to explore these MOFs for sensing picryl chloride (PC), which is as explosive as picric acid and used widely to prepare more stable explosives like 2,4,6-trinitroaniline from PA. Moreover, the recyclability and sensitivity studies indicated that these MOFs can be reused several times with parts per billion (ppb) levels of sensitivity towards PC and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Fluorescence turn-on recognition of chiral amino acids using dye incorporated β-CD functionalized AuNPs assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aswathy, B., E-mail: aswathybv@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    An assembly of dye incorporated β-cyclodextrin (βCD) functionalized AuNPs for the fluorescent probing of chiral amino acids is presented. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) possessing a high extinction coefficient function can be used as excellent fluorescent quenchers in AuNP–fluorophore system. Inclusion of fluorescein (FL) into β-cyclodextrin (βCD) makes energy transfer to occur through the donor and quencher nearby. This energy transfer switches off by virtue of the analyte induced release of FL from β-CD cavity, which results in the fluorescence recovery of the quenched dye. Analysis suggests that the assembly of AuNPs–βCDs–FL is effective as a turn-on fluorescent probe for the chiroselective optical discrimination between D,L-tryptophan, D,L-phenyl alanine and D,L-tyrosine. The detection limits for analyzing L-tryptophan, L-phenyl alanine and L-tyrosine were found to be 0.59, 1.2 and 1.5 μM respectively. - Highlights: • Fluorescence quenching AuNP–βCD–dye assembly via energy transfer. • Energy transfer from dye to AuNPs is a SET process. • Fluorescence turn-on detection of amino acids by the competitive binding method. • Chiroselective discrimination between enantiomeric amino acids.

  4. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher; Cocoma, John Paul; Roberts, Victor David

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  5. Exploiting fluorescent polymers to probe the self-assembly of virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena-Nava, Ruben D; Hu, Yufang; Garmann, Rees F; Ng, Benny; Zelikin, Alexander N; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2011-03-17

    The inside surfaces of the protein shells of many viruses are positively charged, thereby enhancing the self-assembly of capsid proteins around their (oppositely charged) RNA genome. These proteins have been shown to organize similarly around a variety of nonbiological, negatively charged, polymers, for example, poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), forming virus-like particles (VLPs). We have demonstrated recently that the VLPs formed from cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid protein increase in size (from T=2 to T=3 structures) upon increase in PSS molecular weight (from 400 kDa to 3.4 MDa), and that the total charge on the PSS exceeds that of the capsid protein by as much as a factor of 9. Here, we extend studies of this kind to PSS molecules that are sufficiently small that two or more can be packaged into VLPs. The use of 38 kDa PSS polymers that have been fluorescently labeled with Rhodamine B allows us to determine the number of PSS molecules per capsid. Electron micrographs of the VLPs show a bimodal distribution of particle diameters, with one peak centered around 19 nm, typical of a T=1 triangulation number, and the other around 21 nm, consistent with a pseudo T=2 structure; increasing the molar ratio of protein to PSS in the reaction mix shifts the VLP distribution from T=1 to T=2 structures. By combining fluorescence and gel electrophoresis measurements, it is determined that, on average, there are two polymers in each T=1 capsid and three in each T=2, with the PSS charge less than that of the capsid protein by as much as a factor of 2. VLPs of this kind provide a versatile model system for determining the principles underlying self-assembly of controlled numbers of cargo molecules in nanocontainers of increasing size. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Characterization of self-assembling copolymers in aqueous solutions using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghein, N; Rouxhet, L; Dinguizli, M; Brewster, M E; Ariën, A; Préat, V; Habib, J L; Gallez, B

    2007-02-12

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used to determine the micropolarity and microviscosity of self-assembling systems based on mmePEG-p(CL-co-TMC) having different PEG chain lengths and different CL/TMC ratios and PEG/MOG/SA (45/5/50) polymers with different PEG chain lengths. Four reporter probes have been used: two spin probes, 16-doxyl stearic acid and 5-doxylstearic acid, and two fluorescent probes, pyrene and 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl) propane (P3P). We found that the micelles based on mmePEG-p(CL-co-TMC) polymers are of a biphasic nature. The micelles are made of a hydrophilic corona with low viscosity while the core of the micelle is more hydrophobic and more viscous. The outer shell is made up of PEG chains, the hydrophobic part of the chains making the core. The partial hydration of the shell seems to lead to a looser chain network than that associated with deeper domains in the micelles. By contrast, in micelles composed of PEG/MOG/SA, there is no clear domain separation. This is consistent with a spatial configuration of random polymeric chains forming a loose network. In these micelles, the microviscosity is low and the hydrophobicity is high.

  7. Perovskite Nanocrystals: Across-dimensional Attachment, Film-scale Assembly on Flexible Substrate and Their Fluorescence Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenyi; Liu, Jiajia; Bai, Bing; Huang, Liu; Xu, Meng; Liu, Jia; Rong, Hongpan; Zhang, Jiatao

    2018-01-16

    Perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), a good fluorescent candidate for excellent photoelectric properties, have opened new avenues in the fabrication of highly efficient solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and other optoelectronic devices. Further advances will rely on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional (3D) perovskites with architectural innovations. In this work, the perovskite film was fabricated on the flexible substrate by simple dip-coating technology and 3D assemblies of perovskite NCs were obtained through an attachment process. Original perovskite NCs had a rectangle or square morphology with high particle uniformity and the narrow and symmetric fluorescence emission peak was adjustable at 515-527 nm. The controllable self-assembly of the micron size cuboid-like 3D assembly had an apparent enhancement on peak (111) in the XRD diffraction pattern. Surface ligands not only play a role in attachment process but also keep the independence of each NC in 3D assemblies. Such assembly perovskite film maintained original perovskite NCs fluorescent emission peak and narrow full width at the half-maximum (FWHM), which is of great importance for the investigation of future devices. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Hg2+-reactive double hydrophilic block copolymer assemblies as novel multifunctional fluorescent probes with improved performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinming; Li, Changhua; Liu, Shiyong

    2010-01-19

    We report on novel type of responsive double hydrophilic block copolymer (DHBC)-based multifunctional chemosensors to Hg(2+) ions, pH, and temperatures and investigate the effects of thermo-induced micellization on the detection sensitivity. Well-defined DHBCs bearing rhodamine B-based Hg(2+)-reactive moieties (RhBHA) in the thermo-responsive block, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-RhBHA) (PEO-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA)), were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Nonfluorescent RhBHA moieties are subjected to selective ring-opening reaction upon addition of Hg(2+) ions or lowering solution pH, producing highly fluorescent acyclic species. Thus, at room temperature PEO-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA) DHBCs can serve as water-soluble multifunctional and efficient fluorescent chemosensors to Hg(2+) ions and pH. Upon heating above the lower critical solution temperature (approximately 36 degrees C) of the PNIPAM block, they self-assemble into micelles possessing P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA) cores and well-solvated PEO coronas, which were fully characterized by dynamic and static laser light scattering. It was found that the detection sensitivity to Hg(2+) ions and pH could be dramatically improved at elevated temperatures due to fluorescence enhancement of RhBHA residues in the acyclic form, which were embedded within hydrophobic cores of thermo-induced micellar aggregates. This work represents a proof-of-concept example of responsive DHBC-based multifunctional fluorescent chemosensors for the highly efficient detection of Hg(2+) ions, pH, and temperatures with tunable detection sensitivity. Compared to reaction-based small molecule Hg(2+) probes in previous literature reports, the integration of stimuli-responsive block copolymers with well-developed small molecule-based selective sensing moieties in the current study are expected to exhibit preferred advantages including enhanced detection sensitivity, water dispersibility

  9. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Dot-Protein Kinase Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yildiz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In search of viable strategies to identify selective inhibitors of protein kinases, we have designed a binding assay to probe the interactions of human phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 with potential ligands. Our protocol is based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between semiconductor quantum dots (QDs and organic dyes. Specifically, we have expressed and purified the catalytic kinase domain of PDK1 with an N-terminal histidine tag [His6-PDK1(ΔPH]. We have conjugated this construct to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs coated with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA and tested the response of the resulting assembly to a molecular dyad incorporating an ATP ligand and a BODIPY chromophore. The supramolecular association of the BODIPY-ATP dyad with the His6-PDK1(ΔPH-QD assembly encourages the transfer of energy from the QDs to the BODIPY dyes upon excitation. The addition of ATP results in the displacement of BODIPY-ATP from the binding domain of the His6-PDK1(ΔPH conjugated to the nanoparticles. The competitive binding, however, does not prevent the energy transfer process. A control experiment with QDs, lacking the His6-PDK1(ΔPH, indicates that the BODIPY-ATP dyad adsorbs nonspecifically on the surface of the nanoparticles, promoting the transfer of energy from the CdSe core to the adsorbed BODIPY dyes. Thus, the implementation of FRET-based assays to probe the binding domain of PDK1 with luminescent QDs requires the identification of energy acceptors unable to interact nonspecifically with the surface of the nanoparticles.

  10. Study of the controlled assembly of DNA gated PEI/Chitosan/SiO2 fluorescent sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zheng; Mi, Yinghao; Zheng, Xingwang

    2017-12-12

    In this paper, polyethylenimine (PEI) and Chitosan were simultaneously one-step doped into silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) nanoparticles to synthesize PEI/Chitosan/SiO2 composite nanoparticles. The polymer PEI contained a large amount of amino groups, which can realize the amino functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles. And, the good pore forming effect of Chitosan was introduced into SiO2 nanoparticles, and the resulting composite nanoparticles also had a porous structure. In pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the amino groups of PEI had positive charges, and therefore the fluorescein sodium dye molecule can be loaded into the channels of PEI/Chitosan/SiO2 composite nanoparticles by electrostatic adsorption. Furthermore, utilizing the diversity of DNA molecular conformation, we designed a high sensitive controllable assembly of DNA gated fluorescent sensor based on PEI/Chitosan/SiO2 composite nanoparticles as loading materials. The factors affecting the sensing performance of the sensor were investigated, and the sensing mechanism was also further studied. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Fluorescent polystyrene photonic crystals self-assembled with water-soluble conjugated polyrotaxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Stasio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate control of the photoluminescence spectra and decay rates of water-soluble green-emitting conjugated polyrotaxanes by incorporating them in polystyrene opals with a stop-band spectrally tuned on the rotaxane emission (405–650 nm. We observe a suppression of the luminescence within the photonic stop-band and a corresponding enhancement of the high-energy edge (405–447 nm. Time-resolved measurements reveal a wavelength-dependent modification of the emission lifetime, which is shortened at the high-energy edge (by ∼11%, in the range 405–447 nm, but elongated within the stop-band (by ∼13%, in the range 448–482 nm. We assign both effects to the modification of the density of photonic states induced by the photonic crystal band structure. We propose the growth of fluorescent composite photonic crystals from blends of “solvent-compatible” non-covalently bonded nanosphere-polymer systems as a general method for achieving a uniform distribution of polymeric dopants in three-dimensional self-assembling photonic structures.

  12. Efficient White-Light Generation from Ionically Self-Assembled Triply-Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Susmita; Debnath, Tanay; Basu, Amrita; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit Kumar; Baker, Gary A; Patra, Amitava

    2016-06-20

    Low cost, simple, and environmentally friendly strategies for white-light generation which do not require rare-earth phosphors or other toxic or elementally scare species remain an essentially unmet challenge. Progress in the area of all-organic approaches is highly sought, single molecular systems remaining a particular challenge. Taking inspiration from the designer nature of ionic-liquid chemistry, we now introduce a new strategy toward white-light emission based on the facile generation of nanoparticles comprising three different fluorophores assembled in a well-defined stoichiometry purely through electrostatic interactions. The building blocks consist of the fluorophores aminopyrene, fluorescein, and rhodamine 6G which represent blue, green, and red-emitting species, respectively. Spherical nanoparticles 16(±5) nm in size were prepared which display bright white-light emission with high fluorescence quantum efficiency (26 %) and color coordinate at (0.29, 0.38) which lie in close proximity to pure white light (0.33, 0.33). It is noteworthy that this same fluorophore mixture in free solution yields only blue emission. Density functional theory calculations reveal H-bond and ground-state proton transfer mediated absolute non-parallel orientation of the constituent units which result in frustrated energy transfer, giving rise to emission from the individual centers and concomitant white-light emission. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuento Matti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs. The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles.

  14. Self-assembly of fluorescent carbon dots in a N,N-dimethylmethanamide solution via Schiff base reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shengliang; Ding, Yanli; Chang, Qing; Trinchi, Adrian; Lin, Kui; Yang, Jinlong; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis.The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and more characterization of carbon dot assemblies. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07119k

  15. Study of ferritin self-assembly and heteropolymer formation by the use of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Fernando; Poli, Maura; Bertuzzi, Michela; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Gangemi, Fabrizio; Arosio, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The high stability and strong self-assembly properties made ferritins the most used proteins for nanotechnological applications. Human ferritins are made of 24 subunits of the H- and L-type that coassemble in an almost spherical nanocage 12nm across, delimiting a large cavity. The mechanism and kinetics of ferritin self-assembly and why H/L heteropolymers formation is favored over the homopolymers remain unclarified. In order to study this, we used the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) tool by binding multiple donor or acceptor Alexa Fluor fluorophores on the outer surface of human H and L ferritins and then denaturing and reassembling them in different proportions and conditions. The FRET efficiency increase from 0.7 in the assembled allowed to study the assembly kinetics. We found that their assembly was complete in about one hour, and that the initial rate of self-assembly of H/L heteropolymers was slightly faster than that of the H/H homopolymers. Then, by adding various proportions of unlabeled H or L-chains to the FRET system we found that the presence of the L-chains displaced the formation of H-H dimers more efficiently than that of the H-chains. This favored formation of H/L heterodimers, which is the initial step in ferritin self-assembly, contributes to explain the preferred formation of H/L heteropolymers over the H or L homopolymers. Moreover, we found that the H-chains arrange at distant positions on the heteropolymeric shell until they reach a number above eight, when they start to co-localize. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Directed self-assembly of fluorescence responsive nanoparticles and their use for real-time surface and cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Shane; O'Shea, Donal F

    2017-12-01

    Directed self-assemblies in water are known as the most efficient means of forming complex higher ordered structures in nature. Here we show a straightforward and robust method for particle assembly which utilises the amphiphilic tri-block co-polymer poloxamer-188 and a hydrophobic fluorophore as the two designer components, which have a built-in ability to convey spatial and temporal information about their surroundings to an observer. Templating of particle self-assembly is attributed to interactions between the fluorophore and hydrophobic segment of the poloxamer. Particle fluorescence in water is quenched but can be induced to selectively switch on in response to temperature, surface adsorption and cellular uptake. The ability of the particles to dynamically modulate emission intensity can be exploited for selective labelling and real-time imaging of drug crystal surfaces, natural fibres and insulin fibrils, and cellular delivery. As particle solutions are easily prepared, further applications for this water-based NIR-fluorescent paint are anticipated.

  17. Photochemical properties and interfacial fluorescence sensing for homocysteine of triptycene orthoquinone layer-by-layer-assembled multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiangying, E-mail: sunxy@hqu.edu.cn; Liu, Bin; Wu, Qiong; Li, Fang

    2014-07-01

    In the present work, the properties of triptycene orthoquinone derivatives were studied. As a kind of good electron-transfer platform, triptycene derivatives with different electron donors or electron acceptors behave distinctively with their luminescent properties. The intensity ratio of fluorescence peaks can be controlled by the number of methoxy groups (electron donor) and orthoquinone groups (electron acceptor) simultaneously. We have assembled 6,7,12,13-4-methoxyl-2, 3-2-orthoquinone triptycene onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to create a probe for detecting biological thiols. The SAMs exhibited higher selectivity toward homocysteine than to other thiol-containing compounds with a fast response and a stable signal over a wide liner range from 2.0 μmol/L to 1.0 mmol/L with the detection limit of 0.52 μmol/L. - Highlights: • A dual fluorescence probe for biological thiols was reported. • This probe is based on triptycene orthoquinones self-assembled mutilayers. • The sensor exhibits higher selectivity toward homocysteine than other thiol compounds.

  18. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Fluorescence Enhancement from Self-Assembled Aggregates II: Factors Influencing Florescence Color from Azobenzene Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mina

    2013-09-01

    We have chosen two types of azobenzene derivatives to elucidate the correlation between molecular structure and fluorescence color of light-driven azobenzene-based aggregates. The fluorescence color from azobenzene molecules (1 and 2), adopting a planar structure, was obviously red-shifted from that of the corresponding twisted ortho-alkylated azobenzene 3. The steric hindrance resulting from bulky alkyl groups at the ortho position of the azo linkage was considered to lessen the intermolecular π - π stacking between aromatic rings, leading to the relatively smaller spectral shift in fluorescence from the absorption band of the initial azobenzene solution. The substitution of electron-withdrawing groups into the azobenzene core gave rise to a blue-shift in fluorescence wavelength. That is, the extended π-conjugated system consisting of a planar azobenzene core as well as the electronic properties of the substituents are key factors influencing the fluorescence color from the light-driven azobenzene aggregates. Moreover, we could prepare fluorescent polymer films by mixing fluorescent azobenzene aggregates with polymers. The fluorescence colors from the polymer films were comparable to those from the azobenzene aggregates.

  20. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Selective, direct detection of acetylcholine in PBS solution, with self-assembled fluorescent nano-particles: experiment and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erieau-Peyrard, Lisa; Coiffier, Claire; Bordat, Patrice; Bégué, Didier; Chierici, Sabine; Pinet, Sandra; Gosse, Isabelle; Baraille, Isabelle; Brown, Ross

    2015-02-14

    We report synthesis, characterisation and molecular modelling of a new fluorescent cyclotriveratrylene probe for acetylcholine in aqueous media, with emission around 430 nm thanks to extended conjugation. The probe discriminates acetylcholine from choline, with respective binding constants 540 and 240 M(-1) in PBS buffered saline solution, an order of magnitude improvement over the previous best performance. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy show the new probe self-assembles in ca. 5 nm diameter particles in PBS medium. Molecular modelling suggests that the high fluorescence quantum yield of the probe, 20% in aqueous media, is due to features of the molecular arrangement in the nano-particles, contributing both to exposure of the complexation site and to shielding of the fluorescent π system from quenching by water. Titration data for other quaternary ammoniums and modelling indicate that recognition of acetylcholine vs. choline depends on specific electrostatic interactions, and to a lesser extent on exclusion of water by hydrophobic-hydrophilic segregation. Probe-substrate interactions enhance the fluorescence of the probe by shielding against water and by flattening the π system.

  3. Sensitive detection of sulfide based on the self-assembly of fluorescent silver nanoclusters on the surface of silica nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yehan; Zhang, Kui; Yu, Huan; Zhu, Houjuan; Sun, Mingtai; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Suhua

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic and flammable gaseous pollutant often emitted to air as a by-product of water supply, chemical, petroleum and coal industries. It can be transferred into sulfur dioxide in the air under some meteorologic conditions. Herein, we report a novel ratiometric fluorescence method for hydrogen sulfide based on silver nanoclusters and quantum dots. The silver nanoclusters have been self-assemblied onto the surface of silica spheres, which are embedded with red fluorescent quantum dots, to form a dual-emissive nanohybrid. Such dual-emissive nanohybrid has been applied for hydrogen sulfide detection on the basis of the interfacial interaction between silver nanoclusters and sulfide ions. The blue-emission of Ag NCs is specifically prone to hydrogen sulfide due to surface binding and etching, but the red-emission of QDs within the silica nanospheres is inert against hydrogen sulfide. The different response of the two components to hydrogen sulfide results in fluorescence color variation from violet to red when the blue fluorescence is gradually quenched. This nanohybrid has been successfully demonstrated for the application in sensitive and selective detection of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solution and gaseous state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Medium dependent dual turn on/turn off fluorescence sensing for Cu2+ions using AMI/SDS assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujar, Varsha B; Ottoor, Divya

    2017-02-15

    Behavior of Amiloride (AMI) as a metal ion sensor in anionic surfactant assemblies of varying concentrations at different pH is depicted in this work. From a non-sensor fluorophore, AMI has been transformed in to a tunable fluorosensor for Cu 2+ ions in various SDS concentrations. At premicellar concentration of SDS, ion-pair complex is expected to be formed between AMI and SDS due to electrostatic interactions between them. However at CMC concentrations of SDS, fluorescence intensity of AMI is greatly enhanced with red shift in emission, due to the incorporation of AMI molecule in the hydrophobic micellar interface. The behavior of metal sensing by AMI-SDS assemblies gives rise to several interesting observations. Micellation of SDS has been greatly enhanced by increasing copper ion concentrations, as these counter ions screens the charge on monomers of SDS which lead to the aggregation at premicellar concentrations only. Concentrations and pH dependent discrete trends of interactions between SDS-AMI and SDS-Cu 2+ ions, have given tunable fluorescence responses (fluorescence turn on/turn off) of AMI for added Cu 2+ ions. The electrostatic interaction between the metal cations and the anionic surfactants is the driving force for bringing the metal ions near to the vicinity of micelle where AMI resides. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism related to the 'turn on-turn off' fluorescence response of AMI with respect to pH and SDS concentration for effective Cu 2+ ion sensing is illustrated in this work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluorescent polymeric assemblies as stimuli-responsive vehicles for drug controlled release and cell/tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Li, Yang; Yu, Shirong; Mao, Jie; Liu, Cheng; Li, Qi; Yuan, Conghui; He, Ning; Luo, Weiang; Dai, Lizong

    2015-01-16

    Polymer assemblies with good biocompatibility, stimuli-responsive properties and clinical imaging capability are desirable carriers for future biomedical applications. Herein, we report on the synthesis of a novel anthracenecarboxaldehyde-decorated poly(N-(4-aminophenyl) methacryl amide-oligoethyleneglycolmonomethylether methacrylate) (P(MAAPAC-MAAP-MAPEG)) copolymer, comprising fluorescent chromophore and acid-labile moiety. This copolymer can assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and shows a spherical shape with well-defined particle size and narrow particle size distribution. The pH-responsive property of the micelles has been evaluated by the change of particle size and the controlled release of guest molecules. The intrinsic fluorescence property endows the micelles with excellent cell/tissue imaging capability. Cell viability evaluation with human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402 cells demonstrates that the micelles are nontoxic. The cellular uptake of the micelles indicates a time-dependent behavior. The H22-tumor bearing mice treated with the micelles clearly exhibits the tumor accumulation. These multi-functional nanocarriers may be of great interest in the application of drug delivery.

  6. Complex assembly behavior during the encapsulation of green fluorescent protein analogs in virus derived protein capsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minten, Inge J.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes encapsulated in nanocontainers are a better model of the conditions inside a living cell than free enzymes in solution. In a first step toward the encapsulation of multiple enzymes inside the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was attached

  7. Exploiting Fluorescent Polymers To Probe the Self-Assembly of Virus-like Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caden-Nava, Ruben D.; Hu, Yufang; Garmann, Rees F.

    2011-01-01

    ), and that the total charge on the PSS exceeds that of the capsid protein by as much as a factor of 9. Here, we extend studies of this kind to PSS molecules that are sufficiently small that two or more can be packaged into VLPs. The use of 38 kDa PSS polymers that have been fluorescently labeled with Rhodamine B...... the molar ratio of protein to PSS in the reaction mix shifts the VLP distribution from T = 1 to T = 2 structures. By combining fluorescence and gel electrophoresis measurements, it is determined that, on average, there are two polymers in each T = 1 capsid and three in each T = 2, with the PSS charge less...

  8. Large Scale Solution Assembly of Quantum Dot - Gold Nanorod Architectures with Plasmon Enhanced Fluorescence (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Park, and Richard A. Vaia 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4347 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER X041 (BN102100) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER AFRL/RXAS 3005 Hobson Way Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 9. SPONSORING...assembly of spherical units via layer-by-layer deposition on particles,n42 direct chemica l coupl ing using molecular/biological linkers,𔄃•20 or

  9. Assembly-line manipulation of droplets in microfluidic platform for fluorescence encoding and simultaneous multiplexed DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyang; Zhou, Guohua; Liu, Yufei; Ye, Tai; Xiang, Xia; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2015-03-01

    In this article, a new mode of droplets manipulation is presented and applied for simultaneous multiplexed DNA detection. We call this droplets manipulation, "assembly-line manipulation of droplets (ALMD)". Firstly, multiple droplets containing the same target mixtures are generated in the microchannel, and then fused with later generated different droplets containing corresponding probes, respectively. Finally, all the fused droplets were fluorescence imaged on-line and real-time. The successful implementation of droplets fluorescence encoding based on ALMD shows the reproducibility and accuracy of this manipulation mode. As a proof-of-concept application, the simultaneous multiplexed DNA detection was carried out through the model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene sequence and variola virus (small pox, VV) gene sequence based on ALMD in the microfluidic system. It is proved that this method achieves simultaneous multiplexed DNA measurements with a significantly time-saving way and without different dye-labelled probes or complex operation procedures. In addition, it reveals the possibility of high-throughput biosensing with simple chip design and detection equipment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In vivo self-assembly of stable green fluorescent protein fusion particles and their uses in enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venning-Slater, Mark; Hooks, David O; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are aggregations of mostly inactive and misfolded proteins. However, previously the in vivo self-assembly of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions into fluorescent particles which displayed specific binding sites suitable for applications in bioseparation and diagnostics was demonstrated. Here, the suitability of GFP particles for enzyme immobilization was assessed. The enzymes tested were a thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis, N-acetyl-d-neuraminic acid aldolase (NanA) from Escherichia coli, and organophosphohydrolase (OpdA) from Agrobacterium radiobacter. Respective GFP particles were isolated and could be stably maintained outside the cell. These enzyme-bearing GFP particles exhibited considerable stability across a range of temperature, pH, and storage conditions and could be recycled. The α-amylase-bearing particles retained activity after treatments at 4 to 85°C and at pHs 4 to 10, were stable for 3 months at 4°C, and could be recycled up to three times. OpdA-bearing particles retained degradation activity after treatments at 4 to 45°C and at pHs 5 to 10 and were able to be recycled up to four times. In contrast, the performance of NanA-bearing particles rapidly declined (>50% loss) after each recycling step and 3 months storage at 4°C. However, they were still able to convert N-acetylmannosamine and pyruvate to N-acetylneuraminic acid after treatment at 4 to 85°C and at pHs 4 to 11. Fluorescent GFP fusion particles represent a novel method for the immobilization and display of enzymes. Potential applications include diagnostic assays, biomass conversion, pharmaceutical production, and bioremediation.

  11. Quantifying the Assembly of Multicomponent Molecular Machines by Single-Molecule Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, E M; Subramanyam, S; Ghoneim, M; Washington, M Todd; Spies, M

    2016-01-01

    Large, dynamic macromolecular complexes play essential roles in many cellular processes. Knowing how the components of these complexes associate with one another and undergo structural rearrangements is critical to understanding how they function. Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful approach for addressing these fundamental issues. In this article, we first discuss single-molecule TIRF microscopes and strategies to immobilize and fluorescently label macromolecules. We then review the use of single-molecule TIRF microscopy to study the formation of binary macromolecular complexes using one-color imaging and inhibitors. We conclude with a discussion of the use of TIRF microscopy to examine the formation of higher-order (i.e., ternary) complexes using multicolor setups. The focus throughout this article is on experimental design, controls, data acquisition, and data analysis. We hope that single-molecule TIRF microscopy, which has largely been the province of specialists, will soon become as common in the tool box of biophysicists and biochemists as structural approaches have become today. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  13. Phenazine-based colorimetric and fluorescent sensor for the selective detection of cyanides based on supramolecular self-assembly in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Li; Wei, Tai-Bao; Li, Wen-Ting; Qu, Wen-Juan; Leng, Yan-Li; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Lin, Qi; Zhang, You-Ming; Yao, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Taking advantages of both the well-known phenazine structure and the mechanism of the supramolecular self-assembly and deprotonation process, the fluorescent and colorimetric sensor (ZL) was designed and synthesized, behaving as a circulation utilization (above 10 times) receptor for selective detection of cyanide anion (CN-) in aqueous media. Upon the addition of CN-, the sensor displayed obvious color changes from yellow to jacinth by naked eyes and the fluorescence immediately quenched (< 10 s). With respect to other common anions, the sensor possessed high selectivity and sensitivity (0.05 μM) for cyanide anions. In addition, the test strips of ZL were fabricated, which could serve as practical colorimetric and fluorescent sensor for "in-the-field" measurements.

  14. In-capillary probing of quantum dots and fluorescent protein self-assembly and displacement using Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhao; Fan, Jie; Li, Jinchen; Liu, Li; Wang, Jianpeng; Jiang, Pengju; Liu, Xiaoqian; Qiu, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Herein, a Förster resonance energy transfer system was designed, which consisted of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots donor and mCherry fluorescent protein acceptor. The quantum dots and the mCherry proteins were conjugated to permit Förster resonance energy transfer. Capillary electrophoresis with fluorescence detection was used for the analyses for the described system. The quantum dots and mCherry were sequentially injected into the capillary, while the real-time fluorescence signal of donor and acceptor was simultaneously monitored by two channels with fixed wavelength detectors. An effective separation of complexes from free donor and acceptor was achieved. Results showed quantum dots and hexahistidine tagged mCherry had high affinity and the assembly was affected by His6 -mCherry/quantum dot molar ratio. The kinetics of the self-assembly was calculated using the Hill equation. The microscopic dissociation constant values for out of- and in-capillary assays were 10.49 and 23.39 μM, respectively. The capillary electrophoresis with fluorescence detection that monitored ligands competition assay further delineated the different binding capacities of histidine containing peptide ligands for binding sites on quantum dots. This work demonstrated a novel approach for the improvement of Förster resonance energy transfer for higher efficiency, increased sensitivity, intuitionistic observation, and low sample requirements of the in-capillary probing system. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Oligonucleotide duplexes and multistrand assemblies with 8-aza-2'-deoxyisoguanosine: a fluorescent isoG(d) shape mimic expanding the genetic alphabet and forming ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dawei; Seela, Frank

    2010-03-24

    8-Aza-2'-deoxyisoguanosine (4) is the first fluorescent shape mimic of 2'-deoxyisoguanosine (1a); its fluorescence is stronger in alkaline medium than under neutral conditions. Nucleoside 4, which was synthesized from 8-aza-2'-deoxyguanosine via a 4,6-diamino intermediate after selective deamination, was incorporated in oligodeoxyribonucleotides using phosphoramidite 11. Duplexes with 4 x m(5)iC(d) (5-methyl-2'-deoxyisocytidine) base pairs are more stable than those incorporating dG-dC pairs, thereby expanding the genetic alphabet by a fluorescent orthogonal base pair. As demonstrated by T(m) measurements, the base pair stability decreases in the order m(5)iC(d) x 4 > dG x 4 > dT x 4 > or = dC x 4 > dA x 4. A better base pairing selectivity of 4 against the canonical nucleosides dT, dC, dA, and dG is observed than for the degenerated base pairing of 1a. The base pair stability changes can be monitored by nucleobase anion fluorescence sensing. The fluorescence change correlates to the DNA base pair stability. Oligonucleotide 5'-d(T(4)4(4)T(4)) (22), containing short runs of nucleoside 4, forms stable multistranded assemblies (ionophores) with K(+) in the central cavity. They are quite stable at elevated temperature but are destroyed at high pH value.

  16. Assembly of the fluorescent acrosomal matrix and its fate in fertilization in the water strider, Aquarius remigis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Noda, Naoki; Fairbairn, Daphne J; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Cardullo, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    Animal sperm show remarkable diversity in both morphology and molecular composition. Here we provide the first report of intense intrinsic fluorescence in an animal sperm. The sperm from a semi-aquatic insect, the water strider, Aquarius remigis, contains an intrinsically fluorescent molecule with properties consistent with those of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which appears first in the acrosomal vesicle of round spermatids and persists in the acrosome throughout spermiogenesis. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that the fluorescent molecule exhibits unrestricted mobility in the acrosomal vesicle of round spermatids but is completely immobile in the acrosome of mature sperm. Fluorescence polarization microscopy shows a net alignment of the fluorescent molecules in the acrosome of the mature sperm but not in the acrosomal vesicle of round spermatids. These results suggest that acrosomal molecules are rearranged in the elongating acrosome and FAD is incorporated into the acrosomal matrix during its formation. Further, we followed the fate of the acrosomal matrix in fertilization utilizing the intrinsic fluorescence. The fluorescent acrosomal matrix was observed inside the fertilized egg and remained structurally intact even after gastrulation started. This observation suggests that FAD is not released from the acrosomal matrix during the fertilization process or early development and supports an idea that FAD is involved in the formation of the acrosomal matrix. The intrinsic fluorescence of the A. remigis acrosome will be a useful marker for following spermatogenesis and fertilization. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Red fluorescent proteins for gene expression and protein localization studies in Streptococcus pneumoniae and efficient transformation with Gibson assembled DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beilharz, Katrin; van Raaphorst, Renske; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, a wide range of fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been developed and improved. This has had a great impact on the possibilities in biological imaging and the investigation of cellular processes at the single cell level. Recently, we have benchmarked a set of green fluorescent

  18. Synthesis and characterization of self-assembled CdHgTe/gelatin nanospheres as stable near infrared fluorescent probes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunqing; Ye, Chao; Wu, Liheng; Hu, Yuzhu

    2010-11-02

    This work presented a kind of novel near infrared emitting CdHgTe/gelatin nanospheres which were synthesized with Cd(NO(3))(2), Hg(NO(3))(2), NaHTe and a thiol stabilizer in gelatin solution. The self-assembled nanospheres were megranate-like and nearly 40 nm in diameter, with CdHgTe QDs uniformly embedded in gelatin matrix. They exhibited strong fluorescence ranging from 580 to 800 nm that could be tuned by molar ratios of Hg(2+) and gelatin. The full widths at half-maximum of the emission spectra were in the range of 60-80 nm. Compared with bare CdHgTe QDs, the photostability of this compact complex nanostructure remarkably improved. Moreover, the fluorescence of CdHgTe/gelatin nanospheres was much more resistant to the interference from certain kinds of endogenous biomolecules such as HSA, transferrin and hemoglobin. Further applications of living cells and mouse imaging were demonstrated with an in vivo near infrared fluorescence imaging system. The inherent advantages of high stability as well as high fluorescence intensity make the nanospheres particular interested NIR bioprobe candidates for in vivo imaging studies. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurement of Fluorescence in a Rhodamine-123 Doped Self-Assembled “Giant” Mesostructured Silica Sphere Using a Smartphone as Optical Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingemar Petermann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The blue OLED emission from a mobile phone was characterised, revealing a sharp emission band centred at λ = 445 nm with a 3dB bandwidth Δλ ~ 20 nm. It was used to excite Rhodamine 123 doped within a “giant” mesostructured silica sphere during fabrication through evaporative self-assembly of silica nanoparticles. Fluorescence was able to be detected using a standard optical microscope fitted with a green transmission pass filter and cooled CCD and with 1 ms exposure time demonstrating the potential of mobile platforms as the basis for portable diagnostics in the field.

  20. The convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer and microfluidics for monitoring DNA polyplex self-assembly in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Ping; Chen, Hunter H; Leong, Kam W; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) and microfluidics, through which molecular interactions were precisely controlled and monitored using highly sensitive quantum-dot-mediated FRET. We demonstrate its potential in studying the kinetics of self-assembly of DNA polyplexes under laminar flow in real time with millisecond resolution. The integration of nanophotonics and microfluidics offers a powerful tool for elucidating the formation of polyelectrolyte polyplexes, which is expected to provide better control and synthesis of uniform and customizable polyplexes for future nucleic acid-based therapeutics. PMID:19417478

  1. The convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer and microfluidics for monitoring DNA polyplex self-assembly in real time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho Yiping; Wang, T-H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University (United States); Chen, Hunter H; Leong, Kam W [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University (United States)], E-mail: thwang@jhu.edu

    2009-03-04

    We present a novel convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) and microfluidics, through which molecular interactions were precisely controlled and monitored using highly sensitive quantum-dot-mediated FRET. We demonstrate its potential in studying the kinetics of self-assembly of DNA polyplexes under laminar flow in real time with millisecond resolution. The integration of nanophotonics and microfluidics offers a powerful tool for elucidating the formation of polyelectrolyte polyplexes, which is expected to provide better control and synthesis of uniform and customizable polyplexes for future nucleic acid-based therapeutics.

  2. Fluorescent π-conjugated polymer dots versus self-assembled small-molecule nanoparticles: what's the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Irén; Kaeser, Adrien; Peters-Gumbs, Mauraline A M; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2013-08-12

    Fluorescent nanoparticles based on π-conjugated small molecules and polymers are two different classes of π-conjugated systems that have attracted much interest. To date, both emerging classes have only been studied separately and showed no clear differences in their properties. Herein these nanoparticles are compared on the basis of a fluorene co-polymer and its corresponding small molecule. Both systems formed nanoparticles with the same diameter, whereas the fluorescence properties clearly differed. In case of the polymer the fluorescence diminished, whereas for the small molecules the fluorescence increased. In addition, the capability of encapsulation and release of a hydrophobic dye from the fluorescent nanoparticles was studied. For the polymer system, encapsulation was highly efficient and no release was observed, whereas for the small molecule system encapsulation was less efficient and release of the dye was observed. These studies show a clear difference between small molecules and polymers which has important implications for the design of fluorescent nanoparticles. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein as a scaffold to assemble an octavalent peptide nanoprobe for enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiming; Yang, Jie; Jin, Honglin; Huang, Chuan; Fu, Jianwei; Yang, Fei; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    Relatively weak tumor affinities and short retention time in vivo hinder the application of targeting peptides in tumor molecular imaging. Multivalent strategies based on various scaffolds have been utilized to improve the ability of peptide-receptor binding or extend the clearance time of peptide-based probes. Here, we use a tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein (tfRFP) as a scaffold to create a self-assembled octavalent peptide fluorescent nanoprobe (Octa-FNP) using a genetic engineering approach. The multiligand connecting, fluorophore labeling and nanostructure formation of Octa-FNP were performed in one step. In vitro studies showed Octa-FNP is a 10-nm fluorescent probe with excellent serum stability. Cellular uptake of Octa-FNP by human nasopharyngeal cancer 5-8F cells is 15-fold of tetravalent probe, ∼80-fold of monovalent probe and ∼600-fold of nulvalent tfRFP. In vivo enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake of Octa-FNP were confirmed using optical imaging and Western blot analysis. It achieved extremely high contrast of Octa-FNP signal between tumor tissue and normal organs, especially seldom Octa-FNP detected in liver and spleen. Owing to easy preparation, precise structural and functional control, and multivalent effect, Octa-FNP provides a powerful tool for tumor optical molecular imaging and evaluating the targeting ability of numerous peptides in vivo.

  4. Hybrid nanostructures of well-organized arrays of colloidal quantum dots and a self-assembled monolayer of gold nanoparticles for enhanced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoying; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials comprised of well-organized arrays of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in close proximity to metal nanoparticles (NPs) represent an appealing system for high-performance, spectrum-tunable photon sources with controlled photoluminescence. Experimental realization of such materials requires well-defined QD arrays and precisely controlled QD-metal interspacing. This long-standing challenge is tackled through a strategy that synergistically combines lateral confinement and vertical stacking. Lithographically generated nanoscale patterns with tailored surface chemistry confine the QDs into well-organized arrays with high selectivity through chemical pattern directed assembly, while subsequent coating with a monolayer of close-packed Au NPs introduces the plasmonic component for fluorescence enhancement. The results show uniform fluorescence emission in large-area ordered arrays for the fabricated QD structures and demonstrate five-fold fluorescence amplification for red, yellow, and green QDs in the presence of the Au NP monolayer. Encapsulation of QDs with a silica shell is shown to extend the design space for reliable QD/metal coupling with stronger enhancement of 11 times through the tuning of QD-metal spatial separation. This approach provides new opportunities for designing hybrid nanomaterials with tailored array structures and multiple functionalities for applications such as multiplexed optical coding, color display, and quantum transduction.

  5. Study of cell-differentiation and assembly of photosynthetic proteins during greening of etiolated Zea mays leaves using confocal fluorescence microspectroscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yutaka; Katoh, Wataru; Tahara, Yukari

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescence microspectroscopy observations were used to study the processes of cell differentiation and assemblies of photosynthesis proteins in Zea mays leaves under the greening process. The observations were done at 78K by setting the sample in a cryostat to avoid any undesired progress of the greening process during the measurements. The lateral and axial spatial resolutions of the system were 0.64μm and 4.4μm, respectively. The study revealed the spatial distributions of protochlorophyllide (PChld) in both the 632-nm-emitting and 655-nm-emitting forms within etiolated Zea mays leaves. The sizes of the fluorescence spots attributed to the former were larger than those of the latter, validating the assignment of the former and latter to the prothylakoid and prolamellar bodies, respectively. In vivo microspectroscopy observations of mature Zea mays leaves confirmed the different photosystem II (PS I)/photosystem I (PS II) ratio between the bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (MS) cells, which is specific for C4-plants. The BS cells in Zea mays leaves 1h after the initiation of the greening process tended to show fluorescence spectra at shorter wavelength side (at around 679nm) than the MS cells (at around 682nm). The 679-nm-emitting chlorophyll-a form observed mainly in the BS cells was attributed to putative precursor complexes to PS I. The BS cells under 3-h greening showed higher relative intensities of the PS I fluorescence band at around 735nm, suggesting the reduced PS II amount in the BS cells in this greening stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In-capillary self-assembly study of quantum dots and protein using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Li, Jinchen; Qin, Yuqin; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2015-07-01

    As a vast number of novel materials in particular inorganic nanoparticles have been invented and introduced to all aspects of life, public concerns about how they might affect our ecosystem and human life continue to arise. Such incertitude roots at a fundamental question of how inorganic nanoparticles self-assemble with biomolecules in solution. Various techniques have been developed to probe the interaction between particles and biomolecules, but very few if any can provide advantages of both rapid and convenient. Herein, we report a systematic investigation on quantum dots (QDs) and protein self-assembly inside a capillary. QDs and protein were injected to a capillary one after another. They were mixed inside the capillary when a high voltage was applied. Online separation and detection were then achieved. This new method can also be used to study the self-assembly kinetics of QDs and protein using the Hill equation, the KD value for the self-assembly of QDs and protein was calculated to be 8.8 μM. The obtained results were compared with the previous out of-capillary method and confirmed the effectiveness of the present method. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Fluorescence detection using optical waveguide collection device with high efficiency on assembly of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaowen; Ma, Zongmin; Qin, Li; Fu, Yueping; Shi, Yunbo; Liu, Jun; Li, Yan Jun

    2018-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a fluorescence waveguide excitation and collection (FWEC) method that allows for an excess of 45% collection efficiency of pump photons into optically detected magnetic resonance. The FWEC system used can collect fluorescence 96 times higher than the confocal system under spin manipulation with a microwave. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the FWEC system is improved 9 times compared with that of the confocal system. In addition, the increase in contrast observed using the FWEC system shows that the integration of the system is much improved with 3D printing technology. Thus, this research has a great potential application in subsequent magnetic detection and quantum optics.

  8. Insights into Insulin Fibril Assembly at Physiological and Acidic pH and Related Amyloid Intrinsic Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Iannuzzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human insulin is a widely used model protein for the study of amyloid formation as both associated to insulin injection amyloidosis in type II diabetes and highly prone to form amyloid fibrils in vitro. In this study, we aim to gain new structural insights into insulin fibril formation under two different aggregating conditions at neutral and acidic pH, using a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron miscroscopy. We reveal that fibrils formed at neutral pH are morphologically different from those obtained at lower pH. Moreover, differences in FTIR spectra were also detected. In addition, only insulin fibrils formed at neutral pH showed the characteristic blue-green fluorescence generally associated to amyloid fibrils. So far, the molecular origin of this fluorescence phenomenon has not been clarified and different hypotheses have been proposed. In this respect, our data provide experimental evidence that allow identifying the molecular origin of such intrinsic property.

  9. Regenerable fluorescent nanosensors for monitoring and recovering metal ions based on photoactivatable monolayer self-assembly and host-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wong, Nai-Kei; Sun, Mingda; Yan, Chunqiu; Ma, Siyuan; Yang, Qingbiao; Li, Yaoxian

    2015-04-29

    Efficient detection, removal, and recovery of heavy metal ions from aqueous environments represents a technologically challenging and ecologically urgent question in the face of increasing metal-related pollution and poisoning across the globe. Although small-molecule and entrapment-based nanoparticle sensors have been extensively explored for metal detection, neither of these extant strategies satisfies the critical needs for high-performance sensors that are inexpensive, efficient, and recyclable. Here we first report the development of a regenerable fluorescent nanosensor system for the selective and sensitive detection of multiple heavy metal ions, based on light-switchable monolayer self-assembly and host-guest interactions. The system exploits photocontrolled inclusion and exclusion responses of an α-cyclodextrin (CD)-containing surface conjugated with photoisomerizable azobenzene as a supramolecular system that undergoes reversible assembly and disassembly. The metal nanosensors can be facilely fabricated and photochemically switched between three chemically distinct entities, each having an excellent capacity for selective detecting specific metal ions (namely, Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Hg(2+)) in a chemical system and in assays on actual water samples with interfering contaminants.

  10. Dual-Targeting Lactoferrin-Conjugated Polymerized Magnetic Polydiacetylene-Assembled Nanocarriers with Self-Responsive Fluorescence/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for In Vivo Brain Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jen-Hung; Chiu, Tsung-Lang; Huang, Wei-Chen; Lai, Yen-Ho; Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Chen, You-Yin; Chen, San-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining a high concentration of therapeutic agents in the brain is difficult due to the restrictions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and rapid removal from blood circulation. To enable controlled drug release and enhance the blood-brain barrier (BBB)-crossing efficiency for brain tumor therapy, a new dual-targeting magnetic polydiacetylene nanocarriers (PDNCs) delivery system modified with lactoferrin (Lf) is developed. The PDNCs are synthesized using the ultraviolet (UV) cross-linkable 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) monomers through spontaneous assembling onto the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles to form micelles-polymerized structures. The results demonstrate that PDNCs will reduce the drug leakage and further control the drug release, and display self-responsive fluorescence upon intracellular uptake for cell trafficking and imaging-guided tumor treatment. The magnetic Lf-modified PDNCs with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual-targeting ability can enhance the transportation of the PDNCs across the BBB for tracking and targeting gliomas. An enhanced therapeutic efficiency can be obtained using Lf-Cur (Curcumin)-PDNCs by improving the retention time of the encapsulated Cur and producing fourfold higher Cur amounts in the brain compared to free Cur. Animal studies also confirm that Lf targeting and controlled release act synergistically to significantly suppress tumors in orthotopic brain-bearing rats. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Self-assembly of [UO{sub 2}X{sub 4}]{sup 2−} (X=Cl, Br) dianions with γ substituted pyridinium cations: Structural systematics and fluorescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surbella, Robert G.; Andrews, Michael B.; Cahill, Christopher L., E-mail: cahill@gwu.edu

    2016-04-15

    Room temperature self-assembly of [UO{sub 2}X{sub 4}]{sup 2−} (X=Cl, Br) with γ substituted pyridinium cations has resulted in the formation of twelve compounds that were studied via single crystal X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. Systematic variation of electron donating groups on the pyridinium species is shown to influence the presence and/or strength of various supramolecular synthons, including hydrogen bonding and pi interactions. Combinations of such non-covalent interactions (NCIs) have given rise to a range of supramolecular assemblies, and are shown to influence uranyl emission by way of second sphere coordination to equatorial ligands. - Graphical abstract: Supramolecular assembly of the [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}]{sup 2−} dianion with pyridinium cations is a viable synthetic route to the growth of uranyl containing single crystals.

  12. Synthesis of core-fluorescent four-armed star and dicyclic 8-shaped poly(THF)s by electrostatic self-assembly and covalent fixation (ESA–CF) protocol

    KAUST Repository

    Fujiwara, Susumu

    2013-12-07

    A pair of four-armed star and dicyclic 8-shaped poly(tetrahydrofuran)s, poly(THF)s, possessing a perylene diimide group at the core position (Ia and Ib, respectively) were synthesized by means of an electrostatic self-assembly and covalent fixation (ESA–CF) protocol. Mono- and bifunctional poly(THF)s having N-phenylpiperidinium salt end groups accompanying a perylene diimide tetracarboxylate as a counteranion were prepared by the ion-exchange reaction, and the subsequent covalent conversion by reflux in toluene afforded the corresponding core-fluorescent four-armed star and dicyclic 8-shaped poly(THF)s, (Ia and Ib, respectively) for the use of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy measurements.

  13. Self-Assembled Gold Nanoparticle-Fluorescent Protein Conjugates as Platforms for Sensing Thiolate Compounds via Modulation of Energy Transfer Quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Anshika; Aldeek, Fadi; Ji, Xin; Safi, Malak; Wang, Wentao; Del Cid, Ada; Steinbock, Oliver; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2017-02-15

    The ability of Au and other metal nanostructures to strongly quench the fluorescence of proximal fluorophores (dyes and fluorescent proteins) has made AuNP conjugates attractive for use as platforms for sensor development based on energy transfer interactions. In this study, we first characterize the energy transfer quenching of mCherry fluorescent proteins immobilized on AuNPs via metal-histidine coordination, where parameters such as NP size and number of attached proteins are varied. Using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, we recorded very high mCherry quenching, with efficiency reaching ∼95-97%, independent of the NP size or number of bound fluorophores (i.e., conjugate valence). We further exploited these findings to develop a solution phase sensing platform targeting thiolate compounds. Energy transfer (ET) was employed as a transduction mechanism to monitor the competitive displacement of mCherry from the Au surface upon the introduction of varying amounts of thiolates with different size and coordination numbers. Our results show that the competitive displacement of mCherry depends on the thiolate concentration, time of reaction, and type of thiol derivatives used. Further analysis of the PL recovery data provides a measure for the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd-1) for these compounds. These findings combined indicate that the AuNP-fluorescent protein conjugates may offer a potentially useful platform for thiol sensing both in solution and in cell cultures.

  14. Capillary-based three-dimensional immunosensor assembly for high-performance detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaoling; Wang, Xu; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-02-04

    A novel capillary-based three-dimensional (3D) fluoroimmunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen detection was explored for the first time. The immunosensor was designed in symmetrical cylinder structure and fabricated with capillary tubes encapsulated in a quartz tube. The 3D design of the sensor increased the area of sensing surface, flexibility in light path design and efficiency of fluorescence collection by aluminum foil, resulting in analytical performance improvement. The CEA immunosensor was constructed in double antibody sandwich format. Fluorescence signals from DyLight 550-labeled antibody were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry. There is an obvious improvement in the linear detection range of 0.7-80 ng/mL. This novel 3D immunosensor dramatically improved the detection limit (1.1 pmol/L CEA) and sensitivity. Assay validation studies indicated that the correlation coefficient reached 0.9935, with recoveries of 92.82-118.81%. Furthermore, the immunosensor was successfully applied to CEA determination in actual saliva specimens with high sensitivity and acceptable precision. Regarding accuracy, the results obtained by 3D immunosensor were not significantly different (t test) from those obtained by validated electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. This new 3D CEA immunosensor was demonstrated to be a high-performance tool for CEA diagnostics.

  15. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S. M.; Richardson, R. W.

    1983-12-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  16. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  17. Layer-by-layer assembled fluorescent probes in the second near-infrared window for systemic delivery and detection of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xiangnan; Gu, Li; Qi, Jifa; Correa, Santiago; Zhang, Geran; Belcher, Angela M; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-05-10

    Fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II, 1,000-1,700 nm) features deep tissue penetration, reduced tissue scattering, and diminishing tissue autofluorescence. Here, NIR-II fluorescent probes, including down-conversion nanoparticles, quantum dots, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and organic dyes, are constructed into biocompatible nanoparticles using the layer-by-layer (LbL) platform due to its modular and versatile nature. The LbL platform has previously been demonstrated to enable incorporation of diagnostic agents, drugs, and nucleic acids such as siRNA while providing enhanced blood plasma half-life and tumor targeting. This work carries out head-to-head comparisons of currently available NIR-II probes with identical LbL coatings with regard to their biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and toxicities. Overall, rare-earth-based down-conversion nanoparticles demonstrate optimal biological and optical performance and are evaluated as a diagnostic probe for high-grade serous ovarian cancer, typically diagnosed at late stage. Successful detection of orthotopic ovarian tumors is achieved by in vivo NIR-II imaging and confirmed by ex vivo microscopic imaging. Collectively, these results indicate that LbL-based NIR-II probes can serve as a promising theranostic platform to effectively and noninvasively monitor the progression and treatment of serous ovarian cancer.

  18. Fluorescent Cross-Linked Supramolecular Polymer Constructed by Orthogonal Self-Assembly of Metal-Ligand Coordination and Host-Guest Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaomin; Gong, Weitao; Li, Xiaopeng; Fang, Le; Kuang, Xiaojun; Ning, Guiling

    2016-05-10

    A new host molecule consists of four terpyridine groups as the binding sites with zinc(II) ion and a copillar[5]arene incorporated in the center as a spacer to interact with guest molecule was designed and synthesized. Due to the 120 ° angle of the rigid aromatic segment, a cross-linked dimeric hexagonal supramolecular polymer was therefore generated as the result of the orthogonal self-assembly of metal-ligand coordination and host-guest interaction. UV/Vis spectroscopy, (1) H NMR spectroscopy, viscosity and dynamic light-scattering techniques were employed to characterize and understand the cross-linking process with the introduction of zinc(II) ion and guest molecule. More importantly, well-defined morphology of the self-assembled supramolecular structure can be tuned by altering the adding sequence of the two components, that is, the zinc(II) ion and the guest molecule. In addition, introduction of a competitive ligand suggested the dynamic nature of the supramolecular structure. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Self-assembly of chiral fluorescent nanoparticles based on water-soluble L-tryptophan derivatives of p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel L. Padnya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New water-soluble tetra-substituted derivatives of p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene containing fragments of L-tryptophan in cone and 1,3-alternate conformations were obtained. It was shown that the resulting compounds form stable, positively charged aggregates of 86–134 nm in diameter in water at a concentration of 1 × 10−4 M as confirmed by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was established that these aggregates are fluorescently active and chiral. A distinctive feature of the compounds is the pronounced dependence of their spectral (emission and chiroptical properties on the polarity of the solvent and the length of the linker between the macrocyclic and fluorophore parts of the molecule.

  20. Self-assembly of chiral fluorescent nanoparticles based on water-soluble L-tryptophan derivatives of p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padnya, Pavel L; Khripunova, Irina A; Mostovaya, Olga A; Mukhametzyanov, Timur A; Evtugyn, Vladimir G; Vorobev, Vyacheslav V; Osin, Yuri N; Stoikov, Ivan I

    2017-01-01

    New water-soluble tetra-substituted derivatives of p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene containing fragments of L-tryptophan in cone and 1,3-alternate conformations were obtained. It was shown that the resulting compounds form stable, positively charged aggregates of 86-134 nm in diameter in water at a concentration of 1 × 10-4 M as confirmed by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was established that these aggregates are fluorescently active and chiral. A distinctive feature of the compounds is the pronounced dependence of their spectral (emission and chiroptical) properties on the polarity of the solvent and the length of the linker between the macrocyclic and fluorophore parts of the molecule.

  1. Four thiophene-pyridyl-amide-based Zn{sup II}/Cd{sup II} coordination polymers: Assembly, structures, photocatalytic properties and fluorescent recognition for Fe{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wu, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Guo-Cheng; Li, Qiao-Min; Lin, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xiang

    2017-05-15

    By tuning metal ions and combining with different dicarboxylates, four new semi-rigid thiophene-bis-pyridyl-bis-amide-based coordination polymers, namely, [Zn(3-bptpa)(1,3-BDC)]·DMA·2H{sub 2}O (1), [Zn(3-bptpa)(5-MIP)] (2), [Cd(3-bptpa)(1,3-BDC)]·2H{sub 2}O (3) and [Cd(3-bptpa)(5-MIP)]·4H{sub 2}O (4) (3-bptpa=N,N′-bis(pyridine-3-yl)thiophene-2,5-dicarboxamide, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 5-H{sub 2}MIP=5-methylisophthalic acid, DMA=N,N-dimethylacetamide), were solvothermally/hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR spectra, UV–vis diffuse-reflectance spectra (DRS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermal gravimetric analyses (TG). The structural analysis reveals that Zn-complexes 1 and 2 are similar 2D networks. While Cd-complexes 3 and 4 exhibit similar 2-fold interpenetrating 3D α-Po frameworks with the (4{sup 12}·6{sup 3}) topology. The photocatalytic properties for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under ultraviolet light irradiation of the title complexes have been investigated in detail. Furthermore, the luminescent sensing behaviors for metal cations of 1–4 have been studied, the results indicate that 3 is an excellent fluorescent probe, with high sensitivity, selectivity, and simple regeneration, for environmentally relevant Fe{sup 3+} ions. - Graphical abstract: Four Zn{sup II}/Cd{sup II} coordination polymers with a thiophene-pyridyl-amide ligand have been prepared. The photocatalytic activities and fluorescent sensing properties for metal ions of the title complexes have been investigated. - Highlights: • Four coordination polymers with thiophene-pyridyl-amide ligands have been obtained. • The central metal ions play an important role in the formation of the frameworks. • The photoluminescent sensing and the photocatalytic properties have been investigated.

  2. Four thiophene-pyridyl-amide-based ZnII/CdII coordination polymers: Assembly, structures, photocatalytic properties and fluorescent recognition for Fe3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wu, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Guo-Cheng; Li, Qiao-Min; Lin, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xiang

    2017-05-01

    By tuning metal ions and combining with different dicarboxylates, four new semi-rigid thiophene-bis-pyridyl-bis-amide-based coordination polymers, namely, [Zn(3-bptpa)(1,3-BDC)]·DMA·2H2O (1), [Zn(3-bptpa)(5-MIP)] (2), [Cd(3-bptpa)(1,3-BDC)]·2H2O (3) and [Cd(3-bptpa)(5-MIP)]·4H2O (4) (3-bptpa=N,N‧-bis(pyridine-3-yl)thiophene-2,5-dicarboxamide, 1,3-H2BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 5-H2MIP=5-methylisophthalic acid, DMA=N,N-dimethylacetamide), were solvothermally/hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR spectra, UV-vis diffuse-reflectance spectra (DRS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermal gravimetric analyses (TG). The structural analysis reveals that Zn-complexes 1 and 2 are similar 2D networks. While Cd-complexes 3 and 4 exhibit similar 2-fold interpenetrating 3D α-Po frameworks with the (412·63) topology. The photocatalytic properties for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under ultraviolet light irradiation of the title complexes have been investigated in detail. Furthermore, the luminescent sensing behaviors for metal cations of 1-4 have been studied, the results indicate that 3 is an excellent fluorescent probe, with high sensitivity, selectivity, and simple regeneration, for environmentally relevant Fe3+ ions.

  3. Enzyme-Directed Assembly of Nanoparticles in Tumors Monitored by In Vivo Whole Animal and Ex Vivo Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Miao-Ping; Carlini, Andrea S.; Hu, Dehong; Barback, Christopher V.; Rush, Anthony M.; Hall, David J.; Orr, Galya; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2013-12-18

    Matrix metalloproteinase enzymes, overexpressed in HT-1080 human fibrocarcinoma tumors, were used to guide the accumulation and retention of an enzyme-responsive nanoparticle in a xenograft mouse model. The nanoparticles were prepared as micelles from amphiphilic block copolymers bearing a simple hydrophobic block, and a hydrophilic peptide brush. The polymers were end-labeled with Alexa Fluor 647 dyes leading to the formation of labeled micelles upon dialysis of the polymers from DMSO to aqueous buffer. This dye-labeling strategy allowed the presence of the retained material to be visualized via whole animal imaging in vivo, and in ex vivo organ analysis following intratumoral injection into HT-1080 xenograft tumors. We propose that the material is retained by virtue of an enzyme-induced accumulation process whereby particles change morphology from 20 nm spherical micelles to micron-scale aggregates, kinetically trapping them within the tumor. This hypothesis is tested here via an unprecedented super resolution fluorescence analysis of ex vivo tissue slices confirming a particle size increase occurs concomitantly with extended retention of responsive particles compared to unresponsive controls.

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...... the foundations of the fluorescence phenomenon, introduces some general methodologies and provides selected examples on applications focused to disentangle structural and dynamical aspects of biological processes....

  5. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Nikolay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors.

  6. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...... and plays an important role in processing the information generated by these methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current publicly available sequence assembly programs. We describe the basic principles of computational assembly along with the main concerns, such as repetitive sequences...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  7. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Bruce A.; Siminovitch, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  8. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Cross-Reactive Sensor Array for Metal Ion Sensing Based on Fluorescent SAMs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basabe Desmonts, M.L.; van der Baan, Frederieke; Zimmerman, R.S.; Reinhoudt, David; Crego Calama, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass were previouslydeveloped in our group as new sensing materials for metal ions. These fluorescent SAMs arecomprised by fluorophores and small molecules sequentially deposited on a monolayer onglass. The preorganization provided by the surface

  10. Super-resolution imaging of self-assembly of amphiphilic photoswitchable macrocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qiong-Xin; Xin, Bo; Xiong, Zu-Jing; Gong, Wen-Liang; Li, Chong; Huang, Zhen-Li; Zhu, Ming-Qiang

    2017-02-28

    Self-assembly of an amphiphilic photoswitchable fluorescent macrocycle methoxy-tetraethylene glycol-substituted hexaarylbiimidazole-borondipyrromethene can be observed directly under a super-resolution fluorescence microscope, with the nanoscale resolution beyond the optical diffraction limitation.

  11. Fluorescent carbon nanomaterials: "quantum dots" or nanoclusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekaliuk, Mariia O; Viagin, Oleg; Malyukin, Yuriy V; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2014-08-14

    Despite many efforts, the mechanisms of light absorption and emission of small fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (C-dots) are still unresolved and are a subject of active discussion. In this work we address the question as to whether the fluorescence is a collective property of these nanoparticles or they are composed of assembled individual emitters. Selecting three types of C-dots with "violet", "blue" and "green" emissions and performing a detailed study of fluorescence intensity, lifetime and time-resolved anisotropy as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths together with the effect of viscogen and dynamic fluorescence quencher, we demonstrate that the C-dots represent assemblies of surface-exposed fluorophores. They behave as individual emitters, display electronic anisotropy, do not exchange their excited-state energies via homo-FRET and possibly display sub-nanosecond intra-particle mobility.

  12. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Koktysh, Dmitry; Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and visible light-emitting (~600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. Synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron ...

  13. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  14. Time resolved fluorescence of naproxen in organogel medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguete, M. Isabel; Izquierdo, M. Angeles; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen and the self assembled fibrillar network created by a low molecular weight organogelator has been probed by means of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  15. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  16. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  17. Fluorescence of dyes adsorbed on highly organized nanostructured gold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, S.; Mourran, Ahmed; Spatz, Joachim P.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David; Möller, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that fluorescent dyes can be adsorbed selectively on gold nanoparticles which are immobilized on a glass substrate and that the fluorescence originating from the adsorbed dyes exhibits significantly less quenching when compared to dyes adsorbed on bulk gold. Self-assembled monolayers of

  18. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  19. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  20. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  1. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  2. Programming protein self assembly with coiled coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Hendrik; Bornschloegl, Thomas; Heym, Roland; Koenig, Frauke; Rief, Matthias [Physik Department E22, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The controlled assembly of protein domains into supramolecular structures will be an important prerequisite for the use of functional proteins in future nanotechnology applications. Coiled coils are multimerization motifs whose dimerization properties can be programmed by amino acid sequence. Here, we report programmed supramolecular self-assembly of protein molecules using coiled coils and directly demonstrate its potential on the single molecule level by AFM force spectroscopy. We flanked two different model proteins, Ig27 from human cardiac titin and green fluorescent protein (GFP), by coiled coil binding partners and studied the capability of these elementary building blocks to self-assemble into linear chains. Simple sterical constraints are shown to control the assembly process, providing evidence that many proteins can be assembled with this method. An application for this technique is the design of polyproteins for single molecule force spectroscopy with an integrated force-calibration standard.

  3. Introduction to fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiran, Ionita C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of basic principles of fluorescence microscopy, including a brief history on the invention of this type of microscopy. The chapter highlights important points related to properties of fluorochromes, resolution in fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast and fluorescence, fluorescence filters, construction of a fluorescence microscope, and tips on the correct use of this equipment.

  4. Directed Supramolecular Surface Assembly of SNAP-tag Fusion Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlenheuer, D.A.; Wasserberg, D.; Haase, C.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Schenkel, J.H.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Ravoo, B.J.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular assembly of proteins on surfaces and vesicles was investigated by site-selective incorporation of a supramolecular guest element on proteins. Fluorescent proteins were site-selectively labeled with bisadamantane by SNAP-tag technology. The assembly of the bisadamantane functionalized

  5. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  6. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy of Single Fluorescent Dendritic Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Levi, S.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David; van Hulst, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Individual dendritic molecules adsorbed o­n glass containing a single fluorescent rhodamine B core have been observed with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM); height and fluorescence images were obtained simultaneously. The dendritic assemblies can be discriminated from free fluorescent

  8. 77 FR 5420 - Airworthiness Directives; Aeronautical Accessories Inc. High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Accessories Inc. High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for the Aeronautical Accessories Inc. (AAI) High Landing Gear Aft Crosstube Assembly (aft... aft crosstube assembly, removing paint and sealant, and fluorescent penetrant inspecting each aft...

  9. Fabrication of fluorescent chitosan-containing microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang R.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intense emission peaks of Eu(DBM3Phen (DBM and Phen are dibenzoylmethane and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively in the microcapsules containing molecules of quaternary ammonium chitosan (QACS and sodium alginate are observed. The microcapsules are assembled by using CaCO3 particles as template cores by the layer-by-layer (LbL technique. Observation of microcapsules by the fluorescence mode and the transmission mode in the confocal laser scanning microscopy shows that the microcapsules are intact after core decomposition. Fluorescence under ultraviolet irradiation comes directly from the Eu(DBM3Phen. Homogeneous assembly of Eu(DBM3Phen can be deduced due to the homogeneous fluorescence of the microcapsules in the fluorescence micrographs. The microcapsules show adherence to solid substrates due to large quantities of hydroxyl groups of QACS. AFM measurements of dried hollow microcapsules with only 4 bilayers of (CS/SA fabricated with Eu(DBM3Phen show the intact shell with a thickness of 3.0 nm. Regarding the biocompatible natural polysaccharides and the intense fluorescence emission, the microcapsules in this work might be of great importance in potential application in drug delivery and bioassay.

  10. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bos taurus genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Song, Xing-Zhi Henry; Jiang, Huaiyang; Shen, Yufeng; Durbin, K James; Lien, Sigbjørn; Kent, Matthew Peter; Sodeland, Marte; Ren, Yanru; Zhang, Lan; Sodergren, Erica; Havlak, Paul; Worley, Kim C; Weinstock, George M; Gibbs, Richard A

    2009-04-24

    We present here the assembly of the bovine genome. The assembly method combines the BAC plus WGS local assembly used for the rat and sea urchin with the whole genome shotgun (WGS) only assembly used for many other animal genomes including the rhesus macaque. The assembly process consisted of multiple phases: First, BACs were assembled with BAC generated sequence, then subsequently in combination with the individual overlapping WGS reads. Different assembly parameters were tested to separately optimize the performance for each BAC assembly of the BAC and WGS reads. In parallel, a second assembly was produced using only the WGS sequences and a global whole genome assembly method. The two assemblies were combined to create a more complete genome representation that retained the high quality BAC-based local assembly information, but with gaps between BACs filled in with the WGS-only assembly. Finally, the entire assembly was placed on chromosomes using the available map information.Over 90% of the assembly is now placed on chromosomes. The estimated genome size is 2.87 Gb which represents a high degree of completeness, with 95% of the available EST sequences found in assembled contigs. The quality of the assembly was evaluated by comparison to 73 finished BACs, where the draft assembly covers between 92.5 and 100% (average 98.5%) of the finished BACs. The assembly contigs and scaffolds align linearly to the finished BACs, suggesting that misassemblies are rare. Genotyping and genetic mapping of 17,482 SNPs revealed that more than 99.2% were correctly positioned within the Btau_4.0 assembly, confirming the accuracy of the assembly. The biological analysis of this bovine genome assembly is being published, and the sequence data is available to support future bovine research.

  12. Bos taurus genome assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodergren Erica

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present here the assembly of the bovine genome. The assembly method combines the BAC plus WGS local assembly used for the rat and sea urchin with the whole genome shotgun (WGS only assembly used for many other animal genomes including the rhesus macaque. Results The assembly process consisted of multiple phases: First, BACs were assembled with BAC generated sequence, then subsequently in combination with the individual overlapping WGS reads. Different assembly parameters were tested to separately optimize the performance for each BAC assembly of the BAC and WGS reads. In parallel, a second assembly was produced using only the WGS sequences and a global whole genome assembly method. The two assemblies were combined to create a more complete genome representation that retained the high quality BAC-based local assembly information, but with gaps between BACs filled in with the WGS-only assembly. Finally, the entire assembly was placed on chromosomes using the available map information. Over 90% of the assembly is now placed on chromosomes. The estimated genome size is 2.87 Gb which represents a high degree of completeness, with 95% of the available EST sequences found in assembled contigs. The quality of the assembly was evaluated by comparison to 73 finished BACs, where the draft assembly covers between 92.5 and 100% (average 98.5% of the finished BACs. The assembly contigs and scaffolds align linearly to the finished BACs, suggesting that misassemblies are rare. Genotyping and genetic mapping of 17,482 SNPs revealed that more than 99.2% were correctly positioned within the Btau_4.0 assembly, confirming the accuracy of the assembly. Conclusion The biological analysis of this bovine genome assembly is being published, and the sequence data is available to support future bovine research.

  13. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  14. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  15. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  16. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  17. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    C -1 D FLUORESCENT LAMP SPECIFICATION SHEETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D -1 E LED WAVES’ LED ...friendly products, advances in efficiency, and lower production costs for lamps . The conversion of fluorescent bulbs to LED technology has many benefits...repeatedly turned on and off. (5) LEDs can be used in existing fluorescent lighting fixtures using LED retrofit kits or replacement lamps . (6

  18. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  19. Firearm trigger assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  20. Spontaneous Assembly of Exopolymers from Phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Xue Ding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton exopolymeric substances (EPS contribute significantly to the dissolved organic car bon (DOC pool in the ocean, playing crucial roles in the surface ocean car bon cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that ~10% of marine DOC can self-assemble as microgels through electro static Ca bonds providing hotspots of enriched microbial substrate. How ever, the question whether EPS can self-assemble and the formation mechanisms for EPS microgels have not been examined. Here were port that EPS from three representative phytoplankton species, Synechococcus, Emiliania huxleyi, and Skeletonema costatum can spontaneously self assemble in artificial sea water (ASW, forming microscopic gels of ~ 3 - 4 __m in diameter. Different from the marine DOC polymers assembly, these EPS samples can self-assemble in Ca2+-free ASW. Further experiments from fluorescence enhancement and chemical composition analysis confirmed the existence of fair amounts of hydrophobic domains in these EPS samples. These results suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a key role in the assembly of EPS from these three species of marine phytoplankton.

  1. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Samuel M.; Richardson, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  2. FAITH – Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadravová, Romana [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Rumlová, Michaela, E-mail: michaela.rumlova@vscht.cz [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Biotechnology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Ruml, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.ruml@vscht.cz [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Due to the high number of drug-resistant HIV-1 mutants generated by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there is continuing demand for new types of inhibitors. Both the assembly of the Gag polyprotein into immature and mature HIV-1 particles are attractive candidates for the blocking of the retroviral life cycle. Currently, no therapeutically-used assembly inhibitor is available. One possible explanation is the lack of a reliable and simple assembly inhibitor screening method. To identify compounds potentially inhibiting the formation of both types of HIV-1 particles, we developed a new fluorescent high-throughput screening assay. This assay is based on the quantification of the assembly efficiency in vitro in a 96-well plate format. The key components of the assay are HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins and a dual-labelled oligonucleotide, which emits fluorescence only when the assembly of retroviral particles is inhibited. The method was validated using three (CAI, BM2, PF74) reported assembly inhibitors. - Highlights: • Allows screening of assembly inhibitors of both mature and immature HIV-1 particles. • Based on Gag-derived proteins with CA in mature or immature conformation. • Simple and sensitive method suitable for high-throughput screening of inhibitors. • Unlike in other HIV assembly methods, works under physiological conditions. • No washing steps are necessary.

  3. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  4. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields, solvent-polarity- dependent fluorescence behavior, susceptibility to quenching by certain chemical species, and/or two-photon fluorescence, none of them has the combination of all of these attributes. Because the present dyes do have all of these attributes

  5. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  6. A smart ZnO@polydopamine-nucleic acid nanosystem for ultrasensitive live cell mRNA imaging by the target-triggered intracellular self-assembly of active DNAzyme nanostructures† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Oligonucleotide sequences, DLS and zeta potential measurements, TEM images, absorption and fluorescence spectra, cytotoxicity assay and CLSM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04633a Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dinggeng; He, Xing; Yang, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Efficient strategies for the ultrasensitive imaging of gene expression in living cells are essential in chemistry and cell biology. Here, we report a novel and efficient enzyme-free dual signal amplification strategy for live cell mRNA imaging by using a smart nucleic acid hairpin-based nanosystem. This nanosystem consists of a ZnO nanoparticle core, an interlayer of polydopamine and an outer layer of four hairpin DNA (hpDNA) probes. Such a core–shell nanosystem facilitates the cellular uptake of molecular hairpin payloads, protects them from nuclease digestion, and delivers them into the cytoplasm by the acid-triggered dissolution of the ZnO core. In the presence of target mRNA, the released hpDNA probes self-assemble via HCR into wire-shaped active DNAzymes that catalyze the generation of a fluorescence signal. The target-initiated HCR events and DNAzyme cascades offer efficient dual amplification and enable the ultrasensitive detection of mRNA with a femtomolar detection limit. Live cell assays show an intense fluorescence response from a tumor-related biomarker survivin mRNA only in tumor cells untreated with a survivin expression repressor YM155, but not in normal cells. The developed nanosystem provides a potential platform for the amplified imaging of low-abundance disease-related biomarkers in live cells. PMID:28553521

  7. Mauve assembly metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Aaron E; Tritt, Andrew; Eisen, Jonathan A; Facciotti, Marc T

    2011-10-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have spurred the development of numerous novel methods for genome assembly. With few exceptions, these algorithms are heuristic and require one or more parameters to be manually set by the user. One approach to parameter tuning involves assembling data from an organism with an available high-quality reference genome, and measuring assembly accuracy using some metrics. We developed a system to measure assembly quality under several scoring metrics, and to compare assembly quality across a variety of assemblers, sequence data types, and parameter choices. When used in conjunction with training data such as a high-quality reference genome and sequence reads from the same organism, our program can be used to manually identify an optimal sequencing and assembly strategy for de novo sequencing of related organisms. GPL source code and a usage tutorial is at http://ngopt.googlecode.com aarondarling@ucdavis.edu Supplementary data is available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for ...

  9. Off-on Fluorescent Sensor from On-off Sensor: Exploiting Silver Nanoparticles Influence on the Organic Fluorophore Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, P S; Sivasubramanian, Arvind; Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip

    2014-03-01

    Turn-off fluorescence of organic fluorophore, 2-{[4-(2H-Naphtho[1,2-d][1,2,3]triazol-2-yl)-phenyl]carboxylic acid (NTPC), with metal ions (Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+)) was converted into turn-on fluorescent sensor for biologically important Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) metal ions in aqueous solution at ppb level by exploiting strong fluorescence quenching phenomena of metal nanoparticles when organic fluorophores assembled in the vicinity of metallic surface. Amino acid attached phenolic ligands (L) were used as reducing as well as functional capping agents in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The hydrogen bonding functionality of L facilitated the assembling of NTPC in the vicinity of metallic surfaces that leads to complete quenching of NTPC fluorescence. The strong and selective coordination of L with metal ions (Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and Fe(3+)) separates the NTPC from the AgNPs surface that turn-on the NTPC fluorescence. HR-TEM and absorption studies confirm the metal coordination with L and separation of NTPC from the AgNPs surface. Mn(2+) showed selective red shifting of NTPC fluorescence after 12 h with all sample. Effects of different amino acid attached phenolic ligands were explored in the metal ion sensitivity and selectivity. This approach demonstrates the multifunctional utility of metal NPs in the development of turn-on fluorescence sensor for paramagnetic heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. ᅟ

  10. DNA Self-assembly Catalyzed by Artificial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Menghua; Ma, Cuiping

    2017-07-28

    Nucleic acids have been shown to be versatile molecules and engineered to produce various nanostructures. However, the poor rate of these uncatalyzed nucleic acid reactions has restricted the development and applications. Herein, we reported a novel finding that DNA self-assembly could be nonenzymatically catalyzed by artificial agents with an increasing dissociation rate constant K2. The catalytic role of several artificial agents in DNA self-assembly was verified by real-time fluorescent detection or agarose gel electrophoresis. We found that 20% PEG 200 could significantly catalyze DNA self-assembly and increase the reaction efficiency, such as linear hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and exponential hairpin assembly (EHA). Therefore, we foresee that a fast and efficient DNA self-assembly in structural DNA nanotechnology will be desirable.

  11. Metal selective co-ordinative self-assembly of -donors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and Ag+. With different fluorescent response for metal complexes, we essentially obtained similar 1-D assemblies suggesting similar binding modes for all of them. Supramolecular approach through which morphology of an electron donor moiety can be engineered by metal ions can be a new tool in nanoelectronics.

  12. Experiments with Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-10-01

    The experiments described below show the irradiance and illuminance spectra of two fluorescent lamps in relation to their color temperatures, and the efficacy in comparison to that of an incandescent lamp. Spectra of "warm white" and "cool daylight" fluorescent lamps are demonstrated.

  13. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  14. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  15. Multicolor, Fluorescent Supercapacitor Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meng; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Jingxia; Xie, Songlin; Fu, Xuemei; Sun, Xuemei; Wang, Bingjie; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-10-05

    Fiber-shaped supercapacitors have attracted broad attentions from both academic and industrial communities due to the demonstrated potentials as next-generation power modules. However, it is important while remains challenging to develop dark-environment identifiable supercapacitor fibers for enhancement on operation convenience and security in nighttime applications. Herein, a novel family of colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers has been produced from aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets. Fluorescent dye particles are introduced and stably anchored on the surfaces of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes to prepare hybrid fiber electrodes with a broad range of colors from red to purple. The fluorescent component in the dye introduces fluorescent indication capability to the fiber, which is particularly promising for flexible and wearable devices applied in dark environment. In addition, the colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers also maintain high electrochemical performance under cyclic bending and charge-discharge processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  17. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  18. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  19. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  20. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koktysh, Dmitry [Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Station B 351822, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington, E-mail: dmitry.koktysh@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: wellington.pham@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue South AA, 1105 MCN, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-07-08

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by the conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and visible light emitting ({approx}600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. The synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering analysis, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescent imaging. The luminescence imaging region of the nanoprobe was extended to the near-infrared (NIR) ({approx}800 nm) by conjugation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with synthesized CdHgTe/CdS QDs. Cadmium, mercury based QDs in HINP can be easily replaced by novel water-soluble glutathione stabilized AgInS{sub 2}/ZnS QDs to present a new class of cadmium-free multimodal imaging agents. The observed NIR photoluminescence of fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites supports their use for bioimaging. The developed HINP provides dual-imaging channels for simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koktysh, Dmitry; Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington

    2011-07-01

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by the conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and visible light emitting (~600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. The synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering analysis, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescent imaging. The luminescence imaging region of the nanoprobe was extended to the near-infrared (NIR) (~800 nm) by conjugation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with synthesized CdHgTe/CdS QDs. Cadmium, mercury based QDs in HINP can be easily replaced by novel water-soluble glutathione stabilized AgInS2/ZnS QDs to present a new class of cadmium-free multimodal imaging agents. The observed NIR photoluminescence of fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites supports their use for bioimaging. The developed HINP provides dual-imaging channels for simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  3. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...... and updated data reporting formats are also required....

  4. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  5. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  6. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-07-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  9. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid, and in some cases surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assembles within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells, and how these are modified in cases where the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques that have been used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly which are likely to receive significant attention in the near future. PMID:25532951

  10. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  11. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Paul A.; Church, Deanna M.; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D.; Pruitt, Kim D.; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-01

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site. PMID:26578580

  12. Fluorescent radiation converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  13. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ; Sun, Yiru [Princeton, NJ; Giebink, Noel [Princeton, NJ; Thompson, Mark E [Anaheim Hills, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  14. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  15. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluorescence-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strianese, Maria; Staiano, Maria; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Labella, Tullio; Pellecchia, Claudio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2012-01-01

    The field of optical sensors has been a growing research area over the last three decades. A wide range of books and review articles has been published by experts in the field who have highlighted the advantages of optical sensing over other transduction methods. Fluorescence is by far the method most often applied and comes in a variety of schemes. Nowadays, one of the most common approaches in the field of optical biosensors is to combine the high sensitivity of fluorescence detection in combination with the high selectivity provided by ligand-binding proteins. In this chapter we deal with reviewing our recent results on the implementation of fluorescence-based sensors for monitoring environmentally hazardous gas molecules (e.g. nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide). Reflectivity-based sensors, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-based (FCS) systems, and sensors relying on the enhanced fluorescence emission on silver island films (SIFs) coupled to the total internal reflection fluorescence mode (TIRF) for the detection of gliadin and other prolamines considered toxic for celiac patients are also discussed herein.

  17. Dynamic Nanoparticles Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, LIBING; XU, LIGUANG; KUANG, HUA; XU, CHUANLAI; KOTOV, NICHOLAS A.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Importance Although nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are at the beginning of their development, their unique geometrical shapes and media-responsive optical, electronic and magnetic properties have attracted significant interest. Nanoscale assembly bridges multiple sizes of materials: individual nanoparticles, discrete molecule-like or virus-like nanoscale agglomerates, microscale devices, and macroscale materials. The capacity to self-assemble can greatly facilitate the integration of nanotechnology with other technologies and, in particular, with microscale fabrication. In this Account, we describe developments in the emerging field of dynamic NP assemblies, which are spontaneously formed superstructures containing more than two inorganic nanoscale particles that display ability to change their geometrical, physical, chemical, and other attributes. In many ways, dynamic assemblies can represent a bottleneck in the ‘bottom-up’ fabrication of NP-based devices because they can produce a much greater variety of assemblies, but they also provide a convenient tool for variation of geometries and dimensions of nanoparticle assemblies. Classification Superstructures of NPs (and those held together by similar intrinsic forces) are classified into two groups: Class 1 where media and external fields can alter shape, conformation, and order of stable superstructures with a nearly constant number same. The future development of successful dynamic assemblies requires understanding the equilibrium in dynamic NP systems. The dynamic nature of Class 1 assemblies is associated with the equilibrium between different conformations of a superstructure and is comparable to the isomerization in classical chemistry. Class 2 assemblies involve the formation and/or breakage of linkages between the NPs, which is analogous to the classical chemical equilibrium for the formation of a molecule from atoms. Finer classification of NP assemblies in accord with established conventions

  18. Dynamic nanoparticle assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libing; Xu, Liguang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2012-11-20

    Although nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are at the beginning of their development, their unique geometrical shapes and media-responsive optical, electronic, and magnetic properties have attracted significant interest. Nanoscale assembly bridges multiple levels of hierarchy of materials: individual nanoparticles, discrete molecule-like or virus-like nanoscale agglomerates, microscale devices, and macroscale materials. The capacity to self-assemble can greatly facilitate the integration of nanotechnology with other technologies and, in particular, with microscale fabrication. In this Account, we describe developments in the emerging field of dynamic NP assemblies, which are spontaneously form superstructures containing more than two inorganic nanoscale particles that display the ability to change their geometrical, physical, chemical, and other attributes. In many ways, dynamic assemblies can represent a bottleneck in the "bottom-up" fabrication of NP-based devices because they can produce a much greater variety of assemblies, but they also provide a convenient tool for variation of geometries and dimensions of nanoparticle assemblies. Superstructures of NPs (and those held together by similar intrinsic forces)are classified into two groups: Class 1 where media and external fields can alter shape, conformation, and order of stable super structures with a nearly constant number of NPs or Class 2 where the total number of NPs changes, while the organizational motif in the final superstructure remains the same. The future development of successful dynamic assemblies requires understanding the equilibrium in dynamic NP systems. The dynamic nature of Class 1 assemblies is associated with the equilibrium between different conformations of a superstructure and is comparable to the isomerization in classical chemistry. Class 2 assemblies involve the formation or breakage of linkages between the NPs, which is analogous to the classical chemical equilibrium for the formation of

  19. Multifunctional assembly of micrometer-sized colloids for cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chenyao; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jiangyan; Cheng, Yongqiang; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2015-06-03

    Compared to the extensively studied nanometer-sized colloids, less attention has been paid to the assembly of micrometer-sized colloids with multifunctional characteristics. To address this need, a bottom-up approach is developed for constructing self-assemblies of micrometer-sized magnetic colloids possessing multifunctionality, including magnetic, optical, and biological activities. Biotinylated oligo (p-phenylene vinylene) (OPV) derivatives are designed to mediate the self-assembly of streptavidin-modified magnetic beads. The optical element OPV derivatives provide a fluorescence imaging ability for tracing the assembly process. Target cells can be recognized and assembled by the colloidal assembly with bioactive element antibodies. The colloidal assembly reveals better cell isolation performance by its amplified magnetic response in comparison to monodisperse colloids. The self-assembly of micrometer-sized magnetic colloids through a combination of different functional ingredients to realize multifunction is conceptually simple and easy to achieve. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Accurate length control of supramolecular oligomerization: Vernier assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Christopher A; Tomas, Salvador

    2006-07-12

    Linear oligomeric supramolecular assemblies of defined length have been generated using the Vernier principle. Two molecules, containing a different number (n and m) of mutually complementary binding sites, separated by the same distance, interact with each other to form an assembly of length (n x m). The assembly grows in the same way as simple supramolecular polymers, but at a molecular stop signal, when the binding sites come into register, the assembly terminates giving an oligomer of defined length. This strategy has been realized using tin and zinc porphyrin oligomers as the molecular building blocks. In the presence of isonicotinic acid, a zinc porphyrin trimer and a tin porphyrin dimer form a 3:4 triple stranded Vernier assembly six porphyrins long. The triple strand Vernier architecture introduced here adds an additional level of cooperativity, yielding a stability and selectivity that cannot be achieved via a simple Vernier approach. The assembly properties of the system were characterized using fluorescence titrations and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Assembly of the Vernier complex is efficient at micromolar concentrations in nonpolar solvents, and under more competitive conditions, a variety of fragmentation assemblies can be detected, allowing determination of the stability constants for this system and detailed speciation profiles to be constructed.

  1. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  2. Fluorescent nanoparticle beacon for logic gate operation regulated by strand displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Shen, Lingjing; Ma, Jingjing; Schlaberg, H Inaki; Liu, Shi; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Cheng

    2013-06-26

    A mechanism is developed to construct a logic system by employing DNA/gold nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugates as a basic work unit, utilizing a fluorescent beacon probe to detect output signals. To implement the logic circuit, a self-assembly DNA structure is attached onto nanoparticles to form the fluorescent beacon. Moreover, assisted by regulation of multilevel strand displacement, cascaded logic gates are achieved. The computing results are detected by methods using fluorescent signals, gel electrophoresis and transmission electron microscope (TEM). This work is expected to demonstrate the feasibility of the cascaded logic system based on fluorescent nanoparticle beacons, suggesting applications in DNA computation and biotechnology.

  3. Simultaneous single molecule atomic force and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Olaf; Koberling, Felix; Walters, Deron; Koenig, Marcelle; Viani, Jacob; Ros, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with single-molecule-sensitive confocal fluorescence microscopy enables a fascinating investigation into the structure, dynamics and interactions of single biomolecules or their assemblies. AFM reveals the structure of macromolecular complexes with nanometer resolution, while fluorescence can facilitate the identification of their constituent parts. In addition, nanophotonic effects, such as fluorescence quenching or enhancement due to the AFM tip, can be used to increase the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit, thus enabling the identification of different fluorescence labels within a macromolecular complex. We present a novel setup consisting of two commercial, state-of-the-art microscopes. A sample scanning atomic force microscope is mounted onto an objective scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime microscope. The ability to move the sample and objective independently allows for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) gives us the opportunity to measure single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes. We will be able to study molecular complexes in the vicinity of an AFM probe on a level that has yet to be achieved. With this setup we simultaneously obtained single molecule sensitivity in the AFM topography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of YOYO-1 stained lambda-DNA samples and we showed silicon tip induced single molecule quenching on organic fluorophores.

  4. Microtubule Self- Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Yongseok; Choi, M. C.; Farago, O.; Kim, Mahnwon; Pincus, P. A.

    2008-03-01

    Microtubules are important structural elements for neurons. Microtubles are cylindrical pipes that are self-assembled from tubulin dimers, These structures are intimately related to the neuron transport system. Abnormal microtubule disintegration contributes to neuro-disease. For several decades, experimentalists investigated the structure of the microtubules using TEM and Cryo-EM. However, the detailed structure at a molecular level remain incompletely understood. . In this presentation, we report numerically studies of the self-assembly process using a toy model for tubulin dimers. We investigate the nature of the interactions which are essential to stabilize such the cylindrical assembly of protofilaments. We use Monte Carlo simulations to suggest the pathways for assembly and disassembly of the microtubules.

  5. Flexseal Insulator Test Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Eric

    1995-01-01

    Small-scale version of solid-fuel rocket motor flexseal nozzle bearing assembly instrumented and tested in compression-testing fixture simulating conditions during rocket motor operation described in report.

  6. DNAzyme-Based Logic Gate-Mediated DNA Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Shuoxing; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-13

    Controlling DNA self-assembly processes using rationally designed logic gates is a major goal of DNA-based nanotechnology and programming. Such controls could facilitate the hierarchical engineering of complex nanopatterns responding to various molecular triggers or inputs. Here, we demonstrate the use of a series of DNAzyme-based logic gates to control DNA tile self-assembly onto a prescribed DNA origami frame. Logic systems such as "YES," "OR," "AND," and "logic switch" are implemented based on DNAzyme-mediated tile recognition with the DNA origami frame. DNAzyme is designed to play two roles: (1) as an intermediate messenger to motivate downstream reactions and (2) as a final trigger to report fluorescent signals, enabling information relay between the DNA origami-framed tile assembly and fluorescent signaling. The results of this study demonstrate the plausibility of DNAzyme-mediated hierarchical self-assembly and provide new tools for generating dynamic and responsive self-assembly systems.

  7. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The authors show how certification assembles ‘sustainable’ territories through a complex layering of regulatory authority in which both government and nongovernment entities claim rule-making authority, sometimes working together, sometimes in parallel, sometimes competitively. It is argued...... dynamic in assembling sustainable territories, and that certification always involves state agencies in determining how the key elements that comprise it are defined. Whereas some state agencies have been suspicious of sustainability certification, others have embraced it or even used it to extend...

  8. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  9. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  10. Assembly and testing of microparticle and microcapsule smart tattoo materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Microscale biochemical sensors are attractive for in vitro diagnostics and disease management, as well as medical and biological research applications. Fluorescent sensors, coupling specific glucose-binding proteins with fluorescent readout methods, have been developed for this purpose. Our work has focused on the development of assembly and packaging systems for producing micro- and nanoscale sensing components that can be used as implants, intracellular reporters, or as elements in larger systems. Both hybrid organic/inorganic particles and hollow microshells have been developed to physically couple the sensing materials together in biocompatible, semipermeable packages. Fabrication details and sensor characterization are used to demonstrate the potential of these sensor concepts.

  11. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  12. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  13. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-02

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  14. Fluorescent cross-linked supramolecular polymers constructed from a novel self-complementary AABB-type heteromultitopic monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Le; Hu, Yuanli; Li, Qiang; Xu, Shutao; Dhinakarank, Manivannan Kalavathi; Gong, Weitao; Ning, Guiling

    2016-04-26

    A novel AABB-type heteromultitopic monomer (), having a self-complementary perpendicular structure, could solely self-assemble to fluorescent cross-linked supramolecular polymers. Interestingly, the supramolecular gel film shows a sensitive fluorescence change on exposure to acid and base vapor, endowing this system with a potential application in gas detection.

  15. Novel fluorescence adjustable photonic crystal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaoxia; Ni, Yaru; Fang, Jiaojiao; Fang, Liang; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2017-11-01

    Novel photonic crystal materials (PCMs) with adjustable fluorescence were fabricated by distributing organic fluorescent powders of Yb0.2Er0.4Tm0.4(TTA)3Phen into the opal structures of self-assembled silica photonic crystals (PCs). Via removing the silica solution in a constant speed, PCs with controllable thicknesses and different periodic sizes were obtained on glass slides. Yb0.2Er0.4Tm0.4(TTA)3Phen powders were subsequently distributed into the opal structures. The structures and optical properties of the prepared PCMs were investigated. Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) calculation was used to further analyze the electric field distributions in PCs with different periodic sizes while the relation between periodic sizes and fluorescent spectra of PCMs was discussed. The results showed that the emission color of the PCMs under irradiation of 980 nm laser can be easily adjusted from green to blue by increasing the periodic size from 250 to 450 nm.

  16. Nanoscale click-reactive scaffolds from peptide self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenplan, Alexander P M; Young, Laurence J; Matak-Vinkovic, Dijana; Kaminski, Clemens F; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2017-10-06

    Due to their natural tendency to self-assemble, proteins and peptides are important components for organic nanotechnology. One particular class of peptides of recent interest is those that form amyloid fibrils, as this self-assembly results in extremely strong, stable quasi-one-dimensional structures which can be used to organise a wide range of cargo species including proteins and oligonucleotides. However, assembly of peptides already conjugated to proteins is limited to cargo species that do not interfere sterically with the assembly process or misfold under the harsh conditions often used for assembly. Therefore, a general method is needed to conjugate proteins and other molecules to amyloid fibrils after the fibrils have self-assembled. Here we have designed an amyloidogenic peptide based on the TTR105-115 fragment of transthyretin to form fibrils that display an alkyne functionality, important for bioorthogonal chemical reactions, on their surface. The fibrils were formed and reacted both with an azide-containing amino acid and with an azide-functionalised dye by the Huisgen cycloaddition, one of the class of "click" reactions. Mass spectrometry and total internal reflection fluorescence optical microscopy were used to show that peptides incorporated into the fibrils reacted with the azide while maintaining the structure of the fibril. These click-functionalised amyloid fibrils have a variety of potential uses in materials and as scaffolds for bionanotechnology. Although previous studies have produced peptides that can both form amyloid fibrils and undergo "click"-type reactions, this is the first example of amyloid fibrils that can undergo such a reaction after they have been formed. Our approach has the advantage that self-assembly takes place before click functionalization rather than pre-functionalised building blocks self-assembling. Therefore, the molecules used to functionalise the fibril do not themselves have to be exposed to harsh, amyloid

  17. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  19. Wrist joint assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, L.; Johnson, J. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrist joint assembly is provided for use with a mechanical manipulator arm for finely positioning an end-effector carried by the wrist joint on the terminal end of the manipulator arm. The wrist joint assembly is pivotable about a first axis to produce a yaw motion, a second axis is to produce a pitch motion, and a third axis to produce a roll motion. The wrist joint assembly includes a disk segment affixed to the terminal end of the manipulator arm and a first housing member, a second housing member, and a third housing member. The third housing member and the mechanical end-effector are moved in the yaw, pitch, and roll motion. Drive means are provided for rotating each of the housings about their respective axis which includes a cluster of miniature motors having spur gears carried on the output drive shaft which mesh with a center drive gear affixed on the housing to be rotated.

  20. Integrated magnetic transformer assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics transformer assembly comprising a first magnetically permeable core forming a first substantially closed magnetic flux path and a second magnetically permeable core forming a second substantially closed magnetic flux path. A first input...... inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the first magnetically permeable core and a second input inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the second magnetically permeable core. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly further comprises a first output......-winding of the first output inductor winding and the first half-winding of the second output inductor winding are configured to produce aligned, i.e. in the same direction, magnetic fluxes through the first substantially closed magnetic flux path. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly is well- suited for use...

  1. Power module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeremy B [Torrance, CA; Newson, Steve [Redondo Beach, CA

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  2. Novel approach for the assembly of highly efficient SERS substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Molnár, Gábor; Vieu, Christophe

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we present the properties of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrates elaborated by a low-cost approach. Our methodology relying on capillary assembly and soft lithography allows us to generate periodic two-dimensional (2D) matrixes of 100 nm gold nanoparticle patterns in a very precise, cost-efficient, and large-scale manner. For this study, we assembled nanoparticle aggregates of different sizes (one to six particles) in order to determine the influence of the aggregation on the local electric field enhancement. We further demonstrate that this substrate is greatly efficient not only for SERS but also in metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) for local enhancement of conventional fluorescence.

  3. Analysis of actin assembly by in vitro TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Dennis; Kiesewetter, Antje K; Linkner, Joern; Faix, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Since directed movement toward an extracellular chemoattractant requires rapid and continuous reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton to form complex structures such as a protruding lamellipodium, it is of great interest to analyze and understand the individual contribution of proteins specifically involved in this process. Over the last decade, enormous progress has been made toward understanding the versatile molecular mechanisms underlying actin-based cell motility and the regulation of site-specific F-actin assembly and disassembly. In spite of this wealth of knowledge and due to the constant discovery of novel regulatory factors, many questions remain to be answered. In this chapter, we describe a powerful method that allows to study the effects of actin-binding proteins on the assembly of single filaments by in vitro total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy using purified proteins and fluorescently labeled actin.

  4. Fluorescent polymers from non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jan O; Voll, Dominik; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-12-25

    A facile, fast and ambient-temperature avenue towards highly fluorescent polymers is introduced via polymerizing non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers based on light-induced NITEC chemistry, providing a platform technology for fluorescent polymers. The resulting polypyrazolines were analyzed in depth and the photo-triggered step-growth process was monitored in a detailed kinetic study.

  5. Low inductance connector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann; Carlson, Douglas S

    2013-07-09

    A busbar connector assembly for coupling first and second terminals on a two-terminal device to first and second contacts on a power module is provided. The first terminal resides proximate the first contact and the second terminal resides proximate the second contact. The assembly comprises a first bridge having a first end configured to be electrically coupled to the first terminal, and a second end configured to be electrically coupled to the second contact, and a second bridge substantially overlapping the first bridge and having a first end electrically coupled to the first contact, and a second end electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  6. Phylogenetic Comparative Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husemann, Peter; Stoye, Jens

    Recent high throughput sequencing technologies are capable of generating a huge amount of data for bacterial genome sequencing projects. Although current sequence assemblers successfully merge the overlapping reads, often several contigs remain which cannot be assembled any further. It is still costly and time consuming to close all the gaps in order to acquire the whole genomic sequence. Here we propose an algorithm that takes several related genomes and their phylogenetic relationships into account to create a contig adjacency graph. From this a layout graph can be computed which indicates putative adjacencies of the contigs in order to aid biologists in finishing the complete genomic sequence.

  7. Hand Controller Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Pablo (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A user input device for a vehicular electrical system is provided. The user input device includes a handle sized and shaped to be gripped by a human hand and a gimbal assembly within the handle. The gimbal assembly includes a first gimbal component, a second gimbal component coupled to the first gimbal component such that the second gimbal component is rotatable relative to the first gimbal component about a first axis, and a third gimbal component coupled to the second gimbal component such that the third gimbal component is rotatable relative to the second gimbal component about a second axis.

  8. Assembling an aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. To assemble or fold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2014-10-11

    This communication reports an elegant structure formation by an amide functionalized donor (D)-acceptor (A) dyad by stepwise folding and assembly. It adopts a folded conformation by intra-chain CT-interaction that subsequently dimerizes by inter-molecular H-bonding to produce a folded dimer (FD) with a DAAD stacking sequence. Incompatibility of the aromatic stacked face with MCH triggers macroscopic assembly by solvophobically driven edge-to-edge stacking of the FD with concomitant growth in the orthogonal direction by D-D π-stacking leading to the formation of a reverse-vesicle.

  10. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy in polymer science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raja, T.N.; Brouwer, A.M.; Demchenko, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer science is an interdisciplinary field, combining chemistry, physics, and in some cases biology. Structure, morphology, and dynamical phenomena in natural and synthetic polymers can be addressed using fluorescence spectroscopy. The most attractive aspect of fluorescent reporters is that their

  12. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  13. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003553.htm Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) is a lab test that looks for micro- ...

  14. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital c...

  15. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  16. A Method for Designing Assembly Tolerance Networks of Mechanical Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing mechanical assemblies, assembly tolerance design is an important issue which must be seriously considered by designers. Assembly tolerances reflect functional requirements of assembling, which can be used to control assembling qualities and production costs. This paper proposes a new method for designing assembly tolerance networks of mechanical assemblies. The method establishes the assembly structure tree model of an assembly based on its product structure tree model. On this basis, assembly information model and assembly relation model are set up based on polychromatic sets (PS theory. According to the two models, the systems of location relation equations and interference relation equations are established. Then, using methods of topologically related surfaces (TTRS theory and variational geometric constraints (VGC theory, three VGC reasoning matrices are constructed. According to corresponding relations between VGCs and assembly tolerance types, the reasoning matrices of tolerance types are also established by using contour matrices of PS. Finally, an exemplary product is used to construct its assembly tolerance networks and meanwhile to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  18. Thioflavin T fluorescence to analyse amyloid formation kinetics: Measurement frequency as a factor explaining irreproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiao, Mathew; Quittot, Noe; Bourgault, Steve

    2017-09-01

    The most frequent method to monitor amyloid formation relies on the fluorescence of thioflavin T (ThT). The present study reports a novel factor of irreproducibility in ThT kinetic assays performed in microplate. Discrepancies among kinetics of amyloid assembly, performed under quiescent conditions, were associated with the frequency of fluorescence measurement. Evaluating self-assembly of the islet amyloid polypeptide at short intervals hastened its fibrillization. This observation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorescence. This effect, attributed to agitation during microplate displacements between fluorescence measurements, reinforces the importance of a better standardization in amyloid formation assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interest of fluorescence derivatization and fluorescence probe assisted post-column detection of phospholipids: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hanadi; Caudron, Eric; Kasselouri, Athena; Prognon, Pratrice

    2010-01-18

    Phospholipids are essential constituents of all living cell membranes. There are many analytical methods available for the quantitative and qualitative determination of phospholipids, but since these molecules lack chromophores, common absorbance based methods are of limited use. Beside mass spectrometry, some less specific approaches that are routinely used are evaporative light scattering detection or fluorescence, which exhibit sufficient sensitivity. Here, we focus on fluorescence, which remains an interesting way to quantify phospholipids. Two ways of detecting phospholipids by fluorescence are possible coupled with separation techniques such as thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE): firstly, pre-column derivatization procedures and secondly, probe assisted post-column detection with suitable fluorescence reagents. In both cases, the common purpose is to increase the detection sensitivity. It is shown that, whereas pre-column derivatization is characterized by selectivity due to the chemical functionality of the analyte involved in the derivatization process, in supramolecular post-column derivatization, the selectivity only proceeds from the capacity of the lipid to involve supramolecular assemblies with a fluorescence probe. The aim of this review is to summarize available experiments concerning fluorescence detection of phospholipids. The interest and limitation of such detection approaches are discussed.

  20. Driving nucleolar assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Kathleen L; Baserga, Susan J

    2014-02-01

    In this issue of Genes & Development, Grob and colleagues (pp. 220-230) identify the minimal molecular requirements to assemble a fully functional nucleolus in human cells and demonstrate the importance of the nucleolar transcription factor upstream binding factor (UBF) as a mitotic bookmark at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA).

  1. Nanoparticle assemblies and superstructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kotov, Nicholas A

    2006-01-01

    ... building blocks of larger and more complex systems. Therefore, the present challenge of nanoscale science is to shift from making certain building blocks to organizing them in one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures. Such assemblies and superstructures are the next logical step in the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this re...

  2. Turbomachine blade assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  3. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly ma...

  4. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may require t...

  5. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may r...

  6. Industrial Assembly Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Buch, Jacob Pørksen; Iversen, Thorbjørn Mosekjær

    This technical report presents 13 different industrial assembly tasks, which are composed of 70 different operations. The report is written to provide an overview and do as such not contain product specific information such as object weights, dimensions etc. The operations are classified into a set...

  7. Multidimensional constrained test assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2002-01-01

    Two mathematical programming approaches are presented for the assembly of ability tests from item pools calibrated under a multidimensional item response theory model. Item selection is based on Fisher information matrix. Several criteria can be used to optimize this matrix. In this article, the

  8. Constrained multidimensional test assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2000-01-01

    Two mathematical programming approaches are presented for the assembly of ability test from item pools calibrated under a multidimensional item response theory model. Item selection is based on Fisher's Information matrix. Several criteria can be used to optimize this matrix. In this paper, the

  9. Nanotechnology: A molecular assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, T. Ross; Snapper, Marc L.

    2017-09-01

    The idea of nanometre-scale machines that can assemble molecules has long been thought of as the stuff of science fiction. Such a machine has now been built -- and might herald a new model for organic synthesis. See Letter p.374

  10. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Alvarez, Patricio D.

    2010-09-21

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  11. America's Assembly Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David Edwin

    A social history of the assembly line, invented in 1913. Both praised as a boon to consumers and as a curse for workers, it has been satirized, imitated, and celebrated for 100 years. It has inspired fiction, comedy, cafeteria layouts, and suburban housing. It transformed industrial labor...

  12. Investigation of transient dynamics of capillary assisted particle assembly yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virganavičius, D. [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Laboratory of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Juodėnas, M. [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Tamulevičius, T., E-mail: tomas.tamulevicius@ktu.lt [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Department of Physics, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentų St. 50, Kaunas LT-51368 (Lithuania); Schift, H. [Laboratory of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Tamulevičius, S. [Institute of Materials Science, Kaunas University of Technology, K. Baršausko St. 59, Kaunas LT-51423 (Lithuania); Department of Physics, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentų St. 50, Kaunas LT-51368 (Lithuania)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Regular particles arrays were assembled by capillary force assisted deposition. • Deposition yield dynamics was investigated at different thermal velocity regimes. • Yield transient behavior was approximated with logistic function. • Pattern density influence for switching behavior was assessed. - Abstract: In this paper, the transient behavior of the particle assembly yield dynamics when switching from low yield to high yield deposition at different velocity and thermal regimes is investigated. Capillary force assisted particle assembly (CAPA) using colloidal suspension of green fluorescent 270 nm diameter polystyrene beads was performed on patterned poly (dimethyl siloxane) substrates using a custom-built deposition setup. Two types of patterns with different trapping site densities were used to assess CAPA process dynamics and the influence of pattern density and geometry on the deposition yield transitions. Closely packed 300 nm diameter circular pits ordered in hexagonal arrangement with 300 nm pitch, and 2 × 2 mm{sup 2} square pits with 2 μm spacing were used. 2-D regular structures of the deposited particles were investigated by means of optical fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The fluorescence micrographs were analyzed using a custom algorithm enabling to identify particles and calculate efficiency of the deposition performed at different regimes. Relationship between the spatial distribution of particles in transition zone and ambient conditions was evaluated and quantified by approximation of the yield profile with a logistic function.

  13. Propagation of ionization waves during ignition of fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, R.; Garner, R.; Hilscher, A.; Tidecks, R.; Horn, S.

    2008-07-01

    The propagation of the first ionization wave in a compact fluorescent lamp (T4 tube with standard electrodes) during ignition was investigated for various initial dc-voltages (both polarities measured against ground) and gas compositions (with and without mercury). In addition the effect of the presence of a fluorescent powder coating was studied. The propagation velocity of the initial wave was measured by an assembly of photomultipliers installed along the tube, which detected the light emitted by the wave head. The propagation was found to be faster for positive than for negative polarity. This effect is explained involving processes in the electrode region as well as in the wave head. Waves propagate faster in the presence of a fluorescent powder coating than without it and gases of lighter mass show a faster propagation than gases with higher mass.

  14. Propagation of ionization waves during ignition of fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, R; Tidecks, R; Horn, S [Institute of Physics, Chair for Experimental Physics II, University of Augsburg, Universitaetsstrasse 1, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Garner, R [Central Research and Services Laboratory, OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Hilscher, A [OSRAM GmbH, Berliner Allee 65, D-86136 Augsburg (Germany)], E-mail: Reinhard.Langer@physik.uni-augsburg.de

    2008-07-21

    The propagation of the first ionization wave in a compact fluorescent lamp (T4 tube with standard electrodes) during ignition was investigated for various initial dc-voltages (both polarities measured against ground) and gas compositions (with and without mercury). In addition the effect of the presence of a fluorescent powder coating was studied. The propagation velocity of the initial wave was measured by an assembly of photomultipliers installed along the tube, which detected the light emitted by the wave head. The propagation was found to be faster for positive than for negative polarity. This effect is explained involving processes in the electrode region as well as in the wave head. Waves propagate faster in the presence of a fluorescent powder coating than without it and gases of lighter mass show a faster propagation than gases with higher mass.

  15. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce well-registered serial sections that are suitable for three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structures. Because of a lack of a commercial LSFM microscope, numerous versions of light sheet microscopes have been constructed by different investigators. This review describes development of the technology, reviews existing devices, provides details of one LSFM device, and shows examples of images and three-dimensional reconstructions of tissues that were produced by LSFM. PMID:21339178

  16. Resettable fluorescence logic gate based on calcein/layered double hydroxide ultrathin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenying; Ji, Xiaolan; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2012-05-08

    A fluorescent logic gate was fabricated based on calcein/layered double hydroxide ultrathin films (UTFs) via alternate assembly technique, which exhibits high stability, reversibility, and resettability. The logic gate was manipulated by utilizing pH value, Hg(2+) and Cl(-) ion as inputs, and the fluorescence emission of the (calcein/LDH)(16) UTF as output, serving as a three-input logic gate that combines the YES and INHIBIT operation.

  17. Topological defects in liquid crystals as templates for molecular self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S.; Bukusoglu, Emre; de Pablo, Juan J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerization, leading to a range of assemblies, elastomers and gels. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. Here, we report that nanoscopic environments defined by LC topological defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, we observed signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects, including cooperativity, reversibility and controlled growth. We also show that nanoscopic o-rings synthesized from Saturn-ring disclinations and other molecular assemblies templated by defects can be preserved by using photocrosslinkable amphiphiles. Our results reveal that, in analogy to other classes of macromolecular templates such as polymer-surfactant complexes, topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates that can direct processes of molecular self-assembly.

  18. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  19. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  20. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing...housings, plastic grates, old wiring) and the new LED technology (cardboard packaging) were broken down and separated into the appropriate container for... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  1. Inner/Outer Nuclear Membrane Fusion in Nuclear Pore Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment. PMID:20926687

  2. Single-Molecule Analysis for RISC Assembly and Target Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi M; Tadakuma, Hisashi; Tomari, Yukihide

    2018-01-01

    RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is a small RNA-protein complex that mediates silencing of complementary target RNAs. Biochemistry has been successfully used to characterize the molecular mechanism of RISC assembly and function for nearly two decades. However, further dissection of intermediate states during the reactions has been warranted to fill in the gaps in our understanding of RNA silencing mechanisms. Single-molecule analysis with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful imaging-based approach to interrogate complex formation and dynamics at the individual molecule level with high sensitivity. Combining this technique with our recently established in vitro reconstitution system of fly Ago2-RISC, we have developed a single-molecule observation system for RISC assembly. In this chapter, we summarize the detailed protocol for single-molecule analysis of chaperone-assisted assembly of fly Ago2-RISC as well as its target cleavage reaction.

  3. Optical nanoimaging for block copolymer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Zhao, Ling-Xi; Li, Chong; Hu, Zhe; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Chen, Ze-Qiang; Chen, Tao; Huang, Zhen-Li; Zhu, Jintao; Zhu, Ming-Qiang

    2015-02-25

    One approach toward optical nanoimaging involves sequential molecular localization of photoswitchable fluorophores to achieve high resolution beyond optical limit of diffraction. Block copolymer micelles assembled from polystryrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers (PSt-b-PEO) are visualized in optical nanoimaging by staining the polystyrene blocks with spiropyrans (SPs). SPs localized in hydrophobic phase of block copolymer micelles exhibit reversible fluorescence on-off switching at alternating irradiation of UV and visible light. Phase-selective distribution of SPs in block copolymer micelles enables optical nanoimaging of microphase structures of block copolymer self-assembly at 50-nm resolution. To date, this is the sturdiest realization of optical nanoimaging with subdiffraction resolution for solution self-assembly of block copolymers.

  4. Protocols for self-assembly and imaging of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobey, Thomas L; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2011-01-01

    Programed molecular structures allow us to research and make use of physical, chemical, and biological effects at the nanoscale. They are an example of the "bottom-up" approach to nanotechnology, with structures forming through self-assembly. DNA is a particularly useful molecule for this purpose, and some of its advantages include parallel (as opposed to serial) assembly, naturally occurring "tools," such as enzymes and proteins for making modifications and attachments, and structural dependence on base sequence. This allows us to develop one, two, and three dimensional structures that are interesting for their fundamental physical and chemical behavior, and for potential applications such as biosensors, medical diagnostics, molecular electronics, and efficient light-harvesting systems. We describe five techniques that allow one to assemble and image such structures: concentration measurement by ultraviolet absorption, titration gel electrophoresis, thermal annealing, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy in fluids.

  5. Substrate-driven chemotactic assembly in an enzyme cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Palacci, Henri; Yadav, Vinita; Spiering, Michelle M.; Gilson, Michael K.; Butler, Peter J.; Hess, Henry; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Sen, Ayusman

    2018-03-01

    Enzymatic catalysis is essential to cell survival. In many instances, enzymes that participate in reaction cascades have been shown to assemble into metabolons in response to the presence of the substrate for the first enzyme. However, what triggers metabolon formation has remained an open question. Through a combination of theory and experiments, we show that enzymes in a cascade can assemble via chemotaxis. We apply microfluidic and fluorescent spectroscopy techniques to study the coordinated movement of the first four enzymes of the glycolysis cascade: hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase and aldolase. We show that each enzyme independently follows its own specific substrate gradient, which in turn is produced by the preceding enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, we find that the chemotactic assembly of enzymes occurs even under cytosolic crowding conditions.

  6. Color tunable hybrid lamp: LED-incandescent and LED-fluorescent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ivan

    2007-03-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) can be chosen to emit light in a wide variety of highly saturated colors. As a consequence, a hybrid lamp assembled with colored LEDs and with one incandescent or fluorescent source easily allows the user to dynamically select the desired color point without additional filters, with high color rendering index, and at a low cost. We measure some properties of a color tunable lamp that uses both colored LEDs and an incandescent or a fluorescent source. For the LED-incandescent type, we assemble an array of blue LEDs with a typical incandescent bulb source, and to assemble a LED-fluorescent type we used an array of red LEDs with a commercially available compact fluorescent lamp. Incandescent and fluorescent sources have a fixed intensity, while LED intensities are adjusted to tune color. For LED-incandescent lamps, our experimental data show that the correlated color temperature (CCT) can be linearly tuned with the electric current of the LED array. The LED-fluorescent lamp exhibits a CCT that exponentially varies with the drive current of red LEDs.

  7. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  8. Assembling large, complex environmental metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, A. C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Jansson, J. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Malfatti, S. A. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tringe, S. G. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tiedje, J. M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Brown, C. T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Computer Science and Engineering

    2012-12-28

    The large volumes of sequencing data required to sample complex environments deeply pose new challenges to sequence analysis approaches. De novo metagenomic assembly effectively reduces the total amount of data to be analyzed but requires significant computational resources. We apply two pre-assembly filtering approaches, digital normalization and partitioning, to make large metagenome assemblies more computationaly tractable. Using a human gut mock community dataset, we demonstrate that these methods result in assemblies nearly identical to assemblies from unprocessed data. We then assemble two large soil metagenomes from matched Iowa corn and native prairie soils. The predicted functional content and phylogenetic origin of the assembled contigs indicate significant taxonomic differences despite similar function. The assembly strategies presented are generic and can be extended to any metagenome; full source code is freely available under a BSD license.

  9. Optical Space Telescope Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Space Telescope Assembly (OSTA) task is to demonstrate the technology readiness of assembling large space telescopes on orbit in 2015. This task is an...

  10. Blue fluorescent cGMP sensor for multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP (cGMP regulates many physiological processes by cooperating with the other signaling molecules such as cyclic AMP (cAMP and Ca(2+. Genetically encoded sensors for cGMP have been developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins. However, to analyze the dynamic relationship among these second messengers, combined use of existing sensors in a single cell is inadequate because of the significant spectral overlaps. A single wavelength indicator is an effective alternative to avoid this problem, but color variants of a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor are limited. In this study, to construct a new color fluorescent sensor, we converted the FRET-based sensor into a single wavelength indicator using a dark FRET acceptor. We developed a blue fluorescent cGMP biosensor, which is spectrally compatible with a FRET-based cAMP sensor using cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP/YFP. We cotransfected them and loaded a red fluorescent probe for Ca(2+ into cells, and accomplished triple-parameter fluorescence imaging of these cyclic nucleotides and Ca(2+, confirming the applicability of this combination to individually monitor their dynamics in a single cell. This blue fluorescent sensor and the approach using this FRET pair would be useful for multiparameter fluorescence imaging to understand complex signal transduction networks.

  11. Assembly 6: occupation and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Christer Janson

    2016-01-01

    Assembly 6 is an interdisciplinary assembly that gathers together pneumologists, epidemiologists, clinicians, statisticians, occupational doctors, air pollution scientists and health educators. The assembly now has almost 500 members and has seen a steady growth in membership. Assembly 6 comprises four different groups that complement each other and often work together in joint activities. The groups are: 6.1) epidemiology; 6.2) occupational and environmental health; 6.3) tobacco, smoking con...

  12. Ingestion resistant seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, David A [Chuluota, FL

    2011-12-13

    A seal assembly limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a gas turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus associated with a blade structure including a row of airfoils. The seal apparatus includes an annular inner shroud associated with adjacent stationary components, a wing member, and a first wing flange. The wing member extends axially from the blade structure toward the annular inner shroud. The first wing flange extends radially outwardly from the wing member toward the annular inner shroud. A plurality of regions including one or more recirculation zones are defined between the blade structure and the annular inner shroud that recirculate working gas therein back toward the hot gas path.

  13. Low inductance busbar assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann

    2010-09-21

    A busbar assembly for electrically coupling first and second busbars to first and second contacts, respectively, on a power module is provided. The assembly comprises a first terminal integrally formed with the first busbar, a second terminal integrally formed with the second busbar and overlapping the first terminal, a first bridge electrode having a first tab electrically coupled to the first terminal and overlapping the first and second terminals, and a second tab electrically coupled to the first contact, a second bridge electrode having a third tab electrically coupled to the second terminal, and overlapping the first and second terminals and the first tab, and a fourth tab electrically coupled to the second contact, and a fastener configured to couple the first tab to the first terminal, and the third tab to the second terminal.

  14. Hearing Aid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Progress in hearing aids has come a long way. Yet despite such progress hearing aids are not the perfect answer to many hearing problems. Some adult ears cannot accommodate tightly fitting hearing aids. Mouth movements such as chewing, talking, and athletic or other active endeavors also lead to loosely fitting ear molds. It is well accepted that loosely fitting hearing aids are the cause of feedback noise. Since feedback noise is the most common complaint of hearing aid wearers it has been the subject of various patents. Herein a hearing aid assembly is provided eliminating feedback noise. The assembly includes the combination of a hearing aid with a headset developed to constrict feedback noise.

  15. Turbine seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, David A.

    2013-04-16

    A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

  16. Types for DSP Assembler Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ken

    2006-01-01

    in assembler language. However, programming in assembler causes numerous problems, such as memory corruption, for instance. To test the thesis I define a model assembler language called Featherweight DSP which captures some of the essential features of a real custom DSP used in the industrial partner's digital...

  17. Composite airfoil assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  18. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  19. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  20. IAHS Third Scientific Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) convened its Third Scientific Assembly in Baltimore, Md., May 10-19, 1989. The Assembly was attended by about 450 scientists and engineers. The attendance was highest from the U.S., as could be expected; 37 were from Canada; 22 each, Netherlands and United Kingdom; 14, Italy; 12, China; 10, Federal Republic of Germany; 8 each from France, the Republic of South Africa, and Switzerland; 7, Austria; 6 each, Finland and Japan; others were scattered among the remainder of 48 countries total.one of the cosponsors and also handled business matters for the Assembly. Other cosponsors included the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (IAMAP), United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and U.K. Overseas Development Authority (ODA). U.S. federal agencies serving as cosponsors included the Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, National Weather Service, Department of Agriculture, Department of State, and U.S. Geological Survey.

  1. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Modifications to the statutes of the association Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda...

  2. In-capillary self-assembly and proteolytic cleavage of polyhistidine peptide capped quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Li, Jinchen; Liu, Feifei [School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213164 (China); Zhou, Xiang; Yao, Yi [Changzhou Qianhong Bio-pharma Co. Ltd, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Cheli [School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213164 (China); Qiu, Lin, E-mail: linqiupjj@gmail.com [School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213164 (China); Jiang, Pengju, E-mail: pengju.jiang@gmail.com [School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213164 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-10-01

    A new method using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL) for monitoring self-assembly and proteolytic cleavage of hexahistidine peptide capped quantum dots (QDs) inside a capillary has been developed in this report. QDs and the ATTO 590-labeled hexahistidine peptide (H6-ATTO) were injected into a capillary, sequentially. Their self-assembly inside the capillary was driven by a metal-affinity force which yielded a new fluorescence signal due to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The highly efficient separation of fluorescent complexes and the FRET process were analyzed using CE-FL. The self-assembly of QDs and biomolecules was found to effectively take place inside the capillary. The kinetics of the assembly was monitored by CE-FL, and the approach was extended to the study of proteolytic cleavage of surface conjugated peptides. Being the first in-depth analysis of in-capillary nanoparticle–biomolecule assembly, the novel approach reported here provides inspiration to the development of QD-based FRET probes for biomedical applications. - Highlights: • We examined the self-assembly QDs with H6-ATTO inside a capillary. • We prove CE-FL to be a powerful method to resolve QDs-H6-ATTO complex. • We achieve chromatographic separation of QDs-H6-ATTO complex. • We discovered a novel strategy for the online detection of thrombin. • This technique integrated “injection, mixing, reaction, separation and detection”.

  3. An Assembly Funnel Makes Biomolecular Complex Assembly Efficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, John; Schulman, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Like protein folding and crystallization, the self-assembly of complexes is a fundamental form of biomolecular organization. While the number of methods for creating synthetic complexes is growing rapidly, most require empirical tuning of assembly conditions and/or produce low yields. We use coarse-grained simulations of the assembly kinetics of complexes to identify generic limitations on yields that arise because of the many simultaneous interactions allowed between the components and intermediates of a complex. Efficient assembly occurs when nucleation is fast and growth pathways are few, i.e. when there is an assembly “funnel”. For typical complexes, an assembly funnel occurs in a narrow window of conditions whose location is highly complex specific. However, by redesigning the components this window can be drastically broadened, so that complexes can form quickly across many conditions. The generality of this approach suggests assembly funnel design as a foundational strategy for robust biomolecular complex synthesis. PMID:25360818

  4. Hydrazine-mediated construction of nanocrystal self-assembly materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ding; Liu, Min; Lin, Min; Bu, Xinyuan; Luo, Xintao; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2014-10-28

    Self-assembly is the basic feature of supramolecular chemistry, which permits to integrate and enhance the functionalities of nano-objects. However, the conversion of self-assembled structures to practical materials is still laborious. In this work, on the basis of studying one-pot synthesis, spontaneous assembly, and in situ polymerization of aqueous semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), NC self-assembly materials are produced and applied to design high performance white light-emitting diode (WLED). In producing self-assembly materials, the additive hydrazine (N2H4) is curial, which acts as the promoter to achieve room-temperature synthesis of aqueous NCs by favoring a reaction-controlled growth, as the polyelectrolyte to weaken inter-NC electrostatic repulsion and therewith facilitate the one-dimensional self-assembly, and in particular as the bifunctional monomers to polymerize with mercapto carboxylic acid-modified NCs via in situ amidation reaction. This strategy is versatile for mercapto carboxylic acid-modified aqueous NCs, for example CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CdSe(x)Te(1-x), and Cd(y)Hg(1-y)Te. Because of the multisite modification with carboxyl, the NCs act as macromonomers, thus producing cross-linked self-assembly materials with excellent thermal, solvent, and photostability. The assembled NCs preserve strong luminescence and avoid unpredictable fluorescent resonance energy transfer, the main problem in design WLED from multiple NC components. These advantages allow the fabrication of NC-based WLED with high color rendering index (86), high luminous efficacy (41 lm/W), and controllable color temperature.

  5. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  6. Fluorescent Europium Chelate Stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaff, W. L.; Dyer, D. L.; Mori, K.

    1969-01-01

    The europium chelate of 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl)-1,3-butanedione (thenoyl-trifluoroacetone; TTA) is firmly bound to microorganisms. It fluoresces brightly at 613 nm with activation at 340 nm. Cells may be stained with 10−3m chelate in 50% ethyl alcohol, followed by washing with 50% ethyl alcohol. Equal or better stains are produced with 10−3m aqueous europium salt, water wash, and 10−2m aqueous TTA. A noncomplexing buffer should be used to maintain the pH at 6.5 to 6.8. Images PMID:4181107

  7. A novel aggregation-induced emission enhancement triggered by the assembly of a chiral gelator: from non-emissive nanofibers to emissive micro-loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenrui; Qing, Guangyan; Sun, Taolei

    2016-12-22

    In this study, a novel aggregation-induced emission (AIE) enhancement triggered by the self-assembly of chiral gelator is described. Tuning of molecular chirality in situ triggers different assemblies of superstructures exhibiting fluorescence. This novel AIE material can constitute an emerging library of chiral supramolecules for turn-on fluorescent sensors. It will also help in better understanding the effects of chiral factors on the photophysical process.

  8. Construction of energy transfer pathways self-assembled from DNA-templated stacks of anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaura, Rika; Yui, Hiroharu; Someya, Yuu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi

    2014-01-05

    We describe optical properties of anthracene stacks formed from single-component self-assembly of thymidylic acid-appended anthracene 2,6-bis[5-(3'-thymidylic acid)pentyloxy] anthracene (TACT) and the binary self-assembly of TACT and complementary 20-meric oligoadenylic acid (TACT/dA20) in an aqueous buffer. UV-Vis and emission spectra for the single-component self-assembly of TACT and the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20 were very consistent with stacked acene moieties in both self-assemblies. Interestingly, time-resolved fluorescence spectra from anthracene stacks exhibited very different features of the single-component and binary self-assemblies. In the single-component self-assembly of TACT, a dynamic Stokes shift (DSS) and relatively short fluorescence lifetime (τ=0.35ns) observed at around 450nm suggested that the anthracene moieties were flexible. Moreover, a broad emission at 530nm suggested the formation of an excited dimer (excimer). In the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20, we detected a broad, red-shifted emission component at 534nm with a lifetime (τ=0.4ns) shorter than that observed in the TACT single-component self-assembly. Combining these results with the emission spectrum of the binary self-assembly of TACT/5'-HEX dA20, we concluded that the energy transfer pathway was constructed by columnar anthracene stacks formed from the DNA-templated self-assembly of TACT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ``fluorescent cryocooler`` could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance.

  10. Biocompatible self-assembly of nano-materials for Bio-MEMS and insect reconnaissance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozik, Susan Marie; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Sinclair, Michael B.; Manginell, Monica; Ashley, Carlee E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Calvert, Paul Davidson (University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA); Hartenberger, Tamara N.; Flemming, Jeb Hunter; Baca, Helen Kennicott (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the development of new biocompatible self-assembly procedures enabling the immobilization of genetically engineered cells in a compact, self-sustaining, remotely addressable sensor platform. We used evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) to immobilize cells within periodic silica nanostructures, characterized by unimodal pore sizes and pore connectivity, that can be patterned using ink-jet printing or photo patterning. We constructed cell lines for the expression of fluorescent proteins and induced reporter protein expression in immobilized cells. We investigated the role of the abiotic/biotic interface during cell-mediated self-assembly of synthetic materials.

  11. Diffraction phase and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongkeun; Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-04

    We have developed diffraction phase and fluorescence (DPF) microscopy as a new technique for simultaneous quantitative phase imaging and epi-fluorescence investigation of live cells. The DPF instrument consists of an interference microscope, which is incorporated into a conventional inverted fluorescence microscope. The quantitative phase images are characterized by sub-nanometer optical path-length stability over periods from milliseconds to a cell lifetime. The potential of the technique for quantifying rapid nanoscale motions in live cells is demonstrated by experiments on red blood cells, while the composite phase-fluorescence imaging mode is exemplified with mitotic kidney cells.

  12. Fluorescent nanodiamonds for ultrasensitive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Joseph; Shumilov, Dmytro; Maliwa, Badri; Zerda, T. W.; Rout, Bibhu; Fudala, Rafal; Raut, Sangram; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Simanek, Eric; Borejdo, Julian; Rich, Ryan; Akopova, Irina; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) are new and emerging nanomaterials that have potential to be used as fluorescence imaging agents and also as a highly versatile platform for the controlled functionalization and delivery of a wide spectrum of therapeutic agents. We will utilize two experimental methods, TIRF, a relatively simple method based on total internal reflection fluorescence and SPRF, fluorescence enhanced by resonance coupling with surface plasmons. We estimate that the SPRF method will be 100 times sensitive than currently available similar detectors based on detectors. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop microarray platforms that could be used for sensitive, fast and inexpensive gene sequencing and protein detection.

  13. America's Assembly Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David Edwin

    A social history of the assembly line, invented in 1913. Both praised as a boon to consumers and as a curse for workers, it has been satirized, imitated, and celebrated for 100 years. It has inspired fiction, comedy, cafeteria layouts, and suburban housing. It transformed industrial labor...... and provoked strikes and union drives in the 1930s, but became a symbol of victory in the Second World War and Cold War. Reinvented by Japan as "lean production" and then increasingly automated after 1990, it remains a cornerstone of production but no longer employs many workers, even as it evolves toward...

  14. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Petkau-Milroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins.

  15. Spatially confined assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong; Lu, Nan; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-10-21

    The ability to assemble NPs into ordered structures that are expected to yield collective physical or chemical properties has afforded new and exciting opportunities in the field of nanotechnology. Among the various configurations of nanoparticle assemblies, two-dimensional (2D) NP patterns and one-dimensional (1D) NP arrays on surfaces are regarded as the ideal assembly configurations for many technological devices, for example, solar cells, magnetic memory, switching devices, and sensing devices, due to their unique transport phenomena and the cooperative properties of NPs in assemblies. To realize the potential applications of NP assemblies, especially in nanodevice-related applications, certain key issues must still be resolved, for example, ordering and alignment, manipulating and positioning in nanodevices, and multicomponent or hierarchical structures of NP assemblies for device integration. Additionally, the assembly of NPs with high precision and high levels of integration and uniformity for devices with scaled-down dimensions has become a key and challenging issue. Two-dimensional NP patterns and 1D NP arrays are obtained using traditional lithography techniques (top-down strategies) or interfacial assembly techniques (bottom-up strategies). However, a formidable challenge that persists is the controllable assembly of NPs in desired locations over large areas with high precision and high levels of integration. The difficulty of this assembly is due to the low efficiency of small features over large areas in lithography techniques or the inevitable structural defects that occur during the assembly process. The combination of self-assembly strategies with existing nanofabrication techniques could potentially provide effective and distinctive solutions for fabricating NPs with precise position control and high resolution. Furthermore, the synergistic combination of spatially mediated interactions between nanoparticles and prestructures on surfaces may play

  16. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  17. Quantitative approach of speleothems fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiers, Marine; Perrette, Yves; Poulenard, Jérôme; Chalmin, Emilie; Revol, Morgane

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we propose a framework to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence of speleothems organic matter (OM) by the way of a bank of water-extracted organic matter. Due to its efficiency to described dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteritics, fluorescence has been used to determined DOM signatures in natural systems, water circulations, OM transfer from soils, OM evolution in soils or recently, DOM changes in engineered treatment systems. Fluorescence has also been used in speleothems studies, mainly as a growth indicator. Only few studies interpret it as an environmental proxy. Indeed, the fluorescence of OM provides information on the type of organic molecules trapped in speleothems and their evolutions. But the most direct information given by fluorescence is the variation of OM quantities. Actually, increase of fluorescence intensity is generally related to an increase in OM quantity but may also be induced by calcite optical effect or qualitative change of OM. However, analytical technics used in water environments cannot be used for speleothem samples. In this study we propose to give a frame to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence signal of speleothems. 3 different samples of stalagmites from french northern Prealps were used. To allow the quantification of the fluorescence signal, we need to measure the fluorescence and the quantity of organic matter on the same sample. OM of speleothems was extracted by an acid digestion method and analysed with a spectrofluorimeter. However, it was not possible to quantify directly the OM, as the extract solvant was a high-concentrated acid. To solve this problem, a calibration using soil extracts was realised. Soils were chosen in order to represent the diversity of OM present in the environment above the caves. Attention was focused on soil and vegetation types, and landuse. Organic material was water extracted from soils and its fluorescence was also measured. Total organic carbon was performed on the

  18. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy on nucleotide excision repair complexes using GFP fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; Rademakers, Suzanne; Vermeulen, Wim; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Greve, Jan; Koenig, Karsten; Tanke, Hans J.; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    Scanning Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy is used for single molecule studies on DNA-protein complexes that occur in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). During DNA-damage elimination by the NER-pathway, complex protein structures assemble over DNA. It is our aim to resolve the architecture of these

  19. Fluorescent 'two-faced' polymer wafers with embedded pyrene-functionalised gelator nanofibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jamie R; Smith, David K

    2011-11-21

    Pyrene-functionalised gelators self-assemble into nano-fibrillar organogels in DMSO/styrene/divinylbenzene mixtures, which when polymerised yield polymer wafers with two distinct faces, only one of which is fluorescent and has embedded gelator nanofibres. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  20. Progress of EMBarrel assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalifour, M

    2002-01-01

    The assembly of the sixteen "M" modules into a vertical axis cylinder has been achieved last Friday, completing the first wheel of the Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter (see picture). With this, an important milestone in the construction of the ATLAS detector has been reached. Future steps are the rotation of the cylinder axis into horizontal position, in order to integrate the presamplers and heat exchangers by the end of October. The transportation of the wheel and its insertion into the cryostat is the next major milestone, and is planned for the beginning of 2003. The construction of the modules (the so-called "P" modules) of the second wheel is ongoing at Saclay, Annecy and CERN, and will be completed in the coming months. The assembly of the second wheel should start at CERN in February, and its insertion in the cryostat is scheduled for June 2003. This achievement is the result of a successful collaboration of all institutes involved in the construction of the EM Barrel, namely Annecy, Saclay and CE...

  1. ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Auditorium on Wednesday 3 October 2001 at 14.30 hrs The Agenda comprises:   Opening Remarks (P. Levaux) Some aspects of risk in a pension fund (C. Cuénoud) Annual Report 2000: Presentation and results (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the Report are available from divisional secretariats. Results of the actuarial reviews (G. Maurin) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (P. Levaux) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2000 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel. + 41 22 767 91 94; e-mail Graziella.Praire@cern.ch) The English version will be published next week.

  2. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Wayne L.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  3. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  4. Micrometer size rod formed by secondary self assembly of omeprazole with α- and β-cyclodextrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, N.; Venkatesh, G.

    2015-02-01

    Self assembly of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) micro rods induced by omeprazole (OMP) were observed by SEM and TEM. OMP/CD inclusion complexes have formed the secondary self assembly micro meter size rod like structure. This structure was driven by the intermolecular hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals forces. Both forces induced the ordered assembly and arrangement of OMP/CD inclusion complexes, whereas CD molecules acted as molecular bricks. The OMP/CD inclusion complexes primary assembled form individual nanorods and then secondary self aggregate nanorods were form a micro meter rod structure. The results indicate that inter-nanotubular hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in the formation of the self assembled micro rods. The inclusion complexes were also characterized using FT-IR, DSC, powder XRD, 1H NMR, absorption, fluorescence, life time measurements and molecular modeling methods.

  5. Resolving Single-Molecule Assembled Patterns with Superresolution Blink-Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Strackharn, Mathias; Stahl, Stefan W.; Summerer, Wolfram; Steinhauer, Christian; Forthmann, Carsten; Puchner, Elias M.; Vogelsang, Jan; Gaub, Hermann E.; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally combine a recently developed AFM-based molecule-by-molecule assembly (single-molecule cut-and-paste, SMCP) with subdiffraction resolution fluorescence imaging. Using “Blink-Microscopy”, which exploits the fluctuating emission of single molecules for the reconstruction

  6. Fluorescent blood glucose monitor by hemin-functionalized graphene quantum dots based sensing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yuezhen; Wang, Xiaoxun; Sun, Jian; Jiao, Shoufeng; Chen, Hongqi; Gao, Feng; Wang, Lun, E-mail: wanglun@mail.ahnu.edu.cn

    2014-01-31

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Hemin is assembled onto the surfaces of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). •With the aid of hemin, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} could quench the FL signal of GQDs obviously. •Based on this effect, a fluorescent platform is proposed for the sensing of glucose. •The proposed method provides a new pathway to explore practical application of GQDs. -- Abstract: In the present work, a highly sensitive and specific fluorescent biosensor for blood glucose monitoring is developed based on hemin-functionalized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and glucose oxidase (GOx) system. The GQDs which are simply prepared by pyrolyzing citric acid exhibit strong fluorescence and good water-solubility. Due to the noncovalent assembly between hemin and GQDs, the addition of hemin can make hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to destroy the passivated surface of GQDs, leading to significant fluorescence quenching of GQDs. Based on this effect, a novel fluorescent platform is proposed for the sensing of glucose. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of glucose is from 9 to 300 μM, and the limit of detection is 0.1 μM. As unique properties of GQDs, the proposed biosensor is green, simple, cost-efficient, and it is successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human serum. In addition, the proposed method provides a new pathway to further design the biosensors based on the assembly of GQDs with hemin for detection of biomolecules.

  7. Assembly of Fibronectin Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Purva; Carraher, Cara; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    In the process of matrix assembly, multivalent extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are induced to self-associate and to interact with other ECM proteins to form fibrillar networks. Matrix assembly is usually initiated by ECM glycoproteins binding to cell surface receptors, such as fibronectin (FN) dimers binding to α5β1 integrin. Receptor binding stimulates FN self-association mediated by the N-terminal assembly domain and organizes the actin cytoskeleton to promote cell contractility. FN conformational changes expose additional binding sites that participate in fibril formation and in conversion of fibrils into a stabilized, insoluble form. Once assembled, the FN matrix impacts tissue organization by contributing to the assembly of other ECM proteins. Here, we describe the major steps, molecular interactions, and cellular mechanisms involved in assembling FN dimers into fibrillar matrix while highlighting important issues and major questions that require further investigation. PMID:20690820

  8. Sensitization effects of supramolecular assemblies on the luminescence of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hong; Yi Chongyue; Li Xue; Fang Fang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Yajiang, E-mail: yjyang@mail.hust.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Luminescence enhancement of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes (Tb(III)-PUFX) in supramolecular hydrogels formed by assembly of 1,3:2,4-di-O-benzylidene-D-sorbitol (DBS) was investigated by steady-state fluorescence, varying temperature fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence. The luminescence images show that Tb(III)-PUFX were dispersed in the DBS gels. The luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX in the DBS gels was significantly increased in comparison with that in corresponding aqueous solutions. The varying temperature fluorescent spectra show that the luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX decreased with an increase in the temperature. This implies that the luminescence enhancement of Tb(III)-PUFX is related to the dissociation and the formation of the DBS assemblies. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show slower rotational motion in DBS gels in comparison with that in the corresponding aqueous solutions. This may be ascribed to a unique microstructure of three-dimensional network formed by DBC aggregates, resulting in deactivation of the nonradiative relaxation. The images of field emission scanning electron microscopy and polarized optical microscopy indicate that the morphology of the DBS assemblies was not influenced upon addition of Tb(III)-PUFX to the DBS gels.

  9. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  10. Visible fluorescent proteins for FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremers, G.J.; Goedhart, J.; Gadella, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses the use of Visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) for FRET studies, a comprehensive table with Förster radii of VFP pairs is presented and recommendations for choosing the right pairs are made. The chapter discusses VFPs that are used for studies that use fluorescence resonance

  11. Fluorescent Proteins for Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Teresa S; Hawley, Robert G; Telford, William G

    2017-04-03

    Fluorescent proteins have become standard tools for cell and molecular biologists. The color palette of fluorescent proteins spans the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectrum. Utility of fluorescent proteins has been greatly facilitated by the availability of compact and affordable solid state lasers capable of providing various excitation wavelengths. In theory, the plethora of fluorescent proteins and lasers make it easy to detect multiple fluorescent proteins simultaneously. However, in practice, heavy spectral overlap due to broad excitation and emission spectra presents a challenge. In conventional flow cytometry, careful selection of excitation wavelengths and detection filters is necessary. Spectral flow cytometry, an emerging methodology that is not confined by the "one color, one detector" paradigm, shows promise in the facile detection of multiple fluorescent proteins. This chapter provides a synopsis of fluorescent protein development, a list of commonly used fluorescent proteins, some practical considerations and strategies for detection, and examples of applications. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in "TPT". These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by…

  13. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Nicholas P [Palo Alto, CA; Fulton, Donald A [Fairfield, CA

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  14. Spontaneous self-assembly of SC3 hydrophobins into nanorods in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykwinska, Agata; Guillemette, Thomas; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Cuenot, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Hydrophobins are small surface active proteins secreted by filamentous fungi. Because of their ability to self-assemble at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces, hydrophobins play a key role in fungal growth and development. In the present work, the organization in aqueous solution of SC3 hydrophobins from the fungus Schizophyllum commune was assessed using Dynamic Light Scattering, Atomic Force Microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. These complementary approaches have demonstrated that SC3 hydrophobins are able not only to spontaneously self-assemble at the air-water interface but also in pure water. AFM experiments evidenced that hydrophobins self-assemble in solution into nanorods. Fluorescence assays with thioflavin T allowed establishing that the mechanism governing SC3 hydrophobin self-assembly into nanorods involves β-sheet stacking. SC3 assembly was shown to be strongly influenced by ionic strength and solution pH. The presence of a very low ionic strength significantly favoured the protein self-assembly but a further increase of ions in solution disrupted the protein assembly. It was assessed that solution pH had a significant effect on the SC3 hydrophobins organization. In peculiar, the self-assembly process was considerably reduced at acidic pH. Our findings demonstrate that the self-assembly of SC3 hydrophobins into nanorods of well-defined length can be directly controlled in solution. Such control allows opening the way for the development of new smart self-assembled structures for targeted applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Introduction of customized inserts for streamlined assembly and optimization of BioBrick synthetic genetic circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Saurabh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BioBrick standard biological parts are designed to make biological systems easier to engineer (e.g. assemble, manipulate, and modify. There are over 5,000 parts available in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts that can be easily assembled into genetic circuits using a standard assembly technique. The standardization of the assembly technique has allowed for wide distribution to a large number of users -- the parts are reusable and interchangeable during the assembly process. The standard assembly process, however, has some limitations. In particular it does not allow for modification of already assembled biological circuits, addition of protein tags to pre-existing BioBrick parts, or addition of non-BioBrick parts to assemblies. Results In this paper we describe a simple technique for rapid generation of synthetic biological circuits using introduction of customized inserts. We demonstrate its use in Escherichia coli (E. coli to express green fluorescent protein (GFP at pre-calculated relative levels and to add an N-terminal tag to GFP. The technique uses a new BioBrick part (called a BioScaffold that can be inserted into cloning vectors and excised from them to leave a gap into which other DNA elements can be placed. The removal of the BioScaffold is performed by a Type IIB restriction enzyme (REase that recognizes the BioScaffold but cuts into the surrounding sequences; therefore, the placement and removal of the BioScaffold allows the creation of seamless connections between arbitrary DNA sequences in cloning vectors. The BioScaffold contains a built-in red fluorescent protein (RFP reporter; successful insertion of the BioScaffold is, thus, accompanied by gain of red fluorescence and its removal is manifested by disappearance of the red fluorescence. Conclusions The ability to perform targeted modifications of existing BioBrick circuits with BioScaffolds (1 simplifies and speeds up the iterative design

  16. Introduction of customized inserts for streamlined assembly and optimization of BioBrick synthetic genetic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background BioBrick standard biological parts are designed to make biological systems easier to engineer (e.g. assemble, manipulate, and modify). There are over 5,000 parts available in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts that can be easily assembled into genetic circuits using a standard assembly technique. The standardization of the assembly technique has allowed for wide distribution to a large number of users -- the parts are reusable and interchangeable during the assembly process. The standard assembly process, however, has some limitations. In particular it does not allow for modification of already assembled biological circuits, addition of protein tags to pre-existing BioBrick parts, or addition of non-BioBrick parts to assemblies. Results In this paper we describe a simple technique for rapid generation of synthetic biological circuits using introduction of customized inserts. We demonstrate its use in Escherichia coli (E. coli) to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) at pre-calculated relative levels and to add an N-terminal tag to GFP. The technique uses a new BioBrick part (called a BioScaffold) that can be inserted into cloning vectors and excised from them to leave a gap into which other DNA elements can be placed. The removal of the BioScaffold is performed by a Type IIB restriction enzyme (REase) that recognizes the BioScaffold but cuts into the surrounding sequences; therefore, the placement and removal of the BioScaffold allows the creation of seamless connections between arbitrary DNA sequences in cloning vectors. The BioScaffold contains a built-in red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter; successful insertion of the BioScaffold is, thus, accompanied by gain of red fluorescence and its removal is manifested by disappearance of the red fluorescence. Conclusions The ability to perform targeted modifications of existing BioBrick circuits with BioScaffolds (1) simplifies and speeds up the iterative design-build-test process through direct

  17. Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Nanoparticles as Fluorophore-Free Contrast Agents for Multicolor Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the fabrication of self-assembled polyelectrolyte nanoparticles that provide a multicolor optical imaging modality. Poly(γ-glutamic acid(γ-PGA formed self-assembled nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions with two different cationic polymers: poly(L-lysine(PLL and chitosan. The self-assembled γ-PGA/PLL and γ-PGA/chitosan nanoparticles were crosslinked by glutaraldehyde. Crosslinking of the ionic self-assembled nanoparticles with glutaraldehyde not only stabilized the nanoparticles but also generated a strong autofluorescence signal. Fluorescent Schiff base bonds (C=N and double bonds (C=C were generated simultaneously by crosslinking of the amine moiety of the cationic polyelectrolytes with monomeric glutaraldehyde or with polymeric glutaraldehyde. The unique optical properties of the nanoparticles that resulted from the crosslinking by glutaraldehyde were analyzed using UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. We observed that the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles could be regulated by adjusting the crosslinker concentration and the reaction time. The nanoparticles also exhibited high performance in the labeling and monitoring of therapeutic immune cells (macrophages and dendritic cells. These self-assembled nanoparticles are expected to be a promising multicolor optical imaging contrast agent for the labeling, detection, and monitoring of cells.

  18. Characterization of pi-conjugated oligopeptide superstructures created via continuous directed self assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Lawrence; Schroeder, Charles; Wilson, William

    Development of precise methods for controlling the nanoscale ordering of functional materials is a key challenge to achieving efficient and reliable organic semiconductor-based devices. In this work, we report a new continuous flow method for the directed assembly of oligopeptides with pi-conjugated cores based on tailored flow profile manipulation in microreactors. In particular, we implement 3-D flow focusing of oligopeptide streams combined with a planar extensional flow to achieve supramolecular assembly, alignment, and ordering. We characterize the assembly reaction in real-time using in situ confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Through shifts in spectra and fluorescence lifetimes of accompany amyloid formation in oligopeptides with OPV3, 4T, or PDI cores, we demonstrate oligopeptide assembly in a 3D confined volume along the extensional flow axis. Moreover, we characterize assembled materials via the emerging technique of nano-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (nano-FTIR), which combines the molecular fingerprinting of traditional FTIR with the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We further employ conductive probe AFM to characterize the optoelectronic properties of these materials. This work was supported by DOE BES Award #SC-0011847.

  19. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  20. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  1. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  2. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Heuy Gap; Jhung, Myung Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-01

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  4. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptomics studies often rely on partial reference transcriptomes that fail to capture the full catalog of transcripts and their variations. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and assembly algorithms have facilitated the reconstruction of the entire transcriptome by deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), even without a reference genome. However, transcriptome assembly from billions of RNA-seq reads, which are often very short, poses a significant informatics challenge. This Review summarizes the recent developments in transcriptome assembly approaches - reference-based, de novo and combined strategies-along with some perspectives on transcriptome assembly in the near future.

  5. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  6. Reconfigurable assembly work station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yhu-Tin; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Spicer, John Patrick

    2017-11-14

    A reconfigurable autonomous workstation includes a multi-faced superstructure including a horizontally-arranged frame section supported on a plurality of posts. The posts form a plurality of vertical faces arranged between adjacent pairs of the posts, the faces including first and second faces and a power distribution and position reference face. A controllable robotic arm suspends from the rectangular frame section, and a work table fixedly couples to the power distribution and position reference face. A plurality of conveyor tables are fixedly coupled to the work table including a first conveyor table through the first face and a second conveyor table through the second face. A vision system monitors the work table and each of the conveyor tables. A programmable controller monitors signal inputs from the vision system to identify and determine orientation of the component on the first conveyor table and control the robotic arm to execute an assembly task.

  7. Optimising Magnetostatic Assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders

    theorem. This theorem formulates an energy equivalence principle with several implications concerning the optimisation of objective functionals that are linear with respect to the magnetic field. Linear functionals represent different optimisation goals, e.g. maximising a certain component of the field...... magnetic material can be optimised within this framework. Since in the practice most structures are realized by assembling uniformly magnetized pieces of permanent magnet, it is relevant to address the question of how a given region of space is best subdivided. This problem is investigated here within...... investigates some of the effects on the performance of magnetic systems, due to non-linear magnetic phenomena. In particular, the non-linear demagnetization effects caused by the finite coercivity of the permanent magnet material will be examined. All the optmisation techniques will be illustrated with example...

  8. Self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While the solution state structure of 1 can be best described as a trinuclear complex, in the solidstate well-fashioned intermolecular - and CH- interactions are observed. Thus, in the solid-state further self-assembly of already self-assembled molecular triangle is witnessed. The triangular panels are arranged in a linear ...

  9. A Versatile Multiple Target Detection System Based on DNA Nano-assembled Linear FRET Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yansheng; Du, Hongwu; Wang, Wenqian; Zhang, Peixun; Xu, Liping; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-05-27

    DNA molecules have been utilized both as powerful synthetic building blocks to create nanoscale architectures and as inconstant programmable templates for assembly of biosensors. In this paper, a versatile, scalable and multiplex detection system is reported based on an extending fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) cascades on a linear DNA assemblies. Seven combinations of three kinds of targets are successfully detected through the changes of fluorescence spectra because of the three-steps FRET or non-FRET continuity mechanisms. This nano-assembled FRET-based nanowire is extremely significant for the development of rapid, simple and sensitive detection system. The method used here could be extended to a general platform for multiplex detection through more-step FRET process.

  10. Visualization of Actin Assembly and Filament Turnover by In Vitro Multicolor TIRF Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, Moritz; Brühmann, Stefan; Franke, Christof; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Faix, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In response to chemotactic signals, motile cells develop a single protruding front to persistently migrate in direction of the chemotactic gradient. The highly dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is an essential part during this process and requires the precise interplay of various actin filament assembly factors and actin-binding proteins (ABPs). Although many ABPs have been implicated in cell migration, as yet only a few of them have been well characterized concerning their specific functions during actin network assembly and disassembly. In this chapter, we describe a versatile method that allows the direct visualization of the assembly of single actin filaments and higher structures in real time by in vitro total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF-M) using purified and fluorescently labeled actin and ABPs.

  11. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  13. A dual-stimuli-responsive fluorescent switch ultrathin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixiong; Liang, Ruizheng; Liu, Wendi; Yan, Dongpeng; Wei, Min

    2015-10-01

    Stimuli-responsive fluorescent switches have shown broad applications in optical devices, biological materials and intelligent responses. Herein, we describe the design and fabrication of a dual-stimuli-responsive fluorescent switch ultrathin film (UTF) via a three-step layer-by-layer (LBL) technique: (i) encapsulation of spiropyran (SP) within an amphiphilic block copolymer (PTBEM) to give the (SP@PTBEM) micelle; (ii) the mixture of riboflavin (Rf) and poly(styrene 4-sulfonate) (PSS) to enhance the adhesion ability of small molecules; (iii) assembly of negatively charged SP@PTBEM and Rf-PSS with cationic layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets to obtain the (Rf-PSS/LDH/SP@PTBEM)n UTFs (n: bilayer number). The assembly process of the UTFs and their luminescence properties, as monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), present a uniform and ordered layered structure with stepwise growth. The resulting Rf-PSS/LDH/SP@PTBEM UTF serves as a three-state switchable multicolor (green, yellow, and red) luminescent system based on stimulation from UV/Vis light and pH, with an acceptable reversibility. Therefore, this work provides a facile way to fabricate stimuli-responsive solid-state film switches with tunable-color luminescence, which have potential applications in the areas of displays, sensors, and rewritable optical memory and fluorescent logic devices.Stimuli-responsive fluorescent switches have shown broad applications in optical devices, biological materials and intelligent responses. Herein, we describe the design and fabrication of a dual-stimuli-responsive fluorescent switch ultrathin film (UTF) via a three-step layer-by-layer (LBL) technique: (i) encapsulation of spiropyran (SP) within an amphiphilic block copolymer (PTBEM) to give the (SP@PTBEM) micelle; (ii) the mixture of riboflavin (Rf) and poly(styrene 4-sulfonate) (PSS) to enhance the adhesion ability of small molecules; (iii) assembly of negatively charged SP

  14. Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric W.; Zelten, J. Peter; Wiseman, Benjamin A.

    1988-06-01

    We report on the development of a laser scanning fluorescence microscope possessing several features which facilitate its application to biological and biophysical analyses in living cells. It is built around a standard inverted microscope stand, enabling the use of standard optics, micromanipulation apparatus, and conventional (including video) microscopy in conjunction with laser scanning. The beam is scanned across the specimen by a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors, driven by a programmable controller which can operate in three modes: full raster scan, region of interest, and random-access. A full 512x512 pixel image can be acquired in one second. In region of interest mode, several subareas of the field can be selected for more rapid or detailed analysis. For those cases where the time scale of the observed phenomenon precludes full-field imaging, or where a full-field image is unnecessary, the random access mode enables an arbitrary pattern of isolated points to be selected and rapidly sequenced through. Via a graphical user interface implemented on the system's host computer, a user will be able to take a scout image either with video or a full-field laser scan, select regions or points on the scout image with a mouse, and set up experimental parameters such as detector integration times with a window-style menu. The instrument is designed to be a flexible testbed for investigating new techniques, without compromising its utility as a tool for biological research.

  15. Assembly sequencing with toleranced parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latombe, J.C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Robotics Lab.; Wilson, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1995-02-21

    The goal of assembly sequencing is to plan a feasible series of operations to construct a product from its individual parts. Previous research has thoroughly investigated assembly sequencing under the assumption that parts have nominal geometry. This paper considers the case where parts have toleranced geometry. Its main contribution is an efficient procedure that decides if a product admits an assembly sequence with infinite translations that is feasible for all possible instances of the components within the specified tolerances. If the product admits one such sequence, the procedure can also generate it. For the cases where there exists no such assembly sequence, another procedure is proposed which generates assembly sequences that are feasible only for some values of the toleranced dimensions. If this procedure produces no such sequence, then no instance of the product is assemblable. Finally, this paper analyzes the relation between assembly and disassembly sequences in the presence of toleranced parts. This work assumes a simple, but non-trivial tolerance language that falls short of capturing all imperfections of a manufacturing process. Hence, it is only one step toward assembly sequencing with toleranced parts.

  16. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  17. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ...—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP...

  18. The Bicycle Assembly Line Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    "The Bicycle Assembly Line Game" is a team-based, in-class activity that helps students develop a basic understanding of continuously operating processes. Each team of 7-10 students selects one of seven prefigured bicycle assembly lines to operate. The lines are run in real-time, and the team that operates the line that yields the…

  19. What was the Assembly Line?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David

    2010-01-01

    The assembly line is still evolving a century after its invention, and it was not a distinct historical stage, nor was it part of an inevitable sequence that followed "Taylorism."......The assembly line is still evolving a century after its invention, and it was not a distinct historical stage, nor was it part of an inevitable sequence that followed "Taylorism."...

  20. Newnes electronics assembly pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Produced in association with the Engineering Training Authority with contributions from dozens of people in the electronics industry. The material covers common skills in electrical and electronic engineering and concentrates mainly on wiring and assembly. 'Newnes Electronics Assembly Pocket Book' is for electronics technicians, students and apprentices.

  1. Fluorescent labelling in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anselm Fabian Lowell; Hackenberger, Christian Peter Richard

    2017-12-01

    The labelling of proteins with green fluorescent protein enabled the visualization of proteins in living cells for the first time. Since then, much progress has been made in the field. Modern strategies allow the labelling of proteins in live cells through a range of specialized methods with sophisticated chemical probes that show enhanced photophysical properties compared to fluorescent proteins. This review briefly summarizes recent advances in the field of fluorescent chemical protein labelling inside living cells and illustrates key aspects on the requirements and advantages of each given method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  3. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.193 Section 572.193... Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.193 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 180-2000. For purposes of this test, the neck assembly is mounted within the headform assembly...

  4. 19 CFR 10.16 - Assembly abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assembly abroad. 10.16 Section 10.16 Customs... with United States Components § 10.16 Assembly abroad. (a) Assembly operations. The assembly operations..., accompanied, or followed by operations incidental to the assembly as illustrated in paragraph (b) of this...

  5. Molecular Gels Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Molecular gels and fibrillar networks – a comprehensive guide to experiment and theory Molecular Gels: Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks provides a comprehensive treatise on gelators, especially low molecular-mass gelators (LMOGs), and the properties of their gels. The structures and modes of formation of the self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFINs) that immobilize the liquid components of the gels are discussed experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic, rheological, and structural features of the different classes of LMOGs are also presented. Many examples of the application of the principal analytical techniques for investigation of molecular gels (including SANS, SAXS, WAXS, UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, scanning electron, transmission electron and optical microscopies, and molecular modeling) are presented didactically and in-depth, as are several of the theories of the stages of aggregation of individual LMOG molecules leading to SAFINs. Several actua...

  6. Self-assembly of rhodamine 6G on silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; Yu, Hongtao

    2018-01-01

    Understanding interactions between nanoparticles and small molecules is of significance for design of nanoparticle-based materials. Each citrate-coated silver nanoparticle (AgNP, 24 nm) in solution attracts 210,000 rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules to assemble on its surface to form 170 nm "micelle-like" structures, where the fluorescence of the R6G molecules is efficiently quenched. The "micelles" can form agglomerates of 370 nm at higher concentrations. The R6G-AgNP self-assembly does not occur at higher R6G concentrations (≥5 μM) or can be prevented if AgNP is coated with polymers such as polyethylene glycol or polyvinyl pyrrolidone.

  7. J-aggregation of cyanine dyes by self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Rolf; Pugin, Raphaël; Heier, Jakob

    2009-12-01

    The importance of highly ordered surfaces, containing adsorptive surface states, is discussed for J-aggregation by self-assembly. Such nucleating surfaces are nanometer-sized edges and corners of cubic AgBr microcrystals, or surface iodide-clusters located along edges and corners of AgBr:I microcrystals. Of particular interest are dendrimers, monoatomic steps on terraced silver halide microcrystals and fullerene derivatives as nucleating surfaces. Molecular organisation into J-aggregates by self-assembly was realized using aprotic, apolar solvents for fullerenes, and polar solvents for dendrimers and monoatomic surface steps. By using dendrimers as nucleating agents in mesopores of metal oxide nanoparticle coatings, size-controlled and stable J-aggregates with high optical densities and strong fluorescence were obtained reproducibly. Such films may be useful for sensors, opto-electronics, lighting and photovoltaics.

  8. Versatile Self-Assembly and Biosensing Applications of DNA and Carbon Quantum Dots Coordinated Cerium Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yitong; Sun, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Geping; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-08-01

    Self-assembly exploits noncovalent interactions to offer a facile and effective method for the construction of soft materials with multifunctionalities and diversity. In this work, fluorescence carbon quantum dots coordinated by Ce3+ ions (CQDCe) have been synthesized and exploited as building blocks to generate a series of hierarchical structures through the ionic self-assembly of CQDCe and biomolecules, namely DNA, myoglobin (Mb), and hyaluronic acid (HA). In particular, vesicles can be constructed by the simple mixing of oppositely charged CQDCe and DNA in water. The formation of unusual vesicles can be explained by the self-assembly of CQDCe with a rearranged structure and the rigid DNA biomolecular scaffolds. This facile noncovalent self-assembly method has inspired the innovative use of virgin DNA as a building block to construct vesicles rather than resorting to a sophisticated synthesis. The self-assembly of CQDCe-biopolymers was accompanied by aggregation-induced photoluminescence (PL) quenching. The biosensing platform was designed to detect polypeptides and deoxyribonuclease I through competitive binding of CQDCe and enzymatic hydrolysis of the DNA backbone, respectively. We believe that the integrative self-assembly of CQDCe and DNA will enrich the theoretical study of vesicle formation by DNA molecules and extend the application of fluorescence carbon quantum dots in the biological field. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Photobleaching-activated micropatterning on self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; Kodali, Vamsi K; Kovari, Daniel T; Curtis, Jennifer E, E-mail: jennifer.curtis@physics.gatech.ed [School of Physics and Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences (IBB), Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Functional chemical micropatterns were fabricated by exploiting the photobleaching of dye-coupled species near methacrylate self-assembled monolayers. Using this approach we have demonstrated that multiple chemistries can be coupled to the monolayer using a standard fluorescence microscope. The surface bound functional groups remain active and patterns with feature sizes down to 3 {mu}m can be readily achieved with excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Control over the ligand binding density was demonstrated to illustrate the convenient route provided by this platform for fabricating complex spatial gradients in ligand density.

  10. Self-assembly in chiral nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Julian; Wang, Nan; Khoo, Iam Choon; He, Sailing

    2017-08-01

    Small molecule chiral nematic LCs contain a variety of defect lines which can cause aggregation of polymers, nanoparticles and small molecule materials such as fluorescent dyes. While normal dyes suffer aggregation induced quenching a class of propeller-like dyes display aggregation induced emission (AIE), which makes them an ideal material for cholesteric lasers. Nanoparticle dispersion is necessary for switchability, while aggregation can be used as a tool to produce assembled structures. Here we discuss strategies to promote or inhibit aggregation of various materials in chiral nematics.

  11. Bioorthogonal cyclization-mediated in situ self-assembly of small-molecule probes for imaging caspase activity in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Cui, Lina; Tong, Ling; Tee, Sui Seng; Tikhomirov, Grigory; Felsher, Dean W.; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-06-01

    Directed self-assembly of small molecules in living systems could enable a myriad of applications in biology and medicine, and already this has been used widely to synthesize supramolecules and nano/microstructures in solution and in living cells. However, controlling the self-assembly of synthetic small molecules in living animals is challenging because of the complex and dynamic in vivo physiological environment. Here we employ an optimized first-order bioorthogonal cyclization reaction to control the self-assembly of a fluorescent small molecule, and demonstrate its in vivo applicability by imaging caspase-3/7 activity in human tumour xenograft mouse models of chemotherapy. The fluorescent nanoparticles assembled in situ were imaged successfully in both apoptotic cells and tumour tissues using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo.

  12. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  13. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Rietdorf, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique to map the spatial distribution of nanosecond excited state lifetimes within microscopic images. FLIM systems have been implemented both in the frequency domain, using sinusoidally intensity-modulated excitation light and modulated

  15. Advanced Methods in Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Fritzky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It requires a good deal of will power to resist hyperbole in considering the advances that have been achieved in fluorescence microscopy in the last 25 years. Our effort has been to survey the modalities of microscopic fluorescence imaging available to cell biologists and perhaps useful for diagnostic pathologists. The gamut extends from established confocal laser scanning through multiphoton and TIRF to the emerging technologies of super-resolution microscopy that breech the Abbé limit of resolution. Also considered are the recent innovations in structured and light sheet illumination, the use of FRET and molecular beacons that exploit specific characteristics of designer fluorescent proteins, fluorescence speckles, and second harmonic generation for native anisometric structures like collagen, microtubules and sarcomeres.

  16. Tunable Fluorescent Silica-Coated Carbon Dots: A Synergistic Effect for Enhancing the Fluorescence Sensing of Extracellular Cu²⁺ in Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuqing; Wang, Chao; Li, Linbo; Wang, Hao; Liu, Kangyu; Wang, Keqing; Li, Bo

    2015-12-16

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) combined with self-assembly strategy have created an innovative way to fabricate novel hybrids for biological analysis. This study demonstrates a new fluorescence platform with enhanced selectivity for copper ion sensing in the striatum of the rat brain following the cerebral calm/sepsis process. Here, the fabrication of silica-coated CDs probes is based on the efficient hybridization of APTES which act as a precursor of organosilane self-assembly, with CDs to form silica-coated CDs probes. The fluorescent properties including intensity, fluorescence quantum yield, excitation-independent region, and red/blue shift of the emission wavelength of the probe are tunable through reliable regulation of the ratio of CDs and APTES, realizing selectivity and sensitivity-oriented Cu(2+) sensing. The as-prepared probes (i.e., 3.33% APTES-0.9 mg mL(-1) CDs probe) show a synergistic amplification effect of CDs and APTES on enhancing the fluorescence signal of Cu(2+) detection through fluorescent self-quenching. The underlying mechanism can be ascribed to the stronger interaction including chelation and electrostatic attraction between Cu(2+) and N and O atoms-containing as well as negatively charged silica-coated CDs than other interference. Interestingly, colorimetric assay and Tyndall effect can be observed and applied to directly distinguish the concentration of Cu(2+) by the naked eye. The proposed fluorescent platform here has been successfully applied to monitor the alteration of striatum Cu(2+) in rat brain during the cerebral calm/sepsis process. The versatile properties of the probe provide a new and effective fluorescent platform for the sensing method in vivo sampled from the rat brain.

  17. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Wang Ai; Wei Ren

    2013-01-01

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, adv...

  18. Fluorescence axial nanotomography with plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Nicholas I; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel imaging technique with super-resolution axial sensitivity, exploiting the changes in fluorescence lifetime above a plasmonic substrate. Using conventional confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging, we show that it is possible to deliver down to 6 nm axial position sensitivity of fluorophores in whole biological cell imaging. We employ this technique to map the topography of the cellular membrane, and demonstrate its application in an investigation of receptor-mediated endocytosis in carcinoma cells.

  19. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  20. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Mi...

  1. Determination of amines based on their interaction with QDs: Effect of the formation QD-assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina; Simonet, Bartolome M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2011-10-10

    Highlights: {yields} Formation of quantum dots-nanochains assisted by the covalent linking through bifunctional dithiol molecules. {yields} With time, the extent of chain assembly and network formation became enhanced and interconnectivity between chains was observed. {yields} The optical properties changed as a function of the total length of the structure. {yields} Fluorescence response of QDs towards amines was enhanced after the formation of QD-assemblies induced by the presence of dithiol molecules. - Abstract: Assemblies of closed nanoparticles have focused interest because they exhibit new optical and chemical properties. The use of a 1D covalent strategy for quantum dots-assemblies has been proposed in this work as novelty. It was studied the effect of use different dithiols, including aromatic and aliphatic dithiol compounds, on the formation of QDs-assemblies in order to establish the influence of the linker's structure on the geometry of the assemblies, and hence on their properties. As a second part of the work, the changes on analytical response to analytes thanks to the formation of QDs-assemblies when dithiols are added were studied for firs time. For this study, some biogenic amines were selected as target analytes. We observed an improvement of 2.7-4 times in the sensitivity, expressed as slope of the calibration graph, when the dithiols were added to the system obtaining QDs-assemblies.

  2. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongxuan

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  3. Subchannel Analysis of Wire Wrapped SCWR Assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shan, Jianqiang; Wang, Henan; Liu, Wei; Song, Linxing; Chen, Xuanxiang; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    .... The HPLWR wire wrapped assembly was analyzed. The results show that: (1) the assembly with wire wrap can obtain a more uniform coolant temperature profile than the grid spaced assembly, which will result in a lower peak cladding temperature; (2...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.630 - Staged-assembly and delegated assembly exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staged-assembly and delegated assembly... Staged-assembly and delegated assembly exemptions. (a) Staged assembly. You may ask us to provide a... assembly. This paragraph (b) applies where the engine manufacturer/remanufacturer does not complete...

  5. Assembly line performance and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Arun B.; Sunnapwar, Vivek K.

    2017-03-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations. In this thesis, a methodology is proposed to reduce cycle time and time loss due to important factors like equipment failure, shortage of inventory, absenteeism, set-up, material handling, rejection and fatigue to improve output within given cost constraints. Various relationships between these factors, corresponding cost and output are established by scientific approach. This methodology is validated in three different vehicle assembly plants. Proposed methodology may help practitioners to optimize the assembly line using lean techniques.

  6. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2010-07-26

    How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions between parts. We present results for a wide variety of assemblies. © 2010 ACM.

  7. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2013-01-01

    How-things-work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of the individual parts and the interactions across the parts based on their geometry and a few user-specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences, and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions across parts. We demonstrate our system on a wide variety of assemblies. © 2013 ACM 0001-0782/13/01.

  8. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  9. Strong Fluorescent Smart Organogel as a Dual Sensing Material for Volatile Acid and Organic Amine Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Pengchong; Yao, Boqi; Wang, Panpan; Gong, Peng; Zhang, Zhenqi; Lu, Ran

    2015-11-23

    An L-phenylalanine derivative (C12PhBPCP) consisting of a strong emission fluorophore with benzoxazole and cyano groups is designed and synthesized to realize dual responses to volatile acid and organic amine vapors. The photophysical properties and self-assembly of the said derivative in the gel phase are also studied. C12PhBPCP can gelate organic solvents and self-assemble into 1 D nanofibers in the gels. UV/Vis absorption spectral results show H-aggregate formation during gelation, which indicates strong exciton coupling between fluorophores. Both wet gel and xerogel emit strong green fluorescence because the cyano group suppresses fluorescence quenching in the self-assemblies. Moreover, the xerogel film with strong green fluorescence can be used as a dual chemosensor for quantitative detection of volatile acid and organic amine vapors with fast response times and low detection limits owing to its large surface area and amplified fluorescence quenching. The detection limits are 796 ppt and 25 ppb for gaseous aniline and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Ratiometric Catalyzed-Assembly of NanoCluster Beacons: A Nonenzymatic Approach for Amplified DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lei; Sun, Ximei; Hong, Qing; Li, Feng

    2017-09-20

    In this work, a novel fluorescent transformation phenomenon of oligonucleotide-encapsulated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) was demonstrated, in which green-emissive AgNCs effectively transformed to red-emissive AgNCs when placed in close proximity to a special DNA fragment (denoted as convertor here). Taking advantage of a catalyzed-hairpin-assembly (CHA) amplification strategy, we rationally and compatibly engineered a simple and sensitive AgNC-based fluorescent signal amplification strategy through the ratiometric catalyzed-assembly (RCA) of green-emissive NanoCluster Beacon (NCB) with a convertor modified DNA hairpin to induce the template transformation circularly. The proposed ratiometric fluorescent biosensing platform based on RCA-amplified NCB (RCA-NCB) emits intense green fluorescence in the absence of target DNA and will undergo consecutively fluorescent signal transformation from green emission to red emission upon exposure to its target DNA. The ratiometric adaptation of the NCB to CHA circuit advances their general usability as biosensing platform with great improvements in detection sensitivity. By measuring the fluorescence intensity ratio of the red emission and green emission, the proposed RCA-NCB platform exhibits sensitive and accurate analytical performance toward Werner Syndrome-relevant gene, the proof-of-concept target in this work. A low detection limit down to the pM level was achieved, which is lower than most of the reported AgNC-based fluorescent DNA biosensors, making the proposed RCA-NCB biosensing strategy appealing in amplifying the ratiometric fluorescent signal for sensitive DNA detection. Moreover, our proposed RCA-NCB platform shows good recovery toward the target DNA in real human serum samples, illustrating their potential promise for clinical and imaging applications in the future.

  11. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  12. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-14

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology.

  13. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function ...

  14. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology. PMID:23710326

  15. Fluorescent retroreflective signing of work zones : abstract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.P. de; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Kooi, F.L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescent retroreflective materials increase the brightness of traffic signs. In construction work zones a benefit is expected from the increased conspicuity of fluorescent retroreflective signs. Fluorescent material can be used instead of non-fluorescent materials both for the advance warning

  16. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification. A fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by exposing...

  17. Side chains control dynamics and self-sorting in fluorescent organic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Adrien; Fischer, Irén; Abbel, Robert; Besenius, Pol; Dasgupta, Debarshi; Gillisen, Martijn A J; Portale, Giuseppe; Stevens, Amy L; Herz, Laura M; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2013-01-22

    To develop fluorescent organic nanoparticles with tailored properties for imaging and sensing, full control over the size, fluorescence, stability, dynamics, and supramolecular organization of these particles is crucial. We have designed, synthesized, and fully characterized 12 nonionic fluorene co-oligomers that formed self-assembled fluorescent nanoparticles in water. In these series of molecules, the ratio of hydrophilic ethylene glycol and hydrophobic alkyl side chains was systematically altered to investigate its role on the above-mentioned properties. The nanoparticles consisting of π-conjugated oligomers containing polar ethylene glycol side chains were less stable and larger in size, while nanoparticles self-assembled from oligomers containing nonpolar pendant chains were more stable, smaller, and generally had a higher fluorescence quantum yield. Furthermore, the dynamics of the molecules between the nanoparticles was enhanced if the number of hydrophilic side chains increased. Energy transfer studies between naphthalene and benzothiadiazole fluorene co-oligomers with the same side chains showed no exchange of molecules between the particles for the apolar molecules. For the more polar systems, the exchange of molecules between nanoparticles took place at room temperature or after annealing. Self-assembled nanoparticles consisting of π-conjugated oligomers having different side chains caused self-sorting, resulting either in the formation of domains within particles or the formation of separate nanoparticles. Our results show that we can control the stability, fluorescence, dynamics, and self-sorting properties of the nanoparticles by simply changing the nature of the side chains of the π-conjugated oligomers. These findings are not only important for the field of self-assembled nanoparticles but also for the construction of well-defined multicomponent supramolecular materials in general.

  18. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called "digital materials." We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  19. Rocket launcher mechanism of collaborative actin assembly defined by single-molecule imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Dennis; Jaiswal, Richa; Bombardier, Jeffrey P.; Gould, Christopher J.; Gelles, Jeff; Goode, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Interacting sets of actin assembly factors work together in cells, but the underlying mechanisms have remained obscure. We used triple-color single molecule fluorescence microscopy to image the tumor-suppressor Adenomateous polyposis coli (APC) and the formin mDia1 during filament assembly. Complexes consisting of APC, mDia1, and actin monomers intiated actin filament formation, overcoming inhibition by capping protein and profilin. Upon filament polymerization, the complexes separated, with mDia1 moving processively on growing barbed ends while APC remained at the site of nucleation. Thus, the two assembly factors directly interact to initiate filament assembly, and then separate but retain independent associations with either end of the growing filament. PMID:22654058

  20. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  1. Analysis of Illumina Microbial Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia; Foster, Brian; Froula, Jeff; LaButti, Kurt; Sczyrba, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Woyke, Tanja

    2010-05-28

    Since the emerging of second generation sequencing technologies, the evaluation of different sequencing approaches and their assembly strategies for different types of genomes has become an important undertaken. Next generation sequencing technologies dramatically increase sequence throughput while decreasing cost, making them an attractive tool for whole genome shotgun sequencing. To compare different approaches for de-novo whole genome assembly, appropriate tools and a solid understanding of both quantity and quality of the underlying sequence data are crucial. Here, we performed an in-depth analysis of short-read Illumina sequence assembly strategies for bacterial and archaeal genomes. Different types of Illumina libraries as well as different trim parameters and assemblers were evaluated. Results of the comparative analysis and sequencing platforms will be presented. The goal of this analysis is to develop a cost-effective approach for the increased throughput of the generation of high quality microbial genomes.

  2. Glass-formers vs. Assemblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzer, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    In most instances, the formation of a glass signifies an inability of the constituents of a system to self-organize into a well-defined, thermodynamically preferred ordered structure. Thus good ''assemblers'' may make poor glass-formers, and good glass-formers tend to be poor assemblers. How good or bad a system is in assembling or vitrifying/jamming depends on many features of the constituent building blocks, including shape and interactions. In many cases, building blocks whose shapes make them good glass-formers can, through almost imperceptible perturbations, become good assemblers, and vice versa. We examine these issues through consideration of several model systems, including colloidal ''rocks'' and foldable nets. *with E.R. Chen, P. Damasceno, P. Dodd, M. Engel, A.S. Keys, D. Klotsa, E. Teich, and G. van Anders

  3. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  4. Assembly delay line pulse generators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    Assembly of six of the ten delay line pulse generators that will power the ten kicker magnet modules. One modulator part contains two pulse generators. Capacitors, inductances, and voltage dividers are in the oil tank on the left. Triggered high-pressure spark gap switches are on the platforms on the right. High voltage pulse cables to the kicker magnet emerge under the spark gaps. In the centre background are the assembled master gaps.

  5. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from ass...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  6. Nuclear actin and protein 4.1: Essential interactions during nuclear assembly in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Chen, Cynthia; Penman, Sheldon; Heald, Rebecca

    2003-06-11

    Structural protein 4.1, which has crucial interactions within the spectin-actin lattice of the human red cell membrane skeleton, also is widely distributed at diverse intracellular sites in nucleated cells. We previously showed that 4.1 is essential for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro and that the capacity of 4.1 to bind actin is required. Here we report that 4.1 and actin colocalize in mammalian cell nuclei using fluorescence microscopy and, by higher resolution cell whole mount electron microscopy, are associated on nuclear filaments. We also devised a cell-free assay using Xenopus egg extract containing fluorescent actin to follow actin during nuclear assembly. By directly imaging actin under non-perturbing conditions, the total nuclear actin population is retained and is visualized in situ relative to intact chromatin. We detected actin initially when chromatin and nuclear pores began assembling. As the nuclear lamina assembled, but preceding DNA synthesis, a discrete actin network formed throughout the nucleus. Protein 4.1 epitopes also were detected when actin began to accumulate in nuclei, producing a diffuse coincident pattern. As nuclei matured, actin was detected both coincident with and also independent of 4.1 epitopes. To test whether acquisition of nuclear actin is required for nuclear assembly, the actin inhibitor latrunculin A was added to Xenopus egg extracts during nuclear assembly. Latrunculin A strongly perturbed nuclear assembly and produced distorted nuclear structures containing neither actin nor protein 4.1. Our results suggest that actin as well as 4.1 is necessary for nuclear assembly and that 4.1-actin interactions may be critical.

  7. Multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsugi, Yu; Kinjo, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    We report simultaneous determination of diffusion coefficients at different points of a cell membrane using a multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system. A system carrying seven detection areas in the evanescent field is achieved by using seven optical fibers on the image plane in the detection port of an objective-type total internal reflection FCS (TIR-FCS) system. Fluctuation of fluorescence intensity is monitored and evaluated using seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a newly constructed multichannel correlator. We demonstrate simultaneous-multipoint FCS, with a 3-mus time resolution, to investigate heterogeneous structures such as cell membranes and membrane-binding molecular dynamics near glass surfaces in live cells.

  8. Ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, R.A.; Glazer, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    We have shown that a number of polycationic highly fluorescent dyes form complexes with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) which are stable to electrophoresis and have characterized in detail such dsDNA complexes with TOTO (1,1[prime]-(4,4,7,7-tetramethyl-4,7-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-[3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene]-quinolinium tetraiodide) and oxazole yellow dimer (YOYO; an analogue of TOTO with a benzo-1,3-oxazole in place of the benzo-1,3-thiazole). TOTO and YOYO are virtually non-fluorescent in solution, but form highly fluorescent complexes with dsDNA, up to a maximum dye to DNA bp ratio of 1:4, with >1000-fold fluorescence enhancement. We have developed an assay using YOYO for the quantitation of single-stranded and dsDNA in solution applicable over a range of DNA concentrations from 0.5 to 100 ng per ml. The fluorescent dsDNA-dye complexes allow detection of dsDNA on agarose and acrylamide gels with picogram sensitivity. We have applied these complexes in multiplex mapping experiments for accurate sizing and quantitation of restriction fragments. We have shown that in gel shift experiments the stable dsDNA-dye complexes can be used to detect heteroduplex-Muts complexes with a sensitivity comparable to radioisotopic detection.

  9. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  10. [Reading by fluorescent lamp light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfling, G

    1979-08-01

    In dioptrics courses it has hitherto been taught that eyes of near-sighted patients who work in fluorescent light should be slightly under-corrected, since the near point is approximated in bluish light as a result of the chromatic aberration of the eye, in contrast to its location in white light or even the reddish light of incandescent lamps. The theory further states that this recommendation does not apply if close-range refraction occurs under fluorescent light. However, this is seldom the case. In our own investigations this approximation of the near point, under uniform illumination by fluorescent strip lights running across the ceiling, did not occur, at least not in "white" light (No. 33). On the contrary, under an incandescent lamp which was only half as powerful the near point was regularly closer to the eye than under white fluorescent light. The recommendation for under-correction of pulpit spectacles computed in incandescent light can therefore no longer be upheld.--While many patients complain of difficulties in diffuse incandescent light, these may be due to several other illumination factors which have not yet been fully investigated.--Some fundamental differences between diffuse fluorescent lighting and incandescent lamp lighting where there is a fall-off in luminosity are described.

  11. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  12. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-05-18

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  13. Quantum dot-assembled nanoparticles with polydiacetylene supramolecule toward label-free, multiplexed optical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeong, San; Kang, Homan; Yim, Joonhyuk; Jeon, Su-Ji; Jeong, Cheol Hwan; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2013-03-15

    Quantum dot (QD)-assembled silica nanoparticles bearing a polydiacetylene (PDA) supramolecule on their surface (SiO(2)@QDs@PDA NPs) were developed for label-free and multiplexed detection of biological molecules. Two types of QD-assembled silica NPs (SiO(2)@QDs NPs) were prepared and coated with the PDA supramolecule via photo-induced polymerization of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid. One of the SiO(2)@QDs NPs was embedded with blue-QDs, and the other was embedded with green-QDs for encoding. The resulting SiO(2)@QDs@PDA NPs showed discrete QD photoluminescence for encoding as well as PDA fluorescence for sensing a target without interference or overlap. Under heating stress of the SiO(2)@QDs@PDA NPs, the color of the PDA changed from blue to red, which allowed us to observe the fluorescence emitted from red PDA. The mixture of two different SiO(2)@QDs@PDA NPs, SiO(2)@QDs@blue-PDA NPs not emitting the fluorescence of PDA and SiO(2)@QDs@red-PDA NPs where stress was brought onto turn on the PDA fluorescence, was effectively imaged and readily distinguished via fluorescence microscopy, indicating their potential for label-free and multiplexed detection of target molecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly efficient and directional homo- and heterodimeric energy transfer materials based on fluorescently derivatized α,γ-cyclic octapeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Roberto J; Pérez-Alvite, María Jesús; Panciera, Michele; Mosquera, Manuel; Castedo, Luis; Granja, Juan R

    2011-01-03

    Cyclic octapeptides composed of α-amino acids alternated with cis-3-aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acids, self-assemble as drumlike dimers through β-sheet-like, backbone-to-backbone hydrogen bonding. Heterodimerization appears to be significantly more favored than homodimerization, and this represents a novel approach for the design and fabrication of highly stable heterodimeric assemblies. A multicomponent equilibrium network based on fluorescently derivatized self-assembling α,γ-cyclic octapeptides has been successfully used to form light-harvesting/light-converting ensembles with a distinctive organization of donor and acceptor units able to act as efficient artificial photosystems.

  15. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic components for led applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Anton

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) constitute a rapidly evolving and fast growing technology that promises to replace incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent lights in many illumination applications. Large-area LED luminaires have a capability to transform lighting by providing a venue for development of smart lighting systems with additional benefits, such as visible light communications, sensing, health and productivity improvement through color temperature control, capability of creating "virtual sky" ceiling, and many others. The objective of this work is to explore directed self-assembly (DSA) approaches suitable for cost-effective assembly of large amount of LEDs and other mesoscopic (i.e. millimeter and sub-millimeter) electronic components and thus to enable manufacturing of smart lighting luminaires. Existing alternative approaches for assembly of semiconductor dies are examined including transfer printing, laser-assisted die transfer, and various directed self-assembly approaches using shape-recognition, magnetic and capillary forces, etc. After comparing their advantages and limitations, we developed two approaches to magnetic force-assisted DSA of LEDs on a large-area substrate in liquid and air medium. The first approach involves pick-up of buoyant and magnetic dies from the liquid surface onto the flexible substrate in a roll-to-roll process. The possibility of high-speed assembly of LED dies is demonstrated, but with a low yield due to the influence of the capillary force of the carrier liquid and the difficulty in ensuring reliable supply of dies to the assembly interface. To overcome the aforementioned challenges this process was modified to assemble the dies by sinking them onto the receiving substrate with a stencil mask on top, demonstrating LED assembly with a very low error rate but at a lower speed. A solder-assisted self-alignment is used to further improve placement precision and to ensure the proper orientation of the dies. The second

  16. Patterning of Nanoclays on Positively Charged Self-Assembled Monolayers via Micromolding in Capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Moritz; Staniford, Mark; Lamping, Sebastian; Körsgen, Martin; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Kynast, Ulrich; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2017-09-05

    Nanoclays are nanomaterials with versatile adsorptive properties. This contribution describes the generation of micropatterns of a nanoclay ("laponite") on ammonium-terminated, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass and silicon. Microstructured immobilization of the laponite was performed using micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC). The immobilization was verified using contact angle goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, laponite was modified with Nile red to generate a fluorescence enhancement-based surface sensor for the vitamin choline.

  17. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  18. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wang Ai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  19. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2013-11-11

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  20. [Fluorescence spectra of ponceau-4R].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ai-Min; Zhu, Tuo; Gu, En-Dong; Liu, Zhou-Yi; Xu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra of ponceau 4R induced by 220-400 nm light were studied in the present paper. The result shows that ponceau 4R has four obvious fluorescence spectral peaks respectively located at 420, 530, 635 and 687 nm, each of these fluorescence spectral peaks has different best induced light, and the corresponding fluorescence spectra were listed. It was considered that this fluorescence comes from the transition n --> pi* of n electrons in the -OH and pi* --> pi of pi electrons in the naphthalene. The fluorescence spectral peaks at 420 nm come from the transition n --> pi* and the other three fluorescence spectral peaks come from pi* --> pi. But the intensity of the four fluorescence spectral peaks changes differently with the excited wavelength This paper attempted to give the expression of the four fluorescence spectral peaks based on the microcosmic mechanism. The reason for that ponceau 4R has complex fluorescence characteristic is that ponceau 4R not only has big and conjugate structure such as naphthalene and provides electron group -OH which can intensify its ability to emit fluorescence, but also absorbs electron group such as N=N which can depress its ability to emit fluorescence. Investigation on the fluorescence spectra and its characteristics will contribute to the study on the fluorescence spectra of other azo pigment and help find a new way for checking food safety.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime standards for time and frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boens, N.; Qin, Wenwu; Basaric, N.; Hofkens, J.; Ameloot, M.; Pouget, J.; Lefevre, J.P.; Valeur, B.; Gratton, E.; Ven, van de M.; Silva jr., D.; Engelborghs, Y.; Willaert, K.; Sillen, A.; Rumbles, G.; Philips, D.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.; Lakowicz, J.R.; Malak, H.; Gryczynski, I.; Szabo, A.G.; Krajcarski, D.T.; Tamai, N.; Miura, A.

    2007-01-01

    A series of fluorophores with single-exponential fluorescence decays in liquid solution at 20 C were measured independently by nine laboratories using single-photon timing and multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry instruments with lasers as excitation source. The dyes that can serve as

  2. PH-sensitive fluorescence detection by diffuse fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; Gao, Feng; Duan, Linjing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan

    2012-03-01

    The importance of cellular pH has been shown clearly in the study of cell activity, pathological feature, drug metabolism, etc. Monitoring pH changes of living cells and imaging the regions with abnormal pH values in vivo could provide the physiologic and pathologic information for the research of the cell biology, pharmacokinetics, diagnostics and therapeutics of certain diseases such as cancer. Thus, pH-sensitive fluorescence imaging of bulk tissues has been attracting great attention in the regime of near-infrared diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT), an efficient small-animal imaging tool. In this paper, the feasibility of quantifying pH-sensitive fluorescence targets in turbid medium is investigated using both time-domain and steady-state DFT methods. By use of the specifically designed time-domain and continuous-wave systems and the previously proposed image reconstruction scheme, we validate the method through 2-dimensional imaging experiments on a small-animal-sized phantom with multiply targets of distinct pH values. The results show that the approach can localize the targets with reasonable accuracy and achieve quantitative reconstruction of the pH-sensitive fluorescent yield.

  3. Molecular self-assembly advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dequan, Alex Li

    2012-01-01

    In the past several decades, molecular self-assembly has emerged as one of the main themes in chemistry, biology, and materials science. This book compiles and details cutting-edge research in molecular assemblies ranging from self-organized peptide nanostructures and DNA-chromophore foldamers to supramolecular systems and metal-directed assemblies, even to nanocrystal superparticles and self-assembled microdevices

  4. optimal assembly line balancing using simulation techniques

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In assembly line balancing, a garment manufacturer is interested in whether assembly work will be finished on time for delivery, how machines and employees are being utilized, whether any station in the assembly line is lagging behind the schedule and how the assembly line is doing overall. The role of a supervisor is to ...

  5. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head... assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Test procedure...

  6. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.183 Section 572.183... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.183 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-2000. For purposes of this test, the neck is mounted within the headform assembly 175...

  7. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.112 Section 572.112... 50th Percentile Male § 572.112 Head assembly. The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 78051-61X...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly in...

  8. 48 CFR 239.7409 - Special assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special assembly. 239.7409... Services 239.7409 Special assembly. (a) Special assembly is the designing, manufacturing, arranging... general use equipment. (b) Special assembly rates and charges shall be based on estimated costs. The...

  9. A lightweight suction gripper for micro assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E.J.C.; Bullema, J.E.; Delbressine, F.L.M.; Schellekens, P.H.J.; Dietzel, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Assembly is a crucial part in the realization of a product. Compared to assembly in the macro world, assembly in the micro world is influenced by scaling effects. These include surface forces, high requirements on placement uncertainty and small product dimensions. Conventional high-speed assembly

  10. 49 CFR 572.186 - Abdomen assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Abdomen assembly. 572.186 Section 572.186... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.186 Abdomen assembly. (a) The abdomen assembly (175-5000) is part of the dummy assembly shown in drawing 175-0000 including load sensors specified in § 572.189(e...

  11. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.113 Section 572.113... 50th Percentile Male § 572.113 Neck assembly. The head/neck assembly consists of the parts 78051-61X...) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head and neck assembly in a test environment at any temperature between 20...

  12. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.192 Section 572.192... Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.192 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (180-1000...) of this section, the head assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c) of...

  13. Use of fluorescent Ca2+ dyes with green fluorescent protein and its variants: problems and solutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolsover, S.; O. Ibrahim; O'luanaigh, N; Williams, H; Cockcroft, S

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes, and green fluorescent protein and its variants, can be used together. We find that the most commonly used fluorescent protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), seriously contaminates fura 2 signals. We suggest two alternative combinations for which there is no detectable contamination of the Ca(2+) indicator signal by the fluorescent protein. Blue fluorescent protein can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura Red...

  14. Fluorescence Endoscopy in vivo based on Fiber-bundle Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zufiria, B.; Gomez-Garcia, P.; Stamatakis, K.; Vaquero, J.J.; Fresno, M.; Desco, M.; Ripoll, J.; Arranz, A.

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have become important for the determination of the cellular organization that is coupled to organ function. In many cases the organ can be viewed without the need of ionizing radiation techniques in an easier way. This is the case of the gastrointestinal tract, an organ that can be directly accessed with endoscopy avoiding any invasive procedure. Here we describe the design, assembly and testing of a fluorescence high-resolution endoscope intended for the study of the cellular organization of the colon in an experimental mouse model of colon carcinoma. Access to the colon of the mouse took place using a fiber-optic bundle that redirects the light coming from a LED to produce fluorescence and detect it back through the fiber bundle. Results from in vivo and ex-vivo test using our fluorescence fiber bundle endoscope show altered tissue structure and destruction of the intestinal crypts in tumor-bearing areas compared with healthy tissue. (Author)

  15. Peptide amphiphile self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscen, Aysenur; Schatz, George C.

    2017-08-01

    Self-assembly is a process whereby molecules organize into structures with hierarchical order and complexity, often leading to functional materials. Biomolecules such as peptides, lipids and DNA are frequently involved in self-assembly, and this leads to materials of interest for a wide variety of applications in biomedicine, photonics, electronics, mechanics, etc. The diversity of structures and functions that can be produced provides motivation for developing theoretical models that can be used for a molecular-level description of these materials. Here we overview recently developed computational methods for modeling the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PA) into supramolecular structures that form cylindrical nanoscale fibers using molecular-dynamics simulations. Both all-atom and coarse-grained force field methods are described, and we emphasize how these calculations contribute insight into fiber structure, including the importance of β-sheet formation. We show that the temperature at which self-assembly takes place affects the conformations of PA chains, resulting in cylindrical nanofibers with higher β-sheet content as temperature increases. We also present a new high-density PA model that shows long network formation of β-sheets along the long axis of the fiber, a result that correlates with some experiments. The β-sheet network is mostly helical in nature which helps to maintain strong interactions between the PAs both radially and longitudinally. Contribution to Focus Issue Self-assemblies of Inorganic and Organic Nanomaterials edited by Marie-Paule Pileni.

  16. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    We have postulated that, in the case of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme, crystal growth occurs by the addition of pre-critical nuclei sized n-mers that form in the bulk solution, and that the n-mer growth units were multiples of the tetrameric 4(sub 3) helical structure. These have the strongest intermolecular bonds in the crystal and are therefore likely to be the first species formed. High resolution AFM studies provide strong supporting evidence for this model, but the data also suggest that the actual species in solution may not be identical in structure to that found in the crystal. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2(sub 1) space group. FRET studies are being carried out between the cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex(sub max) 366 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex(sub max) 430 nm, Em 528 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R(sub 0) for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approx. 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 4(sub 3) helix. The short donor lifetime of 2.80 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.644), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules (greater than or equal to 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Lifetime data show that CB-lys has a single lifetime when it is the only species in solution. Similarly, LY-lys also exhibits a single lifetime of 4.63 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.42) when alone in solution. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a third lifetime component of 0.348ns for the CB-lys. The fractional intensities of the different species present can be used to estimate the distribution of monomer and n-mers in solution. The self

  17. Chemometric endogenous fluorescence for tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run; Vasquez, Kevin; Xu, M.

    2017-02-01

    Endogenous fluorescence is a powerful technique for probing both structure and function of tissue. We show that enabling wide-field fluorescence microscopy with chemometrics can significantly enhance the performance of tissue diagnosis with endogenous fluorescence. The spatial distribution and absolute concentration of fluorophores is uncovered with non-negative factorization aided by the spatial diversity from microscopic autofluorescence color images. Fluorescence quantification in terms of its absolute concentration map avoids issues dependent on specific measurement approach or systems and yields biologically meaningful data. The standardization of endogenous fluorescence in terms of absolute concentration will facilitate its translation to the clinics and simplifies the assessment of competing methods relating to tissue fluorescence.

  18. Anastral spindle assembly and γ-tubulin in Drosophila oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallen Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anastral spindles assemble by a mechanism that involves microtubule nucleation and growth from chromatin. It is still uncertain whether γ-tubulin, a microtubule nucleator essential for mitotic spindle assembly and maintenance, plays a role. Not only is the requirement for γ-tubulin to form anastral Drosophila oocyte meiosis I spindles controversial, but its presence in oocyte meiosis I spindles has not been demonstrated and is uncertain. Results We show, for the first time, using a bright GFP fusion protein and live imaging, that the Drosophila maternally-expressed γTub37C is present at low levels in oocyte meiosis I spindles. Despite this, we find that formation of bipolar meiosis I spindles does not require functional γTub37C, extending previous findings by others. Fluorescence photobleaching assays show rapid recovery of γTub37C in the meiosis I spindle, similar to the cytoplasm, indicating weak binding by γTub37C to spindles, and fits of a new, potentially more accurate model for fluorescence recovery yield kinetic parameters consistent with transient, diffusional binding. Conclusions The FRAP results, together with its mutant effects late in meiosis I, indicate that γTub37C may perform a role subsequent to metaphase I, rather than nucleating microtubules for meiosis I spindle formation. Weak binding to the meiosis I spindle could stabilize pre-existing microtubules or position γ-tubulin for function during meiosis II spindle assembly, which follows rapidly upon oocyte activation and completion of the meiosis I division.

  19. A Dimmable Electrodeless Fluorescent Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuming; Long, Qi; Chen, Dahua; Li, Weide; Wang, Aiqun

    A dimmable electrodeless fluorescent lamp (induction lamp) is introduced in this paper. The principles of the induction lamp are introduced in details. A dimming approach for the lamp is discussed in both theory and experiment. A continuous dimming range from 30%-100% can be realized with the application of the IC chip.

  20. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  1. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and its Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    ferent aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy and applications in chemistry, which I hope would be useful to both chemists and spectroscopists. I thank the Indian Academy of Sciences and, in particular, the Editorial. Board of the Journal of Chemical Sciences for inviting me to be the Guest. Editor of this Special Issue.

  2. Fluorescence for high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheiss, N.G.; Kool, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In a not obligatory series of lessons for high school students in the Netherlands we discuss the fluorescence aspects of anthracene. These lessons were developed because HiSPARC (High school Project on Astrophysics Research with Cosmics) detection of cosmic rays are available for different secondary

  3. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  4. Live Cell Imaging of F-actin Dynamics via Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (FSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, James; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2009-01-01

    In this protocol we describe the use of Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (FSM) to capture high-resolution images of actin dynamics in PtK1 cells. A unique advantage of FSM is its ability to capture the movement and turnover kinetics (assembly/disassembly) of the F-actin network within living cells. This technique is particularly useful in deriving quantitative measurements of F-actin dynamics when paired with computer vision software (qFSM). We describe the selection, microinjection and visualization of fluorescent actin probes in living cells. Importantly, similar procedures are applicable to visualizing other macomolecular assemblies. FSM has been demonstrated for microtubules, intermediate filaments, and adhesion complexes. PMID:19684563

  5. Polymersomes and Wormlike Micelles Made Fluorescent by Direct Modifications of Block Copolymer Amphiphiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikan Rajagopal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wormlike micelles and vesicles prepared from diblock copolymers are attracting great interest for a number of technological applications. Although transmission electron microscopy has remained as the method of choice for assessing the morphologies, fluorescence microscopy has a number of advantages. We show here that when commercially available fluorophores are covalently attached to diblock copolymers, a number of their physicochemical characteristics can be investigated. This method becomes particularly useful for visualizing phase separation within polymer assemblies and assessing the dynamics of wormlike micelles in real time. Near-IR fluorophores can be covalently conjugated to polymers and this opens the possibility for deep-tissue fluorescence imaging of polymer assemblies in drug delivery applications.

  6. Insulation assembly for electric machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Frederick W.; Titmuss, David F.; Parish, Harold; Campbell, John D.

    2013-10-15

    An insulation assembly is provided that includes a generally annularly-shaped main body and at least two spaced-apart fingers extending radially inwards from the main body. The spaced-apart fingers define a gap between the fingers. A slot liner may be inserted within the gap. The main body may include a plurality of circumferentially distributed segments. Each one of the plurality of segments may be operatively connected to another of the plurality of segments to form the continuous main body. The slot liner may be formed as a single extruded piece defining a plurality of cavities. A plurality of conductors (extendable from the stator assembly) may be axially inserted within a respective one of the plurality of cavities. The insulation assembly electrically isolates the conductors in the electric motor from the stator stack and from other conductors.

  7. Introduction of customized inserts for s-treamlined assembly and optimization of BioBrick synthetic genetic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norville, Julie E; Derda, Ratmir; Gupta, Saurabh; Drinkwater, Kelly A; Belcher, Angela M; Leschziner, Andres E; Knight, Thomas F

    2010-12-20

    BioBrick standard biological parts are designed to make biological systems easier to engineer (e.g. assemble, manipulate, and modify). There are over 5,000 parts available in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts that can be easily assembled into genetic circuits using a standard assembly technique. The standardization of the assembly technique has allowed for wide distribution to a large number of users -- the parts are reusable and interchangeable during the assembly process. The standard assembly process, however, has some limitations. In particular it does not allow for modification of already assembled biological circuits, addition of protein tags to pre-existing BioBrick parts, or addition of non-BioBrick parts to assemblies. In this paper we describe a simple technique for rapid generation of synthetic biological circuits using introduction of customized inserts. We demonstrate its use in Escherichia coli (E. coli) to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) at pre-calculated relative levels and to add an N-terminal tag to GFP. The technique uses a new BioBrick part (called a BioScaffold) that can be inserted into cloning vectors and excised from them to leave a gap into which other DNA elements can be placed. The removal of the BioScaffold is performed by a Type IIB restriction enzyme (REase) that recognizes the BioScaffold but cuts into the surrounding sequences; therefore, the placement and removal of the BioScaffold allows the creation of seamless connections between arbitrary DNA sequences in cloning vectors. The BioScaffold contains a built-in red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter; successful insertion of the BioScaffold is, thus, accompanied by gain of red fluorescence and its removal is manifested by disappearance of the red fluorescence. The ability to perform targeted modifications of existing BioBrick circuits with BioScaffolds (1) simplifies and speeds up the iterative design-build-test process through direct reuse of existing circuits, (2

  8. Coronavirus envelope (E) protein remains at the site of assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatagopalan, Pavithra [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Daskalova, Sasha M. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Lopez, Lisa A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Dolezal, Kelly A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Hogue, Brenda G., E-mail: Brenda.Hogue@asu.edu [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble at endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and egress from cells in cargo vesicles. Only a few molecules of the envelope (E) protein are assembled into virions. The role of E in morphogenesis is not fully understood. The cellular localization and dynamics of mouse hepatitis CoV A59 (MHV) E protein were investigated to further understanding of its role during infection. E protein localized in the ERGIC and Golgi with the amino and carboxy termini in the lumen and cytoplasm, respectively. E protein does not traffic to the cell surface. MHV was genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag at the carboxy end of E. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) confirmed the presence of E in Golgi cisternae. The results provide strong support that E proteins carry out their function(s) at the site of budding/assembly. - Highlights: • Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-CoV) E protein localizes in the ERGIC and Golgi. • MHV-CoV E does not transport to the cell surface. • MHV-CoV can be genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag appended to E. • First FRAP and correlative light electron microscopy of a CoV E protein. • Live-cell imaging shows that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes.

  9. Rapid assembly of customized TALENs into multiple delivery systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxing Zhang

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs have become a powerful tool for genome editing. Here we present an efficient TALEN assembly approach in which TALENs are assembled by direct Golden Gate ligation into Gateway(® Entry vectors from a repeat variable di-residue (RVD plasmid array. We constructed TALEN pairs targeted to mouse Ddx3 subfamily genes, and demonstrated that our modified TALEN assembly approach efficiently generates accurate TALEN moieties that effectively introduce mutations into target genes. We generated "user friendly" TALEN Entry vectors containing TALEN expression cassettes with fluorescent reporter genes that can be efficiently transferred via Gateway (LR recombination into different delivery systems. We demonstrated that the TALEN Entry vectors can be easily transferred to an adenoviral delivery system to expand application to cells that are difficult to transfect. Since TALENs work in pairs, we also generated a TALEN Entry vector set that combines a TALEN pair into one PiggyBac transposon-based destination vector. The approach described here can also be modified for construction of TALE transcriptional activators, repressors or other functional domains.

  10. Coronavirus envelope (E) protein remains at the site of assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatagopalan, Pavithra; Daskalova, Sasha M; Lopez, Lisa A; Dolezal, Kelly A; Hogue, Brenda G

    2015-04-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble at endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and egress from cells in cargo vesicles. Only a few molecules of the envelope (E) protein are assembled into virions. The role of E in morphogenesis is not fully understood. The cellular localization and dynamics of mouse hepatitis CoV A59 (MHV) E protein were investigated to further understanding of its role during infection. E protein localized in the ERGIC and Golgi with the amino and carboxy termini in the lumen and cytoplasm, respectively. E protein does not traffic to the cell surface. MHV was genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag at the carboxy end of E. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) confirmed the presence of E in Golgi cisternae. The results provide strong support that E proteins carry out their function(s) at the site of budding/assembly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Polymer directed self-assembly of pH-responsive antioxidant nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Christina; Amin, Devang; Messersmith, Phillip B; Anthony, John E; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-03-31

    We have developed pH-responsive, multifunctional nanoparticles based on encapsulation of an antioxidant, tannic acid (TA), using flash nanoprecipitation, a polymer directed self-assembly method. Formation of insoluble coordination complexes of tannic acid and iron during mixing drives nanoparticle assembly. Tuning the core material to polymer ratio, the size of the nanoparticles can be readily tuned between 50 and 265 nm. The resulting nanoparticle is pH-responsive, i.e., stable at pH 7.4 and soluble under acidic conditions due to the nature of the coordination complex. Further, the coordination complex can be coprecipitated with other hydrophobic materials such as therapeutics or imaging agents. For example, coprecipitation with a hydrophobic fluorescent dye creates fluorescent nanoparticles. In vitro, the nanoparticles have low cytotoxicity and show antioxidant activity. Therefore, these particles may facilitate intracellular delivery of antioxidants.

  12. Ultraviolet Fluorescence Spectra of Fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Saitoh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied inherent fluorescence spectra and imaging of fingerprints in the deep ultraviolet (UV region with a nanosecond-pulsed Nd-YAG laser system that consists of a tunable laser, a cooled CCD camera, and a grating spectrometer. In this paper, we have studied UV fluorescence spectra of fingerprints under 266-nm illumination. Fluorescence spectra of fingerprints have two main peaks, around 330 nm (peak A and 440 nm (peak B. At first, when a fingerprint has just been pressed, peak A is dominant. However, its intensity reduces as the total illumination time increases. On the other hand, peak B is weak at first. It appears after enough 266-nm illumination and its intensity increases as time elapses. After 3 h of illumination, peak A almost diminishes and peak B becomes dominant. By leaving the fingerprint under a fluorescent lamp in a room without laser illumination, peak A can be restored partly, while the intensity of peak B still increases.Time-resolved fluorescence spectra were also measured for these two peaks. The lifetime of each peak is 2.0 nsec (peak A and 6.2 nsec (peak B on average. Both peaks seem to consist of several components with different lifetimes. In the case of peak A, the 330-nm peak decays fast and a new component at 360 nm becomes dominant when the delay time exceeds 20 nsec. In the case of peak B, unlike peak A, no clear peak separation is observed, but the peak position seems to move from 440 to 460 nm when the delay time becomes larger.

  13. Self-assembly of cyclodextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Z.; Kurkov, S.V.; Nielsen, T.T.

    2012-01-01

    that increases upon formation of inclusion complexes with lipophilic drugs. However, the stability of such aggregates is not sufficient for parenteral administration. In this review CD polymers and CD containing nanoparticles are categorized, with focus on self-assembled CD nanoparticles. It is described how......The design of functional cyclodextrin (CD) nanoparticles is a developing area in the field of nanomedicine. CDs can not only help in the formation of drug carriers but also increase the local concentration of drugs at the site of action. CD monomers form aggregates by self-assembly, a tendency...

  14. Muscle assembly: a titanic achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio, C C; Granzier, H; Sorimachi, H; Labeit, S

    1999-02-01

    The formation of perfectly aligned myofibrils in striated muscle represents a dramatic example of supramolecular assembly in eukaryotic cells. Recently, considerable progress has been made in deciphering the roles that titin, the third most abundant protein in muscle, has in this process. An increasing number of sarcomeric proteins (ligands) are being identified that bind to specific titin domains. Titin may serve as a molecular blueprint for sarcomere assembly and turnover by specifying the precise position of its ligands within each half-sarcomere in addition to functioning as a molecular spring that maintains the structural integrity of the contracting myofibrils.

  15. Coagulation protein FVIII binding to phospholipid membranes investigated by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Engelke, Hanna C.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) allows one to measure protein-membrane binding, self-assembly and other molecular reactions and parameters quantitatively in buffer as well as in complex media. Subject of this thesis was to investigate protein-membrane interactions within blood coagulation in buffer as well as in their biological environment with FCS. Binding of Factor VIII (FVIII) to phosphatidylserine (PS)-expressing platelets is a key process in the intravascular pathwa...

  16. Prolonged fluorescence lifetime of carbon quantum dots by combining with hydroxyapatite nanorods for bio-applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baojin; Zhang, Shan; Liu, Ruoyu; Qiu, Jichuan; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Shicai; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2017-02-09

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are a new type of fluorescent nanoparticle for cell imaging and tracking. However, they would easily diffuse and quench, followed by the loss of their fluorescence ability. By connecting their functional groups with other nanoparticles, the CQDs will be protected from destruction and exhibit long-time fluorescence. Here, carbon quantum dot-hydroxyapatite (CQD-HAp) hybrid nanorods were prepared by the self-assembly of CQDs on the surface of HAp nanorods through a facile one-pot process. The morphology and size of the CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods can be well controlled by using oleic acid, which meanwhile is the source of CQDs. The hydrophilic CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods have prolonged fluorescence life due to the connection between CQDs and HAp nanorods, and exhibit a higher fluorescence quantum yield than pure CQDs. In addition, when hybrid nanorods load doxorubicin (Dox) to form Dox-CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods, they can more efficiently kill human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells, rather than human prostatic cancer (PC-3) cells. Long time fluorescence for cell imaging and high efficiency in killing cancer cells as a drug-delivery medium make CQD-HAp hybrid nanorods have great potential applications in the bio-field.

  17. Enhancement of fluorescent emission in photonic crystal film and application in photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng; Zhou, Wenying; Fang, Jiaojiao; Ni, Yaru; Fang, Liang; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi; Kang, Zhitao

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent photonic crystal films composed of monodisperse NaYF4:15Yb,0.5Tm@SiO2 (where 15 and 0.5 represent the mole percentage of reactants) core–shell spheres were successfully fabricated and applied in photocatalysis. The core–shell spheres were prepared using a modified Stober method, and fluorescent photonic crystal films were fabricated via a simple self-assembly method. The morphologies, structures and upconversion fluorescent properties of the fluorescent photonic crystal films with different photonic band gaps were characterized. Moreover, their photocatalytic capability in decomposing rhodamine B using near-infrared light was studied. Results indicate that the band edge effect plays a critical role in the enhancement of short wave emission intensity of fluorescent photonic crystal films. Specifically, in comparison to the reference sample without a band edge effect, the 363 nm emission intensity was enhanced by 5.97 times, while the percentage of UV upconversion emission was improved by 6.23%. In addition, the 451 nm emission intensity was enhanced by 5.81 times, and the percentage of visible upconversion emission was improved by 8.88%. Furthermore, fluorescent photonic crystal films with enhanced short wave emission exhibited great photocatalytic performance in the degradation of rhodamine B aqueous solutions under near-infrared light.

  18. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  19. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  20. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuo, Jun; Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Xiaojing; Xiong, Xiaohong; Xiao, Saijin; Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

      Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good...

  1. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good biocompatibility and high fluorescence. Meanwhile, fluorescence CDs overcome the shortcomings of high toxicity of traditional nanomaterials. Moreover, the preparation procedure of fluorescent CDs is simple and easy. Therefore, fluorescent CDs have great potential applied in photocatalysis, biochemical sensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other related areas. In this paper, recent hot researches on fluorescent CDs are reviewed and some problems in the progress of fluorescent CDs are also summarized. At last, a future outlook in this direction is presented.

  2. Purification of recombinant human and Drosophila septin hexamers for TIRF assays of actin-septin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, M; Tsai, F-C; Koenderink, G H

    2016-01-01

    Septins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that are conserved from fungi to humans. Septins assemble into heterooligomeric complexes and higher-order structures with key roles in various cellular functions including cell migration and division. The mechanisms by which septins assemble and interact with other cytoskeletal elements like actin remain elusive. A powerful approach to address this question is by cell-free reconstitution of purified cytoskeletal proteins combined with fluorescence microscopy. Here, we describe procedures for the purification of recombinant Drosophila and human septin hexamers from Escherichia coli and reconstitution of actin-septin coassembly. These procedures can be used to compare assembly of Drosophila and human septins and their coassembly with the actin cytoskeleton by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Highly Fluorescent Metal-Organic-Framework Nanocomposites for Photonic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguzzi, A; Ballabio, M; Yanai, N; Kimizuka, N; Fazzi, D; Campione, M; Meinardi, F

    2018-01-10

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous hybrid materials built up from organic ligands coordinated to metal ions or clusters by means of self-assembly strategies. The peculiarity of these materials is the possibility, according to specific synthetic routes, to manipulate both the composition and ligands arrangement in order to control their optical and energy-transport properties. Therefore, optimized MOFs nanocrystals (nano-MOFs) can potentially represent the next generation of luminescent materials with features similar to those of their inorganic predecessors, that is, the colloidal semiconductor quantum dots. The luminescence of fluorescent nano-MOFs is generated through the radiative recombination of ligand molecular excitons. The uniqueness of these nanocrystals is the possibility to pack the ligand chromophores close enough to allow a fast exciton diffusion but sufficiently far from each other preventing the aggregation-induced effects of the organic crystals. In particular, the formation of strongly coupled dimers or excimers is avoided, thus preserving the optical features of the isolated molecule. However, nano-MOFs have a very small fluorescence quantum yield (QY). In order to overcome this limitation and achieve highly emitting systems, we analyzed the fluorescence process in blue emitting nano-MOFs and modeled the diffusion and quenching mechanism of photogenerated singlet excitons. Our results demonstrate that the excitons quenching in nano-MOFs is mainly due to the presence of surface-located, nonradiative recombination centers. In analogy with their inorganic counterparts, we found that the passivation of the nano-MOF surfaces is a straightforward method to enhance the emission efficiency. By embedding the nanocrystals in an inert polymeric host, we observed a +200% increment of the fluorescence QY, thus recovering the emission properties of the isolated ligand in solution.

  4. Directed self-assembled crystalline oligomer domains on graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Klarskov, Mikkel Buster

    2014-01-01

    We observe the formation of thin films of fibre-like aggregates from the prototypical organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) on graphite thin flakes and on monolayer graphene. Using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, polarized fluorescence...... show that the graphene surface can be used as a growth substrate to direct the self-assembly of organic molecular thin films and nanofibres, both with and without lithographical processing....

  5. Electromagnetic fields emitted by fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, C.; Sebastiao, D.; Ladeira, D.; Carpinteiro, G.; Antunes, M.; Correia, L.M.; Fernandes, C. [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-05-15

    In the scope of the monIT Project, it was found that fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps are also important sources of radiation. More than increasing electromagnetic field (EMF) levels in a particular environment, the radiated EMFs from ballasts may cause interference in other devices. Two different lamps are analysed, both in terms of their radiated frequency spectrum and of their compliance with European EMF recommended exposure levels. As expected, the analysis of results shows that, in the immediate vicinity of a lamp, EMF levels radiated by lighting devices depend on the lamp power. Finally, one can conclude that EMFs radiated from both lamps are in compliance with the EMF reference levels. (author)

  6. Hierarchical Assembly of Plasmonic Nanostructures using Virus Capsid Scaffolds on DNA Origami Tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Debin; Capehart, Stacy L.; Pal, Suchetan; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Lei; Schuck, P. J.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Francis, Matthew B.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-07-07

    Plasmonic nanoarchitectures using biological scaffolds have shown the potential to attain controllable plasmonic fluorescence via precise spatial arrangement of fluorophores and plasmonic antennae. However, previous studies report a predominance of fluorescence quenching for small metal nanoparticles (less than ~60 nm) due to their small scattering cross-sections. In this work, we report the design and performance of fluorescent plasmonic structures composed of fluorophore-modified virus capsids and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembled on DNA origami tiles. The virus capsid creates a scaffold for control over the three dimensional arrangement of the fluorophores, whereas the DNA origami tile provides precise control over the distance between the capsid and the AuNP. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations and multimodal single-particle imaging measurements, we show that the judicial design of these structures places the dye molecules near the hot spot of the AuNP. This effectively increases the fluorescence intensity in the quenching regime of the AuNP, with an enhancement factor that increases with increasing AuNP size. This strategy of using biological scaffolds to control fluorescence paves the way for exploring the parameters that determine plasmonic fluorescence. It may lead to a better understanding of the antenna effects of photon absorption and emission, enabling the construction of multicomponent plasmonic systems.

  7. Two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-01-01

    We discovered that hemoglobin emits high energy Soret fluorescence when two-photon excited by the visible femtosecond light sources. The unique spectral and temporal characteristics of hemoglobin fluorescence were measured by using a time-resolved spectroscopic detection system. The high energy Soret fluorescence of hemoglobin shows the spectral peak at 438 nm with extremely short lifetime. This discovery enables two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to become a potentially powerful t...

  8. Entangled-photon coincidence fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok H

    2008-09-29

    We describe fluorescence imaging using the second-order correlation of entangled photon pairs. The proposed method is based on the principle that one photon of the pair carries information on where the other photon has been absorbed and has produced fluorescence in a sample. Because fluorescent molecules serve as "detectors" breaking the entanglement, multiply-scattered fluorescence photons within the sample do not cause image blur. We discuss experimental implementations.

  9. Assembly of RNA nanostructures on supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Michanek, Agnes; Jaeger, Luc; Rabe, Michael; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Höök, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy; Sparr, Emma

    2014-12-01

    The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of this, the use of laterally mobile lipid bilayers to control RNA three-dimensional nanostructure formation on surfaces remains largely unexplored. Here, we direct the self-assembly of RNA building blocks into three-dimensional structures of RNA on fluid lipid bilayers composed of cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) or mixtures of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cationic sphingosine. We demonstrate the stepwise supramolecular assembly of discrete building blocks through specific and selective RNA-RNA interactions, based on results from quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), ellipsometry, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) experiments. The assembly can be controlled to give a densely packed single layer of RNA polyhedrons at the fluid lipid bilayer surface. We show that assembly of the 3D structure can be modulated by sequence specific interactions, surface charge and changes in the salt composition and concentration. In addition, the tertiary structure of the RNA polyhedron can be controllably switched from an extended structure to one that is dense and compact. The versatile approach to building up three-dimensional structures of RNA does not require modification of the surface or the RNA molecules, and can be used as a bottom-up means of nanofabrication of functionalized bio-mimicking surfaces.The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of

  10. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  11. ATLAS Assembly Hall Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    To mark the 50th Anniversary of the founding of CERN, a day of tours, displays and presentations was held in October 2004. The assembly halls for the experiments that were waiting to be installed on the LHC, such as ATLAS shown here, were transformed into display areas and cafés.

  12. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Victor T.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  13. Vibration Damping Circuit Card Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ronald Allen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibration damping circuit card assembly includes a populated circuit card having a mass M. A closed metal container is coupled to a surface of the populated circuit card at approximately a geometric center of the populated circuit card. Tungsten balls fill approximately 90% of the metal container with a collective mass of the tungsten balls being approximately (0.07) M.

  14. Coded nanoscale self-assembly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the number of starting particles. Figure 6. Coded self-assembly results in specific shapes. When the con- stituent particles are coded to only combine in a certain defined rules, it al- ways manages to generate the same shape. The simplest case of linear coding with multiseed option is presented here. in place the resultant ...

  15. STAGE MODEL FOR GONDWANA ASSEMBLY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the Kalahari craton (IMSLEK terranes) with the Congo craton and the Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS). The younger granulite event recorded in the Kitumbi area could then mark a younger collision between Australo-Antarctica and the combined IMSLEK-Conga. ANS collage marking the final assembly of Gondwana.

  16. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  17. In Vitro Assembly of Catalase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process. PMID:25148685

  18. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distributed assembly processes. From a physical perspective, these phenomena provide insight into delay dynamics and inventory distributions in large-scale manufacturing systems.

  20. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  1. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  2. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  3. ATP Changes the Fluorescence Lifetime of Cyan Fluorescent protein via an Interaction with His148

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.W.; Willemse, M.; Slijkhuis, R.; Krogt, G.; Laptenok, S.; Jalink, K.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described that ATP induces changes in YFP/CFP fluorescence intensities of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors based on CFP-YFP. To get insight into this phenomenon, we employed fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy to analyze the influence of ATP on these fluorescent

  4. ATP changes the fluorescence lifetime of cyan fluorescent protein via an interaction with His148.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.W.; Willemse, M.P.; Slijkhuis, R.; Krogt, G. van der; Laptenok, S.P.; Jalink, K.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described that ATP induces changes in YFP/CFP fluorescence intensities of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors based on CFP-YFP. To get insight into this phenomenon, we employed fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy to analyze the influence of ATP on these fluorescent

  5. Multi-Robot Assembly Strategies and Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARVEL, JEREMY A.; BOSTELMAN, ROGER; FALCO, JOE

    2018-01-01

    We present a survey of multi-robot assembly applications and methods and describe trends and general insights into the multi-robot assembly problem for industrial applications. We focus on fixtureless assembly strategies featuring two or more robotic systems. Such robotic systems include industrial robot arms, dexterous robotic hands, and autonomous mobile platforms, such as automated guided vehicles. In this survey, we identify the types of assemblies that are enabled by utilizing multiple robots, the algorithms that synchronize the motions of the robots to complete the assembly operations, and the metrics used to assess the quality and performance of the assemblies. PMID:29497234

  6. Quantitative live-cell imaging of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtel, Viola; Müller, Barbara; Lamb, Don C

    2012-05-01

    Advances in fluorescence methodologies make it possible to investigate biological systems in unprecedented detail. Over the last few years, quantitative live-cell imaging has increasingly been used to study the dynamic interactions of viruses with cells and is expected to become even more indispensable in the future. Here, we describe different fluorescence labeling strategies that have been used to label HIV-1 for live cell imaging and the fluorescence based methods used to visualize individual aspects of virus-cell interactions. This review presents an overview of experimental methods and recent experiments that have employed quantitative microscopy in order to elucidate the dynamics of late stages in the HIV-1 replication cycle. This includes cytosolic interactions of the main structural protein, Gag, with itself and the viral RNA genome, the recruitment of Gag and RNA to the plasma membrane, virion assembly at the membrane and the recruitment of cellular proteins involved in HIV-1 release to the nascent budding site.

  7. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  9. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-10-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation--integration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Fluorescence imaging agents in cancerology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganin-Gioanni, Aurélie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Paquereau, Laurent; Ecochard, Vincent; Golzio, Muriel; Teissié, Justin

    2010-09-01

    One of the major challenges in cancer therapy is to improve early detection and prevention using novel targeted cancer diagnostics. Detection requests specific recognition. Tumor markers have to be ideally present on the surface of cancer cells. Their targeting with ligands coupled to imaging agents make them visible/detectable. Fluorescence imaging is a newly emerging technology which is becoming a complementary medical method for cancer diagnosis. It allows detection with a high spatio-temporal resolution of tumor markers in small animals and in clinical studies. In this review, we focus on the recent outcome of basic studies in the design of new approaches (probes and devices) used to detect tumor cells by fluorescence imaging.

  11. Controlled short-linkage assembly of functional nano-objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Shilpi; Kamra, Tripta [Division of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); ENI AB, Malmö (Sweden); Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Uddin, Khan Mohammad Ahsan [Division of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Snezhkova, Olesia [Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Jayawardena, H. Surangi N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave., Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Yan, Mingdi [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave., Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Department of Chemistry, KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 30, S-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Montelius, Lars [ENI AB, Malmö (Sweden); Schnadt, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.schnadt@sljus.lu.se [Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Ye, Lei, E-mail: lei.ye@tbiokem.lth.se [Division of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fast photoconjugation of nanoparticles on surface. • Non-destructive feature guarantees intact function of nanoparticles. • Direct contact between nano-objects allows efficient photon and electron transfer. • Possibility of generating patterned nanoparticle assemblies on surface. • Open new opportunities for assembling chemical sensors. - Abstract: In this work, we report a method that allows the deterministic, photo-controlled covalent assembly of nanoparticles directly on surface. As a model system, we study the conjugation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles on a glass surface and confirm that the immobilized nanoparticles maintain their molecular recognition functionality. The glass slide was first modified with perfluorophenylazide and then used to bind MIP nanoparticles under UV irradiation. After each step the surface was analyzed by water contact angle measurement, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and/or synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The MIP nanoparticles immobilized on the glass surface remained stable and maintained specific binding for the template molecule, propranolol. The method developed in this work allows MIP nanoparticles to be directly coupled to a flat surface, offering a straightforward means to construct robust chemical sensors. Using the reported photo conjugation method, it is possible to generate patterned assembly of nanoparticles using a photomask. Since perfluorophenylazide-based photochemistry works with all kinds of organic material, the method developed in this work is expected to enable immobilization of not only MIPs but also other kinds of organic and inorganic–organic core–shell particles for various applications involving photon or electron transfer.

  12. Fluorescent compounds present in food

    OpenAIRE

    Soto Serrano, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Póster The food industry demands fast, reliable, cheap and reproducible methods for quality and process control. This bibliographic review work investigates florescence spectroscopy, a method that couldn’t be used in food until the recent technological advances, concretely front-face fluorescence and chemometric tools. This technology presents advantages as compared to classical methods like HPLC or capillary electrophoresis, which require qualified staff, sample preparation and are time-c...

  13. Controllable Assembly and Separation of Colloidal Nanoparticles through a One-Tube Synthesis Based on Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaohan; Li, Minglin; Kuang, Yun; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Zhao; Zhang, Jin; You, Shusen; Yin, Meizhen; Wan, Pengbo; Luo, Liang; Sun, Xiaoming

    2015-05-04

    Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with finite primary units was achieved by introducing a thin salt (NaCl) solution layer into density gradient before centrifugation. The electrostatic interactions between Au nanoparticles would be affected and cause 1D assembly upon passing through the salt layer. A negatively charged polymer such as poly(acrylic acid) was used as an encapsulation/stabilization layer to help the formation of 1D Au assemblies, which were subsequently sorted according to unit numbers at succeeding separation zones. A centrifugal field was introduced as the external field to overcome the random Brownian motion of NPs and benefit the assembly effect. Such a facile "one-tube synthesis" approach couples assembly and separation in one centrifuge tube by centrifuging once. The method can be tuned by changing the concentration of interference salt layer, encapsulation layer, and centrifugation rate. Furthermore, positively charged fluorescent polymers such as perylenediimide-poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) could encapsulate the assemblies to give tunable fluorescence properties. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fluorescent lamp and ballast options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This paper reviews some of the current technologies for fluorescent lamps and ballasts with particular focus on the most common configuration in Canada - the F32T8, 4 ft length, two-lamp ballast combination. Fluorescent lamps require a high voltage surge for start-up. Technical specifications for the F32T8 lamp were provided along with reasons why they are the preferred choice. The three types of ballasts include electromagnetic, electronic and hybrid. While electromagnetic ballasts perform the same start-up duty, they are not as efficient as electronic or hybrid ballasts. Hybrid ballasts are energy efficient, but they have problems with lamp flicker, tar leakage and shorter life expectancy. Electronic ballasts eliminate flicker, do not leak and have a life expectancy of 25 years. Electronic ballasts can be instant, rapid start, or dimmable. Energy information on different types of ballast systems was presented along with a comparison of the type of light produced according to lamp and ballast combinations. This paper also presents a case study in which the lighting system of a 25-storey building was retrofitted with energy efficient fluorescent lamps and ballasts for an energy savings of about $100,000 per year and a 5 year payback period. 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Studying the structural dynamics of bipedal DNA motors with single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Rula; Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Plavner, Noa; Liber, Miran; Nir, Eyal

    2012-07-24

    We present a test case example of a detailed single-molecule fluorescence study of one of the most sophisticated and complex DNA devices introduced to date, a recently published autonomous bipedal DNA motor. We used the diffusion-based single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer technique, coupled to alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET-ALEX), to monitor the motor assembly and operation. The study included verification of the formation of the correct structures, and of the correct motor operation, determination of the formation and stepping reaction yields, and identification of side products. Finally, the mechanisms of the motor assembly and operation were elucidated by measuring the reaction kinetics profile of track-walker binding and of lifting of the walker's leg upon fuel addition. The profiles revealed a fast phase, in which about half of the reaction was completed, followed by a slow phase which adds somewhat to the yield, reflecting the incomplete motor assembly and operation identified in the equilibrium experiments. Although further study is needed to fully understand the reasons for the incomplete assembly and operation, this work demonstrates that single-molecule fluorescence, based on its ability to provide detailed in situ structural dynamics information, inaccessible for traditional methods, constitutes an excellent tool for chaperoning the development of DNA-based technology.

  16. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Bobin George Abraham; Karen S Sarkisyan; Mishin, Alexander S.; Ville Santala; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Matti Karp

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicit...

  17. Fluorescent multiple chemical sensing using time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nagl, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging in multiple chemical sensing approaches. Using fluorescence lifetime as an analytical parameter allows extracting more information out of probes than fluorescence intensity measurements and it is therefore attractive in order to quantitate multiple species. It leads to better data quality as fluorescence lifetime measurements are not or less affected by many sources of noise in fluorescence signals such as straylight and othe...

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  19. Application of Fluorescent Label in Polymer Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Zarybnicka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrospinning of fluorescent probe polyamide 6 doped by 7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benzo[de]isoquinolin-7-on is presented as a model processing photoluminescent nanofibers. The presence of the fluorescent probe in the fiber layers was confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR; the surface nanofiber structure was described by high-resolution fluorescence microscope and scanning electron microscope images. The prepared nanofibers with the fluorescent label were further characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, both in the solid phase and in the solution.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy of synthetic melanin in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, G.; Frassanito, M.C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Palazzo, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gallone, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Mallardi, A. [ICPS-CNR, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Biagi, P.F. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Capozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy)], E-mail: v.capozzi@unifg.it

    2009-01-15

    We report a detailed investigation of fluorescence properties of synthetic eumelanin pigment in solution. A complete set of fluorescence spectra in the near-UV and visible range is analysed. Excitation spectra at a few selected emission energies are also investigated. Our measurements support the hypothesis that fluorescence in eumelanin is related to chemically distinct oligomeric units that can be selectively excited. Fluorescence due to large oligomer systems is spectrally differentiated from that due to monomers and small oligomer systems. Fluorescence excitation measurements show the contribution of 5,6-dihydroxyndole-2-carboxylic acid and 5,6-dihydroxyndole monomers to the emission of small-size oligomers.

  1. COLORFUL-Circuit: a platform for rapid multigene assembly, delivery and expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan eGhareeb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Advancing basic and applied plant research requires the continuous innovative development of the available technology toolbox. Essential components of this toolbox are methods that simplify the assembly, delivery and expression of multiple transgenes of interest. To allow simultaneous and directional multigene assembly on the same plant transformation vector, several strategies based on overlapping sequences or restriction enzymes have recently been developed. However, the assembly of homologous and repetitive DNA sequences can be inefficient and the frequent occurrence of target sequences recognized by commonly used restriction enzymes can be a limiting factor. Here, we noted that recognition sites for the restriction enzyme SfiI are rarely occurring in plant genomes. This fact was exploited to establish a multigene assembly system called COLORFUL-Circuit. To this end, we developed a set of binary vectors which provide a flexible and cost efficient cloning platform. The gene expression cassettes in our system are flanked with unique SfiI sites, which allow simultaneous multi-gene cassette assembly in a hosting binary vector. We used COLORFUL-Circuit to transiently and stably express up to four fluorescent organelle markers in addition to a selectable marker and analyzed the impact of assembly design on coexpression efficiency. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our optimized COLORFUL-Circuit system in an exemplary case study, in which we monitored simultaneously the subcellular behavior of multiple organelles in a biotrophic plant-microbe interaction by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

  2. Protein adsorption and biomimetic mineralization behaviors of PLL-DNA multilayered films assembled onto titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Wenli [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Feng Bo, E-mail: fengbo@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Ni Yuxiang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Yang Yongli [College of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610054 (China); Lu Xiong; Weng Jie [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2010-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys are frequently used as surgical implants in load bearing situations, such as hip prostheses and dental implants, owing to their biocompatibility, mechanical and physical properties. In this paper, a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique, based on the polyelectrolyte-mediated electrostatic adsorption of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and DNA, was used to the formation of multilayer on titanium surfaces. Then bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption and biomimetic mineralization of modified surfaces were studied. The chemical composition and wettability of assembled substrates were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fluorescence microscopy and water contact angle measurement, respectively. The XPS analysis indicated that the layers were assembled successfully through electrostatic attractions. The measurement with ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer revealed that the LBL films enhanced ability of BSA adsorption onto titanium. The adsorption quantity of BSA on the surface terminated with PLL was higher than that of the surface terminated with DNA, and the samples of TiOH/P/D/P absorbed BSA most. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that samples of assembled PLL or/and DNA had better bioactivity in inducing HA formation. Thus the assembling of PLL and DNA onto the surface of titanium in turn via a layer-by-layer self-assembly technology can improve the bioactivity of titanium.

  3. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  4. Topological defects in liquid crystals and molecular self-assembly (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2017-02-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerizations, leading to a range of elastomers and gels with complex mechanical and optical properties. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. This presentation will describe an experimental study that reveals that nanoscopic environments defined by LC topological defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, key signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects are observed - including cooperativity, reversibility, and controlled growth of the molecular assemblies. By using polymerizable amphiphiles, we also demonstrate preservation of molecular assemblies templated by defects, including nanoscopic "o-rings" synthesized from "Saturn-ring" disclinations. Our results reveal that topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates that can direct processes of molecular self-assembly in a manner that is strongly analogous to other classes of macromolecular templates (e.g., polymer—surfactant complexes). Opportunities for the design of exquisitely responsive soft materials will be discussed using bacterial endotoxin as an example.

  5. Assembly and melting of DNA nanotubes from single-sequence tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobey, T L; Renner, S; Simmel, F C

    2009-01-21

    DNA melting and renaturation studies are an extremely valuable tool to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex dissociation and reassociation reactions. These are important not only in a biological or biotechnological context, but also for DNA nanotechnology which aims at the construction of molecular materials by DNA self-assembly. We here study experimentally the formation and melting of a DNA nanotube structure, which is composed of many copies of an oligonucleotide containing several palindromic sequences. This is done using temperature-controlled UV absorption measurements correlated with atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. In the melting studies, important factors such as DNA strand concentration, hierarchy of assembly and annealing protocol are investigated. Assembly and melting of the nanotubes are shown to proceed via different pathways. Whereas assembly occurs in several hierarchical steps related to the formation of tiles, lattices and tubes, melting of DNA nanotubes appears to occur in a single step. This is proposed to relate to fundamental differences between closed, three-dimensional tube-like structures and open, two-dimensional lattices. DNA melting studies can lead to a better understanding of the many factors that affect the assembly process which will be essential for the assembly of increasingly complex DNA nanostructures.

  6. Assembly and melting of DNA nanotubes from single-sequence tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobey, T L; Renner, S; Simmel, F C [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioelektronik-E14, Department Physik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: thomas.sobey@ph.tum.de

    2009-01-21

    DNA melting and renaturation studies are an extremely valuable tool to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex dissociation and reassociation reactions. These are important not only in a biological or biotechnological context, but also for DNA nanotechnology which aims at the construction of molecular materials by DNA self-assembly. We here study experimentally the formation and melting of a DNA nanotube structure, which is composed of many copies of an oligonucleotide containing several palindromic sequences. This is done using temperature-controlled UV absorption measurements correlated with atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. In the melting studies, important factors such as DNA strand concentration, hierarchy of assembly and annealing protocol are investigated. Assembly and melting of the nanotubes are shown to proceed via different pathways. Whereas assembly occurs in several hierarchical steps related to the formation of tiles, lattices and tubes, melting of DNA nanotubes appears to occur in a single step. This is proposed to relate to fundamental differences between closed, three-dimensional tube-like structures and open, two-dimensional lattices. DNA melting studies can lead to a better understanding of the many factors that affect the assembly process which will be essential for the assembly of increasingly complex DNA nanostructures.

  7. Assembly, component for an assembly and method of manufacturing in assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.M. de; Brand, J. van den; Heck, G.T. van

    2011-01-01

    An assembly of a plurality of tiles (1) with a carrier (40), wherein the tiles (1) comprise a foil (20) with an electro-physical transducer (10) and electrical connectors (24, 28) to said transducer. The tiles are mechanically and electrically coupled to the carrier, and the tiles overlay according

  8. Multicolour fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography for structural genomics of membrane multiprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcej, David; Guntrum, Renate; Schmidt, Sabine; Hinz, Andreas; Tampé, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Many interesting and important membrane proteins are hetero-oligomeric. However, besides naturally abundant examples, the structures of relatively few such complexes are known. Partly, this is due to difficulties in expression, stoichiometric assembly, and in the evaluation of their stability prior to crystallization trials. Here we describe a new approach, which allows rapid assessment of protein complex quality, assembly and stoichiometry, simplifying the search for conditions conducive to long-term stability and crystallization. Multicolour fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography (MC-FSEC) is used to enable tracking of individual subunits through expression, solubilization and purification steps. We show how the method has been applied to the heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and demonstrate how it may be extended in order to analyse membrane multisubunit assemblies.

  9. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of primed SNARE complexes in presynaptic terminals and β cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Sawada, Wakako; Noguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Yagishita, Sho; Ohno, Mitsuyo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Kasai, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear how readiness for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis depends on varying degrees of SNARE complex assembly. Here we directly investigate the SNARE assembly using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between three pairs of neuronal SNAREs in presynaptic boutons and pancreatic β cells in the islets of Langerhans. These FRET probes functionally rescue their endogenous counterparts, supporting ultrafast exocytosis. We show that trans-SNARE complexes accumulated in the active zone, and estimate the number of complexes associated with each docked vesicle. In contrast, SNAREs were unassembled in resting state, and assembled only shortly prior to insulin exocytosis, which proceeds slowly. We thus demonstrate that distinct states of fusion readiness are associated with SNARE complex formation. Our FRET/FLIM approaches enable optical imaging of fusion readiness in both live and chemically fixed tissues.

  10. Molecular Assemblies of Finite Shapes: Design and Self-Assembly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Assembly via Coordination · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20 · Slide 21 · Molecular Box · Slide 23.

  11. Hierarchical Fullerene Assembly: Seeded Coprecipitation and Electric Field Directed Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelson, Angela C; Penterman, Sonny J; Watson, Chekesha M Liddell

    2017-05-01

    Hierarchical C60 colloidal films are assembled from nanoscale to macroscale. Fullerene molecular crystals are grown via seeded cosolvent precipitation with mixed solvent [tetrahydronaphthalene (THN)/trimethylpyridine (TMP)] and antisolvent 2-propanol. The fullerene solutions are aged under illumination, which due to the presence of TMP reduces the free monomer concentration through fullerene aggregation into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles seed the growth of monodisperse fullerene colloids on injection into the antisolvent. Diverse colloidal morphologies are prepared as a function of injection volume and fullerene solution concentration. The high fullerene solubility of THN enables C60 colloids to be prepared in quantities sufficient for assembly (5 × 10(8) ). Electric fields are applied to colloidal C60 platelets confined to two dimensions. The particles assemble under dipolar forces, dielectrophoretic forces, and electrohydrodynamic flows. Frequency-dependent phase transitions occur at the critical Maxwell-Wagner crossover frequency, where the effective polarizability of the particles in the medium is substantially reduced. Structures form as a function of field strength, frequency, and confinement including hexagonal, oblique, string fluid, coexistent hexagonal-rhombic, and tetratic. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Interaction of fluorescent phospholipids with cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, Manuela; Haralampiev, Ivan; Schiller, Sabine; Szente, Lajos; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel; Müller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent analogs of phospholipids are often employed to investigate the structure and dynamics of lipids in membranes. Some of those studies have used cyclodextrins e.g., to modulate the lipid phase. However, the role of the fluorescence moiety of analogs for the interaction between cyclodextrins and fluorescent lipids has not been investigated so far in detail. Therefore, in the present study the interaction of various fluorescent phospholipid analogs with methylated α-, β- and γ- cyclodextrins was investigated. The analogs differed in their structure, in the length of the fatty acyl chain, in the position of the fluorescence group, and in the attached fluorescence moiety (7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl (NBD) or dipyrrometheneboron difluoride (BODIPY)). In aqueous buffer, cyclodextrins bind fluorescent lipids disturbing the organization of the analogs. When incorporated into lipid vesicles, analogs are selectively extracted from the membrane upon addition of cyclodextrins. The results show that the interaction of cyclodextrins with fluorescent phospholipids depends on the cyclodextrin species, the fluorescence moiety and the phospholipid structure. The presented data should be of interest for studies using fluorescent phospholipids and cyclodextrins, since the interaction between the fluorescence group and the cyclodextrin may interfere with the process(es) under study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Randomized BioBrick assembly: a novel DNA assembly method for randomizing and optimizing genetic circuits and metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, Sean C; Sauro, Herbert M

    2013-09-20

    The optimization of genetic circuits and metabolic pathways often involves constructing various iterations of the same construct or using directed evolution to achieve the desired function. Alternatively, a method that randomizes individual parts in the same assembly reaction could be used for optimization by allowing for the ability to screen large numbers of individual clones expressing randomized circuits or pathways for optimal function. Here we describe a new assembly method to randomize genetic circuits and metabolic pathways from modular DNA fragments derived from PCR-amplified BioBricks. As a proof-of-principle for this method, we successfully assembled CMY (Cyan-Magenta-Yellow) three-gene circuits using Gibson Assembly that express CFP, RFP, and YFP with independently randomized promoters, ribosome binding sites, transcriptional terminators, and all parts randomized simultaneously. Sequencing results from 24 CMY circuits with various parts randomized show that 20/24 circuits are distinct and expression varies over a 200-fold range above background levels. We then adapted this method to randomize the same parts with enzyme coding sequences from the lycopene biosynthesis pathway instead of fluorescent proteins, designed to independently express each enzyme in the pathway from a different promoter. Lycopene production is improved using this randomization method by about 30% relative to the highest polycistronic-expressing pathway. These results demonstrate the potential of generating nearly 20,000 unique circuit or pathway combinations when three parts are permutated at each position in a three-gene circuit or pathway, and the methodology can likely be adapted to other circuits and pathways to maximize products of interest.

  14. Let's push things forward: disruptive technologies and the mechanics of tissue assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Victor D; Nelson, Celeste M

    2013-09-01

    Although many of the molecular mechanisms that regulate tissue assembly in the embryo have been delineated, the physical forces that couple these mechanisms to actual changes in tissue form remain unclear. Qualitative studies suggest that mechanical loads play a regulatory role in development, but clear quantitative evidence has been lacking. This is partly owing to the complex nature of these problems - embryonic tissues typically undergo large deformations and exhibit evolving, highly viscoelastic material properties. Still, despite these challenges, new disruptive technologies are enabling study of the mechanics of tissue assembly in unprecedented detail. Here, we present novel experimental techniques that enable the study of each component of these physical problems: kinematics, forces, and constitutive properties. Specifically, we detail advances in light sheet microscopy, optical coherence tomography, traction force microscopy, fluorescence force spectroscopy, microrheology and micropatterning. Taken together, these technologies are helping elucidate a more quantitative understanding of the mechanics of tissue assembly.

  15. Nuclear pore assembly proceeds by an inside-out extrusion of the nuclear envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Bui, Khanh Huy; Schorb, Martin; Hossain, M Julius; Politi, Antonio Z; Koch, Birgit; Eltsov, Mikhail; Beck, Martin; Ellenberg, Jan

    2016-09-15

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) mediates nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear envelope. How the NPC assembles into this double membrane boundary has remained enigmatic. Here, we captured temporally staged assembly intermediates by correlating live cell imaging with high-resolution electron tomography and super-resolution microscopy. Intermediates were dome-shaped evaginations of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), that grew in diameter and depth until they fused with the flat outer nuclear membrane. Live and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy revealed the molecular maturation of the intermediates, which initially contained the nuclear and cytoplasmic ring component Nup107, and only later the cytoplasmic filament component Nup358. EM particle averaging showed that the evagination base was surrounded by an 8-fold rotationally symmetric ring structure from the beginning and that a growing mushroom-shaped density was continuously associated with the deforming membrane. Quantitative structural analysis revealed that interphase NPC assembly proceeds by an asymmetric inside-out extrusion of the INM.

  16. Basic investigation of concentrator using fluorescent substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, Mitsuo

    1986-12-01

    A concentrator was manufactured on an experimental basis to improve the performance of the concentrator using fluorescent substance and the analysis based on the test result of optical characteristics of the materials composing the concentrator was made. The concentrator is composed of fluorescent substance sandwiched between two acrylic sheets. Organic fluorescent solution prepared by dissolving eosin to alcohol and capsulating with transparent encapsulant was used as the fluorescent substance. The concentration ratio based on the characteristic tests of the fluorescent substance and material of acrylic sheet composing the concentrator and the numerical calculation model was calculated. The results show that the difference between the experimental and calculated values is 10%. The result of calculation based on the numerical model indicates that the energy efficiency is decreased through the concentration ratio is increased in a thin concentrator, because the fluorescence is decreased by the absorption during passing more frequently through the fluorescent layer. (1 ref, 10 figs)

  17. Chloroplast genome assembly approaches from NGS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravka Ivanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The advent of Next Generation Sequencing platforms led to increase of research in whole genome assembly algorithms and software. Illumina Genome Analyzer produces a large amount of sequencing data, with a shorted read length, higher coverage and different errors in comparison to Sanger Sequencing. In response to this, several new assemblers were developed specifically for de novo assembly of next generation sequencing. This study compares software assembly packages named Edena, SPAdes, ABySS and analyzes results delivered by de novo assembly experiments. We show that assembly job of small genome can be completed in a short time on a 32 bit Linux OS with 4 GB RAM, indicating than de novo assembly can be executed and millions of very reads assembled on a desktop computer.

  18. Exploiting sparseness in de novo genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chengxi; Ma, Zhanshan Sam; Cannon, Charles H; Pop, Mihai; Yu, Douglas W

    2012-04-19

    The very large memory requirements for the construction of assembly graphs for de novo genome assembly limit current algorithms to super-computing environments. In this paper, we demonstrate that constructing a sparse assembly graph which stores only a small fraction of the observed k-mers as nodes and the links between these nodes allows the de novo assembly of even moderately-sized genomes (~500 M) on a typical laptop computer. We implement this sparse graph concept in a proof-of-principle software package, SparseAssembler, utilizing a new sparse k-mer graph structure evolved from the de Bruijn graph. We test our SparseAssembler with both simulated and real data, achieving ~90% memory savings and retaining high assembly accuracy, without sacrificing speed in comparison to existing de novo assemblers.

  19. Virtual Reality and Haptics for Product Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptics can significantly enhance the user's sense of immersion and interactivity. An industrial application of virtual reality and haptics for product assembly is described in this paper, which provides a new and low-cost approach for product assembly design, assembly task planning and assembly operation training. A demonstration of the system with haptics device interaction was available at the session of exp.at'11.

  20. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  1. Linear Logic for Meaning Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Dalrymple, M; Pereira, F C N; Saraswat, V; Dalrymple, Mary; Lamping, John; Pereira, Fernando; Saraswat, Vijay

    1995-01-01

    Semantic theories of natural language associate meanings with utterances by providing meanings for lexical items and rules for determining the meaning of larger units given the meanings of their parts. Meanings are often assumed to combine via function application, which works well when constituent structure trees are used to guide semantic composition. However, we believe that the functional structure of Lexical-Functional Grammar is best used to provide the syntactic information necessary for constraining derivations of meaning in a cross-linguistically uniform format. It has been difficult, however, to reconcile this approach with the combination of meanings by function application. In contrast to compositional approaches, we present a deductive approach to assembling meanings, based on reasoning with constraints, which meshes well with the unordered nature of information in the functional structure. Our use of linear logic as a `glue' for assembling meanings allows for a coherent treatment of the LFG requ...

  2. Nanobiocatalytic assemblies for artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hong; Nam, Dong Heon; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-08-01

    Natural photosynthesis, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion process, occurs through a series of photo-induced electron transfer reactions in nanoscale architectures that contain light-harvesting complexes, protein-metal clusters, and many redox biocatalysts. Artificial photosynthesis in nanobiocatalytic assemblies aims to reconstruct man-made photosensitizers, electron mediators, electron donors, and redox enzymes for solar synthesis of valuable chemicals through visible light-driven cofactor regeneration. The key requirement in the design of biocatalyzed artificial photosynthetic process is an efficient and forward electron transfer between each photosynthetic component. This review describes basic principles in combining redox biocatalysis with photocatalysis, and highlights recent research outcomes in the development of nanobiocatalytic assemblies that can mimic natural photosystems I and II, respectively. Current issues in biocatalyzed artificial photosynthesis and future perspectives will be briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Combinatorial pathway assembly in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Essani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of synthetic biology and the vast knowledge about individual biocatalytic reactions, the challenge nowadays is to implement whole natural or synthetic pathways into microorganisms. For this purpose balanced enzyme activities throughout the pathway need to be achieved in addition to simple functional gene expression to avoid bottlenecks and to obtain high titers of the desired product. As the optimization of pathways in a specific biological context is often hard to achieve by rational design, combinatorial approaches have been developed to address this issue. Here, current strategies and proof of concepts for combinatorial pathway assembly in yeasts are reviewed. By exploiting its ability to join multiple DNA fragments in a very efficient and easy manner, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not only constitute an attractive host for heterologous pathway expression, but also for assembling pathways by recombination in vivo.

  4. Flat structure cooled detector assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb, Nathalie; Coutures, Bernard; Gerin, Nicolas; Reale, S.; Guille, B.

    1994-07-01

    Long wavelength IR detectors need to be cooled at cryogenic temperature to achieve high performances. This specific need makes it difficult to integrate the detector because of high cost of dewar and cooling device designed to fulfill severe vibration conditions. A new era for IR detection could begin with flat structures allowing intrinsic vibration resistance for detectors to be plugged on electronics board. Sofradir has carried out a study about feasibility of detector dewar assembly including a flat Joule-Thomson cooler with porous heat exchanger in cooperation with Air Liquide. The aim of this paper is to put forward the interest of such a product. The very good results achieved demonstrate a promising future for such flat structure detector assembly.

  5. First Occurrence of Tetrazines in Aqueous Solution: Electrochemistry and Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritea, Luminiţa; Audebert, Pierre; Galmiche, Laurent; Gorgy, Karine; Le Goff, Alan; Villalonga, Reynaldo; Săndulescu, Robert; Cosnier, Serge

    2015-12-01

    The photophysical and electrochemical properties of tetrazines substituted by linear 2,3-naphtalimide antennas and/or adamantane groups specifically dedicated to host-guest interactions with cyclodextrins are studied both in organic and aqueous media. In acetonitrile solvent, the reduction potential of tetrazine leading to the anion radical is shifted, depending on the electron-withdrawing power of the substituent of the tetrazines. Due to the hydrophobic character of these compounds, their solubilization in aqueous solution is achieved successively in presence of either β-cyclodextrins or gold nanoparticules modified by β-cyclodextrins. We demonstrate that the formation of the inclusion compound tetrazine-cyclodextrin allows the solubilization of the tetrazines in aqueous solution. The supramolecular assemblies obtained in water retain tetrazine's emission properties, yielding a yellow fluorescence. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Fluorescent Magnetic Bioprobes by Surface Modification of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tito Trindade

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal nanoprobes comprising both magnetic and optical functionalities have been prepared via a sequential two-step process. Firstly, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs with well-defined cubic shape and an average dimension of 80 nm were produced by hydrolysis of iron sulfate and were then surface modified with silica shells by using the sol-gel method. The Fe3O4@SiO2 particles were then functionalized with the fluorophore, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, mediated by assembled shells of the cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI. The Fe3O4 functionalized particles were then preliminary evaluated as fluorescent and magnetic probes by performing studies in which neuroblast cells have been contacted with these nanomaterials.

  7. Design principles for nonequilibrium self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2016-12-13

    We consider an important class of self-assembly problems, and using the formalism of stochastic thermodynamics, we derive a set of design principles for growing controlled assemblies far from equilibrium. The design principles constrain the set of configurations that can be obtained under nonequilibrium conditions. Our central result provides intuition for how equilibrium self-assembly landscapes are modified under finite nonequilibrium drive.

  8. Simultaneous assembly of multiple test forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Adema, J.J.; Adema, Jos J.

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for the assembly of multiple test forms is proposed in which the multiple-form problem is reduced to a series of computationally less intensive two-form problems. At each step, one form is assembled to its true specifications; the other form is a dummy assembled only to maintain a

  9. Simultaneous assembly of multiple test forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Adema, Jos J.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm for the assembly of multiple test forms is proposed in which the multiple-form problem is reduced to a series of computationally less intensive two-form problems. At each step one form is assembled to its true specifications; the other form is a dummy assembled only to maintain a

  10. 24 CFR 3285.601 - Field assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Field assembly. 3285.601 Section... § 3285.601 Field assembly. Home manufacturers must provide specific installation instructions for the proper field assembly of manufacturer-supplied and shipped loose ducts, plumbing, and fuel supply system...

  11. 49 CFR 572.184 - Shoulder assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shoulder assembly. 572.184 Section 572.184... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.184 Shoulder assembly. (a) The shoulder (175-3000) is part of the body assembly shown in drawing 175-0000. When subjected to impact tests specified in paragraph (b...

  12. LHC Magnet Assembly Facility in building 181

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Video Productions

    2005-01-01

    Hall 181 activities for the LHC machine * Reception of the American magnets : quadrupoles and separation dipoles * Assembly of the string Low-Beta Triplet -Q2-Q3-DFBX-D1 * Insertion quadrupoles cold masses assembly * Magnets reception type MQM, MQY, MCBC et MCBY * Assembly in the shell * Longitudinal welding under the press * Equipment with end covers in the finishing area

  13. Assembly and budding of Ebolavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshi Noda; Hideki Ebihara; Yukiko Muramoto; Ken Fujii; Ayato Takada; Hiroshi Sagara; Jin Hyun Kim; Hiroshi Kida; Heinz Feldmann; Yoshihiro Kawaoka

    2006-01-01

    Ebolavirus is responsible for highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. Like all viruses, it must reproduce its various components and assemble them in cells in order to reproduce infectious virions and perpetuate itself. To generate infectious Ebolavirus, a viral genome-protein complex called the nucleocapsid (NC) must be produced and transported to the cell surface, incorporated into virions, and then released from cells. To further our understanding of the Ebolavirus life cycle, we expressed the va...

  14. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. © 2015 Madru et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Biologically Assembled Quantum Electronic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Salve Regina, 2010. N. Seeman, James W. Canary 50th Birthday Symposium, New York, 2010. N. Seeman, CNIC 2010, Havana , 2010. N. Seeman, Kavli Prize Lecture...electron tunneling steps in the current-voltage characteristics of linear arrays of gold nanopaarticles assembled by 2D DNA scaffolding. In the...nanomechanical devices (1999). In conjunction with the Kiehl laboratory, the Seeman laboratory was involved in organizing gold nanoparticles in 2D arrays

  16. Orbital assembly and maintenance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, D.; Grant, C.; Kyrias, G.; Lord, C.; Rombach, J.; Salis, M.; Skidmore, R.; Thomas, R.

    1975-01-01

    The requirements, conceptual design, tradeoffs, procedures, and techniques for orbital assembly of the support structure of the microwave power transmission system and the radio astronomy telescope are described. Thermal and stress analyses, packaging, alignment, and subsystems requirements are included along with manned vs. automated and transportation tradeoffs. Technical and operational concepts for the manned and automated maintenance of satellites were investigated and further developed results are presented.

  17. Subtleties of catanionic surfactant reverse micelle assemblies revealed by a fluorescent molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Cristian C.; Silber, Juana J.; Darío Falcone, R.; Mariano Correa, N.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the absorption and emission behavior of the cationic hemicyanine trans-4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (HC) in reverse micelles (RMs) formed by the catanionic surfactants benzyl-n-hexadecyldimethylammonium-1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT-BHD) and cetyltrimethylammonium-1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT-CTA) have been investigated. Our results show that the spectroscopic behavior of HC changes when the dye is dissolved in AOT-BHD or in AOT-CTA RMs. While HC undergoes an intramolecular charge-transfer process upon excitation in AOT-CTA RMs, in AOT-BHD RMs this process is inhibited due to a specific interaction between HC and the polar head group of the BHD+ cation. This implies that the chemical structure of CTA+ and BHD+ cations has a large impact on the excited stated from which HC emission occurs. Additionally, the structural difference between the two cations impacts on the water–RM interface interaction, which provides a way of controlling the solvation process in these RMs. Furthermore, differences in the interfacial fluidity between the two catanionic RMs is observed, a result that is particularly interesting with regard to these systems being used as nanoreactors.

  18. Nucleosome Core Particle Disassembly and Assembly Kinetics Studied Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Noa Plavner; Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Masoud, Rula; Toth, Katalin; Langowski, Joerg; Nir, Eyal

    2015-10-20

    The stability of the nucleosome core particle (NCP) is believed to play a major role in regulation of gene expression. To understand the mechanisms that influence NCP stability, we studied stability and dissociation and association kinetics under different histone protein (NCP) and NaCl concentrations using single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation techniques. The method enables distinction between folded, unfolded, and intermediate NCP states and enables measurements at picomolar to nanomolar NCP concentrations where dissociation and association reactions can be directly observed. We reproduced the previously observed nonmonotonic dependence of NCP stability on NaCl concentration, and we suggest that this rather unexpected behavior is a result of interplay between repulsive and attractive forces within positively charged histones and between the histones and the negatively charged DNA. Higher NaCl concentrations decrease the attractive force between the histone proteins and the DNA but also stabilize H2A/H2B histone dimers, and possibly (H3/H4)2 tetramers. An intermediate state in which one DNA arm is unwrapped, previously observed at high NaCl concentrations, is also explained by this salt-induced stabilization. The strong dependence of NCP stability on ion and histone concentrations, and possibly on other charged macromolecules, may play a role in chromosomal morphology. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Haptic feedback for virtual assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Greg R.; Zafer, Naci

    1998-12-01

    Assembly operations require high speed and precision with low cost. The manufacturing industry has recently turned attenuation to the possibility of investigating assembly procedures using graphical display of CAD parts. For these tasks, some sort of feedback to the person is invaluable in providing a real sense of interaction with virtual parts. This research develops the use of a commercial assembly robot as the haptic display in such tasks. For demonstration, a peg-hole insertion task is studied. Kane's Method is employed to derive the dynamics of the peg and the contact motions between the peg and the hole. A handle modeled as a cylindrical peg is attached to the end effector of a PUMA 560 robotic arm. The arm is handle modeled as a cylindrical peg is attached to the end effector of a PUMA 560 robotic arm. The arm is equipped with a six axis force/torque transducer. The use grabs the handle and the user-applied forces are recorded. A 300 MHz Pentium computer is used to simulate the dynamics of the virtual peg and its interactions as it is inserted in the virtual hole. The computed torque control is then employed to exert the full dynamics of the task to the user hand. Visual feedback is also incorporated to help the user in the process of inserting the peg into the hole. Experimental results are presented to show several contact configurations for this virtually simulated task.

  20. Assembly and microscopic characterization of DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheible, Max; Jungmann, Ralf; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-01-01

    DNA origami is a revolutionary method for the assembly of molecular nanostructures from DNA with precisely defined dimensions and with an unprecedented yield. This can be utilized to arrange nanoscale components such as proteins or nanoparticles into pre-defined patterns. For applications it will now be of interest to arrange such components into functional complexes and study their geometry-dependent interactions. While commonly DNA nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy or electron microscopy, these techniques often lack the time-resolution to study dynamic processes. It is therefore of considerable interest to also apply fluorescence microscopic techniques to DNA nanostructures. Of particular importance here is the utilization of novel super-resolved microscopy methods that enable imaging beyond the classical diffraction limit.

  1. Stable assembly of HIV-1 export complexes occurs cotranscriptionally

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawroth, Isabel; Mueller, Florian; Basyuk, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 Rev protein mediates export of unspliced and singly spliced viral transcripts by binding to the Rev response element (RRE) and recruiting the cellular export factor CRM1. Here, we investigated the recruitment of Rev to the transcription sites of HIV-1 reporters that splice either post......- or cotranscriptionally. In both cases, we observed that Rev localized to the transcription sites of the reporters and recruited CRM1. Rev and CRM1 remained at the reporter transcription sites when cells were treated with the splicing inhibitor Spliceostatin A (SSA), showing that the proteins associate with RNA prior...... to or during early spliceosome assembly. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed that Rev and CRM1 have similar kinetics as the HIV-1 RNA, indicating that Rev, CRM1, and RRE-containing RNAs are released from the site of transcription in one single export complex. These results suggest...

  2. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  3. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  4. AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Henry C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome assembly is difficult due to repeated sequences within the genome, which create ambiguities and cause the final assembly to be broken up into many separate sequences (contigs. Long range linking information, such as mate-pairs or mapping data, is necessary to help assembly software resolve repeats, thereby leading to a more complete reconstruction of genomes. Prior work has used optical maps for validating assemblies and scaffolding contigs, after an initial assembly has been produced. However, optical maps have not previously been used within the genome assembly process. Here, we use optical map information within the popular de Bruijn graph assembly paradigm to eliminate paths in the de Bruijn graph which are not consistent with the optical map and help determine the correct reconstruction of the genome. Results We developed a new algorithm called AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment. AGORA is the first algorithm to use optical map information directly within the de Bruijn graph framework to help produce an accurate assembly of a genome that is consistent with the optical map information provided. Our simulations on bacterial genomes show that AGORA is effective at producing assemblies closely matching the reference sequences. Additionally, we show that noise in the optical map can have a strong impact on the final assembly quality for some complex genomes, and we also measure how various characteristics of the starting de Bruijn graph may impact the quality of the final assembly. Lastly, we show that a proper choice of restriction enzyme for the optical map may substantially improve the quality of the final assembly. Conclusions Our work shows that optical maps can be used effectively to assemble genomes within the de Bruijn graph assembly framework. Our experiments also provide insights into the characteristics of the mapping data that most affect the performance of our algorithm, indicating the

  5. IFT trains in different stages of assembly queue at the ciliary base for consecutive release into the cilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Jenna L; Mengoni, Ilaria; Bomberger, Heather; Jiang, Yu-Yang; Walsh, Jonathon D; Brown, Jason M; Picariello, Tyler; Cochran, Deborah A; Zhu, Bing; Pan, Junmin; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan; Gaertig, Jacek; Witman, George B; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl

    2017-05-31

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, multimegadalton assemblies of IFT proteins and motors, traffic proteins in cilia. To study how trains assemble, we employed fluorescence protein-tagged IFT proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. IFT-A and motor proteins are recruited from the cell body to the basal body pool, assembled into trains, move through the cilium, and disperse back into the cell body. In contrast to this 'open' system, IFT-B proteins from retrograde trains reenter the pool and a portion is reused directly in anterograde trains indicating a 'semi-open' system. Similar IFT systems were also observed in Tetrahymena thermophila and IMCD3 cells. FRAP analysis indicated that IFT proteins and motors of a given train are sequentially recruited to the basal bodies. IFT dynein and tubulin cargoes are loaded briefly before the trains depart. We conclude that the pool contains IFT trains in multiple stages of assembly queuing for successive release into the cilium upon completion.

  6. Fuel injection assembly for use in turbine engines and method of assembling same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward

    2015-03-24

    A fuel injection assembly for use in a turbine engine is provided. The fuel injection assembly includes a plurality of tube assemblies, wherein each of the tube assemblies includes an upstream portion and a downstream portion. Each tube assembly includes a plurality of tubes that extend from the upstream portion to the downstream portion or from the upstream portion through the downstream portion. At least one injection system is coupled to at least one tube assembly of the plurality of tube assemblies. The injection system includes a fluid supply member that extends from a fluid source to the downstream portion of the tube assembly. The fluid supply member includes a first end portion located in the downstream portion of the tube assembly, wherein the first end portion has at least one first opening for channeling fluid through the tube assembly to facilitate reducing a temperature therein.

  7. Assembly of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) somaclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzyńska, Agnieszka; Kuśmirek, Wiktor; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Nowak, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    The development of next generation sequencing opens the possibility of using sequencing in various plant studies, such as finding structural changes and small polymorphisms between species and within them. Most analyzes rely on genomic sequences and it is crucial to use well-assembled genomes of high quality and completeness. Herein we compare commonly available programs for genomic assembling and newly developed software - dnaasm. Assemblies were tested on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) lines obtained by in vitro regeneration (somaclones), showing different phenotypes. Obtained results shows that dnaasm assembler is a good tool for short read assembly, which allows obtaining genomes of high quality and completeness.

  8. [1,10]Phenanthroline based cyanine dyes as fluorescent probes for ribonucleic acids in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalska, Vladyslava; Kuperman, Marina; Varzatskii, Oleg; Kryvorotenko, Dmytro; Kinski, Elisa; Schikora, Margot; Janko, Christina; Alexiou, Christoph; Yarmoluk, Sergiy; Mokhir, Andriy

    2017-12-01

    A series of monomethine, trimethine- and styrylcyanine dyes based on a [1,10]phenanthroline moiety was synthesized, characterized and investigated as potential fluorescent probes for nucleic acids in cell free settings and in cells. The dyes were found to be weakly fluorescent in the unbound state, whereas upon the binding to dsDNA or RNA their emission intensity raised up to 50 times (for monomethine benzothiazole derivative FT1 complexed with RNA). The strongest fluorescence intensity in assemblies with dsDNA and RNA was observed for the trimethine benzothiazole derivative FT4. The quantum yield of FT4 fluorescence in its complex with dsDNA was found to be 1.5% and the binding constant (K b) was estimated to be 7.9 × 104 M‑1 that is a typical value for intercalating molecules. The FT4 dye was found to be cell membrane permeable. It stains RNA rich components—the nucleoli and most probably the cytoplasmic RNA. FT4 bound to RNAs delivers a very strong fluorescence signal, which makes this easily accessible dye a potentially useful alternative to known RNA stains, e.g. expensive SYTO® 83. The advantage of FT4 is its easy synthetic access including no chromatographic purification steps, which will be reflected in its substantially lower price.

  9. Formation of fluorescent polydopamine dots from hydroxyl radical-induced degradation of polydopamine nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Yu, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-06-21

    This study describes the synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine dots (PDs) through hydroxyl radical-induced degradation of polydopamine nanoparticles. The decomposition of polydopamine nanoparticles to fluorescent PDs was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy. The analysis of PDs by using laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed that the PDs consisted of dopamine, 5,6-dihydroxyindole, and trihydroxyindole units. Oligomerization and self-assembly of these units produced a broad adsorption band, resulting in an excitation-wavelength-dependent emission behavior. The maximal fluorescence of PDs appeared at 440 nm with a quantum yield of 1.2%. The coordination between the catechol groups of PDs and ferric ions (Fe(3+)) quenched the fluorescence of PDs; the limit of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for Fe(3+) was determined to be 0.3 μM. The presence of pyrophosphate switched on the fluorescence of the PD-Fe(3+) complexes. Compared to the other reported methods for sensing Fe(3+), PDs provided simple, low-cost, and reusable detection of Fe(3+).

  10. Highly fluorescent peptide nanoribbon impregnated with Sn-porphyrin as a potent DNA sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parayil, Sreenivasan Koliyat; Lee, Jooran; Yoon, Minjoong

    2013-05-01

    Highly fluorescent and thermo-stable peptide nanoribbons (PNRs) were fabricated by solvothermal self-assembly of a single peptide (D,D-diphenyl alanine peptides) with Sn-porphyrin (trans-dihydroxo[5,10,15,20-tetrakis(p-tolyl)porphyrinato] Sn(IV) (SnTTP(OH)2)). The structural characterization of the as-prepared nanoribbons was performed by transmitting electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, indicating that the lipophilic Sn-porphyrins are impregnated into the porous surface formed in the process of nanoribbon formation through intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the peptide main chains. Consequently the Sn-porphyrin-impregnated peptide nanoribbons (Sn-porphyrin-PNRs) exhibited typical UV-visible absorption spectrum of the monomer porphyrin with a red shifted Q-band, and their fluorescence quantum yield was observed to be enhanced compared to that of free Sn-porphyrin. Interestingly the fluorescence intensity and lifetimes of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs were selectively affected upon interaction with nucleotide base sequences of DNA while those of free Sn-porphyrins were not affected by binding with any of the DNA studied, indicating that DNA-induced changes in the fluorescence properties of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs are due to interaction between DNA and the PNR scaffold. These results imply that Sn-porphyrin-PNR will be useful as a potent fluorescent protein analogue and as a biocompatible DNA sensor.

  11. Preparation of fluorescent DNA probe by solid-phase organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent DNA probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET was prepared by solid-phase organic synthesis when CdTe quantum dots (QDs were as energy donors and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs were as energy accepters. The poly(divinylbenzene core/poly(4-vinylpyridine shell microspheres, as solid-phase carriers, were prepared by seeds distillation-precipitation polymerization with 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN as initiator in neat acetonitrile. The CdTe QDs and AuNPs were self-assembled on the surface of core/shell microspheres, and then the linkage of CdTe QDs with oligonucleotides (CdTe-DNA and AuNPs with complementary single-stranded DNA (Au-DNA was on the solid-phase carriers instead of in aqueous solution. The hybridization of complementary double stranded DNA (dsDNA bonded to the QDs and AuNPs (CdTe-dsDNA-Au determined the FRET distance of CdTe QDs and AuNPs. Compared with the fluorescence of CdTe-DNA, the fluorescence of CdTe-dsDNA-Au conjugates (DNA probes decreased extremely, which indicated that the FRET occurred between CdTe QDs and AuNPs. The probe system would have a certain degree recovery of fluorescence when the complementary single stranded DNA was introduced into this system, which showed that the distance between CdTe QDs and AuNPs was increased.

  12. Fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishkumar, B C; Doorn, Stephen K; Baker, Gary A; Dattelbaum, Andrew M

    2008-11-25

    We present a new approach for the preparation of single walled carbon nanotube silica composite materials that retain the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of the encapsulated nanotubes. Incorporation of isolated nanotubes into optically transparent matrices, such as sol-gel prepared silica, to take advantage of their near-infrared emission properties for applications like sensing has been a challenging task. In general, the alcohol solvents and acidic conditions required for typical sol-gel preparations disrupt the nanotube/surfactant assembly and cause the isolated nanotubes to aggregate leading to degradation of their fluorescence properties. To overcome these issues, we have used a sugar alcohol modified silica precursor molecule, diglycerylsilane, for encapsulation of nanotubes in silica under aqueous conditions and at neutral pH. The silica/nanotube composite materials have been prepared as monoliths, at least 5 mm thick, or as films (characteristics of the silica encapsulated carbon nanotubes by means of redox doping studies as well as demonstrated their potential for biosensing applications. Such nanotube/silica composite systems may allow for new sensing and imaging applications that are not currently achievable.

  13. Observations and Models of Galaxy Assembly Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan A.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly history of dark matter haloes imparts various correlations between a halo’s physical properties and its large scale environment, i.e. assembly bias. It is common for models of the galaxy-halo connection to assume that galaxy properties are only a function of halo mass, implicitly ignoring how assembly bias may affect galaxies. Recently, programs to model and constrain the degree to which galaxy properties are influenced by assembly bias have been undertaken; however, the extent and character of galaxy assembly bias remains a mystery. Nevertheless, characterizing and modeling galaxy assembly bias is an important step in understanding galaxy evolution and limiting any systematic effects assembly bias may pose in cosmological measurements using galaxy surveys.I will present work on modeling and constraining the effect of assembly bias in two galaxy properties: stellar mass and star-formation rate. Conditional abundance matching allows for these galaxy properties to be tied to halo formation history to a variable degree, making studies of the relative strength of assembly bias possible. Galaxy-galaxy clustering and galactic conformity, the degree to which galaxy color is correlated between neighbors, are sensitive observational measures of galaxy assembly bias. I will show how these measurements can be used to constrain galaxy assembly bias and the peril of ignoring it.

  14. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  15. Backward assembly planning with DFA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An assembly planning system that operates based on a recursive decomposition of assembly into subassemblies, and analyzes assembly cost in terms of stability, directionality, and manipulability to guide the generation of preferred assembly plans is presented. The planning in this system incorporates the special processes, such as cleaning, testing, labeling, etc. that must occur during the assembly, and handles nonreversible as well as reversible assembly tasks through backward assembly planning. In order to increase the planning efficiency, the system avoids the analysis of decompositions that do not correspond to feasible assembly tasks. This is achieved by grouping and merging those parts that can not be decomposable at the current stage of backward assembly planning due to the requirement of special processes and the constraint of interconnection feasibility. The invention includes methods of evaluating assembly cost in terms of the number of fixtures (or holding devices) and reorientations required for assembly, through the analysis of stability, directionality, and manipulability. All these factors are used in defining cost and heuristic functions for an AO* search for an optimal plan.

  16. Once for All: A Novel Robust System for Co-expression of Multiple Chimeric Fluorescent Fusion Proteins in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitao Zhong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric fluorescent fusion proteins have been employed as a powerful tool to reveal the subcellular localizations and dynamics of proteins in living cells. Co-expression of a fluorescent fusion protein with well-known organelle markers in the same cell is especially useful in revealing its spatial and temporal functions of the protein in question. However, the conventional methods for co-expressing multiple fluorescent tagged proteins in plants have the drawbacks of low expression efficiency, variations in the expression level and time-consuming genetic crossing. Here, we have developed a novel robust system that allows for high-efficient co-expression of multiple chimeric fluorescent fusion proteins in plants in a time-saving fashion. This system takes advantage of employing a single expression vector which consists of multiple semi-independent expressing cassettes for the protein co-expression thereby overcoming the limitations of using multiple independent expressing plasmids. In addition, it is a highly manipulable DNA assembly system, in which modification and recombination of DNA molecules are easily achieved through an optimized one-step assembly reaction. By employing this effective system, we demonstrated that co-expression of two chimeric fluorescent fusion reporter proteins of vacuolar sorting receptor and secretory carrier membrane protein gave rise to their perspective subcellular localizations in plants via both transient expression and stable transformation. Thus, we believed that this technical advance represents a promising approach for multi-color-protein co-expression in plant cells.

  17. Dynamic pathways for viral capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Michael F.; Chandler, David

    2006-02-09

    We develop a class of models with which we simulate the assembly of particles into T1 capsid-like objects using Newtonian dynamics. By simulating assembly for many different values of system parameters, we vary the forces that drive assembly. For some ranges of parameters, assembly is facile, while for others, assembly is dynamically frustrated by kinetic traps corresponding to malformed or incompletely formed capsids. Our simulations sample many independent trajectories at various capsomer concentrations, allowing for statistically meaningful conclusions. Depending on subunit (i.e., capsomer) geometries, successful assembly proceeds by several mechanisms involving binding of intermediates of various sizes. We discuss the relationship between these mechanisms and experimental evaluations of capsid assembly processes.

  18. Capacitor assembly and related method of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Tan, Daniel Qi; Sullivan, Jeffrey S.

    2017-12-19

    A capacitor assembly is disclosed. The capacitor assembly includes a housing. The capacitor assembly further includes a plurality of capacitors disposed within the housing. Furthermore, the capacitor assembly includes a thermally conductive article disposed about at least a portion of a capacitor body of the capacitors, and in thermal contact with the capacitor body. Moreover, the capacitor assembly also includes a heat sink disposed within the housing and in thermal contact with at least a portion of the housing and the thermally conductive article such that the heat sink is configured to remove heat from the capacitor in a radial direction of the capacitor assembly. Further, a method of forming the capacitor assembly is also presented.

  19. Chromosome characterization using single fluorescent dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A. (Los Alamos, NM); Hirons, Gregory T. (Irvine, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomes are characterized by fluorescent emissions from a single fluorescent dye that is excited over two different wavelengths. A mixture containing chromosomes is stained with a single dye selected from the group consisting of TOTO and YOYO and the stained chromosomes are placed in a flow cytometer. The fluorescent dye is excited sequentially by a first light having a wavelength in the ultraviolet range to excite the TOTO or YOYO to fluoresce at a first intensity and by a second light having a wavelength effective to excite the TOTO or YOYO dye to fluoresce at a second intensity. Specific chromosomes may be identified and sorted by intensity relationships between the first and second fluorescence emissions.

  20. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.