WorldWideScience

Sample records for assembled fluorescent spion-peptide

  1. Enhanced stem cell tracking via electrostatically assembled fluorescent SPION-peptide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For cellular MRI there is a need to label cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) that have multiple imaging moieties that are nontoxic and have increased NMR relaxation properties to improve the detection and tracking of therapeutic cells. Although increases in the relaxation properties of SPION have been accomplished, detection of tagged cells is limited by either poor cell labeling efficiency or low intracellular iron content. A strategy via a complex formation with transfection agents to overcome these obstacles has been reported. In this paper, we report a complex formation between negatively charged fluorescent monodisperse SPION and positively charged peptides and use the complex formation to improve the MR properties of labeled stem cells. As a result, labeled stem cells exhibited a strong fluorescent signal and enhanced T 2*-weighted MR imaging in vitro and in vivo in a flank tumor model.

  2. Enhanced stem cell tracking via electrostatically assembled fluorescent SPION-peptide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Ho; Smith, Melissa A.; Liu, Wei; Gold, Eric M.; Lewis, Bobbi; Song, Ho-Taek; Frank, Joseph A.

    2009-09-01

    For cellular MRI there is a need to label cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) that have multiple imaging moieties that are nontoxic and have increased NMR relaxation properties to improve the detection and tracking of therapeutic cells. Although increases in the relaxation properties of SPION have been accomplished, detection of tagged cells is limited by either poor cell labeling efficiency or low intracellular iron content. A strategy via a complex formation with transfection agents to overcome these obstacles has been reported. In this paper, we report a complex formation between negatively charged fluorescent monodisperse SPION and positively charged peptides and use the complex formation to improve the MR properties of labeled stem cells. As a result, labeled stem cells exhibited a strong fluorescent signal and enhanced T 2*-weighted MR imaging in vitro and in vivo in a flank tumor model.

  3. Robust, directed assembly of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Kianinia, Mehran; Shimoni, Olga; Randolph, Steven J; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor; Lobo, Charlene J

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of fluorescent nanoparticles are highly sought after for applications in sensing and nanophotonics. Here we present a simple and robust method of assembling fluorescent nanodiamonds into macroscopic arrays. Remarkably, the yield of this directed assembly process is greater than 90% and the assembled patterns withstand ultra-sonication for more than three hours. The assembly process is based on covalent bonding of carboxyl to amine functional carbon seeds and is applicable to any material, and to non-planar surfaces. Our results pave the way to directed assembly of sensing and nanophotonics devices.

  4. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  5. Assembly of naphthalenediimide conjugated peptides: aggregation induced changes in fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Shibaji; Nanda, Jayanta; Banerjee, Arindam

    2013-08-01

    Naphthalenediimide appended peptide based self-assembly was studied. Interestingly, an aggregation induced drastic change in the fluorescence property and gel formation were observed depending on the solvent composition (chloroform : methylcyclohexane) at a fixed concentration of 1.6 mM at room temperature. PMID:23799544

  6. Antibacterial activities of fluorescent nano assembled triphenylamine phosphonium ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Frédéric; Lautard, Christelle; Garzino, Frédéric; Giorgio, Suzanne; Raimundo, Jean M; Bolla, Jean M; Camplo, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram positive coccal bacterium is a major cause of nosocomial infection. We report the synthesis of new triphenylamine phosphonium ionic liquids which are able to self-assemble into multiwall nanoassemblies and to reveal a strong bactericidal activity (MIC=0.5mg/L) for Gram positive bacteria (including resistant strains) comparable to that of standard antibiotics. Time kill, metabolism and fluorescence confocal microscopy studies show a quasi-instantaneously penetration of the nanoassemblies inside the bacteria resulting of a rapid blocking (30min) of their proliferation. As confirmed by rezasurin reduction monitoring, these compounds strongly affect the bacterial metabolism and a Gram positive versus Gram negative selectivity is clearly observed. These fluorescent phosphonium ionic liquid might constitute a useful tool for both translocation studies and to tackle infectious diseases related to the field of implantology. PMID:27287371

  7. Quantifying cadherin mechanotransduction machinery assembly/disassembly dynamics using fluorescence covariance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Pavan; Cruz, Lissette A.; Gutierrez, Natasha; Davis, Justin; Ayee, Brian; Abramczyk, Rachel; Rodriguez, Alexis J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying multi-molecular complex assembly in specific cytoplasmic compartments is crucial to understand how cells use assembly/disassembly of these complexes to control function. Currently, biophysical methods like Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy provide quantitative measurements of direct protein-protein interactions, while traditional biochemical approaches such as sub-cellular fractionation and immunoprecipitation remain the main approaches used to study multi-protein complex assembly/disassembly dynamics. In this article, we validate and quantify multi-protein adherens junction complex assembly in situ using light microscopy and Fluorescence Covariance Analysis. Utilizing specific fluorescently-labeled protein pairs, we quantified various stages of adherens junction complex assembly, the multiprotein complex regulating epithelial tissue structure and function following de novo cell-cell contact. We demonstrate: minimal cadherin-catenin complex assembly in the perinuclear cytoplasm and subsequent localization to the cell-cell contact zone, assembly of adherens junction complexes, acto-myosin tension-mediated anchoring, and adherens junction maturation following de novo cell-cell contact. Finally applying Fluorescence Covariance Analysis in live cells expressing fluorescently tagged adherens junction complex proteins, we also quantified adherens junction complex assembly dynamics during epithelial monolayer formation. PMID:27357130

  8. Quantifying cadherin mechanotransduction machinery assembly/disassembly dynamics using fluorescence covariance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Pavan; Cruz, Lissette A; Gutierrez, Natasha; Davis, Justin; Ayee, Brian; Abramczyk, Rachel; Rodriguez, Alexis J

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying multi-molecular complex assembly in specific cytoplasmic compartments is crucial to understand how cells use assembly/disassembly of these complexes to control function. Currently, biophysical methods like Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy provide quantitative measurements of direct protein-protein interactions, while traditional biochemical approaches such as sub-cellular fractionation and immunoprecipitation remain the main approaches used to study multi-protein complex assembly/disassembly dynamics. In this article, we validate and quantify multi-protein adherens junction complex assembly in situ using light microscopy and Fluorescence Covariance Analysis. Utilizing specific fluorescently-labeled protein pairs, we quantified various stages of adherens junction complex assembly, the multiprotein complex regulating epithelial tissue structure and function following de novo cell-cell contact. We demonstrate: minimal cadherin-catenin complex assembly in the perinuclear cytoplasm and subsequent localization to the cell-cell contact zone, assembly of adherens junction complexes, acto-myosin tension-mediated anchoring, and adherens junction maturation following de novo cell-cell contact. Finally applying Fluorescence Covariance Analysis in live cells expressing fluorescently tagged adherens junction complex proteins, we also quantified adherens junction complex assembly dynamics during epithelial monolayer formation.

  9. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein-protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces.

  10. Fluorescent Ensemble Based on Bispyrene Fluorophore and Surfactant Assemblies: Sensing and Discriminating Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junmei; Ding, Liping; Bo, Yu; Fang, Yu

    2015-10-14

    A particular bispyrene fluorophore (1) with two pyrene moieties covalently linked via a hydrophilic spacer was synthesized. Fluorescence measurements reveal that the fluorescence emission of 1 could be well modulated by a cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Protein sensing studies illustrate that the selected ensemble based on 1/DTAB assemblies exhibits ratiometric responses to nonmetalloproteins and turn-off responses to metalloproteins, which can be used to differentiate the two types of proteins. Moreover, negatively charged nonmetalloproteins can be discriminated from the positively charged ones according to the difference in ratiometric responses. Fluorescence sensing studies with control bispyrenes indicate that the polarity of the spacer connecting two pyrene moieties plays an important role in locating bispyrene fluorophore in DTAB assemblies, which further influences its sensing behaviors to noncovalent interacting proteins. This study sheds light on the influence of the probe structure on the sensing performance of a fluorescent ensemble based on probe and surfactant assemblies.

  11. Controllable self-assembly of NaREF4 upconversion nanoparticles and their distinctive fluorescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Ni, Yaru; Zhu, Cheng; Fang, Liang; Kou, Jiahui; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the growth of hexagonal NaYF4:Yb3+, Tm3+ nanocrystals with tunable sizes induced by different contents of doped Yb3+ ions (10%–99.5%) using the thermal decomposition method. These nanoparticles, which have different sizes, are then self-assembled at the interface of cyclohexane and ethylene and transferred onto a normal glass slide. It is found that the size of nanoparticles directs their self-assembly. Due to the appropriate size of 40.5 nm, 15% Yb3+ ions doped nanoparticles are able to be self-assembled into an ordered inorganic monolayer membrane with a large area of about 10 × 10 μm2. More importantly, the obvious short-wave (300–500 nm) fluorescence improvement of the ordered 2D self-assembly structure is observed to be relative to disordered nanoparticles, which is because intrinsic absorption and scattering of upconversion nanoparticles leads to the self-loss of fluorescence, especially the short-wave fluorescence inside the disordered structure, and the relative emission of short-wave fluorescence is reduced. The construction of a 2D self-assembly structure can effectively avoid this and improve the radiated short-wave fluorescence, especially UV photons, and is able to direct the design of new types of solid-state optical materials in many fields.

  12. Assembling Tunable Time-Resolved Fluorescence Layer onto Nano-Gold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The assembling of a coating of time-resolved fluorescent chelator BSPDA (abbreviated for 4,7-bis(sulfhydrylphenyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) onto a nano-gold layer was demonstrated. First, BSPDA was synthesized by simple procedures, and then an approach was developed to immobilize BSPDA onto the nano-gold layer deposited on a silane modified glass substrate, whereby europium ion (Ⅲ, Eu3+) was captured and released owing to the interactive process of complexation and dissociation between BSPDA functionalized coating and Eu3+ solution. The fluorescence spectra and related lifetimes were determined. Also, the BSPDA functionalized coating's specific complexation with Eu3+ on the BSPDA assembly layer and the nonspecific adsorption of Eu3+ on the nano-gold layer were compared. These results allowed a selective complexation of Eu3+ by assembling a BSPDA chelating layer on the nano-gold layer;thus, a tunable time-resolved fluorescent layer was covalently attached. The results of the nanoparticle assembling and probing (or labeling) processes to specific bio-systems were very interesting and had significant implications to time-resolved-fluorescence-based detection on biosensor surfaces such as DNA chip and to arrayed light display devices.

  13. Self-Assembled Gold Nanoclusters for Bright Fluorescence Imaging and Enhanced Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia-Ammar, Akram; Sierra, Daniel; Mérola, Fabienne; Hildebrandt, Niko; Le Guével, Xavier

    2016-02-23

    Nanoparticles combining enhanced cellular drug delivery with efficient fluorescence detection are important tools for the development of theranostic agents. Here, we demonstrate this concept by a simple, fast, and robust protocol of cationic polymer-mediated gold nanocluster (Au NCs) self-assembly into nanoparticles (NPs) of ca. 120 nm diameter. An extensive characterization of the monodisperse and positively charged NPs revealed pH-dependent swelling properties, strong fluorescence enhancement, and excellent colloidal and photostability in water, buffer, and culture medium. The versatility of the preparation is demonstrated by using different Au NC surface ligands and cationic polymers. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements give insight into the aggregation-induced emission phenomenon (AIE) by tuning the Au NC interactions in the self-assembled nanoparticles using the pH-dependent swelling. In vitro studies in human monocytic cells indicate strongly enhanced uptake of the NPs compared to free Au NCs in endocytic compartments. The NPs keep their assembly structure with quite low cytotoxicity up to 500 μg Au/mL. Enhanced drug delivery is demonstrated by loading peptides or antibodies in the NPs using a one-pot synthesis. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed intracellular colocalization of the biomolecules and the NP carriers with a respective 1.7-fold and 6.5-fold enhanced cellular uptake of peptides and antibodies compared to the free biomolecules. PMID:26845515

  14. Large scale solution assembly of quantum dot-gold nanorod architectures with plasmon enhanced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Dhriti; Drummy, Lawrence F; Biswas, Sushmita; Park, Kyoungweon; Vaia, Richard A

    2013-10-22

    Tailoring the efficiency of fluorescent emission via plasmon-exciton coupling requires structure control on a nanometer length scale using a high-yield fabrication route not achievable with current lithographic techniques. These systems can be fabricated using a bottom-up approach if problems of colloidal stability and low yield can be addressed. We report progress on this pathway with the assembly of quantum dots (emitter) on gold nanorods (plasmonic units) with precisely controlled spacing, quantum dot/nanorod ratio, and long-term colloidal stability, which enables the purification and encapsulation of the assembled architecture in a protective silica shell. Overall, such controllability with nanometer precision allows one to synthesize stable, complex architectures at large volume in a rational and controllable manner. The assembled architectures demonstrate photoluminescent enhancement (5×) useful for applications ranging from biological sensing to advanced optical communication. PMID:24004164

  15. Fluorescence enhancement in large-scale self-assembled gold nanoparticle double arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekini, M.; Bierwagen, J.; Cunningham, A.; Bürgi, T., E-mail: Thomas.Buergi@unige.ch [Département de Chimie Physique, Université de Genève, 1211 Genève (Switzerland); Filter, R. [Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Solid State Optics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Rockstuhl, C. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Theoretical Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-12-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances excited in metallic nanoparticles confine and enhance electromagnetic fields at the nanoscale. This is particularly pronounced in dimers made from two closely spaced nanoparticles. When quantum emitters, such as dyes, are placed in the gap of those dimers, their absorption and emission characteristics can be modified. Both processes have to be considered when aiming to enhance the fluorescence from the quantum emitters. This is particularly challenging for dimers, since the electromagnetic properties and the enhanced fluorescence sensitively depend on the distance between the nanoparticles. Here, we use a layer-by-layer method to precisely control the distances in such systems. We consider a dye layer deposited on top of an array of gold nanoparticles or integrated into a central position of a double array of gold nanoparticles. We study the effect of the spatial arrangement and the average distance on the plasmon-enhanced fluorescence. We found a maximum of a 99-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity of the dye layer sandwiched between two gold nanoparticle arrays. The interaction of the dye layer with the plasmonic system also causes a spectral shift in the emission wavelengths and a shortening of the fluorescence life times. Our work paves the way for large-scale, high throughput, and low-cost self-assembled functionalized plasmonic systems that can be used as efficient light sources.

  16. Multicomponent assembly of fluorescent-tag functionalized ligands in metal-organic frameworks for sensing explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, Bappaditya; Bar, Arun Kumar; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2014-10-01

    Detection of trace amounts of explosive materials is significantly important for security concerns and pollution control. Four multicomponent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs-12, 13, 23, and 123) have been synthesized by employing ligands embedded with fluorescent tags. The multicomponent assembly of the ligands was utilized to acquire a diverse electronic behavior of the MOFs and the fluorescent tags were strategically chosen to enhance the electron density in the MOFs. The phase purity of the MOFs was established by PXRD, NMR spectroscopy, and finally by single-crystal XRD. Single-crystal structures of the MOFs-12 and 13 showed the formation of three-dimensional porous networks with the aromatic tags projecting inwardly into the pores. These electron-rich MOFs were utilized for detection of explosive nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) through fluorescence quenching with high selectivity and sensitivity. The rate of fluorescence quenching for all the MOFs follows the order of electron deficiency of the NACs. We also showed the detection of picric acid (PA) by luminescent MOFs is not always reliable and can be misleading. This attracts our attention to explore these MOFs for sensing picryl chloride (PC), which is as explosive as picric acid and used widely to prepare more stable explosives like 2,4,6-trinitroaniline from PA. Moreover, the recyclability and sensitivity studies indicated that these MOFs can be reused several times with parts per billion (ppb) levels of sensitivity towards PC and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  17. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm)

  18. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Christof P.; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm).

  19. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Christof P., E-mail: cpd3@st-andrews.ac.uk; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C., E-mail: mcg6@st-andrews.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-08

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm)

  20. Self-assembly of novel fluorescent quantum dot-cerasome hybrid for bioelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daliang; Zhuang, Qian; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shuyao; Kikuchi, Jun-Ichi; Han, Zhengbo; Zhang, Qian; Song, Xi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    A novel fluorescent nanohybrid was fabricated via the self-assembly of semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) on biocompatible cerasomes. The nanohybrid (denoted as QDs-cerasome) was used as an electrode material for visible protein immobilization and bioelectrochemistry. The morphology and surface properties of the QDs-cerasome hybrid were characterized by transmission electron microscopies, atomic force microscopies and zeta potential measurements. Because the QDs-cerasome hybrid possessed a positive charge in aqueous solution, it could be used as a matrix to immobilize negatively charged hemoglobin (Hb) via electrostatic interaction. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy demonstrated that Hb was immobilized on the hybrid matrix without denaturation. The fluorescence of the QDs-cerasome was quenched as Hb was immobilized, indicating that the protein immobilization process could be visibly detected. Compared with protein electrodes constructed using a single-component material, including Hb-QDs/GC and Hb-cerasome/GC electrodes, the Hb-QDs-cerasome/GC electrode not only realized enhanced direct electrochemistry, but also displayed higher sensitivity and a wider linear range toward the detection of hydrogen peroxide because of the synergistic effect of the QDs and cerasomes. The experimental results demonstrate that this fluorescent multicomponent hybrid material provides a novel and effective platform to immobilize a redox protein to realize direct electrochemistry. As such, this hybrid shows promise for application in third-generation electrochemical biosensors.

  1. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as a fluorescent turn-on sensor for lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Lee, Fook Loy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a toxic inflammatory stimulator released from the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, known to be directly related to, for example, septic shock, that causes millions of casualties annually. This number could potentially be lowered significantly if specific, sensitive, and more simply applicable LPS biosensors existed. In this work, we present a facile, sensitive and selective LPS sensor, developed by assembling tetramethylrhodamine-labeled LPS-binding peptides on graphene oxide (GO). The fluorescence of the dye-labeled peptide is quenched upon interaction with GO. Specific binding to LPS triggers the release of the peptide-LPS complex from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery. This fluorescent turn-on sensor offers an estimated limit of detection of 130 pM, which is the lowest ever reported among all synthetic LPS sensors to date. Importantly, this sensor is applicable for detection of LPS in commonly used clinical injectable fluids, and it enables selective detection of LPS from different bacterial strains as well as LPS on the membrane of living E. coli. PMID:26303386

  2. Exploiting Fluorescent Polymers To Probe the Self-Assembly of Virus-like Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caden-Nava, Ruben D.; Hu, Yufang; Garmann, Rees F.;

    2011-01-01

    The inside surfaces of the protein shells of many viruses are positively charged, thereby enhancing the self-assembly of capsid proteins around their (oppositely charged) RNA genome. These proteins have been shown to organize similarly around a variety of nonbiological, negatively charged, polyme...... than that of the capsid protein by as much as a factor of 2. VLPs of this kind provide a versatile model system for determining the principles underlying self-assembly of controlled numbers of cargo molecules in nanocontainers of increasing size.......The inside surfaces of the protein shells of many viruses are positively charged, thereby enhancing the self-assembly of capsid proteins around their (oppositely charged) RNA genome. These proteins have been shown to organize similarly around a variety of nonbiological, negatively charged, polymers......), and that the total charge on the PSS exceeds that of the capsid protein by as much as a factor of 9. Here, we extend studies of this kind to PSS molecules that are sufficiently small that two or more can be packaged into VLPs. The use of 38 kDa PSS polymers that have been fluorescently labeled with Rhodamine B...

  3. Fluorescence turn-on recognition of chiral amino acids using dye incorporated β-CD functionalized AuNPs assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aswathy, B., E-mail: aswathybv@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    An assembly of dye incorporated β-cyclodextrin (βCD) functionalized AuNPs for the fluorescent probing of chiral amino acids is presented. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) possessing a high extinction coefficient function can be used as excellent fluorescent quenchers in AuNP–fluorophore system. Inclusion of fluorescein (FL) into β-cyclodextrin (βCD) makes energy transfer to occur through the donor and quencher nearby. This energy transfer switches off by virtue of the analyte induced release of FL from β-CD cavity, which results in the fluorescence recovery of the quenched dye. Analysis suggests that the assembly of AuNPs–βCDs–FL is effective as a turn-on fluorescent probe for the chiroselective optical discrimination between D,L-tryptophan, D,L-phenyl alanine and D,L-tyrosine. The detection limits for analyzing L-tryptophan, L-phenyl alanine and L-tyrosine were found to be 0.59, 1.2 and 1.5 μM respectively. - Highlights: • Fluorescence quenching AuNP–βCD–dye assembly via energy transfer. • Energy transfer from dye to AuNPs is a SET process. • Fluorescence turn-on detection of amino acids by the competitive binding method. • Chiroselective discrimination between enantiomeric amino acids.

  4. Proteolytic disassembly of peptide-mediated graphene oxide assemblies for turn-on fluorescence sensing of proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kwak, Seon-Yeong; Jeon, Su-Ji; Lee, Eunjin; Ju, Jong-Min; Kim, Hye-In; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Molecule-induced assembly of nanomaterials can alter their unique chemical and physical properties, which can be a promising approach for sensing. Herein, we demonstrate an optical `turn-on' biosensor for the detection of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), fabricated by means of a peptide-induced assembly of fluorescent graphene oxide (GO). Functionalization of GO with a peptide substrate for MMP-2 bearing a thiol group leads to its self-assembly via disulfide bonding, accompanied by self-quenching of GO's strong fluorescence. This peptide-induced GO assembly is then disassembled by proteolytic cleavage in the presence of MMP-2, thereby restoring the level of self-quenched GO fluorescence. With this approach, we are able to detect MMP-2 and to investigate the kinetic parameters of MMP-2 activity. The GO-peptide assembly is successfully applied to the selective and sensitive detection of MMP-2 secreted by living cells, human hepatocytes HepG2, at a concentration of 2 ng mL-1.Molecule-induced assembly of nanomaterials can alter their unique chemical and physical properties, which can be a promising approach for sensing. Herein, we demonstrate an optical `turn-on' biosensor for the detection of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), fabricated by means of a peptide-induced assembly of fluorescent graphene oxide (GO). Functionalization of GO with a peptide substrate for MMP-2 bearing a thiol group leads to its self-assembly via disulfide bonding, accompanied by self-quenching of GO's strong fluorescence. This peptide-induced GO assembly is then disassembled by proteolytic cleavage in the presence of MMP-2, thereby restoring the level of self-quenched GO fluorescence. With this approach, we are able to detect MMP-2 and to investigate the kinetic parameters of MMP-2 activity. The GO-peptide assembly is successfully applied to the selective and sensitive detection of MMP-2 secreted by living cells, human hepatocytes HepG2, at a concentration of 2 ng mL-1. Electronic

  5. DNA Triplexes-Guided Assembly of G-Quadruplexes for Constructing Label-free Fluorescent Logic Gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Hong, Shanni; Shen, Xiaoqiang; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Jine; Zhang, Jianye; Pei, Renjun

    2016-07-01

    Assembly of G-quadruplexes guided by DNA triplexes in a controlled manner is achieved for the first time. The folding of triplex sequences in acidic conditions brings two separated guanine-rich sequences together and subsequently a G-quadruplex structure is formed in the presence of K(+) . Based on this novel platform, label-free fluorescent logic gates, such as AND, INHIBIT, and NOR, are constructed with ions as input and the fluorescence of a G-quadruplex-specific fluorescent probe NMM as output. PMID:27224871

  6. Fluorescently Sensing of DNA Triplex Assembly Using an Isoquinoline Alkaloid as Selector, Stabilizer, Inducer, and Switch-On Emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuehua; Lin, Fan; Wu, Tao; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shao, Yong

    2016-07-20

    DNA triplex assembly has attracted a variety of interest in the regulation of genetic expression, drug screening, molecular switches, and sensors. However, these achievements are essentially dependent on the formation and stability of the triplex assembly. Herein, the recognition of DNA triplex assembly with various isoquinoline alkaloids was investigated. We found that natural chelerythrine (CHE) exhibits the highest selectivity in recognizing the triplex structure. The DNA triplex stability is substantially increased upon CHE binding, as opposed to the invariance in the stability of the duplex counterpart. CHE also favors the assembly of the triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) with its duplex counterpart. The triplex binding switches CHE to a strong fluorescent emitter, which suggests CHE as a useful probe in following triplex assembly. As a unique triplex selector, inducer, and emitter, CHE successfully reports the wide pH- and metal-ion-dependent tunability of the triplex nanoswitch in a label-free manner. PMID:27252050

  7. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides into microtubes with "turn on" fluorescence using an aggregation-induced emission molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Na; Mu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Qiuling; Wen, Jiying; Wang, Fangfang; Ouyang, Jin

    2013-10-01

    The self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides (l-Phe-l-Phe) into microtubes with "turn on" bright yellow green fluorescence was described, which was achieved using an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) molecule of 9,10-bis[4-(3-sulfonatopropoxyl)-styryl] anthracene (BSPSA) sodium. PMID:24045462

  8. Steric hindrance regulated supramolecular assembly between β-cyclodextrin polymer and pyrene for alkaline phosphatase fluorescent sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunxia; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Maogui; Guo, Xiaochen

    2016-03-01

    We herein report a strategy for sensitive alkaline phosphatase (ALP) fluorescent sensing based on steric hindrance regulated supramolecular assembly between β-cyclodextrin polymer (polyβ-CD) and pyrene. The fluorescence of pyrene was enhanced more than 10 times through supramolecular assembly with polyβ-CD. The 5‧-phosphorylated dsDNA probe with pyrene attached on the 3‧-terminal could be cleaved by λ exonuclease (λ exo), yielding pyrene attached on mononucleotides. Pyrene attached on mononucleotides could easily enter the cavity of polyβ-CD, resulting in fluorescence enhancement. When ALP was introduced, it could remove 5‧-phosphate groups from dsDNA and then prevented the cleavage of dsDNA. Pyrene attached on dsDNA was difficult to enter the cavity of polyβ-CD because of steric hindrance, resulting in an inconspicuous fluorescence enhancement. Owing to the excellent fluorescence enhancement during steric hindrance regulated supramolecular assembly, excellent performance of the assay method was achieved for ALP with a detection limit of 0.04 U mL- 1. The detection limit was superior or comparable with the reported methods. Besides, this method was simple in design, avoiding double-labeling of probe.

  9. Pulsed Laser-Driven Molecular Self-assembly of Cephalexin: Aggregation-Induced Fluorescence and Its Utility as a Mercury Ion Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Prabhune, Asmita; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2015-11-01

    A fluorescent self-assembly of cephalexin is obtained by pulsed laser irradiation process. An intense fluorescence emission is found in the self-assembled form due to occurrence of a typical aggregation-induced emission in cephalexin molecules. It is observed that fluorescence quenching of the self-assembled fluorescent nanostructures occurs in the presence of extremely low Hg(++) ions concentrations (10(-7) m) as compared to other heavy metal ions e.g. Ferrous (Fe(++) ), Manganese (Mn(++) ), Magnesium (Mg(++) ), Cobalt (Co(++) ), Nickel (Ni(++) ) and Zinc (Zn(++) ) at the same concentrations. PMID:26333412

  10. Solvent-assistant self-assembly of an AIE+TICT fluorescent Schiff base for the improved ammonia detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tianyu; Wei, Wei; Yuan, Jing; Duan, Yuai; Li, Yaping; Hu, Liangyu; Dong, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Solvent-assistant self-assembly of an AIE+TICT fluorescent Schiff base into one-dimensional nanofilaments has been developed. The orientation of the assemblies can be controlled by a simple dewetting process: the filaments are interweaved when the self-assembly process is performed on a horizontal substrate, while tilting the substrate to a tiny angle results in the formation of highly oriented ones with long-range order as verified by microscopic examination. The compound shows remarkable fluorescent response to ammonia gas based on a TICT-LE transition. The self-assembled film presents higher detection sensitivity compared with the non-assembled test paper: the former enables 4.75 times faster response time and 6.86 times lower detection limit than the latter. Furthermore, the former demonstrates better selectivity toward ammonia gas in the presence of various organic amines. The sensing devices also enjoy the advantage of cyclic utilization. The fluorescence of the fumed devices can be converted back into the original state when they are heated at 100 °C for 5 min, as thermal treatment can desorb the ammonia gas that adsorbed in the sensing devices.

  11. Electrostatic-assembly-driven formation of supramolecular rhombus microparticles and their application for fluorescent nucleic acid detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Li

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on the large-scale formation of supramolecular rhombus microparticles (SRMs driven by electrostatic assembly, carried out by direct mixing of an aqueous HAuCl(4 solution and an ethanol solution of 4,4'-bipyridine at room temperature. We further demonstrate their use as an effective fluorescent sensing platform for nucleic acid detection with a high selectivity down to single-base mismatch. The general concept used in this approach is based on adsorption of the fluorescently labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA probe by SRM, which is accompanied by substantial fluorescence quenching. In the following assay, specific hybridization with its target to form double-stranded DNA (dsDNA results in desorption of ssDNA from SRM surface and subsequent fluorescence recovery.

  12. Fluorescent polystyrene photonic crystals self-assembled with water-soluble conjugated polyrotaxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Stasio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate control of the photoluminescence spectra and decay rates of water-soluble green-emitting conjugated polyrotaxanes by incorporating them in polystyrene opals with a stop-band spectrally tuned on the rotaxane emission (405–650 nm. We observe a suppression of the luminescence within the photonic stop-band and a corresponding enhancement of the high-energy edge (405–447 nm. Time-resolved measurements reveal a wavelength-dependent modification of the emission lifetime, which is shortened at the high-energy edge (by ∼11%, in the range 405–447 nm, but elongated within the stop-band (by ∼13%, in the range 448–482 nm. We assign both effects to the modification of the density of photonic states induced by the photonic crystal band structure. We propose the growth of fluorescent composite photonic crystals from blends of “solvent-compatible” non-covalently bonded nanosphere-polymer systems as a general method for achieving a uniform distribution of polymeric dopants in three-dimensional self-assembling photonic structures.

  13. Micelles assembled with carbocyanine dyes for theranostic near-infrared fluorescent cancer imaging and photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Mao, Huajian; Wan, Zhihui; Zhu, Aijun; Guo, Miao; Li, Yanli; Li, Xinming; Wan, Jiangling; Yang, Xiangliang; Shuai, Xintao; Chen, Huabing

    2013-12-01

    It is an emerging focus to explore a theranostic nanocarrier for simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy. Herein, we demonstrate a theranostic micelle system for cancer near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging with enhanced signal to noise ratio and superior photothermal therapy. The copolymers consisting of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) and alkylamine-grafted poly(L-aspartic acid) are assembled with carbocyanine dyes into theranostic micelles, which exhibit small size, high loading capacity, good stability, sustained release behavior, and enhanced cellular uptake. The micelles achieve the preferable biodistribution and long-term retention of carbocyanine dyes at tumor, which result in enhanced NIRF imaging by generating stable retention of NIRF signals at both hypervascular and hypovascular tumors during a long-term imaging period of up to 8 day, accompanying with negligible noise at normal tissues. The photostability of carbocyanine dye (Cypate) plays an important role for long-term cancer imaging with enhanced SNR. Moreover, the micelles exhibit severe photothermal damage on cancer cells via the destabilization of subcellular organelles upon photoirradiation, causing superior photothermal tumor regress. The micelles act as a powerful theranostic nanocarrier for simultaneous cancer imaging with high contrast and superior photothermal therapy.

  14. Efficient White-Light Generation from Ionically Self-Assembled Triply-Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Susmita; Debnath, Tanay; Basu, Amrita; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit Kumar; Baker, Gary A; Patra, Amitava

    2016-06-20

    Low cost, simple, and environmentally friendly strategies for white-light generation which do not require rare-earth phosphors or other toxic or elementally scare species remain an essentially unmet challenge. Progress in the area of all-organic approaches is highly sought, single molecular systems remaining a particular challenge. Taking inspiration from the designer nature of ionic-liquid chemistry, we now introduce a new strategy toward white-light emission based on the facile generation of nanoparticles comprising three different fluorophores assembled in a well-defined stoichiometry purely through electrostatic interactions. The building blocks consist of the fluorophores aminopyrene, fluorescein, and rhodamine 6G which represent blue, green, and red-emitting species, respectively. Spherical nanoparticles 16(±5) nm in size were prepared which display bright white-light emission with high fluorescence quantum efficiency (26 %) and color coordinate at (0.29, 0.38) which lie in close proximity to pure white light (0.33, 0.33). It is noteworthy that this same fluorophore mixture in free solution yields only blue emission. Density functional theory calculations reveal H-bond and ground-state proton transfer mediated absolute non-parallel orientation of the constituent units which result in frustrated energy transfer, giving rise to emission from the individual centers and concomitant white-light emission. PMID:27219524

  15. Development of a quantitative diagnostic method of estrogen receptor expression levels by immunohistochemistry using organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles for IHC were prepared. ► New nanoparticle fluorescent intensity was 10.2-fold greater than Qdot655. ► Nanoparticle staining analyzed a wide range of ER expression levels in tissue. ► Nanoparticle staining enhanced the quantitative sensitivity for ER diagnosis. -- Abstract: The detection of estrogen receptors (ERs) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) is slightly weak as a prognostic marker, but it is essential to the application of endocrine therapy, such as antiestrogen tamoxifen-based therapy. IHC using DAB is a poor quantitative method because horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity depends on reaction time, temperature and substrate concentration. However, IHC using fluorescent material provides an effective method to quantitatively use IHC because the signal intensity is proportional to the intensity of the photon excitation energy. However, the high level of autofluorescence has impeded the development of quantitative IHC using fluorescence. We developed organic fluorescent material (tetramethylrhodamine)-assembled nanoparticles for IHC. Tissue autofluorescence is comparable to the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots, which are the most representative fluorescent nanoparticles. The fluorescent intensity of our novel nanoparticles was 10.2-fold greater than quantum dots, and they did not bind non-specifically to breast cancer tissues due to the polyethylene glycol chain that coated their surfaces. Therefore, the fluorescent intensity of our nanoparticles significantly exceeded autofluorescence, which produced a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio on IHC-imaged cancer tissues than previous methods. Moreover, immunostaining data from our nanoparticle fluorescent IHC and IHC with DAB were compared in the same region of adjacent tissues sections to quantitatively examine the two methods. The results demonstrated that our nanoparticle staining analyzed a

  16. Development of a quantitative diagnostic method of estrogen receptor expression levels by immunohistochemistry using organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonda, Kohsuke, E-mail: gonda@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Miyashita, Minoru [Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); Watanabe, Mika; Takahashi, Yayoi [Department of Pathology, Tohoku University Hospital, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); Goda, Hideki; Okada, Hisatake; Nakano, Yasushi [Optical and Biological R and D Center, Konica Minolta Technology Center, Inc., No. 1 Sakuramachi, Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-8511 (Japan); Tada, Hiroshi [Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); Amari, Masakazu [Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Ohuchi, Noriaki [Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles for IHC were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New nanoparticle fluorescent intensity was 10.2-fold greater than Qdot655. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticle staining analyzed a wide range of ER expression levels in tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticle staining enhanced the quantitative sensitivity for ER diagnosis. -- Abstract: The detection of estrogen receptors (ERs) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using 3,3 Prime -diaminobenzidine (DAB) is slightly weak as a prognostic marker, but it is essential to the application of endocrine therapy, such as antiestrogen tamoxifen-based therapy. IHC using DAB is a poor quantitative method because horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity depends on reaction time, temperature and substrate concentration. However, IHC using fluorescent material provides an effective method to quantitatively use IHC because the signal intensity is proportional to the intensity of the photon excitation energy. However, the high level of autofluorescence has impeded the development of quantitative IHC using fluorescence. We developed organic fluorescent material (tetramethylrhodamine)-assembled nanoparticles for IHC. Tissue autofluorescence is comparable to the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots, which are the most representative fluorescent nanoparticles. The fluorescent intensity of our novel nanoparticles was 10.2-fold greater than quantum dots, and they did not bind non-specifically to breast cancer tissues due to the polyethylene glycol chain that coated their surfaces. Therefore, the fluorescent intensity of our nanoparticles significantly exceeded autofluorescence, which produced a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio on IHC-imaged cancer tissues than previous methods. Moreover, immunostaining data from our nanoparticle fluorescent IHC and IHC with DAB were compared in the same region of adjacent tissues sections to

  17. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuento Matti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs. The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles.

  18. Development of a quantitative diagnostic method of estrogen receptor expression levels by immunohistochemistry using organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Watanabe, Mika; Takahashi, Yayoi; Goda, Hideki; Okada, Hisatake; Nakano, Yasushi; Tada, Hiroshi; Amari, Masakazu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2012-09-28

    The detection of estrogen receptors (ERs) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) is slightly weak as a prognostic marker, but it is essential to the application of endocrine therapy, such as antiestrogen tamoxifen-based therapy. IHC using DAB is a poor quantitative method because horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity depends on reaction time, temperature and substrate concentration. However, IHC using fluorescent material provides an effective method to quantitatively use IHC because the signal intensity is proportional to the intensity of the photon excitation energy. However, the high level of autofluorescence has impeded the development of quantitative IHC using fluorescence. We developed organic fluorescent material (tetramethylrhodamine)-assembled nanoparticles for IHC. Tissue autofluorescence is comparable to the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots, which are the most representative fluorescent nanoparticles. The fluorescent intensity of our novel nanoparticles was 10.2-fold greater than quantum dots, and they did not bind non-specifically to breast cancer tissues due to the polyethylene glycol chain that coated their surfaces. Therefore, the fluorescent intensity of our nanoparticles significantly exceeded autofluorescence, which produced a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio on IHC-imaged cancer tissues than previous methods. Moreover, immunostaining data from our nanoparticle fluorescent IHC and IHC with DAB were compared in the same region of adjacent tissues sections to quantitatively examine the two methods. The results demonstrated that our nanoparticle staining analyzed a wide range of ER expression levels with higher accuracy and quantitative sensitivity than DAB staining. This enhancement in the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for ERs using our immunostaining method will improve the prediction of responses to therapies that target ERs and progesterone receptors that are induced by a downstream ER signal. PMID

  19. Homogeneous detection of concanavalin A using pyrene-conjugated maltose assembled graphene based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiushui; Wei, Weili; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-07-15

    In this work, we proposed a novel biosensor to homogeneously detect concanavalin A (ConA) using pyrene-conjugated maltose assembled graphene based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Maltose-grafted-aminopyrene (Mal-Apy) was synthesized and characterized by mass spectra, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra. The Mal-Apy was further employed for fluorescence switch and ConA recognition. When Mal-Apy was self-assembled on the surface of graphene by means of π-stacking interaction, its fluorescence was adequately quenched because the graphene acted as a "nanoquencher" of the pyrene rings due to FRET. As a result, in the presence of ConA, competitive binding of ConA with glucose destroyed the π-stacking interaction between the pyrene and graphene, thereby causing the fluorescence recovery. This method was demonstrated the selective sensing of ConA, and the linear range is 2.0 × 10⁻² to 1.0 μM with the linear equation y=1.029x + 0.284 (R = 0.996). The limit of detection for ConA was low to 0.8 nM, and the detection of ConA could be performed in 5 min, indicating that this method could be used for fast, sensitive, and selective sensing of ConA. Such data suggests that the graphene FRET platform is a great potential application for protein-carbohydrate studies, and would be widely applied in drug screening, bimolecular recognition and disease diagnosis. PMID:21621405

  20. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Identifying the Assembly Configuration and Fluorescence Spectra of Nanoscale Zinc-Tetraphenylporphyrin Aggregates with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Jiang, Jian-Wei; Liu, Yi-Ting; Lou, Shi-Tao; Gao, Chun-Lei; Jin, Qing-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    ZnTPP (Zinc-Tetraphenylporphyrin) is one of the most common nanostructured materials, having high stability and excellent optoelectronic properties. In this paper, the fluorescence features of self-assembled ZnTPP monomers and aggregates on Au(111) surface are investigated in detail on the nanometer scale with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The formation of ZnTPP dimers is found in thick layers of a layer-by-layer molecular assembly on Au substrate with its specific molecular arrangement well characterized. Tip-induced luminescence shows a red shift from tilted dimers comparing with the behavior from monomers, which can be attributed to the change of vibrational states due to the intermolecular interaction and the increasing dielectric effect. The nanoscale configuration dependence of electroluminescence is demonstrated to provide a powerful tool aiding the design of functional molecular photoelectric devices.

  3. Self-Assembly of Electron Donor-Acceptor-Based Carbazole Derivatives: Novel Fluorescent Organic Nanoprobes for Both One- and Two-Photon Cellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Wencheng; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Li, King Fai; Chen, Rui; Adachi, Chihaya; Chen, Zhan; Rogach, Andrey L; Zhu, Guangyu; Yu, Peter K N; Zhang, Wenjun; Cheah, Kok Wai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-05-11

    In this study, we report fluorescent organic nanoprobes with intense blue, green, and orange-red emissions prepared by self-assembling three carbazole derivatives into nanorods/nanoparticles. The three compounds consist of two or four electron-donating carbazole groups linked to a central dicyanobenzene electron acceptor. Steric hindrance from the carbazole groups leads to noncoplanar 3D molecular structures favorable to fluorescence in the solid state, while the donor-acceptor structures endow the molecules with good two-photon excited emission properties. The fluorescent organic nanoprobes exhibit good water dispersibility, low cytotoxicity, superior resistance against photodegradation and photobleaching. Both one- and two-photon fluorescent imaging were shown in the A549 cell line. Two-photon fluorescence imaging with the fluorescent probes was demonstrated to be more effective in visualizing and distinguishing cellular details compared to conventional one-photon fluorescence imaging. PMID:27097920

  4. Fluorescent polymeric assemblies as stimuli-responsive vehicles for drug controlled release and cell/tissue imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymer assemblies with good biocompatibility, stimuli-responsive properties and clinical imaging capability are desirable carriers for future biomedical applications. Herein, we report on the synthesis of a novel anthracenecarboxaldehyde-decorated poly(N-(4-aminophenyl) methacryl amide-oligoethyleneglycolmonomethylether methacrylate) (P(MAAPAC-MAAP-MAPEG)) copolymer, comprising fluorescent chromophore and acid-labile moiety. This copolymer can assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and shows a spherical shape with well-defined particle size and narrow particle size distribution. The pH-responsive property of the micelles has been evaluated by the change of particle size and the controlled release of guest molecules. The intrinsic fluorescence property endows the micelles with excellent cell/tissue imaging capability. Cell viability evaluation with human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402 cells demonstrates that the micelles are nontoxic. The cellular uptake of the micelles indicates a time-dependent behavior. The H22-tumor bearing mice treated with the micelles clearly exhibits the tumor accumulation. These multi-functional nanocarriers may be of great interest in the application of drug delivery. (paper)

  5. Fluorescent polymeric assemblies as stimuli-responsive vehicles for drug controlled release and cell/tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Li, Yang; Yu, Shirong; Mao, Jie; Liu, Cheng; Li, Qi; Yuan, Conghui; He, Ning; Luo, Weiang; Dai, Lizong

    2015-01-01

    Polymer assemblies with good biocompatibility, stimuli-responsive properties and clinical imaging capability are desirable carriers for future biomedical applications. Herein, we report on the synthesis of a novel anthracenecarboxaldehyde-decorated poly(N-(4-aminophenyl) methacryl amide-oligoethyleneglycolmonomethylether methacrylate) (P(MAAPAC-MAAP-MAPEG)) copolymer, comprising fluorescent chromophore and acid-labile moiety. This copolymer can assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and shows a spherical shape with well-defined particle size and narrow particle size distribution. The pH-responsive property of the micelles has been evaluated by the change of particle size and the controlled release of guest molecules. The intrinsic fluorescence property endows the micelles with excellent cell/tissue imaging capability. Cell viability evaluation with human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402 cells demonstrates that the micelles are nontoxic. The cellular uptake of the micelles indicates a time-dependent behavior. The H22-tumor bearing mice treated with the micelles clearly exhibits the tumor accumulation. These multi-functional nanocarriers may be of great interest in the application of drug delivery.

  6. TRANES analysis of the fluorescence of nile red in organized molecular assemblies confirms emission from two species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A S R Koti; N Periasamy

    2001-04-01

    Time-resolved area normalized emission spectroscopy (TRANES) is a new method for the analysis of fluorescence of dyes in complex chemical and biological systems (A S R Koti, M M G Krishna and N Periasamy, 2001, J. Phys. Chem. 105, 1767). The model-free method extends the power of time-resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) analysis and removes the ambiguity in the interpretation when the emission spectrum is time-dependent. Observation of an isoemissive point in TRANES analysis of fluorescence is an unambiguous indication for the presence of two emissive species in the sample. The isoemissive point occurs at a wavelength where the ratio of the radiative rates of the two species is equal to the ratio of their total radiative rates. The polarity-sensitive nile red dye shows timedependent emission spectra in the organized bilayer assemblies of TX micelle and bilayer egg-phosphotidylcholine (egg-PC) membrane. Time-dependent spectra in complex systems support many important models (solvation model and heterogeneity in the ground and/or excited state). TRANES analysis shows that the fluorescence emission of nile red in TX micelle and egg-PC membrane is due to two emissive species solubilized in different sites.

  7. Complex Assembly Behavior During the Encapsulation of Green Fluorescent Protein Analogs in Virus Derived Protein Capsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minten, Inge J.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes encapsulated in nanocontainers are a better model of the conditions inside a living cell than free enzymes in solution. In a first step toward the encapsulation of multiple enzymes inside the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was attached

  8. Collective fluorescence switching of counterion-assembled dyes in polymer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisch, Andreas; Didier, Pascal; Richert, Ludovic; Oncul, Sule; Arntz, Youri; Mély, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2014-06-01

    The current challenge in the field of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for bioimaging is to achieve extreme brightness and external control of their emission using biodegradable materials. Here we propose a new concept of fluorescent polymer NPs, doped with ionic liquid-like salts of a cationic dye (octadecyl rhodamine B) with a bulky hydrophobic counterion (fluorinated tetraphenylborate) that serves as spacer minimizing dye aggregation and self-quenching. The obtained 40-nm poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) NPs containing up to 500 dyes are brighter than quantum dots and exhibit photo-induced reversible on/off fluorescence switching, never reported for dye-doped NPs. We show that this collective switching of hundreds of dyes is due to ultrafast excitation energy transfer and can be used for super-resolution imaging. These NPs, being spontaneously endocytosed by living cells, feature high signal-to-noise ratio and absence of toxicity. The counterion-based concept opens the way to a new class of nanomaterials for sensing, imaging and light harvesting.

  9. Reusable fluorescent sensor for captopril based on energy transfer from photoluminescent graphene oxide self-assembly multilayers to silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangying; Liu, Bin; Li, Shuchun; Li, Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this work we designed a self-assembly multilayers, in which photoluminescent graphene oxide was employed as a fluorescence probe. This multilayers film can effectively recognize captopril by resonance energy transfer from graphite oxide to silver nanoparticles. A new interfacial sensing method for captopril with high signal to noise ratio was established, by means of that multilayers was quenched by silver nanoparticles and subsequently recovered by adding captopril. The linear relation between intensity and captopril concentration was good, and the detection limit was found to be 0.1578 μM. Also, this novel detection platform demonstrated intriguing reusable properties, and the sensor could be repeated more than ten times without obviously losing its sensing performance.

  10. Subtle spectral effects accompanying the assembly of bacteriochlorophylls into cyclic light harvesting complexes revealed by high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rätsep, Margus, E-mail: margus.ratsep@ut.ee; Pajusalu, Mihkel, E-mail: mihkel.pajusalu@ut.ee; Linnanto, Juha Matti, E-mail: juha.matti.linnanto@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Freiberg, Arvi, E-mail: arvi.freiberg@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu, Estonia and Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Tartu, Riia 23, 51010 Tartu (Estonia)

    2014-10-21

    We have observed that an assembly of the bacteriochloropyll a molecules into B850 and B875 groups of cyclic bacterial light-harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1, respectively, results an almost total loss of the intra-molecular vibronic structure in the fluorescence spectrum, and simultaneously, an essential enhancement of its phonon sideband due to electron-phonon coupling. While the suppression of the vibronic coupling in delocalized (excitonic) molecular systems is predictable, as also confirmed by our model calculations, a boost of the electron-phonon coupling is rather unexpected. The latter phenomenon is explained by exciton self-trapping, promoted by mixing the molecular exciton states with charge transfer states between the adjacent chromophores in the tightly packed B850 and B875 arrangements. Similar, although less dramatic trends were noted for the light-harvesting complexes containing chlorophyll pigments.

  11. A fluorescent bis(benzoxazole) ligand: toward binuclear Zn(II)-Zn(II) assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Qinghui; Medvetz, Doug A; Panzner, Matthew J; Pang, Yi

    2010-06-14

    A bis(benzoxazole) ligand (HL) has been synthesized, and its reaction with Zn(OAc)(2) has led to fluorescent complexes via formation of binuclear Zn(II)-Zn(II) cores. The ligand-to-metal ratio of the complexes varies from 1 : 1 to 2 : 1, depending on the reaction conditions. A large binding constant K = 8.3 x 10(20) [M(-3)] has been determined for the reaction L + Zn(2+)-->L(2):Zn(2)(2+). The result indicates that the bis(benzoxazole) ligand is a useful building block to construct a binuclear core. On the basis of X-ray analysis, the binuclear Zn(II)-Zn(II) distance in the complexes is determined to be approximately 3.22 A, which is quite comparable to that found in the enzymes (3.3 A). Absorption and fluorescence study shows that a subtle chemical environmental change within the binuclear core can induce a large optical response.

  12. BODIPY-based self-assembled nanoparticles as fluorescence turn-on sensor for the selective detection of zinc in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ming-Yan; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Niu, Li-Ya; Feng, Liang

    2016-11-15

    Zinc plays important roles in regulating physiological and pathological processes. Regrettably, mild to moderate zinc deficiency is common worldwide. Hair Zn(2+) concentration, which reflects a zinc storage status, is useful for tracking trends in zinc status within populations. In this work, we report BODIPY-based self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) as fluorescence turn-on sensor for the selective sensing of Zn(2+) in human hair. The BODIPY monomers (BAN) self-assemble in aqueous medium to form nonfluorescent NPs. In the presence of Zn(2+) ions, the NPs selectively show an obvious turn-on fluorescence change. This selective response of the NPs allows the determination and quantification of Zn(2+) in human hair with a detection limit of 61.3nM. This study demonstrates that the small molecule self-assembled nanoparticle is a versatile and useful tool, and shows great potential for applications in sensing of important analytes in biological systems. PMID:27209578

  13. Anion Recognition Triggered Nanoribbon-Like Self-Assembly: A Fluorescent Chemosensor for Nitrate in Acidic Aqueous Solution and Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaping; Chen, Shiyan; Ni, Xin-Long

    2015-07-21

    A water-soluble π-conjugated bispyridinium phenylenevinylene-based fluorogenic probe has been developed as a novel fluorescent chemosensor for highly selective, sensitive, and rapid detection of NO3(-) anion in acidic aqueous media. This system self-assembles to a nanoribbon as a result of ionic interaction. The positively charged chemosensor generates a nearly instantaneous significant fluorescence signal (475 vs 605 nm) in response to NO3(-) in the green/yellow spectral region, with a large Stokes shift (130 nm). The fluorescence changes can be attributed to the self-aggregation of the sensor triggered by ionic interaction, which occurs as a consequence of the subtle cooperation of electrostatic ionic bonding, van der Waals forces, and π-stacking of the π-conjugated aromatic moieties. Importantly, this chemosensor has been employed for the first time for the fluorescence detection of intracellular NO3(-) anion in cultured cells. PMID:26084357

  14. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzenhäuser, Julia; Wyss, Romain; Manley, Suliana

    2014-01-01

    The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  15. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  16. Reaction-Driven Self-Assembled Micellar Nanoprobes for Ratiometric Fluorescence Detection of CS2 with High Selectivity and Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Zhenzhong; Gu, Jincui; Zhang, Jiawei; Huang, Youju; Huang, Qing; Chen, Tao

    2016-08-10

    The detection of highly toxic CS2, which is known as a notorious occupational hazard in various industrial processes, is important from both environmental and public safety perspectives. We describe here a robust type of chemical-reaction-based supramolecular fluorescent nanoprobes for ratiometric determination of CS2 with high selectivity and sensitivity in water medium. The micellar nanoprobes self-assemble from amphiphilic pyrene-modified hyperbranched polyethylenimine (Py-HPEI) polymers with intense pyrene excimer emission. Selective sensing is based on a CS2-specific reaction with hydrophilic amino groups to produce hydrophobic dithiocarbamate moieties, which can strongly quench the pyrene excimer emission via a known photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. Therefore, the developed micellar nanoprobes are free of the H2S interference problem often encountered in the widely used colorimetric assays and proved to show high selectivity over many potentially competing chemical species. Importantly, the developed approach is capable of CS2 sensing even in complex tap and river water samples. In addition, in view of the modular design principle of these powerful micellar nanoprobes, the sensing strategy used here is expected to be applicable to the development of various sensory systems for other environmentally important guest species. PMID:27419849

  17. Aggregation-induced emission of an aminated silole: A fluorescence probe for monitoring layer-by-layer self-assembling processes of polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new fluorescence technique for monitoring layer-by-layer self-assembling processes of polycations and polyanions is developed in this work. The fluorescent probe is a fluorogenic dye named 1,1-bis[p-(diethylaminomethyl)phenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetraphenylsilole (A2HPS). Whereas fluorescence of a 'normal' fluorophore is often quenched by aggregate formation, the protonated salt of A2HPS, i.e., [H2A2HPS]2+, emits strong light in the suspensions of its nanoaggregates and in the solid films of its blends with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDAC), thanks to its novel aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics. When ([H2A2HPS]2++PDDAC) cations and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) anions were used to fabricate thin films via layer-by-layer deposition processes on quartz and glass substrates, the emission intensity of [H2A2HPS]2+ showed linear relationship with the number of ([H2A2HPS]2++PDDAC)/PSS bilayers, due to the uniform co-deposition of [H2A2HPS]2+ cations into the PDDAC/PSS bilayers. This proves that the AIE fluorophore is an excellent probe for monitoring the layer-by-layer self-assembling processes of the polyelectrolytes on various substrates

  18. Self-Assembly of New Arene-Ruthenium Rectangles Containing Triptycene Building Block and Their Application in Fluorescent Detection of Nitro Aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Abhishek; Mishra, Anurag; Min, Jin Wook; Lee, Min Hyung; Kim, Hyunuk; Stang, Peter J.; Chi, Ki-Whan

    2014-01-01

    A suite of two new tetraruthenium metallarectangles 5 and 6 have been obtained from [2 + 2] self-assemblies between dipyridylethynyltriptycene 2 and one of the two dinuclear arene ruthenium clips, [Ru2 (μ-η4-OO∩OO) (η6-p-cymene)2][OTf]2 ; (OO∩OO = oxalate 3; 6,11-dihydroxy-5,12-naphthacenedionato (dotq) 4; OTf = triflate). These molecular rectangles are fully characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy, electrospray mass spectrometry. A single crystal of 6 was suitable for X-ray diffraction structural characterization. These new metallarectangles showed fluorescence behavior in solution, have been examined for emission quenching effects with various aromatic compounds, and show high quenching selectivity and sensitivity towards nitroaromatics, particularly picric acid and trinitrotoluene. Excited-state charge transfer from the rectangles to nitro aromatic substrates can be used to develop selective fluorescent sensors for nitro aromatics. PMID:26321767

  19. Measurement of Fluorescence in a Rhodamine-123 Doped Self-Assembled “Giant” Mesostructured Silica Sphere Using a Smartphone as Optical Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingemar Petermann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The blue OLED emission from a mobile phone was characterised, revealing a sharp emission band centred at λ = 445 nm with a 3dB bandwidth Δλ ~ 20 nm. It was used to excite Rhodamine 123 doped within a “giant” mesostructured silica sphere during fabrication through evaporative self-assembly of silica nanoparticles. Fluorescence was able to be detected using a standard optical microscope fitted with a green transmission pass filter and cooled CCD and with 1 ms exposure time demonstrating the potential of mobile platforms as the basis for portable diagnostics in the field.

  20. Hybrid nanostructures of well-organized arrays of colloidal quantum dots and a self-assembled monolayer of gold nanoparticles for enhanced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoying; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials comprised of well-organized arrays of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in close proximity to metal nanoparticles (NPs) represent an appealing system for high-performance, spectrum-tunable photon sources with controlled photoluminescence. Experimental realization of such materials requires well-defined QD arrays and precisely controlled QD-metal interspacing. This long-standing challenge is tackled through a strategy that synergistically combines lateral confinement and vertical stacking. Lithographically generated nanoscale patterns with tailored surface chemistry confine the QDs into well-organized arrays with high selectivity through chemical pattern directed assembly, while subsequent coating with a monolayer of close-packed Au NPs introduces the plasmonic component for fluorescence enhancement. The results show uniform fluorescence emission in large-area ordered arrays for the fabricated QD structures and demonstrate five-fold fluorescence amplification for red, yellow, and green QDs in the presence of the Au NP monolayer. Encapsulation of QDs with a silica shell is shown to extend the design space for reliable QD/metal coupling with stronger enhancement of 11 times through the tuning of QD-metal spatial separation. This approach provides new opportunities for designing hybrid nanomaterials with tailored array structures and multiple functionalities for applications such as multiplexed optical coding, color display, and quantum transduction.

  1. Hybrid nanostructures of well-organized arrays of colloidal quantum dots and a self-assembled monolayer of gold nanoparticles for enhanced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoying; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanomaterials comprised of well-organized arrays of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in close proximity to metal nanoparticles (NPs) represent an appealing system for high-performance, spectrum-tunable photon sources with controlled photoluminescence. Experimental realization of such materials requires well-defined QD arrays and precisely controlled QD–metal interspacing. This long-standing challenge is tackled through a strategy that synergistically combines lateral confinement and vertical stacking. Lithographically generated nanoscale patterns with tailored surface chemistry confine the QDs into well-organized arrays with high selectivity through chemical pattern directed assembly, while subsequent coating with a monolayer of close-packed Au NPs introduces the plasmonic component for fluorescence enhancement. The results show uniform fluorescence emission in large-area ordered arrays for the fabricated QD structures and demonstrate five-fold fluorescence amplification for red, yellow, and green QDs in the presence of the Au NP monolayer. Encapsulation of QDs with a silica shell is shown to extend the design space for reliable QD/metal coupling with stronger enhancement of 11 times through the tuning of QD–metal spatial separation. This approach provides new opportunities for designing hybrid nanomaterials with tailored array structures and multiple functionalities for applications such as multiplexed optical coding, color display, and quantum transduction.

  2. Tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein as a scaffold to assemble an octavalent peptide nanoprobe for enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiming; Yang, Jie; Jin, Honglin; Huang, Chuan; Fu, Jianwei; Yang, Fei; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    Relatively weak tumor affinities and short retention time in vivo hinder the application of targeting peptides in tumor molecular imaging. Multivalent strategies based on various scaffolds have been utilized to improve the ability of peptide-receptor binding or extend the clearance time of peptide-based probes. Here, we use a tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein (tfRFP) as a scaffold to create a self-assembled octavalent peptide fluorescent nanoprobe (Octa-FNP) using a genetic engineering approach. The multiligand connecting, fluorophore labeling and nanostructure formation of Octa-FNP were performed in one step. In vitro studies showed Octa-FNP is a 10-nm fluorescent probe with excellent serum stability. Cellular uptake of Octa-FNP by human nasopharyngeal cancer 5-8F cells is 15-fold of tetravalent probe, ∼80-fold of monovalent probe and ∼600-fold of nulvalent tfRFP. In vivo enhanced tumor targeting and intracellular uptake of Octa-FNP were confirmed using optical imaging and Western blot analysis. It achieved extremely high contrast of Octa-FNP signal between tumor tissue and normal organs, especially seldom Octa-FNP detected in liver and spleen. Owing to easy preparation, precise structural and functional control, and multivalent effect, Octa-FNP provides a powerful tool for tumor optical molecular imaging and evaluating the targeting ability of numerous peptides in vivo.

  3. Hierarchical self-assembly of switchable nucleolipid supramolecular gels based on environmentally-sensitive fluorescent nucleoside analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuthanakanti, Ashok; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2016-02-01

    Exquisite recognition and folding properties have rendered nucleic acids as useful supramolecular synthons for the construction of programmable architectures. Despite their proven applications in nanotechnology, scalability and fabrication of nucleic acid nanostructures still remain a challenge. Here, we describe a novel design strategy to construct new supramolecular nucleolipid synthons by using environmentally-sensitive fluorescent nucleoside analogs, based on 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)uracil and 5-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)uracil cores, as the head group and fatty acids, attached to the ribose sugar, as the lipophilic group. These modified nucleoside-lipid hybrids formed organogels driven by hierarchical structures such as fibers, twisted ribbons, helical ribbons and nanotubes, which depended on the nature of fatty acid chain and nucleobase modification. NMR, single crystal X-ray and powder X-ray diffraction studies revealed the coordinated interplay of various non-covalent interactions invoked by modified nucleobase, sugar and fatty acid chains in setting up the pathway for the gelation process. Importantly, these nucleolipid gels retained or displayed aggregation-induced enhanced emission and their gelation behavior and photophysical properties could be reversibly switched by external stimuli such as temperature, ultrasound and chemicals. Furthermore, the switchable nature of nucleolipid gels to chemical stimuli enabled the selective two channel recognition of fluoride and Hg2+ ions through visual phase transition and fluorescence change. Fluorescent organogels exhibiting such a combination of useful features is rare, and hence, we expect that this innovative design of fluorescent nucleolipid supramolecular synthons could lead to the emergence of a new family of smart optical materials and probes.Exquisite recognition and folding properties have rendered nucleic acids as useful supramolecular synthons for the construction of programmable architectures. Despite their

  4. Self-assembly into spheres of a hybrid diphenylalanine-porphyrin: increased fluorescence lifetime and conserved electronic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambidis, Georgios; Kasotakis, Emmanouil; Lazarides, Theodore; Mitraki, Anna; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G

    2011-06-20

    A series of protected phenylalanine and diphenylalanine derivatives have been coupled through a peptide bond to a monoaminoporphyrin to form new materials. A comparative study in solution and in the solid state has been performed and confirmed new and interesting properties for the self-assembled hybrid materials while conserving the electronic properties of the chromophore. Thus, they are powerful candidates for use in dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:21618629

  5. Gelation-induced enhanced fluorescence emission from organogels of salicylanilide-containing compounds exhibiting excited-state intramolecular proton transfer: synthesis and self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Manoj Kumar; Kim, Byung-Hwa; Kwon, Ji Eon; Park, Sanghyuk; Seo, Jangwon; Chung, Jong Won; Park, Soo Young

    2010-07-01

    Self-assembly structure, stability, hydrogen-bonding interaction, and optical properties of a new class of low molecular weight organogelators (LMOGs) formed by salicylanilides 3 and 4 have been investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence, as well as theoretical studies by DFT and semiempirical calculations with CI (AM1/PECI=8) methods. It was found that salicylanilides form gels in nonpolar solvents due to pi-stacking interaction complemented by the presence of both inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The supramolecular arrangement in these organogels predicted by XRD shows lamellar and hexagonal columnar structures for gelators 3 and 4, respectively. Of particular interest is the observation of significant fluorescence enhancement accompanying gelation, which was ascribed to the formation of J-aggregates and inhibition of intramolecular rotation in the gel state. PMID:20491121

  6. Amplified fluorescence detection of adenosine via catalyzed hairpin assembly and host-guest interactions between β-cyclodextrin polymer and pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haihua; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Liu, Jianbo; Song, Chunxia

    2016-04-21

    Nowadays, enzyme-free nucleic acid-based signal amplification strategies are frequently utilized in the design of biosensors due to their excellent sensitivity. Developing more extended analytical methods is fundamental for basic studies in the biological and biomedical fields. Herein, we introduce an enzyme-free amplified detection strategy for the small molecule adenosine. The approach is based on adenosine-aptamer binding triggered catalyzed hairpin assembly and host-guest interactions between β-cyclodextrin polymer (β-CDP) and pyrene. Two hairpin probes (probe H1 and probe H2) and an aptamer-trigger/inhibitor duplex probe were employed in the system and the pyrene-labeled probe H1 was chosen as the signal unit. In the absence of adenosine, the aptamer-trigger was inhibited by the inhibitor strand. The hairpin probes were in the closed hairpin formation without activation of the trigger strand. Pyrene labeled at the 5'-termini of the single-stranded stem of probe H1 could be easily trapped in the hydrophobic cavity of β-CDP because of weak steric hindrance, leading to a significant fluorescence enhancement. Once the hairpin assembly was catalyzed by the adenosine-aptamer binding event, a hybridized DNA duplex H1/H2 was created continuously. Pyrene labeled at the 5'-termini of the DNA duplex H1/H2 finds it difficult to enter the cavity of β-CDP due to steric hindrance, leading to a weaker fluorescence signal. Thus, the target could be detected by this simple mix-and-detect amplification method without a need for expensive and perishable protein enzymes. As low as 42 nM of adenosine was detected by this assay, which is comparable to that of some reported colorimetric methods. Meanwhile, the proposed method was further successfully applied to detect adenosine in human serum samples, showing great potential for adenosine detection from complex fluids.

  7. pH-Sensitive self-assembling nanoparticles for tumor near-infrared fluorescence imaging and chemo-photodynamic combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wenxiu; Zhao, Xin; Qian, Xiaoqing; Pan, Fei; Zhang, Chunlei; Yang, Yuming; de La Fuente, Jesús Martínez; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-12-01

    The development of visual tumor theranostic nanoparticles has become a great challenge. In this study, d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was conjugated to acid-sensitive cis-aconitic anhydride-modified doxorubicin (CAD) to obtain pH-sensitive anti-tumor prodrug nanoparticles (TCAD NPs) via self-assembling. Subsequently, the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) was loaded into the resulting prodrug nanoparticles to prepare a novel tumor near-infrared fluorescence imaging and chemo-photodynamic combination therapy system (TCAD@Ce6 NPs). An accelerated release of doxorubicin (DOX) and chlorin e6 (Ce6) from the TCAD@Ce6 NPs could be achieved due to the hydrolysis of the acid-sensitive amide linker under mild acidic conditions (pH = 5.5). An in vitro experiment showed that A549 lung cancer cells exhibited a significantly higher uptake of DOX and Ce6 by using our delivery system than the free form of DOX and Ce6. An in vivo experiment showed that TCAD@Ce6 NPs displayed better tumor targeting gathering through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect than free Ce6, thus improving fluorescence imaging. Moreover, the chemo-photodynamic combination therapy of TCAD@Ce6 NPs combined with near-infrared laser irradiation was confirmed to be capable of inducing high apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells (A549) in vitro and to display a significantly higher tumor growth suppression in the A549 lung cancer-bearing mice model. Furthermore, compared with exclusive chemotreatment (DOX) or photodynamic treatment (Ce6), our system showed enhanced therapeutic effects both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the high performance TCAD@Ce6 NPs can be used as a promising NIR fluorescence imaging and highly effective chemo-photodynamic system for theranostics of lung cancer, etc. in the near future.The development of visual tumor theranostic nanoparticles has become a great challenge. In this study, d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was

  8. Pentadecyl phenol- and cardanol-functionalized fluorescent, room-temperature liquid-crystalline perylene bisimides: effect of pendant chain unsaturation on self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Ghanashyam A; Asha, S K

    2011-11-01

    A new perylene bisimide (PBI) building block based on pentadecyl phenol (PDP) or cardanol was developed, which upon esterification with 3,4,5-tridodecyloxy gallate resulted in highly emissive, room-temperature liquid-crystalline (LC) molecules. The self assembly in solution was studied in detail by NMR spectroscopy, UV/Vis absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In solution both PDP- and cardanol-based PBI exhibited similar behavior. They were molecularly dissolved in chloroform (CHCl(3)) but formed rotationally displaced H-type aggregates that emitted at 640 nm in methylcyclohexane (MCH). Surface morphology in dropcast films were characterized using microscopic techniques such as SEM, TEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The liquid-crystalline properties were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and variable-temperature X-ray (small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD)) studies. Variable-temperature X-ray studies in the LC phase indicated strong π-π stacking interaction present in the PDP-based PBI derivative, whereas the stacking was absent in the LC phase of the cardanol-based PBI. The latter formed self-organized structures of extremely short length due to the presence of cis double bonds in the C15 alkyl side chain, whereas the saturated alkyl side chain in PDP could pack efficiently, thereby resulting in nanofibers that were several micrometers in length. PMID:21956257

  9. Bright Fluorescence and Host-Guest Sensing with a Nanoscale M₄L₆ Tetrahedron Accessed by Self-Assembly of Zinc-Imine Chelate Vertices and Perylene Bisimide Edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischmann, Peter D; Kunz, Valentin; Würthner, Frank

    2015-06-15

    A highly luminescent Zn4L6 tetrahedron is reported with 3.8 nm perylene bisimide edges and hexadentate Zn(II)-imine chelate vertices. Replacing Fe(II) and monoamines commonly utilized in subcomponent self-assembly with Zn(II) and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine provides access to a metallosupramolecular host with the rare combination of structural integrity at concentrations <10(-7) mol L(-1) and an exceptionally high fluorescence quantum yield of Φ(em) =0.67. Encapsulation of multiple perylene or coronene guest molecules is accompanied by strong luminescence quenching. We anticipate this self-assembly strategy may be generalized to improve access to brightly fluorescent coordination cages tailored for host-guest light-harvesting, photocatalysis, and sensing.

  10. Synthesis of core-fluorescent four-armed star and dicyclic 8-shaped poly(THF)s by electrostatic self-assembly and covalent fixation (ESA–CF) protocol

    KAUST Repository

    Fujiwara, Susumu

    2013-12-07

    A pair of four-armed star and dicyclic 8-shaped poly(tetrahydrofuran)s, poly(THF)s, possessing a perylene diimide group at the core position (Ia and Ib, respectively) were synthesized by means of an electrostatic self-assembly and covalent fixation (ESA–CF) protocol. Mono- and bifunctional poly(THF)s having N-phenylpiperidinium salt end groups accompanying a perylene diimide tetracarboxylate as a counteranion were prepared by the ion-exchange reaction, and the subsequent covalent conversion by reflux in toluene afforded the corresponding core-fluorescent four-armed star and dicyclic 8-shaped poly(THF)s, (Ia and Ib, respectively) for the use of single-molecule fluorescence microscopy measurements.

  11. Modulation of Intracellular Quantum Dot to Fluorescent Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer via Customized Ligands and Spatial Control of Donor–Acceptor Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D. Field

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how to controllably modulate the efficiency of energy transfer in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based assemblies is critical to their implementation as sensing modalities. This is particularly true for sensing assemblies that are to be used as the basis for real time intracellular sensing of intracellular processes and events. We use a quantum dot (QD donor -mCherry acceptor platform that is engineered to self-assemble in situ wherein the protein acceptor is expressed via transient transfection and the QD donor is microinjected into the cell. QD-protein assembly is driven by metal-affinity interactions where a terminal polyhistidine tag on the protein binds to the QD surface. Using this system, we show the ability to modulate the efficiency of the donor–acceptor energy transfer process by controllably altering either the ligand coating on the QD surface or the precise location where the QD-protein assembly process occurs. Intracellularly, a short, zwitterionic ligand mediates more efficient FRET relative to longer ligand species that are based on the solubilizing polymer, poly(ethylene glycol. We further show that a greater FRET efficiency is achieved when the QD-protein assembly occurs free in the cytosol compared to when the mCherry acceptor is expressed tethered to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the latter case, the lower FRET efficiency is likely attributable to a lower expression level of the mCherry acceptor at the membrane combined with steric hindrance. Our work points to some of the design considerations that one must be mindful of when developing FRET-based sensing schemes for use in intracellular sensing.

  12. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  13. Zinc-porphyrins functionalized with redox-active metal peripherals: enhancement of dπ-pπ interaction leading to unique assembly and redox-triggered remote switching of fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Masahito; Sugimoto, Manabu; Akita, Munetaka

    2013-12-01

    Novel porphyrin-MCp*(dppe) conjugates with the acetylene linker, por-C≡CMCp*(dppe) (por = (5,15-diarylporphinato)zinc(II), Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5, dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane; M/aryl = Fe/phenyl (1), Fe/3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl (2), Ru/phenyl (3)), are synthesized. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies combined with electrochemical investigations reveal strong interactions between the porphyrin moieties and the electron-donating MCp*(dppe) fragments. Oxidation of the porphyrin core of the iron conjugate 1 generates the dication radical 1(2+), which is spontaneously associated with its mono-cationic counterpart 1(+) to form the stable π-radical trication dimer [1(2)](3+), whereas complexes 2 and 3 undergo simple oxidation without forming such dimers. Furthermore, intramolecular charge transfer between the porphyrin rings and the MCp*(dppe) fragments causes the appearance of a charge transfer absorption band in the visible region. It is also found that fluorescence derived from the porphyrin rings is quenched upon oxidation via intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer from the MCp*(dppe) moieties to the porphyrin chromophores in the excited states. The emission is recovered by subsequent reduction of the MCp*(dppe) fragments. Thus, the fluorescence from the porphyrin moieties is switched off and on upon oxidation and subsequent reduction, respectively. The iron acetylide complex 1 can assemble with nitrogen-donors including pyridine and DABCO as well as a π-acceptor, naphthalenediimide, to provide the nano-sized stacking structures which are detected by NMR. PMID:24008592

  14. Four 1-D metal-organic polymers self-assembled from semi-flexible benzimidazole-based ligand: Syntheses, structures and fluorescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun-lin; Wang, Shi-min; Liu, Sai-nan; Yu, Tian-tian; Li, Rui-ying; Xu, Hong; Liu, Zhong-yi; Sun, Huan; Cheng, Jia-jia; Li, Jin-peng; Hou, Hong-wei; Chang, Jun-biao

    2016-08-01

    Four one-dimensional (1-D) metal-organic polymers based on methylene-bis(1,1‧-benzimidazole)(mbbz), namely, {[Hg(mbbz)(SCN)2]·1/3H2O}n (1), [Co(mbbz)(Cl)2]n (2), {[Co(mbbz)(SO4)]·CH3OH}n (3) and {[Zn(mbbz)(SO4)]·CH3OH}n (4) have been successfully synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that polymers 1 and 2 exhibit interesting 1-D double helical chain structures, while polymers 3 and 4 are 1-D double chain structures due to the bridging effect of mbbz ligands and sulfate anions. These polymers containing the mbbz-based ligand have a high degree of dependence on the corresponding counter anions. Furthermore, the fluorescence properties of the four polymers were also investigated in the solid state, showing the fluorescence signal changes in comparing with that of free ligand mbbz.

  15. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo. PMID:27299677

  16. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly with plasmid DNA of a quaternary ammonium derivative of pectic galactan and its fluorescent labeling for bioimaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintakunta, Ramesh; Buaron, Nitsa; Kahn, Nicole; Moriah, Amana; Lifshiz, Rinat; Goldbart, Riki; Traitel, Tamar; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry; Kost, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Quaternized derivatives of pectic galactan (QPG) were synthesized by a reaction of pectic galactan (PG) with 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CHPTAC) in the presence of aqueous sodium hydroxide solution under mild reaction conditions. The results showed that the concentration of CHPTAC and NaOH has great impact on the quaternization reaction. QPG was found to interact electrostatically with plasmid DNA in aqueous solution to form complexes in globular condensed morphology in a nanometer scale size ranging from 60 to 160nm. Complexes formed with QPG fluorescently labeled with 5-DTAF (QPG-5-DTAF) were introduced to the C6 rat glioma cell line, and were found to be able to enter the cell and approach the nucleus within 24h. The results suggest that this type of modified natural polysaccharide may have an advantage as a biocompatible and biodegradable gene delivery carrier and furthermore may serve as a cell specific carrier. PMID:27312642

  18. Enzyme-Directed Assembly of Nanoparticles in Tumors Monitored by In Vivo Whole Animal and Ex Vivo Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Miao-Ping; Carlini, Andrea S.; Hu, Dehong; Barback, Christopher V.; Rush, Anthony M.; Hall, David J.; Orr, Galya; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2013-12-18

    Matrix metalloproteinase enzymes, overexpressed in HT-1080 human fibrocarcinoma tumors, were used to guide the accumulation and retention of an enzyme-responsive nanoparticle in a xenograft mouse model. The nanoparticles were prepared as micelles from amphiphilic block copolymers bearing a simple hydrophobic block, and a hydrophilic peptide brush. The polymers were end-labeled with Alexa Fluor 647 dyes leading to the formation of labeled micelles upon dialysis of the polymers from DMSO to aqueous buffer. This dye-labeling strategy allowed the presence of the retained material to be visualized via whole animal imaging in vivo, and in ex vivo organ analysis following intratumoral injection into HT-1080 xenograft tumors. We propose that the material is retained by virtue of an enzyme-induced accumulation process whereby particles change morphology from 20 nm spherical micelles to micron-scale aggregates, kinetically trapping them within the tumor. This hypothesis is tested here via an unprecedented super resolution fluorescence analysis of ex vivo tissue slices confirming a particle size increase occurs concomitantly with extended retention of responsive particles compared to unresponsive controls.

  19. Evidence for covalent binding of epicocconone with proteins from synchronous fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetimes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashis Panda; Anindya Datta

    2007-03-01

    Synchronous fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic studies that reveal the interaction of epicocconone with human serum albumin is significantly different from its interaction with surfactant assemblies. This observation, along with steady-state fluorescence data, indicates groundstate interaction between the fluorophore epicocconone and the protein. Similarity in fluorescence properties with the adduct of the fluorophore with -butylamine indicates that bonding occurs at the Nterminus of the protein.

  20. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  1. J Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Nietfeld, W; A. Engel; Neukammer, J.; Nitschke, R.; Ebert, P.; Macdonald, R

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to illustrate the need for an improved quality assurance in fluorometry. For this purpose, instrumental sources of error and their influences on the reliability and comparability of fluorescence data are highlighted for frequently used photoluminescence techniques ranging from conventional macro- and microfluorometry over fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to microarray technology as well as in vivo fluorescence imaging. Particularly, the need for and requir...

  2. Fluorescent refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  3. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria;

    2009-01-01

    and plays an important role in processing the information generated by these methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current publicly available sequence assembly programs. We describe the basic principles of computational assembly along with the main concerns, such as repetitive sequences...

  4. Analyzing Intracellular Binding and Diffusion with Continuous Fluorescence Photobleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Wachsmuth, Malte; Weidemann, Thomas; Müller, Gabriele; Hoffmann-Rohrer, Urs W.; Knoch, Tobias A.; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Transport and binding of molecules to specific sites are necessary for the assembly and function of ordered supramolecular structures in cells. For analyzing these processes in vivo, we have developed a confocal fluorescence fluctuation microscope that allows both imaging of the spatial distribution of fluorescent molecules with confocal laser scanning microscopy and probing their mobility at specific positions in the cell with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and continuous fluorescence...

  5. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  6. Furnace assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  7. Fluorescence of dyes adsorbed on highly organized nanostructured gold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Stefano A.; Mourran, Ahmed; Spatz, Joachim P.; Veggel, van Frank C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Möller, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that fluorescent dyes can be adsorbed selectively on gold nanoparticles which are immobilized on a glass substrate and that the fluorescence originating from the adsorbed dyes exhibits significantly less quenching when compared to dyes adsorbed on bulk gold. Self-assembled monolayers of

  8. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  9. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  10. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  11. Heater assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrical resistance heater, installed in the H1 borehole, is used to thermally perturb the rock mass through a controlled heating and cooling cycle. Heater power levels are controlled by a Variac power transformer and are measured by wattmeters. Temperatures are measured by thermocouples on the borehole wall and on the heater assembly. Power and temperature values are recorded by the DAS described in Chapter 12. The heater assembly consists of a 3.55-m (11.6-ft) long by 20.3-cm (8-in.) O.D., Type 304 stainless steel pipe, containing a tubular hairpin heating element. The element has a heated length of 3 m (9.84 ft). The power rating of the element is 10 kW; however, we plan to operate the unit at a maximum power of only 3 kW. The heater is positioned with its midpoint directly below the axis of the P2 borehole, as shown in the borehole configuration diagram. This heater midpoint position corresponds to a distance of approximately 8.5 m (27.9 ft) from the H1 borehole collar. A schematic of the heater assembly in the borehole is shown. The distance from the borehole collar to the closest point on the assembly (the front end) is 6.5 m (21.3 ft). A high-temperature inflatable packer, used to seal the borehole for moisture collection, is positioned 50 cm (19.7 in.) ahead of the heater front end. The heater is supported and centralized within the borehole by two skids, fabricated from 25-mm (1-in.) O.D. stainless steel pipe. Thermocouples are installed at a number of locations in the H1 borehole. Four thermocouples that are attached to the heater skin monitor temperatures on the outer surface of the can, while three thermocouples that are held in place by rock sections monitor borehole wall temperatures beneath the heater. Temperatures are also monitored at the heater terminal and on the packer hardware

  12. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. PMID:26773303

  13. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  14. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  15. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  16. Molecular Component Structures Mediated Formation of Self-assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular recognition directed self-assemblies from complementary molecular components, melamine and barbituric acid derivatives were studied by means of NMR, fluorescence, and TEM. It was found that both the process of the self-assembly and the morphologies of the result ed self-assemblies could be mediated by modifying the structures of the molecular components used. The effect of the structures of the molecular components on the formation of the self-as semblies was discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions.

  17. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  18. Fabrication of fluorescent chitosan-containing microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang R.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intense emission peaks of Eu(DBM3Phen (DBM and Phen are dibenzoylmethane and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively in the microcapsules containing molecules of quaternary ammonium chitosan (QACS and sodium alginate are observed. The microcapsules are assembled by using CaCO3 particles as template cores by the layer-by-layer (LbL technique. Observation of microcapsules by the fluorescence mode and the transmission mode in the confocal laser scanning microscopy shows that the microcapsules are intact after core decomposition. Fluorescence under ultraviolet irradiation comes directly from the Eu(DBM3Phen. Homogeneous assembly of Eu(DBM3Phen can be deduced due to the homogeneous fluorescence of the microcapsules in the fluorescence micrographs. The microcapsules show adherence to solid substrates due to large quantities of hydroxyl groups of QACS. AFM measurements of dried hollow microcapsules with only 4 bilayers of (CS/SA fabricated with Eu(DBM3Phen show the intact shell with a thickness of 3.0 nm. Regarding the biocompatible natural polysaccharides and the intense fluorescence emission, the microcapsules in this work might be of great importance in potential application in drug delivery and bioassay.

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution of a fuel assembly in which short fuel rods vary greatly in the vicinity of a boundary where the distribution of uranium amount is different, the reading value of local power range monitors, having the detectors positioned in the vicinity of the boundary is varied. Then in the present invention, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rod is so made as not approaching with the detection position of the local power range monitor in a reactor core. Further, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rods in a 4 x 4 fuel rod lattice positioned at the corner on the side of the local power range monitor is so made as not approaching the detection position of the local power range monitor. As a result, the change of the neutron flux distribution and power distribution in the vicinity of the position where the detector of the local power range monitor is situated can be extremely reduced. Accordingly, there is no scattering and fluctuation for the reading value by the local power range monitor, to improve the monitoring performance for thermal characteristics in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reconstruct a BWR type reactor into a high conversion reactor with no substantial changes for the reactor inner structure such as control rod structure. Constitution: The horizontal cross sectional shape of a channel box is reformed into a square configuration and the arrangement of fuel rods is formed as a trigonal lattice-like configuration. As a method of improving the conversion ratio, there is considered to use a dense lattice by narrowing the distance between fuel rods and trigonal lattice arrangement for fuel rod is advantageous therefor. A square shape cross sectional configuration having equal length both in the lateral and longitudinal directions is suitable for the channel box as a guide upon movement of the control rod. Fuel rods can be arranged with no loss by the trigonal lattice configuration, by which it is possible to improve the neutron moderation, increase the reactor core reactivity and conduct effective fuel combustion. In this way, it is possible to attain the object by inserting the follower portion of the control rod at the earier half and extracting the same at the latter half during the operation period in the reactor core comprising fuel assemblies suitable to a high conversion BWR type reactor having average conversion ratio of about 0.8. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  2. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  3. Fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the construction and characterisation of fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins used as building blocks for the fabrication of nanostructured monomolecular biocoatings on silica particles with defined fluorescence properties. The S-layer protein SgsE of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a was fused with the pH-dependant cyan, green and yellow variant of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the red fluorescent protein mRFP1. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins, acting as scaffold and optical sensing element simultaneously, were able to reassemble in solution and on silica particles forming 2D nanostructures with p2 lattice symmetry (a=11 ±0.5 nm, b=14 ±0.4 nm, g=80 ±1o). The pH-dependant fluorescence behaviour was studied with fluorimetry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins can be used as pH-sensor. 50% of the fluorescence intensity decreases at their calculated pKa values (pH6 - pH5). The fluorescence intensity of the GFP variants vanished completely between pH4 and pH3 whereas the chromophore of the red protein mRFP1 was only slightly affected in acidic conditions. At the isoelectric point of the S-layer coated silica particles (pH4.6 ±0.2) an increase in particle aggregation was detected by flow cytometry. The cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins were chosen to create a bi-fluorescent S-layer tandem fusion protein with the possibility for resonance energy transfer (FRET). A transfer efficiency of 20% and a molecular distance between the donor (ECFP) and acceptor (YFP) chromophores of around 6.2 nm could be shown. This bi-fluorescent ECFP-SgsE-YFP tandem fusion protein was able to reassemble on solid surfaces. The remarkable combination of fluorescence and self-assembly and the design of bi-functional S-layer tandem fusion protein matrices makes them to a promising tool in nanobiotechnology. (author)

  4. Diurnal variations in leaf fluorescence induction kinetics: variable fluorescence in crassulacean Acid metabolism plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, G; Chen, S S; Black, C C

    1983-06-01

    The variable fluorescence of leaves from Kalanchoë daigremontiana and pineapple, Ananas comosus, both CAM plants, was found to change over a 24-hour cycle and to exhibit high temperature-dependent maxima during the night period. The time course of the induced fluorescence was correlated with malic acid accumulation but not with other aspects of CAM such as with the nature of the decarboxylation pathway or with stomatal movements. The variable fluorescences of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and corn (Zea mays L.) leaves were compared with the CAM plants diurnally; both plants also exhibit high fluorescence maxima during the night period. We conclude that the assembly of the photosystems in the light is a primary process in photosynthesis induction and may be influenced by other cellular metabolic processes, specifically in the case of CAM leaves by malic acid accumulation. PMID:16663024

  5. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hink

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  6. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  7. Multiparameter fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Gary R.

    1994-08-01

    The ability to quantitate physiological parameters in single living cells using fluorescence spectroscopic imaging has expanded our understanding of many cell regulatory processes. Previous studies have focussed on the measurement of single parameters, such as the concentration of calcium, and more recently two parameters, such as calcium and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging. The complexity of the interrelationships among cell biochemical reactions suggests a need to extend the measurement scheme to several parameters. Expansion of the number of parameters involves several complexities associated with fluorescent probe selection and instrumentation design as well as the processing and management of the data. A system has been assembled which provides maximum flexibility in multiparameter fluorescence imaging measurements. The system provides multiple combinations of excitation, dichroic mirror, and emission wavelengths. It has automatic acquisition of any number of parameters. The number of parameters is primarily limited by the selection of fluorescent probes with nonoverlapping spectra. We demonstrate the utility of the system by the coordinated monitoring of stimulated changes in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and pH using fluorescence ratio imaging coupled with a conventional transmitted light image of single smooth muscle cells. The results demonstrate coordinated changes in some instances but uncoordinated changes in others.

  8. Self and directed assembly: people and molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Tony D

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly and directed-assembly are two very important aspects of supramolecular chemistry. As a young postgraduate student working in Canada with Tom Fyles my introduction to Supramolecular Chemistry was through the self-assembly of phospholipid membranes to form vesicles for which we were developing unimolecular and self-assembling transporter molecules. The next stage of my development as a scientist was in Japan with Seiji Shinkai where in a "Eureka" moment, the boronic acid templating unit (directed-assembly) of Wulff was combined with photoinduced electron transfer systems pioneered by De Silva. The result was a turn-on fluorescence sensor for saccharides; this simple result has continued to fuel my research to the present day. Throughout my career as well as assembling molecules, I have enjoyed bringing together researchers in order to develop collaborative networks. This is where molecules meet people resulting in assemblies worth more than the individual "molecule" or "researcher". My role in developing networks with Japan was rewarded by the award of a Daiwa-Adrian Prize in 2013 and I was recently rewarded for developing networks with China with an Inaugural CASE Prize in 2015. PMID:27340435

  9. Probe tip heating assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  10. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  11. Inlet nozzle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Precechtel, Donald R.; Smith, Bob G.; Knight, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  12. Measurement of in vitro microtubule polymerization by turbidity and fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirigian, Matthew; Mukherjee, Kamalika; Bane, Susan L; Sackett, Dan L

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin polymerization may be conveniently monitored by the increase in turbidity (optical density, or OD) or by the increase in fluorescence intensity of diamidino-phenylindole. The resulting data can be a quantitative measure of microtubule (MT) assembly, but some care is needed in interpretation, especially of OD data. Buffer formulations used for the assembly reaction significantly influence the polymerization, both by altering the critical concentration for polymerization and by altering the exact polymer produced-for example, by increasing the production of sheet polymers in addition to MT. Both the turbidity and the fluorescence methods are useful for demonstrating the effect of MT-stabilizing or -destabilizing additives.

  13. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  14. Cyclodextrin nanoaggregates and their assembly with protein: a spectroscopic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, N.; Villari, V.; Mazzaglia, A.; Monsú Scolaro, L.; Valerio, A.; Rencurosi, A.; Lay, L.

    2006-07-01

    Light scattering and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy results showed that specially designed amphiphilic cyclodextrins are able to bind a specific protein, PA-I lectin. When containing a galactosyl group, the self-assembled cyclodextrins interact with the protein affecting the dynamical properties of the system and the fluorescence lifetimes (as well as the fluorescence anisotropy) of the protein itself. The self-assembled cyclodextrins containing a glucosyl group, on the other hand, do not induce any change in these measured quantities, suggesting no interaction with protein. This binding capability of galactosyl-modified cyclodextrins offers perspectives on exploiting self-assembled supramolecular structures as nano-carriers to deliver drugs to target tissues.

  15. Cyclodextrin nanoaggregates and their assembly with protein: a spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micali, N [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Via La Farina 237, I-98123, Messina (Italy); Villari, V [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Via La Farina 237, I-98123, Messina (Italy); Mazzaglia, A [CNR-Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati, c/o Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica, Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo Salita Sperone 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Scolaro, L Monsu [Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica, Chimica Analitica e Chimica Fisica and CIRCMSB, Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo Salita Sperone 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Valerio, A [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ed Industriale, Universita di Milano, Via G Venezian 21, 20133, Milan (Italy); Rencurosi, A [CNR-Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Via C Golgi 19, 20133 Milan (Italy); Lay, L [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ed Industriale, Universita di Milano, Via G Venezian 21, 20133, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-14

    Light scattering and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy results showed that specially designed amphiphilic cyclodextrins are able to bind a specific protein, PA-I lectin. When containing a galactosyl group, the self-assembled cyclodextrins interact with the protein affecting the dynamical properties of the system and the fluorescence lifetimes (as well as the fluorescence anisotropy) of the protein itself. The self-assembled cyclodextrins containing a glucosyl group, on the other hand, do not induce any change in these measured quantities, suggesting no interaction with protein. This binding capability of galactosyl-modified cyclodextrins offers perspectives on exploiting self-assembled supramolecular structures as nano-carriers to deliver drugs to target tissues.

  16. Assembly plans for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assembly of ITER represents an extrapolation of a factor of two or more in size over existing large tokamaks. An assembly plan has been developed based on the ITER Outline Design. This plan was reviewed by technical experts and critical issues were identified. Alternate designs are being developed to address the most serious concerns and to minimize cost and assembly schedule. Because ITER has many characteristics of a full-scale nuclear reactor its assembly has challenges not faced previously by the fusion community. Careful assembly planning and well-designed tooling are required to insure success in the assembly of ITER

  17. Firearm trigger assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  18. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  19. Use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Zhao, Xueqiang; Weber, Marion; Jantti, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    Visualization of protein-protein interactions in vivo offers a powerful tool to resolve spatial and temporal aspects of cellular functions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) makes use of nonfluorescent fragments of green fluorescent protein or its variants that are added as "tags" to target proteins under study. Only upon target protein interaction is a fluorescent protein complex assembled and the site of interaction can be monitored by microscopy. In this chapter, we describe the method and tools for use of BiFC in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19066026

  20. Spontaneous Assembly of Exopolymers from Phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Xue Ding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton exopolymeric substances (EPS contribute significantly to the dissolved organic car bon (DOC pool in the ocean, playing crucial roles in the surface ocean car bon cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that ~10% of marine DOC can self-assemble as microgels through electro static Ca bonds providing hotspots of enriched microbial substrate. How ever, the question whether EPS can self-assemble and the formation mechanisms for EPS microgels have not been examined. Here were port that EPS from three representative phytoplankton species, Synechococcus, Emiliania huxleyi, and Skeletonema costatum can spontaneously self assemble in artificial sea water (ASW, forming microscopic gels of ~ 3 - 4 _ in diameter. Different from the marine DOC polymers assembly, these EPS samples can self-assemble in Ca2+-free ASW. Further experiments from fluorescence enhancement and chemical composition analysis confirmed the existence of fair amounts of hydrophobic domains in these EPS samples. These results suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a key role in the assembly of EPS from these three species of marine phytoplankton.

  1. Self-assembled helical nanostructures from an asymmetrical perylene diimide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Ying Yang; Min Min Shi; Mang Wang; Hong Zheng Chen

    2008-01-01

    An asymmetrical perylene diimide 3,N-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N'-(4-nitrophenyl)-perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide,was synthesized,and its self-assembly and dissociation behaviors in chloroform was studied in detail bv UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies.The resulting unique helical nanostructures from 3 were proposed to be self-assembled via the cooperative actions of π-π stacking,steric hindrance and electrophile-nucleophile type pairing.

  2. Location deterministic biosensing from quantum-dot-nanowire assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chao; Kim, Kwanoh; Fan, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with high fluorescent brightness, stability, and tunable sizes, have received considerable interest for imaging, sensing, and delivery of biomolecules. In this research, we demonstrate location deterministic biochemical detection from arrays of QD-nanowire hybrid assemblies. QDs with diameters less than 10 nm are manipulated and precisely positioned on the tips of the assembled Gold (Au) nanowires. The manipulation mechanisms are quantitatively ...

  3. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  4. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  5. Analyzing Intracellular Binding and Diffusion with Continuous Fluorescence Photobleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Malte; Weidemann, Thomas; Müller, Gabriele; Hoffmann-Rohrer, Urs W.; Knoch, Tobias A.; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Transport and binding of molecules to specific sites are necessary for the assembly and function of ordered supramolecular structures in cells. For analyzing these processes in vivo, we have developed a confocal fluorescence fluctuation microscope that allows both imaging of the spatial distribution of fluorescent molecules with confocal laser scanning microscopy and probing their mobility at specific positions in the cell with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and continuous fluorescence photobleaching (CP). Because fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is restricted to rapidly diffusing particles and CP to slower processes, these two methods complement each other. For the analysis of binding-related contributions to mobility we have derived analytical expressions for the temporal behavior of CP curves from which the bound fraction and/or the dissociation rate or residence time at binding sites, respectively, can be obtained. In experiments, we investigated HeLa cells expressing different fluorescent proteins: Although enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) shows high mobility, fusions of histone H2B with the yellow fluorescent protein are incorporated into chromatin, and these nuclei exhibit the presence of a stably bound and a freely diffusing species. Nonpermanent binding was found for mTTF-I, a transcription termination factor for RNA polymerase I, fused with EGFP. The cells show fluorescent nucleoli, and binding is transient. CP yields residence times for mTTF-I-EGFP of ∼13 s. PMID:12719264

  6. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  7. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  8. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  9. Fluorescence in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Victoria L.; Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Intrater, Nurit; Vigneron, Jean-Pol

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules are much in demand for biosensors, solar cells, LEDs and VCSEL diodes, therefore, considerable efforts have been expended in designing and tailoring fluorescence to specific technical applications. However, naturally occurring fluorescence of diverse types has been reported from a wide array of living organisms: most famously, the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, but also in over 100 species of coral and in the cuticle of scorpions, where it is the rule, rather than the exception. Despite the plethora of known insect species, comparatively few quantitative studies have been made of insect fluorescence. Because of the potential applications of natural fluorescence, studies in this field have relevance to both physics and biology. Therefore, in this paper, we review the literature on insect fluorescence, before documenting its occurrence in the longhorn beetles Sternotomis virescens, Sternotomis variabilis var. semi rufescens, Anoplophora elegans and Stellognatha maculata, the tiger beetles Cicindela maritima and Cicindela germanica and the weevil Pachyrrhynchus gemmatus purpureus. Optical features of insect fluorescence, including emitted wavelength, molecular ageing and naturally occurring combinations of fluorescence with bioluminescence and colour-producing structures are discussed.

  10. Fluorescence of atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1967-01-01

    Purified atopic allergens have been found to emit flue fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light of 365 mμ wavelength. The maximum of fluorescence is in the region 445–490 mμ and the intensity is of the same order of magnitude for different atopic allergens. Synthetic model compounds, inc

  11. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  12. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  13. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  14. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  15. Assembly of ISX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, N.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Impurity Study Experiment, a moderate size tokamak, was recently assembled at ORNL. Demountable toroidal field coils allowed for the assembly of major components at remote locations and rapid installation into ISX. A discharge cleaning plasma was generated in ISX six weeks after the arrival of the final toroidal field coil. A chronological summary of the assembly is presented, emphasizing features designed to aid in assembly and maintenance. A cross-section of the machine showing the major mechanical components to be discussed is given.

  16. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  17. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  18. Anabaena cell ageing monitored with confocal fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shan; Bindokas, Vytas; Haselkorn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria use a sophisticated system of pigments to collect light energy across the visible spectrum for photosynthesis. The pigments are assembled in structures called phycobilisomes, composed of phycoerythrocyanin, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, which absorb energy and transfer it to chlorophyll in photosystem II reaction centres. All of the components of this system are fluorescent, allowing sensitive measurements of energy transfer using single cell confocal fluorescence microscopy. The native pigments can be interrogated without the use of reporters. Here, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy to monitor changes in the efficiency of energy transfer as single cells age, between the time they are born at cell division until they are ready to divide again. Alteration of fluorescence was demonstrated to change with the age of the cyanobacterial cell.

  19. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz;

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  20. Assembly of primary cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Veland, Iben R; Schrøder, Jacob M;

    2008-01-01

    in primary cilia assembly or function have been associated with a panoply of disorders and diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, left-right asymmetry defects, hydrocephalus, and Bardet Biedl Syndrome. Here we provide an up-to-date review focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly...

  1. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  2. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  3. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  4. Constrained space camera assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  5. Plasmonic Molecular Nanohybrids—Spectral Dependence of Fluorescence Quenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olejnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate strong spectral dependence of the efficiency of fluorescence quenching in molecular systems composed of organic dyes and gold nanoparticles. In order to probe the coupling with metallic nanoparticles we use dyes with varied spectral overlap between the plasmon resonance and their absorption. Hybrid molecular structures were obtained via conjugation of metallic nanoparticles with the dyes using biotin-streptavidin linkage. For dyes featuring absorption above the plasmon excitation in gold nanoparticles, laser excitation induces minute changes in the fluorescence intensity and its lifetime for both conjugated and non-conjugated mixtures, which are the reference. In contrast, when the absorption of the dye overlaps with the plasmon resonance, the effect is quite dramatic, reaching 85% and 95% fluorescence quenching for non-conjugated and conjugated mixtures, respectively. The degree of fluorescence quenching strongly depends upon the concentration of metallic nanoparticles. Importantly, the origin of the fluorescence quenching is different in the case of the conjugated mixture, as evidenced by time-resolved fluorescence. For conjugated mixtures of dyes resonant with plasmon, excitation features two-exponential decay. This is in contrast to the single exponential decay measured for the off-resonant configuration. The results provide valuable insight into spectral dependence of the fluorescence quenching in molecular assemblies involving organic dyes and metallic nanoparticles.

  6. Ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed by rolling circle amplification and catalytic hairpin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiling; Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Wenbo

    2015-02-11

    An ultrasensitive protocol for fluorescent detection of DNA is designed by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) with Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) and Catalytic Hairpin Assembly (CHA), showing a remarkable amplification efficiency.

  7. Phycobiliprotein fusion proteins: versatile intensely fluorescent constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping A.; Tooley, Aaron J.

    2004-06-01

    Since 1982, phycobiliproteins have served as fluorescent labels in a wide variety of cell and molecule analyses. The exceptional spectroscopic properties of these labels include very high absorbance coefficients and quantum yields, and large Stokes shifts. The spectroscopic diversity of these reagents is restricted to a subset of naturally occurring phycobiliproteins with stable assembly states in vitro, whose target specificity is generated by chemical conjugation to proteins or small molecules. The latter step generates heterogeneity. These limitations have been overcome by expressing various recombinant phycobiliprotein constructs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Modular recombinant phycobiliprotein-based labels were constructed with some or all of the following features (a) an affinity purification tag; (b) a stable oligomerization domain (to maintain stable higher order assemblies of the phycobiliprotein monomers at very low protein concentration); (c) a biospecific recognition domain. Such phycobiliprotein constructs are readily purified from crude cell extracts by affinity chromatography and used directly as fluorescent labels. To generate constructs for intracellular in vivo labeling, the entire pathways for the biosynthesis of the His-tagged holo- α (phycocyanobilin-bearing) subunit of phycocyanin (emission max. 641 nm) and of the His-tagged holo-α (phycobiliviolin-bearing) subunit of phycoerythrocyanin (emission max. 582 nm) were reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

  8. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Fe3O4/CdTe Magnetic/Fluorescent Nanocomposites and their Applications in Immuno-labeling and Fluorescent Imaging of Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Pan; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Chang; Fang, Jin; WANG, Meng; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jingpu; Mao, Chuanbin; Xu, Shukun

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of a new kind of magnetic, fluorescent multifunctional nanoparticles (~30 nm in diameter) was demonstrated, where multiple fluorescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) are covalently linked to and assembled around individual silica-coated superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and active carboxylic groups are presented on the surface for easy bioconjugation with biomolecules. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were firstly functionalized with thiol groups, followed by chemical conjugation with multi...

  10. DC source assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  11. Steam separator latch assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  12. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  13. Spent fuel assembly hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When spent nuclear fuel is disposed of in a repository, the waste package will include the spent fuel assembly hardware, the structural portion of the fuel assembly, and the fuel pins. The spent fuel assembly hardware is the subject of this paper. The basic constituent parts of the fuel assembly will be described with particular attention on the materials used in their construction. The results of laboratory analyses performed to determine radionuclide inventories and trace impurities also will be described. Much of this work has been incorporated into a US Department of Energy (DOE) database maintained by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This database is documented in DOE/RW-0184 and can be obtained from Karl Notz at ORNL. The database provides a single source for information regarding wastes that may be sent to the repository

  14. High speed door assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, C.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  15. Assemblies of gold icosahedra

    OpenAIRE

    Bilalbegovic, G.

    2004-01-01

    Low-dimensional free-standing aggregates of bare gold clusters are studied by the molecular dynamics simulation. Icosahedra of 55 and 147 atoms are equilibrated at T=300 K. Then, their one- and two-dimensional assemblies are investigated. It is found that icosahedra do not coalescence into large drops, but stable amorphous nanostructures are formed: nanowires for one-dimensional and nanofilms for two-dimensional assemblies. The high-temperature stability of these nanostructures is also invest...

  16. FLEX: fluorescence explorer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoll, M.Ph.; Court, A.J.; Smorenburg, C.; Visser, H.; Crocco, L.; Heilimo, J.; Honig, A.

    1999-01-01

    FLEX is a scientifically driven space mission to provide demonstration/validation of the instrumentation and technique for measuring the natural fluorescence of vegetation in the Fraunhofer lines. The payload consists of high spectral resolution (0.1-0.3 nm) CCD imaging grating spectrometer with two

  17. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  18. Ultraviolet fluorescence monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Preppernau, B.L.; Aragon, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Laser, Optics and Remote Sensing Dept.

    1997-05-01

    A multispectral ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence imaging fluorometer and a pulsed molecular beam laser fluorometer were developed to detect volatile organic compounds of interest in environmental monitoring and drug interdiction applications. The UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer is a relatively simple instrument which uses multiple excitation wavelengths to measure the excitation/emission matrix for irradiated samples. Detection limits in the high part-per-million to low part-per-million range were measured for a number of volatile organic vapors in the atmosphere. Detection limits in the low part-per-million range were obtained using cryogenic cooling to pre-concentrate unknown samples before introducing them into the imaging fluorometer. A multivariate analysis algorithm was developed to analyze the excitation/emission matrix and used to determine the relative concentrations of species in computer synthesized mixtures containing up to five organic compounds. Analysis results demonstrated the utility of multispectral UV fluorescence in analytical measurements. A transportable UV fluorescence imaging fluorometer was used in two field tests. Field test results demonstrated that detection limits in the part-per-billion range were needed to reliably identify volatile organic compounds in realistic field test measurements. The molecular beam laser fluorometer, a more complex instrument with detection limits in the part-per-billion to part-per-trillion range, was therefore developed to satisfy detection sensitivity requirements for field test measurements. High-resolution spectroscopic measurements made with the molecular beam laser fluorometer demonstrated its utility in identifying volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  19. Assembly and testing of microparticle and microcapsule smart tattoo materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Microscale biochemical sensors are attractive for in vitro diagnostics and disease management, as well as medical and biological research applications. Fluorescent sensors, coupling specific glucose-binding proteins with fluorescent readout methods, have been developed for this purpose. Our work has focused on the development of assembly and packaging systems for producing micro- and nanoscale sensing components that can be used as implants, intracellular reporters, or as elements in larger systems. Both hybrid organic/inorganic particles and hollow microshells have been developed to physically couple the sensing materials together in biocompatible, semipermeable packages. Fabrication details and sensor characterization are used to demonstrate the potential of these sensor concepts.

  20. Cyanobacterial phycobilisomes: Selective dissociation monitored by fluorescence and circular dichroism

    OpenAIRE

    Rigbi, Meir; Rosinski, Joanne; Siegelman, Harold W.; Sutherland, John Clark

    1980-01-01

    Phycobilisomes are supramolecular assemblies of phycobiliproteins responsible for photosynthetic light collection in red algae and cyanobacteria. They can be selectively dissociated by reduction of temperature and buffer concentration. Phycobilisomes isolated from Fremyella diplosiphon transfer energy collected by C-phycoerythrin and C-phycocyanin to allophycocyanin. The energy transfer to allophycocyanin is nearly abolished at 2°C, as indicated by a blue shift in fluorescence emission, and i...

  1. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  2. An update on complex I assembly: the assembly of players

    OpenAIRE

    Vartak, Rasika S.; Semwal, Manpreet Kaur; Bai, Yidong

    2014-01-01

    Defects in Complex I assembly is one of the emerging underlying causes of severe mitochondrial disorders. The assembly of Complex I has been difficult to understand due to its large size, dual genetic control and the number of proteins involved. Mutations in Complex I subunits as well as assembly factors have been reported to hinder its assembly and give rise to a range of mitochondria disorders. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in understanding the Complex I assembly pat...

  3. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationship...

  4. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  6. Interest of Fluorescence Derivatization and Fluorescence Probe Assisted Post-column Detection of Phospholipids: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratrice Prognon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipids are essential constituents of all living cell membranes. There are many analytical methods available for the quantitative and qualitative determination of phospholipids, but since these molecules lack chromophores, common absorbance based methods are of limited use. Beside mass spectrometry, some less specific approaches that are routinely used are evaporative light scattering detection or fluorescence, which exhibit sufficient sensitivity. Here, we focus on fluorescence, which remains an interesting way to quantify phospholipids. Two ways of detecting phospholipids by fluorescence are possible coupled with separation techniques such as thin layer chromatography (TLC, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and capillary electrophoresis (CE: firstly, pre-column derivatization procedures and secondly, probe assisted post-column detection with suitable fluorescence reagents. In both cases, the common purpose is to increase the detection sensitivity. It is shown that, whereas pre-column derivatization is characterized by selectivity due to the chemical functionality of the analyte involved in the derivatization process, in supramolecular post-column derivatization, the selectivity only proceeds from the capacity of the lipid to involve supramolecular assemblies with a fluorescence probe. The aim of this review is to summarize available experiments concerning fluorescence detection of phospholipids. The interest and limitation of such detection approaches are discussed.

  7. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  8. Plasmonic fluorescent quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu

    2009-01-01

    Combining multiple discrete components into a single multifunctional nanoparticle could be useful in a variety of applications. Retaining the unique optical and electrical properties of each component after nanoscale integration is, however, a long-standing problem1,2. It is particularly difficult when trying to combine fluorophores such as semiconductor quantum dots with plasmonic materials such as gold, because gold and other metals can quench the fluorescence3,4. So far, the combination of...

  9. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  10. Modular Fixture Assembly Model for Virtual Assembly Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Gao-liang; CHEN Guang-feng; LIU Xin-hua

    2009-01-01

    To support modular fixture assembly design in virtual environment, a multi-view based modular fixture virtual assembly model is proposed. Instead of squeezing all assembly related information into a single model, three complementary views of assembly model, element information, function and structure, and assembly relationship are proposed to be used. The first view contains the detailed element information, while the other two explicitly capture the hierarchical function relationships and mating relationships respectively. These views are complementary in the sense that each view only contains a specific aspect of assembly related information while together they include required assembly related information. The proposed assembly model is specialized to accommodate the features of modular fixture virtual assembly design and applied in our developed prototype system.

  11. J-aggregation of a sulfur-substituted naphthalenediimide (NDI) with remarkably bright fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Haridas; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2016-07-01

    This communication reveals the H-bonding driven supramolecular assembly of a sulfur-substituted naphthalenediimide leading to the formation of very strong (Tg > 90 °C) organogel in aliphatic hydrocarbons. Mechanistic investigation reveals nucleation-elongation pathway for self-assembly. Photophysical studies show explicit features of classical J-aggregation which reduces the non-radiative fluorescence rate constant considerably and thus results in a remarkable fluorescence enhancement (ΦPL increases from 1% to 30%) which is unprecedented in the entire NDI literature. PMID:27346798

  12. Fluorescent nanodiamond for biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NV centers in diamond have gained strong interest as a novel tool for quantum information processing, quantum computing and quantum photonics. These applications are based on fluorescent and spin properties of NV-centres. However, in some conditions NV- can lose an electron and turn to NV0. The occupation of NV0 and NV- charge states depend on the position of their ground states with respect to the Fermi level and the mechanism of the charge transfer. Interestingly, that the charge switch has important implications on applications of fluorescent nanodiamond (fND) to nano-biology and nano-medicine. fND can be used for bio-marking and bio-tracking but also for the monitoring of targeted delivery to the cells. In this presentation we review the current state-of-the art for using fND particles for fluorescent bio imaging in cells and discuss the charge transfer and its luminescence stability by using ultra high sensitive spectroscopy methods to study the NV0 and NV- state occupation. (author)

  13. Power module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeremy B.; Newson, Steve

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  14. Blade attachment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  15. In vitro kinetochore assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miell, Matthew D D; Straight, Aaron F

    2016-01-01

    The kinetochore is the primary site of interaction between chromosomes and microtubules of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. The kinetochore is a complex of more than 100 proteins that transiently assemble during mitosis at a single defined region on each chromosome, known as the centromere. Kinetochore assembly and activity must be tightly regulated to ensure proper microtubule interaction and faithful chromosome segregation because perturbation of kinetochores often results in aneuploidy and cell lethality. As such, cell free and reconstituted systems to analyze kinetochore formation and function are invaluable in probing the biochemical activities of kinetochores. In vitro approaches to studying kinetochores have enabled the manipulation of kinetochore protein structure, function, interactions and regulation that are not possible in cells. Here we outline a cell-free approach for the assembly of centromeres and recruitment of functional kinetochores that enables their manipulation and analysis. PMID:27193846

  16. Assembling Sustainable Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandergeest, Peter; Ponte, Stefano; Bush, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The authors show how certification assembles ‘sustainable’ territories through a complex layering of regulatory authority in which both government and nongovernment entities claim rule-making authority, sometimes working together, sometimes in parallel, sometimes competitively. It is argued...... that territorialisation is accomplished not just through (re)defining bounded space, but more broadly through the assembling of four elements: space, subjects, objects, and expertise. Four case studies of sustainability certification in seafood are analyzed to show that ‘green gabbing’ is not necessarily the central...... dynamic in assembling sustainable territories, and that certification always involves state agencies in determining how the key elements that comprise it are defined. Whereas some state agencies have been suspicious of sustainability certification, others have embraced it or even used it to extend...

  17. Integrated magnetic transformer assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics transformer assembly comprising a first magnetically permeable core forming a first substantially closed magnetic flux path and a second magnetically permeable core forming a second substantially closed magnetic flux path. A first input...... inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the first magnetically permeable core and a second input inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the second magnetically permeable core. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly further comprises a first output......-winding of the first output inductor winding and the first half-winding of the second output inductor winding are configured to produce aligned, i.e. in the same direction, magnetic fluxes through the first substantially closed magnetic flux path. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly is well- suited for use...

  18. Anomalous Fluorescence Enhancement from Double Heterostructure 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals-A Multifunctional Fluorescence-Based Sensor Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Kim, Tak H.; Gan, Zongsong; Cole, Ivan S.; Zhao, Dongyuan; Kielpinski, Dave; Gu, Min; Li, Qin

    2015-09-01

    Augmenting fluorescence intensity is of vital importance to the development of chemical and biochemical sensing, imaging and miniature light sources. Here we report an unprecedented fluorescence enhancement with a novel architecture of multilayer three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals self-assembled from polystyrene spheres. The new technique uses a double heterostructure, which comprises a top and a bottom layer with a periodicity overlapping the excitation wavelength (E) of the emitters, and a middle layer with a periodicity matching the fluorescence wavelength (F) and a thickness that supports constructive interference for the excitation wavelength. This E-F-E double heterostructure displays direction-dependent light trapping for both excitation and fluorescence, coupling the modes of photonic crystal with multiple-beam interference. The E-F-E double heterostructure renders an additional 5-fold enhancement to the extraordinary FL amplification of Rhodamine B in monolithic E CPhCs, and 4.3-fold acceleration of emission dynamics. Such a self-assembled double heterostructue CPhCs may find significant applications in illumination, laser, chemical/biochemical sensing, and solar energy harvesting. We further demonstrate the multi-functionality of the E-F-E double heterostructure CPhCs in Hg (II) sensing.

  19. Transfer of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor are transferred during fueling or refueling or the like by a crane. The work-engaging fixture of the crane picks up an assembly, removes it from this slot, transfers it to the deposit site and deposits it in its slot at the deposit site. The control for the crane includes a strain gauge connected to the crane line which raises and lowers the load. The strain gauge senses the load on the crane. The signal from the strain gauge is compared with setpoints; a high-level setpoint, a low-level setpoint and a slack-line setpoint. If the strain gauge signal exceeds the high-level setpoint, the line drive is disabled. This event may occur during raising of a fuel assembly which encounters resistance. The high-level setpoint may be overridden under proper precautions. The line drive is also disabled if the strain gauge signal is less than the low-level setpoint. This event occurs when a fuel assembly being deposited contacts the bottom of its slot or an obstruction in, or at the entry to the slot. To preclude lateral movement and possible damage to a fuel assembly suspended from the crane line, the traverse drive of the crane is disabled once the strain-gauge exceets the lov-level setpoint. The traverse drive can only be enabled after the strain-gauge signal is less than the slack-line set-point. This occurs when the lines has been set in slack-line setting. When the line is tensioned after slack-li ne setting, the traverse drive remains enabled only if the line has been disconnected from the fuel assembly

  20. Fluorescence spectral changes of perylene in polymer matrices during the solvent evaporation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fuyuki; Kogasaka, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Kazuki

    2013-04-01

    This work examined concentration-dependent variations in the fluorescence spectra of solutions of perylene and PMMA in toluene during the process of evaporation, using fluorescence microscopy. At low perylene concentrations, the fluorescence spectra of the resulting perylene/PMMA films exhibited a structural band originating from monomeric perylene. Increasing the concentration resulted in the appearance of new, broader bands due to the formation of two excimer species. An estimation of variations in the fluorescence excitation spectra of these same films with changing concentration and excitation wavelength indicated the formation from monomer to fully overlapped excimer via partially overlapped excimer in terms of the kinetic situation. These species are believed to consist of either ground state aggregates or α-crystals resulting from phase separation within the PMMA films. Dynamic fluorescence changes during solvent evaporation were monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and CCD photography. Fluorescence emission changed from blue to green with the formation of α-crystals, a pattern which was also observed when increasing perylene concentrations in PMMA films during static trials. The concentration distribution around α-crystals was attributed to the crystal growth process and could be followed by observing the fluorescence color gradient radiating from the crystal. Studying concentration-dependent fluorescence spectral changes during solvent evaporation not only provides insight into the molecular dynamics of the casting process and the compatibility between the dispersed material and the polymer matrix but also provides information concerning molecular assembly and the nucleation and growth of crystals of the fluorescent organic molecules.

  1. An improved bimolecular fluorescence complementation tool based on superfolder green fluorescent protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhou; Jian Lin; Cuihong Zhou; Xiaoyan Deng; Bin Xia

    2011-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) has been widely used in the analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in recent years. There are many notable advantages of BiFC such as convenience and direct visualization of PPI in cells. However, BiFC has one common limitation: the separated non-fluorescent fragments can be spontaneously self-assembled into an intact protein,which leads to false-positive results. In this study, a pair of complementary fragments (sfGFPN and sfGFPC) was constructed by splitting superfolder GFP (sfGFP) between the 214 and 215 amino acid residue, and sfGFPC was mutated by site-directed gene mutagenesis to decrease the signal of negative control. Our results showed that mutations in sfGFPC (sfGFPC(m12)) can effectively decrease the signal of negative control. Thus, we provide an improved BiFC tool for the analysis of PPI. Further,since the self-assembly problem is a common shortcoming for application of BiFC, our research provides a feasible strategy for other BiFC candidate proteins with the same problem.

  2. Low inductance connector assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann; Carlson, Douglas S

    2013-07-09

    A busbar connector assembly for coupling first and second terminals on a two-terminal device to first and second contacts on a power module is provided. The first terminal resides proximate the first contact and the second terminal resides proximate the second contact. The assembly comprises a first bridge having a first end configured to be electrically coupled to the first terminal, and a second end configured to be electrically coupled to the second contact, and a second bridge substantially overlapping the first bridge and having a first end electrically coupled to the first contact, and a second end electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  3. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  4. An Interactive Assembly Process Planner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖华飞; 张林鍹; 肖田元; 曾理; 古月

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and performance of the virtual assembly support system (VASS), a new system that can provide designers and assembly process engineers with a simulation and visualization environment where they can evaluate the assemblability/disassemblability of products, and thereby use a computer to intuitively create assembly plans and interactively generate assembly process charts. Subassembly planning and assembly priority reasoning techniques were utilized to find heuristic information to improve the efficiency of assembly process planning. Tool planning was implemented to consider tool requirements in the product design stage. New methods were developed to reduce the computation amount involved in interference checking. As an important feature of the VASS, human interaction was integrated into the whole process of assembly process planning, extending the power of computer reasoning by including human expertise, resulting in better assembly plans and better designs.

  5. A Method for Designing Assembly Tolerance Networks of Mechanical Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing mechanical assemblies, assembly tolerance design is an important issue which must be seriously considered by designers. Assembly tolerances reflect functional requirements of assembling, which can be used to control assembling qualities and production costs. This paper proposes a new method for designing assembly tolerance networks of mechanical assemblies. The method establishes the assembly structure tree model of an assembly based on its product structure tree model. On this basis, assembly information model and assembly relation model are set up based on polychromatic sets (PS theory. According to the two models, the systems of location relation equations and interference relation equations are established. Then, using methods of topologically related surfaces (TTRS theory and variational geometric constraints (VGC theory, three VGC reasoning matrices are constructed. According to corresponding relations between VGCs and assembly tolerance types, the reasoning matrices of tolerance types are also established by using contour matrices of PS. Finally, an exemplary product is used to construct its assembly tolerance networks and meanwhile to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly ma...

  7. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 12 April at 14.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 20 April 2010 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2010 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2010 Programme for 2011 Presentation and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2012 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may r...

  8. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda   Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda. Nevertheless, the Assembly may require t...

  9. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Alvarez, Patricio D.

    2010-09-21

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  10. Corium protection assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A corium protection assembly includes a perforated base grid disposed below a pressure vessel containing a nuclear reactor core and spaced vertically above a containment vessel floor to define a sump therebetween. A plurality of layers of protective blocks are disposed on the grid for protecting the containment vessel floor from the corium.

  11. Spool assembly support analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the wind/seismic analysis and evaluation for the pump pit spool assemblies. Hand calculations were used for the analysis. UBC, AISC, and load factors were used in this evaluation. The results show that the actual loads are under the allowable loads and all requirements are met

  12. Turbomachine blade assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  13. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  14. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  15. Imaging Self-assembly Dependent Spatial Distribution of Small Molecules in Cellular Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on t...

  16. Top-down assembly design using assembly features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石万凯; DENEUX; Dominique; 等

    2002-01-01

    The primary task of top-down assembly desig is to define a product's detailed physical description satisfying its functional requirements identified during the functional design phase.The implementation of this design process requires two things,that is ,product functional representation and a general assembly model.Product functions are not only the formulation of a customer's needs,but also the input data of assembly design.A general assembly model is to support the evolving process of the elaboration of a product structure.The assembly feature of extended concept is taken as a functional carrier,which is a generic relation among assembly-modeled entities.The model of assembly features describes the link between product functions and form features of parts.On the basis of this link,the propagation of design modifications is discussed so as to preserve the functionality and the coherence of the assembly model.The formal model of assembly design process describes the top-down process of creating an assembly model.This formal model is represented by the combination of assembly feature operations,the assembly model and the evaluation process.A design case study is conducted to verify the applicability of the presented approaches.

  17. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kanemaru

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM and an electron microscope (EM. In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM (JEOL JXA8600 M was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM. In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  18. Optical Space Telescope Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Space Telescope Assembly (OSTA) task is to demonstrate the technology readiness of assembling large space telescopes on orbit in 2015. This task is an...

  19. School Assemblies: The Lost Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Daniel R.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines and suggestions are offered for successful school assemblies. The school assembly should be a positive event; an occasion for developing unity, group loyalty, and desirable audience habits. (Author/MLF)

  20. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  1. The TALE Fluorescence Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jui, Charles

    2009-05-01

    The TALE fluorescence detectors are designed to extend the threshold for fluorescence observation by TA down to 3x10^16 eV. It will comprise two main components. The first is a set of 24 telescopes working in stereo, with an existing TA FD station at ˜6 km separation. These will cover between 3-31 degrees in elevation and have azimuthal coverage maximizing the stereo aperture in the 10^18-10^19 eV energy range. The second component consists of 15 telescopes equipped with 4m diameter mirrors and covering the sky between 31 and 73 degrees in elevation. The larger mirror size pushes the physics threshold down to 3x10^16 eV, and provides view of the shower maximum for the lower energy events. The Tower detector will cover one quadrant in azimuth and operate in hybrid mode with the TALE infill array to provide redundant composition measurements from both shower maximum information and muon-to-electron ratio.

  2. Fluorescent calixarenes as molecular receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Lynam, Carol

    2002-01-01

    The synthesis of calixarene L1 is described. This molecular sensor incorporates a fluorescent naphthyl moiety, the necessary fluorophore for optical transduction, whose fluorescent intensity alters to differing degrees on binding of enantiomers. Means of distinguishing between enantiomers of a chiral molecule are of critical importance in many areas of analytical chemistry and biotechnology, particularly in drug design and synthesis. Fluorescent quenching studies of calixarene L1 in methanol ...

  3. Reflector-moderated critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments with reflector-moderated critical assemblies were part of the Rover Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). These assemblies were characterized by thick D2O or beryllium reflectors surrounding large cavities that contained highly enriched uranium at low average densities. Because interest in this type of system has been revived by LASL Plasma Cavity Assembly studies, more detailed descriptions of the early assemblies than had been available in the unclassified literature are provided. (U.S.)

  4. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-02-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth

  5. Measurement Technology for Engine Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Li; ZHENG Zeyu; DAI Shangping

    2006-01-01

    In many industrial, it is often necessary to analyze the engine assembly. This paper introduces three kinds of new technologies on the assembly line of engine in recent years, it have played the positive role in improving the quality of assembling.

  6. Low inductance busbar assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann

    2010-09-21

    A busbar assembly for electrically coupling first and second busbars to first and second contacts, respectively, on a power module is provided. The assembly comprises a first terminal integrally formed with the first busbar, a second terminal integrally formed with the second busbar and overlapping the first terminal, a first bridge electrode having a first tab electrically coupled to the first terminal and overlapping the first and second terminals, and a second tab electrically coupled to the first contact, a second bridge electrode having a third tab electrically coupled to the second terminal, and overlapping the first and second terminals and the first tab, and a fourth tab electrically coupled to the second contact, and a fastener configured to couple the first tab to the first terminal, and the third tab to the second terminal.

  7. Fuel assemblies chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPP Paks found a thermal-hydraulic anomaly in the reactor core during cycle 14 that was caused by corrosion product deposits on fuel assemblies (FAs) that increased the hydraulic resistance of the FAs. Consequently, the coolant flow through the FAs was insufficient resulting in a temperature asymmetry inside the reactor core. Based on this fact NPP Paks performed differential pressure measurements of all fuel assemblies in order to determine the hydraulic resistance and subsequently the limit values for the hydraulic acceptance of FAs to be used. Based on the hydraulic investigations a total number of 170 FAs was selected for cleaning. The necessity for cleaning the FAs was explained by the fact that the FAs were subjected to a short term usage in the reactor core only maximum of 1,5 years and had still a capacity for additional 2 fuel cycles. (authors)

  8. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To increase the fuel assembly rigidity while making balance in view of the dimension thereby improving the earthquake proofness. Constitution: In a nuclear fuel assembly having a control rod guide thimble tube, the gap between the thimble tube and fuel insert (inner diameter of the guiding thimble tube-outer diameter of the fuel insert) is made greater than 1.0 mm. Further, the wall thickness of the thimble tube is made to about 4 - 5 % of the outer diameter, while the flowing fluid pore cross section S in the thimble tube is set as: S = S0 x A0/A where S0: cross section of the present flowing fluid pore, A: effective cross section after improvement, = Π/4(d2 - D2) in which d is the thimble tube inner diameter and the D is the fuel insert outer diameter. A0: present effective cross section. (Seki, T.)

  9. Fuel nozzle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Lacey, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  10. Uniform Test Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Dmitry I.

    2008-01-01

    In educational practice, a test assembly problem is formulated as a system of inequalities induced by test specifications. Each solution to the system is a test, represented by a 0-1 vector, where each element corresponds to an item included (1) or not included (0) into the test. Therefore, the size of a 0-1 vector equals the number of items "n"…

  11. REACTOR NOZZLE ASSEMBLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuder, F.C.; Dearwater, J.R.

    1959-02-10

    An improved nozzle assembly useful in a process for the direct reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride by means of dissociated ammonia in a heated reaction vessel is descrlbed. The nozzle design provides for intimate mixing of the two reactants and at the same time furnishes a layer of dissociated ammonia adjacent to the interior wall of the reaction vessel, thus preventing build-up of the reaction product on the vessel wall.

  12. Self-Assembled Pyridine-Dipyrrolate Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huacheng; Lee, Juhoon; Lammer, Aaron D; Chi, Xiaodong; Brewster, James T; Lynch, Vincent M; Li, Hao; Zhang, Zhan; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    An inherently nonlinear pyridine dipyrrolate ligand, namely 2,6-bis(3,4-diethyl-5-carboxy-1H-pyrrol-2yl)pyridine (compound 1), is able to distinguish between different zinc(II) cation sources, namely Zn(acac)2 and Zn(OAc)2, respectively. This differentiation is manifest both in terms of the observed fluorescent behavior in mixed organic media and the reaction chemistry. Treatment of 1 with Zn(acac)2 gives rise to a cage dimer, cage-1, wherein two molecules of compound 1 act as double bridging units to connect two individual cage subunits. As inferred from X-ray crystallographic studies, this cage system consists of discrete zinc dimers with hydroxide bridges that, with the assistance of bound DMF solvent molecules, serve to fix the geometry and orientation of the pyridine dipyrrolate building blocks. When a different zinc source, Zn(OAc)2, is used to carry out an ostensibly similar complexation reaction with compound 1, an acetate-bridged 1D abacus-like cage polymer is obtained as inferred from X-ray diffraction analysis. This extended solid state structure, cage-2, contains individual zinc dimer cage submits and appears stabilized by solvent molecules (DMF) and the counteranion (acetate). Rod-like assemblies are also observed by DLS and SEM. This construct, in contrast to cage-1, proved fluorescent in mixed organic media. The structure of the ligand itself (i.e., in the absence of Zn(II)) was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis and was found to assemble into a supramolecular polymer. Conversion to a dimer form was seen upon the addition of TBAOAc. On the basis of the metric parameters, the structures seen in the solid state are stabilized via hydrogen bonding interactions involving solvent molecules.

  13. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  14. IAHS Third Scientific Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) convened its Third Scientific Assembly in Baltimore, Md., May 10-19, 1989. The Assembly was attended by about 450 scientists and engineers. The attendance was highest from the U.S., as could be expected; 37 were from Canada; 22 each, Netherlands and United Kingdom; 14, Italy; 12, China; 10, Federal Republic of Germany; 8 each from France, the Republic of South Africa, and Switzerland; 7, Austria; 6 each, Finland and Japan; others were scattered among the remainder of 48 countries total.one of the cosponsors and also handled business matters for the Assembly. Other cosponsors included the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (IAMAP), United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and U.K. Overseas Development Authority (ODA). U.S. federal agencies serving as cosponsors included the Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, National Weather Service, Department of Agriculture, Department of State, and U.S. Geological Survey.

  15. Ordinary General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 20 April at 10.00 Council Chamber, Bldg 503 In conformity with the Statutes of the Staff Association, an ordinary General Assembly is organized once a year (article IV.2.1). Agenda Adoption of the Agenda Approval of the Draft Minutes of the Ordinary General Assembly of 12 May 2009 Presentation and approval of the Activity Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Financial Report 2009 Presentation and approval of the Auditors Report 2009 Programme for 2010 Presentation et and approval of the draft budget and subscription rate 2010 Modifications to the statutes of the association Election of the Election Committee Election of the Board of Auditors Miscellaneous We remind members of article IV.3.4 in the Statutes of the Association which reads: “After having dealt with all the items on the agenda, the members may, with the consent of the Assembly, have other matters discussed, but decisions may be taken only on the items listed on the agenda...

  16. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  17. Discrepancies over the onset of surfactant monomer aggregation interpreted by fluorescence, conductivity and surface tension methods

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Molecular probe techniques have made important contributions to the determination of microstructure of surfactant assemblies such as size, stability, micropolarity and conformation. Conductivity and surface tension were used to determine the critical aggregation concentration (cac) of polymer-surfactant complexes and the critical micellar concentration (cmc) of aqueous micellar aggregates. The results are compared with those of fluorescent techniques. Several surfactant systems were examined,...

  18. Omnidirectional luminescence enhancement of fluorescent SiC via pseudoperiodic antireflective subwavelength structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Yakimova, Rositza;

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, an approach of fabricating pseudoperiodic antireflective subwavelength structures (ARS) on fluorescent SiC by using self-assembled etch mask is demonstrated. By applying the pseudoperiodic (ARS), the average surface reflectance at 6° incidence over the spectral range of 390-7...

  19. Biocompatible self-assembly of nano-materials for Bio-MEMS and insect reconnaissance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozik, Susan Marie; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Sinclair, Michael B.; Manginell, Monica; Ashley, Carlee E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Calvert, Paul Davidson (University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA); Hartenberger, Tamara N.; Flemming, Jeb Hunter; Baca, Helen Kennicott (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the development of new biocompatible self-assembly procedures enabling the immobilization of genetically engineered cells in a compact, self-sustaining, remotely addressable sensor platform. We used evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) to immobilize cells within periodic silica nanostructures, characterized by unimodal pore sizes and pore connectivity, that can be patterned using ink-jet printing or photo patterning. We constructed cell lines for the expression of fluorescent proteins and induced reporter protein expression in immobilized cells. We investigated the role of the abiotic/biotic interface during cell-mediated self-assembly of synthetic materials.

  20. Fluorescent blood glucose monitor by hemin-functionalized graphene quantum dots based sensing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yuezhen; Wang, Xiaoxun; Sun, Jian; Jiao, Shoufeng; Chen, Hongqi; Gao, Feng; Wang, Lun, E-mail: wanglun@mail.ahnu.edu.cn

    2014-01-31

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Hemin is assembled onto the surfaces of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). •With the aid of hemin, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} could quench the FL signal of GQDs obviously. •Based on this effect, a fluorescent platform is proposed for the sensing of glucose. •The proposed method provides a new pathway to explore practical application of GQDs. -- Abstract: In the present work, a highly sensitive and specific fluorescent biosensor for blood glucose monitoring is developed based on hemin-functionalized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and glucose oxidase (GOx) system. The GQDs which are simply prepared by pyrolyzing citric acid exhibit strong fluorescence and good water-solubility. Due to the noncovalent assembly between hemin and GQDs, the addition of hemin can make hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to destroy the passivated surface of GQDs, leading to significant fluorescence quenching of GQDs. Based on this effect, a novel fluorescent platform is proposed for the sensing of glucose. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of glucose is from 9 to 300 μM, and the limit of detection is 0.1 μM. As unique properties of GQDs, the proposed biosensor is green, simple, cost-efficient, and it is successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human serum. In addition, the proposed method provides a new pathway to further design the biosensors based on the assembly of GQDs with hemin for detection of biomolecules.

  1. Non-covalently Functionalized Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes: A Supramolecular Approach of Selective Zinc Ions Sensing in Living Cells%Non-covalently Functionalized Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes: A Supramolecular Approach of Selective Zinc Ions Sensing in Living Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉萍; 陈湧; 张宁; 刘育

    2012-01-01

    A fluorescent cyclodextrin/carbon nanotube assembly was easily constructed through the non-covalent attach- ment of adamantanylpyrene on carbon nanotube and the following association of cyclodextrin derivative bearing fluorescent substituent, and its structure was fully characterized by UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Fluorescence spectroscopic and fluorescence microscopic studies showed that the resultant non-covalently functionalized fluo- rescent nanotube could be used as a highly selective fluorescent probe for Zn2+ in both water and living cells. Without carbon nanotube, the fluorescence probe was unable to enter the cell but only anchored on the cell mem- brane. This approach will overcome the disadvantage of many spectral sensors that are unable to enter living cells and greatly improve the application of naotube-related supramolecular architecture in nanoscience and technology.

  2. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  3. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  4. Interfacial Assembly of Graphene Oxide Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtierrez, Cain; Ismail, Issam; Macosko, Christopher; Stottrup, Benjamin

    Controlled assembly of monolayer graphene-oxide (GO) films at the air/water interface is of interest for the development of transparent conductive thin films of chemically-derived graphene. We present experimental results from investigations of the assembly of polydisperse GO sheets at the air-water interface. GO nanosheets with lateral dimensions of greater than 10 microns were created using a modified Tour synthesis (Dimiev and Tour, 2014). GO films were generated with conventional Langmuir trough techniques to control lateral packing density. Film morphology was characterized in situ with Brewster angle microscopy. Films were transferred unto a substrate via the Langmuir-Blodgett deposition technique and imaged with fluorescence quenching microscopy. Through pH modulation of the aqueous subphase, it was found that GO's intrinsic surface activity to the interface increased with increasing subphase acidity. Finally, we found a dominant elastic contribution during uniaxial film deformation as measured by anisotropic pressure measurements. A. M. Dimiev, and J. M. Tour, ``Mechanism of GO Formation,'' ACS Nano, 8, (2014)

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  6. Optical Properties of Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李戎; 陈东辉

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes have been widely used these years.Because of the special optical performance, conventional CCM systems seem to be unable to predict the recipes of fabrics dyed with fluorescent dyes. In order to enhance the functions of CCM systems, the optical properties of fluorescent dyes in their absorption region were investigated. It has been found that there was a fixed maximum absorption wavelength for each fluorescent dyes whatever its concentration is. Both absorption region and maximum absorption wavelength of the dyes in solution are the same to those in fabric, and that the absorption is directly proportional to the concentration of the dye. So the optical properties obtained in solutions cna be applied for describing the optics performance of fluorescent dyes in fabrics.

  7. Micrometer size rod formed by secondary self assembly of omeprazole with α- and β-cyclodextrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, N.; Venkatesh, G.

    2015-02-01

    Self assembly of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) micro rods induced by omeprazole (OMP) were observed by SEM and TEM. OMP/CD inclusion complexes have formed the secondary self assembly micro meter size rod like structure. This structure was driven by the intermolecular hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals forces. Both forces induced the ordered assembly and arrangement of OMP/CD inclusion complexes, whereas CD molecules acted as molecular bricks. The OMP/CD inclusion complexes primary assembled form individual nanorods and then secondary self aggregate nanorods were form a micro meter rod structure. The results indicate that inter-nanotubular hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in the formation of the self assembled micro rods. The inclusion complexes were also characterized using FT-IR, DSC, powder XRD, 1H NMR, absorption, fluorescence, life time measurements and molecular modeling methods.

  8. Resolving Single-Molecule Assembled Patterns with Superresolution Blink-Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Strackharn, Mathias; Stahl, Stefan W.; Summerer, Wolfram; Steinhauer, Christian; Forthmann, Carsten; Puchner, Elias M.; Vogelsang, Jan; Gaub, Hermann E.; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally combine a recently developed AFM-based molecule-by-molecule assembly (single-molecule cut-and-paste, SMCP) with subdiffraction resolution fluorescence imaging. Using “Blink-Microscopy”, which exploits the fluctuating emission of single molecules for the reconstruction

  9. Spatially confined assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong; Lu, Nan; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-10-21

    The ability to assemble NPs into ordered structures that are expected to yield collective physical or chemical properties has afforded new and exciting opportunities in the field of nanotechnology. Among the various configurations of nanoparticle assemblies, two-dimensional (2D) NP patterns and one-dimensional (1D) NP arrays on surfaces are regarded as the ideal assembly configurations for many technological devices, for example, solar cells, magnetic memory, switching devices, and sensing devices, due to their unique transport phenomena and the cooperative properties of NPs in assemblies. To realize the potential applications of NP assemblies, especially in nanodevice-related applications, certain key issues must still be resolved, for example, ordering and alignment, manipulating and positioning in nanodevices, and multicomponent or hierarchical structures of NP assemblies for device integration. Additionally, the assembly of NPs with high precision and high levels of integration and uniformity for devices with scaled-down dimensions has become a key and challenging issue. Two-dimensional NP patterns and 1D NP arrays are obtained using traditional lithography techniques (top-down strategies) or interfacial assembly techniques (bottom-up strategies). However, a formidable challenge that persists is the controllable assembly of NPs in desired locations over large areas with high precision and high levels of integration. The difficulty of this assembly is due to the low efficiency of small features over large areas in lithography techniques or the inevitable structural defects that occur during the assembly process. The combination of self-assembly strategies with existing nanofabrication techniques could potentially provide effective and distinctive solutions for fabricating NPs with precise position control and high resolution. Furthermore, the synergistic combination of spatially mediated interactions between nanoparticles and prestructures on surfaces may play

  10. Robotic Thumb Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Goza, S. Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An improved robotic thumb for a robotic hand assembly is provided. According to one aspect of the disclosure, improved tendon routing in the robotic thumb provides control of four degrees of freedom with only five tendons. According to another aspect of the disclosure, one of the five degrees of freedom of a human thumb is replaced in the robotic thumb with a permanent twist in the shape of a phalange. According to yet another aspect of the disclosure, a position sensor includes a magnet having two portions shaped as circle segments with different center points. The magnet provides a linearized output from a Hall effect sensor.

  11. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  12. Sensitization effects of supramolecular assemblies on the luminescence of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hong; Yi Chongyue; Li Xue; Fang Fang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Yajiang, E-mail: yjyang@mail.hust.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Luminescence enhancement of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes (Tb(III)-PUFX) in supramolecular hydrogels formed by assembly of 1,3:2,4-di-O-benzylidene-D-sorbitol (DBS) was investigated by steady-state fluorescence, varying temperature fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence. The luminescence images show that Tb(III)-PUFX were dispersed in the DBS gels. The luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX in the DBS gels was significantly increased in comparison with that in corresponding aqueous solutions. The varying temperature fluorescent spectra show that the luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX decreased with an increase in the temperature. This implies that the luminescence enhancement of Tb(III)-PUFX is related to the dissociation and the formation of the DBS assemblies. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show slower rotational motion in DBS gels in comparison with that in the corresponding aqueous solutions. This may be ascribed to a unique microstructure of three-dimensional network formed by DBC aggregates, resulting in deactivation of the nonradiative relaxation. The images of field emission scanning electron microscopy and polarized optical microscopy indicate that the morphology of the DBS assemblies was not influenced upon addition of Tb(III)-PUFX to the DBS gels.

  13. Imaging self-assembly dependent spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2013-12-10

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in a cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on the side chain of the lysine residue of the peptidic motif. These molecules, however, exhibit a different ability of self-assembly before and after enzymatic transformation (e.g., dephosphorylation). Fluorescent imaging reveals that self-assembly directly affects the distribution of these small molecules in a cellular environment. Moreover, cell viability tests suggest that the states and the locations of the molecular assemblies in the cellular environment control the phenotypes of the cells. For example, the molecular nanofibers of one of the small molecules apparently stabilize actin filaments and alleviate the insult of an F-actin toxin (e.g., latrunculin A). Combining fluorescent imaging and enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small peptidic molecules, this work demonstrates self-assembly as a key factor for dictating the spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment. In addition, it illustrates a useful approach, based on enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small molecules, to modulate spatiotemporal profiles of small molecules in a cellular environment, which allows the use of the emergent properties of small molecules to control the fate of cells. PMID:24266765

  14. Imaging Self-assembly Dependent Spatial Distribution of Small Molecules in Cellular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on the side chain of the lysine residue of the peptidic motif. These molecules, however, exhibit different ability of self-assembly before and after enzymatic transformation (e.g., dephosphorylation). Fluorescent imaging reveals that self-assembly directly affects the distribution of these small molecules in cellular environment. Moreover, cell viability tests suggest that the states and the location of the molecular assemblies in the cellular environment control the phenotypes of the cells. For example, the molecular nanofibers of one of the small molecules apparently stabilize actin filaments and alleviate the insult of an F-actin toxin (e.g., latrunculin A). Combining fluorescent imaging and enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small peptidic molecules, this work not only demonstrates that self-assembly as a key factor for dictating the spatial distribution of small molecules in cellular environment. In addition, it illustrates a useful approach, based on enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small molecules, to modulate spatiotemporal profiles of small molecules in cellular environment, which allows the use of the emergent properties of small molecules to control the fate of cells. PMID:24266765

  15. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chen-Ting; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence-based detection techniques are popular in high throughput screening due to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Four commonly used techniques exist, each with distinct characteristics. Fluorescence intensity assays are the simplest to run, but suffer the most from signal interference. Fluorescence polarization assays show less interference from the compounds or the instrument, but require a design that results in change of fluorophore-containing moiety size and usually have narrow assay signal window. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used for detecting protein-protein interactions and is constrained not by the sizes of binding partners, but rather by the distance between fluorophores. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), an advanced modification of FRET approach utilizes special fluorophores with long-lived fluorescence and earns its place near the top of fluorescent techniques list by its performance and robustness, characterized by larger assay window and minimized compound spectral interference. TR-FRET technology can be applied in biochemical or cell-based in vitro assays with ease. It is commonly used to detect modulation of protein-protein interactions and in detection of products of biochemical reactions and cellular activities. PMID:27316992

  16. A dual-stimuli-responsive fluorescent switch ultrathin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixiong; Liang, Ruizheng; Liu, Wendi; Yan, Dongpeng; Wei, Min

    2015-10-01

    Stimuli-responsive fluorescent switches have shown broad applications in optical devices, biological materials and intelligent responses. Herein, we describe the design and fabrication of a dual-stimuli-responsive fluorescent switch ultrathin film (UTF) via a three-step layer-by-layer (LBL) technique: (i) encapsulation of spiropyran (SP) within an amphiphilic block copolymer (PTBEM) to give the (SP@PTBEM) micelle; (ii) the mixture of riboflavin (Rf) and poly(styrene 4-sulfonate) (PSS) to enhance the adhesion ability of small molecules; (iii) assembly of negatively charged SP@PTBEM and Rf-PSS with cationic layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets to obtain the (Rf-PSS/LDH/SP@PTBEM)n UTFs (n: bilayer number). The assembly process of the UTFs and their luminescence properties, as monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), present a uniform and ordered layered structure with stepwise growth. The resulting Rf-PSS/LDH/SP@PTBEM UTF serves as a three-state switchable multicolor (green, yellow, and red) luminescent system based on stimulation from UV/Vis light and pH, with an acceptable reversibility. Therefore, this work provides a facile way to fabricate stimuli-responsive solid-state film switches with tunable-color luminescence, which have potential applications in the areas of displays, sensors, and rewritable optical memory and fluorescent logic devices.Stimuli-responsive fluorescent switches have shown broad applications in optical devices, biological materials and intelligent responses. Herein, we describe the design and fabrication of a dual-stimuli-responsive fluorescent switch ultrathin film (UTF) via a three-step layer-by-layer (LBL) technique: (i) encapsulation of spiropyran (SP) within an amphiphilic block copolymer (PTBEM) to give the (SP@PTBEM) micelle; (ii) the mixture of riboflavin (Rf) and poly(styrene 4-sulfonate) (PSS) to enhance the adhesion ability of small molecules; (iii) assembly of negatively charged SP

  17. Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Nanoparticles as Fluorophore-Free Contrast Agents for Multicolor Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the fabrication of self-assembled polyelectrolyte nanoparticles that provide a multicolor optical imaging modality. Poly(γ-glutamic acid(γ-PGA formed self-assembled nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions with two different cationic polymers: poly(L-lysine(PLL and chitosan. The self-assembled γ-PGA/PLL and γ-PGA/chitosan nanoparticles were crosslinked by glutaraldehyde. Crosslinking of the ionic self-assembled nanoparticles with glutaraldehyde not only stabilized the nanoparticles but also generated a strong autofluorescence signal. Fluorescent Schiff base bonds (C=N and double bonds (C=C were generated simultaneously by crosslinking of the amine moiety of the cationic polyelectrolytes with monomeric glutaraldehyde or with polymeric glutaraldehyde. The unique optical properties of the nanoparticles that resulted from the crosslinking by glutaraldehyde were analyzed using UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. We observed that the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles could be regulated by adjusting the crosslinker concentration and the reaction time. The nanoparticles also exhibited high performance in the labeling and monitoring of therapeutic immune cells (macrophages and dendritic cells. These self-assembled nanoparticles are expected to be a promising multicolor optical imaging contrast agent for the labeling, detection, and monitoring of cells.

  18. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  19. Progress of EMBarrel assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalifour, M

    2002-01-01

    The assembly of the sixteen "M" modules into a vertical axis cylinder has been achieved last Friday, completing the first wheel of the Electromagnetic Barrel Calorimeter (see picture). With this, an important milestone in the construction of the ATLAS detector has been reached. Future steps are the rotation of the cylinder axis into horizontal position, in order to integrate the presamplers and heat exchangers by the end of October. The transportation of the wheel and its insertion into the cryostat is the next major milestone, and is planned for the beginning of 2003. The construction of the modules (the so-called "P" modules) of the second wheel is ongoing at Saclay, Annecy and CERN, and will be completed in the coming months. The assembly of the second wheel should start at CERN in February, and its insertion in the cryostat is scheduled for June 2003. This achievement is the result of a successful collaboration of all institutes involved in the construction of the EM Barrel, namely Annecy, Saclay and CE...

  20. ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Auditorium on Wednesday 3 October 2001 at 14.30 hrs The Agenda comprises:   Opening Remarks (P. Levaux) Some aspects of risk in a pension fund (C. Cuénoud) Annual Report 2000: Presentation and results (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the Report are available from divisional secretariats. Results of the actuarial reviews (G. Maurin) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (P. Levaux) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2000 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel. + 41 22 767 91 94; e-mail Graziella.Praire@cern.ch) The English version will be published next week.

  1. Fuel assembly supporting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For use in forming the core of a pressurized-water reactor, a fuel assembly supporting structure for holding a bundle of interspaced fuel rods, is formed by interspaced end pieces having holes in which the end portions of control rod guide tubes are inserted, fuel rod spacer grids being positioned by these guide tubes between the end pieces. The end pieces are fastened to the end portions of the guide tubes, to integrate the supporting structure, and in the case of at least one of the end pieces, this is done by means which releases that end piece from the guide tubes when the end pieces receive an abnormal thrust force directed towards each other and which would otherwise place the guide tubes under a compressive stress that would cause them to buckle. The spacer grids normally hold the fuel rods interspaced by distances determined by nuclear physics, and buckling of the control rod guide tubes can distort the fuel rod spacer grids with consequent dearrangement of the fuel rod interspacing. A sudden loss of pressure in a pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel can result in the pressurized coolant in the vessel discharging from the vessel at such high velocity as to result in the abnormal thrust force on the end pieces of each fuel assembly, which could cause buckling of the control rod guide tubes when the end pieces are fixed to them in the normal rigid and unyielding manner

  2. Onychomycosis diagnosis using fluorescence and infrared imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ana Paula; Fortunato, Thereza Cury; Stringasci, Mirian D.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Inada, Natalia M.

    2015-06-01

    Onychomycosis is a common disease of the nail plate, constituting approximately half of all cases of nail infection. Onychomycosis diagnosis is challenging because it is hard to distinguish from other diseases of the nail lamina such as psoriasis, lichen ruber or eczematous nails. The existing methods of diagnostics so far consist of clinical and laboratory analysis, such as: Direct Mycological examination and culture, PCR and histopathology with PAS staining. However, they all share certain disadvantages in terms of sensitivity and specificity, time delay, or cost. This study aimed to evaluate the use of infrared and fluorescence imaging as new non-invasive diagnostic tools in patients with suspected onychomycosis, and compare them with established techniques. For fluorescence analysis, a Clinical Evince (MM Optics®) was used, which consists of an optical assembly with UV LED light source wavelength 400 nm +/- 10 nm and the maximum light intensity: 40 mW/cm2 +/- 20%. For infrared analysis, a Fluke® Camera FKL model Ti400 was used. Patients with onychomycosis and control group were analyzed for comparison. The fluorescence images were processed using MATLAB® routines, and infrared images were analyzed using the SmartView® 3.6 software analysis provided by the company Fluke®. The results demonstrated that both infrared and fluorescence could be complementary to diagnose different types of onychomycosis lesions. The simplicity of operation, quick response and non-invasive assessment of the nail patients in real time, are important factors to be consider for an implementation.

  3. FLEX: fluorescence explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Marc-Ph.; Court, Andrew; Smorenburg, Kees; Visser, Huib; Crocco, Luiggi; Heilimo, Jyro; Honig, Andre

    1999-12-01

    FLEX is a scientifically driven space mission to provide demonstration/validation of the instrumentation and technique for measuring the natural fluorescence of vegetation in the Fraunhofer lines. The payload consists of high spectral resolution (0.1 - 0.3 nm) CCD imaging grating spectrometer with two channels: one in the red (648 - 664 nm) and one in the blue (391 - 438 nm) for working with several Fraunhofer lines. The across track FOV is 8.4 degrees; ground spatial resolution is better than 0.5 X 0.5 km2. To increase the S/N ratio a steering mirror will be used, if necessary, to 'freeze' the image and also to provide plus or minus 4 degrees across track depointing. Calibration is made by viewing the sun via a diffuser plate switched into the telescope field of view. A separate CCD camera will allow cloud detection and scene identification. A TIR radiometer will provide simultaneous surface temperature measurements. The spacecraft, overall mass estimated at 200 kg, is derived from the ASI-MITA bus which provides all the necessary subsystems and stabilized platform. By use of on-board storage, ground requirements for satellite control and data link are minimized; the possibility of local stations for real time reception/distribution is also envisaged. Provisional orbit characteristics are: LEO sun synchronous, 500 - 900 km altitude. Priority will be given to highest revisit frequency on a sufficient number of selected test sites.

  4. Selecting Operations for Assembler Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Praczyk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembler Encoding is a neuro-evolutionary method in which a neural network is represented in the form of a simple program called Assembler Encoding Program. The task of the program is to create the so-called Network Definition Matrix which maintains all the information necessary to construct the network. To generate Assembler Encoding Programs and the subsequent neural networks evolutionary techniques are used.
    The performance of Assembler Encoding strongly depends on operations used in Assembler Encoding Programs. To select the most effective operations, experiments in the optimization and the predator-prey problem were carried out. In the experiments, Assembler Encoding Programs equipped with different types of operations were tested. The results of the tests are presented at the end of the paper.

  5. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  6. Self-assembly via microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Sánchez, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic building blocks has attracted extensive interest in myriad fields in recent years, due to their great potential in the nanoscale design of functional hybrid materials. Microfluidic techniques provide an intriguing method to control kinetic aspects of the self-assembly of molecular amphiphiles by the facile adjustment of the hydrodynamics of the fluids. Up to now, there have been several reports about one-step direct self-assembly of different building blocks w...

  7. Coded nanoscale self-assembly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prathyush Samineni; Debabrata Goswami

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate coded self-assembly in nanostructures using the code seeded at the component level through computer simulations. Defects or cavities occur in all natural assembly processes including crystallization and our simulations capture this essential aspect under surface minimization constraints for self-assembly. Our bottom-up approach to nanostructures would provide a new dimension towards nanofabrication and better understanding of defects and crystallization process.

  8. Probing Antigen-Antibody Interaction Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Pengju Jiang; Jiang Xia; Jingyan Li; Cheli Wang; Yue Zhang; Lin Qiu; Jianhao Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the use of fluorescence detection coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL) allowed us to fully characterize the antigen-antibody interaction. CE-FL allowed separation of unbound quantum dots (QDs) and ligand bound QDs and also revealed an ordered assembly of biomolecules on QDs. Further, we observed FRET from QDs donor to DyLight acceptor, which were covalently conjugated with human IgG and goat anti-human IgG, respectively. The immunocomplex was formed and the mutual affinit...

  9. A Versatile Multiple Target Detection System Based on DNA Nano-assembled Linear FRET Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yansheng; Du, Hongwu; Wang, Wenqian; Zhang, Peixun; Xu, Liping; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-05-27

    DNA molecules have been utilized both as powerful synthetic building blocks to create nanoscale architectures and as inconstant programmable templates for assembly of biosensors. In this paper, a versatile, scalable and multiplex detection system is reported based on an extending fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) cascades on a linear DNA assemblies. Seven combinations of three kinds of targets are successfully detected through the changes of fluorescence spectra because of the three-steps FRET or non-FRET continuity mechanisms. This nano-assembled FRET-based nanowire is extremely significant for the development of rapid, simple and sensitive detection system. The method used here could be extended to a general platform for multiplex detection through more-step FRET process.

  10. Dynamic Assemblies and Photophysical Changes of Zinc Porphyrin Dimer Regulated by N-Containing Ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zai-Chun; HE Lin; ZHU Yi-Zhou; ZHENG Jian-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Zinc porphyrin dimer (1) has been designed and synthesized as a novel host of N-containing ligands. The assembly behavior and photophysical changes of its host-guest complexes were evaluated by 1H NMR, fluorescence,and UV-visible titrations, and the processes reveal that the host-guest assembly first creates a stable sandwich complex, then an axial coordination equilibrium appears between the sandwich complex and free ligand. The changes of absorption spectra of the assembly processes rely on the stabilities of the complexes, and fluorescence quenching depends on the axial coordination equilibrium, which indicates that the axial ligation/de-ligation dynamics is indeed a pathway from the excited state to the ground state for metalloporphyrin complexes.

  11. Long-Circulating Near-Infrared Fluorescence Core-Crosslinked Polymeric Micelles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Dual Nuclear/Optical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhi; Zheng, Shiying; Harrison, William J.; Harder, John; Wen, XiaoXia; Gelovani, Juri G.; Qiao, Alex; Li, Chun

    2007-01-01

    We report the synthesis of PEG-coated, core-crosslinked polymeric micelles (CCPMs) derived from an amine-terminated amphiphilic block copolymer, poly(PEG-methacrylate)-b-poly(triethoxysilyl propylmethacrylate) (PPEGMA-b-PESPMA). The block copolymer self-assembled to form micellar nanoparticles, and a Cy-7-like near-infrared fluorescence dye was entrapped in the core bearing reactive ethoxysilane functional groups through a subsequent sol-gel process. The fluorescent signal of CCPMs on the mol...

  12. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  13. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Heuy Gap; Jhung, Myung Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-01

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  15. JWST NIRCam flight mirror assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammini, Paul V.; Holmes, Howard C.; Huff, Lynn; Jacoby, Mike S.; Lopez, Frank

    2011-10-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has an optical prescription which includes numerous fold mirror assemblies. The instrument will operate at 35K after experiencing launch loads at ~293K. The optic mounts must accommodate all associated thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain exceptional optical quality during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) conceived, designed, analyzed, assembled, tested, and integrated the mirror assemblies for the NIRCam instrument. This paper covers the design, analysis, assembly, and test of two of the instruments key fold mirrors.

  16. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  17. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  18. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  19. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  20. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptomics studies often rely on partial reference transcriptomes that fail to capture the full catalog of transcripts and their variations. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and assembly algorithms have facilitated the reconstruction of the entire transcriptome by deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), even without a reference genome. However, transcriptome assembly from billions of RNA-seq reads, which are often very short, poses a significant informatics challenge. This Review summarizes the recent developments in transcriptome assembly approaches - reference-based, de novo and combined strategies-along with some perspectives on transcriptome assembly in the near future.

  1. Modular generation of fluorescent phycobiliproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian-Jun; Chang, Kun; Luo, Juan; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2013-06-01

    Phycobiliproteins are brightly-fluorescent light-harvesting pigments for photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and red algae. They are also of interest as fluorescent biomarkers, but their heterologous generation in vivo has previously required multiple transformations. We report here a modular approach that requires only two DNA segments. The first codes for the apo-protein. The second codes for fusions capable of chromophore biosynthesis and its covalent attachment to the apo-protein; it contains the genes of heme oxygenase, a bilin reductase, and a chromophore lyase. Phycobiliproteins containing phycoerythrobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 560 nm), phycourobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 500 nm), phycocyanobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 630 nm) or phycoviolobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 580 nm) were obtained in high yield in E. coli. This approach facilitates chromophorylation studies of phycobiliproteins, as well as their use for fluorescence labeling based on their high fluorescence.

  2. Fluorescent Sensors for Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-wang Ai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence is one of the most important analytical methods used in biological studies. In the past decade or two, instrumentation in this field has greatly advanced, and now it is possible to detect single photons or fluorescent molecules [1,2], or break the Abbe diffraction limit to distinguish two points spaced less than 50 nm apart [3]. Concurrently, the development of improved fluorescent probes, which can be coupled with state-of-the-art instruments, has been equally important. This special issue on “fluorescent biosensors” in Sensors reports recent results from eight research groups in the field of sensor development. It includes three review articles, and six research articles reporting original results. [...

  3. Modular generation of fluorescent phycobiliproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian-Jun; Chang, Kun; Luo, Juan; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2013-06-01

    Phycobiliproteins are brightly-fluorescent light-harvesting pigments for photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and red algae. They are also of interest as fluorescent biomarkers, but their heterologous generation in vivo has previously required multiple transformations. We report here a modular approach that requires only two DNA segments. The first codes for the apo-protein. The second codes for fusions capable of chromophore biosynthesis and its covalent attachment to the apo-protein; it contains the genes of heme oxygenase, a bilin reductase, and a chromophore lyase. Phycobiliproteins containing phycoerythrobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 560 nm), phycourobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 500 nm), phycocyanobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 630 nm) or phycoviolobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 580 nm) were obtained in high yield in E. coli. This approach facilitates chromophorylation studies of phycobiliproteins, as well as their use for fluorescence labeling based on their high fluorescence. PMID:23545837

  4. Conduit coupling assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conduit coupling assembly for coupling pipes with an interposed seal has a first part for receiving a pipe and is in splined engagement with a bush fixed to a pipe. A second part having radial fingers so that it can be turned by a manipulator, has a threaded engagement with the first part which is the same hand but different pitch to a threaded engagement between the second part and the bush. Pitches of 8:7 for couplings will give a mechanical advantage of 56:1 thus reducing the force needed to obtain a given axial movement of the bush and thus of the pipe and compression of the seal. (author)

  5. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a 239PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  6. Cilium assembly and disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like, immotile organelle present on most types of mammalian cells, which interprets extracellular signals that regulate growth and development. Although once considered a vestigial organelle, the primary cilium is now the focus of considerable interest. We now know that ciliary defects lead to a panoply of human diseases, termed ciliopathies, and the loss of this organelle may be an early signature event during oncogenic transformation. Ciliopathies include numerous seemingly unrelated developmental syndromes, with involvement of the retina, kidney, liver, pancreas, skeletal system and brain. Recent studies have begun to clarify the key mechanisms that link cilium assembly and disassembly to the cell cycle, and suggest new possibilities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27350441

  7. Photovoltaic cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Panitz, Janda K. G.; Sharp, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    A photovoltaic assembly for converting high intensity solar radiation into lectrical energy in which a solar cell is separated from a heat sink by a thin layer of a composite material which has excellent dielectric properties and good thermal conductivity. This composite material is a thin film of porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in which the pores have been substantially filled with an electrophoretically-deposited layer of a styrene-acrylate resin. This composite provides electrical breakdown strengths greater than that of a layer consisting essentially of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and has a higher thermal conductivity than a layer of styrene-acrylate alone.

  8. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  9. Hybrid silica-gold core-shell nanoparticles for fluorescence enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelak, J.; Krajewska, A.; Krajnik, B.; Jamiola, D.; Choma, J.; Jankiewicz, B.; Piątkowski, D.; Nyga, P.; Mackowski, S.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that SiO2 nanoparticles coated with a gold island film (GIF) provide an efficient plasmonic platform for enhancing fluorescence intensity of chlorophyll-containing photosynthetic complexes. Fluorescence images obtained for single SiO2-Au coreshell nanoparticles mixed with photosynthetic complexes reveal very uniform emission patterns of a circular shape, similarly as observed for bare SiO2 nanoparticles. The fluorescence enhancement of chlorophyll emission for SiO2-Au nanostructures is up to four-fold compared to bare SiO2 nanoparticles and shortening of fluorescence decay indicates its plasmonic origin. For doublets or triplets of core-shell SiO2-Au nanoparticles, the intensity of emission is further increased as a result of hot-spot formation at the interfaces of such assemblies.

  10. Tunable fluorescence enhancement based on bandgap-adjustable 3D Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fei; Gao, Suning; Zhu, Lili; Liao, Fan; Yang, Lulu; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-06-01

    Great progress has been made in fluorescence-based detection utilizing solid state enhanced substrates in recent years. However, it is still difficult to achieve reliable substrates with tunable enhancement factors. The present work shows liquid fluorescence enhanced substrates consisting of suspensions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), which can assemble 3D photonic crystal under the external magnetic field. The photonic bandgap induced by the equilibrium of attractive magnetic force and repulsive electrostatic force between adjacent Fe3O4 NPs is utilized to enhance fluorescence intensity of dye molecules (including R6G, RB, Cy5, DMTPS-DCV) in a reversible and controllable manner. The results show that a maximum of 12.3-fold fluorescence enhancement is realized in the 3D Fe3O4 NP substrates without the utilization of metal particles for PCs/DMTPS-DCV (1.0 × 10‑7 M, water fraction (f w) = 90%).

  11. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  12. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  13. Fluorescence lifetimes: fundamentals and interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noomnarm, Ulai; Clegg, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements have been an established mainstay of photosynthesis experiments for many decades. Because in the photosynthesis literature the basics of excited states and their fates are not usually described, we have presented here an easily understandable text for biology students in the style of a chapter in a text book. In this review we give an educational overview of fundamental physical principles of fluorescence, with emphasis on the temporal response of emission. Escape from the excited state of a molecule is a dynamic event, and the fluorescence emission is in direct kinetic competition with several other pathways of de-excitation. It is essentially through a kinetic competition between all the pathways of de-excitation that we gain information about the fluorescent sample on the molecular scale. A simple probability allegory is presented that illustrates the basic ideas that are important for understanding and interpreting most fluorescence experiments. We also briefly point out challenges that confront the experimenter when interpreting time-resolved fluorescence responses.

  14. Supramolecular Assembly of an Evolved Miniprotein Host and Fluorogenic Guest Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bi; Zhou, Xinqi; Stains, Cliff I

    2015-11-18

    Small-molecule-induced assembly of defined protein structures could have broad implications for the fabrication of new materials as well as biological signaling pathways. However, the design of new host-guest pairs capable of small-molecule-induced assembly in a biologically relevant context remains a significant challenge. Herein, we report a series of miniprotein hosts, evolved from the tenth type III domain of fibronectin (Fn3), that display remarkable binding affinity toward a red-shifted environment-sensitive merocyanine derivative, termed sI-Pht. Importantly, the consensus binder isolated from directed evolution experiments (6.2.18) forms a higher order assembly in response to addition of sI-Pht, as assessed by analytical ultracentrifugation. sI-Pht-induced assembly of 6.2.18 results in a 570-fold increase in fluorescence compared to free dye. This property enables the direct visualization of host-guest assemblies by fluorescence microscopy. As a demonstration, we show that supramolecular assembly of the 6.2.18-sI-Pht system can be visualized on the surface of living yeast cells. This new host-guest pair provides a tool for the potential development of new materials as well as pathway engineering. In a broader context, this work details a new design paradigm for the discovery of host-guest systems that function in the context of living cells. PMID:26523606

  15. Assembly sequencing with toleranced parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latombe, J.C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Robotics Lab.; Wilson, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1995-02-21

    The goal of assembly sequencing is to plan a feasible series of operations to construct a product from its individual parts. Previous research has thoroughly investigated assembly sequencing under the assumption that parts have nominal geometry. This paper considers the case where parts have toleranced geometry. Its main contribution is an efficient procedure that decides if a product admits an assembly sequence with infinite translations that is feasible for all possible instances of the components within the specified tolerances. If the product admits one such sequence, the procedure can also generate it. For the cases where there exists no such assembly sequence, another procedure is proposed which generates assembly sequences that are feasible only for some values of the toleranced dimensions. If this procedure produces no such sequence, then no instance of the product is assemblable. Finally, this paper analyzes the relation between assembly and disassembly sequences in the presence of toleranced parts. This work assumes a simple, but non-trivial tolerance language that falls short of capturing all imperfections of a manufacturing process. Hence, it is only one step toward assembly sequencing with toleranced parts.

  16. The Bicycle Assembly Line Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    "The Bicycle Assembly Line Game" is a team-based, in-class activity that helps students develop a basic understanding of continuously operating processes. Each team of 7-10 students selects one of seven prefigured bicycle assembly lines to operate. The lines are run in real-time, and the team that operates the line that yields the…

  17. WHATS IN A CELL ASSEMBLY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DALENOORT, GJ; DEVRIES, PH

    1995-01-01

    The cell assembly as a simple attractor cannot explain many cognitive phenomena. It must be a highly structured network that can sustain highly structured excitation patterns. Moreover, a cell assembly must be more widely distributed in space than on a square millimeter.

  18. What was the Assembly Line?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David

    2010-01-01

    The assembly line is still evolving a century after its invention, and it was not a distinct historical stage, nor was it part of an inevitable sequence that followed "Taylorism."......The assembly line is still evolving a century after its invention, and it was not a distinct historical stage, nor was it part of an inevitable sequence that followed "Taylorism."...

  19. Newnes electronics assembly pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Produced in association with the Engineering Training Authority with contributions from dozens of people in the electronics industry. The material covers common skills in electrical and electronic engineering and concentrates mainly on wiring and assembly. 'Newnes Electronics Assembly Pocket Book' is for electronics technicians, students and apprentices.

  20. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  1. Surface-Induced Hydrogelation for Fluorescence and Naked-Eye Detections of Enzyme Activity in Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tengyan; Liang, Chunhui; Ji, Shenglu; Ding, Dan; Kong, Deling; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou

    2016-07-19

    Fluorescence probes have been widely applied for the detection of important analytes with high sensitivity and specificity. However, they cannot be directly applied for the detection in samples with autofluorescence such as blood. Herein, we demonstrated a simple but effective method of surface-induced self-assembly/hydrogelation for fluorescence detection of an enzyme in biological fluids including blood and cell lysates. The method utilizes an attracting glass surface to induce self-assembly of an enzyme-generating fluorescent probe. After removing the upper solution, the fluorescence turn-on at the glass surface can therefore be used for the detection of enzyme activity. By judging the thickness and color depth of hydrogels at the surface of the glass plates, we could also estimate the enzyme activity by naked eyes. Our study not only expands the application of molecular self-assembly but also provides a useful method that can be applied for direct detection of enzyme activity in complex biological samples such as blood and cell lysates. PMID:27345959

  2. Strong Fluorescent Smart Organogel as a Dual Sensing Material for Volatile Acid and Organic Amine Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Pengchong; Yao, Boqi; Wang, Panpan; Gong, Peng; Zhang, Zhenqi; Lu, Ran

    2015-11-23

    An L-phenylalanine derivative (C12PhBPCP) consisting of a strong emission fluorophore with benzoxazole and cyano groups is designed and synthesized to realize dual responses to volatile acid and organic amine vapors. The photophysical properties and self-assembly of the said derivative in the gel phase are also studied. C12PhBPCP can gelate organic solvents and self-assemble into 1 D nanofibers in the gels. UV/Vis absorption spectral results show H-aggregate formation during gelation, which indicates strong exciton coupling between fluorophores. Both wet gel and xerogel emit strong green fluorescence because the cyano group suppresses fluorescence quenching in the self-assemblies. Moreover, the xerogel film with strong green fluorescence can be used as a dual chemosensor for quantitative detection of volatile acid and organic amine vapors with fast response times and low detection limits owing to its large surface area and amplified fluorescence quenching. The detection limits are 796 ppt and 25 ppb for gaseous aniline and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), respectively.

  3. Molecular Gels Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Molecular gels and fibrillar networks – a comprehensive guide to experiment and theory Molecular Gels: Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks provides a comprehensive treatise on gelators, especially low molecular-mass gelators (LMOGs), and the properties of their gels. The structures and modes of formation of the self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFINs) that immobilize the liquid components of the gels are discussed experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic, rheological, and structural features of the different classes of LMOGs are also presented. Many examples of the application of the principal analytical techniques for investigation of molecular gels (including SANS, SAXS, WAXS, UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, scanning electron, transmission electron and optical microscopies, and molecular modeling) are presented didactically and in-depth, as are several of the theories of the stages of aggregation of individual LMOG molecules leading to SAFINs. Several actua...

  4. Location deterministic biosensing from quantum-dot-nanowire assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Kim, Kwanoh; Fan, D L

    2014-08-25

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with high fluorescent brightness, stability, and tunable sizes, have received considerable interest for imaging, sensing, and delivery of biomolecules. In this research, we demonstrate location deterministic biochemical detection from arrays of QD-nanowire hybrid assemblies. QDs with diameters less than 10 nm are manipulated and precisely positioned on the tips of the assembled Gold (Au) nanowires. The manipulation mechanisms are quantitatively understood as the synergetic effects of dielectrophoretic (DEP) and alternating current electroosmosis (ACEO) due to AC electric fields. The QD-nanowire hybrid sensors operate uniquely by concentrating bioanalytes to QDs on the tips of nanowires before detection, offering much enhanced efficiency and sensitivity, in addition to the position-predictable rationality. This research could result in advances in QD-based biomedical detection and inspires an innovative approach for fabricating various QD-based nanodevices. PMID:25316926

  5. Location deterministic biosensing from quantum-dot-nanowire assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Kim, Kwanoh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Fan, D. L., E-mail: dfan@austin.utexas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-08-25

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with high fluorescent brightness, stability, and tunable sizes, have received considerable interest for imaging, sensing, and delivery of biomolecules. In this research, we demonstrate location deterministic biochemical detection from arrays of QD-nanowire hybrid assemblies. QDs with diameters less than 10 nm are manipulated and precisely positioned on the tips of the assembled Gold (Au) nanowires. The manipulation mechanisms are quantitatively understood as the synergetic effects of dielectrophoretic (DEP) and alternating current electroosmosis (ACEO) due to AC electric fields. The QD-nanowire hybrid sensors operate uniquely by concentrating bioanalytes to QDs on the tips of nanowires before detection, offering much enhanced efficiency and sensitivity, in addition to the position-predictable rationality. This research could result in advances in QD-based biomedical detection and inspires an innovative approach for fabricating various QD-based nanodevices.

  6. Location deterministic biosensing from quantum-dot-nanowire assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with high fluorescent brightness, stability, and tunable sizes, have received considerable interest for imaging, sensing, and delivery of biomolecules. In this research, we demonstrate location deterministic biochemical detection from arrays of QD-nanowire hybrid assemblies. QDs with diameters less than 10 nm are manipulated and precisely positioned on the tips of the assembled Gold (Au) nanowires. The manipulation mechanisms are quantitatively understood as the synergetic effects of dielectrophoretic (DEP) and alternating current electroosmosis (ACEO) due to AC electric fields. The QD-nanowire hybrid sensors operate uniquely by concentrating bioanalytes to QDs on the tips of nanowires before detection, offering much enhanced efficiency and sensitivity, in addition to the position-predictable rationality. This research could result in advances in QD-based biomedical detection and inspires an innovative approach for fabricating various QD-based nanodevices.

  7. A Guide to Using STITCHER for Overlapping Assembly PCR Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping PCR is commonly used in many molecular applications that include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping assembly PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online.

  8. A Guide to Using STITCHER for Overlapping Assembly PCR Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping PCR is commonly used in many molecular applications that include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping assembly PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online. PMID:27671928

  9. Fluorescent retroreflective signing of work zones : abstract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.P. de; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Kooi, F.L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescent retroreflective materials increase the brightness of traffic signs. In construction work zones a benefit is expected from the increased conspicuity of fluorescent retroreflective signs. Fluorescent material can be used instead of non-fluorescent materials both for the advance warning sig

  10. Probing the conformation of the fibronectin III1-2 domain by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, Nancy W; Lin, Zong; Rye, Hays S; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2009-02-01

    Fibronectin (FN) matrix is crucial for cell and tissue functions during embryonic development, wound healing, and oncogenesis. Assembly of FN matrix fibrils requires FN domains that mediate interactions with integrin receptors and with other FN molecules. In addition, regulation of FN matrix assembly depends on the first two FN type III modules, III(1) and III(2), which harbor FN-binding sites. We propose that interactions between these two modules sequester FN-binding sites in soluble FN and that these sites become exposed by FN conformational changes during assembly. To test the idea that III(1-2) has a compact conformation, we constructed CIIIY, a conformational sensor of III(1-2) based on fluorescent resonance energy transfer between cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins conjugated at its N and C termini. We demonstrate energy transfer in CIIIY and show that fluorescent resonance energy transfer was eliminated by proteolysis and by treatment with mild denaturants that disrupted intramolecular interactions between the two modules. We also show that mutations of key charged residues resulted in conformational changes that exposed binding sites for the N-terminal 70-kDa FN fragment. Collectively, these results support a conformation-dependent mechanism for the regulation of FN matrix assembly by III(1-2).

  11. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  12. Investigation of Quenching Mechanism in Thermoreversible Fluorescent Recording Materials of Fluorescence Using Thermochromic Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuzo Hirata,; Martin Vacha,; Toshiyuki Watanabe,

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrated reversible thermosensitive recording of a fluorescent image (TRF) using a low-molecular-weight mixture consisting of a fluorescent dye, a fluoran dye, a developer, and a reversible matrix. In this material, reversible thermoresponsive disorder-crystal transition triggers a cyclical colorless-color change of a fluoran dye, which induces on-off switching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a fluorescent dye to a fluoran dye. On-off switching of fluorescence is induced by heat-promoted off-on switching of FRET. Modulation of fluorescence is held at room temperature by utilizing thermal hysteresis, and nondestructive readout of the fluorescent image is accomplished in the presence of excitation light. Here, we investigate the on-off switching mechanism of fluorescence in this recording material. We analyzed the theoretical factor of emission quenching in the erasing state by comparing the theoretical overlap integral Ω between fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes on the basis of the FRET theory with experimental emission contrast for various combinations of fluorescent dyes and fluoran dyes. It was proved that fluorescence on-off switching occurs mainly by concentration quenching due to the aggregation of fluorescent dyes and FRET from isolated fluorescent dyes to colored fluoran dyes. The key issue to obtain both high-contrast fluorescence and high fluorescence quantum yield is to control these two factors.

  13. Identifying assembly-inhibiting and assembly-tolerant sites in the SbsB S-layer protein from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinns, Helen; Badelt-Lichtblau, Helga; Egelseer, Eva Maria; Sleytr, Uwe B; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-01-29

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins self-assemble into two-dimensional crystalline lattices that cover the cell wall of all archaea and many bacteria. We have generated assembly-negative protein variants of high solubility that will facilitate high-resolution structure determination. Assembly-negative versions of the S-layer protein SbsB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 were obtained using an insertion mutagenesis screen. The haemagglutinin epitope tag was inserted at 23 amino acid positions known to be located on the monomer protein surface from a previous cysteine accessibility screen. Limited proteolysis, circular dichroism, and fluorescence were used to probe whether the epitope insertion affected the secondary and tertiary structures of the monomer, while electron microscopy and size-exclusion chromatography were employed to examine proteins' ability to self-assemble. The screen not only identified assembly-compromised mutants with native fold but also yielded correctly folded, self-assembling mutants suitable for displaying epitopes for biomedical and biophysical applications, as well as cryo-electron microscopy imaging. Our study marks an important step in the analysis of the S-layer structure. In addition, the approach of concerted insertion and cysteine mutagenesis can likely be applied for other supramolecular assemblies.

  14. Design and assembly of supramolecular dual-modality nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Pengcheng; Ray Banerjee, Sangeeta; Xu, Jiadi; Pomper, Martin G.; Cui, Honggang

    2015-05-01

    We report the design and synthesis of self-assembling dual-modality molecular probes containing both a fluorophore for optical imaging and a metal ion chelator for imaging with MRI or radionuclide methods. These molecular probes can spontaneously associate into spherical nanoparticles under physiological conditions. We demonstrate the use of these supramolecular nanoprobes for live-cell optical imaging, as well as their potential use as MRI contrast agents after complexation with gadolinium. Our results suggest that self-assembly into supramolecular nanoprobes presents an effective means to enhance and tune the relaxivities of molecular probes.We report the design and synthesis of self-assembling dual-modality molecular probes containing both a fluorophore for optical imaging and a metal ion chelator for imaging with MRI or radionuclide methods. These molecular probes can spontaneously associate into spherical nanoparticles under physiological conditions. We demonstrate the use of these supramolecular nanoprobes for live-cell optical imaging, as well as their potential use as MRI contrast agents after complexation with gadolinium. Our results suggest that self-assembly into supramolecular nanoprobes presents an effective means to enhance and tune the relaxivities of molecular probes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods, materials, synthesis schemes, sample characterization, fluorescence measurements, cellular uptake and MRI experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01518a

  15. Computational design of co-assembling protein-DNA nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yun; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wannier, Timothy M.; Guo, Chin-Lin; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular self-assemblies are of great interest to nanotechnologists because of their functional versatility and their biocompatibility. Over the past decade, sophisticated single-component nanostructures composed exclusively of nucleic acids, peptides and proteins have been reported, and these nanostructures have been used in a wide range of applications, from drug delivery to molecular computing. Despite these successes, the development of hybrid co-assemblies of nucleic acids and proteins has remained elusive. Here we use computational protein design to create a protein-DNA co-assembling nanomaterial whose assembly is driven via non-covalent interactions. To achieve this, a homodimerization interface is engineered onto the Drosophila Engrailed homeodomain (ENH), allowing the dimerized protein complex to bind to two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. By varying the arrangement of protein-binding sites on the dsDNA, an irregular bulk nanoparticle or a nanowire with single-molecule width can be spontaneously formed by mixing the protein and dsDNA building blocks. We characterize the protein-DNA nanowire using fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray crystallography, confirming that the nanowire is formed via the proposed mechanism. This work lays the foundation for the development of new classes of protein-DNA hybrid materials. Further applications can be explored by incorporating DNA origami, DNA aptamers and/or peptide epitopes into the protein-DNA framework presented here.

  16. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  17. A Three-Component Assembly Promoted by Boronic Acids Delivers a Modular Fluorophore Platform (BASHY Dyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fábio M F; Rosa, João N; Candeias, Nuno R; Carvalho, Cátia Parente; Matos, Ana I; Ventura, Ana E; Florindo, Helena F; Silva, Liana C; Pischel, Uwe; Gois, Pedro M P

    2016-01-26

    The modular assembly of boronic acids with Schiff-base ligands enabled the construction of innovative fluorescent dyes [boronic acid salicylidenehydrazone (BASHY)] with suitable structural and photophysical properties for live cell bioimaging applications. This reaction enabled the straightforward synthesis (yields up to 99%) of structurally diverse and photostable dyes that exhibit a polarity-sensitive green-to-yellow emission with high quantum yields of up to 0.6 in nonpolar environments. These dyes displayed a high brightness (up to 54,000 M(-1) cm(-1)). The promising structural and fluorescence properties of BASHY dyes fostered the preparation of non-cytotoxic, stable, and highly fluorescent poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles that were effectively internalized by dendritic cells. The dyes were also shown to selectively stain lipid droplets in HeLa cells, without inducing any appreciable cytotoxicity or competing plasma membrane labeling; this confirmed their potential as fluorescent stains.

  18. Determination of amines based on their interaction with QDs: Effect of the formation QD-assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Formation of quantum dots-nanochains assisted by the covalent linking through bifunctional dithiol molecules. → With time, the extent of chain assembly and network formation became enhanced and interconnectivity between chains was observed. → The optical properties changed as a function of the total length of the structure. → Fluorescence response of QDs towards amines was enhanced after the formation of QD-assemblies induced by the presence of dithiol molecules. - Abstract: Assemblies of closed nanoparticles have focused interest because they exhibit new optical and chemical properties. The use of a 1D covalent strategy for quantum dots-assemblies has been proposed in this work as novelty. It was studied the effect of use different dithiols, including aromatic and aliphatic dithiol compounds, on the formation of QDs-assemblies in order to establish the influence of the linker's structure on the geometry of the assemblies, and hence on their properties. As a second part of the work, the changes on analytical response to analytes thanks to the formation of QDs-assemblies when dithiols are added were studied for firs time. For this study, some biogenic amines were selected as target analytes. We observed an improvement of 2.7-4 times in the sensitivity, expressed as slope of the calibration graph, when the dithiols were added to the system obtaining QDs-assemblies.

  19. Determination of amines based on their interaction with QDs: Effect of the formation QD-assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina; Simonet, Bartolome M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2011-10-10

    Highlights: {yields} Formation of quantum dots-nanochains assisted by the covalent linking through bifunctional dithiol molecules. {yields} With time, the extent of chain assembly and network formation became enhanced and interconnectivity between chains was observed. {yields} The optical properties changed as a function of the total length of the structure. {yields} Fluorescence response of QDs towards amines was enhanced after the formation of QD-assemblies induced by the presence of dithiol molecules. - Abstract: Assemblies of closed nanoparticles have focused interest because they exhibit new optical and chemical properties. The use of a 1D covalent strategy for quantum dots-assemblies has been proposed in this work as novelty. It was studied the effect of use different dithiols, including aromatic and aliphatic dithiol compounds, on the formation of QDs-assemblies in order to establish the influence of the linker's structure on the geometry of the assemblies, and hence on their properties. As a second part of the work, the changes on analytical response to analytes thanks to the formation of QDs-assemblies when dithiols are added were studied for firs time. For this study, some biogenic amines were selected as target analytes. We observed an improvement of 2.7-4 times in the sensitivity, expressed as slope of the calibration graph, when the dithiols were added to the system obtaining QDs-assemblies.

  20. Fluorescence of quantum dots on e-beam patterned and DNA origami substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Timothy D.; Kessinger, Matthew; Kidd, Jesse; Neff, David; Rahman, Masudur; Norton, Michael L.

    2015-05-01

    Attachment of quantum dots or fluorescent molecules to gold nanoparticles has a variety of optical labeling and sensory applications. In this study, we use both e-beam lithography and DNA origami to examine the fluorescence enhancement of fluorescent molecules and quantum dots with a systematic approach to understanding the contribution of gold nanoparticle size and interparticle spacing. The unique design of our patterns allows us to study the effects of size and spacing of the gold nanoparticles on the enhancement of fluorescence in one quick study with constant conditions - removing undesirable effects such as differences in concentration of quantum dots or other chemistry differences that plague multiple experiments. We also discuss the fluorescence and bonding of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots to both gold as well as DNA for use in self assembled DNA constructs. Specifically, bioconjugated CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots were synthesized and functionalized with MPA using both traditional ligand exchange as well as newly developed in situ functionalization techniques used to increase the quantum yield of the quantum dots. We will present fluorescent images showing results of optimal size and spacing for fluorescence as well as demonstrating attachment chemistry of the quantum dots.

  1. Quantitative single-molecule detection of protein based on DNA tetrahedron fluorescent nanolabels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    A highly sensitive method for single-molecule quantitative detection of human IgG is presented by the employment of a new fluorescent nanolabel. In this method, fluorescent nanolabels were assembled by inserting SYBR Green I into DNA tetrahedron nanostructure. The bio-nanolabels were attached to the streptavidin-antihuman antibody by a specific reaction between biotin and streptavidin. The antibody was combined with the target antigen, human IgG, which was immobilized on the silanized glass subtrate surface. Finally, epi-fluorescence microscopy (EFM) coupled with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device was employed for fluorescence imaging. The fluorescent spots corresponding to single protein molecule on images were counted and further used for the quantitative detection. It was found that the new nanolabel shows good photostability, biocompatiblity and exhibits no blinking compared to traditional labels like fluorescence dyes and quantum dot (QDs). In addition, the number of fluorescence spots on the images has a linear relationship with the concentration of human IgG in the range of 3.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-12)mol L(-1). What is more, this method showed an excellent specificity and a low matrix effect.

  2. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-26

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed

  3. Chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectrum inside a leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrós Esteban, Roberto; Moya, Ismael; Goulas, Yves; Jacquemoud, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence can be used as an early stress indicator. Fluorescence is also connected to photosynthesis so it can be proposed for global monitoring of vegetation status from a satellite platform. Nevertheless, the correct interpretation of fluorescence requires accurate physical models. The spectral shape of the leaf fluorescence free of any re-absorption effect plays a key role in the models and is difficult to measure. We present a vegetation fluorescence emission spectrum fre...

  4. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure

  5. Development of a tuneable test problem generator for assembly sequence planning and assembly line balancing

    OpenAIRE

    Ab Rashid, Mohd Fadzil Faisae; Hutabarat, Windo; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2012-01-01

    Assembly optimisation activities that involve assembly sequence planning and assembly line balancing have been extensively studied because of the importance of optimal assembly efficiency to manufacturing competitiveness. Numerous research works in assembly sequence planning and assembly line balancing mainly focus on developing algorithms to solve problems and to optimise assembly sequence planning and assembly line balancing. However, there is a scarcity in works that focus on developing pr...

  6. Multiplexed fluorescent microarray for human salivary protein analysis using polymer microspheres and fiber-optic bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuai; Benito-Peña, Elena; Zhang, Huaibin; Wu, Yue; Walt, David R

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe a protocol for simultaneously measuring six proteins in saliva using a fiber-optic microsphere-based antibody array. The immuno-array technology employed combines the advantages of microsphere-based suspension array fabrication with the use of fluorescence microscopy. As described in the video protocol, commercially available 4.5 μm polymer microspheres were encoded into seven different types, differentiated by the concentration of two fluorescent dyes physically trapped inside the microspheres. The encoded microspheres containing surface carboxyl groups were modified with monoclonal capture antibodies through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. To assemble the protein microarray, the different types of encoded and functionalized microspheres were mixed and randomly deposited in 4.5 μm microwells, which were chemically etched at the proximal end of a fiber-optic bundle. The fiber-optic bundle was used as both a carrier and for imaging the microspheres. Once assembled, the microarray was used to capture proteins in the saliva supernatant collected from the clinic. The detection was based on a sandwich immunoassay using a mixture of biotinylated detection antibodies for different analytes with a streptavidin-conjugated fluorescent probe, R-phycoerythrin. The microarray was imaged by fluorescence microscopy in three different channels, two for microsphere registration and one for the assay signal. The fluorescence micrographs were then decoded and analyzed using a homemade algorithm in MATLAB. PMID:24145242

  7. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  8. ITER assembly and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is intended to describe the work conducted by the ITER Assembly and Maintenance (A and M) Design Unit and the supporting home teams during the ITER Conceptual Design Activities, carried out from 1988 through 1990. Its content consists of two main sections, i.e., Chapter III, which describes the identified tasks to be performed by the A and M system and a general description of the required equipment; and Chapter IV, which provides a more detailed description of the equipment proposed to perform the assigned tasks. A two-stage R and D program is now planned, i.e., (1) a prototype equipment functional tests using full scale mock-ups and (2) a full scale integration demonstration test facility with real components (vacuum vessel with ports, blanket modules, divertor modules, armor tiles, etc.). Crucial in-vessel and ex-vessel operations and the associated remote handling equipment, including handling of divertor plates and blanket modules will be demonstrated in the first phase, whereby the database needed to proceed with the engineering phase will be acquired. The second phase will demonstrate the ability of the overall system to execute the required maintenance procedures and evaluate the performance of the prototype equipment

  9. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  10. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  11. Bearing assemblies, apparatuses, and motor assemblies using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Timothy N.; Cooley, Craig H.; Knuteson, Cody W.

    2015-12-29

    Various embodiments of the invention relate to bearing assemblies, apparatuses and motor assemblies that include geometric features configured to impart a selected amount of heat transfer and/or hydrodynamic film formation. In an embodiment, a bearing assembly may include a plurality of superhard bearing pads distributed circumferentially about an axis. At least some of the plurality of superhard bearing pads may include a plurality of sub-superhard bearing elements defining a bearing surface. At least some of the plurality of sub-superhard bearing elements may be spaced from one another by one or more voids to impart a selected amount of heat transfer and hydrodynamic film formation thereon during operation. The bearing assembly may also include a support ring that carries the plurality of superhard bearing pads. In addition, at least a portion of the sub-superhard bearing elements may extend beyond the support ring.

  12. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongxuan

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  13. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2013-01-01

    How-things-work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of the individual parts and the interactions across the parts based on their geometry and a few user-specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences, and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions across parts. We demonstrate our system on a wide variety of assemblies. © 2013 ACM 0001-0782/13/01.

  14. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2010-07-26

    How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions between parts. We present results for a wide variety of assemblies. © 2010 ACM.

  15. Toxicity test: Fluorescent silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujoka, K; Hoshino, A; Manome, Y [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Minatoku, Tokyo 105-8461 (Japan); Hanada, S; Kanaya, F; Yamamoto, K [Research Institute, National Centre for Global Health and Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Sato, K; Yokosuka, S; Takigami, Y; Hirakuri, K [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8457 (Japan); Shiohara, A; Tilley, R D [MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Manabe, N, E-mail: kfujioka@jikei.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advance Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-06

    Semiconductor nanoparticles ('quantum dots', QDs) are useful fluorescent materials because of their high fluorescent stability compared with existing organic fluorescent dyes. QDs were tested in many biochemical experiments, and the reported results suggested their advantages. However, when we consider their application at the clinical level, their large-scale use may be problematic because of their influence on the environment and the living body as a result of cadmium contained in existing mainstream QDs. Here we report on the characteristics of silicon particles (synthesised using the gas phase method and liquid phase method, currently in the development stage) as a substitute material, focusing on cell-level safety and the potential mechanisms of toxicity.

  16. Toxicity test: Fluorescent silicon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiconductor nanoparticles ('quantum dots', QDs) are useful fluorescent materials because of their high fluorescent stability compared with existing organic fluorescent dyes. QDs were tested in many biochemical experiments, and the reported results suggested their advantages. However, when we consider their application at the clinical level, their large-scale use may be problematic because of their influence on the environment and the living body as a result of cadmium contained in existing mainstream QDs. Here we report on the characteristics of silicon particles (synthesised using the gas phase method and liquid phase method, currently in the development stage) as a substitute material, focusing on cell-level safety and the potential mechanisms of toxicity.

  17. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  18. Surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from periodic quantum dot arrays through distance control using biomolecular linkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a protein-enabled strategy to fabricate quantum dot (QD) nanoarrays where up to a 15-fold increase in surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence has been achieved. This approach permits a comprehensive control both laterally (via lithographically defined gold nanoarrays) and vertically (via the QD-metal distance) of the collectively behaving assemblies of QDs and gold nanoarrays by way of biomolecular recognition. Specifically, we demonstrated the spectral tuning of plasmon resonant metal nanoarrays and self-assembly of protein-functionalized QDs in a stepwise fashion with a concomitant incremental increase in separation from the metal surface through biotin-streptavidin spacer units.

  19. An unusual role of folate in the self-assembly of heparin-folate conjugates into nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianquan; Ma, Daoshuang; Lu, Qian; Wu, Shaoxiong; Lee, Gee Young; Lane, Lucas A.; Li, Bin; Quan, Li; Wang, Yiqing; Nie, Shuming

    2015-09-01

    Tumor targeting agents including antibodies, peptides, and small molecules, are often used to improve the delivery efficiency of nanoparticles. Despite numerous studies investigating the abilities of targeting agents to increase the accumulation of nanosized therapeutics within diseased tissues, little attention has been focused on how these ligands can affect the self-assembly of the nanoparticle's modified polymer constituents upon chemical conjugation. Here we present an actively tumor targeted nanoparticle constructed via the self-assembly of a folate modified heparin. Folate conjugation unexpectedly allowed the self-assembly of heparin, where a majority of the folate molecules (>80%) resided inside the core of the nanoparticle. The folate-heparin nanoparticles could also physically encapsulate lipophilic fluorescent dyes, enabling the use of the constructs as activatable fluorescent probes for targeted in vivo tumor imaging.Tumor targeting agents including antibodies, peptides, and small molecules, are often used to improve the delivery efficiency of nanoparticles. Despite numerous studies investigating the abilities of targeting agents to increase the accumulation of nanosized therapeutics within diseased tissues, little attention has been focused on how these ligands can affect the self-assembly of the nanoparticle's modified polymer constituents upon chemical conjugation. Here we present an actively tumor targeted nanoparticle constructed via the self-assembly of a folate modified heparin. Folate conjugation unexpectedly allowed the self-assembly of heparin, where a majority of the folate molecules (>80%) resided inside the core of the nanoparticle. The folate-heparin nanoparticles could also physically encapsulate lipophilic fluorescent dyes, enabling the use of the constructs as activatable fluorescent probes for targeted in vivo tumor imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: NMR spectra and fluorescent images of HF-488 with cancer

  20. Fluorescence lifetime standards for time and frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boens, N.; Qin, Wenwu; Basaric, N.; Hofkens, J.; Ameloot, M.; Pouget, J.; Lefevre, J.P.; Valeur, B.; Gratton, E.; Ven, van de M.; Silva jr., D.; Engelborghs, Y.; Willaert, K.; Sillen, A.; Rumbles, G.; Philips, D.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.; Lakowicz, J.R.; Malak, H.; Gryczynski, I.; Szabo, A.G.; Krajcarski, D.T.; Tamai, N.; Miura, A.

    2007-01-01

    A series of fluorophores with single-exponential fluorescence decays in liquid solution at 20 C were measured independently by nine laboratories using single-photon timing and multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry instruments with lasers as excitation source. The dyes that can serve as flu

  1. Nuclear actin and protein 4.1: Essential interactions during nuclear assembly in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Chen, Cynthia; Penman, Sheldon; Heald, Rebecca

    2003-06-11

    Structural protein 4.1, which has crucial interactions within the spectin-actin lattice of the human red cell membrane skeleton, also is widely distributed at diverse intracellular sites in nucleated cells. We previously showed that 4.1 is essential for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro and that the capacity of 4.1 to bind actin is required. Here we report that 4.1 and actin colocalize in mammalian cell nuclei using fluorescence microscopy and, by higher resolution cell whole mount electron microscopy, are associated on nuclear filaments. We also devised a cell-free assay using Xenopus egg extract containing fluorescent actin to follow actin during nuclear assembly. By directly imaging actin under non-perturbing conditions, the total nuclear actin population is retained and is visualized in situ relative to intact chromatin. We detected actin initially when chromatin and nuclear pores began assembling. As the nuclear lamina assembled, but preceding DNA synthesis, a discrete actin network formed throughout the nucleus. Protein 4.1 epitopes also were detected when actin began to accumulate in nuclei, producing a diffuse coincident pattern. As nuclei matured, actin was detected both coincident with and also independent of 4.1 epitopes. To test whether acquisition of nuclear actin is required for nuclear assembly, the actin inhibitor latrunculin A was added to Xenopus egg extracts during nuclear assembly. Latrunculin A strongly perturbed nuclear assembly and produced distorted nuclear structures containing neither actin nor protein 4.1. Our results suggest that actin as well as 4.1 is necessary for nuclear assembly and that 4.1-actin interactions may be critical.

  2. Highly fluorescent resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules with efficient renal clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Kalpana; Patthipati, Venkata Suresh; Han, Sangbum; Swanson, R. James; Whelan, Eoin C.; Osgood, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Ramjee

    2016-08-01

    Nanomaterial based imaging approaches hold substantial promise in addressing current diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. One of the key requirements for the successful clinical translation of nanomaterials is their complete clearance from the body within a reasonable time period preferably via the renal filtration route. This article describes the synthesis of highly fluorescent, water soluble, resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules and demonstrates their effective renal clearance in mice. The synthesis and functionalization of nanocapsules was accomplished in a one-pot operation via thiol-ene reactions without involving self-assembly, sacrificial templates or emulsions. Water soluble resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules obtained by this approach were covalently functionalized with Alexa Fluor 750. Highly fluorescent nanocapsules with hydrodynamic diameters of 122 nm and 68 nm and extinction coefficients of 1.3 × 109 M-1 cm-1 and 1.5 × 108 M-1 cm-1 respectively were prepared by varying the reaction conditions. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these nanocapsules in mice followed by whole-body fluorescence imaging showed that they were both cleared renally within a few hours. Given the inherent encapsulation capabilities of nanocapsules, the renal clearance demonstrated in this work opens up new opportunities for their theranostic applications especially for targeting and treating the urinary tract.

  3. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  4. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  5. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  6. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  7. Assembly delay line pulse generators

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    Assembly of six of the ten delay line pulse generators that will power the ten kicker magnet modules. One modulator part contains two pulse generators. Capacitors, inductances, and voltage dividers are in the oil tank on the left. Triggered high-pressure spark gap switches are on the platforms on the right. High voltage pulse cables to the kicker magnet emerge under the spark gaps. In the centre background are the assembled master gaps.

  8. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  9. Los Alamos Critical Assemblies Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Critical Assemblies Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been in existence for thirty-five years. In that period, many thousands of measurements have been made on assemblies of 235U, 233U, and 239Pu in various configurations, including the nitrate, sulfate, fluoride, carbide, and oxide chemical compositions and the solid, liquid, and gaseous states. The present complex of eleven operating machines is described, and typical applications are presented

  10. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic components for led applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Anton

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) constitute a rapidly evolving and fast growing technology that promises to replace incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent lights in many illumination applications. Large-area LED luminaires have a capability to transform lighting by providing a venue for development of smart lighting systems with additional benefits, such as visible light communications, sensing, health and productivity improvement through color temperature control, capability of creating "virtual sky" ceiling, and many others. The objective of this work is to explore directed self-assembly (DSA) approaches suitable for cost-effective assembly of large amount of LEDs and other mesoscopic (i.e. millimeter and sub-millimeter) electronic components and thus to enable manufacturing of smart lighting luminaires. Existing alternative approaches for assembly of semiconductor dies are examined including transfer printing, laser-assisted die transfer, and various directed self-assembly approaches using shape-recognition, magnetic and capillary forces, etc. After comparing their advantages and limitations, we developed two approaches to magnetic force-assisted DSA of LEDs on a large-area substrate in liquid and air medium. The first approach involves pick-up of buoyant and magnetic dies from the liquid surface onto the flexible substrate in a roll-to-roll process. The possibility of high-speed assembly of LED dies is demonstrated, but with a low yield due to the influence of the capillary force of the carrier liquid and the difficulty in ensuring reliable supply of dies to the assembly interface. To overcome the aforementioned challenges this process was modified to assemble the dies by sinking them onto the receiving substrate with a stencil mask on top, demonstrating LED assembly with a very low error rate but at a lower speed. A solder-assisted self-alignment is used to further improve placement precision and to ensure the proper orientation of the dies. The second

  11. Metal selective co-ordinative self-assembly of -donors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ankit Jain; K Venkata Rao; Ankita Goswami; Subi J George

    2011-11-01

    Metal selective co-ordinative nanostructures were constructed by the supramolecular co-assembly of pyridine appended TTF (TTF-Py) and pyrene (PYR-Py) derivatives in appropriate solvent composition mixtures with metal ions.Microscopic analyses show that TTF-Py shows distinctive morphology with either of these metal ions, forming I-D tapes with 1:1 Pb2+ complex and 2-D sheets with 1:2 Zn2+ complex. A rationale has been provided from molecular level packing for such hierarchical changes. In case of Cu2+, we have observed an anomalous binding of metal ion to the core sulphur groups causing redox changes in the TTF core. PYR-Py on the other hand is shown to be a fluorescent sensor for Pb2+, Zn2+, Hg2+ and Ag+. With different fluorescent response for metal complexes, we essentially obtained similar 1-D assemblies suggesting similar binding modes for all of them. Supramolecular approach through which morphology of an electron donor moiety can be engineered by metal ions can be a new tool in nanoelectronics.

  12. Visual and fluorescent detection of acetamiprid based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on ratiometric fluorescence quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The RF-QDs were fabricated by two different QDs using layer-by-layer assembly methods. • The PL intensity of RF-QDs could be quenched by AuNPs based on inner-filter effect. • Acetamiprid can adsorb on AuNPs led to the PL intensity of RF-QDs recover properly. • AuNPs serve a dual function as fluorescence quencher and colorimetric reporter in the sensor. - Abstract: In this work, we develop a simple and rapid sensing method for the visual and fluorescent detection of acetamiprid (AC) based on the inner-filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on ratiometric fluorescent quantum dots (RF-QDs). The RF-QDs based dual-emission nanosensor was fabricated by assembling green emissive QDs (QDs539 nm, λem = 539 nm) on the surface of red emissive QDs (QDs661 nm, λem = 661 nm)-doped silica microspheres. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of RF-QDs could be quenched by AuNPs based on IFE. Acetamiprid can adsorb on the surface of AuNPs due to its cyano group that has good affinity with gold, which could induce the aggregation of AuNPs accompanying color change from red to blue. Thus, the IFE of AuNPs on RF-QDs was weakened and the PL intensity of RF-QDs was recovered accordingly. Under the optimized conditions, the PL intensity of the RF-QDs/AuNPs system was proportional to the concentration of AC in the range of 0.025–5.0 μg mL−1, with a detection limit of 16.8 μg L−1. The established method had been used for AC detection in environmental and agricultural samples with satisfactory results

  13. Lanthanide-Functionalized Hydrophilic Magnetic Hybrid Nanoparticles: Assembly, Magnetic Behaviour, and Photophysical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuai; Tang, Yu; Guo, Haijun; Qin, Shenjun; Wu, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    The lanthanide-functionalized multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles combining the superparamagnetic core and the luminescent europium complex were successfully designed and assembled via layer-by-layer strategy in this work. It is noted that the hybrid nanoparticles were modified by a hydrophilic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) through hydrogen bonding which bestowed excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility on this material. A bright-red luminescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy, revealing that these magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles were both colloidally and chemically stable in PBS solution. Therefore, the nanocomposite with magnetic resonance response and fluorescence probe property is considered to be of great potential in multi-modal bioimaging and diagnostic applications. PMID:27245169

  14. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  15. Fluorescent Labeling of Nanometer Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZHANG; Yuan YUAN; Changsheng LIU

    2008-01-01

    A novel surface treatment method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AMPTES), was developed to immobilize the fluorescein molecule on nano-HAP (nanometer hydroxyapatite) powders. By pretreating the nano-HAP powders surface with AMPTES, fluorescein, chosen on the basis of the chemical structure of the nano- HAP powders, could be bound to the nano-HAP powders surface. The chemical compositions of nano-HAP before and after being labeled were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology, phase composition, and the fluorescence characteristics of the nano-HAP powders with and without staining were also investigated. The FTIR and XPS results revealed that fiuorescein had been successfully immobilized on the surface of AMPTES-bound nano-HAP powders via the acylamide bond formation between the -COOH of fluorescein and the -NH2 of AMPTES. The labeled nano-HAP powders possessed strong fluorescent intensity with a little deviation from the maximum emission wavelength of fluorescein. But the morphology and phase composition had no obvious alteration. Under fluorescence microscopy, the labeled nano-HAP powders., even after 24 h cell incubation, exhibited strong fluorescence.

  16. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  17. Development of Sealed Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN; Hong-juan; ZHANG; Li-hua; LIU; Huan-liang; FAN; De-jun

    2012-01-01

    <正>In nuclear fuel reprocessing, the fluorescent analytical instrument can be used to analyze various trace elements, such as boron and thorium in uranium product. Due to the high radioactivity, strong acidity, fatal toxic and complex components of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing sample, analytical works become more difficult and instruments used can be damaged easier.

  18. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  19. Fluorescent probes for investigation of isoprenoid configuration and size discrimination by bactoprenol-utilizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Anahita Z; Lujan, Donovan K; Erickson, Katelyn M; Martinez, Christina D; Troutman, Jerry M

    2013-09-01

    Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase (UPPS) is an enzyme critical to the production of complex polysaccharides in bacteria, as it produces the crucial bactoprenol scaffold on which these materials are assembled. Methods to characterize the systems associated with polysaccharide production are non-trivial, in part due to the lack of chemical tools to investigate their assembly. In this report, we develop a new fluorescent tool using UPPS to incorporate a powerful fluorescent anthranilamide moiety into bactoprenol. The activity of this analogue in polysaccharide biosynthesis is then tested with the initiating hexose-1-phosphate transferases involved in Capsular Polysaccharide A biosynthesis in the symbiont Bacteroides fragilis and the asparagine-linked glycosylation system of the pathogenic Campylobacter jejuni. In addition, it is shown that the UPPS used to make this probe is not specific for E-configured isoprenoid substrates and that elongation by UPPS is required for activity with the downstream enzymes. PMID:23816045

  20. Influenza a virus assembly intermediates fuse in the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawala, Seema S; Wu, Yicong; Wawrzusin, Peter; Kabat, Juraj; Broadbent, Andrew J; Lamirande, Elaine W; Fodor, Ervin; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Shroff, Hari; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-03-01

    Reassortment of influenza viral RNA (vRNA) segments in co-infected cells can lead to the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential. Replication of influenza vRNA occurs in the nucleus of infected cells, while progeny virions bud from the plasma membrane. However, the intracellular mechanics of vRNA assembly into progeny virions is not well understood. Here we used recent advances in microscopy to explore vRNA assembly and transport during a productive infection. We visualized four distinct vRNA segments within a single cell using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and observed that foci containing more than one vRNA segment were found at the external nuclear periphery, suggesting that vRNA segments are not exported to the cytoplasm individually. Although many cytoplasmic foci contain multiple vRNA segments, not all vRNA species are present in every focus, indicating that assembly of all eight vRNA segments does not occur prior to export from the nucleus. To extend the observations made in fixed cells, we used a virus that encodes GFP fused to the viral polymerase acidic (PA) protein (WSN PA-GFP) to explore the dynamics of vRNA assembly in live cells during a productive infection. Since WSN PA-GFP colocalizes with viral nucleoprotein and influenza vRNA segments, we used it as a surrogate for visualizing vRNA transport in 3D and at high speed by inverted selective-plane illumination microscopy. We observed cytoplasmic PA-GFP foci colocalizing and traveling together en route to the plasma membrane. Our data strongly support a model in which vRNA segments are exported from the nucleus as complexes that assemble en route to the plasma membrane through dynamic colocalization events in the cytoplasm. PMID:24603687

  1. Influenza a virus assembly intermediates fuse in the cytoplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema S Lakdawala

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reassortment of influenza viral RNA (vRNA segments in co-infected cells can lead to the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential. Replication of influenza vRNA occurs in the nucleus of infected cells, while progeny virions bud from the plasma membrane. However, the intracellular mechanics of vRNA assembly into progeny virions is not well understood. Here we used recent advances in microscopy to explore vRNA assembly and transport during a productive infection. We visualized four distinct vRNA segments within a single cell using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and observed that foci containing more than one vRNA segment were found at the external nuclear periphery, suggesting that vRNA segments are not exported to the cytoplasm individually. Although many cytoplasmic foci contain multiple vRNA segments, not all vRNA species are present in every focus, indicating that assembly of all eight vRNA segments does not occur prior to export from the nucleus. To extend the observations made in fixed cells, we used a virus that encodes GFP fused to the viral polymerase acidic (PA protein (WSN PA-GFP to explore the dynamics of vRNA assembly in live cells during a productive infection. Since WSN PA-GFP colocalizes with viral nucleoprotein and influenza vRNA segments, we used it as a surrogate for visualizing vRNA transport in 3D and at high speed by inverted selective-plane illumination microscopy. We observed cytoplasmic PA-GFP foci colocalizing and traveling together en route to the plasma membrane. Our data strongly support a model in which vRNA segments are exported from the nucleus as complexes that assemble en route to the plasma membrane through dynamic colocalization events in the cytoplasm.

  2. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  3. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins. (paper)

  4. Anorganic fluorescence reference materials for decay time of fluorescence emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A.; Ottermann, C.; Klahn, J.; Korb, T.; Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Kynast, U.; Rupertus, V.

    2008-02-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools, detection methods and imaging applications for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics, and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for steady state fluorescence diagnostics, a method having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers such as absorption/excitation cross sections and quantum yield. This has been done for different types of dopands in different materials such as glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Samples doped with several fluophores of different emission wavelengths and decay times are required for fluorescent multiplexing applications. Decay times shorter than 100 ns are of special interest. In addition, a proper knowledge is necessary of quantum efficiency in highly scattering media. Recently, quantum efficiency in YAG:Ce glass ceramics has been successfully investigated. Glass and glass ceramics doped with threefold charged rare earth elements are available. However, these samples have the disadvantage of emission decay times much longer than 1 microsecond, due to the excitation and emission of their optical forbidden electronic transitions. Therefore first attempts have been made to produce decay-time standards based on organic and inorganic fluophores. Stable LUMOGEN RED pigments and YAG:Ce phosphors are diluted simultaneously in silicone matrices using a wide range of concentrations between 0.0001 and 2 wt%. Organic LUMOGEN RED has decay times in the lower nanosecond range with a slight dependency on concentration

  5. Size-Selective Nanoparticle Assembly on Substrates by DNA Density Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Benjamin D; Lin, Qing-Yuan; Wu, Huanxin; Luijten, Erik; Mirkin, Chad A; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2016-06-28

    The vision of nanoscale self-assembly research is the programmable synthesis of macroscale structures with controlled long and short-range order that exhibit a desired set of properties and functionality. However, strategies to reliably isolate and manipulate the nanoscale building blocks based on their size, shape, or chemistry are still in their infancy. Among the promising candidates, DNA-mediated self-assembly has enabled the programmable assembly of nanoparticles into complex architectures. In particular, two-dimensional assembly on substrates has potential for the development of integrated functional devices and analytical systems. Here, we combine the high-resolution patterning capabilities afforded by electron-beam lithography with the DNA-mediated assembly process to enable direct-write grayscale DNA density patterning. This method allows modulation of the functionally active DNA surface density to control the thermodynamics of interactions between nanoparticles and the substrate. We demonstrate that size-selective directed assembly of nanoparticle films from solutions containing a bimodal distribution of particles can be realized by exploiting the cooperativity of DNA binding in this system. To support this result, we study the temperature-dependence of nanoparticle assembly, analyze the DNA damage by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy, and employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the size-selection behavior. PMID:27192324

  6. Extremely strong self-assembly of a bimetallic salen complex visualized at the single-molecule level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salassa, G.; Coenen, M.J.; Wezenberg, S.J.; Hendriksen, B.L.; Speller, S.; Elemans, J.A.; Kleij, A.W.

    2012-01-01

    A bis-Zn(salphen) structure shows extremely strong self-assembly both in solution as well as at the solid-liquid interface as evidenced by scanning tunneling microscopy, competitive UV-vis and fluorescence titrations, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. Density functional

  7. Localization of GroEL determined by in vivo incorporation of a fluorescent amino acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Wang, Jiangyun; Brustad, Eric;

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone GroEL is required for bacterial growth under all conditions, mediating folding assistance, via its central cavity, to a diverse set of cytosolic proteins; yet the subcellular localization of GroEL remains unresolved. An earlier study, using antibody probing of fixed...... the steric demands of a fluorescent protein fusion, which compromises proper GroEL assembly. Further, this unnatural amino acid incorporation avoids artifacts that can occur with fixation and antibody staining....

  8. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hogue, Ian B.; Jens B Bosse; Jiun-Ruey Hu; Thiberge, Stephan Y.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2014-01-01

    Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV) particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluo...

  9. Cellular Uptake of Tile-Assembled DNA Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Kocabey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA-based nanostructures have received great attention as molecular vehicles for cellular delivery of biomolecules and cancer drugs. Here, we report on the cellular uptake of tubule-like DNA tile-assembled nanostructures 27 nm in length and 8 nm in diameter that carry siRNA molecules, folic acid and fluorescent dyes. In our observations, the DNA structures are delivered to the endosome and do not reach the cytosol of the GFP-expressing HeLa cells that were used in the experiments. Consistent with this observation, no elevated silencing of the GFP gene could be detected. Furthermore, the presence of up to six molecules of folic acid on the carrier surface did not alter the uptake behavior and gene silencing. We further observed several challenges that have to be considered when performing in vitro and in vivo experiments with DNA structures: (i DNA tile tubes consisting of 42 nt-long oligonucleotides and carrying single- or double-stranded extensions degrade within one hour in cell medium at 37 °C, while the same tubes without extensions are stable for up to eight hours. The degradation is caused mainly by the low concentration of divalent ions in the media. The lifetime in cell medium can be increased drastically by employing DNA tiles that are 84 nt long. (ii Dyes may get cleaved from the oligonucleotides and then accumulate inside the cell close to the mitochondria, which can lead to misinterpretation of data generated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. (iii Single-stranded DNA carrying fluorescent dyes are internalized at similar levels as the DNA tile-assembled tubes used here.

  10. Molecular self-assembly advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dequan, Alex Li

    2012-01-01

    In the past several decades, molecular self-assembly has emerged as one of the main themes in chemistry, biology, and materials science. This book compiles and details cutting-edge research in molecular assemblies ranging from self-organized peptide nanostructures and DNA-chromophore foldamers to supramolecular systems and metal-directed assemblies, even to nanocrystal superparticles and self-assembled microdevices

  11. 49 CFR 572.186 - Abdomen assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Abdomen assembly. 572.186 Section 572.186... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.186 Abdomen assembly. (a) The abdomen assembly (175-5000) is part of the dummy assembly shown in drawing 175-0000 including load sensors specified in §...

  12. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.113 Section 572.113... 50th Percentile Male § 572.113 Neck assembly. The head/neck assembly consists of the parts 78051-61X...) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head and neck assembly in a test environment at any temperature between...

  13. 48 CFR 239.7409 - Special assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special assembly. 239.7409... Services 239.7409 Special assembly. (a) Special assembly is the designing, manufacturing, arranging... general use equipment. (b) Special assembly rates and charges shall be based on estimated costs....

  14. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.112 Section 572.112... 50th Percentile Male § 572.112 Head assembly. The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 78051-61X...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly...

  15. A lightweight suction gripper for micro assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, E.J.C.; Bullema, J.E.; Delbressine, F.L.M.; Schellekens, P.H.J.; Dietzel, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Assembly is a crucial part in the realization of a product. Compared to assembly in the macro world, assembly in the micro world is influenced by scaling effects. These include surface forces, high requirements on placement uncertainty and small product dimensions. Conventional high-speed assembly i

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy: basic foundations and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  17. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Bosse, Jens B; Engel, Esteban A; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-11-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  18. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  19. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good biocompatibility and high fluorescence. Meanwhile, fluorescence CDs overcome the shortcomings of high toxicity of traditional nanomaterials. Moreover, the preparation procedure of fluorescent CDs is simple and easy. Therefore, fluorescent CDs have great potential applied in photocatalysis, biochemical sensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other related areas. In this paper, recent hot researches on fluorescent CDs are reviewed and some problems in the progress of fluorescent CDs are also summarized. At last, a future outlook in this direction is presented.

  20. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  1. Temperature-dependent relaxation of excitons in tubular molecular aggregates: Fluorescence decay and stokes shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugzlys, A; Augulis, R; van Loosdrecht, P H M; Didraga, C; Malyshev, V A; Knoester, J

    2006-10-19

    We report temperature-dependent steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies to probe the exciton dynamics in double-wall tubular J-aggregates formed by self-assembly of the dye 3,3'-bis(3-sulfopropyl)-5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1'-dioctylbenzimidacarbocyanine. We focus on the lowest energy fluorescence band, originating from the inner cylindrical wall. At low temperatures, the experiments reveal a nonexponential decay of the fluorescence, with a typical time scale that depends on the emission wavelength. At these temperatures we also find a dynamic Stokes shift of the fluorescence spectrum and its nonmonotonic dependence on temperature under steady-state conditions. All these data indicate that below about 20 K the excitons in the lowest fluorescence band do not reach thermal equilibrium before emission occurs, while above about 60 K thermalization on this time scale is complete. By comparing the two lowest fluorescence bands, we also find indications for fast energy transfer from the outer to the inner wall. We show that the Frenkel exciton model with diagonal disorder, which previously has been proposed to explain the absorption and linear dichroism spectra of these aggregates, yields a quantitative explanation to the observed dynamics. To this end, we extend the model to account for weak phonon-induced scattering of the localized exciton states; the spectral dynamics are then described by solving a Pauli master equation for the exciton populations. PMID:17034206

  2. Anastral spindle assembly and γ-tubulin in Drosophila oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallen Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anastral spindles assemble by a mechanism that involves microtubule nucleation and growth from chromatin. It is still uncertain whether γ-tubulin, a microtubule nucleator essential for mitotic spindle assembly and maintenance, plays a role. Not only is the requirement for γ-tubulin to form anastral Drosophila oocyte meiosis I spindles controversial, but its presence in oocyte meiosis I spindles has not been demonstrated and is uncertain. Results We show, for the first time, using a bright GFP fusion protein and live imaging, that the Drosophila maternally-expressed γTub37C is present at low levels in oocyte meiosis I spindles. Despite this, we find that formation of bipolar meiosis I spindles does not require functional γTub37C, extending previous findings by others. Fluorescence photobleaching assays show rapid recovery of γTub37C in the meiosis I spindle, similar to the cytoplasm, indicating weak binding by γTub37C to spindles, and fits of a new, potentially more accurate model for fluorescence recovery yield kinetic parameters consistent with transient, diffusional binding. Conclusions The FRAP results, together with its mutant effects late in meiosis I, indicate that γTub37C may perform a role subsequent to metaphase I, rather than nucleating microtubules for meiosis I spindle formation. Weak binding to the meiosis I spindle could stabilize pre-existing microtubules or position γ-tubulin for function during meiosis II spindle assembly, which follows rapidly upon oocyte activation and completion of the meiosis I division.

  3. Evolution of a fluorinated green fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Link, A. James; Tirrell, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence of bacterial cells expressing a variant (GFPm) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was reduced to background levels by global replacement of the leucine residues of GFPm by 5,5,5-trifluoroleucine. Eleven rounds of random mutagenesis and screening via fluorescence-activated cell sorting yielded a GFP mutant containing 20 amino acid substitutions. The mutant protein in fluorinated form showed improved folding efficiency both in vivo and in vitro, and the median fluorescence ...

  4. Entangled-photon coincidence fluorescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok H.

    2008-01-01

    We describe fluorescence imaging using the second-order correlation of entangled photon pairs. The proposed method is based on the principle that one photon of the pair carries information on where the other photon has been absorbed and has produced fluorescence in a sample. Because fluorescent molecules serve as “detectors” breaking the entanglement, multiply-scattered fluorescence photons within the sample do not cause image blur. We discuss experimental implementations.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of new fluorescent nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Tao; Xu Hun; Zhu Jun Zhang

    2008-01-01

    A novel kind of fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) has been prepared using a precipitation polymerization method.Methacrylic acid,trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and azobisisobutyronitrile were used as functional-monomer,cross-linker and initiator,respectively.Compared with other fluorescent nanoparticles,the FNPs have the characteristics including low dye leakage and good photostability.The fluorescence microscopy imaging indicates that the FNPs can be used as fluorescent labels in bioanalysis.

  6. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  7. Product lifecycle-oriented virtual assembly technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-hua; NING Ru-xin; YAO Jun; WAN Bi-le

    2006-01-01

    VA (virtual assembly) provides a more efficient,intuitive and convenient method for assembly process modeling,simulation and analysis.Previous researches about VA are almost isolated and dispersive,and have not established the understanding and definition of VA from a macroscopical and integrated view.Based on the analysis of the connotations of VA,a PLO-VATA (product lifecycle-oriented virtual assembly technology architecture) is proposed,in this architecture,VA is decomposed into four basic elements:principles and methodology of DFA (design for assembly),assembly analysis and evaluation,virtual assembly model and virtual assembly toolkits.Immersion,concurrence,integration and collaboration are the four main characteristics of VA being put forward.The key techniques of VA including virtual assembly model,virtual assembly analysis and evaluation,and virtual assembly process planning are discussed.Finally,a prototype system is built to validate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  8. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  9. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the d

  10. Assembly of lamins in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINGUNGWEI; XIANGJUNTONG; 等

    1996-01-01

    After lamins A,B and C were isolated and purified from rat liver,their assembly properties were examined by electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy by electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy using negative staining and the glycerol coating method,respectively.By varying the assembly time or the ionic conditions under which polymerization takes place,we have observed different stages of lamin assembly,which may provide clues on the structure of the 10 nm lamin filaments.At the first level of structural organization,two lamin polypeptides associate laterally into dimers with the two domains being parallel and in register.At the second level of structural organization,two dimers associate in a half-staggered and antiparallel fashion to form a tetramer 75 nm in length.At the third level of structural organization,4-10 lamin tetramers associate laterally in register to form 75 nm long 10nm filaments,which in turn combine head to head into long,fully assembled lamin filaments.The assembled lamin filaments are nonpolar.

  11. Polymer Directed Self-Assembly of pH-Responsive Antioxidant Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Christina; Amin, Devang; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Anthony, John E.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed pH-responsive, multifunctional nanoparticles based on encapsulation of an antioxidant, tannic acid (TA), using Flash NanoPrecipitation, a polymer directed self-assembly method. Formation of insoluble coordination complexes of tannic acid and iron during mixing drives nanoparticle assembly. Tuning the core material to polymer ratio, the size of the nanoparticles can be readily tuned between 50 and 265 nm. The resulting nanoparticle is pH-responsive, i.e. stable at pH 7.4 and soluble under acidic conditions due to the nature of the coordination complex. Further, the coordination complex can be coprecipitated with other hydrophobic materials such as therapeutics or imaging agents. For example, coprecipitation with a hydrophobic fluorescent dye creates fluorescent nanoparticles. In vitro, the nanoparticles have low cytotoxicity show antioxidant activity. Therefore, these particles may facilitate intracellular delivery of antioxidants. PMID:25760226

  12. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen;

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at ....

  13. SELF-ASSEMBLING AMPHIPHILIC POLYELECTROLYTES AND THEIR NANOSTRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yotaro Morishima

    2000-01-01

    The self-assembling behavior of random copolymers of sodium 2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropanesulfonate (AMPS)and hydrophobic comonomers possessing dodecyl groups linked by various spacer bonds was discussed with a focus on the effect of the spacer. The characterization of association behavior of such polymers in water using quasielastic light scattering,capillary electrophoresis, NMR relaxation, various fluorescence, and viscoelastic methods was described. These copolymers form a variety of self-assembled nanostructures depending on the type of the spacer. Random copolymers of AMPS and Ndodecylmethacrylamide show a strong preference for intrapolymer self-association even in concentrated aqueous solutions forming single-macromolecular self-assemblies (unimolecular micelles). In contrast, random copolymers of AMPS and dodecyl methacrylate are prone to undergo interpolymer associations yielding multipolymer micelles. In random copolymers of AMPS and a methacrylate substituted a nonionic surfactant (HO(CH2CH2O)25C12H25) (C12E25), dodecyl groups are much less restricted by the polymer backbone because they are linked via a long, flexible hydrophilic spacer. Thus, the polymerbound C12E25 surfactant moieties form micelles similar to those formed by discrete surfactants, but they are bridged by polymer chains forming a network structure.

  14. Coronavirus envelope (E) protein remains at the site of assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatagopalan, Pavithra [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Daskalova, Sasha M. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Lopez, Lisa A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Dolezal, Kelly A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Hogue, Brenda G., E-mail: Brenda.Hogue@asu.edu [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble at endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and egress from cells in cargo vesicles. Only a few molecules of the envelope (E) protein are assembled into virions. The role of E in morphogenesis is not fully understood. The cellular localization and dynamics of mouse hepatitis CoV A59 (MHV) E protein were investigated to further understanding of its role during infection. E protein localized in the ERGIC and Golgi with the amino and carboxy termini in the lumen and cytoplasm, respectively. E protein does not traffic to the cell surface. MHV was genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag at the carboxy end of E. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) confirmed the presence of E in Golgi cisternae. The results provide strong support that E proteins carry out their function(s) at the site of budding/assembly. - Highlights: • Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-CoV) E protein localizes in the ERGIC and Golgi. • MHV-CoV E does not transport to the cell surface. • MHV-CoV can be genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag appended to E. • First FRAP and correlative light electron microscopy of a CoV E protein. • Live-cell imaging shows that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes.

  15. Chromatin Assembly at Kinetochores Is Uncoupled from DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Richard D.; Monier, Karine; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2000-01-01

    The specification of metazoan centromeres does not depend strictly on centromeric DNA sequences, but also requires epigenetic factors. The mechanistic basis for establishing a centromeric “state” on the DNA remains unclear. In this work, we have directly examined replication timing of the prekinetochore domain of human chromosomes. Kinetochores were labeled by expression of epitope-tagged CENP-A, which stably marks prekinetochore domains in human cells. By immunoprecipitating CENP-A mononucleosomes from synchronized cells pulsed with [3H]thymidine we demonstrate that CENP-A–associated DNA is replicated in mid-to-late S phase. Cytological analysis of DNA replication further demonstrated that centromeres replicate asynchronously in parallel with numerous other genomic regions. In contrast, quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrates that CENP-A protein synthesis occurs later, in G2. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and transient transfection in the presence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA replication, show that CENP-A can assemble into centromeres in the absence of DNA replication. Thus, unlike most genomic chromatin, histone synthesis and assembly are uncoupled from DNA replication at the kinetochore. Uncoupling DNA replication from CENP-A synthesis suggests that regulated chromatin assembly or remodeling could play a role in epigenetic centromere propagation. PMID:11086012

  16. Biocompatible fluorescent supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel for long-term cell tracking and tumor imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Mao, Duo; Wang, Youzhi; Wang, Kai; Yi, Xiaoyong; Kong, Deling; Yang, Zhimou; Liu, Qian; Ding, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible peptide-based supramolecular hydrogel has recently emerged as a new and promising system for biomedical applications. In this work, Rhodamine B is employed as a new capping group of self-assembling peptide, which not only provides the driving force for supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel formation, but also endows the hydrogel with intrinsic fluroescence signal, allowing for various bioimaging applications. The fluorescent peptide nanofibrous hydrogel can be formed via disulfide bond reduction. After dilution of the hydrogel with aqueous solution, the fluorescent nanofiber suspension can be obtained. The resultant nanofibers are able to be internalized by the cancer cells and effectively track the HeLa cells for as long as 7 passages. Using a tumor-bearing mouse model, it is also demonstrated that the fluorescent supramolecular nanofibers can serve as an efficient probe for tumor imaging in a high-contrast manner.

  17. Bioaerosol Analysis by Online Fluorescence Detection and Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Treutlein, Bärbel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol filter samples. To our knowledge, however, this is the first study reporting continuous online measurements of bioaerosol particles over several months, a range of characteristic size distribution patterns, and a persistent bioaerosol peak at 3 μm. The measurement results confirm that PBAPs account for a substantial proportion of coarse aerosol particle number and mass in continental boundary layer air. Moreover, they suggest that the number concentration of viable bioparticles is dominated by fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria with aerodynamic diameters around 3 μm rather than single bacterial cells with diameters around 1 μm. Filter samples were later collected at the same sampling location and analyzed with a fluorescence microscope. By observing collected particles both with transmitted white light and with fluorescent emission from near-UV excitation, the technique provides information about whether individual particles are biological and regarding their viability. Characteristic images of FBAPs

  18. Localized surface plasmon-influenced fluorescence decay in dye-doped metallo-dielectric opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, Dipak [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Vijaya, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Centre for Lasers and Photonics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2016-01-14

    Well-ordered opaline photonic crystals are grown by inward growing self-assembly method from Rhodamine B dye-doped polystyrene colloids. Subsequent to self-assembly, the crystals are infiltrated with gold nanoparticles of 40 nm diameter. Measurements of the stopband features and photoluminescence intensity from these crystals are supplemented by fluorescence decay time analysis. The fluorescence decay times from the dye-doped photonic crystals before and after the infiltration are dramatically different from each other. A lowered fluorescence decay time was observed for the case of gold infiltrated crystal along with an enhanced emission intensity. Double-exponential decay nature of the fluorescence from the dye-doped crystal gets converted into single-exponential decay upon the infiltration of gold nanoparticles due to the resonant radiative process resulting from the overlap of the surface plasmon resonance with the emission spectrum. The influence of localized surface plasmon due to gold nanoparticles on the increase in emission intensity and decrease in decay time of the emitters is established.

  19. Purification of recombinant human and Drosophila septin hexamers for TIRF assays of actin-septin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, M; Tsai, F-C; Koenderink, G H

    2016-01-01

    Septins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that are conserved from fungi to humans. Septins assemble into heterooligomeric complexes and higher-order structures with key roles in various cellular functions including cell migration and division. The mechanisms by which septins assemble and interact with other cytoskeletal elements like actin remain elusive. A powerful approach to address this question is by cell-free reconstitution of purified cytoskeletal proteins combined with fluorescence microscopy. Here, we describe procedures for the purification of recombinant Drosophila and human septin hexamers from Escherichia coli and reconstitution of actin-septin coassembly. These procedures can be used to compare assembly of Drosophila and human septins and their coassembly with the actin cytoskeleton by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  1. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-10-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation--integration.

  2. Ruby fluorescence pressure scale: Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Lei; Bi Yan; Xu Ji-Ar

    2013-01-01

    Effect of non-hydrostatic stress on X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) is studied.The pressure gradient in the sample chamber leads to the broadening of the diffraction peaks,which increase with the hkl index of the crystal.It is found that the difference between the determined d-spacing compressive ratio d/d0 and the real d-spacing compressive ratio dr/d0 is determined by the yield stress of the pressure transmitting media (if used) and the shear modulus of the sample.On the basis of the corrected experiment data of Mao et al.(MXB86),which was used to calibrate the most widely used ruby fluorescence scale,a new relationship of ruby fluorescence pressure scale is corrected,i.e.,P =(1904/9.827)[(1 +△λ/λ0)9.827-1}.

  3. New Fluorescence Probes for Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluorescence measurements have been used for the investigation of interaction between the bovine serum albumin (BSA and fluorescence probes: 3-hydroxy-2,4- bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ6, 3-hydroxy- 2,4-bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ7 and 3-hydroxy-2,4-bis[(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ8. The binding constant between bovine serum albumin and squarine dyes has been determined by using both the Benesi-Hildebrand and Stern-Volmer equations. The negative value of free energy change indicates the existence of a spontaneous complexation process of BSA with squarine dyes.

  4. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  5. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  6. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  7. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distr...

  8. FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER TEST SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-05-30

    This report describes the modeling of a PWR fuel assembly under dynamic shock loading in support of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) shaker test campaign. The focus of the test campaign is on evaluating the response of used fuel to shock and vibration loads that a can occur during highway transport. Modeling began in 2012 using an LS-DYNA fuel assembly model that was first created for modeling impact scenarios. SNL’s proposed test scenario was simulated through analysis and the calculated results helped guide the instrumentation and other aspects of the testing. During FY 2013, the fuel assembly model was refined to better represent the test surrogate. Analysis of the proposed loads suggested the frequency band needed to be lowered to attempt to excite the lower natural frequencies of the fuel assembly. Despite SNL’s expansion of lower frequency components in their five shock realizations, pretest predictions suggested a very mild dynamic response to the test loading. After testing was completed, one specific shock case was modeled, using recorded accelerometer data to excite the model. Direct comparison of predicted strain in the cladding was made to the recorded strain gauge data. The magnitude of both sets of strain (calculated and recorded) are very low, compared to the expected yield strength of the Zircaloy-4 material. The model was accurate enough to predict that no yielding of the cladding was expected, but its precision at predicting micro strains is questionable. The SNL test data offers some opportunity for validation of the finite element model, but the specific loading conditions of the testing only excite the fuel assembly to respond in a limited manner. For example, the test accelerations were not strong enough to substantially drive the fuel assembly out of contact with the basket. Under this test scenario, the fuel assembly model does a reasonable job of approximating actual fuel assembly response, a claim that can be verified through

  9. Workload analyse of assembling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    The workload is the most important indicator for managers responsible of industrial technological processes no matter if these are automated, mechanized or simply manual in each case, machines or workers will be in the focus of workload measurements. The paper deals with workload analyses made to a most part manual assembling technology for roller bearings assembling process, executed in a big company, with integrated bearings manufacturing processes. In this analyses the delay sample technique have been used to identify and divide all bearing assemblers activities, to get information about time parts from 480 minutes day work time that workers allow to each activity. The developed study shows some ways to increase the process productivity without supplementary investments and also indicated the process automation could be the solution to gain maximum productivity.

  10. Template-assembled melittin: structural and functional characterization of a designed, synthetic channel-forming protein.

    OpenAIRE

    PAWLAK, M.; Meseth, U; Dhanapal, B.; Mutter, M.; Vogel, H.

    1994-01-01

    Template-assembled proteins (TASPs) comprising 4 peptide blocks, each of either the natural melittin sequence (melittin-TASP) or of a truncated melittin sequence (amino acids 6-26, melittin6-26-TASP), C-terminally linked to a (linear or cyclic) 10-amino acid template were synthesized and characterized, structurally by CD, by fluorescence spectroscopy, and by monolayer experiments, and functionally, by electrical conductance measurements on planar bilayers and release experiments on dye-loaded...

  11. Synthesis and self-assembly of multiple thermoresponsive amphiphilic block copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Weiß, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In the present thesis, the self-assembly of multi thermoresponsive block copolymers in dilute aqueous solution was investigated by a combination of turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering, TEM measurements, NMR as well as fluorescence spectroscopy. The successive conversion of such block copolymers from a hydrophilic into a hydrophobic state includes intermediate amphiphilic states with a variable hydrophilic-to-lipophilic balance. As a result, the self-organization is not following an all-or-...

  12. Three-dimensional paper microfluidic devices assembled using the principles of origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Crooks, Richard M

    2011-11-01

    We report a method, based on the principles of origami (paper folding), for fabricating three-dimensional (3-D) paper microfluidic devices. The entire 3-D device is fabricated on a single sheet of flat paper in a single photolithographic step. It is assembled by simply folding the paper by hand. Following analysis, the device can be unfolded to reveal each layer. The applicability of the device to chemical analysis is demonstrated by colorimetric and fluorescence assays using multilayer microfluidic networks.

  13. Spectrally resolved fluorescent lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Quentin S.

    2008-01-01

    Placing an imaging spectrograph or related components capable of generating a spectrum between a microscope and the image intensifier of a conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system creates a spectrally resolved FLIM (SFLIM). This arrangement provides a number of opportunities not readily available to conventional systems using bandpass filters. The examples include: simultaneous viewing of multiple fluorophores; tracking of both the donor and acceptor; and observation of a rang...

  14. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Simplified Fluorescently Labeled Discodermolide as a Molecular Probe to Study the Binding of Discodermolide to Tubulin

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Jun; Blanden, Adam R.; Bane, Susan; Kingston, David G. I.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a simplified fluorescently labeled discodermolide analogue possessing a dimethylaminobenzoyl fluorophore has been achieved. Stereoselective Suzuki coupling, Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons reaction or the Wittig reaction comprised the key tactics for its construction. The analogue exhibited qualitatively similar activity to paclitaxel in a tubulin assembly assay, and it can thus be used as a fluorescent molecular probe to explore the local environme...

  15. Assembly of Aditya upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing Aditya tokamak, a medium sized tokamak with limiter configuration is being upgraded to a tokamak with divertor configuration. At present the existing ADITYA tokamak has been dismantled up to bottom plinth on which the whole assembly of toroidal field (TF) coils and vacuum vessel rested. The major components of ADITYA machine includes 20 TF coils and its structural components, 9 Ohmic coils and its clamps, 4 BV coils and its clamps as well as their busbar connections, vacuum vessel and its supports and buckling cylinder, which are all being dismantled. The re-assembly of the ADITYA Upgrade tokamak started with installation and positioning of new buckling cylinder and central solenoid (TR1) coil. After that the inner sections of TF coils are placed following which in-situ winding, installation, positioning and support mounting of two pairs of new inner divertor coils have been carried out. After securing the TF coils with top I-beams the new torus shaped vacuum vessel with circular cross-section in 2 halves have been installed. The assembly of TF structural components such as top and bottom guiding wedges, driving wedges, top and bottom compression ring, inner and outer fish plates and top inverted triangle has been carried out in an appropriate sequence. The assembly of outer sections of TF coils along with the proper placements of top auxiliary TR and vertical field coils with proper alignment and positioning with the optical metrology instrument mainly completes the reassembly. Detailed re-assembly steps and challenges faced during re-assembly will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  17. Fluorescence quenching of flavins by reductive agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de; Bansal, A.K. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Song, S.-H.; Dick, B. [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2007-07-09

    The fluorescence behaviour of the flavins riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and lumiflavin in aqueous solution at pH 8 in the presence of the reducing agents {beta}-mercaptoethanol ({beta}-ME), dithiothreitol (DTT), and sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) is studied under aerobic conditions. The fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes are determined as a function of the reducing agent concentration. For all three reducing agents diffusion controlled dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed which is thought to be due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. For DTT additionally static fluorescence quenching occurs.

  18. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  19. Oscillations in molecular motor assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Vilfan, A; Vilfan, Andrej; Frey, Erwin

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous oscillations in biological systems may have a biochemical origin or result from an interplay between force-generating and visco-elastic elements. In molecular motor assemblies the force-generating elements are molecular engines and the visco-elastic elements are stiff cytoskeletal polymers. The physical mechanism leading to oscillations depends on the particular architecture of the assembly. Existing models can be grouped into two distinct categories: systems with a {\\em delayed force activation} and {\\em anomalous force-velocity relations}. We discuss these systems within phase plane analysis known from the theory of dynamic systems and by adopting methods from control theory, the Nyquist criterion.

  20. A generalized macro-assembler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research is to study existing macro assemblers, and to create a generalized macro assembler, MAG-I, which is a system independent of a source language, and provides the following possibilities: development of any existing language, translation from a language to another, and creation of a new language. The user can choose his own notations to define macros. The system is implemented on an IBM 360/91 computer. Programs are written in symbolic language and the input/output software is written in Fortran

  1. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly ('Gibson assembly') that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  2. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M

    2016-09-12

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly ('Gibson assembly') that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology.

  3. Quantum dot-DNA bioconjugates for fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer-based biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Berti, Lorenzo; Pons, Thomas; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2007-02-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique photophysical properties which make them excellent fluorescence resonance energy transfer donors. However, lack of facile methods for conjugating biomolecules such as DNA, proteins and peptides to QDs have limited their applications. In this report, we describe a general procedure for the preparation of a synthetic peptide that can be covalently attached to DNA segments and used to facilitate the self-assembly of the modified DNA onto water soluble QDs. To characterize this conjugation strategy, dye-labeled DNA is first reacted with the synthetic peptide and the resulting peptide-DNA then self-assembled onto QDs. QD attachment is verified by monitoring resonance energy transfer efficiency from the QD donor to the dye-labeled DNA acceptor. QD-DNA bioconjugates assembled using this method may find applications as molecular beacons and hybridization probes.

  4. Photophysics of the blue fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blue fluorescent protein (BFP) is a mutant of the green fluorescent protein, where the phenolic ring of the chromophore has been replaced by imidazole cycle of histidine residue. The usability of BFP as a fluorescent marker is hampered by its low fluorescence quantum yield at room temperature. The intensity of fluorescence increases by a factor of 4.5 when the temperature is decreased from 320 K down to 225 K. The fluorescence is also enhanced by hydrostatic pressure. Both effects have been explained by shift of the equilibrium between hydrogen nonbonded and hydrogen-bonded chromophores. Our semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations show that the fluorescence quantum yield of the BFP chromophore is low due to isomerization in the electronically excited state -twisting of the bridging bond by 90 deg. At this twisted geometry the potential energy surfaces of ground and excited states are situated close to each other facilitating efficient nonradiative decay

  5. Anomalous fluorescence line intensity in megavoltage bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nino; Litz, Marc; Merkel, George; Schumer, Joseph; Seely, John; Carroll, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission crystal spectrometer intended for laser plasma diagnostics has measured an anomalous ratio between the fluorescence lines in megavoltage bremsstrahlung. When observed in reflection, Kα1 fluorescence is twice as strong as the Kβ line, as is usual. However, in forward-directed bremsstrahlung from a 2 MV end point linear accelerator with a tungsten converter, the Kα1 and Kβ fluorescence are approximately equal. The anomalous fluorescence line ratio, unity, reflects the large amount of fluorescence generated on the side of the converter where the electrons enter, and the differential attenuation of the fluorescence photons as they pass through the converter to opposite side. Understanding of fluorescence in megavoltage bremsstrahlung is relevant to the explanation of anomalous line ratios in spectra produced by high-energy electrons generated by intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

  6. Fluorescence Studies of Selected 2-Alkylaminopyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Low

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of 2-chloropyrimidine with methylamine, ethylamine and piperidine gave the corresponding 2-N-methylamino-, 2-N-ethylamino- and 2N- piperidinopyrimidines, respectively. The fluorescence properties of these alkylamino derivatives in chloroform, ethyl acetate, carbon tetrachloride, acetone, ether, ethanol and methanol were studied. All the alkylamino derivatives showed the highest fluorescence intensity in polar protic solvents; thus 2-N-methylaminopyrimidine (highest fluorescence intensity at 377 nm when excited at 282 nm and 2-N-ethylaminopyrimidine (highest fluorescence intensity at 375 nm, when excited at 286 nm showed the highest fluorescence in methanol. In ethanol, 2-N-piperidinopyrimidine showed a fluorescence peak at 403 nm when excited at 360 nm and in chloroform it fluoresced at 392 nm when excited at 356 nm.

  7. Focal Plane Image Assembly of Subpixel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the scanning assembly principle and construction of scanning assembly sample.The factors that affect assembly accuracy are analyzed.There are two steps in CCD focal plane scanning assembly.The first is rough assembly,and the second is accurate assembly.In this paper,the moiré fringe is introduced in judging assembly accuracy directly and accurately.The equation for optical transmission characteristics of CCD Moiré fringes is presented.The measurement of Moiré fringes can be completed when some conditions are satisfied.2D-assembly error can be obtained by using digital correlation filtering technique.Finally,the result of focal plane scanning assembly is presented.The result is in good accordance with theory.

  8. Assembly Sequence Planning for Mechanical Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A method for assembly sequence planning is proposed in this paper. First, two methods for assembly sequence planning are compared, which are indirect method and direct method. Then, the limits of the previous assembly planning system are pointed out. On the basis of indirect method, an improved method for assembly sequence planning is put forward. This method is composed of four parts, which are assembly modeling for products, assembly sequence representing, assembly sequence planning, and evaluation and optimization. The assembly model is established by human machine interaction, and the assembly model contains components' information and the assembly relation among the components. The assembly sequence planning is based on the breaking up of the assembly model. And/or graph is used to represent assembly sequence set. Every component which satisfies the disassembly condition is recorded as a node of an and/or graph. After the disassembly sequence and/or graph is generated, heuristic algorithm - AO* algorithm is used to search the disassembly sequence and/or graph, and the optimum assembly sequence planning is realized. This method is proved to be effective in a prototype system which is a sub-project of a state 863/CIMS research project of China - ‘Concurrent Engineering’.

  9. Controllable Assembly and Separation of Colloidal Nanoparticles through a One-Tube Synthesis Based on Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaohan; Li, Minglin; Kuang, Yun; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Zhao; Zhang, Jin; You, Shusen; Yin, Meizhen; Wan, Pengbo; Luo, Liang; Sun, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with finite primary units was achieved by introducing a thin salt (NaCl) solution layer into density gradient before centrifugation. The electrostatic interactions between Au nanoparticles would be affected and cause 1D assembly upon passing through the salt layer. A negatively charged polymer such as poly(acrylic acid) was used as an encapsulation/stabilization layer to help the formation of 1D Au assemblies, which were subsequently sorted according to unit numbers at succeeding separation zones. A centrifugal field was introduced as the external field to overcome the random Brownian motion of NPs and benefit the assembly effect. Such a facile "one-tube synthesis" approach couples assembly and separation in one centrifuge tube by centrifuging once. The method can be tuned by changing the concentration of interference salt layer, encapsulation layer, and centrifugation rate. Furthermore, positively charged fluorescent polymers such as perylenediimide-poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) could encapsulate the assemblies to give tunable fluorescence properties. PMID:25809533

  10. Probing Antigen-Antibody Interaction Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengju Jiang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the use of fluorescence detection coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL allowed us to fully characterize the antigen-antibody interaction. CE-FL allowed separation of unbound quantum dots (QDs and ligand bound QDs and also revealed an ordered assembly of biomolecules on QDs. Further, we observed FRET from QDs donor to DyLight acceptor, which were covalently conjugated with human IgG and goat anti-human IgG, respectively. The immunocomplex was formed and the mutual affinity of the antigen and antibody brought QDs and DyLight close enough to allow FRET to occur. This novel CE-based technique can be easily extended to other FRET systems based on QDs and may have potential application in the detection of antibodies.

  11. Quantum magnetism through atomic assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinelli, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of magnetic structures, composed of only a few atoms. Those structures are first built atom-by-atom and then locally probed, both with a low-temperature STM. The technique that we use to assemble them is vertical atom manipulation, while to study their phy

  12. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...

  13. Self-assembly of cyclodextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Z.; Kurkov, S.V.; Nielsen, T.T.;

    2012-01-01

    The design of functional cyclodextrin (CD) nanoparticles is a developing area in the field of nanomedicine. CDs can not only help in the formation of drug carriers but also increase the local concentration of drugs at the site of action. CD monomers form aggregates by self-assembly, a tendency...

  14. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  15. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process.

  16. Pattern formation in centrosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahen, Robert; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2012-02-01

    A striking but poorly explained feature of cell division is the ability to assemble and maintain organelles not bounded by membranes, from freely diffusing components in the cytosol. This process is driven by information transfer across biological scales such that interactions at the molecular scale allow pattern formation at the scale of the organelle. One important example of such an organelle is the centrosome, which is the main microtubule organising centre in the cell. Centrosomes consist of two centrioles surrounded by a cloud of proteins termed the pericentriolar material (PCM). Profound structural and proteomic transitions occur in the centrosome during specific cell cycle stages, underlying events such as centrosome maturation during mitosis, in which the PCM increases in size and microtubule nucleating capacity. Here we use recent insights into the spatio-temporal behaviour of key regulators of centrosomal maturation, including Polo-like kinase 1, CDK5RAP2 and Aurora-A, to propose a model for the assembly and maintenance of the PCM through the mobility and local interactions of its constituent proteins. We argue that PCM structure emerges as a pattern from decentralised self-organisation through a reaction-diffusion mechanism, with or without an underlying template, rather than being assembled from a central structural template alone. Self-organisation of this kind may have broad implications for the maintenance of mitotic structures, which, like the centrosome, exist stably as supramolecular assemblies on the micron scale, based on molecular interactions at the nanometer scale. PMID:22245706

  17. TWOWS Assembly Convenes in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jianlan

    2010-01-01

    @@ "Women are still under-represented in the fields of science and technology,"remarked HE Naledi Pandor,minister of science and technology of South Africa,at her invited speech heralding the opening of the Fourth General Assembly and International Conference of the Third World Organization for Women in Science(TWOWS)on the morning of June 27 in Beijing.

  18. ATLAS Assembly Hall Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    To mark the 50th Anniversary of the founding of CERN, a day of tours, displays and presentations was held in October 2004. The assembly halls for the experiments that were waiting to be installed on the LHC, such as ATLAS shown here, were transformed into display areas and cafés.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of bioactive conjugated near-infrared fluorescent proteinoid-poly(L-lactic acid hollow nanoparticles for optical detection of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolitz-Domb M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Michal Kolitz-Domb, Enav Corem-Salkmon, Igor Grinberg, Shlomo Margel Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel Abstract: Colon cancer is one of the major causes of death in the Western world. Early detection significantly improves long-term survival for patients with colon cancer. Near-infrared (NIR fluorescent nanoparticles are promising candidates for use as contrast agents for tumor detection. Using NIR offers several advantages for bioimaging compared with fluorescence in the visible spectrum: lower autofluorescence of biological tissues and lower absorbance and, consequently, deeper penetration into biomatrices. The present study describes the preparation of new NIR fluorescent proteinoid-poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA nanoparticles. For this purpose, a P(EF-PLLA random copolymer was prepared by thermal copolymerization of L-glutamic acid (E with L-phenylalanine (F and PLLA. Under suitable conditions, this proteinoid-PLLA copolymer can self-assemble to nanosized hollow particles of relatively narrow size distribution. This self-assembly process was used for encapsulation of the NIR dye indocyanine green. The encapsulation process increases significantly the photostability of the dye. These NIR fluorescent nanoparticles were found to be stable and nontoxic. Leakage of the NIR dye from these nanoparticles into phosphate-buffered saline containing 4% human serum albumin was not detected. Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin and anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibodies were covalently conjugated to the surface of the NIR fluorescent P(EF-PLLA nanoparticles, thereby increasing the fluorescent signal of tumors with upregulated corresponding receptors. Specific colon tumor detection by the NIR fluorescent P(EF-PLLA nanoparticles was demonstrated in a chicken embryo model. In future work, we plan to extend this study to a mouse model, as well as to encapsulate a cancer

  20. Assembly and melting of DNA nanotubes from single-sequence tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobey, T L; Renner, S; Simmel, F C [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioelektronik-E14, Department Physik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: thomas.sobey@ph.tum.de

    2009-01-21

    DNA melting and renaturation studies are an extremely valuable tool to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex dissociation and reassociation reactions. These are important not only in a biological or biotechnological context, but also for DNA nanotechnology which aims at the construction of molecular materials by DNA self-assembly. We here study experimentally the formation and melting of a DNA nanotube structure, which is composed of many copies of an oligonucleotide containing several palindromic sequences. This is done using temperature-controlled UV absorption measurements correlated with atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. In the melting studies, important factors such as DNA strand concentration, hierarchy of assembly and annealing protocol are investigated. Assembly and melting of the nanotubes are shown to proceed via different pathways. Whereas assembly occurs in several hierarchical steps related to the formation of tiles, lattices and tubes, melting of DNA nanotubes appears to occur in a single step. This is proposed to relate to fundamental differences between closed, three-dimensional tube-like structures and open, two-dimensional lattices. DNA melting studies can lead to a better understanding of the many factors that affect the assembly process which will be essential for the assembly of increasingly complex DNA nanostructures.

  1. COLORFUL-Circuit: a platform for rapid multigene assembly, delivery and expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan eGhareeb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Advancing basic and applied plant research requires the continuous innovative development of the available technology toolbox. Essential components of this toolbox are methods that simplify the assembly, delivery and expression of multiple transgenes of interest. To allow simultaneous and directional multigene assembly on the same plant transformation vector, several strategies based on overlapping sequences or restriction enzymes have recently been developed. However, the assembly of homologous and repetitive DNA sequences can be inefficient and the frequent occurrence of target sequences recognized by commonly used restriction enzymes can be a limiting factor. Here, we noted that recognition sites for the restriction enzyme SfiI are rarely occurring in plant genomes. This fact was exploited to establish a multigene assembly system called COLORFUL-Circuit. To this end, we developed a set of binary vectors which provide a flexible and cost efficient cloning platform. The gene expression cassettes in our system are flanked with unique SfiI sites, which allow simultaneous multi-gene cassette assembly in a hosting binary vector. We used COLORFUL-Circuit to transiently and stably express up to four fluorescent organelle markers in addition to a selectable marker and analyzed the impact of assembly design on coexpression efficiency. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our optimized COLORFUL-Circuit system in an exemplary case study, in which we monitored simultaneously the subcellular behavior of multiple organelles in a biotrophic plant-microbe interaction by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

  2. Protein adsorption and biomimetic mineralization behaviors of PLL-DNA multilayered films assembled onto titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Wenli [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Feng Bo, E-mail: fengbo@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Ni Yuxiang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Yang Yongli [College of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610054 (China); Lu Xiong; Weng Jie [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2010-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys are frequently used as surgical implants in load bearing situations, such as hip prostheses and dental implants, owing to their biocompatibility, mechanical and physical properties. In this paper, a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique, based on the polyelectrolyte-mediated electrostatic adsorption of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and DNA, was used to the formation of multilayer on titanium surfaces. Then bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption and biomimetic mineralization of modified surfaces were studied. The chemical composition and wettability of assembled substrates were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fluorescence microscopy and water contact angle measurement, respectively. The XPS analysis indicated that the layers were assembled successfully through electrostatic attractions. The measurement with ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer revealed that the LBL films enhanced ability of BSA adsorption onto titanium. The adsorption quantity of BSA on the surface terminated with PLL was higher than that of the surface terminated with DNA, and the samples of TiOH/P/D/P absorbed BSA most. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that samples of assembled PLL or/and DNA had better bioactivity in inducing HA formation. Thus the assembling of PLL and DNA onto the surface of titanium in turn via a layer-by-layer self-assembly technology can improve the bioactivity of titanium.

  3. Probing the Conformation of the Fibronectin III1–2 Domain by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, Nancy W.; Lin, Zong; Rye, Hays S.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) matrix is crucial for cell and tissue functions during embryonic development, wound healing, and oncogenesis. Assembly of FN matrix fibrils requires FN domains that mediate interactions with integrin receptors and with other FN molecules. In addition, regulation of FN matrix assembly depends on the first two FN type III modules, III1 and III2, which harbor FN-binding sites. We propose that interactions between these two modules sequester FN-binding sites in soluble FN and that these sites become exposed by FN conformational changes during assembly. To test the idea that III1–2 has a compact conformation, we constructed CIIIY, a conformational sensor of III1–2 based on fluorescent resonance energy transfer between cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins conjugated at its N and C termini. We demonstrate energy transfer in CIIIY and show that fluorescent resonance energy transfer was eliminated by proteolysis and by treatment with mild denaturants that disrupted intramolecular interactions between the two modules. We also show that mutations of key charged residues resulted in conformational changes that exposed binding sites for the N-terminal 70-kDa FN fragment. Collectively, these results support a conformation-dependent mechanism for the regulation of FN matrix assembly by III1–2. PMID:19064996

  4. Anisotropic magnetic porous assemblies of oxide nanoparticles interconnected via silica bridges for catalytic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Josias B; Parashar, Virendra K; Gijs, Martin A M

    2011-04-19

    We report the microfluidic chip-based assembly of colloidal silanol-functionalized silica nanoparticles using monodisperse water-in-oil droplets as templates. The nanoparticles are linked via silica bridges, thereby forming superstructures that range from doublets to porous spherical or rod-like micro-objects. Adding magnetite nanoparticles to the colloid generates micro-objects that can be magnetically manipulated. We functionalized such magnetic porous assemblies with horseradish peroxidase and demonstrate the catalytic binding of fluorescent dye-labeled tyramide over the complete effective surface of the superstructure. Such nanoparticle assemblies permit easy manipulation and recovery after a heterogeneous catalytic process while providing a large surface similar to that of the individual nanoparticles. PMID:21417232

  5. A novel self-assembling peptide with UV-responsive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ran; Jin, Cheng-Cheng; Quan, Jing; Nie, Hua-li; Zhu, Li-Min

    2014-03-01

    A novel heptapeptide comprising Ile-Gln-Ser-Pro-His-Phe-Phe (IQSPHFF) identified and found to undergo self-assembly into microparticles in solution. To understand the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the self-assembly process, IQSPHFF solutions were exposed to the UV light of 365 nm at room temperature. This exposure was found to have a profound effect on the morphology of the self-assembled aggregates, converting the microparticles to nanorod shapes. Circular dichroism and FTIR studies indicated distinct structural differences in the arrangements of the peptide moieties before and after UV irradiation. However, Mass spectrum analysis and high performance liquid chromatography of the peptide molecules before and after UV irradiation demonstrated that the chemical structure of IQSPHFF was not changed. UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy studies showed that the absorption peak both increased after UV irradiation. Overall, our data show that the heptapeptide with UV-responsive properties. PMID:23828220

  6. Let's push things forward: disruptive technologies and the mechanics of tissue assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Although many of the molecular mechanisms that regulate tissue assembly in the embryo have been delineated, the physical forces that couple these mechanisms to actual changes in tissue form remain unclear. Qualitative studies suggest that mechanical loads play a regulatory role in development, but clear quantitative evidence has been lacking. This is partly owing to the complex nature of these problems – embryonic tissues typically undergo large deformations and exhibit evolving, highly viscoelastic material properties. Still, despite these challenges, new disruptive technologies are enabling study of the mechanics of tissue assembly in unprecedented detail. Here, we present novel experimental techniques that enable the study of each component of these physical problems: kinematics, forces, and constitutive properties. Specifically, we detail advances in light sheet microscopy, optical coherence tomography, traction force microscopy, fluorescence force spectroscopy, microrheology and micropatterning. Taken together, these technologies are helping elucidate a more quantitative understanding of the mechanics of tissue assembly. PMID:23907401

  7. Protein-responsive assemblies from catechol-metal ion supramolecular coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C; Chen, J; Yu, S; Chang, Y; Mao, J; Xu, Y; Luo, W; Zeng, B; Dai, L

    2015-03-21

    Supramolecular self-assembly driven by catechol-metal ion coordination has gained great success in the fabrication of functional materials including adhesives, capsules, coatings and hydrogels. However, this route has encountered a great challenge in the construction of nanoarchitectures in the absence of removable templates, because of the uncontrollable crosslinking of catechol-metal ion coordination. Herein, we show that a supramolecular approach, combining both catechol-metal ion coordination and polymer self-assembly together, can organize polymers into hybrid nanoassemblies ranging from solid particles, homogeneous vesicles to Janus vesicles. Without the introduction of a specific binding ligand or complicated molecular design, these assemblies can totally disassemble in response to proteins. UV/vis absorption, fluorescence quenching and recovery investigations have confirmed that proteins can seize metal ions from the hybrid nanoassemblies, thus causing the degradation of catechol-metal ion coordination networks.

  8. Enabling Light Work in Helical Self-Assembly for Dynamic Amplification of Chirality with Photoreversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yunsong; Guo, Zhiqian; Chen, Jianmei; Li, Wenlong; Zhong, Liubiao; Gao, Ya; Jiang, Lin; Chi, Lifeng; Tian, He; Zhu, Wei-Hong

    2016-02-24

    Light-driven transcription and replication are always subordinate to a delicate chirality transfer. Enabling light work in construction of the helical self-assembly with reversible chiral transformation becomes attractive. Herein we demonstrate that a helical hydrogen-bonded self-assembly is reversibly photoswitched between photochromic open and closed forms upon irradiation with alternative UV and visible light, in which molecular chirality is amplified with the formation of helixes at supramolecular level. The characteristics in these superhelixes such as left-handed or right-handed twist and helical length, height, and pitch are revealed by SEM and AFM. The helical photoswitchable nanostructure provides an easily accessible route to an unprecedented photoreversible modulation in morphology, fluorescence, and helicity, with precise assembly/disassembly architectures similar to biological systems such as protein and DNA. PMID:26709946

  9. Polyhedra self-assembled from DNA tripods and characterized with 3D DNA-PAINT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, Ryosuke; Ke, Yonggang; Jungmann, Ralf; Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Yin, Peng

    2014-04-01

    DNA self-assembly has produced diverse synthetic three-dimensional polyhedra. These structures typically have a molecular weight no greater than 5 megadaltons. We report a simple, general strategy for one-step self-assembly of wireframe DNA polyhedra that are more massive than most previous structures. A stiff three-arm-junction DNA origami tile motif with precisely controlled angles and arm lengths was used for hierarchical assembly of polyhedra. We experimentally constructed a tetrahedron (20 megadaltons), a triangular prism (30 megadaltons), a cube (40 megadaltons), a pentagonal prism (50 megadaltons), and a hexagonal prism (60 megadaltons) with edge widths of 100 nanometers. The structures were visualized by means of transmission electron microscopy and three-dimensional DNA-PAINT super-resolution fluorescent microscopy of single molecules in solution.

  10. DESIGN REUSE METHOD FOR ASSEMBLIES IN CONCEPT DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yan; Tan Jianrong; Xu Jing

    2005-01-01

    Aiming at difficult sorting and retrieving complicated structure assemblies in assembly lib,a method for compartmentalizing assembly design resource by conceptual product structure model is presented. The similar assembly retrieval mechanisms of symbol assembly relation graph matching and symbol assembly relation graph similarity are discussed. The method is validated by taking valve rod assemblies as example.

  11. Minimus: a fast, lightweight genome assembler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzberg Steven L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome assemblers have grown very large and complex in response to the need for algorithms to handle the challenges of large whole-genome sequencing projects. Many of the most common uses of assemblers, however, are best served by a simpler type of assembler that requires fewer software components, uses less memory, and is far easier to install and run. Results We have developed the Minimus assembler to address these issues, and tested it on a range of assembly problems. We show that Minimus performs well on several small assembly tasks, including the assembly of viral genomes, individual genes, and BAC clones. In addition, we evaluate Minimus' performance in assembling bacterial genomes in order to assess its suitability as a component of a larger assembly pipeline. We show that, unlike other software currently used for these tasks, Minimus produces significantly fewer assembly errors, at the cost of generating a more fragmented assembly. Conclusion We find that for small genomes and other small assembly tasks, Minimus is faster and far more flexible than existing tools. Due to its small size and modular design Minimus is perfectly suited to be a component of complex assembly pipelines. Minimus is released as an open-source software project and the code is available as part of the AMOS project at Sourceforge.

  12. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a simplified fluorescently labeled discodermolide as a molecular probe to study the binding of discodermolide to tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jun; Blanden, Adam R; Bane, Susan; Kingston, David G I

    2011-09-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a simplified fluorescently labeled discodermolide analogue possessing a dimethylaminobenzoyl fluorophore has been achieved. Stereoselective Suzuki coupling and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction comprised the key tactics for its construction. The analogue exhibited qualitatively similar activity to paclitaxel in a tubulin assembly assay, and it can thus be used as a fluorescent molecular probe to explore the local environment of the discodermolide binding site on tubulin. The results of fluorescence measurements on the tubulin-bound analogue are reported.

  13. Particle Tracking of Fluorescent Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Zofia; Mueller, Joachim; Berk, Serkan

    2010-10-01

    In this research, the diffusion coefficients of the fluorescent microspheres and the relation of those coefficients to particle radius were investigated. An additional focus was to see how well the measured radius of the microspheres compared to the radius as reported by the manufacturer and to measure the distribution of radii in a sample. This study further developed the critical process of ensuring particle movement within the sample volume and made preliminary sample measurements.The methods developed for tracking microspheres will later be used to determine the radii of virus like particles (VLPs), which are a non-infectious model system of the HIV virus. Results from our measurements will be reported.

  14. Hydraulic Experiment for Simulative Assemblies of Blanket Assembly and Np Transmutation Assembly of China Experimental Fast Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Dao-xi; QI; Xiao-guang; ZHAI; Wei-ming; YANG; Bing; ZHOU; Ping

    2013-01-01

    The out-of reactor hydraulic experiment of fast reactor assembly is one of the important experiments in the process of the development of the fast reactor assembly.In this experiment,the size of the throttling element in the foot of the assembly is decided which is fit for the flow division in the reactor and the

  15. Self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mili C Naranthatta; V Ramkumar; Dillip Kumar Chand

    2014-09-01

    A rare variety of self-assembledmolecular triangle [Pd3(bpy)3(imidazolate)3](NO3)3, 1 is prepared by the combination of Pd(bpy)(NO3)2 with imidazole, at 1:1 ratio, in acetonitrile-water. Deprotonation of imidazole happened during the course of the complexation reaction where upon the metallomacrocycle is formed. The bowl-shaped trinuclear architecture of 1 is crafted with three peripheral bpy units capable of - stacking interactions. While the solution state structure of 1 can be best described as a trinuclear complex, in the solidstate well-fashioned intermolecular - and CH- interactions are observed. Thus, in the solid-state further self-assembly of already self-assembled molecular triangle is witnessed. The triangular panels are arranged in a linear manner utilizing intermolecular - interactions where upon two out of three bpy units of each molecule participated in the chain formation.

  16. Quantum dot-polypeptide hybrid assemblies: Synthesis, fundamental properties, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thedjoisworo, Bayu Atmaja

    We report the development of a multifunctional system that has the capability to target cancer cells, as well as simultaneously image and deliver therapeutics to these targeted cells. Such a "three-in-one" technology that has integrated targeting, imaging, and drug delivery capabilities is highly desirable in the field of cancer therapy. The material that we have developed for this application is a quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid assembly system that is spontaneously formed through the self-assembly of carboxyl-functionalized QDs and poly(diethylene glycol L-lysine)-poly(L-lysine) (PEGLL-PLL) diblock copolypeptide molecules. The hybrid assemblies could be modified to target a great variety of cancer biomarkers and have potential ability to carry therapeutic agents with diverse chemical and physical properties. In addition, the QD-polypeptide assemblies have the advantage of extensive tunability and versatility that allow their properties to be tailored and optimized for a broad range of applications. Cancer targeting can be achieved by modifying the QD-polypeptide hybrid assemblies with ligands that have affinity for certain biomarkers, which are overexpressed on cancer cells. Upon binding and uptake by the target cells through specific ligand-receptor mediated interactions, the assemblies could then allow for the simultaneous imaging of the cells and delivery of therapeutic agents to these cells. Imaging of the cells is done through detection of the QD fluorescence, and drug-delivery can be effected by loading the assembly with therapeutic agents and releasing them by means that disrupt the self-assembly. When compared to other dual imaging and drug-delivery systems, our QD-polypeptide hybrid assemblies have the advantage of extensive tunability and versatility. To showcase the tunability of the assembly, we demonstrated how its tumor-cell binding characteristics could be modulated and optimized by changing the PEGLL x-PLLy, architecture and the self-assembly

  17. Preparation of fluorescent DNA probe by solid-phase organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent DNA probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET was prepared by solid-phase organic synthesis when CdTe quantum dots (QDs were as energy donors and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs were as energy accepters. The poly(divinylbenzene core/poly(4-vinylpyridine shell microspheres, as solid-phase carriers, were prepared by seeds distillation-precipitation polymerization with 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN as initiator in neat acetonitrile. The CdTe QDs and AuNPs were self-assembled on the surface of core/shell microspheres, and then the linkage of CdTe QDs with oligonucleotides (CdTe-DNA and AuNPs with complementary single-stranded DNA (Au-DNA was on the solid-phase carriers instead of in aqueous solution. The hybridization of complementary double stranded DNA (dsDNA bonded to the QDs and AuNPs (CdTe-dsDNA-Au determined the FRET distance of CdTe QDs and AuNPs. Compared with the fluorescence of CdTe-DNA, the fluorescence of CdTe-dsDNA-Au conjugates (DNA probes decreased extremely, which indicated that the FRET occurred between CdTe QDs and AuNPs. The probe system would have a certain degree recovery of fluorescence when the complementary single stranded DNA was introduced into this system, which showed that the distance between CdTe QDs and AuNPs was increased.

  18. Highly fluorescent peptide nanoribbon impregnated with Sn-porphyrin as a potent DNA sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parayil, Sreenivasan Koliyat; Lee, Jooran; Yoon, Minjoong

    2013-05-01

    Highly fluorescent and thermo-stable peptide nanoribbons (PNRs) were fabricated by solvothermal self-assembly of a single peptide (D,D-diphenyl alanine peptides) with Sn-porphyrin (trans-dihydroxo[5,10,15,20-tetrakis(p-tolyl)porphyrinato] Sn(IV) (SnTTP(OH)2)). The structural characterization of the as-prepared nanoribbons was performed by transmitting electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, indicating that the lipophilic Sn-porphyrins are impregnated into the porous surface formed in the process of nanoribbon formation through intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the peptide main chains. Consequently the Sn-porphyrin-impregnated peptide nanoribbons (Sn-porphyrin-PNRs) exhibited typical UV-visible absorption spectrum of the monomer porphyrin with a red shifted Q-band, and their fluorescence quantum yield was observed to be enhanced compared to that of free Sn-porphyrin. Interestingly the fluorescence intensity and lifetimes of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs were selectively affected upon interaction with nucleotide base sequences of DNA while those of free Sn-porphyrins were not affected by binding with any of the DNA studied, indicating that DNA-induced changes in the fluorescence properties of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs are due to interaction between DNA and the PNR scaffold. These results imply that Sn-porphyrin-PNR will be useful as a potent fluorescent protein analogue and as a biocompatible DNA sensor.

  19. Compact MCP assemblies for mass spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, S. [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka (Japan). Electron Tube Div.; Umebayashi, S. [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka (Japan). Electron Tube Div.; Kusuyama, Y. [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka (Japan). Electron Tube Div.; Natsume, Y. [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka (Japan). Electron Tube Div.; Oba, K. [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka (Japan). Electron Tube Div.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed compact microchannel plate (MCP) assemblies which have a high gain, good pulse height resolution and a fast response for MS applications. In this paper, these new assemblies are described referring to their structures, functions and characteristics. (orig.).

  20. The Procedure for Assembling the EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Songtao

    2005-01-01

    Due to the complicated constitution and high precision requirements of the EAST superconducting tokamak, a meticulous assembling procedure and measurement scheme must be established. The big size and mass of the EAST machine's components and complicated configuration with tight installation tolerances call for a highly careful assembling procedure. The assembling procedure consists of three main sub-procedures for the assembling of the base, of the tori of the VV, the vacuum vessel TS and the TF, and of the peripheral parts respectively. Before the assembly, a reference framework has been set up by means of an industrial measurement system with reference fiducial targets fixed on the wall of the test hall. In this paper, the assembling procedure is described in detail, the survey control system of the assembly is discussed, and progress in the assembly work is also reported.

  1. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly (‘Gibson assembly’) that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  2. Cyanobacterial phycobilisomes: selective dissociation monitored by fluorescence and circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigbi, M.; Rosinski, J.; Siegelman, H.W.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1980-04-01

    Phycobilisomes are supramolecular assemblies of phycobiliproteins responsible for photosynthetic light collection in red algae and cyanobacteria. They can be selectively dissociated by reduction of temperature and buffer concentration. Phycobilisomes isolated from Fremyella diplosiphon transfer energy collected by C-phycoerythrin and C-phycocyanin to allophycocyanin. The energy transfer to allophycocyanin is nearly abolished at 2/sup 0/C, as indicated by a blue shift in fluorescence emission, and is accompanied by a decrease in the circular dichroism in the region of allophycocyanin absorbance. Further dissociation of the phycobilisomes can be attained by reduction of buffer concentration and holding at 2/sup 0/C. Energy transfer to C-phycocyanin is nearly abolished, and decreases occur in the circular dichroism in the region of C-phycocyanin and C-phycoerythrin absorbance. Complete dissociation of the phycobilisomes at low buffer concentration and 2/sup 0/C requires extended time. Energy transfer to C-phycocyanin is further reduced and the circular dichroism maximum of C-phycoerythrin at 575 nm is lost. Circular dichroism provides information on the hexamer-monomer transitions of the phycobiliproteins, whereas fluorescence is indicative of hexamer-hexamer interactions. We consider that hydrophobic interactions are fundamental to the maintenance of the structure and function of phycobilisomes.

  3. Advanced Corneal Cross-Linking System with Fluorescence Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc D. Friedman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper describes an advanced system that combines corneal cross-linking with riboflavin with fluorescence dosimetry, the ability to measure riboflavin diffusion within the cornea both before and during UVA treatment. Methods and Results. A corneal cross-linking system utilizing a digital micromirror device (DMD was assembled and used to measure diffusion coefficients of 0.1% riboflavin in 20% dextran in porcine eyes. A value of (3.3±0.2×10−7 cm2/s was obtained for the stroma. Diffusion coefficients for the transepithelial formulation of 0.1% riboflavin in 0.44% saline and 0.02% BAK were also measured to be 4.7±0.3×10−8 cm2/s for epithelium only and (4.6±0.4×10−7 cm2/s for stroma only. Riboflavin consumption during a UVA treatment was also demonstrated. Conclusion. A new advanced corneal cross-linking system with fluorescence dosimetry of riboflavin has been demonstrated. It is hoped that this method may play a significant role in determining the underlying mechanisms of corneal cross-linking and assist with the development of additional riboflavin formulations. Moreover, dosimetry may prove valuable in providing a method to account for the biological differences between individuals, potentially informing cornea-specific UVA treatment doses in real time.

  4. Single optical fiber probe for fluorescence detection and optogenetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaie, Ramin; Falk, Ryan

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic-based probe for precise delivery of stimulation/excitation light pulses and detection of faint fluorescence signals for applications in neuroscience and optogenetics. In this design, a thin multimode fiber serves as the head of the probe to be inserted into the brain. This fiber is used to deliver light to the region of interest and guide a sample of the emission signal back to detectors. The major tradeoff in the design of such a system is to decrease the size of the fiber and intensity of input light to minimize physical damage and to avoid photobleaching/phototoxicity but to keep the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) reasonably high. Here, the excitation light and the associated emission signal are frequency modulated. Then, the output of the detector is passed through a time lens which compresses the distributed energy of the emission signal and maximizes the instantaneous S/N. By measuring the statistics of the noise, the structure of the time lens is designed to achieve the global optimum of S/N. We have also designed side-firing fibers and a micromechanical assembly for distributed light delivery and fluorescence detection. PMID:23060317

  5. Reversible thermochromic polymer film embedded with fluorescent organogel nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungwoo; Chang, Ji Young

    2014-11-18

    We report a reversible thermochromic nanocomposite polymer film composed of fluorescent organogel fibers and a highly cross-linked polymer matrix. A series of cyano-substituted oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (CN-OPV) derivatives were synthesized by the reaction of dialdehydes with phenyl or naphthyl acetonitrile under basic conditions. Among the CN-OPV derivatives, NA-DBA having naphtyl moieties and dodecyloxy chains formed a stable organogel in a cross-linkable monomeric solvent (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate). The organogel showed a thermoreversible sol-gel transition, accompanying the emission color change. A nanocomposite polymer film obtained by photopolymerization of the organogel between two quartz plates also exhibited reversible thermochromism. Under 365 nm irradiation, the orange color of the film at 25 °C became yellowish green at 120 °C. The fluorescence spectroscopy, DSC, and microscopy results determined that the thermally reversible self-assembly of NA-DBA occurred in the polymer matrix, resulting in reversible thermochromism. The melted gelator molecules at 120 °C did not diffuse into the polymer matrix probably because of poor interactions of the gelator molecules with the polymer matrix. The NA-DBA molecules dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate), without forming a supramolecular structure, did not show thermochromism. PMID:25340308

  6. United assembly algorithm for optical burst switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhui Yu(于金辉); Yijun Yang(杨教军); Yuehua Chen(陈月华); Ge Fan(范戈)

    2003-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising optical switching technology. The burst assembly algorithm controls burst assembly, which significantly impacts performance of OBS network. This paper provides a new assembly algorithm, united assembly algorithm, which has more practicability than conventional algorithms. In addition, some factors impacting selections of parameters of this algorithm are discussed and the performance of this algorithm is studied by computer simulation.

  7. Virtual Reality and Haptics for Product Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptics can significantly enhance the user's sense of immersion and interactivity. An industrial application of virtual reality and haptics for product assembly is described in this paper, which provides a new and low-cost approach for product assembly design, assembly task planning and assembly operation training. A demonstration of the system with haptics device interaction was available at the session of exp.at'11.

  8. Hybrid Assembly for Ultra-Precise Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Steinecker, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    International audience This paper presents a European integrated project in the domain of innovative hybrid assembly - the combination of self-assembly and robotics. Robotics allows for high precision and flexibility with full control of the assembly process. Self-assembly, on the other hand, offers massively parallel, unsupervised processing and thus provides high throughputs that cannot be reached with simple robotics alone. The combination of these approaches thus offers robust, high-sp...

  9. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  10. Antibody-based fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh Nhat, Kim Phuong; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Yoshikoshi, Kensuke; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescent indicators for protein phosphorylation are very important in not only fundamental biology but also biomedical applications. In this study, we developed novel fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine (pTyr) derivatives. A single-chain antibody variable fragment (scFv) against phosphotyrosine was fluorescent-labeled by incorporation of tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-linked nonnatural amino acid at the N- or C-terminus. The TAMRA-labeled scFv showed fluorescence enhancement upon addition of pTyr-containing peptides based on antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect on TAMRA. The TAMRA-labeled scFv was further fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to generate a double-labeled scFv for pTyr. In the absence of antigen, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred from EGFP to TAMRA but TAMRA was quenched. The antigen-binding removed the quenching of TAMRA while FRET occurred without altering its efficiency. As a result of the FRET and antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect, the double-labeled scFv exhibited fluorescence ratio enhancement upon the antigen-binding. The fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators obtained in this study will become a novel tool for analysis of protein phosphorylation. Moreover, this strategy utilizes antibody derivatives, and therefore, can be easily applied to other antigen-antibody pairs to generate fluorescent ratiometric indicators for various target molecules. PMID:26896314

  11. Molecularly Tunable Fluorescent Quantum Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyejin; Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Kim, Mijin; Meany, Brendan; Guo, Yong; Schatz, George C; Wang, YuHuang

    2016-06-01

    We describe the chemical creation of molecularly tunable fluorescent quantum defects in semiconducting carbon nanotubes through covalently bonded surface functional groups that are themselves nonemitting. By variation of the surface functional groups, the same carbon nanotube crystal is chemically converted to create more than 30 distinct fluorescent nanostructures with unique near-infrared photoluminescence that is molecularly specific, systematically tunable, and significantly brighter than that of the parent semiconductor. This novel exciton-tailoring chemistry readily occurs in aqueous solution and creates functional defects on the sp(2) carbon lattice with highly predictable C-C bonding from virtually any iodine-containing hydrocarbon precursor. Our new ability to control nanostructure excitons through a single surface functional group opens up exciting possibilities for postsynthesis chemical engineering of carbon nanomaterials and suggests that the rational design and creation of a large variety of molecularly tunable quantum emitters-for applications ranging from in vivo bioimaging and chemical sensing to room-temperature single-photon sources-can now be anticipated. PMID:27159413

  12. Single-primer fluorescent sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, J.L.; Morgan, C.A.; Middendorf, L.R.; Grone, D.L.; Brumbaugh, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Modified linker arm oligonucleotides complementary to standard M13 priming sites were synthesized, labelled with either one, two, or three fluoresceins, and purified by reverse-phase HPLC. When used as primers in standard dideoxy M13 sequencing with /sup 32/P-dNTPs, normal autoradiographic patterns were obtained. To eliminate the radioactivity, direct on-line fluorescence detection was achieved by the use of a scanning 10 mW Argon laser emitting 488 nm light. Fluorescent bands were detected directly in standard 0.2 or 0.35 mm thick polyacrylamide gels at a distance of 24 cm from the loading wells by a photomultiplier tube filtered at 520 nm. Horizontal and temporal location of each band was displayed by computer as a band in real time, providing visual appearance similar to normal 4-lane autoradiograms. Using a single primer labelled with two fluoresceins, sequences of between 500 and 600 bases have been read in a single loading with better than 98% accuracy; up to 400 bases can be read reproducibly with no errors. More than 50 sequences have been determined by this method. This approach requires only 1-2 ug of cloned template, and produces continuous sequence data at about one band per minute.

  13. FAA Fluorescent Penetrant Laboratory Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WINDES,CONNOR L.; MOORE,DAVID G.

    2000-08-02

    The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center currently assesses the capability of various non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods used for analyzing aircraft components. The focus of one such exercise is to evaluate the sensitivity of fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection. A baseline procedure using the water-washable fluorescent penetrant method defines a foundation for comparing the brightness of low cycle fatigue cracks in titanium test panels. The analysis of deviations in the baseline procedure will determine an acceptable range of operation for the steps in the inspection process. The data also gives insight into the depth of each crack and which step(s) of the inspection process most affect penetrant sensitivities. A set of six low cycle fatigue cracks produced in 6.35-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V specimens was used to conduct the experiments to produce sensitivity data. The results will document the consistency of the crack readings and compare previous experiments to find the best parameters for water-washable penetrant.

  14. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  15. Diversity and Evolution of Coral Fluorescent Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Alieva, Naila O.; Konzen, Karen A.; Field, Steven F.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Hunt, Marguerite E.; Victor Beltran-Ramirez; Miller, David J.; Jörg Wiedenmann; Anya Salih; Matz, Mikhail V

    2008-01-01

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full ...

  16. Synthetic Fluorescent Probes for Monovalent Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent probes are powerful and cost-effective tools for the detection of metal ions in biological systems. Compared to non-redox-active metal ions, the design of fluorescent probes for biological copper is challenging. Within the reducing cellular environment, copper is predominantly present in its monovalent oxidation state; therefore, the design of fluorescent probes for biological copper must take into account the rich redox and coordination chemistry of Cu(I). Recent progress in unde...

  17. Radioluminescence : A simple model for fluorescent layers

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to present a simple model for the radiation to light conversion processes in fluorescent layers as an aid in future developments and applications. Optimisation between sensitivity and spatial resolution for fluorescent layers in digital radiology is a delicate task where the extrinsic efficiency for various phosphors needs to be established for varying parameters. The extrinsic efficiency of a fluorescent layer can be expressed as the ratio of the light energy per un...

  18. Random lasing actions in self-assembled perovskite nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shuai; Li, Jiankai; Gu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Kaiyang; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Solution-based perovskite nanoparticles have been intensively studied in past few years due to their applications in both photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. Here, based on the common ground between the solution-based perovskite and random lasers, we have studied the mirrorless lasing actions in self-assembled perovskite nanoparticles. After the synthesis from solution, discrete lasing peaks have been observed from the optically pumped perovskites without any well-defined cavity boundaries. The obtained quality (Q) factors and thresholds of random lasers are around 500 and 60 uJ/cm2, respectively. Both values are comparable to the conventional perovskite microdisk lasers with polygon shaped cavity boundaries. From the corresponding studies on laser spectra and fluorescence microscope images, the lasing actions are considered as random lasers that are generated by strong multiple scattering in random gain media. In additional to conventional single-photon excitation, due to the strong nonlinear effects of...

  19. Stable assembly of HIV-1 export complexes occurs cotranscriptionally

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawroth, Isabel; Mueller, Florian; Basyuk, Eugenia;

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 Rev protein mediates export of unspliced and singly spliced viral transcripts by binding to the Rev response element (RRE) and recruiting the cellular export factor CRM1. Here, we investigated the recruitment of Rev to the transcription sites of HIV-1 reporters that splice either post......- or cotranscriptionally. In both cases, we observed that Rev localized to the transcription sites of the reporters and recruited CRM1. Rev and CRM1 remained at the reporter transcription sites when cells were treated with the splicing inhibitor Spliceostatin A (SSA), showing that the proteins associate with RNA prior...... to or during early spliceosome assembly. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed that Rev and CRM1 have similar kinetics as the HIV-1 RNA, indicating that Rev, CRM1, and RRE-containing RNAs are released from the site of transcription in one single export complex. These results suggest...

  20. Simultaneous Assembly of Multiple Test Forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.; Adema, Jos J.

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for the assembly of multiple test forms is proposed in which the multiple-form problem is reduced to a series of computationally less intensive two-form problems. At each step, one form is assembled to its true specifications; the other form is a dummy assembled only to maintain a balan

  1. 24 CFR 3285.601 - Field assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Field assembly. 3285.601 Section... § 3285.601 Field assembly. Home manufacturers must provide specific installation instructions for the proper field assembly of manufacturer-supplied and shipped loose ducts, plumbing, and fuel supply...

  2. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... The head shall be tested per procedure specified in 49 CFR § 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the...

  3. 49 CFR 572.184 - Shoulder assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shoulder assembly. 572.184 Section 572.184... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.184 Shoulder assembly. (a) The shoulder (175-3000) is part of the body assembly shown in drawing 175-0000. When subjected to impact tests specified in paragraph...

  4. 49 CFR 572.183 - Neck assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 572.33) at the time the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly. 572.183 Section 572.183... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.183 Neck assembly. (a) The neck assembly consists of parts...

  5. Snowball: Strain aware gene assembly of Metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregor, I.; Schoenhuth, A.; McHardy, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Gene assembly is an important step in functional analysis of shotgun metagenomic data. Nonetheless, strain aware assembly remains a challenging task, as current assembly tools often fail to distinguish among strain variants or require closely related reference genomes of the studied species to be av

  6. Shock buffer for nuclear control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shock buffer is provided for the gradual deceleration of a rapidly descending control element assembly in a nuclear reactor. The interactive buffer components are associated respectively with the movable control element assembly and part of the upper guide structure independent of and spaced from the fuel assemblies of the reactor

  7. LHC Magnet Assembly Facility in building 181

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2005-01-01

    Hall 181 activities for the LHC machine * Reception of the American magnets : quadrupoles and separation dipoles * Assembly of the string Low-Beta Triplet -Q2-Q3-DFBX-D1 * Insertion quadrupoles cold masses assembly * Magnets reception type MQM, MQY, MCBC et MCBY * Assembly in the shell * Longitudinal welding under the press * Equipment with end covers in the finishing area

  8. Sensitive fluorescence assay of organophosphorus pesticides based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between CdTe quantum dots and porphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gao; Yue, Zhao; Bing, Zhang; Yiwei, Tang; Xiuying, Liu; Jianrong, Li

    2016-08-01

    A sensitive and selective quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor was successfully fabricated for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). 5,10,15,20-Tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TPyP) with meso-pyridyl substituents was bound to the surface of CdTe QDs to produce self-assembled nanosensors, and the process of FRET between QDs and TPyP occurred. However, the process of FRET was switched off with the addition of OPs, due to the combination between TPyP and OPs. The fluorescence intensity of TPyP (donor) would decrease gradually with the increasing concentration of OPs. Under optimal conditions, a linear correlation was established between the fluorescence intensity ratio ITPyP/IQDs and the concentration of paraoxon in the range of 9.09 × 10(-12)-1.09 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 3.15 × 10(-12) mol L(-1). The attractive sensitivity was obtained due to the efficient FRET and the superior fluorescence properties of QDs. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of the OPs in real fruit samples with satisfactory results. PMID:27305657

  9. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  10. Combinatorial pathway assembly in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Essani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of synthetic biology and the vast knowledge about individual biocatalytic reactions, the challenge nowadays is to implement whole natural or synthetic pathways into microorganisms. For this purpose balanced enzyme activities throughout the pathway need to be achieved in addition to simple functional gene expression to avoid bottlenecks and to obtain high titers of the desired product. As the optimization of pathways in a specific biological context is often hard to achieve by rational design, combinatorial approaches have been developed to address this issue. Here, current strategies and proof of concepts for combinatorial pathway assembly in yeasts are reviewed. By exploiting its ability to join multiple DNA fragments in a very efficient and easy manner, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not only constitute an attractive host for heterologous pathway expression, but also for assembling pathways by recombination in vivo.

  11. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  12. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez; Diego Adrián Fabila-Bustos; Luis Felipe de Jesús Quintanar-Hernández; Alma Valor; Suren Stolik

    2015-01-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs) from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% ag...

  13. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  14. Laser induced fluorescence of some plant leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is successfully used as a technique for remote detection of spectral characteristics of some plants. A pulsed nitrogen laser at 337.1 nm is used to excite cotton, corn and rice leaves. The fluorescence spectrum is detected in the range from 340 nm to 820 nm. It is found that, these plant leaves have common fluorescence maxima at 440 nm, 685 nm and 740 nm. plant leaves are also found to be identifiable by the ratio of the fluorescence intensity at 440 nm to that at 685 nm. The present technique can be further used as a means of assessing, remotely, plant stresses. 5 fig

  15. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-09-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and office supply stores. We also employ violet-blue and green laser pointers as excitation sources. We conclude with a brief discussion of neon pigments in terms of the "day glow" or "daylight fluorescence" phenomenon.

  16. Fluorescence properties of meso-tetrafurylporphyrins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iti Gupta; M Ravikanth

    2005-03-01

    Fluorescence properties of meso-tetrafurylporphyrins with N4, N3S and N2S2 porphyrin cores are studied by both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and compared with the corresponding meso-tetraarylporphyrins. The study shows that the replacement of six-membered aryl groups with five-membered furyl groups at meso-positions alter the fluorescence properties considerably, as reflected in the large red shifts and broadening of fluorescence bands with reduction in quantum yields and singlet excited-state lifetimes. However, zinc(II) derivatives of meso-tetrafurylporphyrin and mesotetraarylporphyrin did not show significant differences in their emission properties.

  17. Voltage-gated metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongxia; Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the influence of electrical current on the ability of surface plasmons to amplify fluorescence signatures. An applied direct current across Silver Island Films (SIFs) of low electrical resistance perturbs the fluorescence enhancement. For a given applied current, surface plasmons in just-continuous films are sparsely available for fluorophore dipole-coupling and hence the enhanced fluorescence is gated as a function of the applied current. For thicker, low resistance films, sufficient charge carriers are now present in the metal that metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) is perturbed to a lesser extent, induced surface plasmons readily formed on the surface by the close-proximity dipole. PMID:19214719

  18. Surfactant-Triggered Fluorescence Turn "on/off" Behavior of a Polythiophene-graft-Polyampholyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Radhakanta; Das, Sandip; Chatterjee, Dhruba P; Nandi, Arun K

    2016-08-23

    Polythiophene-graft-polyampholyte (PTP) is synthesized using N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and tert-butyl methacrylate monomers by grafting from polythiophene backbone, followed by hydrolysis. The resulting polymer exhibits aqueous solubility via formation of small-sized miceller aggregates with hydrophobic polythiophene at the center and radiating polyionic side chains (cationic or anionic depending on the pH of the medium) at the outer periphery. The critical micelle concentration of PTP in acidic solution (0.025 mg/mL, pH = 2.7) is determined from fluorescence spectroscopy. PTP exhibits reversible fluorescence on and off response in both acidic and basic medium with the sequential addition of differently charged ionic surfactants, repeatedly. The fluorescence intensity of PTP at pH 2.7 increases with the addition of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS), due to the self-aggregation forming compound micelles. The fluorescence intensity of these solutions again decreases on addition of a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), because of assembling of SDBS with CTAB, thus deassembling the PTP-SDBS aggregates. At pH 9.2, these turn on and turn off responses are also shown by PTP with the sequential addition of cationic surfactant (CTAB) and anionic surfactant (SDBS), respectively. This result shows that PTP has potential for surfactant-induced reversible fluorescence turn on and off using ionic surfactant (SDBS and CTAB) through self-assembling and deassembling of the ionic aggregates. The reversible aggregation and disaggregation process of PTP with the surfactants at both acidic and basic pH is supported from dynamic light scattering and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the above systems studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy also supports the above aggregation and disaggregation process. PMID:27465928

  19. A turn-on coordination nanoparticle-based fluorescent probe for phosphate in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Na; Li, Jian; Lu, Zhixiang; Bian, Longchun; Zheng, Liyan; Cao, Qiue; Ding, Zhongtao

    2015-03-01

    Coordination nanoparticles (CNPs) are becoming attractive platforms for chemical sensing applications because their unique adjustable properties offer the opportunity to design various luminescent nanoprobes. Here, we present a CNP-based fluorescent nanoprobe, in which fluorophores (rhodamine B, RB) and quenchers (methylene blue, MB) were spontaneously enfolded by coordination networks self-assembled of adenine, biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid (BDA) and zinc ions. The aggregation of fluorophores and quenchers in CNPs resulted in a quenched state fluorescence of RB. RB and MB could be released from CNPs in the presence of phosphate, which triggered the fluorescence of RB. On the basis of recognition-driven disassembly principle, a novel turn-on fluorescent probe for the determination of PO43- with a wide response range (0.5-50 μM) has been successfully applied in the detection of phosphate in human serum samples. This work not only develops a probe for phosphate but also provides a general strategy for designing nanoprobes or nanocarriers towards various targets by altering organic linkers or metal ions.Coordination nanoparticles (CNPs) are becoming attractive platforms for chemical sensing applications because their unique adjustable properties offer the opportunity to design various luminescent nanoprobes. Here, we present a CNP-based fluorescent nanoprobe, in which fluorophores (rhodamine B, RB) and quenchers (methylene blue, MB) were spontaneously enfolded by coordination networks self-assembled of adenine, biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid (BDA) and zinc ions. The aggregation of fluorophores and quenchers in CNPs resulted in a quenched state fluorescence of RB. RB and MB could be released from CNPs in the presence of phosphate, which triggered the fluorescence of RB. On the basis of recognition-driven disassembly principle, a novel turn-on fluorescent probe for the determination of PO43- with a wide response range (0.5-50 μM) has been successfully applied in

  20. Expression of recombinant multi-coloured fluorescent antibodies in gor -/trxB- E. coli cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiv Anatoliy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody-fluorophore conjugates are invaluable reagents used in contemporary molecular cell biology for imaging, cell sorting and tracking intracellular events. However they suffer in some cases from batch to batch variation, partial loss of binding and susceptibility to photo-bleaching. In theory, these issues can all be addressed by using recombinant antibody fused directly to genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. However, single-chain fragment variable domains linked by long flexible linkers are themselves prone to disassociation and aggregation, and in some cases with isoelectric points incompatible with use in physiologically relevant milieu. Here we describe a general approach that permits fully functional intracellular production of a range of coloured fluorescent recombinant antibodies with optimally orientated VH/VL interfaces and isoelectric points compatible for use in physiological solutions at pH 7.4 with a binding site to fluorophore stoichiometry of 1:1. Results Here we report the design, assembly, intracellular bacterial production and purification of a panel of novel antibody fluorescent protein fusion constructs. The insertion of monomeric fluorescent protein derived from either Discosoma or Aequorea in-between the variable regions of anti-p185HER2-ECD antibody 4D5-8 resulted in optimal VH/VL interface interactions to create soluble coloured antibodies each with a single binding site, with isoelectric points of 6.5- 6. The fluorescent antibodies used in cell staining studies with SK-BR-3 cells retained the fluorophore properties and antibody specificity functions, whereas the conventional 4D5-8 single chain antibody with a (Gly4Ser3 linker precipitated at physiological pH 7.4. Conclusions This modular monomeric recombinant fluorescent antibody platform may be used to create a range of recombinant coloured antibody molecules for quantitative in situ, in vivo and ex vivo imaging, cell sorting and cell

  1. Multifunctional self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawodzinski, T.; Bar, G.; Rubin, S.; Uribe, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferrais, J. [Texas Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of at three year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The specific goals of this research project were threefold: to develop multifunctional self-assembled monolayers, to understand the role of monolayer structure on the functioning of such systems, and to apply this knowledge to the development of electrochemical enzyme sensors. An array of molecules that can be used to attach electrochemically active biomolecules to gold surfaces has been synthesized. Several members of a class of electroactive compounds have been characterized and the factors controlling surface modification are beginning to be characterized. Enzymes have been attached to self-assembled molecules arranged on the gold surface, a critical step toward the ultimate goal of this project. Several alternative enzyme attachment strategies to achieve robust enzyme- modified surfaces have been explored. Several means of juxtaposing enzymes and mediators, electroactive compounds through which the enzyme can exchange electrons with the electrode surface, have also been investigated. Finally, the development of sensitive biosensors based on films loaded with nanoscale-supported gold particles that have surface modified with the self-assembled enzyme and mediator have been explored.

  2. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  3. Absorption reconstruction improves biodistribution assessment of fluorescent nanoprobes using hybrid Fluorescence-mediated tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremse, F.; Theek, B.; Kunjachan, S.; Lederle, W.; Pardo, A.; Barth, S.; Lammers, T.G.G.M.; Naumann, U.; Kiessling, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) holds potential for accelerating diagnostic and theranostic drug development. However, for proper quantitative fluorescence reconstruction, knowledge on optical scattering and absorption, which are highly heterogeneous in different (mouse) tissues, is requ

  4. AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Henry C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome assembly is difficult due to repeated sequences within the genome, which create ambiguities and cause the final assembly to be broken up into many separate sequences (contigs. Long range linking information, such as mate-pairs or mapping data, is necessary to help assembly software resolve repeats, thereby leading to a more complete reconstruction of genomes. Prior work has used optical maps for validating assemblies and scaffolding contigs, after an initial assembly has been produced. However, optical maps have not previously been used within the genome assembly process. Here, we use optical map information within the popular de Bruijn graph assembly paradigm to eliminate paths in the de Bruijn graph which are not consistent with the optical map and help determine the correct reconstruction of the genome. Results We developed a new algorithm called AGORA: Assembly Guided by Optical Restriction Alignment. AGORA is the first algorithm to use optical map information directly within the de Bruijn graph framework to help produce an accurate assembly of a genome that is consistent with the optical map information provided. Our simulations on bacterial genomes show that AGORA is effective at producing assemblies closely matching the reference sequences. Additionally, we show that noise in the optical map can have a strong impact on the final assembly quality for some complex genomes, and we also measure how various characteristics of the starting de Bruijn graph may impact the quality of the final assembly. Lastly, we show that a proper choice of restriction enzyme for the optical map may substantially improve the quality of the final assembly. Conclusions Our work shows that optical maps can be used effectively to assemble genomes within the de Bruijn graph assembly framework. Our experiments also provide insights into the characteristics of the mapping data that most affect the performance of our algorithm, indicating the

  5. Detection of single fluorescent proteins inside eukaryotic cells using two-photon fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Ximiao; Cheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Imaging single fluorescent proteins in a live cell is a challenging task because of the strong cellular autofluorescence. Autofluorescence can be minimized by reducing fluorescence excitation volume. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has been routinely used to reduce excitation volume and detect single protein molecules in or close to cell membrane. However, the limited penetration depth of evanescent field excludes imaging of single fluorescent proteins that reside dee...

  6. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    In-Suck Baek; Kim, Moon S.; Hoosoo Lee; Wang-Hee Lee; Byoung-Kwan Cho

    2014-01-01

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 4...

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly identification using computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an improved method of remotely identifying irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies. The method uses existing in-cell TV cameras to input an image of the notch-coded top of the fuel assemblies into a computer vision system, which then produces the identifying number for that assembly. This system replaces systems that use either a mechanical mechanism to feel the notches or use human operators to locate notches visually. The system was developed for identifying fuel assemblies from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor, but could be used for other reactor assembly identification, as appropriate

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment

  9. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of γ rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment was

  10. Nanoparticle assembled microcapsules for application as pH and ammonia sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amali, Arlin Jose [Nanomaterials Laboratory, I and PC Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Tarnaka, Hyderabad 500607 (India); Awwad, Nour H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box: 11-0236, Riad El Solh, Beirut 1107-2020 (Lebanon); Rana, Rohit Kumar, E-mail: rkrana@iict.res.in [Nanomaterials Laboratory, I and PC Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Tarnaka, Hyderabad 500607 (India); Patra, Digambara, E-mail: dp03@aub.edu.lb [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, P.O. Box: 11-0236, Riad El Solh, Beirut 1107-2020 (Lebanon)

    2011-12-05

    Graphical abstract: HPTS encapsulated nanoparticle assembled microcapsule is exploited as dual excitations ratiometic pH sensor. This nanoparticle assembled microcapsule based fluorescence sensor can determine ammonia and offers a robust, simple and fast sensing material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel HPTS encapsulated nanoparticle assembled microcapsule is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its dual excitation facilitates a ratiometic pH sensor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is successfully applied for the determination of ammonia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It provides a robust, simple and fast sensing material. - Abstract: The encapsulation of molecular probes in a suitable nanostructured matrix can be exploited to alter their optical properties and robustness for fabricating efficient chemical sensors. Despite high sensitivity, simplicity, selectivity and cost effectiveness, the photo-destruction and photo-bleaching are the serious concerns while utilizing molecular probes. Herein we demonstrate that hydroxy pyrene trisulfonate (HPTS), a pH sensitive molecular probe, when encapsulated in a microcapsule structure prepared via the assembly of silica nanoparticles mediated by poly-L-lysine and trisodium citrate, provides a robust sensing material for pH sensing under the physiological conditions. The temporal evolution under continuous irradiation indicates that the fluorophore inside the silica microcapsule is extraordinarily photostable. The fluorescence intensity alternation at dual excitation facilitates for a ratiometic sensing of the pH, however, the fluorescence lifetime is insensitive to hydrogen ion concentration. The sensing scheme is found to be robust, fast and simple for the measurement of pH in the range 5.8-8.0, and can be successfully applied for the determination of ammonia in the concentration range 0-1.2 mM, which is important for aquatic life and the environment.

  11. Trapping of Hepatitis B Virus capsid assembly intermediates by phenylpropenamide assembly accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Katen, Sarah P.; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, M.G.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the biological self-assembly process of virus capsids is key to understanding the viral life cycle, as well as serving as a platform for the design of assembly-based antiviral drugs. Here we identify and characterize the phenylpropenamide family of small molecules, known to have antiviral activity in vivo, as assembly effectors of the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) capsid. We have found two representative phenylpropenamides to be assembly accelerators, increasing the rate of assembly w...

  12. Improved monomeric red, orange and yellow fluorescent proteins derived from Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaner, Nathan C; Campbell, Robert E; Steinbach, Paul A; Giepmans, Ben N G; Palmer, Amy E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are genetically encoded, easily imaged reporters crucial in biology and biotechnology. When a protein is tagged by fusion to a fluorescent protein, interactions between fluorescent proteins can undesirably disturb targeting or function. Unfortunately, all wild-type yellow-to-red

  13. Multispectral excitation based multiple fluorescent targets resolving in fluorescence molecular tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and resolve multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. An algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) for multispectral excited FMT is proposed to resolve multiple fluorescent targets in this study. Fluorescent targets are excited by multispectral excitation, and the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent yields under the excitation spectrum is reconstructed by an iterative Tikhonov regularization algorithm. Subsequently, multiple fluorescent targets are resolved from mixed fluorescence signals by employing ICA. Simulations were performed and the results demonstrate that multiple adjacent fluorescent targets can be resolved if the number of excitation wavelengths is not smaller than that of fluorescent targets with different concentrations. The algorithm obtains both independent components that provide spatial information of different fluorescent targets and spectral courses that reflect variation trends of fluorescent yields along with the excitation spectrum. By using this method, it is possible to visualize the metabolism status of drugs in different structure organs, and quantitatively depict the variation trends of fluorescent yields of each functional organ under the excitation spectrum. This method may provide a pattern for tumor detection, drug delivery and treatment monitoring in vivo.

  14. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy for medical and environmental diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for diagnostics in medical and environmental applications. The many aspects of fluorescence emission are utilized to enhance the accuracy of the diagnosis. A fluorescence detection system, based on nitrogen laser or dye laser excitation and optical multichannel detection, was constructed, and fluorescence spectra from human malignant tumours of various origins, were recorded. Tumour demarcation was observed using exogenous chromophores, as well as the endogenous tissue fluorescence. In particular, δ-amino levulinic acid was found to provide very good tumour demarcation. A multi-colour imaging system capable of simultaneous recording of four fluorescence images at selected wavelengths, was developed. Examples of processed images, based on the four sub-images, are shown for malignant tumours. In addition, data from photodynamic treatment of human malignant tumours are presented. Autofluorescence spectra from excised pieces of human atherosclerotic aorta and atherosclerotic coronary segment were found to be different from those of non-diseased vessels. Furthermore, fluorescence decay curves from atherosclerotic samples were found to differ from those of non-diseased samples. It is concluded that both spectral and temporal information should be utilized to enhance the demarcation. Methods for obtaining fluorescence data free from interference from blood, with applications to in vivo laser angioplasty of atherosclerosis, are discussed. The optical multichannel system and the multi-colour imaging system were integrated with a remote sensing system, originally used for environmental measurements, to obtain fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence images of plants at a distance of up to 100 m. The fluorescence data from plants subject to environmental stress or senescent plants were found to differ from those obtained from healthy vegetation. 359 refs

  16. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  17. Sample handling for kinetics and molecular assembly in flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). National Flow Cytometry Resource]|[Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). School of Medicine; Seamer, L.C.; Kuckuck, F.; Prossnitz, E.; Edwards, B. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). School of Medicine; Posner, G. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01

    Flow cytometry discriminates particle associated fluorescence from the fluorescence of the surrounding medium. It permits assemblies of macromolecular complexes on beads or cells to be detected in real-time with precision and specificity. The authors have investigated two types of robust sample handling systems which provide sub-second resolution and high throughput: (1) mixers which use stepper-motor driven syringes to initiate chemical reactions in msec time frames; and (2) flow injection controllers with valves and automated syringes used in chemical process control. In the former system, the authors used fast valves to overcome the disparity between mixing 100 {micro}ls of sample in 100 msecs and delivering sample to a flow cytometer at 1 {micro}l/sec. Particles were detected within 100 msec after mixing, but turbulence was created which lasted for 1 sec after injection of the sample into the flow cytometer. They used optical criteria to discriminate particles which were out of alignment due to the turbulent flow. Complex sample handling protocols involving multiple mixing steps and sample dilution have also been achieved. With the latter system they were able to automate sample handling and delivery with intervals of a few seconds. The authors used a fluidic approach to defeat turbulence caused by sample introduction. By controlling both sheath and sample with individual syringes, the period of turbulence was reduced to {approximately} 200 msecs. Automated sample handling and sub-second resolution should permit broad analytical and diagnostic applications of flow cytometry.

  18. Dynamic pathways for viral capsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Michael F.; Chandler, David

    2006-02-09

    We develop a class of models with which we simulate the assembly of particles into T1 capsid-like objects using Newtonian dynamics. By simulating assembly for many different values of system parameters, we vary the forces that drive assembly. For some ranges of parameters, assembly is facile, while for others, assembly is dynamically frustrated by kinetic traps corresponding to malformed or incompletely formed capsids. Our simulations sample many independent trajectories at various capsomer concentrations, allowing for statistically meaningful conclusions. Depending on subunit (i.e., capsomer) geometries, successful assembly proceeds by several mechanisms involving binding of intermediates of various sizes. We discuss the relationship between these mechanisms and experimental evaluations of capsid assembly processes.

  19. Integrated Virtual Assembly Process Planning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianhua; HOU Weiwei; HOU Weiwei; SHANG Wei; SHANG Wei; NING Ruxin; NING Ruxin

    2009-01-01

    Assembly process planning(APP) for complicated products is a time-consuming and difficult work with conventional method. Virtual assembly process planning(VAPP) provides engineers a new and efficiency way. Previous studies in VAPP are almost isolated and dispersive, and have not established a whole understanding and discussed key realization techniques of VAPP from a systemic and integrated view. The integrated virtual assembly process planning(IVAPP) system is a new virtual reality based engineering application, which offers engineers an efficient, intuitive, immersive and integrated method for assembly process planning in a virtual environment. Based on analysis the information integration requirement of VAPP, the architecture of IVAPP is proposed. Through the integrated structure, IVAPP system can realize information integration and workflow controlling. In order to model the assembly process in IVAPP, a hierarchical assembly task list(HATL) is presented, in which different assembly tasks for assembling different components are organized into a hierarchical list. A process-oriented automatic geometrical constraint recognition algorithm(AGCR) is proposed, so that geometrical constraints between components can be automatically recognized during the process of interactive assembling. At the same time, a progressive hierarchical reasoning(PHR) model is discussed. AGCR and PHR will greatly reduce the interactive workload. A discrete control node model(DCNM) for cable harness assembly planning in IVAPP is detailed. DCNM converts a cable harness into continuous flexed line segments connected by a series of section center points, and designs can realize cable harness planning through controlling those control nodes. Mechanical assemblies (such as transmission case and engine of automobile) are used to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method and algorithms. The application of IVAPP system reveals advantages over the traditional assembly process planning method

  20. Assembly and stability of nisin-lipid II pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasper, Hester Emilie; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2004-09-14

    The peptide antibiotic nisin was the first reported example of an antibiotic that kills bacteria via targeted pore formation. The specific target of nisin is Lipid II, an essential intermediate in the bacterial cell-wall synthesis. High-affinity binding of the antibiotic to Lipid II is followed by rapid permeabilization of the membrane. Here, we investigated the assembly and stability of nisin-Lipid II pore complexes by means of pyrene fluorescence and circular dichroism. We demonstrated that nisin uses all available Lipid II molecules in the membrane to form pore complexes. The pore complexes have a uniform structure and consist of 8 nisin and 4 Lipid II molecules. Moreover, the pores displayed a remarkable stability, because they were able to resist the solubilization of the membrane environment by mild detergents. Similar experiments with [N20P/M21P]nisin showed that the hinge region is essential for the assembly into stable pore complexes. The new insights were used to propose a refined model for nisin pore formation. PMID:15350143