WorldWideScience

Sample records for assembled all-metal nanowire

  1. Hierarchical magnetic assembly of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hangarter, Carlos M; Rheem, Youngwoo; Yoo, Bongyoung; Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Myung, Nosang V

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic alignment is reported as a facile technique for assembling nanowires into hierarchical structures. Cross junction and T junction nanowire networks are demonstrated using a sequential alignment technique on unpatterned substrates and predefined lithographically patterned ferromagnetic electrodes. The formation of T junctions prevails as nanowires from the first alignment behave as ferromagnetic electrodes under the external magnetic field of the second alignment. The presence of prefabricated ferromagnetic electrodes dominates dipole interactions of localized nanowires for preferential alignment. Application of a magnetic field from a cylindrical coaxial magnet has also been utilized to form radially aligned nanowires. The magnetic field of the coaxial cylindrical magnet produced a dense, concentric nanowire configuration at the centre of the magnetic field as a consequence of the radial field gradient, and sparse nanowire arrangements in the peripheral field, which were utilized as interconnects with a concentric electrode design

  2. The Self- and Directed Assembly of Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin David

    This thesis explores the self- and directed assembly of nanowires. Specifically, we examine the driving forces behind nanowire self-assembly and the macro-structures that are formed. Particle-dense, oriented nanowire structures show promise in the fields of photonics, energy, sensing, catalysis, and electronics. Arrays of spherical particles have already found uses in electronic inks, sensing arrays, and many other commercial applications; but, it is a challenge to create specific arrays of morphologically and/or compositionally anisotropic particles. The following chapters illuminate the interactions that drive the assembly of anisotropic particles in high density solutions in the absence of applied fields or solution drying. Special emphasis is placed on the structures that are formed. The properties of micro- and nanoparticles and their assembly are introduced in Chapter 1. In particular, the properties of shape and material anisotropic particles are highlighted, while challenges in producing desired arrays are discussed. In this thesis, metallic nanowires of increasing complexity were used to examine the self-assembly behavior of both shape and material anisotropic particles. Nanowires were synthesized through templated electrodeposition. In this process, porous alumina membranes served as a template in which metal salts were reduced to form particles. Upon template dissolution, billions of nominally identical particles were released. We specifically focused on segmented, metallic nanowires 2-13 mum in length and 180 to 350 nm in diameter. Since these particles have strong van der Waals (VDWs) attractions, an electrostatically repulsive coating was necessary to prevent aggregation; we used small molecule, DNA, or amorphous silica coatings. Nanowires and their coatings were characterized by electron microscopy. In order to study self-assembly behavior, particle-dense aqueous suspensions were placed within an assembly chamber defined by a silicone spacer. The

  3. Assembly of Ultra-Dense Nanowire-Based Computing Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieber, Charles M

    2006-01-01

    ..., with highly reliable defect- and fault-tolerant architecture. We have fabricated and assembled molecular-scale logic elements based on overlapping semiconducting nanowire arrays using novel wafer-scale assembly techniques...

  4. Controlled manipulation of giant hybrid inorganic nanowire assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Fung Suong; Shaijumon, Manikoth M; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2008-07-01

    The ultimate goal of nanotechnology is the design and fabrication of nanosize building blocks with multiple functionalities and their assembly into large-scale functional structures that can be controllably manipulated. Here we show that hybrid inorganic multisegmented nanowires, with hydrophobic carbon nanotube tails and hydrophilic metal nanowire heads, allow the assembly and manipulation of massive ordered structures in solution, reminiscent of the organic molecular micellar assembly. Further, properly designed assemblies can be manipulated using external stimuli such as magnetic field and light. The hybrid nanowires can have multiple segments including magnetic components, allowing the assembly to be manipulated by external magnetic field. The assembled structures can also be manipulated by modifying the hydrophobicity of the respective components via chemical functionalization and optical irradiation. This approach brings the concept of environment sensitive self-assembling nanomaterials closer to reality.

  5. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-02

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  6. Well-dispersed gold nanowire suspension for assembly application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Cailing; Zhang Li; Zhang Haoli; Li Hulin

    2005-01-01

    A method for fabricating well-dispersed nanowire suspension has been demonstrated in the paper. Thin gold nanowires were prepared by template synthesis, and then functionalized with sulphonate group-terminated thiols before suspended in different solvents. The degree of aggregation of the obtained suspension was evaluated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the degree of aggregation was predominated by the solvents, and the best degree of dispersion was obtained when isopropyl alcohol (IPA) was used as the solvent. The gold nanowires from the suspension can be selectively assembled onto chemically patterned substrates. This well-dispersed nanowire suspension is potentially useful for fabricating novel nanodevices

  7. Designing and building nanowires: directed nanocrystal self-assembly into radically branched and zigzag PbS nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fan; Ma Xin; Gerlein, L Felipe; Cloutier, Sylvain G

    2011-01-01

    Lead sulfide nanowires with controllable optoelectronic properties would be promising building blocks for various applications. Here, we report the hot colloidal synthesis of radically branched and zigzag nanowires through self-attachment of star-shaped and octahedral nanocrystals in the presence of multiple surfactants. We obtained high-quality single-crystal nanowires with uniform diameter along the entire length, and the size of the nanowire can be tuned by tailoring the reaction parameters. This slow oriented attachment provides a better understanding of the intricacies of this complex nanocrystal assembly process. Meanwhile, these self-assembled nanowire structures have appealing lateral conformations with narrow side arms or highly faceted edges, where strong quantum confinement can occur. Consequently, the single-crystal nanowire structures exhibit strong photoluminescence in the near-infrared region with a large blue-shift compared to the bulk material.

  8. Self-Assembled InAs Nanowires as Optical Reflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Francesco; Fornasari, Lucia; Marini, Andrea; Bellani, Vittorio; Banfi, Francesco; Roddaro, Stefano; Ercolani, Daniele; Rocci, Mirko; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco; Sorba, Lucia; Rossella, Francesco

    2017-11-21

    Subwavelength nanostructured surfaces are realized with self-assembled vertically-aligned InAs nanowires, and their functionalities as optical reflectors are investigated. In our system, polarization-resolved specular reflectance displays strong modulations as a function of incident photon energy and angle. An effective-medium model allows one to rationalize the experimental findings in the long wavelength regime, whereas numerical simulations fully reproduce the experimental outcomes in the entire frequency range. The impact of the refractive index of the medium surrounding the nanostructure assembly on the reflectance was estimated. In view of the present results, sensing schemes compatible with microfluidic technologies and routes to innovative nanowire-based optical elements are discussed.

  9. Dielectrophoresis-based multi-step nanowire assembly on a flexible superstrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Chen, Ke; Liu, Linbo; Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2018-01-01

    Nanowire assembly based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) could be a useful and efficient tool for fabricating nanowire-based devices. Although there have been extensive reports on the DEP nanowire assembly, the new approaches that make DEP more facile and affordable are still desirable. Herein, we present an approach using the reusable electrodes to assemble silver nanowires onto a removable, independent polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. The PET film is placed on the reusable electrodes, and a sinusoidal AC voltage is applied to the electrodes to induce DEP force for nanowire assembly upon the flexible film. We explore the influences of voltage, frequency and film thickness on nanowire assembly and further realize the assembly of silver nanowire arrays. In addition, the induced electric field is rotated in two consecutive steps to assemble the rectangular mesh-like nanowire networks. This reusable and facile approach for DEP nanowire assembly could provide a low-cost, precise, rapid and convenient tool for applications in the fields of flexible electronics.

  10. Nanowire assembly, e.g. for optical probes, comprises optically trapping high aspect ratio semiconductor nanowire with infrared single-beam optical trap and attaching nanowire to organic or inorganic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Pauzauskie, P.; Radenovic, A.; Trepagnier, E.; Liphardt, J.; Yang, P.

    2007-01-01

    NOVELTY - A nanowire assembly method comprises optically trapping a semiconductor nanowire with an infrared single-beam optical trap and attaching the nanowire to an organic or inorganic structure by laser fusing. The nanowire is further trapped in a fluid environment. The optical trap has a beam wavelength of 1064 nm. The nanowire has an aspect ratio greater than 100 and a diameter less than 100 (preferably less than 80) nm. The nanowire and the organic or inorganic structure form a heterost...

  11. Disproportionation for growing copper nanowires and their controlled self-assembly facilitated by ligand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Enyi; Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Liu, Shuhua; Han, Ming-Yong

    2011-03-07

    The coating makes the wire bundle: High-quality free-standing copper nanowires have been successfully produced by disproportionation of Cu(+) in oleylamine. This provides an effective way to prepare high-quality copper nanowires, but also enriches synthetic routes to other nanostructures. These copper nanowires can self-assemble by surface ligand exchange of oleylamine with trioctylphosphine. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Aligned nanowires and nanodots by directed block copolymer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuaigang; Yang, XiaoMin; Lee, Kim Y.; ver der Veerdonk, Rene J. M.; Kuo, David; Russell, Thomas P.

    2011-07-01

    The directed self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) is a promising route to generate highly ordered arrays of sub-10 nm features. Ultradense arrays of a monolayer of spherical microdomains or cylindrical microdomains oriented parallel to the surface have been produced where the lateral ordering is guided by surface patterning and the lattice defined by the patterning can be commensurate or incommensurate with the natural period of the BCP. Commensurability between the two can be used to elegantly manipulate the lateral ordering and orientation of the BCP microdomains so as to form well-aligned arrays of 1D nanowires or 2D addressable nanodots. No modification of the substrate surface, aside from the patterning, was used, making the influence of lattice mismatch and pattern amplification on the size, shape and pitch of the BCP microdomains more transparent. A skew angle between incommensurate lattices, defining a stretching or compression of the BCP chains to compensate for the lattice mismatch, is presented.

  13. Self-assembly of metal nanowires induced by alternating current electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Pablo; Arcenegui, Juan J.; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We describe the reversible assembly of an aqueous suspension of metal nanowires into two different 2-dimensional stable configurations. The assembly is induced by an AC electric field of magnitude around 10 kV/m. It is known that single metal nanowires orientate parallel to the electric field for all values of applied frequency, according to two different mechanisms depending on the frequency. These different mechanisms also govern the mutual interaction between nanowires, which leads to directed-assembly into distinctive structures, the shape of which depends on the frequency of the applied field. We show that for frequencies higher than the typical frequency for charging the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, dipole-dipole interaction leads to the formation of chains of nanowires. For lower frequencies, the nanowires form wavy bands perpendicular to the electric field direction. This behavior appears to be driven by the electroosmotic flow induced on the metal surface of the nanowires. Remarkably, no similar structures have been reported in previous studies of nanowires.

  14. Directed organization of gold nanoclusters on silver nanowires: A step forward in heterostructure assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jadab; Vivek, J. P.; Vijayamohanan, Kunjukrishna P.; Singh, Poonam; Dharmadhikari, C. V.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the directed assembly of tridecylamine protected gold nanoclusters of 4-5nm size on functionalized silver nanowires of 55-60nm diameter and the electron transfer behavior of this integrated structure using transmission electron microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. Linear I-V for bare silver nanowire suggests metallic behavior but high tunnel resistance indicates presence of insulating layer on the surface. Identical I-Vs obtained for isolated gold nanoparticle and heterostructure suggests that electron transport across nanowires in the latter is governed by gold nanoparticles in contrast to expected ballistic or diffusive transport along their length.

  15. Self-assembled diphenylalanine nanowires for cellular studies and sensor applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Emnéus, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a series of experiments showing that vertical self-assembled diphenylalanine peptide nanowires (PNWs) are a suitable candidate material for cellular biosensing. We grew HeLa and PC12 cells onto PNW modified gold surfaces and observed no hindrance of cell growth caused by ...

  16. Fabrication and characterization of PEDOT nanowires based on self-assembled peptide nanotube lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Castillo, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate the use of self-assembled peptide nanotube structures as masking material in a rapid, mild and low cost fabrication of polymerized p-toluenesulfonate doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:TsO) nanowire device. In this new fabrication approach the PEDOT...

  17. W18O49 nanowires assembled on carbon felt for application to supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinjoo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2018-03-01

    For supercapacitor applications, W18O49 nanowires have been extensively grown on graphitic carbon felt using a facile solvothermal method. The diameter and length of the nanowires are about 7 and 300 nm, respectively. The nanowires consist of monoclinic W18O49 grown along the [010] direction, as shown by TEM and XRD analyses. The W18O49 nanowires, assembled on carbon felt, exhibit a high capacity of 588.33 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g together with an excellent cycle performance, and a low internal resistance during the electrochemical tests. This outstanding performance may originate from the three-dimensional porous nanostructure of these W18O49 nanowires, which leads to a reduction in the resistance and fast reaction kinetics due to the high specific surface area and electrolyte accessibility. Furthermore, sufficient oxygen deficiencies of the substoichiometric tungsten oxide can also contribute to the electrochemical activity, which can be confirmed by comparison of CV and EIS data with WO3 nanowires.

  18. Growth and Magnetic Properties of Polycrystalline Self-Assembled Bifurcated Co Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Silverberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We use anodization of aluminum foil with variable applied anodization voltage to create an alumina template with bifurcated porous structures. The template is then used to electrodeposit Co, fabricating unique bifurcated Co nanowires. In order to better understand the crystal structure of our new material, we then report magnetic properties of these self-assembled bifurcated Co nanowires. Magnetic measurements of the bifurcated wires are studied as functions of branch/stem ratios, wire length, and temperature. The results are compared with those of straight Co nanowires of similar dimensions and thin film Co samples to find that a different crystal lattice structure prevails in the stems than in the branches of the wires.

  19. Wavelength tunable electroluminescence from randomly assembled n-CdSxSe1-x nanowires/p+-SiC heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jen It; Yang, Hui Ying; Li, Hongxing; Chen, Tupei; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-02-01

    Visible electroluminescence (EL) with tunable wavelength has been observed at room temperature from randomly assembled n-CdSxSe1-x nanowires grown on a p+-SiC substrate by the vapor transport technique. The dominant emission peaks can be tuned from ~720 to ~520 nm by varying the composition of the alloy nanowires.Visible electroluminescence (EL) with tunable wavelength has been observed at room temperature from randomly assembled n-CdSxSe1-x nanowires grown on a p+-SiC substrate by the vapor transport technique. The dominant emission peaks can be tuned from ~720 to ~520 nm by varying the composition of the alloy nanowires. This article was submitted as part of a collection highlighting papers on the `Recent Advances in Semiconductor Nanowires Research' from ICMAT 2011.

  20. The Slate all metal airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slate, C. C.; Neumann, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the Slate all metal airship City of Glendale built and completed in 1930 is presented. The airship facilities are discussed. Pertinent data which led to other engineering accomplishments for aviation are shown. The SMD-100 concept is presented along with a brief commentary on the costs and problems involved in such an airship design and the application of the hoisting and elevator facilities to airship development.

  1. Self-assembled quantum dot structures in a hexagonal nanowire for quantum photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Dou, Xiu-Ming; Wei, Bin; Zha, Guo-Wei; Shang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Li; Su, Dan; Xu, Jian-Xing; Wang, Hai-Yan; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Sun, Bao-Quan; Ji, Yuan; Han, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-05-01

    Two types of quantum nanostructures based on self-assembled GaAs quantumdots embedded into GaAs/AlGaAs hexagonal nanowire systems are reported, opening a new avenue to the fabrication of highly efficient single-photon sources, as well as the design of novel quantum optics experiments and robust quantum optoelectronic devices operating at higher temperature, which are required for practical quantum photonics applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Self-assembly of conducting polymer nanowires at air-water interface and its application for gas sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianhua; Jiang Yadong; Yang Yajie; Yu Junsheng

    2009-01-01

    Conducting polymer poly (3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanowires were prepared by wetting Al 2 O 3 membrane (AAO) template method, which could be well dispersed in organic solvent with ultrasonic treatment. In order to obtain highly ordered structure of nanowires, the self-assembly film of nanowires at air/water interface was investigated by Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The results showed that PEDOT nanowire-surfactant complex at air/water interface had well self-assembly capability, and the stable float layer was formed with collapse pressure more than 50 mN/m. This well arranged nanowire film was transferred onto interdigitated electrode successfully as novel gas sensing layer through a vertical dipping method. The as-prepared PEDOT nanowire gas sensor was applied to the precise detection of NH 3 and HCl gas, especially for low gas concentration (lower than 5 ppm), and showed higher gas sensitivity than conventional nanowire gas sensor. The chemical sensors based on ordered PEDOT nanowires presented good reversibility and reproducibility in response. Notably, our work presents an appropriate methodology for fabricating ordered conducting polymer nanomaterial for gas sensor and other applications

  3. Horizontal Assembly of Single Nanowire Diode Fabricated by p-n Junction GaN NW Grown by MOCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hyeon Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxially p-n junction gallium nitride nanowires have been synthesized via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method. Nanowires prepared on Si(111 substrates were found to grow perpendicular to the substrate, and the transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the nanowires had singlecrystalline structures with a growth axis. The parallel assembly of the p-n junction nanowire was prepared on a Si substrate with a thermally grown SiO2 layer. The transport studies of horizontal gallium nitride nanowire structures assembled from p- and n-type materials show that these junctions correspond to well-defined p-n junction diodes. The p-n junction devices based on GaN nanowires suspended over the electrodes were fabricated and their electrical properties were investigated. The horizontally assembled gallium nitride nanowire diodes suspended over the electrodes exhibited a substantial increase in conductance under UV light exposure. Apart from the selectivity to different light wavelengths, high responsivity and extremely short response time have also been obtained.

  4. Use of self-assembled peptide nanostructures for the fabrication of silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Castillo, Jaime; Bakmand, Tania

    2011-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Self-assembled diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes provide a means of achieving nanostructured materials in a very simple and fast way. Recent discoveries have shown that this unique material, in addition to remaining stable under dry conditions, rapidly dissolves in water making it...... nanowires. Furthermore, the PNTs could be used as lift-off masks for the patterning during deposition of materials. REFERENCES [1] K. B. Andersen, J. Castillo-León, M. Hedstrom, W. E. Svendsen. Nanoscale. 3, 994-998, (2011)...

  5. Silicon nanowire charge-trap memory incorporating self-assembled iron oxide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruo-Gu; Heath, James R

    2012-11-19

    Charge-trap non-volatile memory devices based upon the precise integration of quantum dot storage elements with silicon nanowire field-effect transistors are described. Template-assisted assembly yields an ordered array of FeO QDs within the trenches that separate highly aligned SiNWs, and injected charges are reversibly stored via Fowler-Nordheim tunneling into the QDs. Stored charges shift the transistor threshold voltages, providing the basis for a memory device. Quantum dot size is found to strongly influence memory performance metrics. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Formation Mechanism of Self Assembled Horizontal ErSb Nanowires Embedded in a GaSb(001) Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathaniel; Kraemer, Stephan; PalmstrøM, Chris

    The ErxGa1-xSb exhibits a variety of self-assembling nanostructures. In order to harness these nanostructures for use in devices and other material systems it is important to understand their formation. We have characterized the growth mechanism of self-assembled horizontal ErSb nanowires in a GaSb(001) matrix through the use of in-situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) as well as ex-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). We observe large GaSb macrosteps on the growth surface of Er.3Ga.7Sb samples. The areas near the ledge and base of the macrosteps show significant differences in size and distribution of ErSb nanowires. Results suggest that the formation of macrosteps drives the transition from vertical to horizontal nanowires in the ErxGa1-xSb system. We also observe a low temperature growth mode, which results in horizontal nanowire formation under a wide range of flux conditions. This new growth mode does not exhibit the embedded growth observed in the formation of nanowires at higher temperatures and may allow for horizontal nanowire formation without the presence of macrosteps, as well as the formation of smaller nanoparticles which may be useful for achieving smaller nanoparticle dimensions and electron confinement effects. This work was supported by NSF-DMR under 1507875.

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of ZnO nanostructures: Au nanoclusters on Si substrates induce self-assembled nanowire growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, Claudia [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Marin, Oscar [CONICET – LAFISO, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Real, Silvina [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Comedi, David [CONICET – LAFISO, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Tirado, Mónica, E-mail: mtirado@herrera.unt.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanowires were grown on silicon substrate by electrophoretic deposition technique without use a porous template. • The growth was induced by Au nanoclusters and was performed at room temperature. • The photoluminescence spectrum for the nanowires obtained shows a broad UV-blue excitonic emission peak and a low emission in the green region. - Abstract: The present work reports the self-assembled growth of ZnO nanowires on silicon substrate with nanometer sized Au clusters using electrophoretic deposition technique at room temperature without a sacrificial template. A colloidal suspension of ≈5 nm sized ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in 2-propanol was used (nanoparticle bandgap of 3.47 eV as determined from absorbance measurements). The results show that the Au nanoclusters on the silicon substrate induce the self-assembly of the ZnO nanoparticles into vertically aligned ZnO nanowires. This effect is tentatively explained as being due to increased electric field intensities near the Au nanoclusters during the electrophoretic deposition. Photoluminescence measurements reveal the presence of quantum confined excitons and a relatively low concentration of deep defects in the nanowires. The electric field guided growth of semiconductor nanostructures at room temperature has great industrial potential as it minimizes production costs and enables the use of substrate materials not withstanding high temperatures.

  8. Giant exchange bias and its angular dependence in Co/CoO core-shell nanowire assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandha, Kinjal; Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Koymen, Ali R.; Liu, J. Ping, E-mail: pliu@uta.edu

    2017-07-12

    The exchange-bias field (H{sub EB}) and its angular dependence are systematically investigated in Co/CoO core-shell nanowire assemblies (∼15 nm in diameter and ∼200 nm in length) consisting of single-crystalline Co core and polycrystalline CoO shell. Giant exchange-bias field (H{sub EB}) up to 2.4 kOe is observed below a blocking temperature (T{sub EB} ∼150 K) in the aligned Co/CoO nanowire assemblies. It is also found that there is an angular dependence between the H{sub EB} and the applied magnetization direction. The H{sub EB} showed a peak at 30° between the applied field and the nanowire aligned direction, which may be attributed to the noncollinear spin orientations at the interface between the ferromagnetic core and the antiferromagnetic shell. This behavior is quantitatively supported by an analytical calculation based on Stoner–Wohlfarth model. This study underlines the importance of the competing magnetic anisotropies at the interface of Co/CoO core-shell nanowires. - Highlights: • Giant exchange bias is observed in oriented Co/CoO core-shell nanowire assemblies. • Study of angular and temperature dependence of the exchange bias effect. • Competing magnetic anisotropies at the interface of Co/CoO core-shell nanowires. • Effect of misaligned spins in FM/AFM interface on angular dependence of exchange bias. • We explain the analytical model that accounts for experimental results.

  9. Self-assembled nanowire formation during Cu deposition on atomically flat Vse2 surfaces studied by microscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollensteiner, S.; Spiecker, E.; Dieker, C.; Jaeger, W.; Adelung, R.; Kipp, L.; Skibowski, M.

    2003-01-01

    Self-assembled metallic nanostructures gain increasing interest in nanotechnologies and might find application in future electronic device fabrication. Upon UHV deposition of copper onto cleaved layered crystals of VSe 2 , self-assembled networks of nanowires and nanoclusters are observed to form and found to be remarkably stable even during storage under ambient conditions and at moderately increased temperatures. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy combined with scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy have been used to characterize the arrangements, structure and dimensions of the nanostructures and the substrate before metal deposition. On the flat parts of the substrate, self-similar nanowire networks form with wire diameters ranging from 8 to 250 nm and mesh dimensions ranging from 0.35 to 10 μm. The nanowires are preferentially aligned along low-index crystal directions and possess polycrystalline structure. Nanoclusters are formed within the meshes of the nanowire network. A model for the self-assembled growth of nanostructures during metal deposition, which takes into account the electronic charge exchange of adsorbed atoms with the substrate, will be discussed

  10. Structurally Ordered Nanowire Formation from Co-Assembly of DNA Origami and Collagen-Mimetic Peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tao [Department; Meyer, Travis A. [Wallace; Modlin, Charles [Department; Zuo, Xiaobing [X-ray; Conticello, Vincent P. [Department; Ke, Yonggang [Wallace

    2017-10-02

    We describe the co-assembly of two different building units: collagen-mimetic peptides and DNA origami. Two peptides CP++ and sCP(++) are designed with a sequence comprising a central block (Pro-Hyp-Gly) and two positively charged domains (Pro-Arg-Gly) at both N- and C-termini. Co-assembly of peptides and DNA origami two-layer (TL) nanosheets affords the formation of one-dimensional nanowires with repeating periodicity of similar to 10 nm. Structural analyses suggest a face-to-face stacking of DNA nanosheets with peptides aligned perpendicularly to the sheet surfaces. We demonstrate the potential of selective peptide-DNA association between face-to-face and edge-to-edge packing by tailoring the size of DNA nanostructures. This study presents an attractive strategy to create hybrid biomolecular assemblies from peptide and DNA-based building blocks that takes advantage of the intrinsic chemical and physical properties of the respective components to encode structural and, potentially, functional complexity within readily accessible biomimetic materials.

  11. High stability of self-assembled peptide nanowires against thermal, chemical, and proteolytic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungki; Park, Chan Beum

    2010-02-01

    Understanding the self-assembly of peptides into ordered nanostructures is recently getting much attention since it can provide an alternative route for fabricating novel bio-inspired materials. In order to realize the potential of the peptide-based nanofabrication technology, however, more information is needed regarding the integrity or stability of peptide nanostructures under the process conditions encountered in their applications. In this study, we investigated the stability of self-assembled peptide nanowires (PNWs) and nanotubes (PNTs) against thermal, chemical, proteolytic attacks, and their conformational changes upon heat treatment. PNWs and PNTs were grown by the self-assembly of diphenylalanine (Phe-Phe), a peptide building block, on solid substrates at different chemical atmospheres and temperatures. The incubation of diphenylalanine under aniline vapor at 150 degrees C led to the formation of PNWs, while its incubation with water vapor at 25 degrees C produced PNTs. We analyzed the stability of peptide nanostructures using multiple tools, such as electron microscopy, thermal analysis tools, circular dichroism, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that PNWs are highly stable up to 200 degrees C and remain unchanged when incubated in aqueous solutions (from pH 1 to 14) or in various chemical solvents (from polar to non-polar). In contrast, PNTs started to disintegrate even at 100 degrees C and underwent a conformational change at an elevated temperature. When we further studied their resistance to a proteolytic environment, we discovered that PNWs kept their initial structure while PNTs fully disintegrated. We found that the high stability of PNWs originates from their predominant beta-sheet conformation and the conformational change of diphenylalanine nanostructures. Our study suggests that self-assembled PNWs are suitable for future nano-scale applications requiring harsh processing conditions. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Self-assembly of silicon nanowires studied by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Agati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM was successfully applied to the analysis of silicon nanowires (SiNWs that were self-assembled during an inductively coupled plasma (ICP process. The ICP-synthesized SiNWs were found to present a Si–SiO2 core–shell structure and length varying from ≈100 nm to 2–3 μm. The shorter SiNWs (maximum length ≈300 nm were generally found to possess a nanoparticle at their tip. STEM energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy combined with electron tomography performed on these nanostructures revealed that they contain iron, clearly demonstrating that the short ICP-synthesized SiNWs grew via an iron-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism within the plasma reactor. Both the STEM tomography and STEM-EDX analysis contributed to gain further insight into the self-assembly process. In the long-term, this approach might be used to optimize the synthesis of VLS-grown SiNWs via ICP as a competitive technique to the well-established bottom-up approaches used for the production of thin SiNWs.

  13. Self-assembled ZnO agave-like nanowires and anomalous superhydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Wang, B.; Wang, C. X.; Chen, D. H.; Yang, G. W.

    2005-09-01

    Thin films of ZnO agave-like nanowires were prepared on amorphous carbon thin layers on silicon substrates using thermal chemical vapour transport and condensation without any metal catalysts. The unusual superhydrophobicity of the fabricated surface was measured; the water contact angle reaches 151.1°. On the basis of experimental and theoretical analyses, it appears likely that the biomimetic microcomposite and nanocomposite surfaces of the prepared thin films of ZnO agave-like nanowires are responsible for the excellent superhydrophobicity.

  14. Self-assembled ZnO agave-like nanowires and anomalous superhydrophobicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y H; Li, Z Y; Wang, B; Wang, C X; Chen, D H; Yang, G W

    2005-01-01

    Thin films of ZnO agave-like nanowires were prepared on amorphous carbon thin layers on silicon substrates using thermal chemical vapour transport and condensation without any metal catalysts. The unusual superhydrophobicity of the fabricated surface was measured; the water contact angle reaches 151.1 deg. On the basis of experimental and theoretical analyses, it appears likely that the biomimetic microcomposite and nanocomposite surfaces of the prepared thin films of ZnO agave-like nanowires are responsible for the excellent superhydrophobicity

  15. Self-assembled, nanowire network electrodes for depleted bulk heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Xinzheng

    2013-01-06

    Herein, a solution-processed, bottom-up-fabricated, nanowire network electrode is developed. This electrode features a ZnO template which is converted into locally connected, infiltratable, TiO2 nanowires. This new electrode is used to build a depleted bulk heterojunction solar cell employing hybrid-passivated colloidal quantum dots. The new electrode allows the application of a thicker, and thus more light-absorbing, colloidal quantum dot active layer, from which charge extraction of an efficiency comparable to that obtained from a thinner, planar device could be obtained. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Temperature and chemical bonding-directed self-assembly of cobalt phosphide nanowires in reaction solutions into vertical and horizontal alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Ye, Enyi; Liu, Shuhua; Lim, Suo Hon; Tee, Si Yin; Dong, Zhili; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-08-22

    The preparation of vertically or horizontally aligned self-assemblies of CoP nanowires is demonstrated for the first time by aging them in the reaction solution for a sufficient time at 20 or 0 °C. This strategy opens up a way for exploring the controlled self-assembly of various highly anisotropic nanostructures into long-range ordered structures with collective properties. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Three-dimensional MoO2 nanotextiles assembled from elongated nanowires as advanced anode for Li ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqing; Liu, Ping; Ren, Yurong; Huang, Xiaobing; Peng, Zhiguang; Tang, Yougen; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-09-01

    The fabrication of an ideal electrode architecture consisting of robust three dimensional (3D) nanowire networks have gained special interest for energy storage applications owing to the integrated advantages of nanostructures and microstructures. In this work, 3D MoO2 nanotextiles assembled from highly interconnected elongated nanowires are successfully prepared by a facile stirring assisted hydrothermal method and followed by an annealing process. In addition, a methylbenzene/water biphasic reaction system is involved in the hydrothermal process. When used as an anode material in Li ion batteries (LIBs), this robust MoO2 nanotextiles exhibit a high reversible capacity (860.4 mAh g-1 at 300 mA g-1), excellent cycling performance (89% capacity retention after 160 cycles) and rate capability (577 mAh g-1 at 2000 mA g-1). Various synthetic factors to the fabrication of 3D nanotextiles structure are discussed here and this design of 3D network structures may be extended to the preparation of other functional nanomaterials.

  18. Self-assembled and highly selective sensors based on air-bridge-structured nanowire junction arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won Jeong; Choi, Kyung Jin; Kim, Myung Hwa; Koo, Bon Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Baik, Jeong Min

    2013-08-14

    We describe a strategy for creating an air-bridge-structured nanowire junction array platform that capable of reliably discriminating between three gases (hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide) in air. Alternatively driven dual nanowire species of ZnO and CuO with the average diameter of ∼30 nm on a single substrate are used and decorated with metallic nanoparticles to form two-dimensional microarray, which do not need to consider the post fabrications. Each individual nanowires in the array form n-n, p-p, and p-n junctions at the micro/nanoscale on single substrate and the junctions act as electrical conducting path for carriers. The adsorption of gas molecules to the surface changes the potential barrier height formed at the junctions and the carrier transport inside the straight semiconductors, which provide the ability of a given sensor array to differentiate among the junctions. The sensors were tested for their ability to distinguish three gases (H2, CO, and NO2), which they were able to do unequivocally when the data was classified using linear discriminant analysis.

  19. Second harmonic generation on self-assembled GaAs/Au nanowires with thickness gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardini, A.; Leahu, G.; Centini, M.; Li Voti, R.; Fazio, E.; Sibilia, C.; Repetto, D.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.

    2017-05-01

    Here we investigated the SH generation at the wavelength of 400 nm (pump laser at 800 nm, 120 fs pulses) of a "metasurface" composed by an alternation of GaAs nano-grooves and Au nanowires capping portions of flat GaAs. The nano-grooves depth and the Au nanowires thickness gradually vary across the sample. The samples are obtained by ion bombardment at glancing angle on a 150 nm Au mask evaporated on a GaAs plane wafer. The irradiation process erodes anisotropically the surface, creating Au nanowires and, at high ion dose, grooves in the underlying GaAs substrate (pattern transfer). The SHG measurements are performed for different pump linear polarization angle at different positions on the "metasurface" in order to explore the regions with optimal conditions for SHG efficiency. The pump polarization angle is scanned by rotating a half-wave retarder plate. While the output SH signal in reflection is analyzed by setting the polarizer in `s' or `p' configuration in front of the detector. The best polarization condition for SHG is obtained in the configuration where the pump and second harmonic fields are both `p' polarized, and the experiments show a SH polarization dependence of the same symmetry of bulk GaAs. Thus, the presence of gold contributes only as field localization effect, but do not contributes directly as SH generator.

  20. Highly Ordered Single Crystalline Nanowire Array Assembled Three-Dimensional Nb3O7(OH) and Nb2O5 Superstructures for Energy Storage and Conversion Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haimin; Wang, Yun; Liu, Porun; Chou, Shu Lei; Wang, Jia Zhao; Liu, Hongwei; Wang, Guozhong; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-01-26

    Three-dimensional (3D) metal oxide superstructures have demonstrated great potentials for structure-dependent energy storage and conversion applications. Here, we reported a facile hydrothermal method for direct growth of highly ordered single crystalline nanowire array assembled 3D orthorhombic Nb3O7(OH) superstructures and their subsequent thermal transformation into monoclinic Nb2O5 with well preserved 3D nanowire superstructures. The performance of resultant 3D Nb3O7(OH) and Nb2O5 superstructures differed remarkably when used for energy conversion and storage applications. The thermally converted Nb2O5 superstructures as anode material of lithium-ion batteries (LiBs) showed higher capacity and excellent cycling stability compared to the Nb3O7(OH) superstructures, while directly hydrothermal grown Nb3O7(OH) nanowire superstructure film on FTO substrate as photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) without the need for further calcination exhibited an overall light conversion efficiency of 6.38%, higher than that (5.87%) of DSSCs made from the thermally converted Nb2O5 film. The high energy application performance of the niobium-based nanowire superstructures with different chemical compositions can be attributed to their large surface area, superior electron transport property, and high light utilization efficiency resulting from a 3D superstructure, high crystallinity, and large sizes. The formation process of 3D nanowire superstructures before and after thermal treatment was investigated and discussed based on our theoretical and experimental results.

  1. Toward Molecular Nanowires Self-Assembled on an Insulating Substrate: Heptahelicene-2-carboxylic acid on Calcite (10(1)over-bar4)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rahe, P.; Nimmrich, M.; Greuling, A.; Schütte, J.; Stará, Irena G.; Rybáček, Jiří; Huerta-Angeles, Gloria; Starý, Ivo; Rohlfing, M.; Kühnle, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 3 (2010), s. 1547-1552 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/1664; GA MŠk LC512 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) FP6-015847 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nanowires * self-assembly * calcite (1014) Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.520, year: 2010

  2. High-performance ambipolar self-assembled Au/Ag nanowire based vertical quantum dot field effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Haiting; Yu, Yu; Cao, Mingxuan; Che, Yongli; Wang, Jianlong; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Ding, Xin; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-10-07

    Most lateral PbSe quantum dot field effect transistors (QD FETs) show a low on current/off current (I on/I off) ratio in charge transport measurements. A new strategy to provide generally better performance is to design PbSe QD FETs with vertical architecture, in which the structure parameters can be tuned flexibly. Here, we fabricated a novel room-temperature operated vertical quantum dot field effect transistor with a channel of 580 nm, where self-assembled Au/Ag nanowires served as source transparent electrodes and PbSe quantum dots as active channels. Through investigating the electrical characterization, the ambipolar device exhibited excellent characteristics with a high I on/I off current ratio of about 1 × 10(5) and a low sub-threshold slope (0.26 V/decade) in the p-type regime. The all-solution processing vertical architecture provides a convenient way for low cost, large-area integration of the device.

  3. Directed magnetic field induced assembly of high magnetic moment cobalt nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Madhavi, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    A directed magnetic field induced assembly technique was employed to align two phase (h.c.p. + f.c.c.) cobalt nanoparticles in a mechanically robust long wire morphology. Co nanoparticles with an average size of 4.3 nm and saturation magnetization comparable to bulk cobalt were synthesized...

  4. Fabrication of TiO{sub 2} hierarchical architecture assembled by nanowires with anatase/TiO{sub 2}(B) phase-junctions for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Yong; Ouyang, Feng, E-mail: ouyangfh@hit.edu.cn

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • H-titanate nanowires hierarchical architectures (TNH) were prepared by a hydrothermal method. • Calcinations of TNH leads to the formation of anatase/TiO{sub 2}(B) phase-junctions. • The hierarchical architecture offered enhanced light harvesting and large specific surface area. • The 1D nanowires and anatase/TiO{sub 2}(B) phase-junctions both can enhance the separation of photoinduced electron-hole. • The products calcined at the optimum conditions (450 °C) exhibited a maximum hydrogenproduction rate of 7808 μmol g{sup −1} h{sup −1}. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} hierarchical architecture assembled by nanowires with anatase/TiO{sub 2}(B) phase-junctions was prepared by a hydrothermal process followed by calcinations. The optimum calcination treatment (450 °C) not only led to the formation of anatase/TiO{sub 2}(B) phase-junctions, but also kept the morphology of 1D nanowire and hierarchical architecture well. The T-450 load 0.5 wt% Pt cocatalysts showed the best photocatalytic hydrogen production activity, with a maximum hydrogen production rate of 7808 μmol g{sup −1} h{sup −1}. The high photocatalytic activity is ascribed to the combined effects of the following three factors: (1) the hierarchical architecture exhibits better light harvesting; (2) the larger specific surface area provides more surface active sites for the photocatalytic reaction; (3) the 1D nanowires and anatase/TiO{sub 2}(B) phase-junctions both can enhance the separation of photoinduced electron-hole pairs and inhibit their recombination.

  5. Novel 3D nano-antennas of self-assembled zinc oxide on silver nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, John Eder

    The manipulation of geometrical and structural arrangement of nano-devices, especially nanoantennas (nantennnas), is highly desirable for a precise controlling and monitoring of the multidirectional radiation pattern generated from the active elements on nanoantenna (nantenna) applications. Here we report the epitaxial growing of ZnO nanorods preferentially oriented along the [0001] direction on pentagonal faces (010) of Ag nanowires (Ag/ZnO ). The Ag/ZnO nanosystem, resembling an hierarchal aerial antenna, was obtained using an innovative microwave irradiation process. There, the combination of chemical synthesis along accelerated micro wave irradiation digestion process, allows us to control precisely the morphology and distribution of the Ag/ZnO nanostructure. Because of the high order arrangement exhibited for the nanosystem as well as high rate of reproducibility in the production process, we opted to tested the nanostructures in a set of experiments ranging from the bulk properties down to in-situ nanoscale; in order to gain valuable information from the experiments and with the aim to give a real application to the nanomaterial. In this order, first, we described the far and near electric field generated for the nantenna obtained from electrical radiation patterns resulting from phase map reconstruction using off-axis electron holography. It is important to notice that knowing the properties at nanoscale level, it will give key insight of mechanism through which the metal-semiconductor (Ag-ZnO) behaves in opto-electronic applications. In fact, using electric numerical approximations methods for a finite number of ZnO nanorods on Ag nanowires it was shown that the electric radiation intensities maps match closely the experimental results obtained with electron holography. Additionally, to reinforce the understanding of how the metal-semiconductor (Ag-ZnO) nanostructures could be used as an active element on photo-signal reception/transmitter generation it was

  6. Advances in nanowire bioelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Dai, Xiaochuan; Lieber, Charles M.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires represent powerful building blocks for next generation bioelectronics given their attractive properties, including nanometer-scale footprint comparable to subcellular structures and bio-molecules, configurable in nonstandard device geometries readily interfaced with biological systems, high surface-to-volume ratios, fast signal responses, and minimum consumption of energy. In this review article, we summarize recent progress in the field of nanowire bioelectronics with a focus primarily on silicon nanowire field-effect transistor biosensors. First, the synthesis and assembly of semiconductor nanowires will be described, including the basics of nanowire FETs crucial to their configuration as biosensors. Second, we will introduce and review recent results in nanowire bioelectronics for biomedical applications ranging from label-free sensing of biomolecules, to extracellular and intracellular electrophysiological recording.

  7. Orientation symmetry breaking in self-assembled Ce1-xGdxO2-y nanowires derived from chemical solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Queraltó, Albert; Mata, Maria de la; Martínez, L.; Magén, César; Gibert, M; Arbiol, Jordi; Hühne, R; Obradors Berenguer, Xavier; Puig Molina, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the growth mechanisms of nanostructures obtained from chemical solutions, a high-throughput production methodology, is essential to correlate precisely the growth conditions with the nanostructures' morphology, dimensions and orientation. It is shown that self-organized (011)-oriented CeGdO (CGO) nanowires having a single in-plane orientation are achieved when an anisotropic (011)-LaAlO (LAO) substrate is chosen. STEM and AFM images of the epitaxial nanowires reveal the (001)CGO...

  8. From precursor powders to CsPbX{sub 3} perovskite nanowires. One-pot synthesis, growth mechanism, and oriented self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yu; Bohn, Bernhard J.; Urban, Alexander S.; Polavarapu, Lakshminarayana; Feldmann, Jochen [Chair for Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Physics and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Muenchen Univ. (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Munich (Germany); Bladt, Eva; Bals, Sara [EMAT, University of Antwerp (Belgium); Wang, Kun; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter [Department of Physics, Chair for Functional Materials, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2017-10-23

    The colloidal synthesis and assembly of semiconductor nanowires continues to attract a great deal of interest. Herein, we describe the single-step ligand-mediated synthesis of single-crystalline CsPbBr{sub 3} perovskite nanowires (NWs) directly from the precursor powders. Studies of the reaction process and the morphological evolution revealed that the initially formed CsPbBr{sub 3} nanocubes are transformed into NWs through an oriented-attachment mechanism. The optical properties of the NWs can be tuned across the entire visible range by varying the halide (Cl, Br, and I) composition through subsequent halide ion exchange. Single-particle studies showed that these NWs exhibit strongly polarized emission with a polarization anisotropy of 0.36. More importantly, the NWs can self-assemble in a quasi-oriented fashion at an air/liquid interface. This process should also be easily applicable to perovskite nanocrystals of different morphologies for their integration into nanoscale optoelectronic devices. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Directed Self-Assembly of III-V Semiconductor Nanowire and 2D Atomic Crystal Nanosheet Arrays for Advanced Nanoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Theresa

    2014-03-01

    A variety of advanced materials and structures are being explored for next-generation ultra-low-power nanoelectronic devices to augment the capabilities provided by Si-based complementary logic. Interband tunneling field effect (TFET) transistors are particularly attractive because of their sub-60 mV/dec subthreshold swing (SS) and high current drive capabilities. This talk will provide an overview of recent progress to integrate abrupt, axially doped InGaAs nanowire TFET arrays and 2D atomic crystal nanosheets onto Si substrates using electric-field directed self-assembly. This strategy has enabled fabrication of the first lateral p+-i-n+ InGaAs nanowire TFETs with up to ten parallel aligned wires to study the effect of aggressive scaling on device figures of merit. Arrays of micron-scale, few-layer 2D layered group IV-monochalcogenide and transition metal dichalcogenide crystals are also being assembled for subsequent Hall and field-effect mobility measurements. STARnet LEAST Center.

  10. From precursor powders to CsPbX3 perovskite nanowires. One-pot synthesis, growth mechanism, and oriented self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Yu; Bohn, Bernhard J.; Urban, Alexander S.; Polavarapu, Lakshminarayana; Feldmann, Jochen; Bladt, Eva; Bals, Sara; Wang, Kun; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The colloidal synthesis and assembly of semiconductor nanowires continues to attract a great deal of interest. Herein, we describe the single-step ligand-mediated synthesis of single-crystalline CsPbBr 3 perovskite nanowires (NWs) directly from the precursor powders. Studies of the reaction process and the morphological evolution revealed that the initially formed CsPbBr 3 nanocubes are transformed into NWs through an oriented-attachment mechanism. The optical properties of the NWs can be tuned across the entire visible range by varying the halide (Cl, Br, and I) composition through subsequent halide ion exchange. Single-particle studies showed that these NWs exhibit strongly polarized emission with a polarization anisotropy of 0.36. More importantly, the NWs can self-assemble in a quasi-oriented fashion at an air/liquid interface. This process should also be easily applicable to perovskite nanocrystals of different morphologies for their integration into nanoscale optoelectronic devices. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Precise Placement of Metallic Nanowires on a Substrate by Localized Electric Fields and Inter-Nanowire Electrostatic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Hyeok Choi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Placing nanowires at the predetermined locations on a substrate represents one of the significant hurdles to be tackled for realization of heterogeneous nanowire systems. Here, we demonstrate spatially-controlled assembly of a single nanowire at the photolithographically recessed region at the electrode gap with high integration yield (~90%. Two popular routes, such as protruding electrode tips and recessed wells, for spatially-controlled nanowire alignment, are compared to investigate long-range dielectrophoretic nanowire attraction and short-range nanowire-nanowire electrostatic interaction for determining the final alignment of attracted nanowires. Furthermore, the post-assembly process has been developed and tested to make a robust electrical contact to the assembled nanowires, which removes any misaligned ones and connects the nanowires to the underlying electrodes of circuit.

  12. Fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Pihl; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe (tip, cantilever and support) for optical read-out, using a combination of silicon micro-machining and electroforming. The paper describes the entire fabrication process for a nickel AFM-probe. In addition...

  13. Self-assembly and hierarchical patterning of aligned organic nanowire arrays by solvent evaporation on substrates with patterned wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rong-Rong; Zhang, Cheng-Yi; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Ou, Xue-Mei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Jie, Jian-Sheng; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2013-06-26

    The controlled growth and alignment of one-dimensional organic nanostructures at well-defined locations considerably hinders the integration of nanostructures for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple process to achieve the growth, alignment, and hierarchical patterning of organic nanowires on substrates with controlled patterns of surface wettability. The first-level pattern is confined by the substrate patterns of wettability. Organic nanostructures are preferentially grown on solvent wettable regions. The second-level pattern is the patterning of aligned organic nanowires deposited by controlling the shape and movement of the solution contact lines during evaporation on the wettable regions. This process is controlled by the cover-hat-controlled method or vertical evaportation method. Therefore, various new patterns of organic nanostructures can be obtained by combing these two levels of patterns. This simple method proves to be a general approach that can be applied to other organic nanostructure systems. Using the as-prepared patterned nanowire arrays, an optoelectronic device (photodetector) is easily fabricated. Hence, the proposed simple, large-scale, low-cost method of preparing patterns of highly ordered organic nanostructures has high potential applications in various electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  14. V(2)O(5) nanowires with an intrinsic iodination activity leading to the formation of self-assembled melanin-like biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natalio, F.; André, R.; Pihan, S.A.; Humanes, M.; Wever, R.; Tremel, W.

    2011-01-01

    V2O5 nanowires act as biomimetic catalysts resembling vanadium haloperoxidases (V-HPO). The nanowires display iodinating activity as confirmed by a colorimetric assay using thymol blue (TB), UV/Vis spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry (FD-MS). In the presence of dopamine these nanowires catalyze

  15. Observation of layered antiferromagnetism in self-assembled parallel NiSi nanowire arrays on Si(110) by spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ie-Hong; Hsu, Hsin-Zan

    2018-03-01

    The layered antiferromagnetism of parallel nanowire (NW) arrays self-assembled on Si(110) have been observed at room temperature by direct imaging of both the topographies and magnetic domains using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (SP-STM/STS). The topographic STM images reveal that the self-assembled unidirectional and parallel NiSi NWs grow into the Si(110) substrate along the [\\bar{1}10] direction (i.e. the endotaxial growth) and exhibit multiple-layer growth. The spatially-resolved SP-STS maps show that these parallel NiSi NWs of different heights produce two opposite magnetic domains, depending on the heights of either even or odd layers in the layer stack of the NiSi NWs. This layer-wise antiferromagnetic structure can be attributed to an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling between the adjacent layers in the multiple-layer NiSi NW with a B2 (CsCl-type) crystal structure. Such an endotaxial heterostructure of parallel magnetic NiSi NW arrays with a layered antiferromagnetic ordering in Si(110) provides a new and important perspective for the development of novel Si-based spintronic nanodevices.

  16. Single-Crystalline Gold Nanowires Synthesized from Light-Driven Oriented Attachment and Plasmon-Mediated Self-Assembly of Gold Nanorods or Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shang-Yang; Gunawan, Hariyanto; Tsai, Shiao-Wen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei

    2017-03-01

    Through the light-driven geometrically oriented attachment (OA) and self-assembly of Au nanorods (NRs) or nanoparticles (NPs), single-crystalline Au nanowires (NWs) were synthesized by the irradiation of a linearly-polarized (LP) laser. The process was conducted in a droplet of Au colloid on a glass irradiated by LP near-infrared (e.g. 1064 nm and 785 nm) laser beam of low power at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, without any additive. The FE-SEM images show that the cross sections of NWs are various: tetragonal, pentagonal or hexagonal. The EDS spectrum verifies the composition is Au, and the pattern of X-ray diffraction identifies the crystallinity of NWs with the facets of {111}, {200}, {220} and {311}. We proposed a hypothesis for the mechanism that the primary building units are aligned and coalesced by the plasmon-mediated optical torque and force to form the secondary building units. Subsequently, the secondary building units undergo the next self-assembly, and so forth the tertiary ones. The LP light guides the translational and rotational motions of these building units to perform geometrically OA in the side-by-side, end-to-end and T-shaped manners. Consequently, micron-sized ordered mesocrystals are produced. Additionally, the concomitant plasmonic heating causes the annealing for recrystallizing the mesocrystals in water.

  17. Facile Formation of High-quality InGaN/GaN Quantum-disks-in-Nanowires on Bulk-Metal Substrates for High-power Light-emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2016-01-08

    High-quality nitride materials grown on scalable and low-cost metallic substrates are considerably attractive for high-power light emitters. We demonstrate here, for the first time, the high-power red (705 nm) InGaN/GaN quantum-disks (Qdisks)-in-nanowire light-emitting diodes (LEDs) self-assembled directly on metal-substrate. The LEDs exhibited a low turn-on voltage of ~2 V without efficiency droop up to injection current of 500 mA (1.6 kA/cm2) at ~5 V. This is achieved through the direct growth and optimization of high-quality nanowires on titanium (Ti) coated bulk polycrystalline-molybdenum (Mo) substrates. We performed extensive studies on the growth mechanisms, obtained high-crystal-quality nanowires, and confirmed the epitaxial relationship between the cubic titanium nitride (TiN) transition layer and the hexagonal nanowires. The growth of nanowires on all-metal stack of TiN/Ti/Mo enables simultaneous implementation of n-metal contact, reflector and heat-sink, which greatly simplifies the fabrication process of high-power light emitters. Our work ushers in a practical platform for high-power nanowires light emitters, providing versatile solutions for multiple cross-disciplinary applications that are greatly enhanced by leveraging on the chemical stability of nitride materials, large specific surface of nanowires, chemical lift-off ready layer structures, and reusable Mo substrates.

  18. High-Efficiency Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Fast Charge Extraction through Self-Assembled 3D Fibrous Network of Crystalline TiO 2 Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2010-12-28

    Herein, we present a novel morphology for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells based on the simple and straightforward self-assembly of nanorods into a 3D fibrous network of fused single-crystalline anatase nanowires. This architecture offers a high roughness factor, significant light scattering, and up to several orders of magnitude faster electron transport to reach a near-record-breaking conversion efficiency of 4.9%. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  19. Self-supported all-metal THz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, H. O.; Jian, L. K.; Chen, H. S.; Bahou, M.; Kalaiselvi, S. M. P.; Virasawmy, S.; Maniam, S. M.; Cheng, X. X.; Heussler, S. P.; bin Mahmood, Shahrain; Wu, B.-I.

    2009-08-01

    Ideal metamaterials would consist of metal conductors only that are necessary for negative ɛ and μ. However, most of present-day metamaterials include dielectrics for various support functions. Overcoming dielectrics, we manufactured free-standing THz metamaterials as bi-layer chips of S-string arrays suspended by window-frames at a small gap that controls the resonance frequency. Remaining problems concerning their useful range of incidence angles and the possibility of stacking have been solved by manufacturing the first self-supported free-standing all-metal metamaterials featuring upright S-strings interconnected by metal rods. Large-area slabs show maximum magnetic coupling at normal incidence with left-handed resonances between 3.2 - 4.0 THz. Such metamaterials which we dub the meta-foil represent an ideal platform for including index-gradient optics to achieve optical functionalities like beam deflection and imaging.

  20. Effect of surface roughness, chemical composition, and native oxide crystallinity on the orientation of self-assembled GaN nanowires on Ti foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, G.; Pettersen, S. V.; Pfüller, C.; Ramsteiner, M.; Grepstad, J. K.; Brandt, O.; Geelhaar, L.; Fernández-Garrido, S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth of almost randomly oriented, uniformly tilted, and vertically aligned self-assembled GaN nanowires (NWs), respectively, on different types of polycrystalline Ti foils. The NW orientation with respect to the substrate normal, which is affected by an in situ treatment of the foil surface before NW growth, depends on the crystallinity of the native oxide. Direct growth on the as-received foils results in the formation of ensembles of nearly randomly oriented NWs due to the strong roughening of the surface induced by chemical reactions between the impinging elements and Ti. Surface nitridation preceding the NW growth is found to reduce this roughening by transformation of the uppermost layers into TiN and TiO x N y species. These compounds are more stable against chemical reactions and facilitate the growth of uniformly oriented GaN NW ensembles on the surface of the individual grains of the polycrystalline Ti foils. If an amorphous oxide layer is present at the foil surface, vertically oriented NWs are obtained all across the substrate because this layer blocks the transfering of the epitaxial information from the underlying grains. The control of NW orientation and the understanding behind the achievement of vertically oriented NWs obtained in this study represent an important step towards the realization of GaN NW-based bendable devices on polycrystalline metal foils.

  1. Endotaxial silicide nanowires: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.A., E-mail: peter.bennett@asu.edu [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); He, Zhian [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David J. [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Ross, F.M. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights NY 10598 (United States)

    2011-10-03

    We review the topic of self-assembled endotaxial silicide nanowires on silicon. Crystallographic orientation, lattice mismatch and average dimensions are discussed for a variety of systems including Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Pt and several rare earths on Si(100), Si(111) and Si(110) surfaces. In situ observations of growth dynamics support a constant-shape growth model, in which length, width and thickness all change in proportion as the nanowire grows, with thermally activated, facet-dependent rates.

  2. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia

    2014-04-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1-cyclohexyl-pyrrolidone (CHP) of the two components. The FePc/SWNT nanowires have a higher Fermi level compared to pure FePc (d-band center, DFT. =. -0.69. eV versus -0.87. eV, respectively). Consequently, an efficient channel for transferring electron to the FePc surface is readily created, facilitating the interaction between FePc and oxygen, so enhancing the ORR kinetics. This heterojunction-determined activity in ORR illustrates a new stratagem to preparing non-noble ORR electrocatalysts of significant importance in constructing real-world fuel cells. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Functionalization of magnetic nanowires by charged biopolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnin, D.; Callegari, V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We report on a facile method for the preparation of biocompatible and bioactive magnetic nanowires. The method consists of the direct deposition of polysaccharides by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly onto a brush of metallic nanowires; obtained by electrodeposition of the metal within the nanopores ...

  4. Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Al-Shamery, Katharina

    Single crystalline nanowires from fluorescing organic molecules like para-phenylenes or thiophenes are supposed to become key elements in future integrated optoelectronic devices [1]. For a sophisticated design of devices based on nanowires the basic principles of the nanowire formation have...... to be well understood [2]. Nanowires from para-phenylenes, from ®-thiophenes, and from phenylene/thiophene co-oligomers, Fig. 1, are investigated exemplarily. Epitaxy and electrostatic interactions determine the microscopic growth mechanism, whereas kinetics ascertains the macroscopic habit. Results from...

  5. Semiconductor nanowires: optics and optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, R. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lieber, C.M. [Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Division of Engineering Applied Sciences, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Single crystalline semiconductor nanowires are being extensively investigated due to their unique electronic and optical properties and their potential use in novel electronic and photonic devices. The unique properties of nanowires arise owing to their anisotropic geometry, large surface to volume ratio, and carrier and photon confinement in two dimensions (1D system). Currently, tremendous efforts are being devoted to rational synthesis of nanowire structures with control over their composition, structure, dopant concentration, characterization, fundamental properties, and assembly into functional devices. In this article we will review the progress made in the area of nanowire optics and optoelectronic devices, including diodes, lasers, detectors, and waveguides, and will outline the general challenges that must be overcome and some potential solutions in order to continue the exponential progress in this exciting area of research. (orig.)

  6. Self-powered heat-resistant polymeric 1D nanowires and 3D micro/nanowire assemblies in a pressure-crystallized size-distributed graphene oxide/poly (vinylidene fluoride) composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengfei; Lyu, Jun; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Chaoliang

    2017-12-01

    Piezoelectric one- (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) hybrid micro/nanostructured materials have received intense research interest because of their ability in capturing trace amounts of energy and transforming it into electrical energy. In this work, a size-distributed graphene oxide (GO) was utilized for the concurrent growth of both the 1D nanowires and 3D micro/nanowire architectures of poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) with piezoelectricity. The in situ formation of the polymeric micro/nanostructures, with crystalline beta phase, was achieved by the high-pressure crystallization of a well dispersed GO/PVDF composite, fabricated by an environmentally friendly physical approach. Particularly, by controlling the crystallization conditions of the binary composite at high pressure, the melting point of the polymeric micro/nanowires, which further constructed the 3D micro/nanoarchitectures, was nearly 30°C higher than that of the original PVDF. The large scale simultaneous formation of the 1D and 3D micro/nanostructures was attributed to a size-dependent catalysis of the GOs in the pressure-treated composite system. The as-fabricated heat-resistant hybrid micro/nanoarchitectures, consisting of GOs and piezoelectric PVDF micro/nanowires, may permit niche applications in self-powered micro/nanodevices for energy scavenging from their working environments.

  7. Nanowires-based light emitters on thermally and electrically conductive substrates and of making same

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-04-27

    Elemental or compound semiconductors on metal substrates and methods of growing them are provided. The methods can include the steps of: (i) providing a metal substrate; (ii) adding an interlayer on a surface of the metal substrate, and (iii) growing semiconductor nanowires on the interlayer using a semiconductor epitaxy growth system to form the elemental or compound semiconductor. The method can include direct growth of high quality group III-V and group III-N based materials in the form of nanowires and nanowires-based devices on metal substrates. The nanowires on all- metal scheme greatly simplifies the fabrication process of nanowires based high power light emitters.

  8. In situ study of self-assembled GaN nanowires nucleation on Si(111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hestroffer, K.; Daudin, B. [CEA-CNRS Group (Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs), Universite Joseph Fourier and CEA Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Leclere, C.; Renevier, H. [Laboratoire des Materiaux et du Genie Physique, Grenoble INP--MINATEC, 3 parvis L. Neel, 38016 Grenoble (France); Cantelli, V. [' ' Nanostructures et Rayonnement Synchrotron' ' Group, CEA Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Fondation Nanosciences, 23 rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Bougerol, C. [CEA-CNRS Group, ' ' Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs' ' , Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-05-21

    Nucleation of GaN nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is studied through a combination of two in situ tools: grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high energy electron diffraction. Growth on bare Si(111) and on AlN/Si(111) is compared. A significantly larger delay at nucleation is observed for nanowires grown on bare Si(111). The difference in the nucleation delay is correlated to a dissimilarity of chemical reactivity between Al and Ga with nitrided Si(111).

  9. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Zhihuan; Nabet Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with ...

  10. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  11. Robust binder-free anodes assembled with ultralong mischcrystal TiO2 nanowires and reduced graphene oxide for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongzheng; Yang, Dongzhi; Yu, Ruomeng; Liu, Yaxin; Hao, Shu-Meng; Zhang, Shiyi; Qu, Jin; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2018-04-01

    To satisfy increasing power demands of mobile devices and electric vehicles, rationally designed electrodes with short diffusion length are highly imperative to provide highly efficient ion and electron transport paths for high-rate and long-life lithium-ion batteries. Herein, binder-free electrodes with the robust three-dimensional conductive network are prepared by assembling ultralong TiO2 nanowires with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets for high-performance lithium-ion storage. Ultralong TiO2 nanowires are synthesized and used to construct an interconnecting network that avoids the use of inert auxiliary additives of polymer binders and conductive agents. By thermal annealing, a small amount of anatase is generated in situ in the TiO2(B) nanowires to form abundant TiO2(B)/anatase interfaces for accommodating additional lithium ions. Simultaneously, RGO sheets efficiently enhance the electronic conductivity and enlarge the specific surface area of the TiO2/RGO nanocomposite. The robust 3D network in the binder-free electrode not only effectively avoids the agglomeration of TiO2/RGO components during the long-term charging/discharging process, but also provides direct and fast ion/electron transport paths. The binder-free electrode exhibits a high reversible capacity of 259.9 mA h g-1 at 0.1 C and an excellent cycling performance with a high reversible capacity of 111.9 mA h g-1 at 25 C after 5000 cycles.

  12. Individually grown cobalt nanowires as magnetic force microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Shuaa; Samba, Joshua; Pokharel, Sabin; Lan, Yucheng; Uradu, Kelechi; Afolabi, Ayodeji; Unlu, Ilyas; Basnet, Gobind; Aslan, Kadir; Flanders, Bret N; Lisfi, Abdellah; Ozturk, Birol

    2018-02-26

    AC electric fields were utilized in the growth of individual high-aspect ratio cobalt nanowires from simple salt solutions using the Directed Electrochemical Nanowire Assembly method. Nanowire diameters were tuned from the submicron scale to 40 nm by adjusting the AC voltage frequency and the growth solution concentration. The structural properties of the nanowires, including shape and crystallinity, were identified using electron microscopy. Hysteresis loops obtained along different directions of an individual nanowire using vibrating sample magnetometry showed that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy has the same order of magnitude as the shape anisotropy energy. Additionally, the saturation magnetization of an individual cobalt nanowire was estimated to be close to the bulk single crystal value. A small cobalt nanowire segment was grown from a conductive atomic force microscope cantilever tip that was utilized in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging. The fabricated MFM tip provided moderate quality magnetic images of an iron-cobalt thin-film sample.

  13. Achievement of significantly improved lithium storage for novel clew-like Li4Ti5O12 anode assembled by ultrafine nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qinghua; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Zhengxi; Yang, Li

    2017-05-01

    Spinel lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) has attracted extensive attention by virtue of its inherent features of zero strain and high operating potential, which results in outstanding structural stability and remarkable safety as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. But, there are two issues of low specific capacity and poor electrical conductivity yet need to be satisfactorily solved before the practical application of Li4Ti5O12 anode can be well achieved in lithium-ion batteries. Herein, a novel hierarchical structure of clew-like microparticles constructed by ultrafine Li4Ti5O12 nanowires has been successfully prepared via a facile approach. The combination effect of ultrafine nanowire unites and non-compact clew-like architecture provides the as-prepared Li4Ti5O12 with excellent electrochemical performance. A high reversible specific capacity of 184.1 mAh g-1 can be obtained at 20 mA g-1 after 400 cycles. What is more, a capacity of 177.8 and 152.2 mAh g-1 can be gained even after 2500 cycles respectively at 200 and 4000 mA g-1, exhibiting high capacity, superior rate property and outstanding cycling stability. This work may open up a broader vision into developing nanostructure Li4Ti5O12 anode materials for advanced lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Flexible integration of free-standing nanowires into silicon photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bigeng; Wu, Hao; Xin, Chenguang; Dai, Daoxin; Tong, Limin

    2017-06-14

    Silicon photonics has been developed successfully with a top-down fabrication technique to enable large-scale photonic integrated circuits with high reproducibility, but is limited intrinsically by the material capability for active or nonlinear applications. On the other hand, free-standing nanowires synthesized via a bottom-up growth present great material diversity and structural uniformity, but precisely assembling free-standing nanowires for on-demand photonic functionality remains a great challenge. Here we report hybrid integration of free-standing nanowires into silicon photonics with high flexibility by coupling free-standing nanowires onto target silicon waveguides that are simultaneously used for precise positioning. Coupling efficiency between a free-standing nanowire and a silicon waveguide is up to ~97% in the telecommunication band. A hybrid nonlinear-free-standing nanowires-silicon waveguides Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a racetrack resonator for significantly enhanced optical modulation are experimentally demonstrated, as well as hybrid active-free-standing nanowires-silicon waveguides circuits for light generation. These results suggest an alternative approach to flexible multifunctional on-chip nanophotonic devices.Precisely assembling free-standing nanowires for on-demand photonic functionality remains a challenge. Here, Chen et al. integrate free-standing nanowires into silicon waveguides and show all-optical modulation and light generation on silicon photonic chips.

  15. Electrochemical synthesis of CORE-shell magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ovejero, Jesús G.

    2015-04-16

    (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell magnetic nanowires have been synthesized by optimized two-step potentiostatic electrodeposition inside self-assembled nanopores of anodic aluminium templates. The optimal electrochemical parameters (e.g., potential) have been firstly determined for the growth of continuous Au nanotubes at the inner wall of pores. Then, a magnetic core was synthesized inside the Au shells under suitable electrochemical conditions for a wide spectrum of single elements and alloy compositions (e.g., Fe, Ni and CoFe alloys). Novel opportunities offered by such nanowires are discussed particularly the magnetic behavior of (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell nanowires was tested and compared with that of bare TM nanowires. These core-shell nanowires can be released from the template so, opening novel opportunities for biofunctionalization of individual nanowires.

  16. Laser direct written silicon nanowires for electronic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Woongsik

    Silicon nanowires are promising building blocks for high-performance electronics and chemical/biological sensing devices due to their ultra-small body and high surface-to-volume ratios. However, the lack of the ability to assemble and position nanowires in a highly controlled manner still remains an obstacle to fully exploiting the substantial potential of nanowires. Here we demonstrate a one-step method to synthesize intrinsic and doped silicon nanowires for device applications. Sub-diffraction limited nanowires as thin as 60 nm are synthesized using laser direct writing in combination with chemical vapor deposition, which has the advantages of in-situ doping, catalyst-free growth, and precise control of position, orientation, and length. The synthesized nanowires have been fabricated into field effect transistors (FETs) and FET sensors. The FET sensors are employed to detect the proton concentration (pH) of an aqueous solution and highly sensitive pH sensing is demonstrated. Both top- and back-gated silicon nanowire FETs are demonstrated and electrically characterized. In addition, modulation-doped nanowires are synthesized by changing dopant gases during the nanowire growth. The axial p-n junction nanowires are electrically characterized to demonstrate the diode behavior and the transition between dopant levels are measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy.

  17. Microwave- assisted Rapid Self- Assembly of Lamellar Forming Poly (styrene-b- lactic acid) (PS-b-PLA) Block Copolymer for Fabrication of Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarian-Tabari, Parvaneh; Cummins, Cian; Rasappa, Sozaraj; Holmes, Justin D.; Morris, Michael M.

    2013-03-01

    Photolithography has been a fundamental process in the production of integrated circuits, but it is reaching its physical limit for generating ultra-small feature sizes. Block copolymers have a great potential as mask templates for fabricating nano features. Although ordered sub 20 nm features utilising BCPs have been achieved, lengthy annealing times (hours to days) are currently employed. Here we use microwave annealing, a new emerging technique, to achieve lateral phase separation in a lamellar forming PS-b-PLA. Having optimised the microwave conditions such as power, temperature, anneal holding time, solvents etc, a long range order line pattern was formed in less than two minutes on Si, Ge and Al substrates. The etched pattern (PLA removed by Ar/O2 RIE) was transferred to silicon substrate resulting in 18nm Si nanowires.

  18. Gibbs–Thomson Effect in Planar Nanowires: Orientation and Doping Modulated Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2016-06-02

    Epitaxy-enabled bottom-up synthesis of self-assembled planar nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism is an emerging and promising approach toward large-scale direct integration of nanowire-based devices without postgrowth alignment. Here, by examining large assemblies of indium tin oxide nanowires on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate, we demonstrate for the first time that the growth dynamics of planar nanowires follows a modified version of the Gibbs-Thomson mechanism, which has been known for the past decades to govern the correlations between thermodynamic supersaturation, growth speed, and nanowire morphology. Furthermore, the substrate orientation strongly influences the growth characteristics of epitaxial planar nanowires as opposed to impact at only the initial nucleation stage in the growth of vertical nanowires. The rich nanowire morphology can be described by a surface-energy-dependent growth model within the Gibbs-Thomson framework, which is further modulated by the tin doping concentration. Our experiments also reveal that the cutoff nanowire diameter depends on the substrate orientation and decreases with increasing tin doping concentration. These results enable a deeper understanding and control over the growth of planar nanowires, and the insights will help advance the fabrication of self-assembled nanowire devices. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  19. Bonding, aromaticity and reactivity patterns in some all-metal and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The concept of aromaticity/antiaromaticity in chemical systems has become a popular classroom topic and the (4n + ... has opened a new vista of further work on the topic of all-metal aromaticity and since then this seminal .... is negative in some cases reflecting their disliking in accepting further electrons. From table S3 it be-.

  20. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhihuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in “volumetric modes,”which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry–Perot (FP, and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width, tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal, core–shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption and downward transitions (emission of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this “rate management” scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  1. Nanowire resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, M. T.; Ohlsson, B. J.; Thelander, C.; Persson, A. I.; Deppert, K.; Wallenberg, L. R.; Samuelson, L.

    2002-12-01

    Semiconductor heterostructures and their implementation into electronic and photonic devices have had tremendous impact on science and technology. In the development of quantum nanoelectronics, one-dimensional (1D) heterostructure devices are receiving a lot of interest. We report here functional 1D resonant tunneling diodes obtained via bottom-up assembly of designed segments of different semiconductor materials in III/V nanowires. The emitter, collector, and the central quantum dot are made from InAs and the barrier material from InP. Ideal resonant tunneling behavior, with peak-to-valley ratios of up to 50:1 and current densities of 1 nA/μm2 was observed at low temperatures.

  2. High-performance InGaN/GaN Quantum-Disks-in-Nanowires Light-emitters for Monolithic Metal-Optoelectronics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2016-11-21

    The first droop-free, reliable, and high-power InGaN/GaN quantum-disks-in-nanowires light-emitting diode on molybdenum substrates was demonstrated. The high performance was achieved through the epitaxial growth of high-quality nanowires on the all-metal stack of TiN/Ti/Mo.

  3. Surface/Interface Carrier-Transport Modulation for Constructing Photon-Alternative Ultraviolet Detectors Based on Self-Bending-Assembled ZnO Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Zhou, Lianqun; Tang, Yuguo; Li, Lin; Zhang, Zhiqi; Yang, Hongbo; Ma, Hanbin; Nathan, Arokia; Zhao, Dongxu

    2017-09-13

    Surface/interface charge-carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport modulation are especially important in the construction of photodetectors with high efficiency in the field of nanoscience. In the paper, a kind of ultraviolet (UV) detector is designed based on ZnO nanostructures considering photon-trapping, surface plasmonic resonance (SPR), piezophototronic effects, interface carrier-trapping/transport control, and collection. Through carefully optimized surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, a designed device with detectivity as high as 1.69 × 10 16 /1.71 × 10 16 cm·Hz 1/2 /W irradiating with 380 nm photons under ultralow bias of 0.2 V is realized by alternating nanoparticle/nanowire active layers, respectively, and the designed UV photodetectors show fast and slow recovery processes of 0.27 and 4.52 ms, respectively, which well-satisfy practical needs. Further, it is observed that UV photodetection could be performed within an alternative response by varying correlated key parameters, through efficient surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, spectrally resolved photoresponse of the detector revealing controlled detection in the UV region based on the ZnO nanomaterial, photodetection allowed or limited by varying the active layers, irradiation distance from one of the electrodes, standing states, or electric field. The detailed carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport processes are well illustrated to explain charge-carrier dynamics contributing to the photoresponse behavior.

  4. A novel wideband optical absorber based on all-metal 2D gradient nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianhao; Yang, Fulong; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2017-11-01

    Recently, all-metal nanostructures for perfect absorption of light have attracted much attention due to their excellent plasmonic and photonic properties, but only narrow absorption bands were obtained in previous studies. In this paper, a new kind of metallic metasurface with wideband absorption of visible light is designed, which consists only of a gold nanotriangle array on the opaque metal substrate. By combining different resonant modes in the gradual-changed triangular nanostructure, the wide absorption waveband in visible region from 378 to 626 nm is achieved with more than 90% absorptivity. We demonstrate that the absorption property of the nanostructure can be controlled by tuning the cell size and incident angle. In addition, a metallic trapezoidal grating structure is proposed which can also realize wideband light absorption. This research provides a novel strategy in designing wideband metamaterial absorbers for visible light based on all-metal nanostructures which have great potential applications in light energy harvesting and photoelectric conversion.

  5. Heat-transfer and friction factor design data for all-metal compact heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Christina L.

    1989-03-01

    To improve system life, an effort was undertaken to develop all-metal compact heat exchangers to replace existing heat exchangers which contain organic materials. Eliminating organic materials increases system life because outgassing organics can contaminate the helium working fluid and reduce system life. Perforated plate heat exchangers were found to have inherently low axial conduction and are therefore excellent candidates for cryogenic applications where an all-metal design is required. A total of 11 plate cores were tested; 2 were chemically etched, 1 was mechanically punched, and 8 were manufactured using electron beam drilling. Hole size, percent open area, and plate thickness parameters were varied among the plates. Experimental results were compared to analytical projections and found to differ significantly. The single-blow transient test technique was used to determine the heat transfer coefficients and the isothermal pressure drop test was used to determine friction factors, as a function of Reynolds number.

  6. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  7. Stability of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, M.; Wallmann, I.

    2011-01-01

    atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aging experiments under ambient conditions already show substantial morphological changes. Nanoscopic organic clusters, which initially coexist with the nanowires, vanish within hours. Thermal annealing of nanowire samples leads to even more pronounced morphology changes...

  8. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have been obtained. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with.

  9. Super-Joule heating in graphene and silver nanowire network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maize, Kerry; Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Mohammed, Amr M. S.; Shakouri, Ali; Janes, David B.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Transistors, sensors, and transparent conductors based on randomly assembled nanowire networks rely on multi-component percolation for unique and distinctive applications in flexible electronics, biochemical sensing, and solar cells. While conduction models for 1-D and 1-D/2-D networks have been developed, typically assuming linear electronic transport and self-heating, the model has not been validated by direct high-resolution characterization of coupled electronic pathways and thermal response. In this letter, we show the occurrence of nonlinear “super-Joule” self-heating at the transport bottlenecks in networks of silver nanowires and silver nanowire/single layer graphene hybrid using high resolution thermoreflectance (TR) imaging. TR images at the microscopic self-heating hotspots within nanowire network and nanowire/graphene hybrid network devices with submicron spatial resolution are used to infer electrical current pathways. The results encourage a fundamental reevaluation of transport models for network-based percolating conductors

  10. Synthesis and photoelectric properties of cadmium hydroxide and cadmium hydroxide/cadmium sulphide ultrafine nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baoli; Jiang, Xiaohong; Wang, Xiaohong; Tang, Liping; Du, Zuliang

    2017-07-01

    Cd(OH)2 ultrafine nanowires with a high aspect ratio were fabricated by the hydrothermal method and were subsequently used as a sacrificial template to generate Cd(OH)2/CdS nanowires. The transmission electron microscopy results show that the length of the nanowires reached several micrometres, and the diameter of the nanowires was approximately 10-20.0 nm. The charge transport properties of the Cd(OH)2 and Cd(OH)2/CdS nanowires assembled on comb Au electrodes was also investigated. The I-V results showed that the current intensity of the Cd(OH)2/CdS nanowires was increased by four orders of magnitude compared with the Cd(OH)2 nanowires, achieving 10-10A.

  11. Magnetic Nanowires Generated via the Waterborne Desalting Transition Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, M.; Fresnais, J.; Sekar, S.; Chapel, J. -P.; Berret, J. -F.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple and versatile waterborne synthesis of magnetic nanowires following the innovative concept of electrostatic "desalting transition". Highly persistent superparamagnetic nanowires are generated from the controlled assembly of oppositely charged nanoparticles and commercially available polyelectrolytes. The wires have diameters around 200 nm and lengths comprised between 1 {\\mu}m and 1/2 mm, with either positive or negative charges on their surface. Beyond, we show that this so...

  12. Novel fabrication method of conductive polymer nanowires for sensor applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Castillo, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate a new, quiek and low cost fabrication of PEDOT:TsO nanowires using self-assembled peptide nanotubes as a masking material. The peptide nanotubes show a remarkably stability during reactive ion etching and can be dissolved in water afterwards. We have shown that the imp...... that the impedance of the nanowire is changing with backgating the wire, this gives promising possibility for application as a sensor....

  13. [Sb4Au4Sb4]2−: A designer all-metal aromatic sandwich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Wen-Juan; You, Xue-Rui; Guo, Jin-Chang; Li, Da-Zhi; Wang, Ying-Jin; Sun, Zhong-Ming; Zhai, Hua-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We report on the computational design of an all-metal aromatic sandwich, [Sb 4 Au 4 Sb 4 ] 2− . The triple-layered, square-prismatic sandwich complex is the global minimum of the system from Coalescence Kick and Minima Hopping structural searches. Following a standard, qualitative chemical bonding analysis via canonical molecular orbitals, the sandwich complex can be formally described as [Sb 4 ] + [Au 4 ] 4− [Sb 4 ] + , showing ionic bonding characters with electron transfers in between the Sb 4 /Au 4 /Sb 4 layers. For an in-depth understanding of the system, one needs to go beyond the above picture. Significant Sb → Au donation and Sb ← Au back-donation occur, redistributing electrons from the Sb 4 /Au 4 /Sb 4 layers to the interlayer Sb–Au–Sb edges, which effectively lead to four Sb–Au–Sb three-center two-electron bonds. The complex is a system with 30 valence electrons, excluding the Sb 5s and Au 5d lone-pairs. The two [Sb 4 ] + ligands constitute an unusual three-fold (π and σ) aromatic system with all 22 electrons being delocalized. An energy gap of ∼1.6 eV is predicted for this all-metal sandwich. The complex is a rare example for rational design of cluster compounds and invites forth-coming synthetic efforts.

  14. Single conducting polymer nanowire based conductometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangar, Mangesh Ashok

    The detection of toxic chemicals, gases or biological agents at very low concentrations with high sensitivity and selectivity has been subject of immense interest. Sensors employing electrical signal readout as transduction mechanism offer easy, label-free detection of target analyte in real-time. Traditional thin film sensors inherently suffered through loss of sensitivity due to current shunting across the charge depleted/added region upon analyte binding to the sensor surface, due to their large cross sectional area. This limitation was overcome by use of nanostructure such as nanowire/tube as transducer where current shunting during sensing was almost eliminated. Due to their benign chemical/electrochemical fabrication route along with excellent electrical properties and biocompatibility, conducting polymers offer cost-effective alternative over other nanostructures. Biggest obstacle in using these nanostructures is lack of easy, scalable and cost-effective way of assembling these nanostructures on prefabricated micropatterns for device fabrication. In this dissertation, three different approaches have been taken to fabricate individual or array of single conducting polymer (and metal) nanowire based devices and using polymer by itself or after functionalization with appropriate recognition molecule they have been applied for gas and biochemical detection. In the first approach electrochemical fabrication of multisegmented nanowires with middle functional Ppy segment along with ferromagnetic nickel (Ni) and end gold segments for better electrical contact was studied. This multi-layered nanowires were used along with ferromagnetic contact electrode for controlled magnetic assembly of nanowires into devices and were used for ammonia gas sensing. The second approach uses conducting polymer, polypyrrole (Ppy) nanowires using simple electrophoretic alignment and maskless electrodeposition to anchor nanowire which were further functionalized with antibodies against

  15. Linear self-assembly and grafting of gold nanorods into arrayed micrometer-long nanowires on a silicon wafer via a combined top-down/bottom-up approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Elena; Andrei, Codrin; Zerulla, Dominic

    2018-01-01

    Macroscopically long wire-like arrangements of gold nanoparticles were obtained by controlled evaporation and partial coalescence of an aqueous colloidal solution of capped CTAB-Au nanorods onto a functionalised 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) silicon substrate, using a removable, silicon wafer with a hydrophobic surface that serves as a "handrail" for the initial nanorods' linear self-assembly. The wire-like structures display a quasi-continuous pattern by thermal annealing of the gold nanorods when the solvent (i.e. water) is evaporated at temperatures rising from 20°C to 140°C. Formation of both single and self-replicating parallel 1D-superstructures consisting of two or even three wires is observed and explained under such conditions.

  16. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M.; Alam, Sardar Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters s...

  17. A novel method to synthesize cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires from cobalt (Co) nanobowls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Madhavi, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method suitable for the synthesis of the cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanowires at targeted regions is presented in this report. Cobalt (Co) nanobowls synthesized by colloidal crystal directed assembly were transformed into Co3O4 nanowires by a simple heat treatment process. Co nanobowls exhibited...

  18. From nanodiamond to nanowires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, A.; Materials Science Division

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication and characterization of semiconductor and metallic nanowires are proving very successful in meeting the high expectations of nanotechnologists. Although the nanoscience surrounding sp{sup 3} bonded carbon nanotubes has continued to flourish over recent years the successful synthesis of the sp{sup 3} analogue, diamond nanowires, has been limited. This prompts questions as to whether diamond nanowires are fundamentally unstable. By applying knowledge obtained from examining the structural transformations in nanodiamond, a framework for analyzing the structure and stability of diamond nanowires may be established. One possible framework will be discussed here, supported by results of ab initio density functional theory calculations used to study the structural relaxation of nanodiamond and diamond nanowires. The results show that the structural stability and electronic properties of diamond nanowires are dependent on the surface morphology, crystallographic direction of the principal axis, and the degree of surface hydrogenation.

  19. Development of metal seal for UHV compatible all metal quick disconnect flange joint for proton machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiroman, Ram; Ganesh, P.; Yadav, D.P.; Sridhar, R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes design, fabrication and testing results of metal seal indigenously developed for quick disconnect flange joint for its application in ultra high (UHV) system of proton synchrotron/accumulator ring. Plastically deformable aluminium metal seal of improved design requires low compression load for making helium leak tight (Permissible helium leak rate -10 mbar l/s) assembly in very short time duration. Salient features of this metal seal are: UHV compatible, lower compression load, bakeability at 150℃, radiation resistant, good surface finish, self alignment, ease in installation, significant time reduction in making helium leak tight assembly and lower cost of production. Results of experimental study carried out to generate the compression load data for design optimization is also presented. Joint assembled with the developed seal was tested by helium leak detector and helium leak rate was found to be within permissible limit. (author)

  20. Surfactant dependent self-organization of Co3O4 nanowires on Ni foam for high performance supercapacitors: from nanowire microspheres to nanowire paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Yongqing; Xu, Cailing

    2014-04-07

    Different surfactants were used in a typical hydrothermal process for controlling the morphology of the Co3O4 nanowire superstructure on Ni foam. It is easy for the Co3O4 nanowires to self-organize into nanowire microspheres on Ni foam in the absence of surfactants. And the nanowire microspheres gradually unfold into nanowire paddy fields with the addition of nonionic, cationic and anionic surfactants, respectively. The results of BET and electrochemical measurements show that the specific surface area and capacitance first decrease and then increase with the change in the Co3O4 superstructure morphology. Among these electrodes, the Co3O4 electrode with paddy like nanowires shows an outstanding specific capacitance of 1217.4 F g(-1) and areal specific capacitance as high as 6087 mF cm(-2) at 0.7 A g(-1) with high mass loading (5 mg cm(-2)), good power capability (showing a high specific capacitance of 835.1 F g(-1) (4176 mF cm(-2)) at 5 A g(-1)), excellent cycling stability and high columbic efficiency (∼100%). This exceptional performance is benefited from the almost monodispersed nanowire morphology and high specific surface area (121.4 m(2) g(-1)). At the same time, the asymmetric supercapacitor, employing the Co3O4 electrode with paddy-like nanowires as the positive electrode and the activated carbon electrode as the negative electrode, was successfully assembled. It shows a high specific energy and good long-term electrochemical stability. All these impressive results demonstrate that the Co3O4 electrode with paddy-like nanowires is promising for practical applications in supercapacitors.

  1. Analysis of an all-metallic resilient pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A new type of resilient pad gas thrust bearing that does not contain any elastomers in the bearing assembly is described and analyzed. The bearing consists of sector-shaped pads mounted asymmetrically on resilient foil beams. The effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. Performance of a resilient pad bearing is compared with that of a pivoted pad bearing.

  2. Analysis of an all-metallic resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A resilient-pad gas thrust bearing that does not contain any elastomers in the bearing assembly is described and analyzed. The bearing consists of sector-shaped pads mounted asymmetrically on resilient foil beams. The effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. Performance of a resilient-pad bearing is compared with that of a pivoted-pad bearing.

  3. Magnetic nanowires generated via the waterborne desalting transition pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, M; Fresnais, J; Sekar, S; Chapel, J-P; Berret, J-F

    2011-04-01

    We report a simple and versatile waterborne synthesis of magnetic nanowires following the innovative concept of electrostatic "desalting transition". Highly persistent superparamagnetic nanowires are generated from the controlled assembly of oppositely charged nanoparticles and commercially available polyelectrolytes. The wires have diameters around 200 nm and lengths between 1 μm and 0.5 mm, with either positive or negative charges on their surface. Beyond, we show that this soft-chemistry assembly approach is a general phenomenon independent of the feature of the macromolecular building blocks, opening significant perspectives for the design of multifunctional materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Evaluating All-Metal Valves for Use in a Tritium Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houk, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Payton, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-28

    In the tritium gas processing system, it is desired to minimize polymer components due to their degradation from tritium exposure (beta decay). One source of polymers in the tritium process is valve components. A vendor has been identified that manufactures a valve that is marketed as being made from all-metal construction. This manufacturer, Ham-Let Group, manufactures a diaphragm valve (3LE series) that claims to be made entirely of metal. SRNL procured twelve (12) Ham-Let diaphragm valves for characterization and evaluation. The characterization tests include identification of the maximum pressure of these valves by performing pressure and burst tests. Leak tests were performed to ensure the valves do not exceed the acceptable leak rate for tritium service. These valves were then cycled in a nitrogen gas and/or vacuum environment to ensure they would be durable in a process environment. They were subsequently leak tested per ASTM protocol to ensure that the valves maintained their leak tight integrity. A detailed material analysis was also conducted to determine hydrogen and tritium compatibility.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  7. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar c...

  8. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  9. Semiconductor Nanowires: Defects Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    2008-05-01

    Structural defects commonly observed in semiconducting nanowires by electron microscopy will be reviewed and their origins discussed. Their effects on electrical and optical properties will be illustrated with examples from GaSb, InAs, and ZnSe nanowires grown by MOCVD and MBE.

  10. A universal approach to electrically connecting nanowire arrays using nanoparticles—application to a novel gas sensor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthangal, Prahalad M.; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2006-08-01

    We report on a novel, in situ approach toward connecting and electrically contacting vertically aligned nanowire arrays using conductive nanoparticles. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by development of a gas sensing device employing this nano-architecture. Well-aligned, single-crystalline zinc oxide nanowires were grown through a direct thermal evaporation process at 550 °C on gold catalyst layers. Electrical contact to the top of the nanowire array was established by creating a contiguous nanoparticle film through electrostatic attachment of conductive gold nanoparticles exclusively onto the tips of nanowires. A gas sensing device was constructed using such an arrangement and the nanowire assembly was found to be sensitive to both reducing (methanol) and oxidizing (nitrous oxides) gases. This assembly approach is amenable to any nanowire array for which a top contact electrode is needed.

  11. A universal approach to electrically connecting nanowire arrays using nanoparticles-application to a novel gas sensor architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthangal, Prahalad M; Cavicchi, Richard E; Zachariah, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel, in situ approach toward connecting and electrically contacting vertically aligned nanowire arrays using conductive nanoparticles. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by development of a gas sensing device employing this nano-architecture. Well-aligned, single-crystalline zinc oxide nanowires were grown through a direct thermal evaporation process at 550 deg. C on gold catalyst layers. Electrical contact to the top of the nanowire array was established by creating a contiguous nanoparticle film through electrostatic attachment of conductive gold nanoparticles exclusively onto the tips of nanowires. A gas sensing device was constructed using such an arrangement and the nanowire assembly was found to be sensitive to both reducing (methanol) and oxidizing (nitrous oxides) gases. This assembly approach is amenable to any nanowire array for which a top contact electrode is needed

  12. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    consisting of a single, vertical, gallium arsenide(GaAs) nanowire grown on silicon with a radial p-i-n-junction. The average concentration was ~8, and the peak concentration was ~12. By increasing the number of junctions in solar cells, they can extract more energy per absorbed photon. In ideal multi...... of the nanowires, some of which were removed from their growth substrate and turned into single nanowire solar cells (SNWSC). The best device showed a conversion efficiency of 6.8% under 1.5AMG 1-sun illumination. In order to improve the efficiency a surface passivating shell consisting of highly doped, wide......Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar...

  13. All-metal frequency-selective absorber/emitter for laser stealth and infrared stealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Liu, Han; He, Zhihong; Dong, Shikui

    2018-03-10

    In this paper, an all-metal nanostructure is designed with a large frequency ratio (∼6) and a large bandwidth ratio (∼32), and consists of period slit-box cavities and nanodisk clusters. It is a nearly perfect absorber at 1.064 μm to achieve laser stealth, a frequency-selective emitter with low emissivity in wavelength ranges 3-5 and 8-14 μm to achieve infrared stealth, and also an emitter with near unity emissivity at 2.709 μm and 6.107 μm to compensate for the decrease of radiation heat transfer owing to the low emissivity. The absorption/emission peaks are all the Lorentzian shape, and the bandwidths, defined as full width at half-maximum, are 35, 408, and 1124 nm at 1.064, 2.709, and 6.107 μm, respectively. The electric and magnetic field distribution shows that the slit behaves like a capacitor, the box behaves like an inductance, and the nanodisk clusters can excite electric dipole resonance. Considering the solar irradiation, the nanostructure maintains middle-wavelength infrared signal reduction rates greater than 80% from 450 to 1000 K, and long-wavelength infrared signal reduction rates greater than 90% from room temperature to 1000 K. The laser and infrared stealth performances of our nanostructure at 473 K are also studied with different incident angles and polarization angles.

  14. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Jain, Titoo

    2009-01-01

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during self...

  15. Review of recent experiments on the T-10 tokamak with all metal wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershkov, V. A.; Sarychev, D. V.; Notkin, G. E.; Shelukhin, D. A.; Buldakov, M. A.; Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Grashin, S. A.; Kirneva, N. A.; Krupin, V. A.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Melnikov, A. V.; Neudatchin, S. V.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Pavlov, Yu. D.; Savrukhin, P. V.; T-10 Team

    2017-10-01

    Transition to an all-metal wall was realized on T-10 by replacement of graphite limiters with tungsten ones. Light impurity levels remained high and W accumulation in the plasma core was revealed. A movable lithium (Li) limiter was added to investigate the possibility of the limitation of tungsten and light impurity levels in plasma. For the first time, tokamak results on tungsten protection with Li were obtained in OH and ECRH regimes. After lithization the tungsten density in the core dropped more than an order of magnitude, while W influx into plasma decreased 2-4 times. Drastic drops of light impurities in plasma were observed together with improvement of energy confinement time and density limit values. Nevertheless, Li levels in plasma remained low in both OH and ECRH regimes. Li density in the core as low as 0.5% of n e was obtained. Tungsten transport in T-10 plasma was investigated and results on prevention of W accumulation with central ECRH were obtained. Effects of plasma exposure on ITER-grade tungsten plates from limiters were studied. Investigations of density fluctuation with correlation reflectometry confirmed a decrease of fluctuation amplitude on high field side. Modeling showed that this effect can be, to a great extent, explained by the non-locality of reflectometry. Toroidal correlations at a distance of 2.5 m along field lines were studied. Three-wave interaction between geodesic acoustic modes and broad-band turbulence was found by analysis of heavy ion beam probe diagnostics data. The possibility of plasma current control and the prevention of non-thermal electron beams formation at density limit disruption by means of ECR heating and the controlled operation of OH power supply system has been demonstrated. The study of plasma density decay after gas puff switch off during density ramp-up phase in OH regimes and the effect of ‘density pump out’ during ECRH showed that both effects can be explained by the assumption regarding electron

  16. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  17. Perspectives: Nanofibers and nanowires for disordered photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pisignano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As building blocks of microscopically non-homogeneous materials, semiconductor nanowires and polymer nanofibers are emerging component materials for disordered photonics, with unique properties of light emission and scattering. Effects found in assemblies of nanowires and nanofibers include broadband reflection, significant localization of light, strong and collective multiple scattering, enhanced absorption of incident photons, synergistic effects with plasmonic particles, and random lasing. We highlight recent related discoveries, with a focus on material aspects. The control of spatial correlations in complex assemblies during deposition, the coupling of modes with efficient transmission channels provided by nanofiber waveguides, and the embedment of random architectures into individually coded nanowires will allow the potential of these photonic materials to be fully exploited, unconventional physics to be highlighted, and next-generation optical devices to be achieved. The prospects opened by this technology include enhanced random lasing and mode-locking, multi-directionally guided coupling to sensors and receivers, and low-cost encrypting miniatures for encoders and labels.

  18. Conductance Enhancement of InAs/InP Heterostructure Nanowires by Surface Functionalization with Oligo(phenylene vinylene)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schukfeh, Muhammed Ihab; Storm, Kristian; Mahmoud, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the electronic transport through 3 μm long, 45 nm diameter InAs nanowires comprising a 5 nm long InP segment as electronic barrier. After assembly of 12 nm long oligo(phenylene vinylene) derivative molecules onto these InAs/InP nanowires, we observed a pronounced, nonlinear I...

  19. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  20. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-12-19

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  1. Encapsulation of Polythiophene by Glycopolymer for Water Soluble Nano-wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Fukuda; Y Inoue; T Koga; M Matsuoka; Y Miura

    2011-12-31

    A water-soluble polythiophene (PT) was prepared by the self-assembling complex with a glycopolymer. The glycopolymer of poly(N-p-vinylbenzyl-D-lactonamide) (PVLA) formed self-assembling cylindrical structure based on the amphiphilicity even after the complexation with PT. We confirmed the improved optical functionality of PT due to the longer conjugated {pi}-orbital. It suggested that PT behaved like molecular nanowire with the self-assembled structure in the hydrophobic core of PVLA. PVLA-PT also showed specific biorecognition against corresponding lectin. These results suggested that the bioactive nanowire formation of PT with the glycopolymer was developed.

  2. Nanoparticle-mediated nonclassical crystal growth of sodium fluorosilicate nanowires and nanoplates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We observed nonclassical crystal growth of the sodium fluorosilicate nanowires, nanoplates, and hierarchical structures through self-assembly and aggregation of primary intermediate nanoparticles. Unlike traditional ion-by-ion crystallization, the primary nanoparticles formed first and their subsequent self-assembly, fusion, and crystallization generated various final crystals. These findings offer direct evidences for the aggregation-based crystallization mechanism.

  3. Brownian motion of tethered nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Sadao; Li, Tongcang; Li, Yimin; Ye, Ziliang; Labno, Anna; Yin, Xiaobo; Alam, Mohammad-Reza; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    Brownian motion of slender particles near a boundary is ubiquitous in biological systems and in nanomaterial assembly, but the complex hydrodynamic interaction in those systems is still poorly understood. Here, we report experimental and computational studies of the Brownian motion of silicon nanowires tethered on a substrate. An optical interference method enabled direct observation of microscopic rotations of the slender bodies in three dimensions with high angular and temporal resolutions. This quantitative observation revealed anisotropic and angle-dependent hydrodynamic wall effects: rotational diffusivity in inclined and azimuth directions follows different power laws as a function of the length, ∼ L(-2.5) and ∼ L(-3), respectively, and is more hindered for smaller inclined angles. In parallel, we developed an implicit simulation technique that takes the complex wire-wall hydrodynamic interactions into account efficiently, the result of which agreed well with the experimentally observed angle-dependent diffusion. The demonstrated techniques provide a platform for studying the microrheology of soft condensed matters, such as colloidal and biological systems near interfaces, and exploring the optimal self-assembly conditions of nanostructures.

  4. All-metallic electrically gated 2H-TaSe2 thin-film switches and logic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, J.; Samnakay, R.; Jiang, C.; Pope, T. R.; Goli, P.; Yan, Z.; Wickramaratne, D.; Salguero, T. T.; Khitun, A. G.; Lake, R. K.; Balandin, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the fabrication and performance of all-metallic three-terminal devices with tantalum diselenide thin-film conducting channels. For this proof-of-concept demonstration, the layers of 2H-TaSe2 were exfoliated mechanically from single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Devices with nanometer-scale thicknesses exhibit strongly non-linear current-voltage characteristics, unusual optical response, and electrical gating at room temperature. We have found that the drain-source current in thin-film 2H-TaSe2-Ti/Au devices reproducibly shows an abrupt transition from a highly resistive to a conductive state, with the threshold tunable via the gate voltage. Such current-voltage characteristics can be used, in principle, for implementing radiation-hard all-metallic logic circuits. These results may open new application space for thin films of van der Waals materials.

  5. All-metallic electrically gated 2H-TaSe2 thin-film switches and logic circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renteria, J.; Jiang, C.; Yan, Z.; Samnakay, R.; Goli, P.; Pope, T. R.; Salguero, T. T.; Wickramaratne, D.; Lake, R. K.; Khitun, A. G.; Balandin, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the fabrication and performance of all-metallic three-terminal devices with tantalum diselenide thin-film conducting channels. For this proof-of-concept demonstration, the layers of 2H-TaSe 2 were exfoliated mechanically from single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Devices with nanometer-scale thicknesses exhibit strongly non-linear current-voltage characteristics, unusual optical response, and electrical gating at room temperature. We have found that the drain-source current in thin-film 2H-TaSe 2 –Ti/Au devices reproducibly shows an abrupt transition from a highly resistive to a conductive state, with the threshold tunable via the gate voltage. Such current-voltage characteristics can be used, in principle, for implementing radiation-hard all-metallic logic circuits. These results may open new application space for thin films of van der Waals materials

  6. All-metallic electrically gated 2H-TaSe{sub 2} thin-film switches and logic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renteria, J.; Jiang, C.; Yan, Z. [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California–Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Samnakay, R.; Goli, P. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California–Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Pope, T. R.; Salguero, T. T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Wickramaratne, D.; Lake, R. K. [Laboratory for Terascale and Terahertz Electronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California–Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Khitun, A. G. [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California–Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California–Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Balandin, A. A., E-mail: balandin@ee.ucr.edu [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California–Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    We report the fabrication and performance of all-metallic three-terminal devices with tantalum diselenide thin-film conducting channels. For this proof-of-concept demonstration, the layers of 2H-TaSe{sub 2} were exfoliated mechanically from single crystals grown by the chemical vapor transport method. Devices with nanometer-scale thicknesses exhibit strongly non-linear current-voltage characteristics, unusual optical response, and electrical gating at room temperature. We have found that the drain-source current in thin-film 2H-TaSe{sub 2}–Ti/Au devices reproducibly shows an abrupt transition from a highly resistive to a conductive state, with the threshold tunable via the gate voltage. Such current-voltage characteristics can be used, in principle, for implementing radiation-hard all-metallic logic circuits. These results may open new application space for thin films of van der Waals materials.

  7. Directed growth of diameter-tunable nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, Birol; Talukdar, Ishan; Flanders, Bret N [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, 145 Physical Sciences II, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2007-09-12

    This study characterizes a method for controlling the nanowire diameter in the directed electrochemical nanowire assembly technique, where alternating voltages applied to electrodes in simple salt solutions induce the crystallization of metallic wires. Dendritic solidification is identified as an important component of this technique. A characteristic of dendritic solidification is that the growth velocity and tip radius are anti-correlated. This relationship is exploited here to realize diameter-tunable nanowire growth. The experimental parameter that provides this control is {omega}, the frequency of the alternating voltage. Increasing {omega} effectively steepens the metal cation concentration gradient at the wire-solution interface, thereby increasing the growth velocity of the wire. For indium wires, increasing {omega} from 0.5 to 3.5 MHz increases their growth velocity from 11 to 78 {mu}m s{sup -1} and reduces their diameter from 770 to 114 nm. Gold wires exhibit diameter-tunability that ranges from 150 nm to 45 nm. Thus, it is possible to tune the wire diameter from the microscale down to the nanoscale. Moreover, this control is a consequence of non-stationary dendritic growth, which distinguishes this process from most previously studied examples of dendritic solidification.

  8. Selective formation of tungsten nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bien Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a process for fabricating self-aligned tungsten (W nanowires with polycrystalline silicon core. Tungsten nanowires as thin as 10 nm were formed by utilizing polysilicon sidewall transfer technology followed by selective deposition of tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD using WF6 as the precursor. With selective CVD, the process is self-limiting whereby the tungsten formation is confined to the polysilicon regions; hence, the nanowires are formed without the need for lithography or for additional processing. The fabricated tungsten nanowires were observed to be perfectly aligned, showing 100% selectivity to polysilicon and can be made to be electrically isolated from one another. The electrical conductivity of the nanowires was characterized to determine the effect of its physical dimensions. The conductivity for the tungsten nanowires were found to be 40% higher when compared to doped polysilicon nanowires of similar dimensions.

  9. Ledge-flow-controlled catalyst interface dynamics during Si nanowire growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Wirth, CT

    2008-01-01

    and the overall mechanism is largely unresolved. Here, we present a video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy study of Si nanowire formation from Pd silicide crystals under disilane exposure. A Si crystal nucleus forms by phase separation, as observed for the liquid Au–Si system, which we use......Self-assembled nanowires offer the prospect of accurate and scalable device engineering at an atomistic scale for applications in electronics, photonics and biology. However, deterministic nanowire growth and the control of dopant profiles and heterostructures are limited by an incomplete...

  10. Magnetic behaviour of densely packed hexagonal arrays of Ni nanowires: Influence of geometric characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.; Pirota, K.; Torrejon, J.; Navas, D.; Hernandez-Velez, M.

    2005-01-01

    Densely packed arrays of magnetic nanowires with hexagonal symmetry have been prepared by electrodeposition filling of the nanopores in alumina membranes previously formed by self-assembling induced by anodization. The influence of geometrical characteristics of arrays of Ni nanowires on their hysteresis loops have been studied. These characteristics are controlled by suitable choosing of preparation parameters: nanowires diameter ranges between 18 and 80 nm for lattice parameter of hexagonal symmetry of 65 and 105 nm, while length of nanowires is taken between 500 and 2000 nm. Additionally, the temperature dependence of coercivity when applying the field parallel to the nanowires or in-plane of the membrane has been measured. All these results allows us to conclude that magnetic behaviour is determined by the balance between different energy contributions, namely, the shape anisotropy of individual nanowires, the magnetostatic interaction among nanowires (confirmed to play a decisive role), and seemingly the magnetoelastic anisotropy induced in the nanowires by the alumina matrix through temperature changes as a consequence of their different thermal expansion coefficients

  11. Electrodeposition of Cobalt Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sungbok; Hong, Kimin

    2013-01-01

    We developed an electroplating process of cobalt nanowires of which line-widths were between 70 and 200 nm. The plating electrolyte was made of CoSO 4 and an organic additive, dimethyldithiocarbamic acid ester sodium salt (DAESA). DAESA in plating electrolytes had an accelerating effect and reduced the surface roughness of plated cobalt thin films. We obtained void-free cobalt nanowires when the plating current density was 6.25 mA/cm 2 and DAESA concentration was 1 mL/L

  12. Epitaxy-enabled vapor-liquid-solid growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanowires with controlled orientations

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2014-08-13

    Controlling the morphology of nanowires in bottom-up synthesis and assembling them on planar substrates is of tremendous importance for device applications in electronics, photonics, sensing and energy conversion. To date, however, there remain challenges in reliably achieving these goals of orientation-controlled nanowire synthesis and assembly. Here we report that growth of planar, vertical and randomly oriented tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires can be realized on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates via the epitaxy-assisted vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, by simply regulating the growth conditions, in particular the growth temperature. This robust control on nanowire orientation is facilitated by the small lattice mismatch of 1.6% between ITO and YSZ. Further control of the orientation, symmetry and shape of the nanowires can be achieved by using YSZ substrates with (110) and (111), in addition to (100) surfaces. Based on these insights, we succeed in growing regular arrays of planar ITO nanowires from patterned catalyst nanoparticles. Overall, our discovery of unprecedented orientation control in ITO nanowires advances the general VLS synthesis, providing a robust epitaxy-based approach toward rational synthesis of nanowires. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. Semiconductor Nanowires: Epitaxy and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mårtensson, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are nanoscale objects formed by bottom-up synthesis. In recent years their unique properties have been exploited in fields such as electronics, photonics, sensors and the life sciences. In this work, the epitaxial growth of nanowires and their applications were studied. Heteroepitaxial growth of III-V nanowires on silicon substrates was demonstrated. This may enable direct band gap materials for optoelectronic devices, as well as high-mobility, low-contact resis...

  14. Optical transmissivity of metallic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairat, Mazen S.

    2017-08-01

    Optical transmissivity and reflectivity of one dimensional array of metallic nanowires embedded in transparent dielectric is characterized. i employ wave optics simulation to analyze the optical field distribution in both the dielectric and the nanowires. The results indicate that the transmissivity and reflectivity depend on the polarization states of the incident light. The metallic nanowires matrix transmit in-plane polarization but block light out at of-plane polarization.

  15. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  16. Optical Spectroscopy of Single Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Trägårdh, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes optical spectroscopy on III-V semiconductor nanowires. The nanowires were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). Photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy are used as tools to investigate issues such as the size of the band gap, the effects of surface states, and the charge carrier transport in core-shell nanowires. The band gap of InAs1-xPx nanowires with wurtzite crystal structure is measured as a function of ...

  17. Graphene/silicon nanowire Schottky junction for enhanced light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guifeng; Zhu, Hongwei; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan; Li, Xinming; Shu, Qinke; Guo, Ning; Wu, Dehai

    2011-03-01

    Schottky junction solar cells are assembled by directly coating graphene films on n-type silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. The graphene/SiNW junction shows enhanced light trapping and faster carrier transport compared to the graphene/planar Si structure. With chemical doping, the SiNW-based solar cells showed energy conversion efficiencies of up to 2.86% at AM1.5 condition, opening a possibility of using graphene/semiconductor nanostructures in photovoltaic application.

  18. Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors : Sensing Simplicity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mescher, M.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are structures made from silicon with at least one spatial dimension in the nanometer regime (1-100 nm). From these nanowires, silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be constructed. Since their introduction in 2001 silicon nanowire field-effect transistors have been studied

  19. Long Silver Nanowires Synthesis by Pulsed Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Batevandi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanowires were pulse electrodeposited into nanopore anodic alumina oxide templates. The effects of continuous and pulse electrodeposition waveform on the microstructure properties of the nanowire arrays were studied. It is seen that the microstructure of nanowire is depend to pulse condition. The off time duration of pulse waveform enables to control the growth direction of Ag nanowires.

  20. Aging of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Osadnik, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Organic semiconductors formed by epitaxial growth from small molecules such as the para-phenylenes or squaraines promise a vast application potential as the active ingredient in electric and optoelectronic devices. Their self-organization into organic nanowires or "nanofibers" adds a peculiar...... attribute, making them especially interesting for light generation in OLEDs and for light-harvesting devices such as solar cells. Functionalization of the molecules allows the customization of optical and electrical properties. However, aging of the wires might lead to a considerable decrease in device...... performance over time. In this study the morphological stability of organic nanoclusters and nanowires from the methoxy functionalized quaterphenylene, 4,4'''dimethoxy-1,1':4',1''4'',1'''-quaterphenylene (MOP4), is investigated in detail. Aging experiments conducted by atomic force microscopy under ambient...

  1. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  2. Stabilization of an all-metal antiaromatic molecule (Al4Li4) using BH and C as caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Sebastian, K L

    2008-03-17

    It has been reported by Pati et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 3496) that coordination with a transition metal can stabilize the "antiaromatic", all-metal compound Al4Li4. Here, we report that it can also be stabilized by capping with a main group element like C and its isoelectronic species BH. Our calculations of binding energy, nuclear independent chemical shift, energy decomposition analysis, and molecular orbital analysis support the capping-induced stability, reduction of bond length alternation, and increase of aromaticity of these BH/C-capped Al4Li4 systems. The interaction between px and py orbitals of BH/C and the HOMO and LUMO of Al4Li4 is responsible for the stabilization. Our calculations suggest that capping can introduce fluxionality at room temperature.

  3. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)

  4. Self-assembled silicon oxide nanojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L W; Tang, Y H; Chen, C S

    2009-01-01

    Novel silicon oxide nanojunction structures with various shapes, such as X type, Y type, T type, ringlike and treelike, are fabricated in a self-assembled manner by the hydrothermal method without any metallic catalyst. In the silicon oxide nanojunctions, both the silicon oxide nanowire part and the junction part consist of the same chemical composition, forming homogeneous homojunctions and being made suitable for application in nanoscale optoelectronics devices. The formation of silicon oxide nanojunctions may be influenced by the surrounding environment in the reaction kettle, growth space among the silicon oxide nanowires and the weight of SiO droplets at the growth tip.

  5. Self-assembly of an electronically conductive network through microporous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, H Bri; Bryant, Steven L

    2017-06-15

    Electron transfer spanning significant distances through a microporous structure was established via the self-assembly of an electronically conductive iridium oxide nanowire matrix enveloping the pore walls. Microporous formations were simulated using two scaffold materials of varying physical and chemical properties; paraffin wax beads, and agar gel. Following infiltration into the micropores, iridium nanoparticles self-assembled at the pore wall/ethanol interface. Subsequently, cyclic voltammetry was employed to electrochemically crosslink the metal, erecting an interconnected, and electronically conductive metal oxide nanowire matrix. Electrochemical and spectral characterization techniques confirmed the formation of oxide nanowire matrices encompassing lengths of at least 1.6mm, 400× distances previously achieved using iridium nanoparticles. Nanowire matrices were engaged as biofuel cell anodes, where electrons were donated to the nanowires by a glucose oxidizing enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fast-Response Single-Nanowire Photodetector Based on ZnO/WS2 Core/Shell Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butanovs, Edgars; Vlassov, Sergei; Kuzmin, Alexei; Piskunov, Sergei; Butikova, Jelena; Polyakov, Boris

    2018-04-12

    The surface plays an exceptionally important role in nanoscale materials, exerting a strong influence on their properties. Consequently, even a very thin coating can greatly improve the optoelectronic properties of nanostructures by modifying the light absorption and spatial distribution of charge carriers. To use these advantages, 1D/1D heterostructures of ZnO/WS 2 core/shell nanowires with a-few-layers-thick WS 2 shell were fabricated. These heterostructures were thoroughly characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Then, a single-nanowire photoresistive device was assembled by mechanically positioning ZnO/WS 2 core/shell nanowires onto gold electrodes inside a scanning electron microscope. The results show that a few layers of WS 2 significantly enhance the photosensitivity in the short wavelength range and drastically (almost 2 orders of magnitude) improve the photoresponse time of pure ZnO nanowires. The fast response time of ZnO/WS 2 core/shell nanowire was explained by electrons and holes sinking from ZnO nanowire into WS 2 shell, which serves as a charge carrier channel in the ZnO/WS 2 heterostructure. First-principles calculations suggest that the interface layer i-WS 2 , bridging ZnO nanowire surface and WS 2 shell, might play a role of energy barrier, preventing the backward diffusion of charge carriers into ZnO nanowire.

  7. Effects of polymer surface energy on morphology and properties of silver nanowire fabricated via nanoimprint and E-beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Hwang, Soon Hyoung; Jeon, Sohee; Jung, Joo-Yun; Lee, Jihye; Choi, Dae-Geun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Park, Sang-Hu; Jeong, Jun-Ho

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that use of different nanoimprint resins as a polymer pattern has a significant effect on the morphology of silver (Ag) nanowires deposited via an E-beam evaporator. RM-311 and Ormo-stamp resins are chosen as a polymer pattern to form a line with dimensions of width (100 nm) × space (100 nm) × height (120 nm) by using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Their contact angles are then measured to evaluate their surface energies. In order to compare the properties of the Ag nanowires deposited on the various polymer patterns with different surface energies, hydrophobic surface treatment of the polymer pattern surface is implemented using self-assembled monolayers. In addition, gold and aluminum nanowires are fabricated for comparison with the Ag nanowires, with the differences in the nanowire morphologies being determined by the different atomic properties. The monocrystalline and polycrystalline structures of the various Ag nanowire formations are observed using transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the melting temperatures and optical properties of four kinds of Ag nanowire morphologies deposited on various polymer patterns are evaluated using a hot plate and an ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometer, respectively. The results indicate that the morphology of the Ag nanowire determines the melting temperature and the transmission. We believe that these findings will greatly aid the development of NIL, along with physical evaporation and chemical deposition techniques, and will be widely employed in optics, biology, and surface wettability applications.

  8. APPLICABILITY OF FS-ALL-METAL SELF-LOCK NUTS FOR RAILWAY ROLLING STOCK OF 1520 MM GAUGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Кreis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. One of key requirements for rolling stock of next generation is essential increase of warranty period or running between maintenance depots and in periods between programming repair works. This will lead to a reduction of costs to maintenance and repair during service life of rolling stock. In this regard, the industry aspires to use (during construction, repairs, modernization of rolling stock a modern screw joints in structures for fixing parts. These screw joints could provide a high reliability under the action of vibration load. FS-hexagon all-metal self-lock nuts of multiple use, Flaig + Hommel GmbH company meets these requirements. Therefore, there is the need to consider the results of tests to confirm the reliability of FS-nuts in the new environment. Methodology. Test complex of developed programs and methods was carried out on railway rolling stock for functional demonstration of screw joints with FS-nuts. These tests include: 1 proof test and locking moment test as specified in ISO 2320 under normal climatic conditions and after low temperatures impact; 2 running test for rolling stock, secured the most load condition and according to supervised operation of next generation cars on the railway. Findings. Results of the tests testify that FS-all-metal self-lock nuts meet the requirements of international standards and confirm the reliability of the next generation rolling stock during its operation on the railway of 1520 mm gauge. Namely, locking moment and tightening torque is maintained in screw joints both on spring-suspended and unspring parts of freight car bogies by the action of vibration load under multiple use of FS-nuts. Originality. The developed software and methods was improved by conducting additional tests after exposure of screw joints with FS-nuts to low temperatures, as well as by control operations for assessing the condition of screw joints with FS-nuts, in the conditions of controlled operation of rolling

  9. Heterogeneous metal-oxide nanowire micro-sensor array for gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMeo, Dante; MacNaughton, Sam; Wang, Zhilong; Zhang, Xinjie; Sonkusale, Sameer; Vandervelde, Thomas E.

    2014-04-01

    Vanadium oxide, manganese oxide, tungsten oxide, and nickel oxide nanowires were investigated for their applicability as chemiresistive gas sensors. Nanowires have excellent surface-to-volume ratios which yield higher sensitivities than bulk materials. Sensing elements consisting of these materials were assembled in an array to create an electronic nose platform. Dielectrophoresis was used to position the nanomaterials onto a microfabricated array of electrodes, which was subsequently mounted onto a leadless chip carrier and printed circuit board for rapid testing. Samples were tested in an enclosed chamber with vapors of acetone, isopropanol, methanol, and aqueous ammonia. The change in resistance of each assembly was measured. Responses varied between nanowire compositions, each demonstrating unique and repeatable responses to different gases; this enabled direct detection of the gases from the ensemble response. Sensitivities were calculated based on the fractional resistance change in a saturated environment and ranged from 6 × 10-4 to 2 × 10-5%change ppm-1.

  10. Lattice dislocation in Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Taha, H.T. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2009-12-15

    Modified formulas were used to calculate lattice thermal expansion, specific heat and Bulk modulus for Si nanowires with diameters of 115, 56, 37 and 22 nm. From these values and Gruneisen parameter taken from reference, mean lattice volumes were found to be as 20.03 A{sup 3} for the bulk and 23.63, 29.91, 34.69 and 40.46 A{sup 3} for Si nanowire diameters mentioned above, respectively. Their mean bonding length was calculated to be as 0.235 nm for the bulk and 0.248, 0.269, 0.282 and 0.297 nm for the nanowires diameter mentioned above, respectively. By dividing the nanowires diameter on the mean bonding length, number of layers per each nanowire size was found to be as 230, 104, 65 and 37 for the diameters mentioned above, respectively. Lattice dislocations in 22 nm diameter wire were found to be from 0.00324 nm for the 1st central lattice to 0.2579 nm for the last surface lattice. Such dislocation was smaller for larger wire diameters. Dislocation concentration found to change in Si nanowires according to the proportionalities of surface thickness to nanowire radius ratios.

  11. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self -organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  12. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  13. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-09

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  14. Molecular motor transport through hollow nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lard, Mercy; Ten Siethoff, Lasse; Generosi, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecular motors offer self-propelled, directed transport in designed microscale networks and can potentially replace pump-driven nanofluidics. However, in existing systems, transportation is limited to the two-dimensional plane. Here we demonstrate fully one-dimensional (1D) myosin......-driven motion of fluorescent probes (actin filaments) through 80 nm wide, Al2O 3 hollow nanowires of micrometer length. The motor-driven transport is orders of magnitude faster than would be possible by passive diffusion. The system represents a necessary element for advanced devices based on gliding assays......, for example, in lab-on-a-chip systems with channel crossings and in pumpless nanosyringes. It may also serve as a scaffold for bottom-up assembly of muscle proteins into ordered contractile units, mimicking the muscle sarcomere....

  15. Creating New VLS Silicon Nanowire Contact Geometries by Controlling Catalyst Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal; Panciera, Federico; Hansen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The formation of self-assembled contacts between vapor-liquid-solid grown silicon nanowires and flat silicon surfaces was imaged in situ using electron microscopy. By measuring the structural evolution of the contact formation process, we demonstrate how different contact geometries are created b...

  16. Self organized growth of organic thiophene-phenylene nanowires on silicate surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, Manuela; Lützen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    changes in the choice of the substrate lead to distinctly different growth behavior. On muscovite, a commensurate wetting layer of lying molecules is initially formed with subsequent formation of clusters, which assemble into mutually parallel nanowires. The wires grow along a 110 muscovite direction...

  17. Hierarchical Carbon Fibers with ZnO Nanowires for Volatile Sensing in Composite Curing (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    trapped under the pressure of the autoclave. After pressure is removed, these volatiles can expand and cause internal cracking and delaminations... tooth pick dipping. Each ZnO-nanowire on ITO Glass side sensor assembly was placed on a glass slide sample stage patterned with two voltage

  18. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  19. True reference nanosensor realized with silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, A; Wipf, M; Bedner, K; Kurz, J; Fu, W; Guzenko, V A; Knopfmacher, O; Stoop, R L; Calame, M; Schönenberger, C

    2012-06-26

    Conventional gate oxide layers (e.g., SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), or HfO(2)) in silicon field-effect transistors (FETs) provide highly active surfaces, which can be exploited for electronic pH sensing. Recently, great progress has been achieved in pH sensing using compact integrateable nanowire FETs. However, it has turned out to be much harder to realize a true reference electrode, which--while sensing the electrostatic potential--does not respond to the proton concentration. In this work, we demonstrate a highly effective reference sensor, a so-called reference FET, whose proton sensitivity is suppressed by as much as 2 orders of magnitude. To do so, the Al(2)O(3) surface of a nanowire FET was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer of silanes with a long alkyl chain. We have found that a full passivation can be achieved only after an extended period of self-assembling lasting several days at 80 °C. We use this slow process to measure the number of active proton binding sites as a function of time by a quantitative comparison of the measured nonlinear pH-sensitivities to a theoretical model (site-binding model). Furthermore, we have found that a partially passivated surface can sense small changes in the number of active binding sites reaching a detection limit of δN(s) ≈ 170 μm(-2) Hz(-1/2) at 10 Hz and pH 3.

  20. Growth and properties of In(Ga)As nanowires on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertenberger, Simon

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires on silicon (Si) platform by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. All nanowires are grown without the use of foreign catalysts such as Au to achieve high purity material. First, InAs nanowires are grown in a self-assembled manner on SiO x -masked Si(111) where pinholes in the silicon oxide serve as nucleation spots for the nanowires. This leads to the growth of vertically aligned, (111)-oriented nanowires with hexagonal cross-section. Based on this simple process, the entire growth parameter window is investigated for InAs nanowires, revealing an extremely large growth temperature range from 380 C to 580 C and growth rates as large as 6 μ/h. Complex quantitative in-situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry experiments during nanowire growth and post-growth thermal decomposition studies support these findings and indicate a very high thermal stability up to >540 C for InAs nanowires. Furthermore, the influence of the As/In ratio on the nanowire growth is studied revealing two distinct growth regimes, i.e., an In-rich regime for lower As fluxes and an As-rich regime for larger As fluxes, where the latter shows characteristic saturation of the nanowire aspect ratio. For the catalyst-free growth, detailed investigation of the growth mechanism is performed via a combination of in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM,TEM). An abrupt onset of nanowire growth is observed in RHEED intensity and in-plane lattice parameter evolution. Furthermore, completely droplet-free nanowires, continuous radial growth, constant vertical growth rate and growth interruption experiments suggest a vapor-solid growth mode for all investigated nanowire samples. Moreover, site-selective (positioned) growth of InAs nanowires on pre-patterned SiO 2 masked Si(111) substrates is demonstrated which is needed for ultimate control of nanowire

  1. Growth and properties of In(Ga)As nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertenberger, Simon

    2012-10-15

    In this thesis the integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires on silicon (Si) platform by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. All nanowires are grown without the use of foreign catalysts such as Au to achieve high purity material. First, InAs nanowires are grown in a self-assembled manner on SiO{sub x}-masked Si(111) where pinholes in the silicon oxide serve as nucleation spots for the nanowires. This leads to the growth of vertically aligned, (111)-oriented nanowires with hexagonal cross-section. Based on this simple process, the entire growth parameter window is investigated for InAs nanowires, revealing an extremely large growth temperature range from 380 C to 580 C and growth rates as large as 6 μ/h. Complex quantitative in-situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry experiments during nanowire growth and post-growth thermal decomposition studies support these findings and indicate a very high thermal stability up to >540 C for InAs nanowires. Furthermore, the influence of the As/In ratio on the nanowire growth is studied revealing two distinct growth regimes, i.e., an In-rich regime for lower As fluxes and an As-rich regime for larger As fluxes, where the latter shows characteristic saturation of the nanowire aspect ratio. For the catalyst-free growth, detailed investigation of the growth mechanism is performed via a combination of in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM,TEM). An abrupt onset of nanowire growth is observed in RHEED intensity and in-plane lattice parameter evolution. Furthermore, completely droplet-free nanowires, continuous radial growth, constant vertical growth rate and growth interruption experiments suggest a vapor-solid growth mode for all investigated nanowire samples. Moreover, site-selective (positioned) growth of InAs nanowires on pre-patterned SiO{sub 2} masked Si(111) substrates is demonstrated which is needed for ultimate control of

  2. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou Chongwu [Laboratory for Molecular Robotics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)], E-mail: requicha@usc.edu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 {mu}m, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  3. Inhomogeneous electron distribution in InN nanowires: Influence on the optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Sanchez, A.; Garro, N.; Garcia-Cristobal, A.; Cantarero, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Segura-Ruiz, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Div., Grenoble (France); Iikawa, F. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin - Unicamp, CP 6165, Campinas (Brazil); Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    In this work, we study theoretically and experimentally the influence of the surface electron accumulation on the optical properties of InN nanowires. For this purpose, the photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN NWs grown under different conditions. The photoluminescence excitation experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN nanowires. With the self-consistent model we can explore how the optical absorption depends on nanowires radius and doping concentration. Our model solves the Schroedinger equation for a cylindrical nanowire of infinite length, assuming a parabolic conduction band. The columnar geometry introduces effects in both the electron density and in the self-consistent conduction band profile, with no equivalence in planar layer. On the other hand, the differences in the photoluminescence excitation spectra are related to the inhomogeneous electron distribution inside the nanowires, caused by a bulk donor concentration and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states. For nanowire radii larger than 30 nm, such concentrations modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Surface-Passivated AlGaN Nanowires for Enhanced Luminescence of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haiding

    2017-12-19

    Spontaneously-grown, self-aligned AlGaN nanowire ultraviolet light emitting diodes still suffer from low efficiency partially because of the strong surface recombination caused by surface states, i.e., oxidized surface and high density surface states. Several surface passivation methods have been introduced to reduce surface non-radiative recombination by using complex and toxic chemicals. Here, we present an effective method to suppress such undesirable surface recombination of the AlGaN nanowires via diluted potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution; a commonly used chemical process in semiconductor fabrication which is barely used as surface passivation solution in self-assembled nitride-based nanowires. The transmission electron microscopy investigation on the samples reveals almost intact nanowire structures after the passivation process. We demonstrated an approximately 49.7% enhancement in the ultraviolet light output power after 30-s KOH treatment on AlGaN nanowires grown on titanium-coated silicon substrates. We attribute such a remarkable enhancement to the removal of the surface dangling bonds and oxidized nitrides (Ga-O or Al-O bonds) at the surface as we observe the change of the carrier lifetime before and after the passivation. Thus, our results highlight the possibility of employing this process for the realization of high performance nanowire UV emitters.

  5. Electric Conductivity of Phosphorus Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing-Xiang, Zhang; Hui, Li; Xue-Qing, Zhang; Kim-Meow, Liew

    2009-01-01

    We present the structures and electrical transport properties of nanowires made from different strands of phosphorus chains encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Optimized by density function theory, our results indicate that the conductance spectra reveal an oscillation dependence on the size of wires. It can be seen from the density of states and current-voltage curves that the structure of nanowires affects their properties greatly. Among them, the DNA-like double-helical phosphorus nanowire exhibits the distinct characteristic of an approximately linear I – V relationship and has a higher conductance than others. The transport properties of phosphorus nanowires are highly correlated with their microstructures. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  6. Silicon nanowires: structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezhdanov, A.V.; Mashin, A.I.; Razuvaev, A.G.; Ershov, A.V.; Ignatov, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    An attempt to grow silicon nanowires has been made by electron beam evaporation on highly oriented pyrolytic substrate. Needle-like objects are located along the normal to a substrate (density 2 x 10 11 cm -2 ). For modeling quasi-one-dimensional objects calculations of nuclear structure and energy spectra have been accomplished. A fullerene-like structure Si 24 is proposed as a basic atomic configuration of silicon nanowires [ru

  7. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  8. Silver nanowires - unique templates for functional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yugang

    2010-09-01

    This feature article reviews the synthesis and application of silver nanowires with the focus on a polyol process that is capable of producing high quality silver nanowires with high yield. The as-synthesized silver nanowires can be used as both physical templates for the synthesis of metal/dielectric core/shell nanowires and chemical templates for the synthesis of metal nanotubes as well as semiconductor nanowires. Typical examples including Ag/SiO2 coaxial nanocables, single- and multiple-walled nanotubes made of Au-Ag alloy, AgCl nanowires and AgCl/Au core/shell nanowires are discussed in detail to illustrate the versatility of nanostructures derived from silver nanowire templates. Novel properties associated with these one-dimensional nanostructures are also briefly discussed to shed the light on their potential applications in electronics, photonics, optoelectronics, catalysis, and medicine.

  9. Nonlocal Optical Response of Plasmonic Nanowire Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    can be expressed as the product = ()()(). Making this substitution, the differential equation can then be written as 1 ...nanowire geometry and solution method. 61 52 Transmission and reflection of the nanowire metamaterial are now compared for full- vectorial

  10. Thermal conductivity reduction in silicon fishbone nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, Jeremie; Anufriev, Roman; Hori, Takuma; Shiomi, Junichiro; Volz, Sebastian; Nomura, Masahiro

    2018-03-13

    Semiconductor nanowires are potential building blocks for future thermoelectrics because of their low thermal conductivity. Recent theoretical works suggest that thermal conductivity of nanowires can be further reduced by additional constrictions, pillars or wings. Here, we experimentally study heat conduction in silicon nanowires with periodic wings, called fishbone nanowires. We find that like in pristine nanowires, the nanowire cross-section controls thermal conductivity of fishbone nanowires. However, the periodic wings further reduce the thermal conductivity. Whereas an increase in the wing width only slightly affects the thermal conductivity, an increase in the wing depth clearly reduces thermal conductivity, and this reduction is stronger in the structures with narrower nanowires. Our experimental data is supported by the Callaway-Holland model, finite element modelling and phonon transport simulations.

  11. Function of all-metal separators for waste fuels. Phase 1; Funktion av allmetallseparatorer foer avfallsbraenslen. Etapp 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacoby, Juergen; Wrangensten, Lars

    2004-08-01

    Various waste incineration facilities, which use different types of waste fuels, have difficulties with a high content of non-magnetic metal, especially aluminum in their fuels. Aluminum may melt on the grate and can lead to corrosion or fouling in the furnace. Additionally, a high content of aluminum in the flyash may cause difficulties in terms of storage or further use of the ash as e.g. construction material. The industrial demand for efficient separators for non-magnetic metals from a fuel stream is rather large. There is however some uncertainty in the performance and efficiency of metal separators. Two types of separators can be found, the first type is called eddy current separator, the other type is based upon a metal detector with a sorting unit in the form of a chute or similar afterwards. An eddy current separator consists of a fast rotating drum containing several permanent magnets with alternating polarity. Due to the rotation, the change in the magnetic field induces eddy currents in conducting materials. The eddy currents cause a force in non-magnetic metal, the Lorentz force, which repels the material away from the rotating drum while all other material follows the systems flow direction. Systems equipped with a metal detector activate a mechanical sorting device, separate chute or air nozzles, when a metal particle is detected. In contrast to eddy current separators all types of metals can be detected and sorted out by systems based on metal detector. Several technical solutions for metal separation supplied by various manufacturers are described in the report. The companies have been asked to supply product information on the working principle, technical data, efficiency and limits for different types of metals. Two reference power plants have been visited and their experiences with all-metal separators are described. Haendeloeverket in Norrkoeping uses eddy current separators for separation of non-magnetic metals from household waste

  12. Synthesis and Electrical Characterization of Metal-Molecule-Metal Nanowires for Nanoscale and Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Theresa

    2003-03-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to developing molecular-scale devices that function as nonlinear circuit elements and nanowires that interconnect these circuit elements. In this talk, we will present an overview of our research on the electrical characterization of metal-molecule-metal nanowires fabricated by template-directed synthesis. Polycarbonate membranes were used for the electrochemical preparation of nanowires with diameter of 30 - 40 nm and length of 2 - 4 microns. Functionalized dithioacetyl-molecules were adsorbed to the tips of the first Au or Pd segment of the nanowire using a potential-assisted assembly method, which resulted in ordered and uniform self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). A thin layer of seed metal was then deposited on top of the SAM by reduction of metal ions to form Ag or Pd nanoparticles prior to growing the second Au or Pd metal nanowire segment. The resulting in-wire devices were aligned and attached to pairs of large-area Au electrodes using an electrofluidic assembly technique. Electrical measurements were conducted at room temperature for nanowires with SAMs of C12, oligo (phenylene ethynylene) (OPE), and oligo(phenylene vinylene) (OPV) molecules, and with Pd and Au metal contacts. For biases between +/-1 V, the OPV molecular junctions had higher conductance than the OPE junctions. Both of these molecular wire junctions had current that was several orders of magnitude higher than the insulating C12 molecular junction. Comparison of OPE junctions formed with Au-Pd, Ag-Pd, and Pd-Pd contacts showed that the conductance of the Pd-Pd contact was the largest of the three investigated.

  13. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanowires for Biomagnetic Interfacing Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-14

    1 Final Performance Report Multifunctional Magnetic Nanowires for Biomagnetic Interfacing Concepts AFOSR Agreement Number F49620-02-1-0307 July 14...AND DATES COVERED Final report covering 06/15/02 –12/15/05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Magnetic Nanowires for Biomagnetic Interfacing...nanowires for biomagnetic applications. These include (i) tuning of magnetic and other physical properties of nanowires, (ii) selective

  14. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  15. Controlling nanowire emission profile using conical taper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics.......The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics....

  16. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    is presented. A series of experiments with formation of a droplet on top of the wires has been carried out and pyramidal shaped structures at the NW top with pure zinc blende crystal structure are observed. A novel in-situ experiment with fabrication of NWs and simultanous characterization using x......This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x......-ray diffraction is performed with a MBE system attached to a synchrotron beam line. The evolution in crystal structure is monitored for different growth conditions and can be correlated to post growth analysis in TEM. This type of studies gives much more detailed information on formation of the crystal structure...

  17. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-10-05

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.

  18. Template-grown NiFe/Cu/NiFe nanowires for spin transfer devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Renard, K.; Guillemet, R.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new reliable method combining template synthesis and nanolithography-based contacting technique to elaborate current perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance spin valve nanowires, which are very promising for the exploration of electrical spin transfer phenomena....... The method allows the electrical connection of one single nanowire in a large assembly of wires embedded in anodic porous alumina supported on Si substrate with diameters and periodicities to be controllable to a large extent. Both magnetic excitations and switching phenomena driven by a spin...

  19. Preparation and properties of novel magnetic composite nanostructures: Arrays of nanowires in porous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.; Hernandez-Velez, M.; Asenjo, A.; Navas, D.; Pirota, K.; Prida, V.; Sanchez, O.; Baldonedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we introduce our latest achievements in the development of novel highly ordered composite magnetic nanostructures employing anodized nanoporous membranes as precursor templates where long-range hexagonal symmetry is induced by self-assembling during anodization process. Subsequent processing as electroplating, sputtering or pressing are employed to prepare arrays of metallic, semiconductor or polymeric nanowires embedded in oxide or metallic membranes. Particular attention is paid to recent results on controlling the magnetic anisotropy in arrays of metallic nanowires, particularly Co, and nanohole arrays in Ni membranes

  20. All-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits: integrating nanowire plasmonics with fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyuan; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin; Lou, Jingyi; Tong, Limin

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate all-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits by integrating Ag nanowires with optical fibers. Relying on near-field coupling, we realize a photon-to-plasmon conversion efficiency up to 92% in a fiber-based nanowire plasmonic probe. Around optical communication band, we assemble an all-fiber resonator and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) with Q-factor of 6 × 10(6) and extinction ratio up to 30 dB, respectively. Using the MZI, we demonstrate fiber-compatible plasmonic sensing with high sensitivity and low optical power.

  1. Cell number per spheroid and electrical conductivity of nanowires influence the function of silicon nanowired human cardiac spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan; Coyle, Robert C; Yao, Jenny; Xu, Ruoyu; Gou, Wenyu; Wang, Hongjun; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2017-03-15

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) provide an unlimited cell source to treat cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of death worldwide. However, current hiPSC-CMs retain an immature phenotype that leads to difficulties for integration with adult myocardium after transplantation. To address this, we recently utilized electrically conductive silicon nanowires (e-SiNWs) to facilitate self-assembly of hiPSC-CMs to form nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. Our previous results showed addition of e-SiNWs effectively enhanced the functions of the cardiac spheroids and improved the cellular maturation of hiPSC-CMs. Here, we examined two important factors that can affect functions of the nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids: (1) cell number per spheroid (i.e., size of the spheroids), and (2) the electrical conductivity of the e-SiNWs. To examine the first factor, we prepared hiPSC cardiac spheroids with four different sizes by varying cell number per spheroid (∼0.5k, ∼1k, ∼3k, ∼7k cells/spheroid). Spheroids with ∼3k cells/spheroid was found to maximize the beneficial effects of the 3D spheroid microenvironment. This result was explained with a semi-quantitative theory that considers two competing factors: 1) the improved 3D cell-cell adhesion, and 2) the reduced oxygen supply to the center of spheroids with the increase of cell number. Also, the critical role of electrical conductivity of silicon nanowires has been confirmed in improving tissue function of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. These results lay down a solid foundation to develop suitable nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids as an innovative cell delivery system to treat cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult human hearts, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) have received significant attention because they provide a patient specific

  2. Mapping the local structure of nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    The crystallographic and compositional structure of heterostructured semiconductor nanowires has been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy. The native geometry of the studied InP-GaAs nanowires (80-100 nm in diameter) is in general too thick for reliable high-resolution TEM imaging....... Nano Beam Electron Diffraction (NBED) is shown to be a powerful technique to reveal strain near the interface of compositional change in heterostructured semiconductor nanowires. Furthermore, the relative orientation of the nanowires is studied by means of NBED revealing the nanowires to be very...

  3. Micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2015-05-27

    This chapter reviews micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires and their ordered arrays. It starts with a description of the theoretical background of micromagnetism. The chapter discusses main magnetization reversal modes, domain wall types, and state diagrams in cylindrical nanowires of different types and sizes. The results of the hysteresis process in individual nanowires and nanowire arrays also are presented. Modeling results are compared with experimental ones. The chapter also discusses future trends in nanowire applications in relation to simulations, such as current-driven dynamics, spintronics, and spincaloritronics. The main micromagnetic programs are presented and discussed, together with the corresponding links.

  4. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  5. Electrically Injected UV-Visible Nanowire Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Changyi; Li, Qiming; Liu, Sheng; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting -Shan; Chow, Weng W.; Leung, Benjamin; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lu, Tzu-Ming

    2015-09-01

    There is strong interest in minimizing the volume of lasers to enable ultracompact, low-power, coherent light sources. Nanowires represent an ideal candidate for such nanolasers as stand-alone optical cavities and gain media, and optically pumped nanowire lasing has been demonstrated in several semiconductor systems. Electrically injected nanowire lasers are needed to realize actual working devices but have been elusive due to limitations of current methods to address the requirement for nanowire device heterostructures with high material quality, controlled doping and geometry, low optical loss, and efficient carrier injection. In this project we proposed to demonstrate electrically injected single nanowire lasers emitting in the important UV to visible wavelengths. Our approach to simultaneously address these challenges is based on high quality III-nitride nanowire device heterostructures with precisely controlled geometries and strong gain and mode confinement to minimize lasing thresholds, enabled by a unique top-down nanowire fabrication technique.

  6. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  7. Epitaxial nanowire formation in metamorphic GaAs/GaPAs short-period superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Ahrenkiel, S. Phillip

    2017-07-01

    Metamorphic growth presents routes to novel nanomaterials with unique properties that may be suitable for a range of applications. We discuss self-assembled, epitaxial nanowires formed during metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of metamorphic GaAs/GaPAs short-period superlattices. The heterostructures incorporate strain-engineered GaPAs compositional grades on 6°-B miscut GaAs substrates. Lateral diffusion within the SPS into vertically aligned, three-dimensional columns results in nanowires extending along A directions with a lateral period of 70-90 nm. The microstructure is probed by transmission electron microscopy to confirm the presence of coherent GaAs nanowires within GaPAs barriers. The compositional profile is inferred from analysis of {200} dark-field image contrast and lattice images.

  8. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stiévenard, D.; Lévêque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  9. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  10. Electrochemical synthesis of multisegmented nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Kuan-Ying; Ng, Inn-Khuan; Saidin, Nur Ubaidah [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2012-11-27

    Electrochemical deposition has emerged as a promising route for nanostructure fabrication in recent years due to the many inherent advantages it possesses. This study focuses on the synthesis of high-aspect-ratio multisegmented Au/Ni nanowires using template-directed sequential electrochemical deposition techniques. By selectively removing the Ni segments in the nanowires, high-yield of pure gold nanorods of predetermined lengths was obtained. Alternatively, the sacrificial Ni segments in the nanowires can be galvanically displaced with Bi and Te to form barbells structures with Bi{sub x}Te{sub y} nanotubes attached to neighbouring gold segments. Detailed studies on the nanostructures obtained were carried out using various microscopy, diffraction and probebased techniques for structural, morphological and chemical characterizations.

  11. Preparation of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeska da Rocha Caffarena

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured magnetic materials have great interest because of their applications in high-density magnetic information storage and for magnetic sensors. The electrodeposition of materials into porous alumina arrays is a suitable technique to produce nanomaterials, since highly ordered uniform nanomaterials can be obtained simply and cheaply. In this work, template-assisted Co nanowire arrays were prepared by electrodeposition into nanometer-sized pores of an alumite film using a two-electrode electrochemical cell. The Co nanowires were electrodeposited from a solution of 400 g/L of CoSO4.7H2O and 40 g/L of H3BO3. The morphology of the samples was investigated by means of TEM and AFM. The structural characteristic of the samples was examined using XRD, EDX and FTIR, which confirm the cobalt nanowire formation.

  12. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  13. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ...... tumor cells (CTCs) have been fabricated. The CTC concentration is extremely low and highly effective devices for capturing the CTCs may improve the treatment of cancer patients....... is presented. A series of experiments with formation of a droplet on top of the wires has been carried out and pyramidal shaped structures at the NW top with pure zinc blende crystal structure are observed. A novel in-situ experiment with fabrication of NWs and simultanous characterization using x...... and its dependence on growth parameters. By fabricating the NWs on silicon-on-insulator substrates we demonstrate electrically addressable NWs that are still standing vertically on the substrate and can potentially be used for intra-cellular recordings. Devices for biological experiments using vertically...

  14. WO3 Nanowires on Graphene Sheets as Negative Electrode for Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available WO3 nanowires directly grown on graphene sheets have been fabricated by using a seed-mediated hydrothermal method. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of WO3 films prepared by different process were studied. The results show that the precoated nanoseeds and graphene sheets on graphite electrode provide more reactive centers for the nucleation and formation of uniform WO3 nanowires. The WO3 nanowires electrode exhibits a high area specific capacitance of 800 mF cm−2 over negative potential range from −1.0 V to 0 V versus SCE in 1 M Li2SO4 solution. A high performance electrochemical supercapacitor assembled with WO3 nanowires as negative electrode and PANI/MnO2 as positive electrodes over voltage range of 1.6 V displays a high volumetric capacitance of 2.5 F cm−3, which indicate great potential applications of WO3 nanowires on graphene sheets as negative electrode for energy storage devices.

  15. Microfabricated environmental barrier using ZnO nanowire on metal mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Ki; Lee, Joo-Yong; Kim, Jun-Ho; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Ji, Chang-Hyeon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a waterproof environmental barrier for microsensor package has been developed using metal mesh covered with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire. A near superhydrophobic surface with two-dimensional array of holes has been fabricated by hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowire on an off-the-shelf steel use stainless (SUS) mesh. For a twill-woven SUS wire mesh having wire thickness of 30 µm and gap of 33 µm, a maximum contact angle of 160.40° and a minimum contact angle hysteresis of 15.23° have been achieved using ZnO nanowire grown on the wire surface and further deposition of FC film. The mesh was able to withstand a maximum water pressure of 2,459.8 Pa. The measured height of ZnO nanowire was approximately 2–3 µm. The fabricated SUS mesh covered with ZnO nanowire has been assembled with a microphone package, and waterproof characteristics have been measured by cyclic dipping test at various water levels. For a microphone package having two acoustic ports on top and bottom covered with fabricated mesh, no visible change in acoustic characteristics has been observed up to 1,372.9 Pa of water pressure. Total volume of the package was 6.8 × 9.8 × 1.9 mm 3 . (technical note)

  16. Synthesis of diphenylalanine/cobalt oxide hybrid nanowires and their application to energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungki; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kang, Kisuk; Park, Chan Beum

    2010-01-26

    We report the synthesis of novel diphenylalanine/cobalt(II,III) oxide (Co(3)O(4)) composite nanowires by peptide self-assembly. Peptide nanowires were prepared by treating amorphous diphenylalanine film with aniline vapor at an elevated temperature. They were hybridized with Co(3)O(4) nanocrystals through the reduction of cobalt ions in an aqueous solution using sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) without any complex processes such as heat treatment. The formation of peptide/Co(3)O(4) composite nanowires was characterized using multiple tools, such as electron microscopies and elemental analysis, and their potential application as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries was explored by constructing Swagelok-type cells with hybrid nanowires as a working electrode and examining their charge/discharge behavior. The present study provides a useful approach for the synthesis of functional metal oxide nanomaterials by demonstrating the feasibility of peptide/Co(3)O(4) hybrid nanowires as an energy storage material.

  17. Ordered ZnO/AZO/PAM nanowire arrays prepared by seed-layer-assisted electrochemical deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yu-Min; Pan, Chih-Huang; Wang, Sheng-Chang; Huang, Jow-Lay

    2011-01-01

    An Al-doped ZnO (AZO) seed layer is prepared on the back side of a porous alumina membrane (PAM) substrate by spin coating followed by annealing in a vacuum at 400 °C. Zinc oxide in ordered arrays mediated by a high aspect ratio and an ordered pore array of AZO/PAM is synthesized. The ZnO nanowire array is prepared via a 3-electrode electrochemical deposition process using ZnSO 4 and H 2 O 2 solutions at a potential of − 1 V (versus saturated calomel electrode) and temperatures of 65 and 80 °C. The microstructure and chemical composition of the AZO seed layer and ZnO/AZO/PAM nanowire arrays are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results indicate that the ZnO/AZO/PAM nanowire arrays were assembled in the nanochannel of the porous alumina template with diameters of 110–140 nm. The crystallinity of the ZnO nanowires depends on the AZO seed layer during the annealing process. The nucleation and growth process of ZnO/AZO/PAM nanowires are interpreted by the seed-layer-assisted growth mechanism.

  18. Transparent arrays of silver nanowire rings driven by evaporation of sessile droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Kang, Giho; Seong, Baekhoon; Chae, Illkyeong; Yudistira, Hadi Teguh; Lee, Hyungdong; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Hyunggun

    2017-01-01

    A coffee-ring pattern can be yielded on the three-phase contact line following evaporation of sessile droplets with suspended insoluble solutes, such as particles, DNA molecules, and mammalian cells. The formation of such coffee-ring, together with their suppression has been applied in printing and coating technologies. We present here an experimental study on the assembly of silver nanowires inside an evaporating droplet of a colloidal suspension. The effects of nanowire length and concentration on coffee-ring formation of the colloidal suspension were investigated. Several sizes of NWs with an aspect ratio between 50 and 1000 were systematically investigated to fabricate coffee-ring patterns. Larger droplets containing shorter nanowires formed clearer ring deposits after evaporation. An order-to-disorder transition of the nanowires’ alignment was found inside the rings. A printing technique with the evaporation process enabled fabrication of arrays of silver nanowire rings. We could manipulate the patterns silver nanowire rings, which might be applied to the transparent and flexible electrode. (paper)

  19. Germanium nanowires grown using different catalyst metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, R.C., E-mail: riama@ifsp.edu.br [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Área de Ciências, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Rua Américo Ambrósio, 269, Jd. Canaã, Sertãozinho, CEP 14169-263 (Brazil); Kamimura, H.; Munhoz, R.; Rodrigues, A.D. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Leite, E.R. [Departamento de Química – LIEC, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    Germanium nanowires have been synthesized by the well known vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using gold, silver, cooper, indium and nickel as catalyst metals. The influence of metal seeds on nanowires structural and electronic transport properties was also investigated. Electron microscopy images demonstrated that, despite differences in diameters, all nanowires obtained presented single crystalline structures. X-ray patterns showed that all nanowires were composed by germanium with a small amount of germanium oxide, and the catalyst metal was restricted at the nanowires' tips. Raman spectroscopy evidenced the long range order in the crystalline structure of each sample. Electrical measurements indicated that variable range hopping was the dominant mechanism in carrier transport for all devices, with similar hopping distance, regardless the material used as catalyst. Then, in spite of the differences in synthesis temperatures and nanowires diameters, the catalyst metals have not affected the composition and crystalline quality of the germanium nanowires nor the carrier transport in the germanium nanowire network devices. - Highlights: • Ge nanowires were grown by VLS method using Au, Ag, Cu, In and Ni as catalysts. • All nanowires presented high single crystalline quality and long range order. • Devices showed semiconducting behavior having VRH as dominant transport mechanism. • The metal catalyst did not influence structural properties or the transport mechanism.

  20. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  1. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qingxin; Tong Yanhong; Jain, Titoo; Hassenkam, Tue; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjoernholm, Thomas; Wan Qing

    2009-01-01

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO 2 :Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during self-assembly and the gap length was determined by the molecule length. The gold nanorods and gold nanoparticles, respectively covalently bonded at the two ends of the molecule, had very small dimensions, e.g. a width of ∼20 nm, and hence were expected to minimize the screening effect. The ultra-long conducting SnO 2 :Sb nanowires provided the bridge to connect one of the electrodes of the molecular device (gold nanoparticle) to the external circuit. The tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) was contacted onto the other electrode (gold nanorod) for the electrical measurement of the OPV device. The conductance measurement confirmed that the self-assembly of the molecules and the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanorods was a feasible method for the fabrication of the nanogap of the molecular devices.

  2. Cleaved-Coupled Nanowire Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    nanowires with a 40-nm gap show significant modulation of the threshold gain among different lasing modes (Fig. 4, blue dia- monds ). Within the...spectrometer (Princeton Instruments/Acton) equipped with a 1,200-groove/mm grating blazed at 300 nm and a liquid N2-cooled charge-coupled device. The

  3. Photonic nanowires for quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.

    Photonic nanowires (PWs) are simple dielectric structures for which a very efficient and broadband spontaneous emission (SE) control has been predicted [1]. Recently, a single photon source featuring a record high efficiency was demonstrated using this geometry [2]. Using time-resolved micro-phot...

  4. Optical properties of semiconducting nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, L.K. van

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires of high purity and crystallinity hold promise as building blocks for opto-electronical devices at the nanoscale.. They are commonly grown via a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism in which metal (nano) droplets collect the semiconductor precursors to form a solution which,

  5. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO 3 . The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  6. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  7. Electron Transport in Si Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramayya, E [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Vasileska, D [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Goodnick, S M [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Knezevic, I [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We investigate electron transport in silicon nanowires taking into account acoustic, non-polar optical phonons and surface/interface roughness scattering. We find that at very high transverse fields the reduced density of final states to which the carriers can scatter into gives rise to a reduced influence of interface-roughness scattering, which is promising result from a fabrication point of view.

  8. Morphology of living cells cultured on nanowire arrays with varying nanowire densities and diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Persson, Henrik; Adolfsson, Karl; Oredsson, Stina; Prinz, Christelle N

    2018-04-02

    Vertical nanowire arrays are increasingly investigated for their applications in steering cell behavior. The geometry of the array is an important parameter, which influences the morphology and adhesion of cells. Here, we investigate the effects of array geometry on the morphology of MCF7 cancer cells and MCF10A normal-like epithelial cells. Different gallium phosphide nanowire array-geometries were produced by varying the nanowire density and diameter. Our results show that the cell size is smaller on nanowires compared to flat gallium phosphide. The cell area decreases with increasing the nanowire density on the substrate. We observed an effect of the nanowire diameter on MCF10A cells, with a decreased cell area on 40 nm diameter nanowires, compared to 60 and 80 nm diameter nanowires in high-density arrays. The focal adhesion morphology depends on the extent to which cells are contacting the substrate. For low nanowire densities and diameters, cells are lying on the substrate and we observed large focal adhesions at the cell edges. In contrast, for high nanowire densities and diameters, cells are lying on top of the nanowires and we observed point-like focal adhesions distributed over the whole cell. Our results constitute a step towards the ability to fine-tune cell behavior on nanowire arrays.

  9. Enhanced fabrication process of zinc oxide nanowires for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Núñez, C., E-mail: carlos.garcia@uam.es [Grupo de Electrónica y Semiconductores, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pau, J.L.; Ruíz, E.; García Marín, A.; García, B.J.; Piqueras, J. [Grupo de Electrónica y Semiconductores, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Shen, G.; Wilbert, D.S.; Kim, S.M.; Kung, P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) based ultraviolet (UV) sensors have been fabricated using different assembly techniques to form functional structures, aiming at the improvement of the performance of NW-based sensors for optoelectronic applications. NWs with diameters and lengths varying between 90–870 nm and 2–20 μm, respectively, were synthesized by controlling the growth conditions in a chemical vapor transport system. Optical properties of NWs were studied by means of transmission spectroscopy. Electrical properties of single ZnO NW-based sensors were analyzed in dark and under UV illumination (at photon wavelength of λ < 370 nm) as a function of the NW diameter. Results of the study indicate that reduction of the NW diameter below 200 nm leads to an improvement of the photocurrent (at λ < 370 nm) up to 10{sup 2} μA and a decrease of the decay time around 150 s. These enhancements may help to improve the performance of ZnO-based optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • ZnO nanowires (NWs) with diameters 90–870 nm were grown by chemical vapor transport. • ZnO NWs showed strong absorption in the UV range. • Different assembly techniques were tested for preparing ZnO NW-based UV sensors. • Sensor photoresponses were around 10{sup 3} A/W. • Reducing NW diameter below 200 nm improved sensor photosensitivity.

  10. Magnetostatic Interaction in Fe-Co Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Elbaile

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrays of Fe-Co alloy nanowires with diameter around 35 nm and several micrometers in length have been synthesized by codepositing Fe and Co into porous anodic alumina. The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of the nanowires (hysteresis loops and remanence curves were characterized by SEM, TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and VSM, respectively. The XRD patterns indicate that the Fe-Co nanowires present a body-centered cubic (bcc structure and a preferred (110 orientation perpendicular to the template surface. From the hysteresis loops obtained with the magnetic field applied in the axis direction of the nanowires, we can observe that the coercive field slightly decreases when the nanowire length increases. This magnetic behaviour is analyzed considering the shape anisotropy and the dipolar interactions among nanowires.

  11. Magnetic crossover effect in Nickel nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaddar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France); Gloaguen, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie, Electrochimie Moleculaire et Chimie Analytique, CNRS-UMR 6521, C. S. 93837 Brest Cedex 3 (France); Gieraltowski, J. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France); Tannous, C., E-mail: tannous@univ-brest.f [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France)

    2011-05-01

    A crossover effect in the magnetic reversal mechanism within arrays of Nickel nanowires whose diameter varies from 15 to 100 nm is observed around 50 nm. Hysteresis loops and FMR measurements confirm that nanowire diameter controls effectively the nanowire easy axis as well as the magnetization reversal mechanism. This might be very interesting for spintronic devices based on current-induced domain motion such as non-volatile magnetic memory elements (MRAM) and low Ohmic loss devices.

  12. Enhanced ionized impurity scattering in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hyun; Lee, Seok-Hee; Shin, Mincheol

    2013-06-01

    The electronic resistivity in silicon nanowires is investigated by taking into account scattering as well as the donor deactivation from the dielectric mismatch. The effects of poorly screened dopant atoms from the dielectric mismatch and variable carrier density in nanowires are found to play a crucial role in determining the nanowire resistivity. Using Green's function method within the self-consistent Born approximation, it is shown that donor deactivation and ionized impurity scattering combined with the charged interface traps successfully to explain the increase in the resistivity of Si nanowires while reducing the radius, measured by Björk et al. [Nature Nanotech. 4, 103 (2009)].

  13. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong [El Cerrito, CA; Choi, Heonjin [Seoul, KR; Lee, Sangkwon [Daejeon, KR; He, Rongrui [Albany, CA; Zhang, Yanfeng [El Cerrito, CA; Kuykendal, Tevye [Berkeley, CA; Pauzauskie, Peter [Berkeley, CA

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  14. Magnetoresistance of individual ferromagnetic GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Butschkow, Christian H.; Reiger, Elisabeth; Geißler, Stefan; Rudolph, Andreas; Soda, Marcello; Schuh, Dieter; Woltersdorf, Georg; Wegscheider, Werner; Weiss, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    We investigate, angle dependent, the magnetoresistance (MR) of individual self-assembled ferromagnetic GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As core-shell nanowires at cryogenic temperatures. The shape of the MR traces and the observed strong anisotropies in transport can be ascribed to the interplay of the negative magnetoresistance effect and a strong uniaxial anisotropy with the magnetic easy direction pointing along the wire axis. The magnetoresistance can be well described by a quantitative analysis based on the ...

  15. Symposium LL: Nanowires--Synthesis Properties Assembly and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    body fluid and blood flow) into electric energy that will be used to power nanodevices without using battery. We have demonstrated an innovative...nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated through a vacuum filtration process. Once submerged in a HAuCW solution, Au nanoparticles were reduced upon the surface of...fabricated in the form of a composite nonwoven mat via electrospinning, followed by calcination The fiber mats were then immersed in a polyol

  16. Single crystalline PtSi nanowires, PtSi/Si/PtSi nanowire heterostructures, and nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Wu, Wen-Wei; Bai, Jingwei; Chen, Lih J; Tu, K N; Huang, Yu

    2008-03-01

    We report the formation of PtSi nanowires, PtSi/Si/PtSi nanowire heterostructures, and nanodevices from such heterostructures. Scanning electron microscopy studies show that silicon nanowires can be converted into PtSi nanowires through controlled reactions between lithographically defined platinum pads and silicon nanowires. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies show that PtSi/Si/PtSi heterostructure has an atomically sharp interface with epitaxial relationships of Si[110]//PtSi[010] and Si(111)//PtSi(101). Electrical measurements show that the pure PtSi nanowires have low resistivities approximately 28.6 microOmega.cm and high breakdown current densities>1x10(8) A/cm2. Furthermore, using single crystal PtSi/Si/PtSi nanowire heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces, we have fabricated high-performance nanoscale field-effect transistors from intrinsic silicon nanowires, in which the source and drain contacts are defined by the metallic PtSi nanowire regions, and the gate length is defined by the Si nanowire region. Electrical measurements show nearly perfect p-channel enhancement mode transistor behavior with a normalized transconductance of 0.3 mS/microm, field-effect hole mobility of 168 cm2/V.s, and on/off ratio>10(7), demonstrating the best performing device from intrinsic silicon nanowires.

  17. Environmental-Friendly and Facile Synthesis of Co3O4Nanowires and Their Promising Application with Graphene in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Yuanyi; Sun, Lijuan; Deng, Yi; Liao, Li

    2017-12-06

    In this work, we developed an eco-friendly strategy for preparing Co 3 O 4 nanowires. The process consisted of two steps: controllable synthesis of metal cobalt nanowires followed by a facile air-oxidization step. The 1D nanowire structure with a high aspect ratio was easily achieved via a magnetic-field-assisted self-assembly of cobalt ion complexes during reduction. After air-calcinations, the Co 3 O 4 nanowires were prepared in large scale and ready to be used as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The Co 3 O 4 nanowires, which possessed a length ranging from 3 to 8 μm with the aspect ratio more than 15, exhibited a reversible lithium storage capacity up to ~ 790 mAh/g when using a small amount of defect-free graphene flakes as conductive additives. The superior electrochemical performances were ascribable to the synergistic "flat-on" effect between the 1D nanowires and the 2D graphene. Therefore, the Co 3 O 4 nanowire/graphene composite holds promising application for lithium-ion batteries.

  18. Electronic transport in semiconductor nanowires: physics studies and possible device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Lars

    2007-03-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are attractive for physics as well as for applications due to the highly ideal character of their electronic and structural properties. We grow our III-V nanowires by what can be described as guided self-assembly, by which we can accurately control location as well as dimensions of epitaxially nucleated nanowires. The level of control of growth allows controlled formation of axial as well as radial heterostructures. I will describe studies of charge transport via single, double and multiple quantum dots positioned inside InAs/InP nanowires. Such studies have allowed detailed studies of the addition of electrons one-by-one, from the very first electron into an empty quantum dot to the addition of up to 50 electrons. By replacing the one-dimensional emitter by a small quantum dot in a double-dot configuration, the discrete character of the injecting state allows ever more detailed spectroscopic studies of the charge additions to the second dot. Comparisons will be made with transport through quantum dots defined by tunnel barriers induced via gating techniques. Finally, a recently developed technique for the formation vertical wrap-gate field-effect transistors around InAs nanowires will be described, suggesting interesting opportunities for the realization of high-speed and low-power transistors and circuits. The geometrical design of such nanowire wrap-gate field-effect transistors, offers exciting ways of formation of ultra-short transistor gate-lengths as well as the use of heterostructures to further enhance the performance of such devices.

  19. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe

    2014-04-23

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive backbone host. Using a combination of self-assembly, hydrothermal or electrodeposition of single crystalline ZnO nanowires and TiO2 passivation, a novel photoanode with scattering capability for optimal light harvesting is fabricated. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. In Situ Study of Noncatalytic Metal Oxide Nanowire Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Jiang, Hua; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the nanowire synthesis methods utilize catalyst particles to guide the nanowire geometry. In contrast, catalyst-free methods are attractive for facile fabrication of pure nanowires without the need for catalyst preparation. Nonetheless, how nanowire growth is guided without...

  1. Nanowire NMOS Logic Inverter Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yasir

    2016-06-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate characteristics optimization of nanowire N-Channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (NW-MOS) logic inverter. Noise margins and inflection voltage of transfer characteristics are used as limiting factors in this optimization. A computer-based model used to produce static characteristics of NW-NMOS logic inverter. In this research two circuit configuration of NW-NMOS inverter was studied, in first NW-NMOS circuit, the noise margin for (low input-high output) condition was very low. For second NMOS circuit gives excellent noise margins, and results indicate that optimization depends on applied voltage to the inverter. Increasing gate to source voltage with (2/1) nanowires ratio results better noise margins. Increasing of applied DC load transistor voltage tends to increasing in decreasing noise margins; decreasing this voltage will improve noise margins significantly.

  2. DNA hybridization on silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shalini; Zack, Jyoti; Kumar, Dinesh; Srivastava, S.K.; Govind; Saluja, Daman; Khan, M.A.; Singh, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowire-based detection strategies provide promising new routes to bioanalysis and indeed are attractive to conventional systems because of their small size, high surface-to-volume ratios, electronic, and optical properties. A sequence-specific detection of single-stranded oligonucleotides using silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is demonstrated. The surface of the SiNWs is functionalized with densely packed organic monolayer via hydrosilylation for covalent attachment. Subsequently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is immobilized to recognize the complementary target DNA. The biomolecular recognition properties of the nanowires are tested via hybridization with γ P 32 tagged complementary and non-complementary DNA oligonucleotides, showing good selectivity and reversibility. No significant non-specific binding to the incorrect sequences is observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, and nanodrop techniques are used to characterize the modified SiNWs and covalent attachment with DNA. The results show that SiNWs are excellent substrates for the absorption, stabilization and detection of DNA sequences and could be used for DNA microarrays and micro fabricated SiNWs DNA sensors.

  3. Angular Magnetoresistance of Nanowires with Alternating Cobalt and Nickel Segments

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2017-06-22

    Magnetization reversal in segmented Co/Ni nanowires with varying number of segments was studied using angular Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on isolated nanowires. The MR measurements offer an insight into the pinning of domain walls within the nanowires. Angular MR measurements were performed on nanowires with two and multiple segments by varying the angle between the applied magnetic field and nanowire (−90° ≤θ≤90°). The angular MR measurements reveal that at lower values of θ the switching fields are nearly identical for the multisegmented and two-segmented nanowires, whereas at higher values of θ, a decrease in the switching field is observed in the case of two segmented nanowires. The two segmented nanowires generally exhibit a single domain wall pinning event, whereas an increased number of pinning events are characteristic of the multisegmented nanowires at higher values of θ. In-situ magnetic force microscopy substantiates reversal by domain wall nucleation and propagation in multisegmented nanowires.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of aluminum nitride nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, N. R.; Kargin, N. I.; Ryndya, S. M.; Gusev, A. S.; Antonenko, S. V.; Timofeev, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of AlN nanowires deposition on single-crystal silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum is shown in this work. Experimental samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and infrared Fourier spectroscopy. It is shown that the possible mechanism for the AlN nanowires formation is the "vapor-liquid-crystal" mechanism.

  5. Optical properties of nanowire metamaterials with gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isidio de Lima, Joaquim Junior; Adam, Jost; Rego, Davi

    2016-01-01

    The transmittance, reflectance and absorption of a nanowire metamaterial with optical gain are numerically simulated and investigated. It is assumed that the metamaterial is represented by aligned silver nanowires embedded into a semiconductor matrix, made of either silicon or gallium phosphide...

  6. Moessbauer study of Fe-Co nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China)]. E-mail: chenzy@lzu.edu.cn; Zhan Qingfeng; Xue Desheng; Li Fashen [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Zhou Xuezhi; Kunkel, Henry; Williams, Gwyn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, the University of Manitoba (Canada)

    2002-01-28

    Arrays of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} (0.0{<=}x{<=}0.92) nanowires have been prepared by an electrochemical process, co-depositing Fe and Co atoms into the pores of anodic aluminium; their compositions were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscope results show that the nanowires are regularly spaced and uniform in shape with lengths of about 7.5 {mu}m and diameters of 20 nm. The x-ray diffraction indicates a texture in the deposited nanowires. For the composition below 82 at.% cobalt, the nanowires had a body-centred-cubic structure with a [110] preferred orientation. For the 92 at.% cobalt sample, the alloy exhibited a mixture of bcc and face-centred-cubic structure. The room temperature {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra of the arrays of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} nanowires have second and fifth absorption lines of the six-line pattern with almost zero intensity, indicating that the internal magnetic field in the nanowires lies along the long axis of the nanowire. The maximum values of the hyperfine field (B{sub hf} 36.6{+-}0.1 T) and isomer shift (IS=0.06{+-}0.01 mm s-1) occur for 44 at.% cobalt. The variations of the isomer shift and the linewidths with composition indicate that the Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} alloy nanowires around the equiatomic composition are in an atomistic disordered state. (author)

  7. High-Performance Single Nanowire Tunnel Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate single nanowire tunnel diodes with room temperature peak current densities of up to 329 A/cm(2). Despite the large surface to volume ratio of the type-II InP-GaAs axial heterostructure nanowires, we measure peak to valley current ratios (PVCR) of up to 8.2 at room temperature and 27...

  8. Growth and structural characterization of III-V semiconductor nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Rieger, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the growth and structural properties of III-V semiconductor nanowires and nanowire heterostructures are studied. These nanowires represent structures suitable for both fundamental physics and applications in electronic devices such as (tunnel) field effect transistors. The III-V nanowires are grown with molecular beam epitaxy, high κ dielectric layers are deposited conformally around the nanowires by atomic layer deposition. The morphological and structural characteristics of ...

  9. Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

    2014-01-01

    This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

  10. Diamond nanowires: fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Wu, Liangzhuan; Zhi, Jinfang

    2014-12-22

    C(sp(3) )C-bonded diamond nanowires are wide band gap semiconductors that exhibit a combination of superior properties such as negative electron affinity, chemical inertness, high Young's modulus, the highest hardness, and room-temperature thermal conductivity. The creation of 1D diamond nanowires with their giant surface-to-volume ratio enhancements makes it possible to control and enhance the fundamental properties of diamond. Although theoretical comparisons with carbon nanotubes have shown that diamond nanowires are energetically and mechanically viable structures, reproducibly synthesizing the crystalline diamond nanowires has remained challenging. We present a comprehensive, up-to-date review of diamond nanowires, including a discussion of their synthesis along with their structures, properties, and applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Nanowire-decorated microscale metallic electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Antohe, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    of lithographically defined metallic microelectrodes. The anodization of the aluminum permits electroplating only on top of the metallic electrodes, leading to the nanowire patterns having the same shape as the underlying metallic tracks. The variation in the fabricated structures between the patterned and non......The fabrication of metallic nanowire patterns within anodic alumina oxide (AAO) membranes on top of continuous conducting substrates are discussed. The fabrication protocol is based on the realization of nanowire patterns using supported nanoporous alumina templates (SNAT) prepared on top......-patterned substrates can be interpreted in terms of different behavior during anodization. The improved quality of fabricated nanowire patterns is clearly demonstrated by the SEM imaging and the uniform growth of nanowires inside the alumina template is observed without any significant height variation....

  12. Nanowires, nanostructures and devices fabricated therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2005-04-19

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  13. Synthesis and properties of antimonide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattias Borg, B.; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2013-05-01

    Antimonide semiconductors are suitable for low-power electronics and long-wavelength optoelectronic applications. In recent years research on antimonide nanowires has become a rapidly growing field, and nano-materials have promising applications in fundamental physics research, for tunnel field-effect transistors, and long-wavelength detectors. In this review, we give an overview of the field of antimonide nanowires, beginning with a description of the synthesis of these nano-materials. Here we summarize numerous reports on antimonide nanowire growth, with the aim to give an overall picture of the distinctive properties of antimonide nanowire synthesis. Secondly, we review the data on the physical properties and emerging applications for antimonide nanowires, focusing on applications in electronics and optics.

  14. Multisegment CdTe nanowire homojunction photodiode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matei, Elena; Enculescu, Ionut; Ion, Lucian; Antohe, Stefan; Neumann, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical deposition in nanoporous ion track membranes is used for the preparation of multisegment CdTe-homojunction diode nanowires. Our study is based on the fact that the deposition overpotential strongly influences the composition of the compound semiconductor nanowires. Therefore, the transport behavior of the nanowire devices can be tailored by appropriately choosing a certain sequence of electrodeposition potentials. The wires were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, optical spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The current-voltage characteristics measured prove that, by appropriately choosing the voltage pulse pattern, one can fabricate nanowires with ohmic or rectifying behavior. The semiconducting nanowires are sensitive to light, their spectral sensitivity being characteristic of CdTe. The preparation of functional nanostructures in such a simple approach provides, as a major advantage, an increase in the process reproducibility and opens a wide field of potential optoelectronic applications.

  15. Superlattice nanowire pattern transfer (SNAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, James R

    2008-12-01

    During the past 15 years or so, nanowires (NWs) have emerged as a new and distinct class of materials. Their novel structural and physical properties separate them from wires that can be prepared using the standard methods for manufacturing electronics. NW-based applications that range from traditional electronic devices (logic and memory) to novel biomolecular and chemical sensors, thermoelectric materials, and optoelectronic devices, all have appeared during the past few years. From a fundamental perspective, NWs provide a route toward the investigation of new physics in confined dimensions. Perhaps the most familiar fabrication method is the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technique, which produces semiconductor nanowires as bulk materials. However, other fabrication methods exist and have their own advantages. In this Account, I review a particular class of NWs produced by an alternative method called superlattice nanowire pattern transfer (SNAP). The SNAP method is distinct from other nanowire preparation methods in several ways. It can produce large NW arrays from virtually any thin-film material, including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. The dimensions of the NWs can be controlled with near-atomic precision, and NW widths and spacings can be as small as a few nanometers. In addition, SNAP is almost fully compatible with more traditional methods for manufacturing electronics. The motivation behind the development of SNAP was to have a general nanofabrication method for preparing electronics-grade circuitry, but one that would operate at macromolecular dimensions and with access to a broad materials set. Thus, electronics applications, including novel demultiplexing architectures; large-scale, ultrahigh-density memory circuits; and complementary symmetry nanowire logic circuits, have served as drivers for developing various aspects of the SNAP method. Some of that work is reviewed here. As the SNAP method has evolved into a robust nanofabrication

  16. All-metal aromatic clusters M4(2-) (M = B, Al, and Ga). Are π-electrons distortive or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poater, Jordi; Feixas, Ferran; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Solà, Miquel

    2011-12-14

    The π-electrons in benzene, the quintessential aromatic molecule, were previously shown to be distortive, i.e., they prefer localized double bonds alternating with single bonds. It is the σ-electrons that force the double bonds to delocalize, leading to a regular, D(6h) geometry. Herein, we computationally investigate the double-bond localizing or delocalizing propensities of σ- and π-electrons in the archetypal all-metal aromatic cluster Al(4)(2-) and its second- and fourth-period analogs B(4)(2-) and Ga(4)(2-), using Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (MO) theory at BP86/TZ2P in combination with quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). We compare the three all-metal aromatic clusters with the structurally related organic species C(4)H(4)(2+), C(4)H(4), and C(4)H(4)(2-). Our analyses reveal that the π-electrons in the group-13 M(4)(2-) molecules have a weak preference for localizing the double bonds. Instead, the σ-electrons enforce the regular D(4h) equilibrium geometry with delocalized double bonds.

  17. All-in-one nanowire-decorated multifunctional membrane for rapid cell lysis and direct DNA isolation.

    KAUST Repository

    So, Hongyun

    2014-11-24

    This paper describes a handheld device that uses an all-in-one membrane for continuous mechanical cell lysis and rapid DNA isolation without the assistance of power sources, lysis reagents, and routine centrifugation. This nanowire-decorated multifunctional membrane was fabricated to isolate DNA by selective adsorption to silica surface immediately after disruption of nucleus membranes by ultrasharp tips of nanowires for a rapid cell lysis, and it can be directly assembled with commercial syringe filter holders. The membrane was fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching to create microchannel arrays followed by hydrothermal synthesis of nanowires and deposition of silica. The proposed membrane successfully purifies high-quality DNA within 5 min, whereas a commercial purification kit needs more than an hour.

  18. Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanowires with Ordered Large Mesopores for Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    Catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are at the heart of key green-energy fuel cell technology. Nanostructured Pt materials are the most popular and effective catalysts for MOR. Controlling the morphology and structure of Pt nanomaterials can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Ordered nanoporous Pt nanowires with controlled large mesopores (15, 30 and 45 nm) are facilely fabricated by chemical reduction deposition from dual templates using porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with silica nanospheres self-assembled in the channels. The prepared mesoporous Pt nanowires are highly active and stable electrocatalysts for MOR. The mesoporous Pt nanowires with 15 nm mesopores exhibit a large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA, 40.5 m2 g-1), a high mass activity (398 mA mg-1) and specific activity (0.98 mA cm-2), and a good If/Ib ratio (1.15), better than the other mesoporous Pt nanowires and the commercial Pt black catalyst.

  19. Monolithic carbon structures including suspended single nanowires and nanomeshes as a sensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yeongjin; Heo, Jeong-Il; Madou, Marc; Shin, Heungjoo

    2013-11-20

    With the development of nanomaterial-based nanodevices, it became inevitable to develop cost-effective and simple nanofabrication technologies enabling the formation of nanomaterial assembly in a controllable manner. Herein, we present suspended monolithic carbon single nanowires and nanomeshes bridging two bulk carbon posts, fabricated in a designed manner using two successive UV exposure steps and a single pyrolysis step. The pyrolysis step is accompanied with a significant volume reduction, resulting in the shrinkage of micro-sized photoresist structures into nanoscale carbon structures. Even with the significant elongation of the suspended carbon nanowire induced by the volume reduction of the bulk carbon posts, the resultant tensional stress along the nanowire is not significant but grows along the wire thickness; this tensional stress gradient and the bent supports of the bridge-like carbon nanowire enhance structural robustness and alleviate the stiction problem that suspended nanostructures frequently experience. The feasibility of the suspended carbon nanostructures as a sensor platform was demonstrated by testing its electrochemical behavior, conductivity-temperature relationship, and hydrogen gas sensing capability.

  20. Enhanced Response Speed of ZnO Nanowire Photodetector by Coating with Photoresist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-coating photoresist film on ZnO nanowire (NW was introduced into the fabrication procedure to improve photoresponse and recovery speed of a ZnO NW ultraviolet photoelectric detector. A ZnO NW was first assembled on prefabricated electrodes by dielectrophoresis. Then, photoresist was spin-coated on the nanowire. Finally, a metal layer was electrodeposited on the nanowire-electrode contacts. The response properties and I-V characteristics of ZnO NW photodetector were investigated by measuring the electrical current under different conditions. Measurement results demonstrated that the detector has an enhanced photoresponse and recovery speed after coating the nanowire with photoresist. The photoresponse and recovery characteristics of detectors with and without spin-coating were compared to demonstrate the effects of photoresist and the enhancement of response and recovery speed of the photodetector is ascribed to the reduced surface absorbed oxygen molecules and binding effect on the residual oxygen molecules after photoresist spin-coating. The results demonstrated that surface coating may be an effective and simple way to improve the response speed of the photoelectric device.

  1. A review of III-V planar nanowire arrays: selective lateral VLS epitaxy and 3D transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Miao, Xin; Chabak, Kelson D.; Li, Xiuling

    2017-10-01

    Nanowires have long been regarded as a promising architecture for beyond Si CMOS logic, future III-V RF electronics, next generation optoelectronic applications, as well as heterogeneous integration. The inherent 3D structure also enables new device concepts that are otherwise not accessible with conventional technology. Nanowires grown using bottom-up epitaxial methods such as metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are free of ion-induced damage, which is especially critical for III-V because of the irreversibility of such damage, and can be scaled to dimensions smaller than lithographically defined. The challenges for nanowire based devices have been the controllability and compatibility with Si CMOS manufacturing. The discovery of parallel arrays of planar III-V nanowire growth mode provides an in-plane nanowire configuration that is perfectly compatible with existing planar processing technology for industry. The selective lateral epitaxy nature guided by the metal nanoparticles via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism opens up a new paradigm of crystal growth and consequently enabled in situ lateral and radial junctions. In this article, we review the planar nanowire based transistor development, particularly, planar III-As compound semiconductor based transistors enabled by this bottom-up self-assembled selective lateral VLS mechanism. We first review the characteristics and mechanism of planar nanowire growth, then focus on the growth, fabrication, and DC and RF performance of metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors, metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors, and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), before providing our perspective on future development.

  2. Mechanisms involved in the hydrothermal growth of ultra-thin and high aspect ratio ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demes, Thomas [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Ternon, Céline, E-mail: celine.ternon@grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Morisot, Fanny [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP" 2, IMEP-LaHC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Riassetto, David [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Legallais, Maxime [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP" 2, IMEP-LaHC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Roussel, Hervé; Langlet, Michel [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanowires are grown on sol-gel ZnO seed layers by hydrothermal synthesis. • Ultra-thin and high aspect ratio nanowires are obtained without using additives. • Nanowire diameter is 20–25 nm regardless of growth time and seed morphology. • A nanowire growth model is developed on the basis of thermodynamic considerations. • The nanowires are intended for integration into electrically conductive nanonets. - Abstract: Hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires (NWs) with tailored dimensions, notably high aspect ratios (AR) and small diameters, is a major concern for a wide range of applications and still represents a challenging and recurring issue. In this work, an additive-free and reproducible hydrothermal procedure has been developed to grow ultra-thin and high AR ZnO NWs on sol-gel deposited ZnO seed layers. Controlling the substrate temperature and using a low reagent concentration (1 mM) has been found to be essential for obtaining such NWs. We show that the NW diameter remains constant at about 20–25 nm with growth time contrary to the NW length that can be selectively increased leading to NWs with ARs up to 400. On the basis of investigated experimental conditions along with thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, a ZnO NW growth mechanism has been developed which involves the formation and growth of nuclei followed by NW growth when the nuclei reach a critical size of about 20–25 nm. The low reagent concentration inhibits NW lateral growth leading to ultra-thin and high AR NWs. These NWs have been assembled into electrically conductive ZnO nanowire networks, which opens attractive perspectives toward the development of highly sensitive low-cost gas- or bio-sensors.

  3. Confinement-guided shaping of semiconductor nanowires and nanoribbons: "writing with nanowires".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevzner, Alexander; Engel, Yoni; Elnathan, Roey; Tsukernik, Alexander; Barkay, Zahava; Patolsky, Fernando

    2012-01-11

    To fully exploit their full potential, new semiconductor nanowire building blocks with ab initio controlled shapes are desired. However, and despite the great synthetic advances achieved, the ability to control nanowire's geometry has been significantly limited. Here, we demonstrate a simple confinement-guided nanowire growth method that enables to predesign not only the chemical and physical attributes of the synthesized nanowires but also allows a perfect and unlimited control over their geometry. Our method allows the synthesis of semiconductor nanowires in a wide variety of two-dimensional shapes such as any kinked (different turning angles), sinusoidal, linear, and spiral shapes, so that practically any desired geometry can be defined. The shape-controlled nanowires can be grown on almost any substrate such as silicon wafer, quartz and glass slides, and even on plastic substrates (e.g., Kapton HN). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. A ZnO nanowire bio-hybrid solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Houman; Schaefer, Michael; Yaghoubi, Shayan; Jun, Daniel; Schlaf, Rudy; Beatty, J. Thomas; Takshi, Arash

    2017-02-01

    Harvesting solar energy as a carbon free source can be a promising solution to the energy crisis and environmental pollution. Biophotovoltaics seek to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. In the current study, we report on a combination of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with monolayers of photosynthetic reaction centers which are self-assembled, via a cytochrome c linker, as photoactive electrode. In a three-probe biophotovoltaics cell, a photocurrent density of 5.5 μA cm-2 and photovoltage of 36 mV was achieved, using methyl viologen as a redox mediator in the electrolyte. Using ferrocene as a redox mediator a transient photocurrent density of 8.0 μA cm-2 was obtained, which stabilized at 6.4 μA cm-2 after 20 s. In-depth electronic structure characterization using photoemission spectroscopy in conjunction with electrochemical analysis suggests that the fabricated photoactive electrode can provide a proper electronic path for electron transport all the way from the conduction band of the ZnO nanowires, through the protein linker to the RC, and ultimately via redox mediator to the counter electrode.

  5. Controlled synthesis of organic single-crystalline nanowires via the synergy approach of the bottom-up/top-down processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Ming-Peng; Zhang, Ye-Xin; Li, Zhi-Zhou; Shi, Ying-Li; Wang, Xue-Dong; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2018-03-15

    The controlled fabrication of organic single-crystalline nanowires (OSCNWs) with a uniform diameter in the nanoscale via the bottom-up approach, which is just based on weak intermolecular interaction, is a great challenge. Herein, we utilize the synergy approach of the bottom-up and the top-down processes to fabricate OSCNWs with diameters of 120 ± 10 nm through stepwise evolution processes. Specifically, the evolution processes vary from the self-assembled organic micro-rods with a quadrangular pyramid-like end-structure bounded with {111}s and {11-1}s crystal planes to the "top-down" synthesized organic micro-rods with the flat cross-sectional {002}s plane, to the organic micro-tubes with a wall thickness of ∼115 nm, and finally to the organic nanowires. Notably, the anisotropic etching process caused by the protic solvent molecules (such as ethanol) is crucial for the evolution of the morphology throughout the whole top-down process. Therefore, our demonstration opens a new avenue for the controlled-fabrication of organic nanowires, and also contributes to the development of nanowire-based organic optoelectronics such as organic nanowire lasers.

  6. Influence of metallic and dielectric nanowire arrays on the photoluminescence properties of P3HT thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handloser, M; Wisnet, A; Scheu, C; Hartschuh, A; Dunbar, R B; Altpeter, P; Schmidt-Mende, L

    2012-01-01

    The optical properties of organic semiconductor thin films deposited on nanostructured surfaces are investigated using time-resolved two-photon photoluminescence (PL) microscopy. The surfaces consist of parallel aligned metallic or dielectric nanowires forming well-defined arrays on glass substrates. Keeping the nanowire dimensions constant and varying only their spacing from 40 to 400 nm, we study the range of different types of nanowire–semiconductor interactions. For silver nanowires and spacings below 100 nm, the PL intensity and lifetime of P3HT and MDMO-PPV decrease rapidly due to the short-ranged metal-induced quenching that dominates the PL response with respect to a possible plasmonic enhancement of optical transition rates. In the case of P3HT however, we observe an additional longer-ranged reduction of non-radiative losses for both metallic and dielectric nanowires that is not observed for MDMO-PPV. Excitation polarization dependent measurements indicate that this reduction is due to self-assembly of the P3HT polymer chains along the nanowires. In conclusion, nanostructured surfaces, when fabricated across large areas, could be used to control film morphologies and to improve energy transport and collection efficiencies in P3HT-based solar cells. (paper)

  7. Spray-Deposited Large-Area Copper Nanowire Transparent Conductive Electrodes and Their Uses for Touch Screen Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsun-Chen; Chang, Yen-Chen; Lin, Yow; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Wei-Chung; Li, Guo-An; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2016-05-25

    Large-area conducting transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) were prepared by a fast, scalable, and low-cost spray deposition of copper nanowire (CuNW) dispersions. Thin, long, and pure copper nanowires were obtained via the seed-mediated growth in an organic solvent-based synthesis. The mean length and diameter of nanowires are, respectively, 37.7 μm and 46 nm, corresponding to a high-mean-aspect ratio of 790. These wires were spray-deposited onto a glass substrate to form a nanowire conducting network which function as a TCE. CuNW TCEs exhibit high-transparency and high-conductivity since their relatively long lengths are advantageous in lowering in the sheet resistance. For example, a 2 × 2 cm(2) transparent nanowire electrode exhibits transmittance of T = 90% with a sheet resistance as low as 52.7 Ω sq(-1). Large-area sizes (>50 cm(2)) of CuNW TCEs were also prepared by the spray coating method and assembled as resistive touch screens that can be integrated with a variety of devices, including LED lighting array, a computer, electric motors, and audio electronic devices, showing the capability to make diverse sizes and functionalities of CuNW TCEs by the reported method.

  8. Highly integrated synthesis of heterogeneous nanostructures on nanowire heater array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chun Yan; Yun, Jeonghoon; Kim, Jung; Yang, Daejong; Kim, Dong Hwan; Ahn, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; Park, Inkyu

    2014-11-06

    We have proposed a new method for the multiplexed synthesis of heterogeneous nanostructures using a top-down fabricated nanowire heater array. Hydrothermally synthesized nanostructures can be grown only on the heated nanowire through nanoscale temperature control using a Joule heated nanowire. We have demonstrated the selective synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires and copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures, as well as their surface modification with noble metal nanoparticles, using a nanowire heater array. Furthermore, we could fabricate an array of heterogeneous nanostructures via Joule heating of individual nanowire heaters and changing of the precursor solutions in a sequential manner. We have formed a parallel array of palladium (Pd) coated ZnO nanowires and gold (Au) coated ZnO nanowires, as well as a parallel array of ZnO nanowires and CuO nanospikes, in the microscale region by using the developed method.

  9. TiO2 nanowire-templated hierarchical nanowire network as water-repelling coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Tian; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Xiao, Shuai; Yang, Chengduan; Chen, Meiwan; Tao, Jun; Shieh, Han-ping; Yang, Bo-ru; Liu, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Extraordinary water-repelling properties of superhydrophobic surfaces make them novel candidates for a great variety of potential applications. A general approach to achieve superhydrophobicity requires low-energy coating on the surface and roughness on nano- and micrometre scale. However, typical construction of superhydrophobic surfaces with micro-nano structure through top-down fabrication is restricted by sophisticated fabrication techniques and limited choices of substrate materials. Micro-nanoscale topographies templated by conventional microparticles through surface coating may produce large variations in roughness and uncontrollable defects, resulting in poorly controlled surface morphology and wettability. In this work, micro-nanoscale hierarchical nanowire network was fabricated to construct self-cleaning coating using one-dimensional TiO2 nanowires as microscale templates. Hierarchical structure with homogeneous morphology was achieved by branching ZnO nanowires on the TiO2 nanowire backbones through hydrothermal reaction. The hierarchical nanowire network displayed homogeneous micro/nano-topography, in contrast to hierarchical structure templated by traditional microparticles. This hierarchical nanowire network film exhibited high repellency to both water and cell culture medium after functionalization with fluorinated organic molecules. The hierarchical structure templated by TiO2 nanowire coating significantly increased the surface superhydrophobicity compared to vertical ZnO nanowires with nanotopography alone. Our results demonstrated a promising strategy of using nanowires as microscale templates for the rational design of hierarchical coatings with desired superhydrophobicity that can also be applied to various substrate materials. PMID:29308265

  10. TiO2 nanowire-templated hierarchical nanowire network as water-repelling coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Tian; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Xiao, Shuai; Yang, Chengduan; Chen, Meiwan; Tao, Jun; Shieh, Han-ping; Yang, Bo-ru; Liu, Chuan; Xie, Xi

    2017-12-01

    Extraordinary water-repelling properties of superhydrophobic surfaces make them novel candidates for a great variety of potential applications. A general approach to achieve superhydrophobicity requires low-energy coating on the surface and roughness on nano- and micrometre scale. However, typical construction of superhydrophobic surfaces with micro-nano structure through top-down fabrication is restricted by sophisticated fabrication techniques and limited choices of substrate materials. Micro-nanoscale topographies templated by conventional microparticles through surface coating may produce large variations in roughness and uncontrollable defects, resulting in poorly controlled surface morphology and wettability. In this work, micro-nanoscale hierarchical nanowire network was fabricated to construct self-cleaning coating using one-dimensional TiO2 nanowires as microscale templates. Hierarchical structure with homogeneous morphology was achieved by branching ZnO nanowires on the TiO2 nanowire backbones through hydrothermal reaction. The hierarchical nanowire network displayed homogeneous micro/nano-topography, in contrast to hierarchical structure templated by traditional microparticles. This hierarchical nanowire network film exhibited high repellency to both water and cell culture medium after functionalization with fluorinated organic molecules. The hierarchical structure templated by TiO2 nanowire coating significantly increased the surface superhydrophobicity compared to vertical ZnO nanowires with nanotopography alone. Our results demonstrated a promising strategy of using nanowires as microscale templates for the rational design of hierarchical coatings with desired superhydrophobicity that can also be applied to various substrate materials.

  11. Optical properties of heavily doped GaAs nanowires and electroluminescent nanowire structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysov, A; Offer, M; Gutsche, C; Regolin, I; Topaloglu, S; Geller, M; Prost, W; Tegude, F-J

    2011-02-25

    We present GaAs electroluminescent nanowire structures fabricated by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. Electroluminescent structures were realized in both axial pn-junctions in single GaAs nanowires and free-standing nanowire arrays with a pn-junction formed between nanowires and substrate, respectively. The electroluminescence emission peak from single nanowire pn-junctions at 10 K was registered at an energy of around 1.32 eV and shifted to 1.4 eV with an increasing current. The line is attributed to the recombination in the compensated region present in the nanowire due to the memory effect of the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. Arrayed nanowire electroluminescent structures with a pn-junction formed between nanowires and substrate demonstrated at 5 K a strong electroluminescence peak at 1.488 eV and two shoulder peaks at 1.455 and 1.519 eV. The main emission line was attributed to the recombination in the p-doped GaAs. The other two lines correspond to the tunneling-assisted photon emission and band-edge recombination in the abrupt junction, respectively. Electroluminescence spectra are compared with the micro-photoluminescence spectra taken along the single p-, n- and single nanowire pn-junctions to find the origin of the electroluminescence peaks, the distribution of doping species and the sharpness of the junctions.

  12. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...

  13. Polyaniline-coated silver nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Hromádková, Jiřina; Prokeš, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 9 (2010), s. 656-662 ISSN 1381-5148 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA09028; GA ČR GA202/09/1626; GA ČR GA203/08/0686; GA AV ČR IAA100500902; GA AV ČR IAA400500905; GA AV ČR KAN200520704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : conducting polymer * conductivity * nanowire Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.546, year: 2010

  14. Nanodevices based on silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuting; Sha, Jian; Chen, Bo; Fang, Yanjun; Wang, Zongli; Wang, Yewu

    2009-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been demonstrated as one of the promising building blocks for future nanodevices such as field effect transistors, solar cells, sensors and lithium battery; much progress has been made in this field during last decades. In this review paper, the synthesis and physical properties of SiNWs are introduced briefly. Significant advances of SiNWs-related nanodevices reported in recent literature and registered patents are reviewed. The latest development and prospects of SiNWs-related nanodevices are also discussed.

  15. First studies of ITER-diagnostic mirrors in a tokamak with an all-metal interior: results of the first mirror test in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Matveeva, M.; Herrmann, A.; Rohde, V.; Mayer, M.; Sugiyama, K.; Krieger, K.; Voitsenya, V.; Vayakis, G.; Costley, A. E.; Reichle, R.; De Temmerman, G.; Richter, S.; Breuer, U.; Buzi, L.; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U.; Wienhold, P.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-07-01

    In ITER, mirrors will be used as plasma-viewing elements in all optical and laser diagnostics. In the harsh environment, mirror performance will degrade hampering the operation of associated diagnostics. The most adverse effect on mirror performance is caused by the deposition of impurities. It is expected that the most challenging situation will occur in the divertor. With the envisaged changes to all-metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER, an assessment of mirror performance in an existing divertor tokamak with all-metal PFCs is urgently needed. Molybdenum and copper mirrors were exposed for nearly nine months in ASDEX Upgrade which has all-tungsten PFCs. Mirrors were located at the inner wall, under the dome and in the pump duct. During exposure, the mirrors were heated to temperature in the range 145-165 °C. This was made to approach the expected level of heating due to absorption of neutrons and gammas on mirrors in the ITER divertor. After exposure, degradation of the reflectivity was detected on all mirrors. The highest reflectivity drop was measured on mirrors under the dome facing the outer strike point, reaching -55% at 500 nm. The least degradation was detected on mirrors in the pump duct, where the reflectivity was preserved in the range 500-2500 nm and the largest decrease was about -8% at 250 nm. On all contaminated mirrors carbon fraction did not exceed 50 at% while the major contaminants were metals and oxygen. The degradation of exposed mirrors underlines the necessity for urgent R&D on deposition mitigation and in situ mirror cleaning in ITER.

  16. Optical Properties of Rotationally Twinned Nanowire Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Jiming; Bell, David C.; Capasso, Federico

    2008-01-01

    blende InP nanowires. We have constructed the energy band diagram of the resulting multiquantum well heterostructure and have performed detailed quantum mechanical calculations of the electron and hole wave functions. The excitation power dependent blue-shift of the photoluminescence can be explained...... a heterostructure in a chemically homogeneous nanowire material and alter in a major way its optical properties opens new possibilities for band-structure engineering.......We have developed a technique so that both transmission electron microscopy and microphotoluminescence can be performed on the same semiconductor nanowire over a large range of optical power, thus allowing us to directly correlate structural and optical properties of rotationally twinned zinc...

  17. Antimonide Heterostructure Nanowires - Growth, Physics and Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates the growth and application of antimonide heterostructure nanowires for low-power electronics. In the first part of the thesis, GaSb, InSb and InAsSb nanowire growth is presented, and the distinguishing features of the growth are described. It is found that the presence of Sb results in more than 50 at. % group-III concentration in the Au seed particle on top of the nanowires. It is further concluded that the effective V/III ratio inside the seed particle is reduced co...

  18. Growth of HgTe nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvig, E.; Hadzialic, S.; Skauli, T.; Steen, H.; Hansen, V.; Trosdahl-Iversen, L.; van Rheenen, A. D.; Lorentzen, T.; Haakenaasen, R.

    2006-09-01

    HgTe nanowires nucleated by Au particles have been grown on Si and GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The wires are polycrystalline. They evolve from crooked to straight during growth and have rounded to rectangular cross-sections. The widths are in the range 20-500 nm, with lengths up to 4 μm. The height of the nanowires is typically less than the width. The nanowires have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The effects of substrate material, substrate preparation and growth conditions have been investigated.

  19. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-01-01

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti Γ point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi 2 -monolayer and the Dy 3 Si 5 -multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi 2 /Si(111) and Er 3 Si 5 /Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the vector k parallel space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti Γ point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas of the sample surface, which are oriented

  20. Boron carbide nanowires with uniform CNx coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. Z.; Wang, R. M.; You, L. P.; Yu, J.; Chen, H.; Yu, D. P.; Chen, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Boron carbide nanowires with uniform carbon nitride coating layers were synthesized on a silicon substrate using a simple thermal process. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nanowires were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. A correlation between the surface smoothness of the nanowire sidewalls and their lateral sizes has been observed and it is a consequence of the anisotropic formation of the coating layers. A growth mechanism is also proposed for these growth phenomena.

  1. Copper Nanowire-Based Aerogel with Tunable Pore Structure and Its Application as Flexible Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Wang, Ranran; Nie, Pu; Cheng, Yin; Lu, Xiaoyu; Shi, Liangjing; Sun, Jing

    2017-04-26

    Aerogel is a kind of material with high porosity and low density. However, the research on metal-based aerogel with good conductivity is quite limited, which hinders its usage in electronic devices, such as flexible pressure sensors. In this work, we successfully fabricate copper nanowire (CuNW) based aerogel through a one-pot method, and the dynamics for the assembly of CuNWs into hydrogel is intensively investigated. The "bubble controlled assembly" mechanism is put forward for the first time, according to which tunable pore structures and densities (4.3-7.5 mg cm -3 ) of the nanowire aerogel is achieved. Subsequently, ultralight flexible pressure sensors with tunable sensitivities (0.02 kPa -1 to 0.7 kPa -1 ) are fabricated from the Cu NWs aerogels, and the negative correlation behavior of the sensitivity to the density of the aerogel sensors is disclosed systematically. This work provides a versatile strategy for the fabrication of nanowire-based aerogels, which greatly broadens their application potential.

  2. Controlling growth density and patterning of single crystalline silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tung-Hao; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Fu-Ken; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the usage of well-patterned Au nanoparticles (NPs) as a catalyst for one-dimensional growth of single crystalline Si nanowires (NWs) through the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The study reports the fabrication of monolayer Au NPs through the self-assembly of Au NPs on a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)-modified silicon substrate. Results indicate that the spin coating time of Au NPs plays a crucial role in determining the density of Au NPs on the surface of the silicon substrate and the later catalysis growth of Si NWs. The experiments in this study employed optical lithography to pattern Au NPs, treating them as a catalyst for Si NW growth. The patterned Si NW structures easily produced and controlled Si NW density. This approach may be useful for further studies on single crystalline Si NW-based nanodevices and their properties.

  3. pH-controlled silicon nanowires fluorescence switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Lixuan; Shi Wensheng; Zhang Taiping; Zhang Hongyan; She Guangwei

    2010-01-01

    Covalently immobilizing photoinduced electronic transfer (PET) fluorophore 3-[N, N-bis(9-anthrylmethyl)amino]-propyltriethoxysilane (DiAN) on the surface of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) resulted a SiNWs-based fluorescence switch. This fluorescence switch is operated by adjustment of the acidity of the environment and exhibits sensitive response to pH at the range from 8 to 10. Such response is attributed to the effect of pH on the PET process. The successful combination of logic switch and SiNWs provides a rational approach to assemble different logic molecules on SiNWs for realization of miniaturization and modularization of switches and logic devices.

  4. Fabrication and properties of silicon carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), with excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, is a promising material candidate for future devices such as high-temperature electronics and super-strong lightweight structures. Combined with superior intrinsic properties, the nanomaterials of SiC show further advantages thanks to nanoscale effects. This thesis reports the growth mechanism, the self-integration, and the friction of SiC nanowires. The study involves nanowires fabrication using thermal evaporation, structure characterization using electron microscopy, friction measurement, and theoretical modeling. The study on nanowire growth mechanism requires understanding of the surfaces and interfaces of nanowire crystal. The catalyzed growth of SiC nanowires involves interfaces between source vapor, catalytic liquid, and nanowire solid. Our experimental observation includes the periodical twinning in a faceted SiC nanowire and three stage structure transitions during the growth. The proposed theoretical model shows that such phenomenon is the result of surface energy minimization process during the catalytic growth. Surface interactions also exist between nanowires, leading to their self-integration. Our parametric growth study reveals novel self-integration of SiC-SiO 2 core-shell nanowires as a result of SiO2 joining. Attraction between nanowires through van der Waals force and enhanced SiO2 diffusion at high temperature transform individual nanowires to the integrated nanojunctions, nanocables, and finally nanowebs. We also show that such joining process becomes effective either during growth or by annealing. The solid friction is a result of the interaction between two solid surfaces, and it depends on the adhesion and the deformation of two contacting solids among other factors. Having strong adhesion as shown from gecko foot-hairs, nanostructured materials should also have strong friction; this study is the first to investigate friction of nanostructures under

  5. Semiconductor Nanowires for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yun Jeong

    Photolysis of water with semiconductor materials has been investigated intensely as a clean and renewable energy resource by storing solar energy in chemical bonds such as hydrogen. One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as nanowires can provide several advantages for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting due to their high surface areas and excellent charge transport and collection efficiency. This dissertation discusses various nanowire photoelectrodes for single or dual semiconductor systems, and their linked PEC cells for self-driven water splitting. After an introduction of solar water splitting in the first chapter, the second chapter demonstrates water oxidative activities of hydrothermally grown TiO2 nanowire arrays depending on their length and surface properties. The photocurrents with TiO2 nanowire arrays approach saturation due to their poor charge collection efficiency with longer nanowires despite increased photon absorption efficiency. Epitaxial grains of rutile atomic layer deposition (ALD) shell on TiO2 nanowire increase the photocurrent density by 1.5 times due to improved charge collection efficiency especially in the short wavelength region. Chapter three compares the photocurrent density of the planar Si and Si nanowire arrays coated by anatase ALD TiO 2 thin film as a model system of a dual bandgap system. The electroless etched Si nanowire coated by ALD TiO2 (Si EENW/TiO2) shows 2.5 times higher photocurrent density due to lower reflectance and higher surface area. Also, this chapter illustrates that n-Si/n-TiO2 heterojunction is a promising structure for the photoanode application of a dual semiconductor system, since it can enhance the photocurrent density compared to p-Si/n-TiO 2 junction with the assistance of bend banding at the interface. Chapter four demonstrates the charge separation and transport of photogenerated electrons and holes within a single asymmetric Si/TiO2 nanowire. Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements show

  6. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng

    2010-01-13

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi2Se3 material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi2Se5 nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi 2Se5 nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [1120] direction with a rectangular cross-section and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with ∼ 1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitais to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  7. Nanopatterning of ultrananocrystalline diamond nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinpeng; Ocola, Leonidas E; Divan, Ralu S; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2012-02-24

    We report the fabrication of horizontally aligned ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) nanowires (NWs) via two different approaches. First, with the top-down approach by using electron beam lithography (EBL) and reactive ion etching (RIE) with a photo resist layer as an etch mask. Using this approach, we demonstrate fabrication of 50 µm long UNCD NWs with widths as narrow as 40 nm. We further present an alternative approach to grow UNCD NWs at pre-defined positions through a selective seeding process. No RIE was needed either to etch the NWs or to remove the mask. In this case, we achieved UNCD NWs with lengths of 50 µm and smallest width of 90 nm respectively. Characterization of these nanowires by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the UNCD NWs are well defined and fully released, with no indication of residual stress. Characterization using visible and ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy indicates that in both fabrication approaches, UNCD NWs maintain their intrinsic diamond structure.

  8. Synthesis and magneto-transport properties of single PEDOT/Ni and PEDOT/Ni30Fe70 core/shell nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hangarter, Carlos M.; Rheem, Youngwoo; Stahovich, Thomas; Myung, Nosang V.

    2011-01-01

    Single polyethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) nanowires bridging pairs of electrodes were utilized as positive templates to create PEDOT/Ni and PEDOT/Ni 30 Fe 70 core/shell nanowires by electrodepositing ferromagnetic material (i.e., Ni and Ni 30 Fe 70 ) on the entire assembly, including both the electrodes and nanowire. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance indicated that electrons are transported predominately through the ferromagnetic shell. The magnetoresistive (MR) behavior of the core/shell nanowires was investigated as a function of temperature, magnetic field orientation, shell thickness, and composition. The MR behavior of the PEDOT/Ni core/shell nanowires was anomalous for low applied magnetic fields, deviating from expected anisotropic magnetoresistance, with positive ΔR/R O values for all field orientations. PEDOT/Ni 30 Fe 70 core/shell nanowires displayed the opposite behavior, with negative ΔR/R O for both longitudinal and transverse field orientations. The origin of this magnetoresistive behavior is postulated to be a geometry induced domain wall effect.

  9. Formation and frequency response of two-dimensional nanowire lattices in an applied electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Sarah J; Lin, Lan; Guzmán Betancourt, Kimberly; Emery, Robyn; Mayer, Jeffrey S; Mayer, Theresa S; Keating, Christine D

    2015-06-02

    Ordered two-dimensional (2D) lattices were formed by assembling silica-coated solid and segmented Au nanowires between coplanar electrodes using alternating current (ac) electric fields. Dielectrophoretic forces from the ac field concentrated wires between the electrodes, with their long axis aligned parallel to the field lines. After reaching a sufficient particle density, field-induced dipolar interactions resulted in the assembly of dense 2D lattices that spanned the electrodes, a distance of at least ten wire lengths. The ends of neighboring Au wires or segments overlapped a fraction of their length to form lattice structures with a "running bond" brickwork-like pattern. The observed lattice structures were tunable in three distinct ways: (1) particle segmentation pattern, which fixed the lattice periodicity for a given field condition; (2) ac frequency, which varied lattice periodicity in real time; and (3) switching the field on/off, which converted between lattice and smectic particle organizations. Electric field simulations were performed to understand how the observed lattice periodicity depends on the assembly conditions and particle segmentation. Directed self-assembly of well-ordered 2D metallic nanowire lattices that can be designed by Au striping pattern and reconfigured by changes in field conditions could enable new types of switchable optical or electronic devices.

  10. Orientation-Dependent Exciton-Plasmon Coupling in Embedded Organic/Metal Nanowire Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong Jun; Hong, Yan; Peng, Qian; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2017-10-24

    The excitation of surface plasmons by optical emitters based on exciton-plasmon coupling is important for plasmonic devices with active optical properties. It has been theoretically demonstrated that the orientation of exciton dipole can significantly influence the coupling strength, yet systematic study of the coupling process in nanostructures is still hindered by the lack of proper material systems. In this work, we have experimentally investigated the orientation-dependent exciton-plasmon coupling in a rationally designed organic/metal nanowire heterostructure system. The heterostructures were prepared by inserting silver nanowires into crystalline organic waveguides during the self-assembly of dye molecules. Structures with different exciton orientations exhibited varying coupling efficiencies. The near-field exciton-plasmon coupling facilitates the design of nanophotonic devices based on the directional surface plasmon polariton propagations.

  11. Fabrication of gallium nitride nanowires by metal-assisted photochemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao-Rong; Jiang, Qing-Mei; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Wang, Zu-Gang; Hou, Fei; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2017-11-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) were fabricated by metal-assisted photochemical etching (MaPEtch). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as metal catalyst were electrodeposited on the GaN substrate. SEM and HRTEM images show the surface of GaN NWs is smooth and clean without any impurity. SAED and FFT patterns demonstrate GaN NWs have single crystal structure, and the crystallographic orientation of GaN NWs is (0002) face. On the basis of the assumption of localized galvanic cells, combined with the energy levels and electrochemical potentials of reactants in this etching system, the generation, transfer and consumption of electron-hole pairs reveal the whole MaPEtch reaction process. Such easily fabricated GaN NWs have great potential for the assembly of GaN-based single-nanowire nanodevices.

  12. Controlling the Coupling of a Single Nitrogen Vacancy Center to a Silver Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Kumar, Shailesh; Shakoor, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Dipole emitters are expected to efficiently couple to the plasmonic mode propagating along a cylindrically shaped metallic nano-structure. Such a strongly coupled system could serve as a fundamental building block for a single photon source on demand and a device enabling strong non-linear intera......Dipole emitters are expected to efficiently couple to the plasmonic mode propagating along a cylindrically shaped metallic nano-structure. Such a strongly coupled system could serve as a fundamental building block for a single photon source on demand and a device enabling strong non......-linear interaction at the level of a few photons. In our contribution we demonstrate the controlled coupling of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in a diamond nano crystal to a nanowire made of silver. This is in contrast to previous realizations, where the nanowire dipole system was assembled randomly. Ultimate...

  13. Polarized Emission from CsPbBr3 Nanowires Embedded-Electrospun PU fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Tugrul; Topçu, Gökhan; Savacı, Umut; Genç, Aziz; Turan, Servet; Sarı, Emre; Demir, Mustafa M

    2018-01-29

    The interest in all-inorganic halide perovskites has been increasing dramatically due to their high quantum yield, band gap tunability, and ease of fabrication in compositional and geometric diversity. In this study, we synthesized µm long and ~4 nm thick CsPbBr3 nanowires (NWs). They were, then, integrated into electrospun polyurethane (PU) fibers to examine polarization behavior of the composite fiber assembly. Aligned electrospun fibers containing CsPbBr3 nanowires show remarkable increase in degree of polarization from 0.17 to 0.30. This combination of NWs and PU fibers provides a promising composite material for various applications such as optoelectronic devices and solar cells. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  15. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  16. Ballistic transport in gold [110] nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurui, Yoshihiko; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Okamoto, Masakuni; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2009-03-01

    Conductance of gold nanowire elongated along the [110] direction (gold [110] nanowire) was measured during many breaking procedures, while simultaneously acquiring transmission electron microscope images. The conductance histogram exhibits a series of peaks whose conductance values increased nearly in steps of the conductance quantum, G0 =2e^2/h. However thick nanowires above 10G0 showed dequantization, where the increment was only 0.9G0. The structure for each peak was determined to be either an atomic sheet or a hexagonal prism. The number of conductance channels calculated for each atomic structure by first principles theory, coincided well with the peak index in the conductance histogram. The present study shows that the [110] nanowire behave as ballistic conductors, and a conductance peak appears whenever a conductance channel is opened.

  17. Nonradiative Step Facets in Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana M; Zhang, Yunyan; Tait, Edward W; Hine, Nicholas D M; Liu, Huiyun; Beanland, Richard

    2017-04-12

    One of the main advantages of nanowires for functional applications is their high perfection, which results from surface image forces that act on line defects such as dislocations, rendering them unstable and driving them out of the crystal. Here we show that there is a class of step facets that are stable in nanowires, with no long-range strain field or dislocation character. In zinc-blende semiconductors, they take the form of Σ3 (112) facets with heights constrained to be a multiple of three {111} monolayers. Density functional theory calculations show that they act as nonradiative recombination centers and have deleterious effects on nanowire properties. We present experimental observations of these defects on twin boundaries and twins that terminate inside GaAsP nanowires and find that they are indeed always multiples of three monolayers in height. Strategies to use the three-monolayer rule during growth to prevent their formation are discussed.

  18. An Affordable Wet Chemical Route to Grow Conducting Hybrid Graphite-Diamond Nanowires: Demonstration by A Single Nanowire Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Chen, Tin Hao; Simon, Turibius; Li, Liang-Chen; Sun, Kien Wen; Ko, Fu-Hsiang

    2017-09-11

    We report an affordable wet chemical route for the reproducible hybrid graphite-diamond nanowires (G-DNWs) growth from cysteamine functionalized diamond nanoparticles (ND-Cys) via pH induced self-assembly, which has been visualized through SEM and TEM images. Interestingly, the mechanistic aspects behind that self-assembly directed G-DNWs formation was discussed in details. Notably, above self-assembly was validated by AFM and TEM data. Further interrogations by XRD and Raman data were revealed the possible graphite sheath wrapping over DNWs. Moreover, the HR-TEM studies also verified the coexistence of less perfect sp 2 graphite layer wrapped over the sp 3 diamond carbon and the impurity channels as well. Very importantly, conductivity of hybrid G-DNWs was verified via fabrication of a single G-DNW. Wherein, the better conductivity of G-DNW portion L2 was found as 2.4 ± 1.92 × 10 -6 mS/cm and revealed its effective applicability in near future. In addition to note, temperature dependent carrier transport mechanisms and activation energy calculations were reported in details in this work. Ultimately, to demonstrate the importance of our conductivity measurements, the possible mechanism behind the electrical transport and the comparative account on electrical resistivities of carbon based materials were provided.

  19. High-performance single nanowire tunnel diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Persson, Johan M; Wagner, Jakob B; Samuelson, Lars; Deppert, Knut; Borgström, Magnus T

    2010-03-10

    We demonstrate single nanowire tunnel diodes with room temperature peak current densities of up to 329 A/cm(2). Despite the large surface to volume ratio of the type-II InP-GaAs axial heterostructure nanowires, we measure peak to valley current ratios (PVCR) of up to 8.2 at room temperature and 27.6 at liquid helium temperature. These sub-100-nm-diameter structures are promising components for solar cells as well as electronic applications.

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline Bi 2 Te 3 nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 μm. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi 2 Te 3 and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 μm thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  2. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-05-26

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}m. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 {mu}m thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  3. Hydrogen Generation from Photocatalytic Silver|Zinc Oxide Nanowires: Towards Multifunctional Multisegmented Nanowire Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijenburg, A.W.; Rodijk, E.J.B.; Maas, M.G.; Enculescu, Monica; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2011-01-01

    Photoactive nanowires: A novel photo-electrochemical nanowire diode that catalyzes the conversion of methanol and water to hydrogen under UV light is demonstrated. The wire consists of a metal and a metal oxide segment that are connected via a Schottky barrier. Other functions, such as remote-

  4. Optical haze of randomly arranged silver nanowire transparent conductive films with wide range of nanowire diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the diameter of randomly arranged silver nanowires on the optical haze of silver nanowire transparent conductive films was studied. Proposed simulation model behaved similarly with the experimental results, and was used to theoretically study the optical haze of silver nanowires with diameters in the broad range from 30 nm and above. Our results show that a thickening of silver nanowires from 30 to 100 nm results in the increase of the optical haze up to 8 times, while from 100 to 500 nm the optical haze increases only up to 1.38. Moreover, silver nanowires with diameter of 500 nm possess up to 5% lower optical haze and 5% higher transmittance than 100 nm thick silver nanowires for the same 10-100 Ohm/sq sheet resistance range. Further thickening of AgNWs can match the low haze of 30 nm thick AgNWs, but at higher transmittance. The results obtained from this work allow deeper analysis of the silver nanowire transparent conductive films from the perspective of the diameter of nanowires for various optoelectronic devices.

  5. CuO nanowire/microflower/nanowire modified Cu electrode with enhanced electrochemical performance for non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changli; Yamahara, Hiroyasu; Lee, Yaerim; Tabata, Hitoshi; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2015-07-31

    CuO nanowire/microflower structure on Cu foil is synthesized by annealing a Cu(OH)2 nanowire/CuO microflower structure at 250 °C in air. The nanowire/microflower structure with its large surface area leads to an efficient catalysis and charge transfer in glucose detection, achieving a high sensitivity of 1943 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), a wide linear range up to 4 mM and a low detection limit of 4 μM for amperometric glucose sensing in alkaline solution. With a second consecutive growth of CuO nanowires on the microflowers, the sensitivity of the obtained CuO nanowire/microflower/nanowire structure further increases to 2424 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), benefiting from an increased number of electrochemically active sites. The enhanced electrocatalytic performance of the CuO nanowire/microflower/nanowire electrode compared to the CuO nanowire/microflower electrode, CuO nanowire electrode and CuxO film electrode provides evidence for the significant role of available surface area for electrocatalysis. The rational combination of CuO nanowire and microflower nanostructures into a nanowire supporting microflower branching nanowires structure makes it a promising composite nanostructure for use in CuO based electrochemical sensors with promising analytical properties.

  6. Resistance Fluctuations in GaAs Nanowire Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Marasović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical study on resistance fluctuations in a series of nanowire-based grids. Each grid is made of GaAs nanowires arranged in parallel with metallic contacts crossing all nanowires perpendicularly. Electrical properties of GaAs nanowires known from previous experimental research are used as input parameters in the simulation procedure. Due to the nonhomogeneous doping, the resistivity changes along nanowire. Allowing two possible nanowire orientations (“upwards” or “downwards”, the resulting grid is partially disordered in vertical direction which causes resistance fluctuations. The system is modeled using a two-dimensional random resistor network. Transfer-matrix computation algorithm is used to calculate the total network resistance. It is found that probability density function (PDF of resistance fluctuations for a series of nanowire grids changes from Gaussian behavior towards the Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution when both nanowire orientations are equally represented in the grid.

  7. DNA Binding Peptide Directed Synthesis of Continuous DNA Nanowires for Analysis of Large DNA Molecules by Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Il; Lee, Seonghyun; Jin, Xuelin; Kim, Su Ji; Jo, Kyubong; Lee, Jung Heon

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of smooth and continuous DNA nanowires, preserving the original structure of native DNA, and allowing its analysis by scanning electron microscope (SEM), is demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles densely assembled on the DNA backbone via thiol-tagged DNA binding peptides work as seeds for metallization of DNA. This method allows whole analysis of DNA molecules with entangled 3D features. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuya; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Mochida, Takaaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the fuel economy by increasing the reactivity at the latter burning stage of fuel assemblies and thereby increasing the burn-up degree. Constitution: At the later stage of the burning where the infinite multiplication factor of a fuel assembly is lowered, fuel rods are partially discharged to increase the fuel-moderator volume ratio in the fuel assembly. Then, plutonium is positively burnt by bringing the ratio near to an optimum point where the infinite multiplication factor becomes maximum and the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased by utilizing the spectral shift effect. The number of the fuel rods to be removed is selected so as to approach the fuel-moderator atom number ratio where the infinite multiplication factor is maximum. Further, the positions where the thermal neutron fluxes are low are most effective for removing the rods and those positions between which no fuel rods are present and which are adjacent with neither the channel box nor the water rods are preferred. The rods should be removed at the time when the burning is proceeded at lest for one cycle. The reactivity is thus increased and the burn-up degree of fuels upon taking-out can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  10. Long-range magnetostatic interactions in arrays of nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Raposo, V; González, J M; Vázquez, M

    2000-01-01

    Experimental measurements and micromagnetic simulations of the hysteresis loops of arrays of cobalt nanowires are compared here. Arrays of cobalt nanowires (200 nm in diameter) were electrodeposited into the pores of alumina membranes (thickness 60 mu m). Their hysteresis loops along the axial direction of nanowires were measured using vibrating sample magnetometry. Micromagnetic simulations were performed considering dipolar interaction between nanowires leading to similar hysteresis loops as those obtained experimentally.

  11. Probing strain in bent semiconductor nanowires with Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianing; Conache, Gabriela; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Gray, Struan M; Borgström, Magnus T; Xu, Hongxing; Xu, H Q; Samuelson, Lars; Håkanson, Ulf

    2010-04-14

    We present a noninvasive optical method to determine the local strain in individual semiconductor nanowires. InP nanowires were intentionally bent with an atomic force microscope and variations in the optical phonon frequency along the wires were mapped using Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the nanowires with a high curvature showed significantly broadened phonon lines. These observations together with deformation potential theory show that compressive and tensile strain inside the nanowires is the physical origin of the observed phonon energy variations.

  12. Understanding InP Nanowire Array Solar Cell Performance by Nanoprobe-Enabled Single Nanowire Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otnes, Gaute; Barrigón, Enrique; Sundvall, Christian; Svensson, K Erik; Heurlin, Magnus; Siefer, Gerald; Samuelson, Lars; Åberg, Ingvar; Borgström, Magnus T

    2018-04-27

    III-V solar cells in the nanowire geometry might hold significant synthesis-cost and device-design advantages as compared to thin films and have shown impressive performance improvements in recent years. To continue this development there is a need for characterization techniques giving quick and reliable feedback for growth development. Further, characterization techniques which can improve understanding of the link between nanowire growth conditions, subsequent processing, and solar cell performance are desired. Here, we present the use of a nanoprobe system inside a scanning electron microscope to efficiently contact single nanowires and characterize them in terms of key parameters for solar cell performance. Specifically, we study single as-grown InP nanowires and use electron beam induced current characterization to understand the charge carrier collection properties, and dark current-voltage characteristics to understand the diode recombination characteristics. By correlating the single nanowire measurements to performance of fully processed nanowire array solar cells, we identify how the performance limiting parameters are related to growth and/or processing conditions. We use this understanding to achieve a more than 7-fold improvement in efficiency of our InP nanowire solar cells, grown from a different seed particle pattern than previously reported from our group. The best cell shows a certified efficiency of 15.0%; the highest reported value for a bottom-up synthesized InP nanowire solar cell. We believe the presented approach have significant potential to speed-up the development of nanowire solar cells, as well as other nanowire-based electronic/optoelectronic devices.

  13. Controlled growth of single nanowires within a supported alumina template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Faniel, S.

    2006-01-01

    A simple technique for fabricating single nanowires with well-defined position is presented. The process implies the use of a silicon nitride mask for selective electrochemical growth of the nanowires in a porous alumina template. We show that this method allows the realization of complex nanowire...

  14. nanowires via electrochemical method and its investigations as a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The special behaviour of nanowires with respect to electrical conductivity makes them suitable for sensing application. In this paper, we present a copper–ferrous (CuFe) nanowires based sensor for detection of chemicals. CuFe nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemical method.

  15. Nanowires: properties, applications and synthesis via porous anodic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moreover, periodic arrays of magnetic nanowires hold high potential for recording media application. Nanowires are also potential candidates for sensor and bio-medical applications. In the present article, the physical and chemical properties of nanowires along with their probable applications in different fields have been ...

  16. Nanowires: properties, applications and synthesis via porous anodic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. Quasi one-dimensional nanowires possess unique electrical, electronic, thermoelectrical, optical, magnetic and chemical properties, which are different from that of their parent counterpart. The physical properties of nanowires are influenced by the morphology of the nanowires, diameter dependent band gap,.

  17. Microbial nanowires and methods of making and using

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reguera, Gemma; Cologgi, Dena; Worden, Robert Mark; Castro-Forero, Angelines A.; Steidl, Rebecca

    2017-03-21

    Electrically conductive nanowires, and genetically or chemically modified production and use of such nanowires with altered conductive, adhesive, coupling or other properties are described. The disclosed nanowires are used as device or device components or may be adapted for soluble metal remediation.

  18. Nanowires: properties, applications and synthesis via porous anodic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quasi one-dimensional nanowires possess unique electrical, electronic, thermoelectrical, optical, magnetic and chemical properties, which are different from that of their parent counterpart. The physical properties of nanowires are influenced by the morphology of the nanowires, diameter dependent band gap, carrier ...

  19. Failure mechanisms and electromechanical coupling in semiconducting nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional nanostructures, like nanowires and nanotubes, are increasingly being researched for the development of next generation devices like logic gates, transistors, and solar cells. In particular, semiconducting nanowires with a nonsymmetric wurtzitic crystal structure, such as zinc oxide (ZnO and gallium nitride (GaN, have drawn immense research interests due to their electromechanical coupling. The designing of the future nanowire-based devices requires component-level characterization of individual nanowires. In this paper, we present a unique experimental set-up to characterize the mechanical and electromechanical behaviour of individual nanowires. Using this set-up and complementary atomistic simulations, mechanical properties of ZnO nanowires and electromechanical properties of GaN nanowires were investigated. In ZnO nanowires, elastic modulus was found to depend on nanowire diameter decreasing from 190 GPa to 140 GPa as the wire diameter increased from 5 nm to 80 nm. Inconsistent failure mechanisms were observed in ZnO nanowires. Experiments revealed a brittle fracture, whereas simulations using a pairwise potential predicted a phase transformation prior to failure. This inconsistency is addressed in detail from an experimental as well as computational perspective. Lastly, in addition to mechanical properties, preliminary results on the electromechanical properties of gallium nitride nanowires are also reported. Initial investigations reveal that the piezoresistive and piezoelectric behaviour of nanowires is different from bulk gallium nitride.

  20. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, D.S.

    2010-06-02

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.

  1. Single nanowire resistive nano-heater for highly localized thermo-chemical reactions: localized hierarchical heterojunction nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Gunho; Hong, Sukjoon; Lee, Jinhwan; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Lee, Habeom; Park, Heeseung; Manoroktul, Wanit; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Lee, Bong Jae; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2014-12-29

    A single nanowire resistive nano-heater (RNH) is fabricated, and it is demonstrated that the RNH can induce highly localized temperature fields, which can trigger highly localized thermo-chemical reactions to grow hierarchical nanowires directly at the desired specific spot such as ZnO nanowire branch growth on a single Ag nanowire. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Quantification of nanowire uptake by live cells

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications at the cellular level. In order to understand how these nanostructures “behave” and for studying their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made at tagging and investigating their interaction with living cells. In this study, magnetic iron nanowires with an iron oxide layer are coated with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), and subsequently labeled with a fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, covalently bound to the aminosilane surface. Time-lapse live imaging of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells interacting with the labeled iron nanowires is performed for 24 hours. As the pHrodo™ Red conjugated nanowires are non-fluorescent outside the cells but fluoresce brightly inside, internalized nanowires are distinguished from non-internalized ones and their behavior inside the cells can be tracked for the respective time length. A machine learning-based computational framework dedicated to automatic analysis of live cell imaging data, Cell Cognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and non-internalized nanowires and subsequently determine the uptake percentage by cells at different time points. An uptake of 85 % by HCT 116 cells is observed after 24 hours incubation at NW-to-cell ratios of 200. While the approach of using pHrodo™ Red for internalization studies is not novel in the literature, this study reports for the first time the utilization of a machine-learning based time-resolved automatic analysis pipeline for quantification of nanowire uptake by cells. This pipeline has also been used for comparison studies with nickel nanowires coated with APTES and labeled with pHrodo™ Red, and another cell line derived from the cervix carcinoma, HeLa. It has thus the potential to be used for studying the interaction of different types of nanostructures with potentially any live cell types.

  3. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echigoya, Hironori; Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To render the axial distribution relatively flat. Constitution: First nuclear element comprises a fuel can made of zircalloy i.e., the metal with less neutron absorption, which is filled with a plurality of UO 2 pellets and sealed by using a lower end plug, a plenum spring and an upper end plug by means of welding. Second fuel element is formed by substituting a part of the UO 2 pellets with a water tube which is sealed with water and has a space for allowing the heat expansion. The nuclear fuel assembly is constituted by using the first and second fuel elements together. In such a structure, since water reflects neutrons and decrease their leakage to increase the temperature, reactivity is added at the upper portion of the fuel assembly to thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Accordingly, stable operation is possible only by means of deep control rods while requiring no shallow control rods. (Sekiya, K.)

  4. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...

  5. Detection of chemical substances in water using an oxide nanowire transistor covered with a hydrophobic nanoparticle thin film as a liquid-vapour separation filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekyung Lim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method to detect the presence of small amounts of chemical substances in water, using a Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film covered with phosphonic acid (HDF-PA self-assembled monolayer. The HDF-PA self-assembled Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film acts as a liquid-vapour separation filter, allowing the passage of chemical vapour while blocking liquids. Prevention of the liquid from contacting the SnO2 nanowire and source-drain electrodes is required in order to avoid abnormal operation. Using this characteristic, the concentration of chemical substances in water could be evaluated by measuring the current changes in the SnO2 nanowire transistor covered with the HDF-PA self-assembled Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film.

  6. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei; Ando, Ryohei; Mitsutake, Toru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly suitable to a BWR-type reactor and improved especially with the nuclear characteristic, heat performance, hydraulic performance, dismantling or assembling performance and economical property. A part of poison rods are formed as a large-diameter/multi-region poison rods having a larger diameter than a fuel rod. A large number of fuel rods are disposed surrounding a large diameter water rod and a group of the large-diameter/multi-region poison rods in adjacent with the water rod. The large-diameter water rod has a burnable poison at the tube wall portion. At least a portion of the large-diameter poison rods has a coolant circulation portion allowing coolants to circulate therethrough. Since the large-diameter poison rods are disposed at a position of high neutron fluxes, a large neutron multiplication factor suppression effect can be provided, thereby enabling to reduce the number of burnable poison rods relative to fuels. As a result, power peaking in the fuel assembly is moderated and a greater amount of plutonium can be loaded. In addition the flow of cooling water which tends to gather around the large diameter water rod can be controlled to improve cooling performance of fuels. (N.H.)

  8. Unveiling polytype transformation assisted growth mechanism in boron carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningning; Li, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate direct evidence that the lattice distortion, induced by boron carbide (BxCy) stoichiometry, assists the growth of boron carbide nanowires. The transformation between different polytypic boron carbide phases lowers the energy barrier for boron diffusion, promoting boron migration in the nanowire growth. An atomistic mass transport model has been established to explain such volume-diffusion-induced nanowire growth which cannot be explained by the conventional surface diffusion model alone. These findings significantly advance our understanding of nanowire growth processes and mass transport mechanisms and provide new guidelines for the design of nanowire-structured devices.

  9. Gold nanocluster distribution on faceted and kinked Si nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhicha, Rym; Vincent, Laetitia; Renard, Charles; Gardès, Cyrille; Yam, Vy; Fossard, Frédéric; Patriarche, Gilles; Jabeen, Fauzia; Bouchier, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Si nanowires were grown on (111) substrates by ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition using the Au-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) technique. Depending on the growth temperature, the nanowires can be straight in the direction or kinked towards . We present a transmission electron microscopy investigation of the Si nanowires. Results exhibit the relationship between the morphology of nanowires and the distribution of gold on sidewalls bounding the nanowires. The distribution of Au nanoclusters is used as a probe to investigate the growth mechanisms of the VLS process. Our observations are consistent with the model of nucleation and step flow related to the oscillatory behavior of the catalyst droplet.

  10. Conducting Polyaniline Nanowire and Its Applications in Chemiresistive Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Edward; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-08-07

    One dimensional polyaniline nanowire is an electrically conducting polymer that can be used as an active layer for sensors whose conductivity change can be used to detect chemical or biological species. In this review, the basic properties of polyaniline nanowires including chemical structures, redox chemistry, and method of synthesis are discussed. A comprehensive literature survey on chemiresistive/conductometric sensors based on polyaniline nanowires is presented and recent developments in polyaniline nanowire-based sensors are summarized. Finally, the current limitations and the future prospect of polyaniline nanowires are discussed.

  11. Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zhao Yimin; Xia Yongde; Zhu Yanqiu; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-thin W 18 O 49 nanowires were initially obtained by a simple solvothermal method using tungsten chloride and cyclohexanol as precursors. Thermal processing of the resulting bundled nanowires has been carried out in air in a tube furnace. The morphology and phase transformation behavior of the as-synthesized nanowires as a function of annealing temperature have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The nanostructured bundles underwent a series of morphological evolution with increased annealing temperature, becoming straighter, larger in diameter, and smaller in aspect ratio, eventually becoming irregular particles with size up to 5 μm. At 500 deg. C, the monoclinic W 18 O 49 was completely transformed to monoclinic WO 3 phase, which remains stable at high processing temperature. After thermal processing at 400 deg. C and 450 deg. C, the specific surface areas of the resulting nanowires dropped to 110 m 2 g -1 and 66 m 2 g -1 respectively, compared with that of 151 m 2 g -1 for the as-prepared sample. This study may shed light on the understanding of the geometrical and structural evolution occurring in nanowires whose working environment may involve severe temperature variations

  12. Preparation and characterization of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irshad, M. I., E-mail: imrancssp@gmail.com; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia); Ahmad, F., E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Abdullah, M. Z., E-mail: zaki-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Electrochemical deposition technique has been used to deposit cobalt nanowires into the nano sized channels of Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. CoCl{sub 2}Ðœ‡6H2O salt solution was used, which was buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidified by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to increase the plating life and control pH of the solution. Thin film of copper around 150 nm thick on one side of AAO template coated by e-beam evaporation system served as cathode to create electrical contact. FESEM analysis shows that the as-deposited nanowires are highly aligned, parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. The TEM results show that electrodeposited cobalt nanowires are crystalline in nature. The Hysteresis loop shows the magnetization properties for in and out of plane configuration. The in plane saturation magnetization (Ms) is lower than out of plane configuration because of the easy axis of magnetization is perpendicular to nanowire axis. These magnetic nanowires could be utilized for applications such as spintronic devices, high density magnetic storage, and magnetic sensor applications.

  13. Nanowire Electrodes for Advanced Lithium Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Lei; Wei, Qiulong; Sun, Ruimin; Mai, Liqiang

    2014-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) in the past two decades, rechargeable LIBs have become widespread power sources for portable devices used in daily life. However, current demands require higher energy density and power density of batteries. The electrochemical energy storage performance of LIBs could be improved by applying nanomaterial electrodes, but their fast capacity fading is still one of the key limitations and the mechanism need to be clearly understood. Single nanowire electrode devices are considered as a versatile platform for in situ probing the direct relationship between electrical transport, structure change, and other properties of the single nanowire electrode along with the charge/discharge process. The results indicate that the conductivity decrease of the nanowire electrode and the structural disorder/destruction during electrochemical reaction limit the cycling performance of LIBs. Based on the in situ observations, some feasible optimization strategies, including prelithiation, coaxial structure, nanowire arrays, and hierarchical structure architecture, are proposed and utilized to restrain the conductivity decrease and structural disorder/destruction. Further, the applications of nanowire electrodes in some “beyond Li-ion” batteries, such as Li-S and Li-air batteries are also described.

  14. Chemical segregation in metallic glass nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Mo; Li, Qi-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Nanowires made of metallic glass have been actively pursued recently due to the superb and unique properties over those of the crystalline materials. The amorphous nanowires are synthesized either at high temperature or via mechanical disruption using focused ion beam. These processes have potential to cause significant changes in structure and chemical concentration, as well as formation of defect or imperfection, but little is known to date about the possibilities and mechanisms. Here, we report chemical segregation to surfaces and its mechanisms in metallic glass nanowires made of binary Cu and Zr elements from molecular dynamics simulation. Strong concentration deviation are found in the nanowires under the conditions similar to these in experiment via focused ion beam processing, hot imprinting, and casting by rapid cooling from liquid state. Our analysis indicates that non-uniform internal stress distribution is a major cause for the chemical segregation, especially at low temperatures. Extension is discussed for this observation to multicomponent metallic glass nanowires as well as the potential applications and side effects of the composition modulation. The finding also points to the possibility of the mechanical-chemical process that may occur in different settings such as fracture, cavitation, and foams where strong internal stress is present in small length scales

  15. Growth Mechanism of Nanowires: Ternary Chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Hopkins, R. H.; Su, Ching Hua; Arnold, B.; Choa, Fow-Sen; Cullum, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the past two decades there has been a large rise in the investment and expectations for nanotechnology use. Almost every area of research has projected improvements in sensors, or even a promise for the emergence of some novel device technologies. For these applications major focuses of research are in the areas of nanoparticles and graphene. Although there are some near term applications with nanowires in photodetectors and other low light detectors, there are few papers on the growth mechanism and fabrication of nanowire-based devices. Semiconductor nanowires exhibit very favorable and promising optical properties, including high transparency and a several order of magnitude better photocurrent than thin film and bulk materials. We present here an overview of the mechanism of nanowire growth from the melt, and some preliminary results for the thallium arsenic selenide material system. Thallium arsenic selenide (TAS) is a multifunctional material combining excellent acousto-optical, nonlinear and radiation detection properties. We observed that small units of (TAS) nanocubes arrange and rearrange at moderate melt undercooling to form the building block of a nanowire. In some cases very long wires (less than mm) are formed. Since we avoided the catalyst, we observed self-nucleation and uncontrolled growth of wires from different places.

  16. Precise characterization of self-catalyzed III-V nanowire heterostructures via optical second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Wei, Yu-Ming; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Wang, Xue-Hua; Yu, Si-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the utility of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) polarimetry to perform structural characterization of self-assembled zinc-blende/wurtzite III-V nanowire heterostructures. By analyzing four anisotropic SHG polarimetric patterns, we distinguish between wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB) and ZB/WZ mixing III-V semiconducting crystal structures in nanowire systems. By neglecting the surface contributions and treating the bulk crystal within the quasi-static approximation, we can well explain the optical SHG polarimetry from the NWs with diameter from 200-600 nm. We show that the optical in-coupling and out-coupling coefficients arising from depolarization field can determine the polarization of the SHG. We also demonstrate micro-photoluminescence of GaAs quantum dots in related ZB and ZB/WZ mixing sections of core-shell NW structure, in agreement with the SHG polarimetry results. The ability to perform in situ SHG-based crystallographic study of semiconducting single and multi-crystalline nanowire heterostructures will be useful in displaying structure-property relationships of nanodevices.

  17. Size-Induced Switching of Nanowire Growth Direction: a New Approach Toward Kinked Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2016-04-26

    Exploring self-assembled nanostructures with controllable architectures has been a central theme in nanoscience and nanotechnology because of the tantalizing perspective of directly integrating such bottom-up nanostructures into functional devices. Here, the growth of kinked single-crystal In2O3 nanostructures consisting of a nanocone base and a nanowire tip with an epitaxial and defect-free transition is demonstrated for the first time. By tailoring the growth conditions, a reliable switching of the growth direction from [111] to [110] or [112] is observed when the Au catalyst nanoparticles at the apexes of the nanocones shrink below ≈100 nm. The natural formation of kinked nanoarchitectures at constant growth pressures is related to the size-dependent free energy that changes for different orientations of the nanowires. The results suggest that the mechanism of forming such kinked nanocone-nanowire nanostructures in well-controlled growth environment may be universal for a wide range of functional materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Optical properties of ZnO-nanowire/CdSe-colloidal-quantum-dot hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dongchao; Richters, Jan-Peter; Dev, Apurba; Voss, Tobias [Semiconductor Optics, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    One of the research interests in modern nanotechnology is the assembly and study of hybrid heterostructures composed of different materials that offer enhanced properties through the interactions between their different constituents. ZnO nanowires functionalized with colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) display tailored optical properties due to energy and electron transfer processes between these two components, and have a huge potential for applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. Using a facile method, we synthesized water-soluble CdSe QDs with cadmium acetate and sodium selenosulfate as Cd and Se precursors, respectively. 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was used to cap the QDs, acting as the stabilizer, making the QDs water soluble and preventing them from agglomeration. TEM measurements demonstrated a narrow size distribution of the as-prepared QDs with the average diameter around 3 nm, consistent with UV-Vis absorption measurements. The carboxylic groups at the outer surface of the MPA-capped CdSe QDs render a tight and uniform attachment onto the surface of ZnO nanowires with high coverage efficiency possible. We studied the optical properties of the hybrid structures by photoluminescence spectroscopy under different temperatures to analyze the energy and electron transfer dynamics between the nanowires and the QDs.

  19. Synthesis of nanostructures in nanowires using sequential catalyst reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, F.; Chou, Y.-C.; Reuter, M.C.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E.A.; Hofmann, S.; Ross, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanowire growth by the vapor-liquid-solid process enables a high level of control over nanowire composition, diameter, growth direction, branching and kinking, periodic twinning, and crystal structure. The tremendous impact of VLS-grown nanowires is due to this structural versatility, generating applications ranging from solid state lighting and single photon sources to thermoelectric devices. Here we show that the morphology of these nanostructures can be further tailored by using the liquid droplets that catalyze nanowire growth as a “mixing bowl”, in which growth materials are sequentially supplied to nucleate new phases. Growing within the liquid, these phases adopt the shape of faceted nanocrystals that are then incorporated into the nanowires by further growth. We demonstrate this concept by epitaxially incorporating metal silicide nanocrystals into Si nanowires with defect-free interfaces, and discuss how this process can be generalized to create complex nanowire-based heterostructures. PMID:26168344

  20. Optical properties of indium phosphide nanowire ensembles at various temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohn, Andrew J; Onishi, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P [Baskin School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, University of California Santa Cruz-NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Ensembles that contain two types (zincblende and wurtzite) of indium phosphide nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces were studied by micro-photoluminescence and micro-Raman spectroscopy at various low temperatures. The obtained spectra are discussed with the emphasis on the effects of differing lattice types, geometries, and crystallographic orientations present within an ensemble of nanowires grown on non-single crystalline surfaces. In the photoluminescence spectra, a typical Varshni dependence of band gap energy on temperature was observed for emissions from zincblende nanowires and in the high temperature regime energy transfer from excitonic transitions and band-edge transitions was identified. In contrast, the photoluminescence emissions associated with wurtzite nanowires were rather insensitive to temperature. Raman spectra were collected simultaneously from zincblende and wurtzite nanowires coexisting in an ensemble. Raman peaks of the wurtzite nanowires are interpreted as those related to the zincblende nanowires by a folding of the phonon dispersion.

  1. Vertically aligned nanowires from boron-doped diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nianjun; Uetsuka, Hiroshi; Osawa, Eiji; Nebel, Christoph E

    2008-11-01

    Vertically aligned diamond nanowires with controlled geometrical properties like length and distance between wires were fabricated by use of nanodiamond particles as a hard mask and by use of reactive ion etching. The surface structure, electronic properties, and electrochemical functionalization of diamond nanowires were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as electrochemical techniques. AFM and STM experiments show that diamond nanowire etched for 10 s have wire-typed structures with 3-10 nm in length and with typically 11 nm spacing in between. The electrode active area of diamond nanowires is enhanced by a factor of 2. The functionalization of nanowire tips with nitrophenyl molecules is characterized by STM on clean and on nitrophenyl molecule-modified diamond nanowires. Tip-modified diamond nanowires are promising with respect to biosensor applications where controlled biomolecule bonding is required to improve chemical stability and sensing significantly.

  2. Silicon nanowire circuits fabricated by AFM oxidation nanolithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, Ramses V; MartInez, Javier; Garcia, Ricardo, E-mail: rgarcia@imm.cnm.csic.es [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, CSIC, Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-18

    We report a top-down process for the fabrication of single-crystalline silicon nanowire circuits and devices. Local oxidation nanolithography is applied to define very narrow oxide masks on top of a silicon-on-insulator substrate. In a plasma etching, the nano-oxide mask generates a nanowire with a rectangular section. The nanowire width coincides with the lateral size of the mask. In this way, uniform and well-defined transistors with channel widths in the 10-20 nm range have been fabricated. The nanowires can be positioned with sub-100 nm lateral accuracy. The transistors exhibit an on/off current ratio of 10{sup 5}. The atomic force microscope nanolithography offers full control of the nanowire's shape from straight to circular or a combination of them. It also enables the integration of several nanowires within the same circuit. The nanowire transistors have been applied to detect immunological processes.

  3. A detailed study of magnetization reversal in individual Ni nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Vidal, Enrique Vilanova

    2015-01-19

    Magnetic nanowires have emerged as essential components for a broad range of applications. In many cases, a key property of these components is the switching field, which is studied as a function of the angle between the field and the nanowire. We found remarkable differences of up to 100% between the switching fields of different nanowires from the same fabrication batch. Our experimental results and micromagnetic simulations indicate that the nanowires exhibit a single domain behavior and that the switching mechanism includes vortex domain wall motion across the nanowire. The differences between the switching fields are attributed to different cross-sections of the nanowires, as found by electron microscopy. While a circular cross-section yields the smallest switching field values, any deviation from this shape results in an increase of the switching field. The shape of the nanowires\\' cross-sections is thus a critical parameter that has not been previously taken into account.

  4. Doped ZnO nanowires obtained by thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, C X; Liu, Z; Wong, C C; Hark, S K

    2007-02-01

    Doped ZnO nanowires were prepared in a very simple and inexpensive thermal annealing method using ZnSe nanowires as a precursor. As doped, P doped, and As/P codoped ZnO nanowires were obtained in this method. X-ray diffraction shows that the zincblende ZnSe nanowires were converted to doped wurtzite ZnO nanowires. The incorporation of the dopants was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The doping concentration could be adjusted by changing the annealing temperature and duration. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the morphology of the ZnSe nanowires was essentially retained after the annealing and doping process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy also verified the incorporation of the dopants into the nanowires.

  5. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-04-13

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  6. Selective sodium sensing with gold-coated silicon nanowire field-effect transistors in a differential setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipf, Mathias; Stoop, Ralph L; Tarasov, Alexey; Bedner, Kristine; Fu, Wangyang; Wright, Iain A; Martin, Colin J; Constable, Edwin C; Calame, Michel; Schönenberger, Christian

    2013-07-23

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors based on silicon nanowires with high dielectric constant gate oxide layers (e.g., Al2O3 or HfO2) display hydroxyl groups which are known to be sensitive to pH variations but also to other ions present in the electrolyte at high concentration. This intrinsically nonselective sensitivity of the oxide surface greatly complicates the selective sensing of ionic species other than protons. Here, we modify individual nanowires with thin gold films as a novel approach to surface functionalization for the detection of specific analytes. We demonstrate sodium ion (Na(+)) sensing by a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiol-modified crown ethers in a differential measurement setup. A selective Na(+) response of ≈-44 mV per decade in a NaCl solution is achieved and tested in the presence of protons (H(+)), potassium (K(+)), and chloride (Cl(-)) ions, by measuring the difference between a nanowire with a gold surface functionalized by the SAM (active) and a nanowire with a bare gold surface (control). We find that the functional SAM does not affect the unspecific response of gold to pH and background ionic species. This represents a clear advantage of gold compared to oxide surfaces and makes it an ideal candidate for differential measurements.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of semiconductor nanowire networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyak, Oleksiy; Piryatinski, Andrei

    2016-03-01

    To examine the thermoelectric (TE) properties of a semiconductor nanowire (NW) network, we propose a theoretical approach mapping the TE network on a two-port network. In contrast to a conventional single-port (i.e., resistor) network model, our model allows for large scale calculations showing convergence of TE figure of merit, ZT, with an increasing number of junctions. Using this model, numerical simulations are performed for the Bi2Te3 branched nanowire (BNW) and Cayley tree NW (CTNW) network. We find that the phonon scattering at the network junctions plays a dominant role in enhancing the network ZT. Specifically, disordered BNW and CTNW demonstrate an order of magnitude higher ZT enhancement compared to their ordered counterparts. Formation of preferential TE pathways in CTNW makes the network effectively behave as its BNW counterpart. We provide formalism for simulating large scale nanowire networks hinged upon experimentally measurable TE parameters of a single T-junction.

  8. Andreev spin qubits in multichannel Rashba nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghun; Yeyati, A. Levy

    2017-09-01

    We theoretically analyze the Andreev bound states and their coupling to external radiation in superconductor-nanowire-superconductor Josephson junctions. We provide an effective Hamiltonian for the junction projected onto the Andreev level subspace and incorporating the effects of nanowire multichannel structure, Rashba spin-orbit coupling, and Zeeman field. Based on this effective model, we investigate the dependence of the Andreev levels and the matrix elements of the current operator on system parameters such as chemical potential, nanowire dimensions, and normal transmission. We show that the combined effect of the multichannel structure and the spin-orbit coupling gives rise to finite current matrix elements between odd-parity states having different spin polarizations. Moreover, our analytical results allow to determine the appropriate parameters range for the detection of transitions between even as well as odd states in circuit-QED-like experiments, which may provide a way for the Andreev spin-qubit manipulation.

  9. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-09

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling.

  10. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-11-10

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti {gamma} point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi{sub 2}-monolayer and the Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi{sub 2}/Si(111) and Er{sub 3}Si{sub 5}/Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the (vector)k {sub parallel} space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti {gamma} point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas

  11. Shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2007-02-20

    A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. The first edge of one base may be interengageable with the second edge of an adjacent base to be capable of resisting first and second disengaging forces oriented perpendicular to the edges and along planes oriented parallel to and perpendicular to the base. A deflector may be used to help reduce wind uplift forces.

  12. Heater assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.; Ueng, Tzoushin.

    1991-01-01

    An electrical resistance heater, installed in the H1 borehole, is used to thermally perturb the rock mass through a controlled heating and cooling cycle. Heater power levels are controlled by a Variac power transformer and are measured by wattmeters. Temperatures are measured by thermocouples on the borehole wall and on the heater assembly. Power and temperature values are recorded by the DAS described in Chapter 12. The heater assembly consists of a 3.55-m (11.6-ft) long by 20.3-cm (8-in.) O.D., Type 304 stainless steel pipe, containing a tubular hairpin heating element. The element has a heated length of 3 m (9.84 ft). The power rating of the element is 10 kW; however, we plan to operate the unit at a maximum power of only 3 kW. The heater is positioned with its midpoint directly below the axis of the P2 borehole, as shown in the borehole configuration diagram. This heater midpoint position corresponds to a distance of approximately 8.5 m (27.9 ft) from the H1 borehole collar. A schematic of the heater assembly in the borehole is shown. The distance from the borehole collar to the closest point on the assembly (the front end) is 6.5 m (21.3 ft). A high-temperature inflatable packer, used to seal the borehole for moisture collection, is positioned 50 cm (19.7 in.) ahead of the heater front end. The heater is supported and centralized within the borehole by two skids, fabricated from 25-mm (1-in.) O.D. stainless steel pipe. Thermocouples are installed at a number of locations in the H1 borehole. Four thermocouples that are attached to the heater skin monitor temperatures on the outer surface of the can, while three thermocouples that are held in place by rock sections monitor borehole wall temperatures beneath the heater. Temperatures are also monitored at the heater terminal and on the packer hardware

  13. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies the i...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...

  14. Design and Characterisation of III-V Semiconductor Nanowire Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Dhruv

    The development of small, power-efficient lasers underpins many of the technologies that we utilise today. Semiconductor nanowires are promising for miniaturising lasers to even smaller dimensions. III-V semiconductors, such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) and Indium Phosphide (InP), are the most widely used materials for optoelectronic devices and so the development of nanowire lasers based on these materials is expected to have technologically significant outcomes. This PhD dissertation presents a comprehensive study of the design of III-V semiconductor nanowire lasers, with bulk and quantum confined active regions. Based on the design, various III-V semiconductor nanowire lasers are demonstrated, namely, GaAs nanowire lasers, GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum well (MQW) nanowire lasers and InP nanowire lasers. These nanowire lasers are shown to operate at room temperature, have low thresholds, and lase from different transverse modes. The structural and optoelectronic quality of nanowire lasers are characterised via electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. Lasing is characterised in all these devices by optical pumping. The lasing characteristics are analysed by rate equation modelling and the lasing mode(s) in these devices is characterised by threshold gain modelling, polarisation measurements and Fourier plane imaging. Firstly, GaAs nanowire lasers that operate at room temperature are demonstrated. This is achieved by determining the optimal nanowire diameter to reduce threshold gain and by passivating nanowires to improve their quantum efficiency (QE). High-quality surface passivated GaAs nanowires of suitable diameters are grown. The growth procedure is tailored to improve both QE and structural uniformity of nanowires. Room-temperature lasing is demonstrated from individual nanowires and lasing is characterised to be from TM01 mode by threshold gain modelling. To lower threshold even further, nanowire lasers with GaAs/AlGaAs coaxial multi

  15. High Sensitivity deflection detection of nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanii, Babak; Ashby, Paul

    2009-10-28

    A critical limitation of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is the lack of a high-sensitivity position detection mechanism. We introduce a noninterferometric optical approach to determine the position of nanowires with a high sensitivity and bandwidth. Its physical origins and limitations are determined by Mie scattering analysis. This enables a dramatic miniaturization of detectable cantilevers, with attendant reductions to the fundamental minimum force noise in highly damping environments. We measure the force noise of an 81{+-}9??nm radius Ag{sub 2}Ga nanowire cantilever in water at 6{+-}3??fN/{radical}Hz.

  16. Nanowires and nanostructures fabrication using template methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Vlad, A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis...... of nanowires and nanostructures using nanoporous host materials such as supported anodic aluminum considering it as a key template for nanowires based devices. New ways are opened for applications by combining such template synthesis methods with nanolithographic techniques....

  17. Smooth Nanowire/Polymer Composite Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2011-04-29

    Smooth composite transparent electrodes are fabricated via lamination of silver nanowires into the polymer poly-(4,3-ethylene dioxythiophene): poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The surface roughness is dramatically reduced compared to bare nanowires. High-efficiency P3HT:PCBM organic photovoltaic cells can be fabricated using these composites, reproducing the performance of cells on indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass and improving the performance of cells on ITO on plastic. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. An optically guided microdevice comprising a nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a microdevice (100) for emitting electromagnetic radiation onto an associated object. Simultaneous non-contact spatial control over the microdevice in terms of translational movement in three dimensions, and rotational movement around at least two axes, preferably...... three axes, is possible. The microdevice further comprises a nanowire (150) being arranged for emitting electromagnetic radiation onto said associated object. This is advantageous for obtaining better spatial control of the microdevice comprising the nanowire, and this enables that light could more...

  19. Silicon nanowires for photovoltaic solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kui-Qing; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-01-11

    Semiconductor nanowires are attracting intense interest as a promising material for solar energy conversion for the new-generation photovoltaic (PV) technology. In particular, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are under active investigation for PV applications because they offer novel approaches for solar-to-electric energy conversion leading to high-efficiency devices via simple manufacturing. This article reviews the recent developments in the utilization of SiNWs for PV applications, the relationship between SiNW-based PV device structure and performance, and the challenges to obtaining high-performance cost-effective solar cells.

  20. Nanowire and microwire fabrication technique and product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Zach, Michael; Marten, Alan David

    2018-02-27

    A continuous or semi-continuous process for fabricating nanowires or microwires makes use of the substantially planar template that may be moved through electrochemical solution to grow nanowires or microwires on exposed conductive edges on the surface of that template. The planar template allows fabrication of the template using standard equipment and techniques. Adhesive transfer may be used to remove the wires from the template and in one embodiment to draw a continuous wire from the template to be wound around the drum.

  1. Titanium catalyzed silicon nanowires and nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. U. Usman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires, nanoplatelets, and other morphologies resulted from silicon growth catalyzed by thin titanium layers. The nanowires have diameters down to 5 nm and lengths to tens of micrometers. The two-dimensional platelets, in some instances with filigreed, snow flake-like shapes, had thicknesses down to the 10 nm scale and spans to several micrometers. These platelets grew in a narrow temperature range around 900 celsius, apparently representing a new silicon crystallite morphology at this length scale. We surmise that the platelets grow with a faceted dendritic mechanism known for larger crystals nucleated by titanium silicide catalyst islands.

  2. Plasmonic Waveguide-Integrated Nanowire Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bermudez-Urena, Esteban; Tutuncuoglu, Gozde; Cuerda, Javier

    2017-01-01

    technologies. Despite significant advances in their fundamental aspects, the integration within scalable photonic circuitry remains challenging. Here we report on the realization of hybrid photonic devices consisting of nanowire lasers integrated with wafer-scale lithographically designed V-groove plasmonic......Next-generation optoelectronic devices and photonic circuitry will have to incorporate on-chip compatible nanolaser sources. Semiconductor nanowire lasers have emerged as strong candidates for integrated systems with applications ranging from ultrasensitive sensing to data communication...... by a waveguide hybrid photonic-plasmonic mode. This work represents a major advance toward the realization of application-oriented photonic circuits with integrated nanolaser sources....

  3. Ab initio vibrations in nonequilibrium nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Engelund, Mads; Markussen, T

    2010-01-01

    We review recent results on electronic and thermal transport in two different quasi one-dimensional systems: Silicon nanowires (SiNW) and atomic gold chains. For SiNW's we compute the ballistic electronic and thermal transport properties on equal footing, allowing us to make quantitative predicti......We review recent results on electronic and thermal transport in two different quasi one-dimensional systems: Silicon nanowires (SiNW) and atomic gold chains. For SiNW's we compute the ballistic electronic and thermal transport properties on equal footing, allowing us to make quantitative...

  4. Enhanced magnetotransport in nanopatterned manganite nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Lorena; Morellón, Luis; Algarabel, Pedro A; Rodríguez, Luis A; Magén, César; De Teresa, José M; Ibarra, Manuel R

    2014-02-12

    We have combined optical and focused ion beam lithographies to produce large aspect-ratio (length-to-width >300) single-crystal nanowires of La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 that preserve their functional properties. Remarkably, an enhanced magnetoresistance value of 34% in an applied magnetic field of 0.1 T in the narrowest 150 nm nanowire is obtained. The strain release at the edges together with a destabilization of the insulating regions is proposed to account for this behavior. This opens new strategies to implement these structures in functional spintronic devices.

  5. Imaging Electrons in Ultra-thin Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Erin E.

    2011-12-01

    Ultra-thin semiconductor nanowires are promising systems in which to explore novel low-dimensional physics and are attractive candidates for future nanoelectronics. Ultra-thin nanowires with diameters of 20 to 30 nm are essentially one-dimensional (ID) for moderate electron number, because only one radial subband is occupied. Low-temperature scanning gate microscopy is especially well suited for improving our understanding of nanowires in order to optimize the construction of nanowire systems. We use a home-built liquid-He cooled scanning gate microscope (SGM) to probe and manipulate electrons beneath the surface of devices. The SGM's conductance images are obtained by scanning the charged SGM tip above the sample and recording the change in conductance through the device as a function of tip position. We present simulations of extracting the amplitude of the 1D electron wavefunction along the length of the quantum dot in an ultra-thin InAs/InP heterostructure nanowire (diameter = 30 nm) using a SGM. A weakly perturbing SGM tip slightly dents the electron wavefunction inside the quantum dot, and we propose measuring the change in energy of the dot due to the perturbation as a function of tip position. By measuring the change in energy of the dot and by knowing the form of the tip potential, the amplitude of the wavefunction can be found. This extraction technique could serve as a powerful tool to improve our understanding of electron behavior in quasi-1 D systems. We have used our SGM to image the conductance through an ultra-thin (diameter ˜ 30 nm) 1nAs nanowire with two InP barriers. Our imaging technique provides detailed information regarding the position and flow of electrons in the nanowire. We demonstrate that the charged SPM tip's position or voltage can be used to control the number of electrons on the quantum dots. We spatially locate three quantum dots in series along the length of the ultra-thin nanowire. Using energy level spectroscopy and the

  6. Nanowire-functionalized cotton textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovskyi, Maksym; Sanchez-Botero, Lina; McDonald, Matthew P; Hinestroza, Juan; Kuno, Masaru

    2014-02-26

    We show the general functionalization of cotton fabrics using solution-synthesized CdSe and CdTe nanowires (NWs). Conformal coatings onto individual cotton fibers have been achieved through various physical and chemical approaches. Some involve the electrostatic attraction of NWs to cotton charged positively with a Van de Graaff generator or via 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride treatments. Resulting NW-functionalized textiles consist of dense, conformal coatings and have been characterized for their UV-visible absorption as well as Raman activity. We demonstrate potential uses of these functionalized textiles through two proof-of-concept applications. The first entails barcoding cotton using the unique Raman signature of the NWs. We also demonstrate the surface-enhancement of their Raman signatures using codeposited Au. A second demonstration takes advantage of the photoconductive nature of semiconductor NWs to create cotton-based photodetectors. Apart from these illustrations, NW-functionalized cotton textiles may possess other uses in the realm of medical, anticounterfeiting, and photocatalytic applications.

  7. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Polat Genlik, Sevim; Emrah Unalan, Husnu

    2016-10-01

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm-2. Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs.

  8. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-07

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence.

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  10. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  11. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  12. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  13. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  14. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1993-01-01

    Among fuel pellets to be loaded to fuel cans of a fuel assembly, fuel pellets having a small thermal power are charged in a region from the end of each of spacers up to about 50mm on the upstream of coolants that flow vertically at the periphery of fuel rods. Coolants at the periphery of fuel rods are heated by the heat generation, to result in voids. However, since cooling effect on the upstream of the spacers is low due to influences of the spacers. Further, since the fuel pellets disposed in the upstream region have small thermal power, a void coefficient is not increased. Even if a thermal power exceeding cooling performance should be generated, there is no worry of causing burnout in the upstream region. Even if burnout should be caused, safety margin and reliability relative to burnout are improved, to increase an allowable thermal power, thereby enabling to improve integrity and reliability of fuel rods and fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  15. Synthesis of uniform CdS nanowires in high yield and its single nanowire electrical property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shancheng; Sun Litao; Qu Peng; Huang Ninping; Song Yinchen; Xiao Zhongdang

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale high quality CdS nanowires with uniform diameter were synthesized by using a rapid and simple solvothermal route. Field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the CdS nanowires have diameter of about 26 nm and length up to several micrometres. High resolution TEM (HRTEM) study indicates the single-crystalline nature of CdS nanowires with an oriented growth along the c-axis direction. The optical properties of the products were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectra, photoluminescence spectra and Raman spectra. The resistivity, electron concentration and electron mobility of single NW are calculated by fitting the symmetric I-V curves measured on single NW by the metal-semiconductor-metal model based on thermionic field emission theory. - Graphical abstract: Large-scale high quality CdS nanowires (NWs) with uniform diameter were synthesized by using a rapid and simple solvothermal route. The reaction time is reduced to 2 h, comparing to other synthesis which needed long reaction time up to 12 h. In addition, the as-prepared CdS nanowires have more uniform diameter and high yield. More importantly, the I-V curve of present single CdS nanowire has a good symmetric characteristic as expected by the theory.

  16. Controlled Synthesis of Uniform Silver Nanowires via a Simple Polyol Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiyang; Wang, Qingguo; Qu, Zhaoming

    2018-01-01

    Uniform silver nanowires were synthesized via a simple polyol process. Different aspect ratio of silver nanowires was obtained by regulating the concentration of ferric chloride and polyvinyl pyrrolidone, the maximum aspect ratio of synthesized silver nanowires is 570. The silver nanowires film with the aspect ratio of 240 was prepared and its conductivity was measured by four probe method. Controlled synthesis of uniform silver nanowires is crucial, silver nanowires will be the most promising material in the optical, electrical and photonic fields.

  17. Inquisition of Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis nanowires: characterization and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sure, Sandeep; Torriero, Angel A J; Gaur, Aditya; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Ackland, M Leigh; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-11-01

    Identification of extracellular conductive pilus-like structures (PLS) i.e. microbial nanowires has spurred great interest among scientists due to their potential applications in the fields of biogeochemistry, bioelectronics, bioremediation etc. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we identified microbial nanowires in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 which is an aerobic, photosynthetic microorganism. We also confirmed the earlier finding that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 produces microbial nanowires. In contrast to the use of highly instrumented continuous flow reactors for Synechocystis reported earlier, we identified simple and optimum culture conditions which allow increased production of nanowires in both test cyanobacteria. Production of these nanowires in Synechocystis and Microcystis were found to be sensitive to the availability of carbon source and light intensity. These structures seem to be proteinaceous in nature and their diameter was found to be 4.5-7 and 8.5-11 nm in Synechocystis and M. aeruginosa, respectively. Characterization of Synechocystis nanowires by transmission electron microscopy and biochemical techniques confirmed that they are type IV pili (TFP) while nanowires in M. aeruginosa were found to be similar to an unnamed protein (GenBank : CAO90693.1). Modelling studies of the Synechocystis TFP subunit i.e. PilA1 indicated that strategically placed aromatic amino acids may be involved in electron transfer through these nanowires. This study identifies PLS from Microcystis which can act as nanowires and supports the earlier hypothesis that microbial nanowires are widespread in nature and play diverse roles.

  18. Self-assembly of gibberellic amide assemblies and their applications in the growth and fabrication of ordered gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoak, Evan M; Carlo, Andrew D; Fowles, Catherine C; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2010-01-01

    Gibberellins are a group of naturally occurring diterpenoid based phytohormones that play a vital role in plant growth and development. In this work, we have studied the self-assembly of gibberellic acid, a phytohormone, which belongs to the family of gibberellins, and designed amide derivatives of gibberellic acid (GA 3 ) for the facile, green synthesis of gold nanoparticles. It was found that the derivatives self-assembled into nanofibers and nanoribbons in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Further, upon incubation with tetrachloroaurate, the self-assembled GA 3 -amide derivatives efficiently nucleated and formed gold nanoparticles when heated to 60 deg. C. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that uniform coatings of gold nanoparticles in the 10-20 nm range were obtained at low pH on the nanowire surfaces without the assistance of additional reducing agents. This simple method for the development of morphology controlled gold nanoparticles using a plant hormone derivative opens doors for a new class of plant biomaterials which can efficiently yield gold nanoparticles in an environmentally friendly manner. The gold encrusted nanowires formed using biomimetic methods may lead on to the formation of conductive nanowires, which may be useful for a wide range of applications such as in optoelectronics and sensors. Further, the spontaneous formation of highly organized nanostructures obtained from plant phytohormone derivatives such as gibberellic acid is of particular interest as it might help in further understanding the supramolecular assembly mechanism of more highly organized biological structures.

  19. Emerging methanol-tolerant AlN nanowire oxygen reduction electrocatalyst for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, M; Wang, J; Li, J R; Wang, Y G; Tang, H L; Wang, W J

    2014-08-11

    Replacing precious and nondurable Pt catalysts with cheap materials is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cells. In the case of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), the methanol tolerance is also an important concern. Here, we develop AlN nanowires with diameters of about 100-150 nm and the length up to 1 mm through crystal growth method. We find it is electrochemically stable in methanol-contained alkaline electrolyte. This novel material exhibits pronounced electrocatalytic activity with exchange current density of about 6.52 × 10(-8) A/cm(2). The single cell assembled with AlN nanowire cathodic electrode achieves a power density of 18.9 mW cm(-2). After being maintained at 100 mA cm(-2) for 48 h, the AlN nanowire-based single cell keeps 92.1% of the initial performance, which is in comparison with 54.5% for that assembled with Pt/C cathode. This discovery reveals a new type of metal nitride ORR catalyst that can be cheaply produced from crystal growth method.

  20. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2 and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm-2, which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications.Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2

  1. Superconducting InSb nanowire devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szombati, D.B.

    2017-01-01

    Josephson junctions form a two-level system which is used as a building block for many types of superconducting qubits. Junctions fabricated from semiconducting nanowires are gate-tunable and offer electrostatically adjustable Josephson energy, highly desirable in qubit architecture. Studying

  2. Broadband Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Pu, Minhao; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    The fast non-linearity of silicon allows Tbit/s optical signal processing. By choosing suitable dimensions of silicon nanowires their dispersion can be tailored to ensure a high nonlinearity at power levels low enough to avoid significant two-photon abso We have fabricated low insertion...

  3. Visualizing hybridized quantum plasmons in coupled nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Jensen, Kristian Lund; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2013-01-01

    We present full quantum-mechanical calculations of the hybridized plasmon modes of two nanowires at small separation, providing real-space visualization of the modes in the transition from the classical to the quantum tunneling regime. The plasmon modes are obtained as certain eigenfunctions of t...

  4. Thermoelectric efficiency of nanowires in contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akguc, Gursoy B.

    2018-02-01

    Divergence of density of state near Fermi level at low dimensional systems helps to increase efficiency of thermoelectric materials. It is shown here two contacting nanowires in the middle results in electron conduction resonances that enhance the efficiency of overall thermoelectric output of the system. A non-linear response approach as well as efficiency at max power are necessary ingredients for the analysis.

  5. Quantum Dots in Vertical Nanowire Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Weert, M.

    2010-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is aimed at constructing a quantum interface between a single electron spin and a photon, using a nanowire quantum dot. Such a quantum interface enables information transfer from a local electron spin to the polarization of a photon for long distance readout.

  6. Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Chemical Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing‿, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A

  7. Synthesis and characterization of silver molybdate nanowires ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Silver molybdate nanowires, nanorods and multipods like structures have been prepared by an organic free hydrothermal process using ammonium molybdate and silver nitrate solutions. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns reveal that the silver molybdate belongs to anorthic structure. The thickness,.

  8. Printing nanotube/nanowire for flexible microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Printing has become an emerging manufacturing technology for mechanics, electronics, and consumer products. Additionally, both nanotubes and nanowires have recently been used as materials for sensors and electrodes due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. Printed electrodes and conductive traces particularly offer versatility of fabricating low-cost, disposable, and flexible electrical devices and microsystems. While various printing methods such as screen printing have been conventional methods for printing conductive traces and electrodes, inkjet printing has recently attracted great attention due to its unique advantages including no template requirement, rapid printing at low cost, on-demand printing capability, and precise control of the printed material. Computer generated conductive traces or electrode patterns can simply be printed on a thin film substrate with proper conductive ink consisting of nanotubes or nanowires. However, in order to develop nanotube or nanowire ink, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed. The most difficult obstacle to overcome is that of nanotube/nanowire dispersion within a solution. Other challenges include adjusting surface tension and controlling viscosity of the ink as well as treating the surface of the printing substrate. In an attempt to pave the way for nanomaterial inkjet printing, we present a method for preparing carbon nanotube ink as well as its printing technique. A fully printed electrochemical sensor using inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes is also demonstrated as an example of the possibilities for this technology.

  9. Krypton ion implantation effect on selenium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Suresh; Chauhan, R. P.

    2017-08-01

    Among the rapidly progressing interdisciplinary areas of physics, chemistry, material science etc. ion induced modifications of materials is one such evolving field. It has been realized in recent years that a material, in the form of an accelerated ion beam, embedded into a target specimen offers a most productive tool for transforming its properties in a controlled manner. In semiconductors particularly, where the transport behavior is determined by very small concentrations of certain impurities, implantation of ions may bring considerable changes. The present work is based on the study of the effect of krypton ion implantation on selenium nanowires. Selenium nanowires of diameter 80 nm were synthesized by template assisted electro deposition technique. Implantation of krypton ions was done at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. The effect of implantation on structural, electrical and optical properties of selenium nanowires was investigated. XRD analysis of pristine and implanted nanowires shows no shifting in the peak position but there is a variation in the relative intensity with fluence. UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the decrease in the optical band gap with fluence. PL spectra showed emission peak at higher wavelength. A substantial rise in the current was observed from I-V measurements, after implantation and with the increase in fluence. The increase in current conduction may be due to the increase in the current carriers.

  10. Zigzag-shaped nickel nanowires via organometallic template-free route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shviro, Meital; Paszternak, Andras [Bar Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), Bar Ilan University, Department of Chemistry (Israel); Chelly, Avraham [Bar Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), Bar Ilan University, Department of Engineering (Israel); Zitoun, David, E-mail: david.zitoun@biu.ac.il [Bar Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), Bar Ilan University, Department of Chemistry (Israel)

    2013-08-15

    In this manuscript, the formation of nickel nanowires of 10-20 nm in diameter (average size: several tens to hundreds of {mu}m long and 1.0-1.5 {mu}m wide) at low temperature is found to be driven by dewetting of liquid organometallic precursors during spin-coating process and by self-assembly of Ni clusters. Elaboration of metallic thin films by low-temperature deposition technique makes the preparation process compatible with most of the substrates. The use of iron and cobalt precursor shows that the process could be extended to other metallic systems. In this work, AFM and SEM are used to follow the assembly of Ni clusters into straight or zigzag lines. The formation of zigzag structure is specific to the Ni precursor at appropriate preparation parameters. This template-free process allows a control of anisotropic structures with homogeneous sizes and angles on the standard Si/SiO{sub 2} surface.

  11. Self-limited plasmonic welding of silver nanowire junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2012-02-05

    Nanoscience provides many strategies to construct high-performance materials and devices, including solar cells, thermoelectrics, sensors, transistors, and transparent electrodes. Bottom-up fabrication facilitates large-scale chemical synthesis without the need for patterning and etching processes that waste material and create surface defects. However, assembly and contacting procedures still require further development. Here, we demonstrate a light-induced plasmonic nanowelding technique to assemble metallic nanowires into large interconnected networks. The small gaps that form naturally at nanowire junctions enable effective light concentration and heating at the point where the wires need to be joined together. The extreme sensitivity of the heating efficiency on the junction geometry causes the welding process to self-limit when a physical connection between the wires is made. The localized nature of the heating prevents damage to low-thermal-budget substrates such as plastics and polymer solar cells. This work opens new avenues to control light, heat and mass transport at the nanoscale. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. Strategies for specifically directing metal functionalization of protein nanotubes: constructing protein coated silver nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Ascencio, Jorge A; Medina, Ariosto; Aguila, Sergio; Palomares, Laura A; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2013-06-14

    Biological molecules that self-assemble in the nanoscale range are useful multifunctional materials. Rotavirus VP6 protein self-assembles into tubular structures in the absence of other rotavirus proteins. Here, we present strategies for selectively directing metal functionalization to the lumen of VP6 nanotubes. The specific in situ metal reduction in the inner surface of nanotube walls was achieved by the simple modification of a method previously reported to functionalize the nanotube outer surface. Silver nanorods and nanowires as long as 1.5 μm were formed inside the nanotubes by coalescence of nanoparticles. Such one-dimensional structures were longer than others previously obtained using bioscaffolds. The interactions between silver ions and the nanotube were simulated to understand the conditions that allowed nanowire formation. Molecular docking showed that a naturally occurring arrangement of aspartate residues enabled the stabilization of silver ions on the internal surface of the VP6 nanotubes. This is the first time that such a spatial arrangement has been proposed for the nucleation of silver nanoparticles, opening the possibility of using such an array to direct functionalization of other biomolecules. These results demonstrate the natural capabilities of VP6 nanotubes to function as a versatile biotemplate for nanomaterials.

  13. Aligned hierarchical Ag/ZnO nano-heterostructure arrays via electrohydrodynamic nanowire template for enhanced gas-sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhouping; Wang, Xiaomei; Sun, Fazhe; Tong, Xiaohu; Zhu, Chen; Lv, Qiying; Ye, Dong; Wang, Shuai; Luo, Wei; Huang, YongAn

    2017-09-22

    Gas sensing performance can be improved significantly by the increase in both the effective gas exposure area and the surface reactivitiy of ZnO nanorods. Here, we propose aligned hierarchical Ag/ZnO nano-heterostructure arrays (h-Ag/ZnO-NAs) via electrohydrodynamic nanowire template, together with a subsequent hydrothermal synthesis and photoreduction reaction. The h-Ag/ZnO-NAs scatter at top for higher specific surface areas with the air, simultaneously contact at root for the electrical conduction. Besides, the ZnO nanorods are uniformly coated with dispersed Ag nanoparticles, resulting in a tremendous enhancement of the surface reactivity. Compared with pure ZnO, such h-Ag/ZnO-NAs exhibit lower electrical resistance and faster responses. Moreover, they demonstrate enhanced NO 2 gas sensing properties. Self-assembly via electrohydrodynamic nanowire template paves a new way for the preparation of high performance gas sensors.

  14. Conductance enhancement of InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires by surface functionalization with oligo(phenylene vinylene)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukfeh, Muhammed Ihab; Storm, Kristian; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Søndergaard, Roar R; Szwajca, Anna; Hansen, Allan; Hinze, Peter; Weimann, Thomas; Svensson, Sofia Fahlvik; Bora, Achyut; Dick, Kimberly A; Thelander, Claes; Krebs, Frederik C; Lugli, Paolo; Samuelson, Lars; Tornow, Marc

    2013-05-28

    We have investigated the electronic transport through 3 μm long, 45 nm diameter InAs nanowires comprising a 5 nm long InP segment as electronic barrier. After assembly of 12 nm long oligo(phenylene vinylene) derivative molecules onto these InAs/InP nanowires, we observed a pronounced, nonlinear I-V characteristic with significantly increased currents of up to 1 μA at 1 V bias, for a back-gate voltage of 3 V. As supported by our model calculations based on a nonequilibrium Green Function approach, we attribute this effect to charge transport through those surface-bound molecules, which electrically bridge both InAs regions across the embedded InP barrier.

  15. Fabricating fast triggered electro-active shape memory graphite/silver nanowires/epoxy resin composite from polymer template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Li, Hua; Tian, Ran; Dugnani, Roberto; Lu, Huiyuan; Chen, Yujie; Guo, Yiping; Duan, Huanan; Liu, Hezhou

    2017-07-17

    In recent years shape-memory polymers have been under intense investigation due to their unique mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties that could potentially make them extremely valuable in numerous engineering applications. In this manuscript, we report a polymer-template-assisted assembly manufacturing strategy used to fabricate graphite/silver nanowires/epoxy resin (PGSE) composite. In the proposed method, the porous polymer foams work as the skeleton by forming three-dimensional graphite structure, whereas the silver nanowires act as the continuous conductive network. Preliminary testing on hybrid foams after vacuum infusion showed high electrical conductivity and excellent thermal stability. Furthermore, the composites were found to recover their original shape within 60 seconds from the application of a 0.8 V mm -1 electric field. Notably, the reported shape-memory polymer composites are manufactured with readily-available raw materials, they are fast to manufacture, and are shape-controlled.

  16. Electroless Fabrication of Cobalt Alloys Nanowires within Alumina Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Dadvand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of nanowire fabrication based on electroless deposition process is described. The method is novel compared to the current electroless procedure used in making nanowires as it involves growing nanowires from the bottom up. The length of the nanowires was controlled at will simply by adjusting the deposition time. The nanowires were fabricated within the nanopores of an alumina template. It was accomplished by coating one side of the template by a thin layer of palladium in order to activate the electroless deposition within the nanopores from bottom up. However, prior to electroless deposition process, the template was pretreated with a suitable wetting agent in order to facilitate the penetration of the plating solution through the pores. As well, the electroless deposition process combined with oblique metal evaporation process within a prestructured silicon wafer was used in order to fabricate long nanowires along one side of the grooves within the wafer.

  17. Theory of second-harmonic generation in silica nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of second-harmonic generation based on surface dipole and bulk multipole nonlinearities in silica nanowires is investigated numerically. Both circular and microstructured nanowires are considered. Phase matching is provided by propagating the pump field in the fundamental mode......, while generating the second harmonic in one of the modes of the LP11 multiplet. This is shown to work in both circular and microstructured nanowires, although only one of the LP11 modes can be phase-matched in the microstructure. The prospect of obtaining large conversion efficiencies in silica......-based nanowires is critically discussed, based on simulations of second-harmonic generation in nanowires with a fluctuating phase-matching wavelength. It is concluded that efficient wavelength conversion will either require strong improvements in the nanowire uniformity, or an increase of the second...

  18. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suib, Steven Lawrence [Storrs, CT; Yuan, Jikang [Storrs, CT

    2008-10-21

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves, and methods of making, are disclosed. A single crystal ultra-long nanowire includes an ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieve, and has an average length greater than about 10 micrometers and an average diameter of about 5 nanometers to about 100 nanometers. A film comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is stacked on a surface of a substrate, wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned. A free standing membrane comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is aggregately stacked, and wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned.

  19. Shape Evolution of Highly Lattice-Mismatched InN/InGaN Nanowire Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lifan; Hazari, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Millunchick, Joanna M.

    2018-02-01

    We have investigated the structure and shape of GaN-based nanowires grown on (001) Si substrates for optoelectronic device applications. The nanowire heterostructures contained InN disks and In0.4Ga0.6N barrier layers in the active region. The resulting nanowire array comprised two differently shaped nanowires: shorter pencil-like nanowires and longer bead-like nanowires. The two different nanowire shapes evolve due to a variation in the In incorporation rate, which was faster for the bead-like nanowires. Both types of nanowires exhibited evidence of significant migration of both Ga and In during growth. Ga tended to diffuse away and down along the sidewalls, resulting in a Ga-rich shell for all nanowires. Despite the complex structure and great variability in the In composition, the optical properties of the nanowire arrays were very good, with strong luminescence peaking at ˜ 1.63 μm.

  20. Analysis of Critical Dimensions for Nanowire Core-Multishell Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xin; Fan, Shuyu; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    Critical dimensions for nanowire core-multishell heterostructures are analyzed by using finite-element method based on the energy equilibrium criteria. Results show that the nanowire core-shell heterostructure can sufficiently reduce the strain in the shell and increase the critical shell thickness. The critical dimensions for the nanowire core-multishell heterostructure are determined by the stress fields generated at two heterointerfaces. For thin barrier, the critical dimensions decrease a...

  1. Smart Core-Shell Nanowire Architectures for Multifunctional Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-16

    in Orlando, FL USA. “Electronic landscapes near semiconductor nanowire heterostructures ”, Department of Chemistry, Washington University of...Core-Shell Nanowire Architectures for Multifunctional Nanoscale Devices W911NF-08-1-0067 611103 Jonathan E Spanier Drexel University Office of...Hadas Shtrikman, Patrick Kung, Tsachi Livneh, Jonathan E. Spanier. Direct Measurement of Band Edge Discontinuity in Individual Core–Shell Nanowires by

  2. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  3. Photoconductivity of Germanium Nanowire Arrays Incorporated in Anodic Aluminum Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, B; Prikulis, J; Grigorjeva, L; Millers, D; Daly, B; Holmes, J D; Erts, D

    2007-01-01

    Photoconductivity of germanium nanowire arrays of 50 and 100 nm diameter incorporated into Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) membranes illuminated with visible light is investigated. Photocurrent response to excitation radiation with time constants faster than 10 -4 s were governed by absorption of incident light by nanowires, while photokinetics with time constants of the order of 10 -3 s originates from the photoluminescence of the AAO matrix. Possible applications of nanowire arrays inside AAO as photoresistors are discussed

  4. Conducting Polyaniline Nanowire and Its Applications in Chemiresistive Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Edward; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    One dimensional polyaniline nanowire is an electrically conducting polymer that can be used as an active layer for sensors whose conductivity change can be used to detect chemical or biological species. In this review, the basic properties of polyaniline nanowires including chemical structures, redox chemistry, and method of synthesis are discussed. A comprehensive literature survey on chemiresistive/conductometric sensors based on polyaniline nanowires is presented and recent developments in...

  5. Solution-Grown Silver Nanowire Ordered Arrays as Transparent Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacca, Beniamino; van de Groep, Jorik; Polman, Albert; Garnett, Erik C

    2016-02-03

    A transparent conducting film composed of regular networks of silver nanowires is obtained by combining a soft solution process (Tollens' reaction) and nanoimprint lithography. The solution-grown nanowire networks show a threefold higher conductivity than grids obtained by metal evaporation. This is due to the larger grain size in the solution-grown nanowires, which results in a strong reduction of electron scattering by grain boundaries. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Yasunori; Ishii, Yoshihiko; Sadaoka, Noriyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Burnable poisons are disposed in the lower portions of a water rod, a channel box and a control rod guide pipe in a fuel assembly, and the amount for each of them is set to burn out in one operation cycle. Since the inner side of the water rod and the control rod guide pipe and gaps are filled with steams at the initial and the intermediate stages of the operation cycle, moderation of neutrons is delayed to harden the spectrum. On the other hand, since the burnable poisons are burnt out in the final stage of the operation cycle, γ-ray heating is not expected and since the insides of the water rod and the control rod guide pipe and the gaps are filled with water of great moderation effect, the neutron spectrum arae softened. In view of the above, void coefficient is increased to promote conversion from U-235 to Pu-239 by utilizing exothermic reaction of burnable poisons at the initial and the intermediate stages in the operation cycle and generation of voids are eliminated at the final stage where the burnable poisons are burnt out, thereby enabling effective burning of Pu-239. (N.H.)

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Bessho, Yasunori; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor in which a water rod of a large diameter is disposed at the central portion, the cross sectional area perpendicular to the axial direction comprises a region a of a fuel rod group facing to a wide gap water region to which a control rod is inserted, a region b of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the wide gap water region other than the region a, a region d of a fuel rod group facing to a narrow gap water region and a region c of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the narrow gap water region other than the region d. When comparing an amount of fission products contained in the four regions relative to that in the entire regions and average enrichment degrees of fuel rods for the four regions, the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group of the region a is minimized, and the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group in the region b is maximized. Then, reactor shut down margin during cold operation can be improved while flattening the power in the cross section perpendicular to the axial direction. (N.H.)

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of InAs Based Nanowires & Electronic Characterization of Heterostructure InAs/GaInAs Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanta, Rawa

    The work presented in this thesis represents two main topics. The first one, which covers a bigger volume of the thesis, is mainly about Raman spectroscopy on individual InAs based nanowires. The second part presents electronic characterization of heterostructure InAs/GaInAs nanowires. Raman...... modes. In the last chapter of this thesis we present a study on electrical characterization of InAs/GaInAs heterostructure nanowires. First, we performed selective etching experiments in order to locate the barriers. Second, the barriers were probed electrically by performing thermally activated...... spectroscopy measurements on InAs based nanowires include several topics. Firstly, we use polarized Raman spectroscopy for determining the crystal orientation of the nanowires based on conventional Raman selection rules. We studied the effect of the high power laser irradiation on the nanowire, and its...

  10. Electronic homogeneity of nanowire heterostructure Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcu, Camelia; May, Brelon J.; Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Myers, Roberto C.

    In addition to low defect densities and great tunability bandgap within a single heterostructure, the possibility of growing (Al, In,_) GaN nanowire heterostructure LEDs on different substrates while maintaining their high electronic and optical properties makes them very attractive. We investigated the electronic homogeneity of the (Al, In,_) GaN nanowire ensemble by acquiring current maps at certain applied biases using conductive AFM. By taken IVs on individual nanowires, we found that different wires have different turn on voltages and that some of the nanowires degrade due to the applied bias.

  11. Robust Epitaxial Al Coating of Reclined InAs Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Hyun; Grivnin, Anna; Bor, Ella; Reiner, Jonathan; Avraham, Nurit; Ronen, Yuval; Cohen, Yonatan; Kacman, Perla; Shtrikman, Hadas; Beidenkopf, Haim

    2017-12-13

    It was recently shown that in situ epitaxial aluminum coating of indium arsenide nanowires is possible and yields superior properties relative to ex-situ evaporation of aluminum ( Nat. Mater. 2015 , 14 , 400 - 406 ). We demonstrate a robust and adaptive epitaxial growth protocol satisfying the need for producing an intimate contact between the aluminum superconductor and the indium arsenide nanowire. We show that the (001) indium arsenide substrate allows successful aluminum side-coating of reclined indium arsenide nanowires that emerge from (111)B microfacets. A robust, induced hard superconducting gap in the obtained indium arsenide/aluminum core/partial shell nanowires is clearly demonstrated. We compare epitaxial side-coating of round and hexagonal cross-section nanowires and find the surface roughness of the round nanowires to induce a more uniform aluminum profile. Consequently, the extended aluminum grains result in increased strain at the interface with the indium arsenide nanowire, which is found to induce dislocations penetrating into round nanowires only. A unique feature of proposed growth protocol is that it supports in situ epitaxial deposition of aluminum on all three arms of indium arsenide nanowire intersections in a single growth step. Such aluminum coated intersections play a key role in engineering topologically superconducting networks required for Majorana based quantum computation schemes.

  12. Permanent bending and alignment of ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borschel, Christian; Spindler, Susann; Oertel, Michael; Ronning, Carsten [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Lerose, Damiana [MPI fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Institut fuer Photonische Technologien, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Bochmann, Arne [Institut fuer Photonische Technologien, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Christiansen, Silke H. [Institut fuer Photonische Technologien, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); MPI fuer die Physik des Lichts, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Nietzsche, Sandor [Zentrum fuer Elektronenmikroskopie, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Ziegelmuehlenweg 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Ion beams can be used to bend or re-align nanowires permanently, after they have been grown. We have irradiated ZnO nanowires with ions of different species and energy, achieving bending and alignment in various directions. We study the bending of single nanowires as well as the simultaneous alignment of large ensembles of ZnO nanowires in detail. Computer simulations show that the bending is initiated by ion beam induced damage. Dislocations are identified to relax stresses and make the bending and alignment permanent and resistant against annealing procedures.

  13. Permanent bending and alignment of ZnO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschel, Christian; Spindler, Susann; Lerose, Damiana; Bochmann, Arne; Christiansen, Silke H; Nietzsche, Sandor; Oertel, Michael; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-05-06

    Ion beams can be used to permanently bend and re-align nanowires after growth. We have irradiated ZnO nanowires with energetic ions, achieving bending and alignment in different directions. Not only the bending of single nanowires is studied in detail, but also the simultaneous alignment of large ensembles of ZnO nanowires. Computer simulations reveal how the bending is initiated by ion beam induced damage. Detailed structural characterization identifies dislocations to relax stresses and make the bending and alignment permanent, even surviving annealing procedures.

  14. Synthesis of Single Crystal GaN Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lining Fang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The straight and curved gallium nitride (GaN nanowires were successfully synthesized by controlling the gallium/ nitrogen reactant ratio via a chemical vapour deposition method. The structure and morphology of nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The straight and curved GaN nanowires are composed of wurtzite and a zinc blende structure, respectively. Photoluminescence (PL spectra of zinc blende GaN nanowires showed a strong UV emission band at 400 nm, indicating potential application in optoe‐ lectronic devices.

  15. 1D-transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michotte, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Piraux, L.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires grown by an electrodeposition technique, embedded in a nanoporous track-etched polymer membrane. The nanowires are granular, have uniform diameter of ̃40 nm and a very large aspect ratio (̃500). The diameter of the nan......We report on the transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires grown by an electrodeposition technique, embedded in a nanoporous track-etched polymer membrane. The nanowires are granular, have uniform diameter of ̃40 nm and a very large aspect ratio (̃500). The diameter...

  16. Carrier gas effects on aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Yue; Hainey, Mel Jr; Won, Dongjin; Weng, Xiaojun; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Redwing, Joan M

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowire growth under low-pressure chemical vapor deposition conditions requires higher reactor pressures than gold-catalyzed growth, but the reasons for this difference are not well understood. In this study, the effects of reactor pressure and hydrogen partial pressure on silicon nanowire growth using an aluminum catalyst were studied by growing nanowires in hydrogen and hydrogen/nitrogen carrier gas mixtures at different total reactor pressures. Nanowires grown in the nitrogen/hydrogen mixture have faceted catalyst droplet tips, minimal evidence of aluminum diffusion from the tip down the nanowire sidewalls, and significant vapor–solid deposition of silicon on the sidewalls. In comparison, wires grown in pure hydrogen show less well-defined tips, evidence of aluminum diffusion down the nanowire sidewalls at increasing reactor pressures and reduced vapor–solid deposition of silicon on the sidewalls. The results are explained in terms of a model wherein the hydrogen partial pressure plays a critical role in aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth by controlling hydrogen termination of the silicon nanowire sidewalls. For a given reactor pressure, increased hydrogen partial pressures increase the extent of hydrogen termination of the sidewalls which suppresses SiH 4 adsorption thereby reducing vapor–solid deposition of silicon but increases the surface diffusion length of aluminum. Conversely, lower hydrogen partial pressures reduce the hydrogen termination and also increase the extent of SiH 4 gas phase decomposition, shifting the nanowire growth window to lower growth temperatures and silane partial pressures. (paper)

  17. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories, Professor Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-06-14

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires.

  18. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M

    2006-01-01

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires

  19. Enhanced photothermal conversion in vertically oriented gallium arsenide nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Jaspreet; Dhindsa, Navneet; Flannery, Jeremy; Khodabad, Iman; Forrest, James; LaPierre, Ray; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2014-10-08

    The photothermal properties of vertically etched gallium arsenide nanowire arrays are examined using Raman spectroscopy. The nanowires are arranged in square lattices with a constant pitch of 400 nm and diameters ranging from 50 to 155 nm. The arrays were illuminated using a 532 nm laser with an incident energy density of 10 W/mm(2). Nanowire temperatures were highly dependent on the nanowire diameter and were determined by measuring the spectral red-shift for both TO and LO phonons. The highest temperatures were observed for 95 nm diameter nanowires, whose top facets and sidewalls heated up to 600 and 440 K, respectively, and decreased significantly for the smaller or larger diameters studied. The diameter-dependent heating is explained by resonant coupling of the incident laser light into optical modes of the nanowires, resulting in increased absorption. Photothermal activity in a given nanowire diameter can be optimized by proper wavelength selection, as confirmed using computer simulations. This demonstrates that the photothermal properties of GaAs nanowires can be enhanced and tuned by using a photonic lattice structure and that smaller nanowire diameters are not necessarily better to achieve efficient photothermal conversion. The diameter and wavelength dependence of the optical coupling could allow for localized temperature gradients by creating arrays which consist of different diameters.

  20. Nanofabrication of structures for the study of nanowire doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichfeld, Chad

    A variety of techniques were developed for the characterization of nanowires and applied to the study of nanowire growth and dopant incorporation. A technique to selectively plate gold on the n-type regions of modulation-doped silicon nanowires for junction delineation was developed. The ability to electrolessly deposit metal on segments of nanowires could also facilitate electrical contact formation. More complicated structures such as controlled placement of forks along the nanowire could be made by placement of the gold catalyst at predetermined locations along a nanowire followed by a second growth. Additionally, a process was developed that focuses on using this plating ability to grow silicon nanowires horizontally from pre-determined locations. The processing was worked out and nanowires were grown horizontally from plated gold, but the selectivity of gold limited the ability to grow wires in only the desired locations. A silicon nanowire local electrode atom probe test structure is discussed from the initial design steps to successfully using the test structure to analyze silicon nanowires. Initial results using laser pulsed assisted local electrode atom probe indicated that the thermal properties of the nanowire prevent the tip from cooling fast enough and resulted in large thermal tails in the mass spectra. Thermal modeling was used to identify what nanowire diameters and metal coatings would allow the nanowire tip to cool sufficiently fast. A silver catalyzed silicon nanowire with a diameter large enough to allow for sufficient cooling was analyzed, and the concentration of silver in the silicon nanowire was below the detection limit of 10 ppm or 5 x 10 17 cm-3. The growth and characterization of Al catalyzed silicon nanowires is also discussed. Nanowires were grown at higher pressures and using H 2 as a carrier gas resulting in much higher growth rates than previously observed for Al catalyzed nanowires in the literature. The nanowires were

  1. Assembly of tungsten oxide nanobundles and their electrochromic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Xueting, E-mail: xuetingchang@yahoo.cn [Institute of Marine Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai 200135 (China); College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China); Sun Shibin [Institute of Marine Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai 200135 (China); College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China); Li Zhenjiang; Xu Xiao; Qiu Yanyan [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Lenticular W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanobundles composed of ultra-thin nanowires with diameters of 5-10 nm have been synthesized through a simple solvothermal method with hexachloride as precursor and mixed cyclohexanol and ethanol as solvent. Electrochromic films were prepared by assembling the W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanobundle suspension onto tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) coated glass. Results showed that self-assembly of the W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanobundles was strongly influenced by the solvents employed to disperse the nanobundles. The W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanobundles coated films exhibited excellent electrochromic stability and reversibility. The W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanobundle films also showed much higher charge-insertion density compared with the WO{sub 3} nanorod film, which may be due to the ultrathin feature of single nanowires constituting the nanobundles, unique oxygen vacancies of monoclinic W{sub 18}O{sub 49}, and the highly ordered assembly of the nanobundles.

  2. Static friction between silicon nanowires and elastomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qingquan; Zhu, Yong

    2011-09-27

    This paper reports the first direct measurements of static friction force and interfacial shear strength between silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). A micromanipulator is used to manipulate and deform the NWs under a high-magnification optical microscope in real time. The static friction force is measured based on "the most-bent state" of the NWs. The static friction and interface shear strength are found to depend on the ultraviolet/ozone (UVO) treatment of PDMS. The shear strength starts at 0.30 MPa without UVO treatment, increases rapidly up to 10.57 MPa at 60 min of treatment and decreases for longer treatment. Water contact angle measurements suggest that the UVO-induced hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion of PDMS surface is responsible for the increase in the static friction, while the hydrophobic recovery effect contributes to the decrease. The static friction between NWs and PDMS is of critical relevance to many device applications of NWs including NW-based flexible/stretchable electronics, NW assembly and nanocomposites (e.g., supercapacitors). Our results will enable quantitative interface design and control for such applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Materialization of single multicomposite nanowire: entrapment of ZnO nanoparticles in polyaniline nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present materialization of single multicomposite nanowire (SMNW-entrapped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs via an electrochemical growth method, which is a newly developed fabrication method to grow a single nanowire between a pair of pre-patterned electrodes. Entrapment of ZnO NPs was controlled via different conditions of SMNW fabrication such as an applied potential and mixture ratio of NPs and aniline solution. The controlled concentration of ZnO NP results in changes in the physical properties of the SMNWs, as shown in transmission electron microscopy images. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity and elasticity of SMNWs show improvement over those of pure polyaniline nanowire. The new nano-multicomposite material showed synergistic effects on mechanical and electrical properties, with logarithmical change and saturation increasing ZnO NP concentration.

  4. Optical polarization properties of a nanowire quantum dot probed along perpendicular orientations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugarini, G.; Reimer, M.E.; Zwiller, V.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the optical properties of single quantum dots in nanowires probed along orthogonal directions. We address the same quantum dot from either the nanowire side or along the nanowire axis via reflection on a micro-prism. The collected photoluminescence intensity from nanowires lying on a

  5. A review of the electrical properties of semiconductor nanowires: insights gained from terahertz conductivity spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Hannah J.; Boland, Jessica L.; Davies, Christopher L.; Baig, Sarwat A.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Accurately measuring and controlling the electrical properties of semiconductor nanowires is of paramount importance in the development of novel nanowire-based devices. In light of this, terahertz (THz) conductivity spectroscopy has emerged as an ideal non-contact technique for probing nanowire electrical conductivity and is showing tremendous value in the targeted development of nanowire devices. THz spectroscopic measurements of nanowires enable charge carrier lifetimes, mobilities, dopant concentrations and surface recombination velocities to be measured with high accuracy and high throughput in a contact-free fashion. This review spans seminal and recent studies of the electronic properties of nanowires using THz spectroscopy. A didactic description of THz time-domain spectroscopy, optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy, and their application to nanowires is included. We review a variety of technologically important nanowire materials, including GaAs, InAs, InP, GaN and InN nanowires, Si and Ge nanowires, ZnO nanowires, nanowire heterostructures, doped nanowires and modulation-doped nanowires. Finally, we discuss how THz measurements are guiding the development of nanowire-based devices, with the example of single-nanowire photoconductive THz receivers.

  6. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunsung; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral imaging is a powerful tool that extends the capabilities of the human eye. However, multispectral imaging systems generally are expensive and bulky, and multiple exposures are needed. Here, we report the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter array. Multiple filter functions covering visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths are simultaneously defined in a single lithography step using a single material (silicon). Nanowires are then etched and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), thereby realizing a device with eight filter functions. By attaching it to a monochrome silicon image sensor, we successfully realize an all-silicon multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate visible and NIR imaging. We show that the latter is highly sensitive to vegetation and furthermore enables imaging through objects opaque to the eye.

  7. Epitaxy of semiconductor-superconductor nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, P.; Ziino, N.L.B.; Chang, W.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the properties of semiconductor/metal interfaces is a powerful method for designing functionality and improving the performance of electrical devices. Recently semiconductor/superconductor hybrids have appeared as an important example where the atomic scale uniformity of the interface...... plays a key role in determining the quality of the induced superconducting gap. Here we present epitaxial growth of semiconductor-metal core-shell nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy, a method that provides a conceptually new route to controlled electrical contacting of nanostructures and the design...... of devices for specialized applications such as topological and gate-controlled superconducting electronics. Our materials of choice, InAs/Al grown with epitaxially matched single-plane interfaces, and alternative semiconductor/metal combinations allowing epitaxial interface matching in nanowires...

  8. Optical emission of InAs nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möller, M; De Lima Jr, M M; Cantarero, A; Chiaramonte, T; Cotta, M A; Iikawa, F

    2012-01-01

    Wurtzite InAs nanowire samples grown by chemical beam epitaxy have been analyzed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. The nanowires exhibit two main optical emission bands at low temperatures. They are attributed to the recombination of carriers in quantum well structures, formed by zincblende–wurtzite alternating layers, and to the donor–acceptor pair. The blue-shift observed in the former emission band when the excitation power is increased is in good agreement with the type-II band alignment between the wurtzite and zincblende sections predicted by previous theoretical works. When increasing the temperature and the excitation power successively, an additional band attributed to the band-to-band recombination from wurtzite InAs appears. We estimated a lower bound for the wurtzite band gap energy of approximately 0.46 eV at low temperature. (paper)

  9. Optical emission of InAs nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, M.; de Lima, M. M., Jr.; Cantarero, A.; Chiaramonte, T.; Cotta, M. A.; Iikawa, F.

    2012-09-01

    Wurtzite InAs nanowire samples grown by chemical beam epitaxy have been analyzed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. The nanowires exhibit two main optical emission bands at low temperatures. They are attributed to the recombination of carriers in quantum well structures, formed by zincblende-wurtzite alternating layers, and to the donor-acceptor pair. The blue-shift observed in the former emission band when the excitation power is increased is in good agreement with the type-II band alignment between the wurtzite and zincblende sections predicted by previous theoretical works. When increasing the temperature and the excitation power successively, an additional band attributed to the band-to-band recombination from wurtzite InAs appears. We estimated a lower bound for the wurtzite band gap energy of approximately 0.46 eV at low temperature.

  10. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    ), which has proved to be a powerful method for visualizing the physical processes involved in the growth of nanowires by the vapour liquid solid (VLS) mechanism, was used to study VLS SiNW contact formation process. Electrical characteristics and effects of surface modification on electrical behavior...... from movies recorded during contact events. It is demonstrated that the geometry of the final contact formed between the nanowire and the silicon surface could be controlled by varying the contact surface temperature and the electrical current through the bridging SiNW. By adjusting the contact surface...... ends, base and tip and its electrical properties were probed in situ TEM. Such SiNW bridges clamped between two cantilevers in situ TEM was an interesting platform for studying the effect of surface modification on SiNWs electrical properties. The effect of surface oxidation was studied...

  11. Organic nanowire fabrication and device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sung-Yong; Kim, Tae-Sik; Lee, Yeongjun; Cho, Himchan; Xu, Wentao; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-07

    Organic nanowires (ONWs) are flexible, stretchable, and have good electrical properties, and therefore have great potential for use in next-generation textile and wearable electronics. Analysis of trends in ONWs supports their great potential for various stretchable and flexible electronic applications such as flexible displays and flexible photovoltaics. Numerous methods can be used to prepare ONWs, but the practical industrial application of ONWs has not been achieved because of the lack of reliable techniques for controlling and patterning of individual nanowires. Therefore, an "individually controllable" technique to fabricate ONWs is essential for practical device applications. In this paper, three types of fabrication methods of ONWs are reviewed: non-alignment methods, massive-alignment methods, and individual-alignment methods. Recent research on electronic and photonic device applications of ONWs is then reviewed. Finally, suggestions for future research are put forward. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Measurement of carrier mobility in silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Oki; Sekaric, Lidija; Majumdar, Amlan; Rooks, Michael; Appenzeller, Joerg; Sleight, Jeffrey W; Guha, Supratik; Haensch, Wilfried

    2008-06-01

    We report the first direct capacitance measurements of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and the consequent determination of field carrier mobilities in undoped-channel SiNW field-effect transistors (FETs) at room temperature. We employ a two-FET method for accurate extraction of the intrinsic channel resistance and intrinsic channel capacitance of the SiNWs. The devices used in this study were fabricated using a top-down method to create SiNW FETs with up to 1000 wires in parallel for increasing the raw capacitance while maintaining excellent control on device dimensions and series resistance. We found that, compared with the universal mobility curves for bulk silicon, the electron and hole mobilities in nanowires are comparable to those of the surface orientation that offers a lower mobility.

  13. Nanowire field effect transistors principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Nanowire Field Effect Transistor: Basic Principles and Applications” places an emphasis on the application aspects of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET). Device physics and electronics are discussed in a compact manner, together with the p-n junction diode and MOSFET, the former as an essential element in NWFET and the latter as a general background of the FET. During this discussion, the photo-diode, solar cell, LED, LD, DRAM, flash EEPROM and sensors are highlighted to pave the way for similar applications of NWFET. Modeling is discussed in close analogy and comparison with MOSFETs. Contributors focus on processing, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and application of NWFET. This includes coverage of solar and memory cells, biological and chemical sensors, displays and atomic scale light emitting diodes. Appropriate for scientists and engineers interested in acquiring a working knowledge of NWFET as well as graduate students specializing in this subject.

  14. GaN nanowire Schottky barrier diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Sabui, Gourab; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; White, Mary; Pampili, Pietro; Parbrook, Peter J.; McLaren, Mathew; Arredondo-Arechavala, Miryam; Shen, Z. John

    2017-01-01

    A new concept of vertical gallium nitride (GaN) Schottky barrier diode based on nanowire (NW) structures and the principle of dielectric REduced SURface Field (RESURF) is proposed in this paper. High-threading dislocation density in GaN epitaxy grown on foreign substrates has hindered the development and commercialization of vertical GaN power devices. The proposed NW structure, previously explored for LEDs offers an opportunity to reduce defect density and fabricate low cost vertical GaN pow...

  15. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of rough silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochbaum, Allon I.; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz; Liang, Wenjie; Garnett, Erik C.; Najarian, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Yang, Peidong

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 90 per cent of the world's power is generated by heat engines that use fossil fuel combustion as a heat source and typically operate at 30-40 per cent efficiency, such that roughly 15terawatts of heat is lost to the environment. Thermoelectric modules could potentially convert part of this low-grade waste heat to electricity. Their efficiency depends on the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of their material components, which is a function of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and absolute temperature. Over the past five decades it has been challenging to increase ZT>1, since the parameters of ZT are generally interdependent. While nanostructured thermoelectric materials can increase ZT>1 (refs 2-4), the materials (Bi, Te, Pb, Sb, and Ag) and processes used are not often easy to scale to practically useful dimensions. Here we report the electrochemical synthesis of large-area, wafer-scale arrays of rough Si nanowires that are 20-300nm in diameter. These nanowires have Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity values that are the same as doped bulk Si, but those with diameters of about 50nm exhibit 100-fold reduction in thermal conductivity, yielding ZT = 0.6 at room temperature. For such nanowires, the lattice contribution to thermal conductivity approaches the amorphous limit for Si, which cannot be explained by current theories. Although bulk Si is a poor thermoelectric material, by greatly reducing thermal conductivity without much affecting the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity, Si nanowire arrays show promise as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials.

  16. Rigorous modal analysis of metallic nanowire chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Amit; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2009-08-03

    Nanowire chains (NCs) are analyzed by use of a rigorous, full-wave, Source-Model Technique (SMT). The technique employs a proper periodic Green's function which converges regardless of whether the structure is lossless or lossy. By use of this Green's function, it is possible to determine the complex propagation constants of the NC modes directly and accurately, as solutions of a dispersion equation. To demonstrate the method, dispersion curves and mode profiles for a few NCs are calculated.

  17. Nanowires and nanobelts, v.2 nanowires and nanobelts of functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires, nanobelts, nanoribbons, nanorods ..., are a new class of quasi-one-dimensional materials that have been attracting a great research interest in the last few years. These non-carbon based materials have been demonstrated to exhibit superior electrical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties, and can be used as fundamental building blocks for nano-scale science and technology, ranging from chemical and biological sensors, field effect transistors to logic circuits. Nanocircuits built using semiconductor nanowires demonstrated were declared a ""breakthrough in science"" by Science

  18. Electronic Structure of Cdse Nanowires Terminated With Gold ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cadmium selenide nanowires in the wurtzite bulk phase, connected to gold electrodes are studied using local density approximation. The short wire is fully metalized by metal-induced gap states. For longer wires, a gap similar to that in bare cadmium selenide nanowires is observed near the center while sub-gap structure ...

  19. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper telluride (CuTe) nanowires were synthesized electrochemically from aqueous acidic solution of copper (II) sulphate (CuSO4.5H2O) and tellurium oxide (TeO2) on a copper substrate by template-assisted electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition was conducted at 30 °C and the length of nanowires was ...

  20. Light absorption and emission in nanowire array solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupec, Jan; Stoop, Ralph L; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2010-12-20

    Inorganic nanowires are under intense research for large scale solar power generation intended to ultimately contribute a substantial fraction to the overall power mix. Their unique feature is to allow different pathways for the light absorption and carrier transport. In this publication we investigate the properties of a nanowire array acting as a photonic device governed by wave-optical phenomena. We solve the Maxwell equations and calculate the light absorption efficiency for the AM1.5d spectrum and give recommendations on the design. Due to concentration of the incident sunlight at a microscopic level the absorptivity of nanowire solar cells can exceed the absorptivity of an equal amount of material used in thin-film devices. We compute the local density of photon states to assess the effect of emission enhancement, which influences the radiative lifetime of excess carriers. This allows us to compute the efficiency limit within the framework of detailed balance. The efficiency is highly sensitive with respect to the diameter and distance of the nanowires. Designs featuring nanowires below a certain diameter will intrinsically feature low short-circuit current that cannot be compensated even by increasing the nanowire density. Optimum efficiency is not achieved in densely packed arrays, in fact spacing the nanowires further apart (simultaneously decreasing the material use) can even improve efficiency in certain scenarios. We observe absorption enhancement reducing the material use. In terms of carrier generation per material use, nanowire devices can outperform thin-film devices by far.

  1. A catalyst-free synthesis of germanium nanowires obtained by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A catalyst-free innovative synthesis, by combined X-ray chemical vapour deposition and lowtemperature thermal treatments, which has not been applied since so far to the growth of germanium nanowires (Ge-NWs), produced high yields of the nanoproducts with theGeH4 reactant gas. Nanowires were grown on both ...

  2. Silicon-on-Insulator Nanowire Based Optical Waveguide Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyu; Liu, Yong; Chen, Yangqing; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Optical waveguide biosensors based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire have been developed for label free molecular detection. This paper reviews our work on the design, fabrication and measurement of SOI nanowire based high-sensitivity biosensors employing Vernier effect. Biosensing experiments using cascaded double-ring sensor and Mach-Zehnder- ring sensor integrated with microfluidic channels are demonstrated

  3. Perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanowires for sensing ethyl acetate in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopkar, Yashdeep; Kojtari, Arben; Swearer, Dayne; Zivanovic, Sandra; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2014-09-01

    We report the application of perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanowires for sensing ethyl acetate. The conductivity of the crystalline nano/microwires increases quickly and selectively in the presence of ethyl acetate vapor, but not with water, acid and alcohol vapors, suggesting that the nanowires of PTCDI may be used for monitoring ethyl acetate during a wine manufacturing process.

  4. Spatially resolved Hall effect measurement in a single semiconductor nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Kristian; Halvardsson, Filip; Heurlin, Magnus; Lindgren, David; Gustafsson, Anders; Wu, Phillip M.; Monemar, Bo; Samuelson, Lars

    2012-12-01

    Efficient light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic energy-harvesting devices are expected to play an important role in the continued efforts towards sustainable global power consumption. Semiconductor nanowires are promising candidates as the active components of both light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, primarily due to the added freedom in device design offered by the nanowire geometry. However, for nanowire-based components to move past the proof-of-concept stage and be implemented in production-grade devices, it is necessary to precisely quantify and control fundamental material properties such as doping and carrier mobility. Unfortunately, the nanoscale geometry that makes nanowires interesting for applications also makes them inherently difficult to characterize. Here, we report a method to carry out Hall measurements on single core-shell nanowires. Our technique allows spatially resolved and quantitative determination of the carrier concentration and mobility of the nanowire shell. As Hall measurements have previously been completely unavailable for nanowires, the experimental platform presented here should facilitate the implementation of nanowires in advanced practical devices.

  5. Screening model for nanowire surface-charge sensors in liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martin Hedegård; Mortensen, Asger; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    The conductance change of nanowire field-effect transistors is considered a highly sensitive probe for surface charge. However, Debye screening of relevant physiological liquid environments challenge device performance due to competing screening from the ionic liquid and nanowire charge carriers....

  6. Quantum transport in nanowire-based hybrid devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenel, Haci Yusuf

    2013-05-08

    We have studied the low-temperature transport properties of nanowires contacted by a normal metal as well as by superconducting electrodes. As a consequence of quantum coherence, we have demonstrated the electron interference effect in different aspects. The mesoscopic phase coherent transport properties were studied by contacting the semiconductor InAs and InSb nanowires with normal metal electrodes. Moreover, we explored the interaction of the microscopic quantum coherence of the nanowires with the macroscopic quantum coherence of the superconductors. In superconducting Nb contacted InAs nanowire junctions, we have investigated the effect of temperature, magnetic field and electric field on the supercurrent. Owing to relatively high critical temperature of superconducting Nb (T{sub c} ∝ 9 K), we have observed the supercurrent up to 4 K for highly doped nanowire-based junctions, while for low doped nanowire-based junctions a full control of the supercurrent was achieved. Due to low transversal dimension of the nanowires, we have found a monotonous decay of the critical current in magnetic field dependent measurements. The experimental results were analyzed within narrow junction model which has been developed recently. At high bias voltages, we have observed subharmonic energy gap structures as a consequence of multiple Andreev reflection. Some of the nanowires were etched, such that the superconducting Nb electrodes are connected to both ends of the nanowire rather than covering the surface of the nanowire. As a result of well defined nanowire-superconductor interfaces, we have examined quasiparticle interference effect in magnetotransport measurements. Furthermore, we have developed a new junction geometry, such that one of the superconducting Nb electrodes is replaced by a superconducting Al. Owing to the smaller critical magnetic field of superconducting Al (B{sub c} ∝ 15-50,mT), compared to superconducting Nb (B{sub c} ∝ 3 T), we were able to studied

  7. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  8. Abrupt Schottky Junctions in Al/Ge Nanowire Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, S; Zeiner, C; Stöger-Pollach, M; Bertagnolli, E; den Hertog, M I; Lopez-Haro, M; Robin, E; El Hajraoui, K; Lugstein, A

    2015-07-08

    In this Letter we report on the exploration of axial metal/semiconductor (Al/Ge) nanowire heterostructures with abrupt interfaces. The formation process is enabled by a thermal induced exchange reaction between the vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge nanowire and Al contact pads due to the substantially different diffusion behavior of Ge in Al and vice versa. Temperature-dependent I-V measurements revealed the metallic properties of the crystalline Al nanowire segments with a maximum current carrying capacity of about 0.8 MA/cm(2). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization has confirmed both the composition and crystalline nature of the pure Al nanowire segments. A very sharp interface between the ⟨111⟩ oriented Ge nanowire and the reacted Al part was observed with a Schottky barrier height of 361 meV. To demonstrate the potential of this approach, a monolithic Al/Ge/Al heterostructure was used to fabricate a novel impact ionization device.

  9. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar,; Arun, [Orinda, CA; Shakouri, Ali [Santa Cruz, CA; Sands, Timothy D [Moraga, CA; Yang, Peidong [Berkeley, CA; Mao, Samuel S [Berkeley, CA; Russo, Richard E [Walnut Creek, CA; Feick, Henning [Kensington, CA; Weber, Eicke R [Oakland, CA; Kind, Hannes [Schaffhausen, CH; Huang, Michael [Los Angeles, CA; Yan, Haoquan [Albany, CA; Wu, Yiying [Albany, CA; Fan, Rong [El Cerrito, CA

    2009-08-04

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  10. AC surface photovoltage of indium phosphide nanowire networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Baskin School of Engineering; California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (US). Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States). Advanced Studies Laboratories

    2012-06-15

    Surface photovoltage is used to study the dynamics of photogenerated carriers which are transported through a highly interconnected three-dimensional network of indium phosphide nanowires. Through the nanowire network charge transport is possible over distances far in excess of the nanowire lengths. Surface photovoltage was measured within a region 10.5-14.5 mm from the focus of the illumination, which was chopped at a range of frequencies from 15 Hz to 30 kHz. Carrier dynamics were modeled by approximating the nanowire network as a thin film, then fitted to experiment suggesting diffusion of electrons and holes at approximately 75% of the bulk value in InP but with significantly reduced built-in fields, presumably due to screening by nanowire surfaces. (orig.)

  11. Fabrication and morphology of uniaxially aligned perylenediimide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Shinjiro; Tanikatsu, Makoto; Itaya, Akira; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2017-06-01

    Uniaxial alignment of crystalline nanowires consisting of N,N‧-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) was achieved on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) layers prepared by friction transfer method on a glass substrate. The nanowires were formed by spin-coating a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solution of PTCDI-C8 on the PTFE layers and were further grown under TFA vapor atmosphere. The morphology of the PTCDI-C8 nanowires were characterized using atomic force microscope (AFM) and fluorescence optical microscope with changing the dye concentration in the spin coating solution, annealing time in the TFA vapor, and substrate materials. The nanowires prepared on the PTFE layer on a silica-coated silicon or a mica substrate did not grow so well as those on the glass substrate. This result suggests that the surface roughness would affect the PTFE layer and the growth of the PTCDI nanowires.

  12. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2018-01-30

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  13. Manipulation of morphology and magnetic properties in cobalt nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic metallic Cobalt nanowires are synthesized by the reduction of carboxylate salts of Co in 1, 2-butanediol using a solvothermal chemical process. In this process, the size and shape of the nanocrystals can be controlled via reaction parameters such as surfactant ratio, precursor concentration, and the temperature ramp. Synthesized Co nanocrystals exhibit the hexagonally close-packed phase favored the growth of anisotropic particles and the (002 crystalline direction is along the long axis of the nanowires. By varying the catalyst concentration in proper range, the effect of synthetic parameters on controlling Co nanoparticles with different length of 50 - 700 nm was systematically studied. Magnetic measurements and TEM images of the Cobalt nanowires indicate that the coercivity of the Co nanowires depends substantially on the morphology. The obtained highest coercivity of 8.4 kOe can be attributed to their small mean diameter and high crystallinity of nanowires for 200 - 300 nm.

  14. Electron beam irradiated silver nanowires for a highly transparent heater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chan-Hwa; Oh, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cha, Yu-Jung; Kwak, Joon Seop; Shin, Jae-Heon; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Cheong, Woo-Seok

    2015-12-07

    Transparent heaters have attracted increasing attention for their usefulness in vehicle windows, outdoor displays, and periscopes. We present high performance transparent heaters based on Ag nanowires with electron beam irradiation. We obtained an Ag-nanowire thin film with 48 ohm/sq of sheet resistance and 88.8% (substrate included) transmittance at 550 nm after electron beam irradiation for 120 sec. We demonstrate that the electron beam creates nano-soldering at the junctions of the Ag nanowires, which produces lower sheet resistance and improved adhesion of the Ag nanowires. We fabricated a transparent heater with Ag nanowires after electron beam irradiation, and obtained a temperature of 51 °C within 1 min at an applied voltage of 7 V. The presented technique will be useful in a wide range of applications for transparent heaters.

  15. Methods Of Fabricating Nanosturctures And Nanowires And Devices Fabricated Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2006-02-07

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  16. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalska-Szostko, B., E-mail: kalska@uwb.edu.pl; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods.

  17. Design of light scattering in nanowire materials for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskens, Otto L; Rivas, Jaime Gómez; Algra, Rienk E; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Lagendijk, Ad

    2008-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the optical properties of layers of InP, Si, and GaP nanowires, relevant for applications in solar cells. The nanowires are strongly photonic, resulting in a significant coupling mismatch with incident light due to multiple scattering. We identify a design principle for the effective suppression of reflective losses, based on the ratio of the nondiffusive absorption and diffusive scattering lengths. Using this principle, we demonstrate successful suppression of the hemispherical diffuse reflectance of InP nanowires to below that of the corresponding transparent effective medium. The design of light scattering in nanowire materials is of large importance for optimization of the external efficiency of nanowire-based photovoltaic devices.

  18. Tuning wettability of hydrogen titanate nanowire mesh by Na+ irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pritam; Chatterjee, Shyamal

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen titanate (HT) nanowires have been widely studied for remarkable properties and various potential applications. However, a handful studies are available related to ion beam induced structural changes and influence on wetting behavior of the HT nanowire surface. In this work, we exposed HT nanowires to 5 keV Na+ at an ion fluence of 1×1016 ions.cm-2. Scanning electron microscope shows that at this ion fluence nanowires are bent arbitrarily and they are welded to each other forming an interlinked network structure. Computer simulation shows that ion beam induces defect formation in the nanowires, which plays major role in such structural modifications. An interesting alteration of surface wetting property is observed due to ion irradiation. The hydrophilic pristine surface turns into hydrophobic after ion irradiation.

  19. In situ hydrogenation of molybdenum oxide nanowires for enhanced supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Imran

    2014-01-01

    In situ hydrogenation of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide (α-MoO 3) nanowires has been achieved on a large scale by introducing alcohol during the hydrothermal synthesis for electrochemical energy storage supercapacitor devices. The hydrogenated molybdenum trioxide (H xMoO3) nanowires yield a specific capacitance of 168 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and maintain 108 F g-1 at 10 A g-1, which is 36-fold higher than the capacitance obtained from pristine MoO3 nanowires at the same conditions. The electrochemical devices made with HxMoO3 nanowires exhibit excellent cycling stability by retaining 97% of their capacitance after 3000 cycles due to an enhanced electronic conductivity and increased density of hydroxyl groups on the surface of the MoO3 nanowires. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalska-Szostko, B.; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods

  1. Core-shell magnetic nanowires fabrication and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalska-Szostko, B., E-mail: kalska@uwb.edu.pl [Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1K, 15-245 Bialystok (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1L, 15-245 Bialystok, Poland (Poland); Klekotka, U.; Satuła, D. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1K, 15-245 Bialystok (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1L, 15-245 Bialystok, Poland (Poland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • New approach for nanowires modification are presented. • Physical and chemical characterization of the nanowires are shown. • Properties modulations as an effect of the surface layer composition are discussed. - Abstract: In this paper, a new way of the preparation of core-shell magnetic nanowires has been proposed. For the modification Fe nanowires were prepared by electrodeposition in anodic aluminium oxide matrixes, in first step. In second, by wetting chemical deposition, shell layers of Ag, Au or Cu were obtained. Resultant core-shell nanowires structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray. Whereas magnetic properties by Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  2. Conductive polymer nanowire gas sensor fabricated by nanoscale soft lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Jiang, Yang; Qu, Hemi; Duan, Xuexin

    2017-12-01

    Resistive devices composed of one-dimensional nanostructures are promising candidates for the next generation of gas sensors. However, the large-scale fabrication of nanowires is still challenging, which restricts the commercialization of such devices. Here, we report a highly efficient and facile approach to fabricating poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) nanowire chemiresistive gas sensors by nanoscale soft lithography. Well-defined sub-100 nm nanowires are fabricated on silicon substrate, which facilitates device integration. The nanowire chemiresistive gas sensor is demonstrated for NH3 and NO2 detection at room temperature and shows a limit of detection at ppb level, which is compatible with nanoscale PEDOT:PSS gas sensors fabricated with the conventional lithography technique. In comparison with PEDOT:PSS thin-film gas sensors, the nanowire gas sensor exhibits higher sensitivity and a much faster response to gas molecules.

  3. Optoelectronic properties of individually positioned InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbeck, Jan; Brenneis, Andreas; Treu, Julian; Hertenberger, Simon; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Koblmueller, Gregor; Holleitner, Alexander [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Small bandgap semiconducting nanowires offer a promising approach to fabricating nanoscale light-sensitive devices like broadband solar cells or mid-infrared photodetectors. We discuss the optoelectronic properties of individually positioned InAs nanowires on p-Si(111) substrates. The substrates exhibit a top layer of SiO{sub 2} which is structured via e-beam lithography creating holes in the oxide with a diameter of ∝80 nm. The nanowires are then grown vertically on the patterned substrates by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. To fabricate optoelectronic devices, the nanowires are subsequently contacted via a thin, semitransparent metal film evaporated on top of an insulating layer (BCB). The p-Si substrate forms the second contact of the optoelectronic two-terminal devices. We discuss spatially resolved photocurrent measurements which give insights into the interplay of optoelectronic dynamics in single nanowires and in the Si-substrates.

  4. Seedless Growth of Bismuth Nanowire Array via Vacuum Thermal Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingzhao; Nam, Chang-Yong; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Here a seedless and template-free technique is demonstrated to scalably grow bismuth nanowires, through thermal evaporation in high vacuum at RT. Conventionally reserved for the fabrication of metal thin films, thermal evaporation deposits bismuth into an array of vertical single crystalline nanowires over a flat thin film of vanadium held at RT, which is freshly deposited by magnetron sputtering or thermal evaporation. By controlling the temperature of the growth substrate the length and width of the nanowires can be tuned over a wide range. Responsible for this novel technique is a previously unknown nanowire growth mechanism that roots in the mild porosity of the vanadium thin film. Infiltrated into the vanadium pores, the bismuth domains (~ 1 nm) carry excessive surface energy that suppresses their melting point and continuously expels them out of the vanadium matrix to form nanowires. This discovery demonstrates the feasibility of scalable vapor phase synthesis of high purity nanomaterials without using any catalysts. PMID:26709727

  5. Semiconductor nanowires directly grown on graphene--towards wafer scale transferable nanowire arrays with improved electrical contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, John P; Gutes, Albert; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2013-05-21

    We present for the first time the growth of dense arrays of silicon and silicon carbide nanowires directly on graphene as well as methods of transferring these novel hybrids to arbitrary substrates. Improved electrical contact for SiC nanowire/graphene hybrid is demonstrated in the application of a robust supercapacitor electrode.

  6. Magnetic drug delivery with FePd nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondman, Kirsten M.; Bunt, Nathan D. [Neuro Imaging, MIRA Institute, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Maijenburg, A. Wouter [Inorganic Material Science, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Wezel, Richard J.A. van [Biomedical Signals and Systems, MIRA, Twente University, Enschede (Netherlands); Kishore, Uday [Centre for Infection, Immunity and Disease Mechanisms, Biosciences, Brunel University, London (United Kingdom); Abelmann, Leon [Transducer Science and Technology group, MESA+ Institute for nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Elshof, Johan E. ten [Inorganic Material Science, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Haken, Bennie ten, E-mail: b.tenhaken@utwente.nl [Neuro Imaging, MIRA Institute, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic drug delivery is a promising method to target a drug to a diseased area while reducing negative side effects caused by systemic administration of drugs. In magnetic drug delivery a therapeutic agent is coupled to a magnetic nanoparticle. The particles are injected and at the target location withdrawn from blood flow by a magnetic field. In this study a FePd nanowire is developed with optimised properties for magnetic targeting. The nanowires have a high magnetic moment to reduce the field gradient needed to capture them with a magnet. The dimensions and the materials of the nanowire and coating are such that they are dispersable in aqueous media, non-cytotoxic, easily phagocytosed and not complement activating. This is established in several in-vitro tests with macrophage and endothelial cell lines. Along with the nanowires a magnet is designed, optimised for capture of the nanowires from the blood flow in the hind leg of a rat. The system is used in a pilot scale in-vivo experiment. No negative side effects from injection of the nanowires were found within the limited time span of the experiment. In this first pilot experiment no nanowires were found to be targeted by the magnet, or in the liver, kidneys or spleen, most likely the particles were removed during the fixation procedure. - Highlights: • Description of the magnetic properties of nanowires. • Design and characterisation of a biocompatible FePd nanowire. • In-vitro cytotoxicity analysis and immune system responses. • In-vivo magnetic drug delivery using the developed nanowires.

  7. Fabrication of reliable semiconductor nanowires by controlling crystalline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangdan; Lim, Taekyung; Ju, Sanghyun

    2011-07-29

    One-dimensional SnO(2) nanomaterials with wide bandgap characteristics are attractive for flexible and/or transparent displays and high-performance nano-electronics. In this study, the crystallinity of SnO(2) nanowires was regulated by controlling their growth temperatures. Moreover, the correlation of the crystallinity of nanowires with optical and electrical characteristics was analyzed. When SnO(2) nanowires were grown at temperatures below 900 °C, they showed various growth directions and abnormal discontinuity in their crystal structures. On the other hand, most nanowires grown at 950 °C exhibited a regular growth trend in the direction of [100]. In addition, the low temperature photoluminescence measurement revealed that the higher growth temperatures of nanowires gradually decreased the 500 nm peak rather than the 620 nm peak. The former peak is derived from the surface defect related to the shallow energy level and affects nanowire surface states. Owing to crystallinity and defects, the threshold voltage range (maximum-minimum) of SnO(2) nanowire transistors was 1.5 V at 850 °C, 1.1 V at 900 °C, and 0.5 V at 950 °C, with dispersion characteristics dramatically decreased. This study successfully demonstrated the effects of nanowire crystallinity on optical and electrical characteristics. It also suggested that the optical and electrical characteristics of nanowire transistors could be regulated by controlling their growth temperatures in the course of producing SnO(2) nanowires.

  8. Magnetic drug delivery with FePd nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondman, Kirsten M.; Bunt, Nathan D.; Maijenburg, A. Wouter; Wezel, Richard J.A. van; Kishore, Uday; Abelmann, Leon; Elshof, Johan E. ten; Haken, Bennie ten

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic drug delivery is a promising method to target a drug to a diseased area while reducing negative side effects caused by systemic administration of drugs. In magnetic drug delivery a therapeutic agent is coupled to a magnetic nanoparticle. The particles are injected and at the target location withdrawn from blood flow by a magnetic field. In this study a FePd nanowire is developed with optimised properties for magnetic targeting. The nanowires have a high magnetic moment to reduce the field gradient needed to capture them with a magnet. The dimensions and the materials of the nanowire and coating are such that they are dispersable in aqueous media, non-cytotoxic, easily phagocytosed and not complement activating. This is established in several in-vitro tests with macrophage and endothelial cell lines. Along with the nanowires a magnet is designed, optimised for capture of the nanowires from the blood flow in the hind leg of a rat. The system is used in a pilot scale in-vivo experiment. No negative side effects from injection of the nanowires were found within the limited time span of the experiment. In this first pilot experiment no nanowires were found to be targeted by the magnet, or in the liver, kidneys or spleen, most likely the particles were removed during the fixation procedure. - Highlights: • Description of the magnetic properties of nanowires. • Design and characterisation of a biocompatible FePd nanowire. • In-vitro cytotoxicity analysis and immune system responses. • In-vivo magnetic drug delivery using the developed nanowires

  9. Spinel/Layered Heterostructured Lithium-Rich Oxide Nanowires as Cathode Material for High-Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ruizhi; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tao; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xianyou; Shu, Hongbo; Yang, Xiukang

    2017-11-29

    Lithium-rich oxide material has been considered as an attractive candidate for high-energy cathode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the practical applications are still hindered due to its low initial reversible capacity, severe voltage decaying, and unsatisfactory rate capability. Among all, the voltage decaying is a serious barrier that results in a large decrease of energy density during long-term cycling. To overcome these issues, herein, an efficient strategy of fabricating lithium-rich oxide nanowires with spinel/layered heterostructure is proposed. Structural characterizations verify that the spinel/layered heterostructured nanowires are a self-assembly of a lot of nanoparticles, and the Li 4 Mn 5 O 12 spinel phase is embedded inside the layered structure. When the material is used as cathode of LIBs, the spinel/layered heterostructured nanowires can display an extremely high invertible capacity of 290.1 mA h g -1 at 0.1 C and suppressive voltage fading. Moreover, it exhibits a favorable cycling stability with capacity retention of 94.4% after charging/discharging at 0.5 C for 200 cycles and it shows an extraordinary rate capability (183.9 mA h g -1 , 10 C). The remarkable electrochemical properties can be connected with the spinel/layered heterostructure, which is in favor of Li + transport kinetics and enhancing structural stability during the cyclic process.

  10. Earth Abundant Fe/Mn-Based Layered Oxide Interconnected Nanowires for Advanced K-Ion Full Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuanpeng; Xu, Xiaoming; Niu, Chaojiang; Meng, Jiashen; Huang, Meng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Ziang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-01-11

    K-ion battery (KIB) is a new-type energy storage device that possesses potential advantages of low-cost and abundant resource of K precursor materials. However, the main challenge lies on the lack of stable materials to accommodate the intercalation of large-size K-ions. Here we designed and constructed a novel earth abundant Fe/Mn-based layered oxide interconnected nanowires as a cathode in KIBs for the first time, which exhibits both high capacity and good cycling stability. On the basis of advanced in situ X-ray diffraction analysis and electrochemical characterization, we confirm that interconnected K 0.7 Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 O 2 nanowires can provide stable framework structure, fast K-ion diffusion channels, and three-dimensional electron transport network during the depotassiation/potassiation processes. As a result, a considerable initial discharge capacity of 178 mAh g -1 is achieved when measured for KIBs. Besides, K-ion full batteries based on interconnected K 0.7 Fe 0.5 Mn 0.5 O 2 nanowires/soft carbon are assembled, manifesting over 250 cycles with a capacity retention of ∼76%. This work may open up the investigation of high-performance K-ion intercalated earth abundant layered cathodes and will push the development of energy storage systems.

  11. Highly Durable Na2V6O16·1.63H2O Nanowire Cathode for Aqueous Zinc-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Zhu, Ting; Wang, Xuanpeng; Wei, Xiujuan; Yan, Mengyu; Li, Jiantao; Luo, Wen; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Wencui; Zhou, Liang; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2018-03-14

    Rechargeable aqueous zinc-ion batteries are highly desirable for grid-scale applications due to their low cost and high safety; however, the poor cycling stability hinders their widespread application. Herein, a highly durable zinc-ion battery system with a Na 2 V 6 O 16 ·1.63H 2 O nanowire cathode and an aqueous Zn(CF 3 SO 3 ) 2 electrolyte has been developed. The Na 2 V 6 O 16 ·1.63H 2 O nanowires deliver a high specific capacity of 352 mAh g -1 at 50 mA g -1 and exhibit a capacity retention of 90% over 6000 cycles at 5000 mA g -1 , which represents the best cycling performance compared with all previous reports. In contrast, the NaV 3 O 8 nanowires maintain only 17% of the initial capacity after 4000 cycles at 5000 mA g -1 . A single-nanowire-based zinc-ion battery is assembled, which reveals the intrinsic Zn 2+ storage mechanism at nanoscale. The remarkable electrochemical performance especially the long-term cycling stability makes Na 2 V 6 O 16 ·1.63H 2 O a promising cathode for a low-cost and safe aqueous zinc-ion battery.

  12. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as an etching material for the rapid fabrication of silicon wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2011-01-01

    This study has evaluated self-assembled peptide nanotubes (PNTS) and nanowires (PNWS) as etching mask materials for the rapid and low-cost fabrication of silicon wires using reactive ion etching (RIE). The self-assembled peptide structures were fabricated under mild conditions and positioned on c...... characterization by SEM and I-V measurements. Additionally, the fabricated silicon structures were functionalized with fluorescent molecules via a biotin-streptavidin interaction in order to probe their potential in the development of biosensing devices....

  13. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D; Yu Yingda

    2012-01-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiO x nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiO x nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiO x nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiO x nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiO x nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiO x nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiO x particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect. (paper)

  14. Fuel assembly cleaning device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable efficient and sufficient cleaning of a fuel assembly even in corners without disassembling the assembly and to effectively remove crud. Constitution: Cleaning water mixed with abrasive is injected into a fuel assembly contained within a cleaning device body to remove crud adhering to the fuel assembly. Since a coolant passage from the opening of the bottom surface is of the fuel assembly to the opening of the top surface is utilized as the cleaning water passage at this, the crud can be removed by the abrasive in the water stream even from narrow gaps of the fuel assembly. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. The effects of substrates on the geometry and optical properties of aluminum nitride nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavi, Mohammad Amin; Haratizadeh, Hamid; Kitai, Adrian; Moafi, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Based on a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process, an alumina tube electric furnace was assembled to synthesize different one dimensional aluminum nitride (AIN) nanostructures via aluminum powder and nitrogen gas flow. The products obtained where nanowires, nanorods, a unique chain-linked nanocage structure made from an entanglement of AIN nanowires and an interesting micro-sized spherical architecture. The different growth parameters dictated to the system result the product variety, making structure tuning possible. The incorporation of different substrates (silicon and alumina) not only leads to the formation of different shaped structures, but also results different optical emissions ranging from 450 nm (blue) to 650 nm (red), indicating the high potential of AIN nanostructures in LED fabrication. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Selective Area Electron Diffraction (SAED), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Photoluminescence (PL) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis results are discussed and a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS)/Vapor-Solid (VS) based growth mechanism is proposed for the mentioned structures.

  16. Evaluation of the Scaffolding Effect of Pt Nanowires Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide in PEMFC Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mardle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The stacking and overlapping effect of two-dimensional (2D graphene nanosheets in the catalyst coating layer is a big challenge for their practical application in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. These effects hinder the effective transfer of reactant gases to reach the active catalytic sites on catalysts supported on the graphene surface and the removal of the produced water, finally leading to large mass transfer resistances in practical electrodes and poor power performance. In this work, we evaluate the catalytic power performance of aligned Pt nanowires grown on reduced graphene oxide (rGO (PtNW/rGO as cathodes in 16-cm2 single PEMFCs. The results are compared to Pt nanoparticles deposited on rGO (Pt/rGO and commercial Pt/C nanoparticle catalysts. It is found that the scaffolding effect from the aligned Pt nanowire structure reduces the mass transfer resistance in rGO-based catalyst electrodes, and a nearly double power performance is achieved as compared with the Pt/rGO electrodes. However, although a higher mass activity was observed for PtNW/rGO in membrane electrode assembly (MEA measurement, the power performance obtained at a large current density region is still lower than the Pt/C in PEMFCs because of the stacking effect of rGO.

  17. Nanowire Nanoelectronics: Building Interfaces with Tissue and Cells at the Natural Scale of Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Karni, Itzhaq Tzahi

    The interface between nanoscale electronic devices and biological systems enables interactions at length-scales natural to biology, and thus should maximize communication between these two diverse yet complementary systems. Moreover, nanostructures and nanostructured substrates show enhanced coupling to artificial membranes, cells, and tissue. Such nano-bio interfaces offer better sensitivity and spatial resolution as compared to conventional planar structures. In this work, I will report the electrical properties of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) interfaced with embryonic chicken hearts and cultured cardiomyocytes. I developed a scheme that allows us to manipulate the nanoelectronic to tissue/cell interfaces while monitoring their electrical activity. In addition, by utilizing the bottom-up approach, we extend our work to the sub-cellular regime, and interface cells with the smallest reported device ever and thus exceed the spatial and temporal resolution limits of other electrical recording techniques. The exceptional synthetic control and flexible assembly of nanowires provides powerful tools for fundamental studies and applications in life science, and opens up the potential of merging active transistors with cells such that the distinction between nonliving and living systems is blurred.

  18. Temperature-Dependent Charge Transport through Individually Contacted DNA Origami-Based Au Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschome, Bezu; Facsko, Stefan; Schönherr, Tommy; Kerbusch, Jochen; Keller, Adrian; Erbe, Artur

    2016-10-11

    DNA origami nanostructures have been used extensively as scaffolds for numerous applications such as for organizing both organic and inorganic nanomaterials, studying single molecule reactions, and fabricating photonic devices. Yet, little has been done toward the integration of DNA origami nanostructures into nanoelectronic devices. Among other challenges, the technical difficulties in producing well-defined electrical contacts between macroscopic electrodes and individual DNA origami-based nanodevices represent a serious bottleneck that hinders the thorough characterization of such devices. Therefore, in this work, we have developed a method to electrically contact individual DNA origami-based metallic nanowires using electron beam lithography. We then characterize the charge transport of such nanowires in the temperature range from room temperature down to 4.2 K. The room temperature charge transport measurements exhibit ohmic behavior, whereas at lower temperatures, multiple charge transport mechanisms such as tunneling and thermally assisted transport start to dominate. Our results confirm that charge transport along metallized DNA origami nanostructures may deviate from pure metallic behavior due to several factors including partial metallization, seed inhomogeneities, impurities, and weak electronic coupling among AuNPs. Besides, this study further elucidates the importance of variable temperature measurements for determining the dominant charge transport mechanisms for conductive nanostructures made by self-assembly approaches.

  19. Variation in electrical properties of gamma irradiated cadmium selenate nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, R.P., E-mail: chauhanrpc@gmail.com; Rana, Pallavi, E-mail: prana.phy@gmail.com; Narula, Chetna; Panchal, Suresh; Choudhary, Ritika

    2016-07-15

    Preparation of low-dimensional materials attracts more and more interest in the last few years, mainly due to the wide field of potential commercial applications ranging from life sciences, medicine and biotechnology to communication and electronics. One-dimensional systems are the smallest dimension structures that can be used for efficient transport of electrons and thus expected to be critical to the function and integration of nanoscale devices. Nanowires with well controlled morphology and extremely high aspect ratio can be obtained by replicating a nanoporous polymer ion-track membrane with cylindrical pores of controlled dimensions. With this technique, materials can be deposited within the pores of the membrane by electrochemical reduction of the desired ion. In the present study, cadmium selenate nanowires were synthesized potentiostatically via template method. These synthesized nanowires were then exposed to gamma rays by using a {sup 60}Co source at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. Structural, morphological, electrical and elemental characterizations were made in order to analyze the effect of gamma irradiation on the synthesized nanowires. I–V measurements of cadmium selenate nanowires, before and after irradiation were made with the help of Keithley 2400 source meter and Ecopia probe station. A significant change in the electrical conductivity of cadmium selenate nanowires was found after gamma irradiation. The crystallography of the synthesized nanowires was also studied using a Rigaku X-ray diffractrometer equipped with Cu-Kα radiation. XRD patterns of irradiated samples showed no variation in the peak positions or phase change.

  20. Ultrashort pulse manipulation of ZnO nanowire growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eric Tong Yih; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Nishi, Masayuki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2009-01-01

    A procedure of femtosecond pulse laser irradiation was incorporated into the synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires in aqueous solutions to investigate the photo-initiated heterogeneous nucleation induced by the irradiation and the associated nanowire growth. Elongated ZnO nanowires with smooth planes and end tips were successfully grown following the irradiation process and subsequent hydrothermal treatments in a catalyst-free environment, compared to aggregated flower-like nanostructures with porous and rough surfaces, grown from homogeneous nucleation without laser irradiation. Studies using femtosecond laser systems at 1 kHz and 250 kHz repetition rates show that the pulse energy is critical in the heterogeneous nucleation process for the growth of ZnO nanowires. A minimum threshold pulse energy, 200 microJ/pulse for the 1 kHz system and 2.4 microJ/pulse for 250 kHz, is observed beyond which well-defined and individually separated nanowires were grown. Thermal effect caused by the 250 kHz repetition rate provides a counter-balance to the low pulse energy required for the growth process. XRD analysis of the nanowires reveals a hexagonal structure while photoluminescence shows emission at about 385 nm. The overall results show that the pulse energy is critical for heterogeneous nucleation while the irradiation duration affects the density of nucleation, which together with the hydrothermal treatment temperature influence the growth rate and thus the morphology of the nanowires.

  1. Optical properties of nanocomposites: Percolation films, nanowires, and nanoholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolskiy, Viktor Anatolyevich

    The optical properties of percolation films, nanowires, nanowire composites, and nanoholes composites were studied theoretically. Developed theory predicts the existence of localized plasmon modes in metal-dielectric percolation films when the metal concentration is close to the percolation threshold. Due to the plasmon localization local fields, local field fluctuations are extremely enhanced on the surface of percolation composite. This explains enormous enhancement of the nonlinear diffuse scattering by the percolation film. Also, localization of the plasmon modes and their coupling to optical phonon modes leads to the enhanced absorption by thick percolation composites. Our simulations show that spatial plasmon modes localization and unique local spectral characteristics of these modes make it possible to produce extremely sharp responses using the percolation composites. The developed technique suggests the existence of propagating polariton modes in the metal nanowire, which explains the unique spatial distribution of the electromagnetic field around the metal nanowire. Our simulations show the existence of sharp plasmon resonance in single nanowire and localized plasmon modes in nanowire percolation composite. The specific nanowire composite, which has negative refractive index is suggested. Development of recent Generalized Ohm's Law (GOL) approach allows us to explain extraordinary light transmittance by metal-nanoholes composite. The theory predicts large local field enhancement in such composite close to the transmittance resonance. The theory also predicts the plausibility of light nano-management using metal-holes composites.

  2. Domain wall propagation tuning in magnetic nanowires through geometric modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzuza, L.C.C., E-mail: luisarzuza179@gmail.com [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Universidad de la Costa, Departamento de Ciencias Naturales y Exactas, Calle 58 No. 55-66, Barranquilla (Colombia); López-Ruiz, R. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Salazar-Aravena, D. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapacá, 1000007 Arica (Chile); Knobel, M. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), 13083-970 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Béron, F.; Pirota, K.R. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The modulated nanowires dynamics occurs through two reversal modes. • Modulated nanowires show a change in the χ in contrast to homogeneous ones. • The FORC method reveals a non-uniform stray field due to shape modulation. - Abstract: The magnetic behavior of nickel modulated nanowires embedded in porous alumina membranes is investigated. Their diameters exhibit a sharp transition between below (35 nm) and above (52 nm) the theoretical limit for transverse and vortex domain walls. Magnetic hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) were measured on several ordered nanowire arrays with different wide-narrow segment lengths ratio and compared with those from homogenous nanowires. The experimental magnetic response evidences a rather complex susceptibility behavior for nanowires with modulated diameter. Micromagnetic simulations on isolated and first-neighbors arrays of nanowires show that the domain wall structure, which depends on the segment diameter, suffers a transformation while crossing the diameter modulation, but without any pinning. The experimental array magnetic behavior can be ascribed to a heterogeneous stray field induced by the diameter modulation, yielding a stronger interaction field at the wide extremity than at the narrow one. The results evidence the possibility to control the domain wall propagation and morphology by modulating the lateral aspect of the magnetic entity.

  3. Promoting cell proliferation using water dispersible germanium nanowires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bezuidenhout

    Full Text Available Group IV Nanowires have strong potential for several biomedical applications. However, to date their use remains limited because many are synthesised using heavy metal seeds and functionalised using organic ligands to make the materials water dispersible. This can result in unpredicted toxic side effects for mammalian cells cultured on the wires. Here, we describe an approach to make seedless and ligand free Germanium nanowires water dispersible using glutamic acid, a natural occurring amino acid that alleviates the environmental and health hazards associated with traditional functionalisation materials. We analysed the treated material extensively using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, High resolution-TEM, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Using a series of state of the art biochemical and morphological assays, together with a series of complimentary and synergistic cellular and molecular approaches, we show that the water dispersible germanium nanowires are non-toxic and are biocompatible. We monitored the behaviour of the cells growing on the treated germanium nanowires using a real time impedance based platform (xCELLigence which revealed that the treated germanium nanowires promote cell adhesion and cell proliferation which we believe is as a result of the presence of an etched surface giving rise to a collagen like structure and an oxide layer. Furthermore this study is the first to evaluate the associated effect of Germanium nanowires on mammalian cells. Our studies highlight the potential use of water dispersible Germanium Nanowires in biological platforms that encourage anchorage-dependent cell growth.

  4. Characterization of electrodeposited bismuth-tellurium nanowires and nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinisetty, D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Davis, D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Podlaha-Murphy, E.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Murphy, M.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Karki, A.B.; Young, D.P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Devireddy, R.V., E-mail: devireddy@me.lsu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Arrays of nanowires and nanotubes of bismuth-tellurium (Bi-Te) were fabricated by electrodeposition techniques. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to characterize the morphology of the fabricated BiTe nanowires and nanotubes. The fabricated BiTe nanowire and nanotube arrays are shown to be polycrystalline with no preferred orientation. Wavelength dispersive spectroscopy analysis shows that either p-type (Bi rich) or n-type (Te rich) nanowires or nanotubes can be obtained by changing the electrodeposition potentials. The lamellar thickness of the nanowires and nanotube crystallites were determined using the Scherrer equation and found to be {approx}17-24 nm. The Seebeck coefficient measurements at room temperature obtained for the nanowires and nanotubes deposited at -400 mV were +11.5 and +17 {mu}V K{sup -1}, respectively, whereas those obtained at -65 mV were -48 and -63 {mu}V K{sup -1}, respectively. The electrical resistance measurements indicated that the resistance of the nanowires and nanotubes decreased with increasing temperature, suggesting that these nanostructures behave like semiconductors.

  5. Single cell detection using a magnetic zigzag nanowire biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Ger, Tzong-Rong; Lin, Ya-Hui; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2013-08-07

    A magnetic zigzag nanowire device was designed for single cell biosensing. Nanowires with widths of 150, 300, 500, and 800 nm were fabricated on silicon trenches by electron beam lithography, electron beam evaporation, and lift-off processes. Magnetoresistance measurements were performed before and after the attachment of a single magnetic cell to the nanowires to characterize the magnetic signal change due to the influence of the magnetic cell. Magnetoresistance responses were measured in different magnetic field directions, and the results showed that this nanowire device can be used for multi-directional detection. It was observed that the highest switching field variation occurred in a 150 nm wide nanowire when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. On the other hand, the highest magnetoresistance ratio variation occurred in a 800 nm wide nanowire also when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. Besides, the trench-structured substrate proposed in this study can fix the magnetic cell to the sensor in a fluid environment, and the stray field generated by the corners of the magnetic zigzag nanowires has the function of actively attracting the magnetic cells for detection.

  6. Synthesis and field emission properties of GaN nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Enling, E-mail: Lienling@xaut.edu.cn [Science School, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710048 (China); Cui Zhen; Dai Yuanbin; Zhao Danna; Zhao Tao [Science School, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710048 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires grown on nickel-coated n-type Si (1 0 0) substrates have been synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and the field emission properties of GaN nanowires have been studied. The results show that (1) the grown GaN nanowires, which have diameters in the range of 50-100 nm and lengths of several micrometers, are uniformly distributed on Si substrates. The characteristics of the grown GaN nanowires have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and through these investigations it was found that the GaN nanowires are of a good crystalline quality (2) When the emission current density is 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}, the necessary electric field is an open electric field of around 9.1 V/{mu}m (at room temperature). The field enhancement factor is {approx}730. The field emission properties of GaN nanowires films are related both to the surface roughness and the density of the nanowires in the film.

  7. Morphology Controlled Fabrication of InN Nanowires on Brass Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth of semiconductor nanowires on cheap metal substrates could pave the way to the large-scale manufacture of low-cost nanowire-based devices. In this work, we demonstrated that high density InN nanowires can be directly grown on brass substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It was found that Zn from the brass substrates is the key factor in the formation of nanowires by restricting the lateral growth of InN. The nanowire morphology is highly dependent on the growth temperature. While at a lower growth temperature, the nanowires and the In droplets have large diameters. At the elevated growth temperature, the lateral sizes of the nanowires and the In droplets are much smaller. Moreover, the nanowire diameter can be controlled in situ by varying the temperature in the growth process. This method is very instructive to the diameter-controlled growth of nanowires of other materials.

  8. Metal-dielectric-CNT nanowires for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Altun, Ali; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-10-03

    A sensor with a substrate includes nanowires extending vertically from the substrate, a hafnia coating on the nanowires that provides hafnia coated nanowires, and a noble metal coating on the hafnia coated nanowires. The top of the hafnia and noble metal coated nanowires bent onto one another to create a canopy forest structure. There are numerous randomly arranged holes that let through scattered light. The many points of contact, hot spots, amplify signals. The methods include the steps of providing a Raman spectroscopy substrate, introducing nano crystals to the Raman spectroscopy substrate, growing a forest of nanowires from the nano crystals on the Raman spectroscopy substrate, coating the nanowires with hafnia providing hafnia coated nanowires, and coating the hafnia coated nanowires with a noble metal or other metal.

  9. Silicon Nanowires with MoSx and Pt as Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Hsieh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A convenient method was used for synthesizing Pt-nanoparticle/MoSx/silicon nanowires nanocomposites. Obtained Pt-MoSx/silicon nanowires electrocatalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The hydrogen evolution reaction efficiency of the Pt-MoSx/silicon nanowire nanocomposite catalysts was assessed by examining polarization and electrolysis measurements under solar light irradiations. The electrochemical characterizations demonstrate that Pt-MoSx/silicon nanowire electrodes exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in an acidic electrolyte. The hydrogen production capability of Pt-MoSx/silicon nanowires is also comparable to MoSx/silicon nanowires and Pt/silicon nanowires. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments suggest that the enhanced performance of Pt-MoSx/silicon nanowires can be attributed to the fast electron transfer between Pt-MoSx/silicon nanowire electrodes and electrolyte interfaces.

  10. Solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire anodes for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian E.; Rathmell, Aaron R.; Yan, Liang; Ye, Shengrong; Flowers, Patrick F.; You, Wei; Wiley, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%.This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01024h

  11. Development of nanowire arrays for neural probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Xie, Jining; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2005-05-01

    It is already established that functional electrical stimulation is an effective way to restore many functions of the brain in disabled individuals. The electrical stimulation can be done by using an array of electrodes. Neural probes stimulate or sense the biopotentials mainly through the exposed metal sites. These sites should be smaller relative to the spatial potential distribution so that any potential averaging in the sensing area can be avoided. At the same time, the decrease in size of these sensing sites is limited due to the increase in impedance levels and the thermal noise while decreasing its size. It is known that current density in a planar electrode is not uniform and a higher current density can be observer around the perimeter of the electrodes. Electrical measurements conducted on many nanotubes and nanowires have already proved that it could be possible to use for current density applications and the drawbacks of the present design in neural probes can be overcome by incorporating many nanotechnology solutions. In this paper we present the design and development of nanowire arrays for the neural probe for the multisite contact which has the ability to collect and analyze isolated single unit activity. An array of vertically grown nanowires is used as contact site and many of such arrays can be used for stimulating as well as recording sites. The nanolevel interaction and wireless communication solution can extend to applications involving the treatment of many neurological disorders including Parkinson"s disease, Alzheimer"s disease, spinal injuries and the treatment of blindness and paralyzed patients with minimal or no invasive surgical procedures.

  12. Measuring nanowire thermal conductivity at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Yang, Juekuan; Xiong, Yucheng; Huang, Baoling; Xu, Terry T.; Li, Deyu; Xu, Dongyan

    2018-02-01

    This work extends the micro-thermal-bridge method for thermal conductivity measurements of nanowires to high temperatures. The thermal-bridge method, based on a microfabricated device with two side-by-side suspended membranes with integrated platinum resistance heaters/thermometers, has been used to determine thermal conductivity of various nanowires/nanotubes/nanoribbons at relatively low temperatures. However, to date, thermal conductivity characterization of nanowires at temperatures above 600 K has seldom been reported presumably due to several technical difficulties including the instability of the microfabricated thermometers, radiation heat loss, and the effect of the background conductance on the measurement. Here we report on our attempt to address the aforementioned challenges and demonstrate thermal conductivity measurement of boron nanoribbons up to 740 K. To eliminate high temperature resistance instability, the device is first annealed at 1023 K for 5 min in an argon atmosphere. Two radiation shields are installed in the measurement chamber to minimize radiation heat loss from the measurement device to the surroundings; and the temperature of the device at each set point is calibrated by an additional thermocouple directly mounted on the chip carrier. The effect of the background conductance is eliminated by adopting a differential measurement scheme. With all these modifications, we successfully measured the thermal conductivity of boron nanoribbons over a wide temperature range from 27 K to 740 K. The measured thermal conductivity increases monotonically with temperature and reaches a plateau of ~2.5 W m‑1 K‑1 at approximately 400 K, with no clear signature of Umklapp scattering observed in the whole measurement temperature range.

  13. Vertical Ge/Si Core/Shell Nanowire Junctionless Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Fuxi; Otuonye, Ugo; Lu, Wei D

    2016-01-13

    Vertical junctionless transistors with a gate-all-around (GAA) structure based on Ge/Si core/shell nanowires epitaxially grown and integrated on a ⟨111⟩ Si substrate were fabricated and analyzed. Because of efficient gate coupling in the nanowire-GAA transistor structure and the high density one-dimensional hole gas formed in the Ge nanowire core, excellent P-type transistor behaviors with Ion of 750 μA/μm were obtained at a moderate gate length of 544 nm with minimal short-channel effects. The experimental data can be quantitatively modeled by a GAA junctionless transistor model with few fitting parameters, suggesting the nanowire transistors can be fabricated reliably without introducing additional factors that can degrade device performance. Devices with different gate lengths were readily obtained by tuning the thickness of an etching mask film. Analysis of the histogram of different devices yielded a single dominate peak in device parameter distribution, indicating excellent uniformity and high confidence of single nanowire operation. Using two vertical nanowire junctionless transistors, a PMOS-logic inverter with near rail-to-rail output voltage was demonstrated, and device matching in the logic can be conveniently obtained by controlling the number of nanowires employed in different devices rather than modifying device geometry. These studies show that junctionless transistors based on vertical Ge/Si core/shell nanowires can be fabricated in a controlled fashion with excellent performance and may be used in future hybrid, high-performance circuits where bottom-up grown nanowire devices with different functionalities can be directly integrated with an existing Si platform.

  14. Semiconductor Nanowires from Materials Science and Device Physics Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Lars

    2005-03-01

    Realization of extremely down-scaled devices gives tough challenges related to technology and materials science. One reason for the concern is that top-down fabricated nano-devices tend to have their properties dominated by process-induced damage, rendering ultra-small devices not so useful. Alternatively, bottom-up fabrication methods may allow dimensions on the scale even below 10 nm, still with superb device properties. I will in this talk describe our research on catalytically induced growth of semiconductor nanowires. Our method uses catalytic gold nanoparticles, allowing tight control of diameter as well as position of where the nanowire grows, with our work completely focused on epitaxially nucleated nanowires in which the nanowire structure can be seen as a coherent, monolithic extension of the crystalline substrate material. One of the most important achievements in this field of research is the realization of atomically abrupt heterostructures within nanowires, in which the material composition can be altered within only one or a few monolayers, thus allowing 1D heterostructure devices to be realized. This has allowed a variety of quantum devices to be realized, such as single-electron transistors, resonant tunneling devices as well as memory storage devices. A related recent field of progress has been the realization of ideally nucleated III-V nanowires on Si substrates, cases where we have also reported functioning III-V heterostructure device structures on Si. All of these device related challenges evolve from an improved understanding of the materials science involved in nucleation of nanowires, in altering of composition of the growing nanowire, in control of the growth direction etc. I will give examples of these materials science issues and will especially dwell on the opportunities to form new kinds of materials, e.g. as 3D complex nanowire structures, resembling nanotrees or nanoforests.

  15. Optical Space Telescope Assembly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Space Telescope Assembly (OSTA) task is to demonstrate the technology readiness of assembling large space telescopes on orbit in 2015. This task is an...

  16. Transient Rayleigh scattering from single semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazeri, Mohammad; Jackson, Howard E.; Smith, Leigh M. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0011 (United States); Yarrison-Rice, Jan M. [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Kang, Jung-Hyun; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-12-04

    Transient Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy is a new pump-probe technique to study the dynamics and cooling of photo-excited carriers in single semiconductor nanowires. By studying the evolution of the transient Rayleigh spectrum in time after excitation, one can measure the time evolution of the density and temperature of photo-excited electron-hole plasma (EHP) as they equilibrate with lattice. This provides detailed information of dynamics and cooling of carriers including linear and bimolecular recombination properties, carrier transport characteristics, and the energy-loss rate of hot electron-hole plasma through the emission of LO and acoustic phonons.

  17. Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Chemical Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing‿, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A novel top-down fabrication technique was presented for single-crystal Si-NW fabrication realized with conventional microfabrication technique. High quality triangular Si-NWs were made with high wafer-s...

  18. All-metal uranium bed loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichman, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    The uranium bed processing system is essentially a vacuum system designed to transfer tritium gas from a large shipping container into small, portable containers called beds. The portable beds, designed to contain specific amounts of tritium or deuterium gas, are attached to various production systems for the purpose of hydriding occluder films in the production of neutron generators. The beds are constructed of stainless steel and contain uranium that is hydrided up to 50% capacity with tritium or deuterum gas. This technique not only makes it easy to load a bed, but also to recover surplus gas from a production system after the neutron generator hydriding process has been completed. The process development activities were directed toward solving and developing processing procedures for: (1) purifying the tritium gas; (2) reducing the protium gas; (3) removing helium (due to tritium decay) from the vacuum system; (4) eliminating hydrocarbon contamination; (5) increasing helium pumping speed with ion pumps; (6) providing multiple bed processing capability; (7) measuring pressure accurately; and (8) detect system leaks and obtain residual gas analyses of the system

  19. Preparation of Ag/Cu Janus nanowires: Electrodeposition in track-etched polymer templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.R. [Henan Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Physical Engineering College, Zhenzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, C.M.; Fu, Q.B. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiao, Z.; Wang, W.D.; Qin, G.Y. [Henan Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Physical Engineering College, Zhenzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Xue, J.M., E-mail: jmxue@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • In this paper, we introduce a simple method for preparation of Janus nanowires by electrodeposition. • Using ion-track-etched PC polymer templates and commercial PC track-etched membrane templates, Ag/Cu Janus nanowires fabricated by this method all have uniform size. No matter how the holes array in the template, regular or not, the nanowires prepared by this method have similar properties. • By controlling the etching time, the size of the nanowires could be controlled easily and special shape nanowires also can be prepared by this template. • The polymer template is very easy to dissolve thoroughly and has no damage to nanowires almost. It is suitable for the preparation of nanowires suspension. • This method also has better applicability for polymer templates and can be seen as a simple convenient method for the preparation of Ag/Cu Janus nanowires. - Abstract: Bimetal (Janus) nanowire has been widely used as a promising nanoscale motor. In this paper we present a highly controllable method to fabricate Ag/Cu Janus nanowires using track-etched polymer templates. Ag/Cu Janus nanowires with uniform size and stabilized structure have been successfully fabricated by electrodepositing Ag nanowires, and subsequently Cu nanowires in track-etched polymer templates. The pore size of nanopores prepared by this template is uniform and continuously controlled, so aperture of achieved nanowires are uniform and can be regulated. This polymer template can dissolve inorganic solvents that do not react with the nanowires, making it is easy to release the nanowires into solution. The nanopore shape in the track-etched templates is adjustable (e.g. conical), nanowires with more special shapes could be fabricated. Thus, these features make this simple and inexpensive method very suitable for the preparation of Janus nanowire.

  20. The tunable bistable and multistable memory effect in polymer nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Atikur; Sanyal, Milan K

    2008-01-01

    Tunable bistable and multistable resistance switching in conducting polymer nanowires has been reported. These wires show reproducible switching transition under several READ-WRITE-ERASE cycles. The switching is observed at low temperature and the ON/OFF resistance ratio for the voltage biased switching transition was found to be more than 10 3 . Current biased measurements show lower ON/OFF ratio and some of the nanowires exhibit a multistable switching transition in current biased measurements. The threshold voltage for switching and the ON/OFF resistance ratio can be tuned by changing doping concentration of the nanowires

  1. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  2. Microstructural characterization of single-crystalline potassium hollandite nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, C.Y.; Zhen, L.; Zhang, Q.; Tang, J.; Qin, L.-C.

    2008-01-01

    Single-crystalline potassium hollandite KTi 8 O 16.5 nanowires were synthesized by the molten salt method at 800 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy observation shows that the nanowires are with octagonal cross-sections, and combined analyses of transmission electron microscopy and the electron diffraction results show that the terminated planes are angled 90 or 60 degrees to the growth direction, [001] crystallography direction. Ordering of the potassium cations in the tunnels was revealed by electron diffraction. The mechanism of one-dimensional growth of the nanowires was attributed to the oriented attachment mechanism

  3. Plasmon-polariton modes of dense Au nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hongdan; Lemmens, Peter; Wulferding, Dirk; Cetin, Mehmet Fatih [IPKM, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany); Tornow, Sabine; Zwicknagl, Gertrud [IMP, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany); Krieg, Ulrich; Pfnuer, Herbert [IFP, LU Hannover (Germany); Daum, Winfried; Lilienkamp, Gerhard [IEPT, TU Clausthal (Germany); Schilling, Meinhard [EMG, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Using optical absorption and other techniques we study plasmon-polariton modes of dense Au nanowire arrays as function of geometrical parameters and coupling to molecular degrees of freedom. For this instance we electrochemically deposit Au nanowires in porous alumina with well controlled morphology and defect concentration. Transverse and longitudinal modes are observed in the absorption spectra resulting from the anisotropic plasmonic structure. The longitudinal mode shows a blue shift of energy with increasing length of the wires due to the more collective nature of this response. We compare our observations with model calculations and corresponding results on 2D Ag nanowire lattices.

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of ultrathin rhodium nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Bao Lin; Ren-Yun; Sun Hou Qian; Chen Xiao Shuang; Zhao Ji Jun

    2003-01-01

    The structures of ultrathin rhodium nanowires are studied using empirical molecular dynamics simulations with a genetic algorithm. Helical multishell cylindrical and pentagonal packing structures are found. The electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires are calculated using an spd tight-binding Hamiltonian in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The average magnetic moment and electronic density of states are obtained. Our results indicate that the electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires depend not only on the size of the wire but also on the atomic structure. In particular, centred pentagonal and hexagonal structures can be unusually ferromagnetic.

  5. Bottom-up silicon nanowire-based thermoelectric microgenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, D.; Huber, R.; Hierold, C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, bottom-up intrinsic crystalline Si nanowire arrays in combination with top-down microfabrication techniques and a vertical device architecture have been proposed to develop an all-silicon nanostructured thermoelectric generator. To fabricate this device, a suitable vertical integration of Si NWs on patterned microstructures, which define the thermoelectric legs of the generator, has been achieved by bonding top and bottom silicon structures through nanowires. The process has been proven to be a feasible approach that employs a regrowth process of the nanowires for bonding purposes.

  6. Resonant features of the terahertz generation in semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trukhin, V. N., E-mail: valera.truchin@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Bouravleuv, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation); Mustafin, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Cirlin, G. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation); Kuritsyn, D. I.; Rumyantsev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Morosov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation); Kakko, J. P.; Huhtio, T.; Lipsanen, H. [Aalto University, Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Micronova (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies of the generation of terahertz radiation in periodic arrays of GaAs nanowires via excitation by ultrashort optical pulses. It is found that the generation of THz radiation exhibits resonant behavior due to the resonant excitation of cylindrical modes in the nanowires. At the optimal geometric parameters of the nanowire array, the generation efficiency is found to be higher than that for bulk p-InAs, which is one of the most effective coherent terahertz emitters.

  7. Contact materials for nanowire devices and nanoelectromechanical switches

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    The impact of contact materials on the performance of nanostructured devices is expected to be signifi cant. This is especially true since size scaling can increase the contact resistance and induce many unseen phenomenon and reactions that greatly impact device performance. Nanowire and nanoelectromechanical switches are two emerging nanoelectronic devices. Nanowires provide a unique opportunity to control the property of a material at an ultra-scaled dimension, whereas a nanoelectromechanical switch presents zero power consumption in its off state, as it is physically detached from the sensor anode. In this article, we specifi cally discuss contact material issues related to nanowire devices and nanoelectromechanical switches.

  8. Multiple simultaneous fabrication of molecular nanowires using nanoscale electrocrystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Rieko; Kubota, Tohru; Mashiko, Shinro

    2006-01-01

    We carried out a multiple simultaneous fabrication based on the nanoscale electrocrystallization to simultaneously construct molecular nanowires at two or more positions. This substrate-independent nanoscale electrocrystallization process enables nanowires fabrication at specific positions using AC. We also succeeded in multiple fabrications only at each gap between the electrode tips. We found that π-stack was formed along the long axis of the nanowires obtained by analyzing the selected-area electron diffraction. We believe this technique has the potential for expansion to the novel low-cost and energy-saving fabrication of high-performance nanodevices

  9. Investigation of superconducting properties of nanowires prepared by template synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michotte, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Piraux, L.

    2003-01-01

    of the nanowires is small enough to ensure a one-dimensional superconducting regime in a wide temperature range below T. The non-zero resistance in the superconducting state and its variation caused by fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter were measured versus temperature, magnetic field, and applied......We report on the transport properties of single superconducting lead nanowires grown by an electrodeposition technique, embedded in a nanoporous track-etched polymer membrane. The nanowires are granular, have a uniform diameter of ∼40 nm and a very large aspect ratio (∼500). The diameter...

  10. Looking into meta-atoms of plasmonic nanowire metamaterial

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Kuntong

    2014-09-10

    Nanowire-based plasmonic metamaterials exhibit many intriguing properties related to the hyperbolic dispersion, negative refraction, epsilon-near-zero behavior, strong Purcell effect, and nonlinearities. We have experimentally and numerically studied the electromagnetic modes of individual nanowires (meta-atoms) forming the metamaterial. High-resolution, scattering-type near-field optical microscopy has been used to visualize the intensity and phase of the modes. Numerical and analytical modeling of the mode structure is in agreement with the experimental observations and indicates the presence of the nonlocal response associated with cylindrical surface plasmons of nanowires.

  11. Ferromagnetism in Cr-doped passivated AlN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    We apply first principles calculations to predict the effect of Cr doping on the electronic and magnetic properties of passivated AlN nanowires. We compare the energetics of the possible dopant sites and demonstrate the favorable configuration ferromagnetic ordering. The charge density of the pristine passivated AlN nanowires is used to elucidate the bonding character. Spin density maps demonstrate an induced spin polarization for N atoms next to dopant atoms, though most of the magnetism is carried by the Cr atoms. Cr-doped AlN nanowires turn out to be interesting for spintronic devices. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  12. Functionalization of nickel nanowires with a fluorophore aiming at new probes for multimodal bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Paula C; Sousa, Célia T; Araújo, João P; Guiomar, António J; Trindade, Tito

    2013-11-15

    This work reports research on the development of bimodal magnetic and fluorescent 1D nanoprobes. First, ferromagnetic nickel nanowires (NiNW) have been prepared by Ni electrodeposition in an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. The highly ordered self-assembled AAO nanoporous templates were fabricated using a two-step anodization method of aluminum foil. The surface of the NiNW were then modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI) which was previously labeled with an organic dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate: FITC) via covalent bonding. The ensuing functionalized NiNW exhibited the characteristic green fluorescence of FITC and could be magnetically separated from aqueous solutions by using a NdFeB magnet. Finally, the interest of these bimodal NiNW as nanoprobes for in vitro cell separation and biolabeling was preliminary assessed in a proof of principle experiment that involved the attachment of biofunctionalized NiNW to blood cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Fully Integrated Nanosystem of Semiconductor Nanowires for Direct Solar Water Splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chong; Tang, Jinyao; Chen, Hao Ming; Liu, Bin; Yang, Peidong

    2013-06-12

    Artificial photosynthesis, the biomimetic approach to converting sunlight?s energy directly into chemical fuels, aims to imitate nature by using an integrated system of nanostructures, each of which plays a specific role in the sunlight-to-fuel conversion process. Here we describe a fully integrated system of nanoscale photoelectrodes assembled from inorganic nanowires for direct solar water splitting. Similar to the photosynthetic system in a chloroplast, the artificial photosynthetic system comprises two semiconductor light absorbers with large surface area, an interfacial layer for charge transport, and spatially separated cocatalysts to facilitate the water reduction and oxidation. Under simulated sunlight, a 0.12percent solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency is achieved, which is comparable to that of natural photosynthesis. The result demonstrates the possibility of integrating material components into a functional system that mimics the nanoscopic integration in chloroplasts. It also provides a conceptual blueprint of modular design that allows incorporation of newly discovered components for improved performance.

  14. Inhomogeneous free-electron distribution in InN nanowires: Photoluminescence excitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Molina-Sánchez, A.; Garro, N.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Iikawa, F.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2010-09-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN nanowires (NWs) and a high-crystalline quality InN layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The PLE experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN NW. The differences in the PLE spectra can be accounted for the inhomogeneous electron distribution within the NWs caused by a bulk donor concentration (ND+) and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states (Nss+) . For NW radii larger than 30 nm, ND+ and Nss+ modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data.

  15. Selective Mechanical Transfer Deposition of Langmuir Graphene Films for High-Performance Silver Nanowire Hybrid Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Matthew J; Ogilvie, Sean P; Alomairy, Sultan; Vöckerodt, Terence; Myles, David; Cann, Maria; Chan, Helios; Jurewicz, Izabela; King, Alice A K; Dalton, Alan B

    2017-10-31

    In this work, we present silver nanowire hybrid electrodes prepared through the addition of small quantities of pristine graphene by mechanical transfer deposition from surface-assembled Langmuir films. This technique is a fast, efficient, and facile method for modifying the optoelectronic performance of AgNW films. We demonstrate that it is possible to use this technique to perform two-step device production by selective patterning of the stamp used, leading to controlled variation in the local sheet resistance across a device. This is particularly attractive for producing extremely low cost sensors on arbitrarily large scales. Our aim is to address some of the concerns surrounding the use of AgNW films as replacements for indium tin oxide (ITO), namely, the use of scarce materials and poor stability of AgNWs against flexural and environmental degradation.

  16. Polarized emission from CsPbBr3 nanowire embedded-electrospun PU fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Tuğrul; Topçu, Gökhan; Savacı, Umut; Genç, Aziz; Turan, Servet; Sari, Emre; Demir, Mustafa M.

    2018-04-01

    Interest in all-inorganic halide perovskites has been increasing dramatically due to their high quantum yield, band gap tunability, and ease of fabrication in compositional and geometric diversity. In this study, we synthesized several hundreds of nanometer long and ˜4 nm thick CsPbBr 3 nanowires (NWs). They were then integrated into electrospun polyurethane (PU) fibers to examine the polarization behavior of the composite fiber assembly. Aligned electrospun fibers containing CsPbBr 3 NWs showed a remarkable increase in the degree of polarization from 0.17-0.30. This combination of NWs and PU fibers provides a promising composite material for various applications such as optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  17. Sn-doped β-Ga2O3 nanowires deposited by radio frequency powder sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Yong; Kang, Hyon Chol

    2018-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of Sn-doped β-Ga2O3 nanowires (NWs) deposited using radio frequency powder sputtering. The growth sequence of Sn-doped β-Ga2O3 NWs is similar to that of the undoped β-Ga2O3 NWs. Self-assembled Ga clusters act as seeds for initiating the growth of Sn-doped β-Ga2O3 NWs through a vapor-liquid-solid process, while Sn atoms are incorporated into the trunk of NWs uniformly. Different from the straight shape of undoped NWs, the conical shape of NWs is observed, which is attributed to the change in supersaturation conditions and the diffusion of the catalyst tip and reaction species.

  18. Membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  19. Dimensional effects in semiconductor nanowires; Dimensionseffekte in Halbleiternanodraehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stichtenoth, Daniel

    2008-06-23

    Nanomaterials show new physical properties, which are determined by their size and morphology. These new properties can be ascribed to the higher surface to volume ratio, to quantum size effects or to a form anisotropy. They may enable new technologies. The nanowires studied in this work have a diameter of 4 to 400 nm and a length up to 100 {mu}m. The semiconductor material used is mainly zinc oxide (ZnO), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). All nanowires were synthesized according to the vapor liquid solid mechanism, which was originally postulated for the growth of silicon whiskers. Respective modifications for the growth of compound semiconductor nanowires are discussed. Detailed luminescence studies on ZnO nanowires with different diameters show pronounced size effects which can be attributed to the origins given above. Similar to bulk material, a tuning of the material properties is often essential for a further functionalization of the nanowires. This is typical realized by doping the source material. It becomes apparent, that a controlled doping of nanowires during the growth process is not successful. Here an alternative method is chosen: the doping after the growth by ion implantation. However, the doping by ion implantation goes always along with the creation of crystal defects. The defects have to be annihilated in order to reach an activation of th introduced dopants. At high ion fluences and ion masses the sputtering of surface atoms becomes more important. This results in a characteristic change in the morphology of the nanowires. In detail, the doping of ZnO and ZnS nanowires with color centers (manganese and rare earth elements) is demonstrated. Especially, the intra 3d luminescence of manganese implanted ZnS nanostructures shows a strong dependence of the nanowire diameter and morphology. This dependence can be described by expanding Foersters model (which describes an energy transfer to the color centers) by a dimensional parameter

  20. TiO2-Anatase Nanowire Dispersed Composite Electrode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asagoe, K; Suzuki, Y; Ngamsinlapasathian, S; Yoshikawa, S

    2007-01-01

    TiO 2 anatase nanowires have been prepared by a hydrothermal process followed by post-heat treatment in air. TiO 2 nanoparticle/TiO 2 nanowire composite electrodes were prepared for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) in order to improve light-to-electricity conversion efficiency. The TiO 2 NP/TiO 2 NW composite cells showed higher DSC performance than ordinary nanoparticle cells and fully nanowire cells: efficiency (η = 6.53 % for DSC with 10% nanowire, whereas 5.59% for 0% nanowire, and 2.42% for 100% nanowire