WorldWideScience

Sample records for assaying pet targets

  1. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  2. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  3. Melanin Targeted Pre-clinical PET Imaging of Melanoma Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Gang; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Limpa-Amara, Naengnoi; Mahmood, Ashfaq; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Cheng, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Dialkylamino-alkyl-benzamide possess affinities for melanin, suggesting that such 18F-labeled benzamides could potentially be used as melanin targeted positron emission tomography (PET) probes to identify melanotic melanoma metastases in vivo with high sensitivity and specificity. In this report, we describe the synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of 18F-N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-4-fluoro-Benzamide (18F-FBZA) in mouse tumor models.

  4. The Dilemma of Target Delineation with PET/CT in Radiotherapy Planning for Malignant Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Currently there are many unanswered questions concerning contouring a target with PET/CT in radiotherapy planning. Who should contour the PET volume-the radiation oncologist or the nuclear medicine physician? Which factors will contribute to the dual-observer variability between them? What should be taken as the optimal SUV threshold to demarcate a malignant tumor from the normal tissue? When the PET volume does not coincide with the local area CT findings, which portion should be contoured as the target? If a reginal lymph nodedraining area or a remote region is shown to be PET positive but CT negative, or PET negative but CT positive, how is the target identified and selected? Further studies concerning the relationship between PET/CT and the cancerous tissue are needed. The long-term clinical results showing an increased therapeutic ratio will finally verify the applicability of guidelines to contour the target with PET/CT in radiotherapy planning.

  5. Development of PET molecular targeting agents with gallium-68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) is increasing due to its superior imaging quality and its ability to be used for in vivo quantification. Radionuclides that decay by positron emission can be attached to the same chelators used for radiotherapy applications in diagnosis and staging. One such isotope is 68Ga (T1/2 = 68 min), which can be obtained from a long-lived generator by decay of the parent 68Ge (T1/2 = 270.8 d). The availability of 68Ga from a generator plus its ability to be stably incorporated with a variety of chelates hold promise for expanding PET utilization to facilities unable to afford their own cyclotron. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Missouri, we have developed and evaluated peptides that target the melanocortin-1 receptor and the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor for peptide guided imaging and therapy. The melanocortin-1 receptor is an attractive target for peptide guided melanoma imaging and therapy. The limited number of receptors per cell, approximately 900-5000, requires high specific activity radiolabeled peptide ligands to prevent target saturation and ensure optimal cellular uptake. GRP receptors are over-expressed by a variety of human cancers such as breast, lung, pancreatic and prostate tumors, and due to bombesin's toxicity, it is necessary to label it in high specific activity. Results are presented on NOTA and DOTA bifunctionalized α-MSH and bombesin peptides, highlighting the differences in specific activity, preparation time and in vivo characteristics.

  6. Development of PET molecular targeting agents with gallium-68

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, C.S.; Cantorias, M. [Univ. of Missouri Research Reactor Center (MURR), Columbia, MO (United States). Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Inst.; Sisay, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Galazzi, F.; Quinn, T.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Smith, C.J. [Univ. of Missouri School of Medicine and Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Research Reactor Center

    2011-07-01

    The utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) is increasing due to its superior imaging quality and its ability to be used for in vivo quantification. Radionuclides that decay by positron emission can be attached to the same chelators used for radiotherapy applications in diagnosis and staging. One such isotope is {sup 68}Ga (T{sub 1/2} = 68 min), which can be obtained from a long-lived generator by decay of the parent {sup 68}Ge (T{sub 1/2} = 270.8 d). The availability of {sup 68}Ga from a generator plus its ability to be stably incorporated with a variety of chelates hold promise for expanding PET utilization to facilities unable to afford their own cyclotron. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Missouri, we have developed and evaluated peptides that target the melanocortin-1 receptor and the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor for peptide guided imaging and therapy. The melanocortin-1 receptor is an attractive target for peptide guided melanoma imaging and therapy. The limited number of receptors per cell, approximately 900-5000, requires high specific activity radiolabeled peptide ligands to prevent target saturation and ensure optimal cellular uptake. GRP receptors are over-expressed by a variety of human cancers such as breast, lung, pancreatic and prostate tumors, and due to bombesin's toxicity, it is necessary to label it in high specific activity. Results are presented on NOTA and DOTA bifunctionalized {alpha}-MSH and bombesin peptides, highlighting the differences in specific activity, preparation time and in vivo characteristics.

  7. Design considerations for foil windows for PET radioisotope targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of a study performed at SRL to develop analytical and computational techniques for optimizing the design of conduction-cooled foil windows for PET targets. Single foil conduction cooled windows have been found to be good target entrance windows for both low energy accelerators and medium energy cyclotrons. Detailed thermal analysis has given an approximate analytical expression for the maximum temperature reached in a foil window under conditions of realistic ion beam bombardment. The effects of 'hot spots' in the beam density profile were investigated. It was shown that a factor of two safety margin in window design should be adequate to compensate for any possible beam hot spots. In addition, the reduction of foil stress by slack mounting was verified by experiments. The properties of conventional and novel foil materials were investigated for use in conduction cooled windows. Novel foil materials include two-component Al/Ti and Al/Havar foil. Results on the testing of candidate foil materials for thermal conductivity and mechanical strength at elevated temperature were presented. Two optimum foil window geometries were analyzed: a high aspect ratio window and a multiply slotted window. The multiply slotted window combines the advantages of a high aspect ratio foil window with a circular beam strike and is a promising window design for both TCA and cyclotron targets. A multiply slotted window for a N2 gas target for 15O production was designed using the methodologies discussed above. This prototype target was successfully tested using the TCA beam at SRL. (author) 6 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs

  8. Avian-specific real-time PCR assay for authenticity control in farm animal feeds and pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegels, Nicolette; González, Isabel; García, Teresa; Martín, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    A highly sensitive TaqMan real-time PCR assay targeting the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene was developed for detection of an avian-specific DNA fragment (68bp) in farm animal and pet feeds. The specificity of the assay was verified against a wide representation of animal and plant species. Applicability assessment of the avian real-time PCR was conducted through representative analysis of two types of compound feeds: industrial farm animal feeds (n=60) subjected to extreme temperatures, and commercial dog and cat feeds (n=210). Results obtained demonstrated the suitability of the real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of low percentages of highly processed avian material in the feed samples analysed. Although quantification results were well reproducible under the experimental conditions tested, an accurate estimation of the target content in feeds is impossible in practice. Nevertheless, the method may be useful as an alternative tool for traceability purposes within the framework of feed control.

  9. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-02-12

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories.

  10. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Halusa, Goran N; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John A; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Abbatiello, Susan E; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri R; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Fenyö, David; Hiltke, Tara; Ketchum, Karen A.; Kinsinger, Chris; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel C.; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael J; Qian, Wei-Jun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly V; Scott, Mitchell G; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani; Townsend, R. Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories. PMID:26867747

  11. Fully Bayesian Analysis of High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput metabolomic assays that allow simultaneous targeted screening of hundreds of metabolites have recently become available in kit form. Such assays provide a window into understanding changes to biochemical pathways due to chemical exposure or disease, and are usefu...

  12. Pet Food Palatability Evaluation: A Review of Standard Assay Techniques and Interpretation of Results with a Primary Focus on Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Aldrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pet food industry continues to grow steadily as a result of new innovative products. Quality control and product development tests for pet foods are typically conducted through palatability testing with dogs and cats. Palatability is the measure of intake of a food that indicates acceptance or the measure of preference of one food over another. Pet food palatability is most commonly measured using a single-bowl or a two-bowl assay. While these tests answer some questions about the animals’ perception of the food, there are many limitations as well. This review addresses some of these limitations and indicates opportunities for future research.

  13. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  14. Post-target produced [18F]F2 in the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrophilic radiofluorination was successfully carried out in the early years of PET radiochemistry due to its ease and fast reaction speed. However, at the present, the use of electrophilic methods is limited due to low specific activity (SA). Post-target produced [18F]F2 has significantly higher SA compared to other electrophilic approaches, and it has been used in the production of clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals at the Turku PET Centre for years. Here, we summarize the synthesis and use of these radiopharmaceuticals, namely [18F]FDOPA, [18F] CFT, [18F]EF5 and [18F]FBPA.

  15. PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver mass biopsies and ablations: Targeting accuracy of a single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine whether a single 20 s breath-hold positron-emission tomography (PET) acquisition obtained during combined PET/computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous liver biopsy or ablation procedures has the potential to target 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-avid liver masses as accurately as up to 180 s breath-hold PET acquisitions. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 10 adult patients with 13 liver masses who underwent FDG PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies (n = 5) or ablations (n = 5). PET was acquired as nine sequential 20 s, monitored, same-level breath-hold frames and CT was acquired in one monitored breath-hold. Twenty, 40, 60, and 180 s PET datasets were reconstructed. Two blinded readers marked tumour centres on randomized PET and CT datasets. Three-dimensional spatial localization differences between PET datasets and either 180 s PET or CT were analysed using multiple regression analyses. Statistical tests were two-sided and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Targeting differences between 20 s PET and 180 s PET ranged from 0.7–20.3 mm (mean 5.3 ± 4.4 mm; median 4.3) and were not statistically different from 40 or 60 s PET (p = 0.74 and 0.91, respectively). Targeting differences between 20 s PET and CT ranged from 1.4–36 mm (mean 9.6 ± 7.1 mm; median 8.2 mm) and were not statistically different from 40, 60, or 180 s PET (p = 0.84, 0.77, and 0.35, respectively). Conclusion: Single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisitions from PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver procedures have the potential to target FDG-avid liver masses with equivalent accuracy to 180 s summed, breath-hold PET acquisitions and may facilitate strategies that improve image registration and shorten procedure times

  16. Combining PET biodistribution and equilibrium dialysis assays to assess the free brain concentration and BBB transport of CNS drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Roger N; Summerfield, Scott G; Salinas, Cristian A; Read, Kevin D; Guo, Qi; Searle, Graham E; Parker, Christine A; Jeffrey, Phil; Laruelle, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The passage of drugs in and out of the brain is controlled by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), typically, using either passive diffusion across a concentration gradient or active transport via a protein carrier. In-vitro and preclinical measurements of BBB penetration do not always accurately predict the in-vivo situation in humans. Thus, the ability to assay the concentration of novel drug candidates in the human brain in vivo provides valuable information for derisking of candidate molecules early in drug development. Here, positron emission tomography (PET) measurements are combined with in-vitro equilibrium dialysis assays to enable assessment of transport and estimation of the free brain concentration in vivo. The PET and equilibrium dialysis data were obtained for 36 compounds in the pig. Predicted P-glycoprotein (P-gp) status of the compounds was consistent with the PET/equilibrium dialysis results. In particular, Loperamide, a well-known P-gp substrate, exhibited a significant concentration gradient consistent with active efflux and after inhibition of the P-gp process the gradient was removed. The ability to measure the free brain concentration and assess transport of novel compounds in the human brain with combined PET and equilibrium dialysis assays can be a useful tool in central nervous system (CNS) drug development. PMID:22274741

  17. Non-target activity detection by post-radioembolization yttrium-90 PET/CT: Image assessment technique and case examples

    OpenAIRE

    Yung Hsiang eKao; Andrew EH eTan; Richard HG eLo; Kiang Hiong eTay; Bien Soo eTan; Pierce KH eChow; David CE eNg; Anthony SW eGoh

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution yttrium-90 (90Y) imaging of post-radioembolization microsphere biodistribution may be achieved by conventional positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners that have time-of-flight capability. However, reconstructed 90Y PET/CT images have high background noise, making non-target activity detection technically challenging. This educational article describes our image assessment technique for non-target activity detection by 90Y PET/CT which...

  18. Non-Target Activity Detection by Post-Radioembolization Yttrium-90 PET/CT: Image Assessment Technique and Case Examples

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Tan, Andrew E. H.; Lo, Richard H. G.; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Tan, Bien Soo; Chow, Pierce K. H.; Ng, David C. E.; Goh, Anthony S. W.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution yttrium-90 (90Y) imaging of post-radioembolization microsphere biodistribution may be achieved by conventional positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners that have time-of-flight capability. However, reconstructed 90Y PET/CT images have high background noise, making non-target activity detection technically challenging. This educational article describes our image assessment technique for non-target activity detection by 90Y PET/CT, whic...

  19. Cyclotron Target Monitoring During Bombardment for PET Isotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of radio-labeled pharmaceuticals in medicine has generated the need for radioisotope availability on a routine commercial basis. Cyclotrons are commonly used to produce short-lived positron-emitting isotopes. A growing number of small cyclotrons have been installed in hospitals. The materials produced in cyclotrons are used in PET (Positron Emitting Tomography) studies as research tools for observing physiological mechanisms and diagnostic procedures for numerous medical problems. Due to the short half-lives of positron-emitting isotopes, they must be produced as rapidly as possible and be available in the required quantity. Sometimes, due to problems in the cyclotron operation, the production run fails. Physicians and patients expect the radioisotopes to be available at a particular time. A failed run, in addition to delaying or even canceling the scheduled medical examination, is also extremely costly. Hence the need for automated control sensors to monitor the expensive production process arises. The need is even greater in PET commercial, production and distribution centers, and in high energy cyclotron centers that produce and distribute isotopes for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), since numerous hospital clinics and patients rely on the prompt availability of the radiopharmaceuticals. Our goal was to develop an optimum radiation detection system to be used as a diagnostic tool for startup, maintenance and operational needs of the cyclotron facility

  20. Artificial tissue binding models : development and comparative evaluation of high - throughput lipophilicity assays and their use for PET tracer optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Assmus, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to increase the efficiency of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracer development process. Since many neuroimaging agents fail due to undesirably high non-specific binding (NSB) to brain tissue, we aimed at estimating the extent of NSB as early as possible, preferably before radioactive labeling and extensive animal testing. To this purpose we have developed, optimized and evaluated several in vitro assays with respect to their ability to predict brain tis...

  1. Integrating respiratory-gated PET-based target volume delineation in liver SBRT planning, a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the feasibility and benefit of integrating four-dimensional (4D) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) – computed tomography (CT) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning. 8 patients with 14 metastases were accrued in the study. They all underwent a non-gated PET and a 4D PET centered on the liver. The same CT scan was used for attenuation correction, registration, and considered the planning CT for SBRT planning. Six PET phases were reconstructed for each 4D PET. By applying an individualized threshold to the 4D PET, a Biological Internal Target Volume (BITV) was generated for each lesion. A gated Planning Target Volume (PTVg) was created by adding 3 mm to account for set-up margins. This volume was compared to a manual Planning Target Volume (PTV) delineated with the help of a semi-automatic Biological Target Volume (BTV) obtained from the non-gated exam. A 5 mm radial and a 10 mm craniocaudal margins were applied to account for tumor motion and set-up margins to create the PTV. One undiagnosed liver metastasis was discovered thanks to the 4D PET. The semi-automatic BTV were significantly smaller than the BITV (p = 0.0031). However, after applying adapted margins, 4D PET allowed a statistically significant decrease in the PTVg as compared to the PTV (p = 0.0052). In comparison to non-gated PET, 4D PET may better define the respiratory movements of liver targets and improve SBRT planning for liver metastases. Furthermore, non respiratory-gated PET exams can both misdiagnose liver metastases and underestimate the real internal target volumes

  2. Consequences of additional use of PET information for target volume delineation and radiotherapy dose distribution for esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, Christina T.; Schreurs, Liesbeth M.; Busz, Dianne M.; Beukema, Jannet C.; van der Borden, Arnout J.; Pruim, Jan; Van der Jagt, Eric J.; Plukker, John Th.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose. To determine the consequences of target volume (TV) modifications, based on the additional use of PET information, on radiation planning, assuming PET/CT-imaging represents the title extent of the tumour Materials and methods. For 21 patients with esophageal cancer, two separ

  3. 44gSc from metal calcium targets for PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Gregory; Gagnon, K.; Engle, J. W.;

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost and efficient method for producing pre-clinical scale quantities of 44gSc is presented. Production involves proton irradiation of natural unenriched calcium metal followed by rapid separation of radioscandium from the target using hydroxmate functionalized resin.© 2012 American Institu...

  4. 44gSc from metal calcium targets for PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Gregory; Gagnon, K.; Engle, J. W.;

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost and efficient method for producing pre-clinical scale quantities of 44gSc is presented. Production involves proton irradiation of natural unenriched calcium metal followed by rapid separation of radioscandium from the target using hydroxmate functionalized resin.© 2012 American Institute...

  5. Preclinical Study on GRPR-Targeted (68)Ga-Probes for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhe; Sun, Ziyan; Loft, Mathias; Ding, Bingbing; Liu, Changhao; Xu, Liying; Yang, Meng; Jiang, Yuxin; Liu, Jianfeng; Xiao, Yuling; Cheng, Zhen; Hong, Xuechuan

    2016-08-17

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeted positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly promising approach for imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) in small animal models and patients. Developing a GRPR-targeted PET probe with excellent in vivo performance such as high tumor uptake, high contrast, and optimal pharmacokinetics is still very challenging. Herein, a novel bombesin (BBN) analogue (named SCH1) based on JMV594 peptide modified with an 8-amino octanoic acid spacer (AOC) was thus designed and conjugated with the metal chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane,1-glutaric acid-4,7-acetic acid (NODAGA). The resulting NODAGA-SCH1 was then radiolabeled with (68)Ga and evaluated for PET imaging of PCa. Compared with (68)Ga-NODAGA-JMV594 probe, (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 exhibited excellent PET/CT imaging properties on PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice, such as high tumor uptake (5.80 ± 0.42 vs 3.78 ± 0.28%ID/g, 2 h) and high tumor/muscle contrast (16.6 ± 1.50 vs 8.42 ± 0.61%ID/g, 2 h). Importantly, biodistribution data indicated a relatively similar accumulation of (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 was observed in the liver (4.21 ± 0.42%ID/g) and kidney (3.41 ± 0.46%ID/g) suggesting that the clearance is through both the kidney and the liver. Overall, (68)Ga-NODAGA-SCH1 showed promising in vivo properties and is a promising candidate for translation into clinical PET-imaging of PCa patients. PMID:27399868

  6. Full in-beam PET measurements of 62 MeV protons onto a PMMA target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sportelli, G., E-mail: giancarlo.sportelli@pi.infn.it [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Straub, K.; Aiello, M.; Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Ferretti, S. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Marino, N. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, Via G. Caruso 16, I-56122 Pisa (Italy); Nicolosi, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, I-00184 Roma Italy (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable technique to monitor in situ and non-invasively the particle range in ion beam therapy exploiting the beta+ activity produced in nuclear interactions along the beam path within the target volume. Due to the high random rates and dead-time losses induced by the particle spills, as of to date data are usually acquired during beam pauses or after the irradiation. We have developed a new PET prototype with a faster photon discrimination component that reduces the front-end dead time, and a modularized acquisition system that parallelizes the sensitive detector area, so as to enable data acquisition also during therapeutic irradiation (full in-beam measurement). The PET system has been able to sustain the single photon count rates and acquire coincidences during the beam, in conditions of sub-clinical beam currents. A study on the paralyzation conditions and dead time losses under different beam currents is presented and the feasibility of a full in-beam PET scanner is discussed.

  7. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine;

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  8. Post-target produced [{sup 18}F]F{sub 2} in the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsback, Sarita; Solin, Olof [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Lab. and Accelerator Lab.

    2015-06-01

    Electrophilic radiofluorination was successfully carried out in the early years of PET radiochemistry due to its ease and fast reaction speed. However, at the present, the use of electrophilic methods is limited due to low specific activity (SA). Post-target produced [{sup 18}F]F{sub 2} has significantly higher SA compared to other electrophilic approaches, and it has been used in the production of clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals at the Turku PET Centre for years. Here, we summarize the synthesis and use of these radiopharmaceuticals, namely [{sup 18}F]FDOPA, [{sup 18}F] CFT, [{sup 18}F]EF5 and [{sup 18}F]FBPA.

  9. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in recurrent or residual gynaecologic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vees, Hansjoerg; Casanova, Nathalie; Zilli, Thomas; Imperiano, Hestia; Ratib, Osman; Popowski, Youri; Wang, Hui; Zaidi, Habib; Miralbell, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in gynaecological cancer. Methods F-FDG PET/CT based RT treatment planning was performed in 10 patients with locally recurrent (n = 5) or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer (n = 5). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by 4 experienced radiation oncologists first using contrast enhanced CT (GTVCT) and secondly using the fused 18F-FDG PET/CT datasets (GTVPET/CT). In addition, the GTV was delineated u...

  10. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  11. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  12. Targeting MT1-MMP as an ImmunoPET-Based Strategy for Imaging Gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A G de Lucas

    -specific-contrast imaging of MT1-MMP positive GBM tumors and provided strong evidence for utility of MT1-MMP-targeted immunoPET as an alternate to nonspecific imaging of GBM.

  13. Non-target activity detection by post-radioembolization yttrium-90 PET/CT: Image assessment technique and case examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Hsiang eKao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution yttrium-90 (90Y imaging of post-radioembolization microsphere biodistribution may be achieved by conventional positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT scanners that have time-of-flight capability. However, reconstructed 90Y PET/CT images have high background noise, making non-target activity detection technically challenging. This educational article describes our image assessment technique for non-target activity detection by 90Y PET/CT which qualitatively overcomes the problem of background noise. We present selected case examples of non-target activity in untargeted liver, stomach, gallbladder, chest wall and kidney, supported by angiography and 90Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography with integrated computed tomography (SPECT/CT or technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT.

  14. Non-Target Activity Detection by Post-Radioembolization Yttrium-90 PET/CT: Image Assessment Technique and Case Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Tan, Andrew E H; Lo, Richard H G; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Tan, Bien Soo; Chow, Pierce K H; Ng, David C E; Goh, Anthony S W

    2014-01-01

    High resolution yttrium-90 ((90)Y) imaging of post-radioembolization microsphere biodistribution may be achieved by conventional positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners that have time-of-flight capability. However, reconstructed (90)Y PET/CT images have high background noise, making non-target activity detection technically challenging. This educational article describes our image assessment technique for non-target activity detection by (90)Y PET/CT, which qualitatively overcomes the problem of background noise. We present selected case examples of non-target activity in untargeted liver, stomach, gallbladder, chest wall, and kidney, supported by angiography and (90)Y bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography with integrated computed tomography (SPECT/CT) or technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT.

  15. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  16. Human biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of novel PET probes targeting the deoxyribonucleoside salvage pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a rate-limiting enzyme in deoxyribonucleoside salvage, a metabolic pathway involved in the production and maintenance of a balanced pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) for DNA synthesis. dCK phosphorylates and therefore activates nucleoside analogs such as cytarabine, gemcitabine, decitabine, cladribine, and clofarabine that are used routinely in cancer therapy. Imaging probes that target dCK might allow stratifying patients into likely responders and nonresponders with dCK-dependent prodrugs. Here we present the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of three fluorinated dCK substrates, 18F-FAC, L-18F-FAC, and L-18F-FMAC, developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of dCK activity in vivo. PET studies were performed in nine healthy human volunteers, three for each probe. After a transmission scan, the radiopharmaceutical was injected intravenously and three sequential emission scans acquired from the base of the skull to mid-thigh. Regions of interest encompassing visible organs were drawn on the first PET scan and copied to the subsequent scans. Activity in target organs was determined and absorbed dose estimated with OLINDA/EXM. The standardized uptake value was calculated for various organs at different times. Renal excretion was common to all three probes. Bone marrow had higher uptake for L-18F-FAC and L-18F-FMAC than 18F-FAC. Prominent liver uptake was seen in L-18F-FMAC and L-18F-FAC, whereas splenic activity was highest for 18F-FAC. Muscle uptake was also highest for 18F-FAC. The critical organ was the bladder wall for all three probes. The effective dose was 0.00524, 0.00755, and 0.00910 mSv/MBq for 18F-FAC, L-18F-FAC, and L-18F-FMAC, respectively. The biodistribution of 18F-FAC, L-18F-FAC, and L-18F-FMAC in humans reveals similarities and differences. Differences may be explained by different probe affinities for nucleoside transporters, dCK, and catabolic enzymes such as cytidine deaminase (CDA

  17. Human biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of novel PET probes targeting the deoxyribonucleoside salvage pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenberg, Johannes [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Division, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pediatrics, Vienna (Austria); Radu, Caius G.; Tran, Andrew Q.; Phelps, Michael E.; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Benz, Matthias; Fueger, Barbara; Czernin, Johannes; Schiepers, Christiaan [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Division, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Witte, Owen N. [David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a rate-limiting enzyme in deoxyribonucleoside salvage, a metabolic pathway involved in the production and maintenance of a balanced pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) for DNA synthesis. dCK phosphorylates and therefore activates nucleoside analogs such as cytarabine, gemcitabine, decitabine, cladribine, and clofarabine that are used routinely in cancer therapy. Imaging probes that target dCK might allow stratifying patients into likely responders and nonresponders with dCK-dependent prodrugs. Here we present the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of three fluorinated dCK substrates, {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC, developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of dCK activity in vivo. PET studies were performed in nine healthy human volunteers, three for each probe. After a transmission scan, the radiopharmaceutical was injected intravenously and three sequential emission scans acquired from the base of the skull to mid-thigh. Regions of interest encompassing visible organs were drawn on the first PET scan and copied to the subsequent scans. Activity in target organs was determined and absorbed dose estimated with OLINDA/EXM. The standardized uptake value was calculated for various organs at different times. Renal excretion was common to all three probes. Bone marrow had higher uptake for L-{sup 18}F-FAC and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC than {sup 18}F-FAC. Prominent liver uptake was seen in L-{sup 18}F-FMAC and L-{sup 18}F-FAC, whereas splenic activity was highest for {sup 18}F-FAC. Muscle uptake was also highest for {sup 18}F-FAC. The critical organ was the bladder wall for all three probes. The effective dose was 0.00524, 0.00755, and 0.00910 mSv/MBq for {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC, respectively. The biodistribution of {sup 18}F-FAC, L-{sup 18}F-FAC, and L-{sup 18}F-FMAC in humans reveals similarities and differences. Differences may be explained by different probe

  18. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in recurrent or residual gynaecologic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in gynaecological cancer. F-FDG PET/CT based RT treatment planning was performed in 10 patients with locally recurrent (n = 5) or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer (n = 5). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by 4 experienced radiation oncologists first using contrast enhanced CT (GTVCT) and secondly using the fused 18F-FDG PET/CT datasets (GTVPET/CT). In addition, the GTV was delineated using the signal-to-background (SBR) ratio-based adaptive thresholding technique (GTVSBR). Overlap analysis were conducted to assess geographic mismatches between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Inter- and intra-observer variability were also assessed. The mean GTVCT (43.65 cm3) was larger than the mean GTVPET/CT (33.06 cm3), p = 0.02. In 6 patients, GTVPET/CT added substantial tumor extension outside the GTVCT even though 90.4% of the GTVPET/CT was included in the GTVCT and 30.2% of the GTVCT was found outside the GTVPET/CT. The inter- and intra-observer variability was not significantly reduced with the inclusion of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.23 and p = 0.18, respectively). The GTVSBR was smaller than GTVCT p ≤ 0.005 and GTVPET/CT p ≤ 0.005. The use of 18F-FDG PET/CT images for target volume delineation of recurrent or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer alters the GTV in the majority of patients compared to standard CT-definition. The use of SBR-based auto-delineation showed significantly smaller GTVs. The use of PET/CT based target volume delineation may improve the accuracy of RT treatment planning in gynaecologic cancer

  19. Trackable and Targeted Phage as Positron Emission Tomography (PET Agent for Cancer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zibo Li, Qiaoling Jin, Chiunwei Huang, Siva Dasa, Liaohai Chen, Li-peng Yap, Shuanglong Liu, Hancheng Cai, Ryan Park, Peter S Conti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advancement of nanotechnology has provided unprecedented opportunities for the development of nanoparticle enabled technologies for detecting and treating cancer. Here, we reported the construction of a PET trackable organic nanoplatform based on phage particle for targeted tumor imaging. Method: The integrin αvβ3 targeted phage nanoparticle was constructed by expressing RGD peptides on its surface. The target binding affinity of this engineered phage particle was evaluated in vitro. A bifunctional chelator (BFC 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid (DOTA or 4-((8-amino-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo [6.6.6] icosane-1-ylamino methyl benzoic acid (AmBaSar was then conjugated to the phage surface for 64Cu2+ chelation. After 64Cu radiolabeling, microPET imaging was performed in U87MG tumor model and the receptor specificity was confirmed by blocking experiments. Results: The phage-RGD demonstrated target specificity based on ELISA experiment. According to the TEM images, the morphology of the phage was unchanged after the modification with BFCs. The labeling yield was 25 ± 4% for 64Cu-DOTA-phage-RGD and 46 ± 5% for 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD, respectively. At 1 h time point, 64Cu-DOTA-phage-RGD and 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD have comparable tumor uptake (~ 8%ID/g. However, 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD showed significantly higher tumor uptake (13.2 ± 1.5 %ID/g, P<0.05 at late time points compared with 64Cu-DOTA-phage-RGD (10 ± 1.2 %ID/g. 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD also demonstrated significantly lower liver uptake, which could be attributed to the stability difference between these chelators. There is no significant difference between two tracers regarding the uptake in kidney and muscle at all time points tested. In order to confirm the receptor specificity, blocking experiment was performed. In the RGD blocking experiment, the cold RGD peptide was injected 2 min before the administration of 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD. Tumor uptake was

  20. A rapid screening assay for identifying mycobacteria targeted nanoparticle antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Samantha; Tran, Lang; Johnston, Helinor; McLuckie, Joyce; Stevenson, Karen; Stone, Vicki

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem. Nanotechnology offers enormous potential in medicine, yet there is limited knowledge regarding the toxicity of nanoparticles (NP) for mycobacterial species that cause serious human diseases (e.g. tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy). Mycobacterial diseases are a major global health problem; TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills up to 2 million people annually and there are over 200 000 leprosy cases each year caused by Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). Few drugs are effective against these mycobacteria and increasing antibiotic resistance exacerbates the problem. As such, alternative therapies are urgently needed but most current assays used to assess the effectiveness of therapeutics against mycobacteria are slow and expensive. This study aimed to develop a rapid, low-cost assay which can be used for screening the antimicrobial properties of compounds against pathogenic mycobacteria and to assess the toxicity of three NP (silver [Ag], copper oxide [Cu(II)O], and zinc oxide [ZnO]) against a green fluorescent protein reporter strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, a slow growing, pathogenic mycobacterial species causing paratuberculosis in ruminants. Fluorescence was used to monitor mycobacterial growth over time, with NP concentrations of 6.25-100 μg/mL tested for up to 7 days, and a method of data analysis was designed to permit comparison between results. Mycobacterial sensitivity to the NP was found to be NP composition specific and toxicity could be ranked in the following order: Ag > Cu(II)O > ZnO. PMID:26618564

  1. The use of FDG-PET to target tumors by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambin, Philippe [MAASTRO Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lammering, Guido; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Baardwijk, Angela van; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Borger, Jacques; Lutgens, Ludy; Ende, Piet van den; Oellers, Michel

    2010-09-15

    Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) plays an increasingly important role in radiotherapy, beyond staging and selection of patients. Especially for non-small cell lung cancer, FDG-PET has, in the majority of the patients, led to the safe decrease of radiotherapy volumes, enabling radiation dose escalation and, experimentally, redistribution of radiation doses within the tumor. In limited-disease small cell lung cancer, the role of FDG-PET is emerging. For primary brain tumors, PET based on amino acid tracers is currently the best choice, including high-grade glioma. This is especially true for low-grade gliomas, where most data are available for the use of {sup 11}C-MET (methionine) in radiation treatment planning. For esophageal cancer, the main advantage of FDG-PET is the detection of otherwise unrecognized lymph node metastases. In Hodgkin's disease, FDG-PET is essential for involved-node irradiation and leads to decreased irradiation volumes while also decreasing geographic miss. FDG-PET's major role in the treatment of cervical cancer with radiation lies in the detection of para-aortic nodes that can be encompassed in radiation fields. Besides for staging purposes, FDG-PET is not recommended for routine radiotherapy delineation purposes. It should be emphasized that using PET is only safe when adhering to strictly standardized protocols. (orig.)

  2. The impact of PET and SPECT on dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, G. [Dept. of Physics, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bardies, M. [INSERM UMR 601, Nantes (France); Monsieurs, M. [Dept. Anatomy, Embryology, Histology and Medical Physics, Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Savolainen, S. [HUS, Medical Imaging Centre and Dept. of Physical Sciences, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Strand, S.E. [Medical Radiation Physics, Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Lund Univ (Sweden); Lassmann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is an increasingly used treatment modality for a range of cancers. To date, few treatments have involved the use of dosimetry either to plan treatment or to retrospectively ascertain the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. Also the correlation between absorbed dose and biological effect has been difficult to establish. Tomographic methods permit the determination of the activity volume on a macroscopic scale at different time points. Proper attenuation correction in tomographic imaging requires a patient-specific attenuation map. This can be obtained from scintillation-camera transmission scanning, CT, or by using segmented scatter-emission images. Attenuation corrections can be performed either on the projection images, on the reconstructed images, or as part of an iterative reconstruction method. The problem of image quantification for therapy radionuclides, particularly for I-131, is exacerbated by the fact that most cameras are optimised for diagnostic imaging with Tc-99m. In addition, problems may arise when high activities are to be measured due to count losses and mis-positioned events, because of insufficient pile-up and dead time correction methods. Sufficient image quantification, however, is only possible if all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the image have been corrected for. Monte Carlo simulations are an appealing tool that can help to model interactions occurring in the patient or in the detector system. This is helpful to develop and test correction techniques, or to help to define detectors better suited to quantitative imaging. PET is probably the most accurate imaging method for the determination of activity concentrations in tissue. PET imaging can be considered for pre-therapeutic treatment planning but ideally requires the use of a radioisotope from the same element as that used for treatment (e.g. I-124 for I-131; Y-86 for Y-90). Problems, however, are that - some of the positron

  3. Separation of {sup 90}Nb from zirconium target for application in immuno-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, V.; Roesch, F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Filosofov, D.V.; Bochko, O.K.; Lebedev, N.A.; Rakhimov, A.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Hauser, H.; Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry; Aksenov, N.V.; Bozhikov, G.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation). Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions; Ponsard, B. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCKCEN), Mol (Belgium). Radioisotopes and NTD Silicon Production

    2014-07-01

    Fast progressing immuno-PET asks to explore new radionuclides. One of the promising candidates is {sup 90}Nb. It has a half-life of 14.6 h that allows visualizing and quantifying biological processes with medium and slow kinetics, such as tumor accumulation of antibodies and antibodies fragments or drug delivery systems and nanoparticles. {sup 90}Nb exhibits a positron branching of 53% and an average kinetic energy of emitted positrons of E{sub mean} = 0.35 MeV. Currently, radionuclide production routes and NbV labeling techniques are explored to turn this radionuclide into a useful imaging probe. However, efficient separation of {sup 90}Nb from irradiated targets remains in challenge. Ion exchange based separation of {sup 90}Nb from zirconium targets was investigated in systems AG 1 x 8 - HCl/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UTEVA-HCl. {sup 95}Nb (t{sub 1/2} = 35.0 d), {sup 95}Zr (t{sub 1/2} = 64.0 d) and {sup 92m}Nb (t{sub 1/2} = 10.15 d) were chosen for studies on distribution coefficients. Separation after AG 1 x 8 anion exchange yields 99% of {sup 90/95}Nb. Subsequent use of a solid-phase extraction step on UTEVA resin further decontaminates {sup 90/95}Nb from traces of zirconium with yields 95% of {sup 90/95}Nb. A semi-automated separation takes one hour to obtain an overall recovery of {sup 90/95}Nb of 90%. The amount of Zr was reduced by factor of 10{sup 8}. The selected separation provides rapid preparation (< 1 h) of high purity {sup 90}Nb appropriate for the synthesis of {sup 90}Nb-radiopharmaceuticals, relevant for purposes of immuno-PET. Applying the radioniobium obtained, {sup 90/95}Nb-labeling of a monoclonal antibody (rituximab) modified with desferrioxamine achieved labeling yields of > 90% after 1 h incubation at room temperature. (orig.)

  4. The development of PET/CT in determining gross tumor target volume of esophageal carcinoma in precise radiotherapy%PET/CT确定食管癌大体靶区的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 宋轶鹏; 姜翠芳

    2014-01-01

    随着功能影像及分子影像的发展,PET/CT逐渐成为辅助制定肿瘤最佳精确放疗计划的成像方式.许多研究支持18 F-FDG PET/CT用于精确放疗中食管癌的靶区勾画,然而18F-FDGPET/CT在食管癌靶区勾画中的有效性尚需进一步研究.该文主要对18F-FDG PET/CT用于食管癌原发病灶、区域转移淋巴结GTV勾画的应用价值及有效性等方面的研究进行综述.%As the development of functional and molecular imaging,PET/CT gradually becomes one of methods in optimizing cancer radiotherapy treatment planning.Currently,numerous hospitals routinely use 18F-FDG PET/CT for the delineation of target volume in esophageal carcinoma (EC).However,the validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the delineation of target volume for EC is limited and needs further clinical validation.This review focuses on the value and validity of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumor target volume of EC primary lesions and regional lymph nodes.

  5. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-06: Y90 PET/CT for the Instantaneous Determination of Both Target and Non-Target Absorbed Doses Following Hepatic Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasciak, A; Kao, J [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose The process of converting Yttrium-90 (Y90) PET/CT images into 3D absorbed dose maps will be explained. The simple methods presented will allow the medical physicst to analyze Y90 PET images following radioembolization and determine the absorbed dose to tumor, normal liver parenchyma and other areas of interest, without application of Monte-Carlo radiation transport or dose-point-kernel (DPK) convolution. Methods Absorbed dose can be computed from Y90 PET/CT images based on the premise that radioembolization is a permanent implant with a constant relative activity distribution after infusion. Many Y90 PET/CT publications have used DPK convolution to obtain 3D absorbed dose maps. However, this method requires specialized software limiting clinical utility. The Local Deposition method, an alternative to DPK convolution, can be used to obtain absorbed dose and requires no additional computer processing. Pixel values from regions of interest drawn on Y90 PET/CT images can be converted to absorbed dose (Gy) by multiplication with a scalar constant. Results There is evidence that suggests the Local Deposition method may actually be more accurate than DPK convolution and it has been successfully used in a recent Y90 PET/CT publication. We have analytically compared dose-volume-histograms (DVH) for phantom hot-spheres to determine the difference between the DPK and Local Deposition methods, as a function of PET scanner point-spread-function for Y90. We have found that for PET/CT systems with a FWHM greater than 3.0 mm when imaging Y90, the Local Deposition Method provides a more accurate representation of DVH, regardless of target size than DPK convolution. Conclusion Using the Local Deposition Method, post-radioembolization Y90 PET/CT images can be transformed into 3D absorbed dose maps of the liver. An interventional radiologist or a Medical Physicist can perform this transformation in a clinical setting, allowing for rapid prediction of treatment efficacy by

  6. [11C]NS8880, a promising PET radiotracer targeting the norepinephrine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Karina Højrup; Peters, Dan; Nielsen, Elsebeth Ø;

    2014-01-01

    ]methanolate in a Boc-protected precursor. The isolated [11C]NS8880 was evaluated pre-clinically both in a pig model (PET scanning) and in a rat model (μPET scanning) and compared to (S,S)-[11C]-O-methylreboxetine ([11C]MeNER). RESULTS: The radiolabeling technique yielded [11C]NS8880 in low (

  7. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment planning and target volume delineation of radiotherapy in the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer complicated by atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the impact of PET/CT on the treatment planning and target volume delineation of radiotherapy in patients with NSCLC complicated by atelectasis. Methods: Pre-treatment PET/CT scans were performed in 36 patients with pathologically proven NSCLC complicated by atelectasis of different severity undergoing curative 3D-CRT planning. Clinical staging before and after PET/CT was compared and the change of treatment plan was evaluated. The target volumes were delineated by CT and PET/CT. Results: PET/CT results changed the clinical staging in 18 (50.0%, 18/36) patients. PET/CT identified distant metastatic diseases in 11 (30.6%, 11/36) patients, thus excluding their eligibility for curative 3D-CRT. Of these 11 patients, managements were changed to palliative radiotherapy in 3 patients, chemotherapy in 7 patients and best supportive therapy in 1 patient. In the 25 patients with curative 3D-CRT, PET/CT altered the radiotherapy volume in 21 cases, including 12 with volume reduction, 7 with volume enlargement and 2 with location change. Three patients were given additional conventional radiotherapy, since PET/CT indicated supraclavicular nodal metastases. In the 3 patients with palliative 3D-CRT, 2 had target volume reduction and 1 had target volume enlargement after PET/CT. Conclusions: PET/CT may play a role in the management of patients with NSCLC complicated by atelectasis. It is also helpful for accurate delineation of target volume in 3D-CRT treatment planning. (authors)

  8. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  9. Assay strategies for the discovery and validation of therapeutics targeting Brugia pahangi Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Taldone

    Full Text Available The chemotherapy of lymphatic filariasis relies upon drugs such as diethylcarbamazine and ivermectin that largely target the microfilarial stages of the parasite, necessitating continued treatment over the long reproductive life span of the adult worm. The identification of compounds that target adult worms has been a long-term goal of WHO. Here we describe a fluorescence polarization assay for the identification of compounds that target Hsp90 in adult filarial worms. The assay was originally developed to identify inhibitors of Hsp90 in tumor cells, and relies upon the ability of small molecules to inhibit the binding of fluorescently labelled geldanamycin to Hsp90. We demonstrate that the assay works well with soluble extracts of Brugia, while extracts of the free-living nematode C. elegans fail to bind the probe, in agreement with data from other experiments. The assay was validated using known inhibitors of Hsp90 that compete with geldanamycin for binding to Hsp90, including members of the synthetic purine-scaffold series of compounds. The efficacy of some of these compounds against adult worms was confirmed in vitro. Moreover, the assay is sufficiently sensitive to differentiate between binding of purine-scaffold compounds to human and Brugia Hsp90. The assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and provides the first example of a format with the potential to identify novel inhibitors of Hsp90 in filarial worms and in other parasitic species where Hsp90 may be a target.

  10. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in recurrent or residual gynaecologic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vees Hansjörg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in gynaecological cancer. Methods F-FDG PET/CT based RT treatment planning was performed in 10 patients with locally recurrent (n = 5 or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer (n = 5. The gross tumor volume (GTV was defined by 4 experienced radiation oncologists first using contrast enhanced CT (GTVCT and secondly using the fused 18F-FDG PET/CT datasets (GTVPET/CT. In addition, the GTV was delineated using the signal-to-background (SBR ratio-based adaptive thresholding technique (GTVSBR. Overlap analysis were conducted to assess geographic mismatches between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Inter- and intra-observer variability were also assessed. Results The mean GTVCT (43.65 cm3 was larger than the mean GTVPET/CT (33.06 cm3, p = 0.02. In 6 patients, GTVPET/CT added substantial tumor extension outside the GTVCT even though 90.4% of the GTVPET/CT was included in the GTVCT and 30.2% of the GTVCT was found outside the GTVPET/CT. The inter- and intra-observer variability was not significantly reduced with the inclusion of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.23 and p = 0.18, respectively. The GTVSBR was smaller than GTVCT p ≤ 0.005 and GTVPET/CT p ≤ 0.005. Conclusions The use of 18F-FDG PET/CT images for target volume delineation of recurrent or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer alters the GTV in the majority of patients compared to standard CT-definition. The use of SBR-based auto-delineation showed significantly smaller GTVs. The use of PET/CT based target volume delineation may improve the accuracy of RT treatment planning in gynaecologic cancer.

  11. SU-E-I-81: Targeting of HER2-Expressing Tumors with Dual PET-MR Imaging Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, P; Peng, Y; Sun, M; Yang, X [Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology Chinese Academy o, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression in malignant tumors provides important information influencing patient management. Radionuclide in vivo imaging of HER2 may permit the detection of HER2 in both primary tumors and metastases by a single noninvasive procedure. Trastuzumab, effective in about 15 % of women with breast cancer, downregulates signalling through the Akt/PI3K and MAPK pathways.These pathways modulate metabolism which can be monitored by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: The relationship between response of HER2 overexpressing tumours and changes in imaging PET or SPECT and MRI will be examined by a integrated bimodal imaging probe.Small (7 kDa) high-affinity anti-HER2 Affibody molecules and KCCYSL targeting peptide may be suitable tracers for visualization of HER2-expressing tumors. Peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) as MRI imaging and CB-TE2A as PET imaging are integrated into a single synthetic molecule in the HER2 positive cancer. Results: One of targeted contrast bimodal imaging probe agents was synthesized and evaluated to target HER2-expressing tumors in a HER2 positive rat model. We will report the newest results regarding the development of bimodal imaging probes. Conclusion: The preliminary results of the bimodal imaging probe presents high correlation of MRI signal and PET imaging intensity in vivo. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by single model contrast agents. It is envisioned that this bimodal agents can hold great potential for accurate detection of HER2-expressing tumors which are critical for clinical management of the disease.

  12. A high-affinity [18 F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. Methods: p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(−) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blocking agent. Results: The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(−) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. Conclusions: We have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa. Advances in Knowledge: The only FDA-approved imaging agent for PCa, Prostascint®, targets PSMA but suffers from inherent shortcomings. The data acquired in this manuscript confirmed that our new generation of [18F]-labeled PSMA inhibitor exhibited promising in vivo performance as a PET imaging agent for PCa and is well-positioned for subsequent clinical trials. Implications for Patient Care Our preliminary data demonstrate that this tracer

  13. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p 0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation. Conclusion: PET and MRI are complementary and combined use is ideal. However, the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) particularly for primary tumors underscores the limitations of defining GTVs using imaging alone. PE is invaluable and must be incorporated.

  14. Multi-targeted priming for genome-wide gene expression assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adomas Aleksandra B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary approaches to assaying global gene expression are needed to assess gene expression in regions that are poorly assayed by current methodologies. A key component of nearly all gene expression assays is the reverse transcription of transcribed sequences that has traditionally been performed by priming the poly-A tails on many of the transcribed genes in eukaryotes with oligo-dT, or by priming RNA indiscriminately with random hexamers. We designed an algorithm to find common sequence motifs that were present within most protein-coding genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of Neurospora crassa, but that were not present within their ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA genes. We then experimentally tested whether degenerately priming these motifs with multi-targeted primers improved the accuracy and completeness of transcriptomic assays. Results We discovered two multi-targeted primers that would prime a preponderance of genes in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa while avoiding priming ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA. Examining the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen deficiency and profiling Neurospora crassa early sexual development, we demonstrated that using multi-targeted primers in reverse transcription led to superior performance of microarray profiling and next-generation RNA tag sequencing. Priming with multi-targeted primers in addition to oligo-dT resulted in higher sensitivity, a larger number of well-measured genes and greater power to detect differences in gene expression. Conclusions Our results provide the most complete and detailed expression profiles of the yeast nitrogen starvation response and N. crassa early sexual development to date. Furthermore, our multi-targeting priming methodology for genome-wide gene expression assays provides selective targeting of multiple sequences and counter-selection against undesirable sequences, facilitating a more complete and

  15. The effect of PET/CT on cancer teatment strategies of argon-helium cryoablation targeted therapy%PET/CT对氩氦刀靶向治疗肿瘤策略的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李泉旺; 曹阳; 左明焕; 安超; 刘传波; 胡凯文

    2011-01-01

    目的 评价全身18F-FDG PET/CT在氩氦刀靶向治疗中的价值.方法回顾100例肿瘤患者冷冻治疗前目标病灶CT检查、全身PET/CT检查.结果 根据PET/CT和CT结果,100例患者中,肺内病灶53例,肝内病灶22例,盆腔病灶11例;23例临床分期改变,17例治疗计划改变.12例肺内病灶(12/53,22.64%)、3例肝内病灶(3/22,13.64%)、2例盆腔病灶(2/11,18.18%)治疗计划改变.结论 全身PET/CT可提供更多有效的信息,对制定氩氦刀冷冻治疗策略有显著指导意义.%Objective To observe the value of whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT in cryocare targeted cryoablation therapy.Methods Totolly 100 cancer patients were examined with CT and whole body PET/CT before therapy. Results According to PET/CT and CT, lung tumors were detected in 53 patients, liver neoplasms were found in 22 patients, while pelvic masses were shown in 11 patients. Clinical stage were changed in 23 cases, while the treatment plan were changed in 17 cases, including 12 cases of lung tumors (12/53, 22.64%), 3 casesof liver neoplasms (3/22, 13.64%) and 2 cases of pelvic masses (2/11, 18. 18 % ). Conclusion Whole body PET/CT can provide effective information for the treatment strategy of cryocare targeted cryoablation therapy.

  16. Our PET project: an unlimited supply of big and small water sample vials for the assay of radon in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAD7 and BigBottle system has been developed, using large glass bottles, but these are fragile and awkward to carry around. In searching for a better solution, we tested polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for water samples storage to estimate radon loss over time. Two sets of experiments with 0.355 and 1.75 L bottles demonstrated that PET is a suitable material for storage. If correction for 226Ra content in water is applied, we can also calculate the rate of radon loss (0.03 ± 0.08 % day-1). (author)

  17. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in recurrent or residual gynaecologic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vees Hansjörg; Casanova Nathalie; Zilli Thomas; Imperiano Hestia; Ratib Osman; Popowski Youri; Wang Hui; Zaidi Habib; Miralbell Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in gynaecological cancer. Methods F-FDG PET/CT based RT treatment planning was performed in 10 patients with locally recurrent (n = 5) or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer (n = 5). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by 4 experienced radiation oncologists first using contrast enhanced CT (GTVCT) and secondly using the fused 18F-FDG PET/CT datasets (GTVPET/CT). In addition, the GTV was del...

  18. Impact of [F-18]-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine PET imaging on target definition for radiation therapy of high-grade glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    af Rosenschold, Per Munck; Costa, Junia; Engelholm, Svend Aage;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to assess the impact of amino-acid (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (FET) positron emission tomography (PET) on the volumetric target definition for radiation therapy of high-grade glioma versus the current standard using MRI alone. Specifically, we investigated the influence...... to fully encompass the FET-PET positive volume tended to be larger for grade IV tumors (P = .018). CONCLUSION: With an unchanged CTV margin and by including FET-PET for gross tumor volume definition, the CTV will increase moderately for most patients, and quite substantially for a minority of patients...

  19. Commercially available antibodies can be applied in quantitative multiplexed peptide immunoaffinity enrichment targeted mass spectrometry assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Kennedy, Jacob; Yan, Ping; Lin, Chenwei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides coupled to multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (immuno-MRM) enables highly specific, sensitive, and precise quantification of peptides and post-translational modifications. Major obstacles to developing a large number of immuno-MRM assays are the poor availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) validated for immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides and the cost and lead time of developing the antibodies de novo. Although many thousands of mAbs are commercially offered, few have been tested for application to immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides. In this study we tested the success rate of using commercially available mAbs for peptide immuno-MRM assays. We selected 105 commercial mAbs (76 targeting non-modified “pan” epitopes, 29 targeting phosphorylation) to proteins associated with the DNA damage response network. We found that 8 of the 76 pan (11%) and 5 of the 29 phospho-specific mAbs (17%) captured tryptic peptides (detected by LC-MS/MS) of their protein targets from human cell lysates. Seven of these mAbs were successfully used to configure and analytically characterize immuno-MRM assays. By applying selection criteria upfront, the results indicate that a screening success rate of up to 24% is possible, establishing the feasibility of screening a large number of catalog antibodies to provide readily-available assay reagents. PMID:27094115

  20. Platelet hexosaminidase a enzyme assay effectively detects carriers missed by targeted DNA mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Sachiko; Zhan, Jie; Sun, Wei; Ferreira, Jose Carlos; Keiles, Steven; Hambuch, Tina; Kammesheidt, Anja; Mark, Brian L; Schneider, Adele; Gross, Susan; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical testing of hexosaminidase A (HexA) enzyme activity has been available for decades and has the ability to detect almost all Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) carriers, irrespective of ethnic background. This is increasingly important, as the gene pool of those who identify as Ashkenazi Jewish is diversifying. Here we describe the analysis of a cohort of 4,325 individuals arising from large carrier screening programs and tested by the serum and/or platelet HexA enzyme assays and by targeted DNA mutation analysis. Our results continue to support the platelet assay as a highly effective method for TSD carrier screening, with a low inconclusive rate and the ability to detect possible disease-causing mutation carriers that would have been missed by targeted DNA mutation analysis. Sequence analysis performed on one such platelet assay carrier, who had one non-Ashkenazi Jewish parent, identified the amino acid change Thr259Ala (A775G). Based on crystallographic modeling, this change is predicted to be deleterious, as threonine 259 is positioned proximal to the HexA alpha subunit active site and helps to stabilize key residues therein. Accordingly, if individuals are screened for TSD in broad-based programs by targeted molecular testing alone, they must be made aware that there is a more sensitive and inexpensive test available that can identify additional carriers. Alternatively, the enzyme assays can be offered as a first tier test, especially when screening individuals of mixed or non-Jewish ancestry. PMID:23430931

  1. HER1-Targeted 86Y-Panitumumab Possesses Superior Targeting Characteristics than 86Y-Cetuximab for PET Imaging of Human Malignant Mesothelioma Tumors Xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Kayhan Garmestani; Diane E. Milenic; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM), a rare form of cancer is often associated with previous exposure to fibrous minerals, such as asbestos. Asbestos exposure increases HER1-activity and expression in pre-clinical models. Additionally, HER1 over-expression is observed in the majority of MM cases. In this study, the utility of HER1-targeted chimeric IgG1, cetuximab, and a human IgG2, panitumumab, radiolabeled with 86Y, were evaluated for PET imaging to detect MM non-invasively in vivo, and to select a...

  2. Impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on biological target volume (BTV) definition for treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Dean, Geoffrey; Lisbona, Robert; Parker, William; Kaufman, Chris; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2007-02-01

    This work represents our effort to test feasibility of FDG-based PET/CT on target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment planning of NSCLC patients. Different methods have been developed to enable more precise target outlining using PET: Qualitative Visual Method, CTV=2.5 SUV units, linear SUV threshold function method, and CTV=40% Iso of Maximum Uptake Value. We are proposing reconstruction of three biological target volumes: necrotic BTV (same as PTV created by radiation oncologist using CT data), proliferating BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio 1:3) and hypoxic BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio of 1:19). Two IMRT plans were created and compared to the conventional treatment plan: "conservative" IMRT plan delivers 52.5 Gy to the necrotic BTV and 65 Gy to the hypoxic BTV; "radical" IMRT plan delivers 30 Gy to necrotic BTV, 52.5 Gy to proliferating BTV and 65 Gy to hypoxic BTV. Use of BTVs in IMRT plans is attractive because it increases dose to targets considered to need higher doses. It reduces considerably dose to heart and spinal cord, organs considered to limit dose escalation approaches in NSCLC treatment. "Conservative" IMRT approach can be understood as a PET/CT-based concomitant boost to the tumor expressing the highest FDG uptake. "Radical" plan implies deviation from the traditional uniform dose target coverage approach, with the intention of achieving better surrounding tissue sparing and ultimately allowing for dose escalation protocols relying on biologically based treatment planning.

  3. Optimal de novo design of MRM experiments for rapid assay development in targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, Andreas; Jung, Stephan; Zerck, Alexandra; Pfeifer, Nico; Nahnsen, Sven; Henneges, Carsten; Nordheim, Alfred; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Targeted proteomic approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) overcome problems associated with classical shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Developing MRM quantitation assays can be time consuming, because relevant peptide representatives of the proteins must be found and their retention time and the product ions must be determined. Given the transitions, hundreds to thousands of them can be scheduled into one experiment run. However, it is difficult to select which of the transitions should be included into a measurement. We present a novel algorithm that allows the construction of MRM assays from the sequence of the targeted proteins alone. This enables the rapid development of targeted MRM experiments without large libraries of transitions or peptide spectra. The approach relies on combinatorial optimization in combination with machine learning techniques to predict proteotypicity, retention time, and fragmentation of peptides. The resulting potential transitions are scheduled optimally by solving an integer linear program. We demonstrate that fully automated construction of MRM experiments from protein sequences alone is possible and over 80% coverage of the targeted proteins can be achieved without further optimization of the assay. PMID:20201589

  4. SU-C-BRA-02: Gradient Based Method of Target Delineation On PET/MR Image of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dance, M; Chera, B; Falchook, A; Das, S; Lian, J [Univ North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Validate the consistency of a gradient-based segmentation tool to facilitate accurate delineation of PET/CT-based GTVs in head and neck cancers by comparing against hybrid PET/MR-derived GTV contours. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 head and neck target volumes (10 primary and 8 nodal) were retrospectively contoured using a gradient-based segmentation tool by two observers. Each observer independently contoured each target five times. Inter-observer variability was evaluated via absolute percent differences. Intra-observer variability was examined by percentage uncertainty. All target volumes were also contoured using the SUV percent threshold method. The thresholds were explored case by case so its derived volume matched with the gradient-based volume. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) were calculated to determine overlap of PET/CT GTVs and PET/MR GTVs. Results: The Levene’s test showed there was no statistically significant difference of the variances between the observer’s gradient-derived contours. However, the absolute difference between the observer’s volumes was 10.83%, with a range from 0.39% up to 42.89%. PET-avid regions with qualitatively non-uniform shapes and intensity levels had a higher absolute percent difference near 25%, while regions with uniform shapes and intensity levels had an absolute percent difference of 2% between observers. The average percentage uncertainty between observers was 4.83% and 7%. As the volume of the gradient-derived contours increased, the SUV threshold percent needed to match the volume decreased. Dice coefficients showed good agreement of the PET/CT and PET/MR GTVs with an average DSC value across all volumes at 0.69. Conclusion: Gradient-based segmentation of PET volume showed good consistency in general but can vary considerably for non-uniform target shapes and intensity levels. PET/CT-derived GTV contours stemming from the gradient-based tool show good agreement with the anatomically and

  5. SU-C-BRA-02: Gradient Based Method of Target Delineation On PET/MR Image of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Validate the consistency of a gradient-based segmentation tool to facilitate accurate delineation of PET/CT-based GTVs in head and neck cancers by comparing against hybrid PET/MR-derived GTV contours. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 head and neck target volumes (10 primary and 8 nodal) were retrospectively contoured using a gradient-based segmentation tool by two observers. Each observer independently contoured each target five times. Inter-observer variability was evaluated via absolute percent differences. Intra-observer variability was examined by percentage uncertainty. All target volumes were also contoured using the SUV percent threshold method. The thresholds were explored case by case so its derived volume matched with the gradient-based volume. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) were calculated to determine overlap of PET/CT GTVs and PET/MR GTVs. Results: The Levene’s test showed there was no statistically significant difference of the variances between the observer’s gradient-derived contours. However, the absolute difference between the observer’s volumes was 10.83%, with a range from 0.39% up to 42.89%. PET-avid regions with qualitatively non-uniform shapes and intensity levels had a higher absolute percent difference near 25%, while regions with uniform shapes and intensity levels had an absolute percent difference of 2% between observers. The average percentage uncertainty between observers was 4.83% and 7%. As the volume of the gradient-derived contours increased, the SUV threshold percent needed to match the volume decreased. Dice coefficients showed good agreement of the PET/CT and PET/MR GTVs with an average DSC value across all volumes at 0.69. Conclusion: Gradient-based segmentation of PET volume showed good consistency in general but can vary considerably for non-uniform target shapes and intensity levels. PET/CT-derived GTV contours stemming from the gradient-based tool show good agreement with the anatomically and

  6. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  7. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  8. Current Status of Targets and Assays for Anti-HIV Drug Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is one of the most serious public health challenges globally. Despite the great efforts that are being devoted to prevent, treat and to better understand the disease, it is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, there are 30 drugs or combinations of drugs approved by FDA. Because of the side-effects, price and drug resistance, it is essential to discover new targets, to develop new technology and to find new anti-HIV drugs. This review summarizes the major targets and assays currently used in anti-HIV drug screening.

  9. PET/CT imaging for target volume delineation in curative intent radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer: IAEA consensus report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes best practice and evidence based recommendations for the use of FDG-PET/CT for the purposes of radiotherapy target volume delineation (TVD) for curative intent treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These recommendations have been written by an expert advisory group, convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to facilitate a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) aiming to improve the applications of PET based radiation treatment planning (RTP) in low and middle income countries. These guidelines can be applied in routine clinical practice of radiotherapy TVD, for NSCLC patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation or radiotherapy alone, where FDG is used, and where a calibrated PET camera system equipped for RTP patient positioning is available. Recommendations are provided for PET and CT image visualization and interpretation, and for tumor delineation using planning CT with and without breathing motion compensation

  10. HER1-targeted 86Y-panitumumab possesses superior targeting characteristics than 86Y-cetuximab for PET imaging of human malignant mesothelioma tumors xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan K Nayak

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma (MM, a rare form of cancer is often associated with previous exposure to fibrous minerals, such as asbestos. Asbestos exposure increases HER1-activity and expression in pre-clinical models. Additionally, HER1 over-expression is observed in the majority of MM cases. In this study, the utility of HER1-targeted chimeric IgG(1, cetuximab, and a human IgG(2, panitumumab, radiolabeled with (86Y, were evaluated for PET imaging to detect MM non-invasively in vivo, and to select an antibody candidate for radioimmunotherapy (RIT.Radioimmunoconjugates (RICs of cetuximab and panitumumab were prepared by conjugation with CHX-A''-DTPA followed by radiolabeling with (86Y. The HER1 expression of NCI-H226, NCI-H2052, NCI-H2452 and MSTO-211H human mesothelioma cells was characterized by flow cytometry. In vivo biodistribution, pharmacokinetic analysis, and PET imaging were performed in tumor bearing athymic mice.In vivo studies demonstrated high HER1 tumor uptake of both RICs. Significant reduction in tumor uptake was observed in mice co-injected with excess mAb (0.1 mg, demonstrating that uptake in the tumor was receptor specific. Significant differences were observed in the in vivo characteristics of the RICs. The blood clearance T(½α of (86Y-cetuximab (0.9-1.1 h was faster than (86Y-panitumumab (2.6-3.1 h. Also, the tumor area under the curve (AUC to liver AUC ratios of (86Y-panitumumab were 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than (86Y-cetuximab as observed by the differences in PET tumor to background ratios, which could be critical when imaging orthotopic tumors and concerns regarding radiation doses to normal organs such as the liver.This study demonstrates the more favorable HER1-targeting characteristics of (86Y-panitumumab than (86Y-cetuximab for non-invasive assessment of the HER1 status of MM by PET imaging. Due to lower liver uptake, panitumumab based immunoconjugates may fare better in therapy than corresponding cetuximab based

  11. In vivo evaluation of 18F-labeled TCO for pre-targeted PET imaging in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The tetrazine-trans-cylooctene cycloaddition using radiolabeled tetrazine or radiolabeled trans-cyclooctene (TCO) has been reported to be a very fast, selective and bioorthogonal reaction that could be useful for in vivo radiolabeling of molecules. We wanted to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution profile and brain uptake of 18F-labeled TCO ([18F]TCO) to assess its potential for pre-targeted imaging in the brain. Methods: We evaluated the in vivo behavior of [18F]TCO via an ex vivo biodistribution study complemented by in vivo μPET imaging at 5, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 240 min post tracer injection. An in vivo metabolite study was performed at 5 min, 30 min and 120 min post [18F]TCO injection by RP-HPLC analysis of plasma and brain extracts. Incubation with human liver microsomes was performed to further evaluate the metabolite profile of the tracer. Results: μPET imaging and ex-vivo biodistribution revealed an high initial brain uptake of [18F]TCO (3.8%ID/g at 5 min pi) followed by a washout to 3.0%ID/g at 30 min pi. Subsequently the brain uptake increased again to 3.7%ID/g at 120 min pi followed by a slow washout until 240 min pi (2.9%ID/g). Autoradiography confirmed homogenous brain uptake. On the μPET images bone uptake became gradually visible after 120 min pi and was clearly visible at 240 min pi. The metabolite study revealed a fast metabolization of [18F]TCO in plasma and brain into three main polar radiometabolites. Conclusions: Although [18F]TCO has previously been described to be a useful tracer for radiolabeling of tetrazine modified targeting molecules, our study indicates that its utility for in vivo chemistry and pre-targeted imaging will be limited. Although [18F]TCO clearly enters the brain, it is quickly metabolized with a non-specific accumulation of radioactivity in the brain and bone

  12. Expediting SRM assay development for large-scale targeted proteomics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Shi, Tujin; Brown, Joseph N.; He, Jintang; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-10-03

    Due to their high sensitivity and specificity, targeted proteomics measurements, e.g. selected reaction monitoring (SRM), are becoming increasingly popular for biological and translational applications. Selection of optimal transitions and optimization of collision energy (CE) are important assay development steps for achieving sensitive detection and accurate quantification; however, these steps can be labor-intensive, especially for large-scale applications. Herein, we explored several options for accelerating SRM assay development evaluated in the context of a relatively large set of 215 synthetic peptide targets. We first showed that HCD fragmentation is very similar to CID in triple quadrupole (QQQ) instrumentation, and by selection of top six y fragment ions from HCD spectra, >86% of top transitions optimized from direct infusion on QQQ instrument are covered. We also demonstrated that the CE calculated by existing prediction tools was less accurate for +3 precursors, and a significant increase in intensity for transitions could be obtained using a new CE prediction equation constructed from the present experimental data. Overall, our study illustrates the feasibility of expediting the development of larger numbers of high-sensitivity SRM assays through automation of transitions selection and accurate prediction of optimal CE to improve both SRM throughput and measurement quality.

  13. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert - ask your colleague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, C.; Grosu, A.L.; Nestle, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Duncker-Rohr, V. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Ortenau Clinical Center Offenburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Offenburg (Germany); Ruecker, G. [University of Freiburg, Institute of Medical Biometry und Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany); Mix, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); MacManus, M. [University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Ruysscher, D. de [University Hospital Leuven/KU Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Vogel, W. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eriksen, J.G. [Odense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Odense (Denmark); Oyen, W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Weber, W. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology/Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates the dependency of manual delineation on experience and qualification. A total of 44 international interdisciplinary observers each defined a [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET based gross tumor volume (GTV) using the same PET/CT scan from a patient with lung cancer. The observers were ''experts'' (E; n = 3), ''experienced interdisciplinary pairs'' (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), ''single field specialists'' (SFS; n = 13), and ''students'' (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices within the groups (pCI) and relative to the experts (eCI) were calculated. E (pCI = 0.67) and EP (pCI = 0.53) showed a significantly higher agreement within the groups as compared to SFS (pCI = 0.43, p = 0.03, and p = 0.006). In relation to the experts, EP (eCI = 0.55) showed better concordance compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring. Joint delineation by a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician showed remarkable agreement and better concordance with the experts compared to other specialists. The relevant intermethod variability of the automatic algorithms underlines the need for further standardization and optimization in this field. (orig.) [German] Die Daten aus der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) werden in vielen Kliniken routinemaessig zur

  14. Design, synthesis and validation of integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1}-targeted probe for microPET imaging of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chiun-Wei; Li, Zibo; Cai, Hancheng; Chen, Kai; Shahinian, Tony; Conti, Peter S. [University of Southern California, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The ability of PET to aid in the diagnosis and management of recurrent and/or disseminated metastatic prostate cancer may be enhanced by the development of novel prognostic imaging probes. Accumulating experimental evidence indicates that overexpression of integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} may correlate with progression in human prostate cancer. In this study, {sup 64}Cu-labeled integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1}-targeted PET probes were designed and evaluated for the imaging of prostate cancer. DGEA peptides conjugated with a bifunctional chelator (BFC) were developed to image integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} expression with PET in a subcutaneous PC-3 xenograft model. The microPET images were reconstructed by a two-dimensional ordered subsets expectation maximum algorithm. The average radioactivity accumulation within a tumor or an organ was quantified from the multiple region of interest volumes. The PET tracer demonstrated prominent tumor uptake in the PC-3 xenograft (integrin {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1}-positive). The receptor specificity was confirmed in a blocking experiment. Moreover, the low tracer uptake in a CWR-22 tumor model (negative control) further confirmed the receptor specificity. The sarcophagine-conjugated DGEA peptide allows noninvasive imaging of tumor-associated {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} expression, which may be a useful PET probe for evaluating the metastatic potential of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  15. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  16. PET molecular imaging of peripheral and central inflammatory processes targeting the TSPO 18 kDa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo potential of the TSPO 18 kDa as a bio-marker of inflammation, with the use of its radioligand [18F]DPA-714, to non-invasively quantify the inflammatory state within the scope of various pathologies. Multiple animal models of various inflammatory diseases, to include: inflammatory bowel disease, neuro-inflammation, and septic shock, were developed and put in place by adapted measures. The animals well-being and the subsequent inflammation was evaluated. The inflammatory state was measured using quantitative PET imaging with the TSPO radioligand [18F]DPA-714 and correlated to the expression of conventional inflammatory markers using microscopy. Based on the observed data, we were able to distinguish control groups from treated groups when using [18F]DPA-714. This TSPO radioligand permitted us to quantify the inflammatory level and to observe evolutionary changes in the inflammatory state of the disease in multiple models. The PET results, using the [18F]DPA-714 signal was correlated with an increased TSPO expression at cellular level. Results indicate that [18F]DPA-714 is a suitable tracer for studying inflammation of multiple diseases. [18F]DPA-714 could be a good molecular probe to non-invasively evaluate the level and localization of inflammation. Moreover, in vivo imaging using this TSPO ligand is potentially a powerful tool to stage and certainly to follow the evolution and therapeutic efficiency at molecular level in inflammatory diseases. (author)

  17. Genomic analysis of Campylobacter fetus subspecies: identification of candidate virulence determinants and diagnostic assay targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Daniel O

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter fetus subspecies venerealis is the causative agent of bovine genital campylobacteriosis, asymptomatic in bulls the disease is spread to female cattle causing extensive reproductive loss. The microbiological and molecular differentiation of C. fetus subsp. venerealis from C. fetus subsp. fetus is extremely difficult. This study describes the analysis of the available C. fetus subsp. venerealis AZUL-94 strain genome (~75–80% to identify elements exclusively found in C. fetus subsp. venerealis strains as potential diagnostic targets and the characterisation of subspecies virulence genes. Results Eighty Kb of genomic sequence (22 contigs was identified as unique to C. fetus subsp. venerealis AZUL-94 and consisted of type IV secretory pathway components, putative plasmid genes and hypothetical proteins. Of the 9 PCR assays developed to target C. fetus subsp. venerealis type IV secretion system genes, 4 of these were specific for C. fetus subsp. venerealis biovar venerealis and did not detect C. fetus subsp. venerealis biovar intermedius. Two assays were specific for C. fetus subsp. venerealis AZUL-94 strain, with a further single assay specific for the AZUL-94 strain and C. fetus subsp. venerealis biovar intermedius (and not the remaining C. fetus subsp. venerealis biovar venerealis strains tested. C. fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis were found to share most common Campylobacter virulence factors such as SAP, chemotaxis, flagellar biosynthesis, 2-component systems and cytolethal distending toxin subunits (A, B, C. We did not however, identify in C. fetus the full complement of bacterial adherence candidates commonly found in other Campylobacter spp. Conclusion The comparison of the available C. fetus subsp. venerealis genome sequence with the C. fetus subsp. fetus genome identified 80 kb of unique C. fetus subsp. venerealis AZUL94 sequence, with subsequent PCR confirmation demonstrating

  18. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert--ask your colleague

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, C; Duncker-Rohr, V; Rücker, G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates ...

  19. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ikuko, E-mail: nakamuri@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m

  20. Yeast-based assay identifies novel Shh/Gli target genes in vertebrate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milla Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of developmental events and molecular mechanisms associated with the Hedgehog (Hh pathway from Drosophila to vertebrates, suggest that gene regulation is crucial for diverse cellular responses, including target genes not yet described. Although several high-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded information at the genomic, transcriptional and proteomic levels, the specificity of Gli binding sites related to direct target gene activation still remain elusive. This study aims to identify novel putative targets of Gli transcription factors through a protein-DNA binding assay using yeast, and validating a subset of targets both in-vitro and in-vivo. Testing in different Hh/Gli gain- and loss-of-function scenarios we here identified known (e.g., ptc1 and novel Hh-regulated genes in zebrafish embryos. Results The combined yeast-based screening and MEME/MAST analysis were able to predict Gli transcription factor binding sites, and position mapping of these sequences upstream or in the first intron of promoters served to identify new putative target genes of Gli regulation. These candidates were validated by qPCR in combination with either the pharmacological Hh/Gli antagonist cyc or the agonist pur in Hh-responsive C3H10T1/2 cells. We also used small-hairpin RNAs against Gli proteins to evaluate targets and confirm specific Gli regulation their expression. Taking advantage of mutants that have been identified affecting different components of the Hh/Gli signaling system in the zebrafish model, we further analyzed specific novel candidates. Studying Hh function with pharmacological inhibition or activation complemented these genetic loss-of-function approaches. We provide evidence that in zebrafish embryos, Hh signaling regulates sfrp2, neo1, and c-myc expression in-vivo. Conclusion A recently described yeast-based screening allowed us to identify new Hh/Gli target genes, functionally important in

  1. Bioluminescent bioreporter assays for targeted detection of chemical and biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Steven; Jegier, Pat; Johnson, Courtney; Moser, Scott; Islam, Syed; Sayler, Gary

    2008-04-01

    Bioluminescent bioreporters carrying the bacterial lux gene cassette have been well established for the sensing and monitoring of select chemical agents. Their ability to generate target specific visible light signals with no requirement for extraneous additions of substrate or other hands-on manipulations affords a real-time, repetitive assaying technique that is remarkable in its simplicity and accuracy. Although the predominant application of lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters has been towards chemical compound detection, novel genetic engineering schemes are yielding a variety of new bioreporter systems that extend the lux sensing mechanism beyond mere analyte discrimination. For example, the unique specificity of bacteriophage (bacterial viruses) has been exploited in lux bioluminescent assays for specific identification of foodborne bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. With the concurrent ability to interface bioluminescent bioreporter assays onto integrated circuit microluminometers (BBICs; bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuits), the potential exists for the development of sentinel microchips that can function as environmental monitors for multiplexed recognition of chemical and biological agents in air, food, and water. The size and portability of BBIC biosensors may ultimately provide a deployable, interactive network sensing technology adaptable towards chem/bio defense.

  2. Natural product juglone targets three key enzymes from Helicobacter pylori: inhibition assay with crystal structure characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-hua KONG; Liang ZHANG; Zheng-yi YANG; Cong HAN; Li-hong HU; Hua-liang JIANG; Xu SHEN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the inhibition features of the natural product juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) against the three key enzymes from Helicobacter pylori (cystathionine γ-synthase [HpCGS], malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase [HpFabD], and β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase [HpFabZ]). Methods: An enzyme inhibition assay against HpCGS was carded out by using a continuous coupled spectrophotometric assay approach. The inhibition assay of HpFabD was performed based on the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase-coupled system, while the inhibition assay for HpFabZ was monitored by detecting the decrease in absorbance at 260 nm with crotonoyl-CoA conversion to βhydroxybutyryl-CoA. The juglone/FabZ complex crystal was obtained by soaking juglone into the HpFabZ crystal, and the X-ray crystal structure of the complex was analyzed by molecular replacement approach. Results: Juglone was shown to potently inhibit HpCGS, HpFabD, and HpFabZ with the half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 values of 7.0±0.7, 20±1, and 30±4 μmol/L, respectively. An inhibition-type study indicated that juglone was a non-competitive inhibitor of HpCGS against O-succi-nyl-L-homoserine (KI=αKI=24 μmol/L), an uncompetitive inhibitor of HpFabD against malonyl-CoA (αKI=7.4 μmol/L), and a competitive inhibitor of HpFabZ against crotonoyl-CoA (K,1=6.8 μtmol/L). Moreover, the crystal structure of the HpFabZ/juglone complex further revealed the essential binding pattern ofjuglone against HpFabZ at the atomic level. Conclusion: HpCGS, HpFabD, and HpFabZ are potential targets ofjuglone.

  3. Precision and linearity targets for validation of an IFNγ ELISPOT, cytokine flow cytometry, and tetramer assay using CMV peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyerly Herbert K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell assays of immune function are increasingly used to monitor T cell responses in immunotherapy clinical trials. Standardization and validation of such assays are therefore important to interpretation of the clinical trial data. Here we assess the levels of intra-assay, inter-assay, and inter-operator precision, as well as linearity, of CD8+ T cell IFNγ-based ELISPOT and cytokine flow cytometry (CFC, as well as tetramer assays. Results Precision was measured in cryopreserved PBMC with a low, medium, or high response level to a CMV pp65 peptide or peptide mixture. Intra-assay precision was assessed using 6 replicates per assay; inter-assay precision was assessed by performing 8 assays on different days; and inter-operator precision was assessed using 3 different operators working on the same day. Percent CV values ranged from 4% to 133% depending upon the assay and response level. Linearity was measured by diluting PBMC from a high responder into PBMC from a non-responder, and yielded R2 values from 0.85 to 0.99 depending upon the assay and antigen. Conclusion These data provide target values for precision and linearity of single-cell assays for those wishing to validate these assays in their own laboratories. They also allow for comparison of the precision and linearity of ELISPOT, CFC, and tetramer across a range of response levels. There was a trend toward tetramer assays showing the highest precision, followed closely by CFC, and then ELISPOT; while all three assays had similar linearity. These findings are contingent upon the use of optimized protocols for each assay.

  4. Cytotoxicity, tumor targeting and PET imaging of sub-5 nm KGdF4 multifunctional rare earth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinmin; Cao, Fengwen; Xiong, Liqin; Yang, Yang; Cao, Tianye; Cai, Xi; Hai, Wangxi; Li, Biao; Guo, Yixiao; Zhang, Yimin; Li, Fuyou

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasmall sub-5 nm KGdF4 rare earth nanoparticles were synthesized as multifunctional probes for fluorescent, magnetic, and radionuclide imaging. The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles in human glioblastoma U87MG and human non-small cell lung carcinoma H1299 cells was evaluated, and their application for in vitro and in vivo tumor targeted imaging has also been demonstrated.Ultrasmall sub-5 nm KGdF4 rare earth nanoparticles were synthesized as multifunctional probes for fluorescent, magnetic, and radionuclide imaging. The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles in human glioblastoma U87MG and human non-small cell lung carcinoma H1299 cells was evaluated, and their application for in vitro and in vivo tumor targeted imaging has also been demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental section as well as EDXA, XRD, zeta potential, FTIR, TGA, stability, TEM, Z scanning, ICP-MS, and MicroPET/CT images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03374h

  5. Medium to large scale radioisotope production for targeted radiotherapy using a small PET cyclotron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge; Jensen, Mikael; Elema, Dennis Ringkjøbing

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the use of radionuclides in targeted cancer therapy has increased. In this study we have developed a high-current solid target system and demonstrated that by the use of a typical low-energy medical cyclotron, it is possible to produce tens of GBq's of many unconventional...... radionuclides relevant for cancer therapy such as 64Cu and 119Sb locally at the hospitals....

  6. A comprehensive assay for targeted multiplex amplification of human DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Sujatha; Zheng, Jianbiao; Wilhelmy, Julie; Faham, Malek; Mindrinos, Michael; Davis, Ronald

    2008-07-01

    We developed a robust and reproducible methodology to amplify human sequences in parallel for use in downstream multiplexed sequence analyses. We call the methodology SMART (Spacer Multiplex Amplification Reaction), and it is based, in part, on padlock probe technology. As a proof of principle, we used SMART technology to simultaneously amplify 485 human exons ranging from 100 to 500 bp from human genomic DNA. In multiple repetitions, >90% of the targets were successfully amplified with a high degree of uniformity, with 70% of targets falling within a 10-fold range and all products falling within a 100-fold range of each other in abundance. We used long padlock probes (LPPs) >300 bases in length for the assay, and the increased length of these probes allowed for the capture of human sequences up to 500 bp in length, which is optimal for capturing most human exons. To engineer the LPPs, we developed a method that generates ssDNA molecules with precise ends, using an appropriately designed dsDNA template. The template has appropriate restriction sites engineered into it that can be digested to generate nucleotide overhangs that are suitable for lambda exonuclease digestion, producing a single-stranded probe from dsDNA. The SMART technology is flexible and can be easily adapted to multiplex tens of thousands of target sequences in a single reaction.

  7. CRISPR is an optimal target for the design of specific PCR assays for salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Fabre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serotype-specific PCR assays targeting Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A, the causal agents of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, are required to accelerate formal diagnosis and to overcome the lack of typing sera and, in some situations, the need for culture. However, the sensitivity and specificity of such assays must be demonstrated on large collections of strains representative of the targeted serotypes and all other bacterial populations producing similar clinical symptoms. METHODOLOGY: Using a new family of repeated DNA sequences, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, as a serotype-specific target, we developed a conventional multiplex PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A from cultured isolates. We also developed EvaGreen-based real-time singleplex PCR assays with the same two sets of primers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity for each protocol after validation of the assays on 188 serotype Typhi and 74 serotype Paratyphi A strains from diverse genetic groups, geographic origins and time periods and on 70 strains of bacteria frequently encountered in bloodstream infections, including 29 other Salmonella serotypes and 42 strains from 38 other bacterial species. CONCLUSIONS: The performance and convenience of our serotype-specific PCR assays should facilitate the rapid and accurate identification of these two major serotypes in a large range of clinical and public health laboratories with access to PCR technology. These assays were developed for use with DNA from cultured isolates, but with modifications to the assay, the CRISPR targets could be used in the development of assays for use with clinical and other samples.

  8. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Based Radiotherapy Target Volume Definition in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Delineation by Radiation Oncologists vs. Joint Outlining With a PET Radiologist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has benefits in target volume (TV) definition in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, an optimal protocol for TV delineation has not been determined. We investigate volumetric and positional variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation using a planning PET/CT among three radiation oncologists and a PET radiologist. Methods and Materials: RTP PET/CT scans were performed on 28 NSCLC patients (Stage IA-IIIB) of which 14 patients received prior induction chemotherapy. Three radiation oncologists and one PET radiologist working with a fourth radiation oncologist independently delineated the GTV on CT alone (GTVCT) and on fused PET/CT images (GTVPETCT). The mean percentage volume change (PVC) between GTVCT and GTVPETCT for the radiation oncologists and the PVC between GTVCT and GTVPETCT for the PET radiologist were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Concordance index (CI) was used to assess both positional and volume change between GTVCT and GTVPETCT in a single measurement. Results: For all patients, a significant difference in PVC from GTVCT to GTVPETCT exists between the radiation oncologist (median, 5.9%), and the PET radiologist (median, -0.4%, p = 0.001). However, no significant difference in median concordance index (comparing GTVCT and GTVFUSED for individual cases) was observed (PET radiologist = 0.73; radiation oncologists = 0.66; p = 0.088). Conclusions: Percentage volume changes from GTVCT to GTVPETCT were lower for the PET radiologist than for the radiation oncologists, suggesting a lower impact of PET/CT in TV delineation for the PET radiologist than for the oncologists. Guidelines are needed to standardize the use of PET/CT for TV delineation in RTP.

  9. Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Using CT in Combination with a PET Examination to Minimize the Clinical Target Volume of the Mediastinum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusheng Shi; Xiaogang Deng; Longhua Chen

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To decrease radiation injury of the esophagus and lungs by utilizing a CT scan in combination with PET tumor imaging in order to minimize the clinical target area of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, without preventive radiation on the lymphatic drainage area. METHODS Of 76 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 32 received a PET examination before radiotherapy. Preventive radiation was not conducted in the mediastinum area without lymphatic metastasis, which was confirmed by CT and PET. For the other 44 patients, preventive radiation was performed in the lymphatic drainage area. PET examinations showed that the clinical target volume of the patients was decreased on average to about one third. The radiation therapy for patients of the two groups was the same, I.e. The dose for accelerated fractionated irradiation was 3 Gy/time and 5 time/week. The preventive dose was 42 to 45 Gy/time, 14 to 15 time/week, with 3-week treatment, and the therapeutic dose was 60 to 63 Gy/time, 20 to 21 time/week, with a period of 4 to 5 weeks.RESULTS The rate of missed lymph nodes beyond the irradiation field was 6.3% and 4.5% respectively in the group with and without PET examination (P = 0.831). The incidence of acute radioactive esophagitis was 15.6 % and 45.5% in the two groups respectively (P = 0.006). The incidence of acute radiation pneumonia and long-term pulmonary fibrosis in the two groups was 6.3% and 9.1%, and 68.8% and 75.0%, respectively (P = 0.982 and P = 0.547).CONCLUSION The recurrence rate in the lymph nodes beyond the target area was not increased after minimizing the clinical target volume (CTV), whereas radioactive injury to the lungs and esophageal injury was reduced, and especially with a significant decrease in the rate of acute radioactive esophagitis. The method of CT in combination with PET for minimizing the mediastinal CTV is superior to the conventional preventive radiation of the mediastinum.

  10. Tier-1 assays for assessing the toxicity of insecticidal proteins produced by genetically engineered plants to non-target arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-He; Romeis, Jörg; Wu, Kong-Ming; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2014-04-01

    In assessing an insect-resistant genetically engineered (IRGE) crop before its commercialization, researchers normally use so-called "Tier-1 assays" as the initial step to determine the effects of the crop on non-target organisms. In these tests, the insecticidal proteins (IPs) produced by the IRGEs are added to the diets of test organisms in the laboratory. Test organisms in such assays can be directly exposed to much higher concentrations of the test IPs than they would encounter in the field. The results of Tier-1 assays are thus more conservative than those generated in studies in which the organisms are exposed to the IPs by feeding on IRGE plant tissue or in the case of predators or parasites, by feeding on invertebrate prey or hosts that have fed on IRGE plant tissue. In this report, we consider three important factors that must be considered in Tier-1 assays: (i) methods for delivery of the IP to the test organisms; (ii) the need for and selection of compounds used as positive controls; and (iii) methods for monitoring the concentration, stability and bioactivity of the IP during the assay. We also analyze the existing data from Tier-1 assays regarding the toxicity of Bt Cry proteins to non-target arthropod species. The data indicate that the widely used Bt proteins have no direct toxicity to non-target organisms.

  11. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  12. PET imaging of angiogenesis after myocardial infarction/reperfusion using a one-step labeled integrin-targeted tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haokao [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Lang, Lixin; Guo, Ning; Quan, Qimeng; Hu, Shuo; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), Bethesda, MD (United States); Cao, Feng [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China)

    2012-04-15

    The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin represents a potential target for noninvasive imaging of angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel one-step labeled integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeting positron emission tomography (PET) probe, {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2, for angiogenesis imaging in a myocardial infarction/reperfusion (MI/R) animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 45-min transient left coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. The myocardial infarction was confirmed by ECG, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging, and cardiac ultrasound. In vivo PET imaging was used to determine myocardial uptake of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 at different time points following reperfusion. The control peptide RAD was labeled with a similar procedure and used to confirm the specificity. Ex vivo autoradiographic analysis and CD31/CD61 double immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the PET results. Myocardial origin of the {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 accumulation was confirmed by {sup 18}F-FDG and autoradiography. PET imaging demonstrated increased focal accumulation of {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-PRGD2 in the infarcted area which started at day 3 (0.28 {+-} 0.03%ID/g, p < 0.05) and peaked between 1 and 3 weeks (0.59 {+-} 0.16 and 0.55 {+-} 0.13%ID/g, respectively). The focal accumulation decreased but still kept at a higher level than the sham group after 4 months of reperfusion (0.31 {+-} 0.01%ID/g, p < 0.05). Pretreatment with unlabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide significantly decreased tracer uptake, indicating integrin specificity of this tracer. At 1 week after MI/R, uptake of the control tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-RAD that does not bind to integrin, in the infarcted area, was only 0.21 {+-} 0.01%ID/g. Autoradiographic imaging showed the same trend of uptake in the myocardial infarction area. The time course of focal tracer uptake was consistent with the pattern of vascular density and integrin {beta

  13. Design and radio-synthesis of somatostatin receptors targeted 68Ga-DOTA-Benereotide for non-invasive PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we reported the synthesis, radiolabeling and evaluation of a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer DOTA-Benerotide labeled with 68Ga with potential application in SSTR1,2,3,5 positive tumors for PET imaging. Radiolabeling of DOTA-Benerotide with 68Ga achieved its highest efficiency at pH 3.5 and 100 deg C for 20 min. It also showed excellent in vitro stability in different buffers. Micro-PET imaging of human colorectal adenocarcinoma tumor cell (HT-29) bearing mice clearly delineated tumors at 4 h after tail vein injection of 68Ga-DOTA-Benerotide tracer. Further studies are needed to identify the mechanism of cell/organ uptake of this new SSTR PET imaging tracer. (author)

  14. Comparison of primary target volumes delineated on four-dimensional CT and 18 F-FDG PET/CT of non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the optimal threshold of 18 F-fluorodexyglucose (18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography CT (PET/CT) images that generates the best volumetric match to internal gross target volume (IGTV) based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) images. Twenty patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent enhanced three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scan followed by enhanced 4DCT scan of the thorax under normal free breathing with the administration of intravenous contrast agents. A total of 100 ml of ioversol was injected intravenously, 2 ml/s for 3DCT and 1 ml/s for 4DCT. Then 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed based on the same positioning parameters (the same immobilization devices and identical position verified by laser localizer as well as skin marks). Gross target volumes (GTVs) of the primary tumor were contoured on the ten phases images of 4DCT to generate IGTV10. GTVPET were determined with eight different threshold using an auto-contouring function. The differences in the position, volume, concordance index (CI) and degree of inclusion (DI) of the targets between GTVPET and IGTV10 were compared. The images from seventeen patients were suitable for further analysis. Significant differences between the centric coordinate positions of GTVPET (excluding GTVPET15%) and IGTV10 were observed only in z axes (P < 0.05). GTVPET15%, GTVPET25% and GTVPET2.0 were not statistically different from IGTV10 (P < 0.05). GTVPET15% approximated closely to IGTV10 with median percentage volume changes of 4.86%. The best CI was between IGTV10 and GTVPET15% (0.57). The best DI of IGTV10 in GTVPET was IGTV10 in GTVPET15% (0.80). None of the PET-based contours had both close spatial and volumetric approximation to the 4DCT IGTV10. At present 3D-PET/CT should not be used for IGTV generation

  15. Target volume definition in high-risk prostate cancer patients using sentinel node SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vees Hansjörg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the influence of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline (18 F-FCH PET/CT in radiotherapy (RT treatment planning for prostate cancer patients with a high-risk for lymph node (LN involvement. Methods Twenty high-risk prostate cancer patients underwent a pelvic SPECT acquisition following a transrectal ultrasound guided injection of 99mTc-Nanocoll into the prostate. In all patients but one an 18 F-FCH PET/CT for RT treatment planning was performed. SPECT studies were coregistered with the respective abdominal CTs. Pelvic SNs localized on SPECT/CT and LN metastases detected by 18 F-FCH PET/CT were compared to standard pelvic clinical target volumes (CTV. Results A total of 104 pelvic SNs were identified on SPECT/CT (mean 5.2 SNs/patient; range 1–10. Twenty-seven SNs were located outside the standard pelvic CTV, 17 in the proximal common iliac and retroperitoneal regions above S1, 9 in the pararectal fat and 1 in the inguinal region. SPECT/CT succeeded to optimize the definition of the CTV and treatment plans in 6/20 patients due to the presence of pararectal SNs located outside the standard treatment volume. 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified abnormal tracer uptake in the iliac LN region in 2/19 patients. These abnormal LNs were negative on SPECT/CT suggesting a potential blockade of lymphatic drainage by metastatic LNs with a high tumour burden. Conclusions Multimodality imaging which combines SPECT/CT prostate lymphoscintigraphy and 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified SNs outside standard pelvic CTVs or highly suspicious pelvic LNs in 40% of high-risk prostate cancer patients, highlighting the potential impact of this approach in RT treatment planning.

  16. Target volume definition in high-risk prostate cancer patients using sentinel node SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the influence of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline (18 F-FCH) PET/CT in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning for prostate cancer patients with a high-risk for lymph node (LN) involvement. Twenty high-risk prostate cancer patients underwent a pelvic SPECT acquisition following a transrectal ultrasound guided injection of 99mTc-Nanocoll into the prostate. In all patients but one an 18 F-FCH PET/CT for RT treatment planning was performed. SPECT studies were coregistered with the respective abdominal CTs. Pelvic SNs localized on SPECT/CT and LN metastases detected by 18 F-FCH PET/CT were compared to standard pelvic clinical target volumes (CTV). A total of 104 pelvic SNs were identified on SPECT/CT (mean 5.2 SNs/patient; range 1–10). Twenty-seven SNs were located outside the standard pelvic CTV, 17 in the proximal common iliac and retroperitoneal regions above S1, 9 in the pararectal fat and 1 in the inguinal region. SPECT/CT succeeded to optimize the definition of the CTV and treatment plans in 6/20 patients due to the presence of pararectal SNs located outside the standard treatment volume. 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified abnormal tracer uptake in the iliac LN region in 2/19 patients. These abnormal LNs were negative on SPECT/CT suggesting a potential blockade of lymphatic drainage by metastatic LNs with a high tumour burden. Multimodality imaging which combines SPECT/CT prostate lymphoscintigraphy and 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified SNs outside standard pelvic CTVs or highly suspicious pelvic LNs in 40% of high-risk prostate cancer patients, highlighting the potential impact of this approach in RT treatment planning

  17. Cancer-associated stroma affects FDG uptake in experimental carcinomas. Implications for FDG-PET delineation of radiotherapy target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Galie, Mirco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina [University of Verona, Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, Verona (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Fanti, Stefano [Policlinico ' S. Orsola-Malpighi' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences, Milan (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, PET Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    To analyse the influence of cancer-associated stroma on FDG-uptake in two carcinoma models characterized by different stromal degrees. Eight nude mice were subcutaneously injected with DU-145 prostate cancer cells or BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, and underwent FDG-PET imaging about 2 weeks after implantation. After the mice were killed, histology, and CD31 and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry were performed. To further evaluate the highly stromalized carcinoma using perfusion-sensitive imaging, four BXPC-3 tumours underwent two successive albumin-binding (MS-325) MRI scans during tumour growth. FDG uptake was significantly higher in the DU-145 than in the BXPC-3 tumours, which were hardly distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue. In the BXPC-3 tumours, histology confirmed the widespread presence of aberrant infiltrated stroma, embedded with numerous vessels marked by CD31. In both tumour types, the stromal matrix was negative for GLUT1. In DU-145 tumour cells, GLUT1 immunostaining was greater than in BXPC-3 tumour cells, but not homogeneously, since it was less evident in the tumour cells which were nearer to vessels and stroma. Finally, MS-325 MRI always clearly showed areas of enhancement in the BXPC-3 tumours. Cancer-associated stroma has been reported to be capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption. Furthermore, it has been proposed that regions with high vascular perfusion exhibit a significantly lower FDG uptake, suggesting some vascular/metabolic reciprocity. Since our results are consistent with these recent findings, they signal a risk of tumour volume underestimation in radiotherapy if FDG uptake alone is used for target delineation of carcinomas, which suggests that additional evaluation should be performed using vasculature/perfusion-sensitive imaging. (orig.)

  18. PET Imaging of CRF1 with [{sup 11}C]R121920 and [{sup 11}C]DMP696: is the target of sufficient density?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Gregory M. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]. E-mail: gms11@columbia.edu; Parsey, Ramin V. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Kumar, J.S. Dileep [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Arango, Victoria [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Kassir, Suham A. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Huang, Yung-yu [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Simpson, Norman R. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald L. [Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Mann, J. John [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Aim: Overstimulation of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) is implicated in anxiety and depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo binding characteristics of [{sup 11}C]R121920 and [{sup 11}C]DMP696 in the nonhuman primate for application in positron emission tomography (PET) studies of CRF1. Methods: PET imaging with the two novel CRF1 radioligands was performed in baboon. In vitro binding studies for CRF1 were performed in postmortem brain tissue of baboon and human to assess sufficiency of receptor density for PET. Results: Both [{sup 11}C]R121920 and [{sup 11}C]DMP696 distributed rapidly and uniformly throughout the brain. Washout was comparable across brain regions, without differences in volume of distribution between regions reported to have high and low in vitro CRF1 binding. Membrane-enriched tissue homogenate assay using [{sup 125}I]Tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine and specific CRF1 antagonists CP154,526 and SN003 in human occipital cortex yielded maximal binding (B {sub max}) of 63.3 and 147.3 fmol/mg protein, respectively, and in human cerebellar cortex yielded B {sub max} of 103.6 and 64.6 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Dissociation constants (K {sub D}) were subnanomolar. In baboon, specific binding was not detectable in the same regions; therefore, B {sub max} and K {sub D} were not measurable. Autoradiographic results were consistent except there was also detectable CRF1-specific binding in baboon cerebellum. Conclusion: Neither [{sup 11}C]R121920 nor [{sup 11}C]DMP696 demonstrated quantifiable regional binding in vivo in baboon. In vitro results suggest CRF1 density in baboon may be insufficient for PET. Studies in man may generate more promising results due to the higher CRF1 density compared with baboon in cerebral cortex and cerebellum.

  19. Employment of colorimetric enzyme assay for monitoring expression and solubility of GST fusion proteins targeted to inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mačinković, Igor S; Abughren, Mohamed; Mrkic, Ivan; Grozdanović, Milica M; Prodanović, Radivoje; Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija

    2013-12-01

    High levels of recombinant protein expression can lead to the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. These complex aggregates are commonly solubilized in strong denaturants, such as 6-8M urea, although, if possible, solubilization under milder conditions could facilitate subsequent refolding and purification of bioactive proteins. Commercially available GST-tag assays are designed for quantitative measurement of GST activity under native conditions. GST fusion proteins accumulated in inclusion bodies are considered to be undetectable by such assays. In this work, solubilization of recombinantly produced proteins was performed in 4M urea. The activity of rGST was assayed in 2M urea and it was shown that rGST preserves 85% of its activity under such denaturing conditions. A colorimetric GST activity assay with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was examined for use in rapid detection of expression targeted to inclusion bodies and for the identification of inclusion body proteins which can be solubilized in low concentrations of chaotropic agents. Applicability of the assay was evaluated by tracking protein expression of two GST-fused allergens of biopharmaceutical value in E. coli, GST-Der p 2 and GST-Mus a 5, both targeted to inclusion bodies.

  20. PET imaging of inflammation and adenocarcinoma xenografts using vascular adhesion protein 1 targeting peptide 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1: comparison with 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate inflammation and tumour imaging with a vascular adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1) targeting peptide 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 in comparison with 18F-FDG. Rats with both subcutaneous human pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts and turpentine oil-induced acute sterile inflammation were evaluated by dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and by digital autoradiography of tissue cryosections. Subsequently, the autoradiographs were combined with histological and immunohistological analysis of the sections. 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 delineated acute, sterile inflammation comparable with 18F-FDG. However, the tumour uptake of 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 was low in contrast to prominent 18F-FDG uptake. The standardised uptake values of inflammation and tumours by PET were 1.1 ± 0.4 (mean ± SEM) and 0.4 ± 0.1 for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 and 2.0 ± 0.5 and 1.6 ± 0.8 for 18F-FDG, respectively. In addition, PET studies showed inflammation to muscle and tumour to muscle ratios of 5.1 ± 3.1 and 1.7 ± 0.3 for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 and 6.2 ± 0.7 and 4.6 ± 2.2 for 18F-FDG, respectively. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression of luminal VAP-1 on the endothelium at the site of inflammation and low expression in the tumour The 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 PET was able to visualise inflammation better than tumour, which was in accordance with the luminal expression of VAP-1 on vasculature in these experimental models. (orig.)

  1. Targeting post-infarct inflammation by PET imaging: comparison of 68Ga-citrate and 68Ga-DOTATATE with 18F-FDG in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of inflammation early after myocardial infarction (MI) is a promising approach to the guidance of novel molecular interventions that support endogenous healing processes. 18F-FDG PET has been used, but may be complicated by physiological myocyte uptake. We evaluated the potential of two alternative imaging targets: lactoferrin binding by 68Ga-citrate and somatostatin receptor binding by 68Ga-DOTATATE. C57Bl/6 mice underwent permanent coronary artery ligation. Serial PET imaging was performed 3 - 7 days after MI using 68Ga-citrate, 68Ga-DOTATATE, or 18F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of myocyte glucose uptake. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by 13N-ammonia PET and cardiac geometry by contrast-enhanced ECG-gated CT. Mice exhibited a perfusion defect of 30 - 40 % (of the total left ventricle) with apical anterolateral wall akinesia and thinning on day 7 after MI. 18F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression demonstrated distinct uptake in the infarct region, as well as in the border zone and remote myocardium. The myocardial standardized uptake value in MI mice was significantly higher than in healthy mice under ketamine/xylazine anaesthesia (1.9 ± 0.4 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1). 68Ga images exhibited high blood pool activity with no specific myocardial uptake up to 90 min after injection (tissue-to-blood contrast 0.9). 68Ga-DOTATATE was rapidly cleared from the blood, but myocardial SUV was very low (0.10 ± 0.03). Neither 68Ga nor 68Ga-DOTATATE is a useful alternative to 18F-FDG for PET imaging of myocardial inflammation after MI in mice. Among the three tested approaches, 18F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of cardiomyocyte uptake remains the most practical imaging marker of post-infarct inflammation. (orig.)

  2. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  3. Analysis of Target Volume Definition Using CT, MRI and FDG-PET in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning of Anal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, E.; Hendel, H. Westergreen; Johannesen, H. Hjorth;

    2012-01-01

    and MRI. The delineations of GTV were done twice for each imaging modality with a minimum of 3 months in between. Delineations on the CT and MRI were done by routine methods. For the PET part three different cut-off values were used: SUV 2.5, 40% and 50% of maximum SUV, respectively. The GTVs were...

  4. Investigation on the role of integrated PET/MRI for target volume definition and radiotherapy planning in patients with high grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery MRI (FLAIR/MRI) and Carbon-11-labeled-methionine PET (11C-MET-PET) on high grade glioma (HGG) tumor volume delineation for radiotherapy planning. Material and methods: Sixty-nine patients with HGG were evaluated. The clinical target volumes (CTV1, generated by adding a 10 mm margin to FLAIRMRI area, CTV2 by adding a 20 mm margin to enhanced T1MRI) and biological target volume (BTV) were delineated on pre-operative MRI images and 11CMETPET respectively. Results: The overlap between CTV1 and CTV2 showed a low correlation between the two volumes with CTV1 not always fully included into the CTV2. In all cases the whole BTV was included into the CTV1, while in 35/69 patients (50%) part of BTV was outside the CTV2 despite larger margins were added. In all cases recurrences were within the CTV1 volume and in 19/38 (50%) partially outside the CTV2. In all patients relapse corresponded to the BTV area. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the target volume definition using FLAIR–MRI is more adequate compared to enhanced T1MRI. 11C-METPET uptake could help identify microscopic residual areas

  5. Generic detection of poleroviruses using an RT-PCR assay targeting the RdRp coding sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotos, Leonidas; Efthimiou, Konstantinos; Maliogka, Varvara I; Katis, Nikolaos I

    2014-03-01

    In this study a two-step RT-PCR assay was developed for the generic detection of poleroviruses. The RdRp coding region was selected as the primers' target, since it differs significantly from that of other members in the family Luteoviridae and its sequence can be more informative than other regions in the viral genome. Species specific RT-PCR assays targeting the same region were also developed for the detection of the six most widespread poleroviral species (Beet mild yellowing virus, Beet western yellows virus, Cucurbit aphid-borne virus, Carrot red leaf virus, Potato leafroll virus and Turnip yellows virus) in Greece and the collection of isolates. These isolates along with other characterized ones were used for the evaluation of the generic PCR's detection range. The developed assay efficiently amplified a 593bp RdRp fragment from 46 isolates of 10 different Polerovirus species. Phylogenetic analysis using the generic PCR's amplicon sequence showed that although it cannot accurately infer evolutionary relationships within the genus it can differentiate poleroviruses at the species level. Overall, the described generic assay could be applied for the reliable detection of Polerovirus infections and, in combination with the specific PCRs, for the identification of new and uncharacterized species in the genus. PMID:24374125

  6. PET-based compartmental modeling of {sup 124}I-A33 antibody: quantitative characterization of patient-specific tumor targeting in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Ruan, Shutian; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stony Brook School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Divgi, Chaitanya [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Scott, Andrew M. [La Trobe University, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kemeny, Nancy E.; Wong, Douglas; Scheinberg, David [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fong, Yuman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); City of Hope, Department of Surgery, Duarte, CA (United States); Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achem; Old, Lloyd J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against tumor antigens has proven effective for targeted therapy of human cancers, as shown by a growing list of successful antibody-based drug products. We describe a novel, nonlinear compartmental model using PET-derived data to determine the ''best-fit'' parameters and model-derived quantities for optimizing biodistribution of intravenously injected {sup 124}I-labeled antitumor antibodies. As an example of this paradigm, quantitative image and kinetic analyses of anti-A33 humanized mAb (also known as ''A33'') were performed in 11 colorectal cancer patients. Serial whole-body PET scans of {sup 124}I-labeled A33 and blood samples were acquired and the resulting tissue time-activity data for each patient were fit to a nonlinear compartmental model using the SAAM II computer code. Excellent agreement was observed between fitted and measured parameters of tumor uptake, ''off-target'' uptake in bowel mucosa, blood clearance, tumor antigen levels, and percent antigen occupancy. This approach should be generally applicable to antibody-antigen systems in human tumors for which the masses of antigen-expressing tumor and of normal tissues can be estimated and for which antibody kinetics can be measured with PET. Ultimately, based on each patient's resulting ''best-fit'' nonlinear model, a patient-specific optimum mAb dose (in micromoles, for example) may be derived. (orig.)

  7. A novel SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay to detect specific DNA target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Feuillie

    Full Text Available In this study, we have applied Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS technology to the specific detection of DNA. We present an innovative SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that allows specific DNA detection without any enzymatic amplification, such as is the case with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. In some substrates, such as ancient or processed remains, enzymatic amplification fails due to DNA alteration (degradation, chemical modification or to the presence of inhibitors. Consequently, the development of a non-enzymatic method, allowing specific DNA detection, could avoid long, expensive and inconclusive amplification trials. Here, we report the proof of concept of a SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that leads to the detection of a specific chamois DNA. This SERRS assay reveals its potential as a non-enzymatic alternative technology to DNA amplification methods (particularly the PCR method with several applications for species detection. As the amount and type of damage highly depend on the preservation conditions, the present SERRS assay would enlarge the range of samples suitable for DNA analysis and ultimately would provide exciting new opportunities for the investigation of ancient DNA in the fields of evolutionary biology and molecular ecology, and of altered DNA in food frauds detection and forensics.

  8. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets. PMID:26691755

  9. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hong; Goodwin, Peter M; Keller, Richard A.; Nolan, Rhiannon L.

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  10. A Prospective Evaluation of Staging and Target Volume Definition of Lymph Nodes by 18FDG PET/CT in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine an optimal standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold for detecting lymph node (LN) metastases in esophageal cancer using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (18FDG PET/CT) and to define the resulting nodal target volume, using histopathology as a “gold standard.” Methods: Sixteen patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radical esophagectomy and three-field LN dissection after 18FDG PET/CT and CT scans were enrolled into this study. Locations of LN groups were recorded according to a uniform LN map. Diagnostic performance of different SUV thresholds was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The optimal cutoff SUV was determined by plotting the false-negative rate (FNR) and false-positive rate (FPR), the sum of both error rates (FNR+FPR), and accuracy against a hypothetical SUV threshold. For each patient, nodal gross tumor volumes (GTVNs) were generated with CT alone (GTVNCT), PET/CT (GTVNPET), and pathologic data (GTVNpath). GTVNCT or GTVNPET was compared with GTVNpath by means of a conformity index (CI), which is the intersection of the two GTVNs divided by the sum of them minus the intersection, e.g., CICT and path = GTVNCT and path/(GTVNCT+ GTVNpath – GTVNCT and path). Results: LN metastases occurred in 21 LN groups among the 144 specimens taken from the 16 patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.9017 ± 0.0410. The plot of error rates showed a minimum of FNR+FPR for an SUV of 2.36, at which the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 76.19%, 95.93%, and 93.06%, respectively, whereas those of CT were 33.33%, 94.31%, and 85.42% (p values: 0.0117, 0.7539, and 0.0266). Mean GTVNCT, GTVNPET, and GTVNpath were 1.52 ± 2.38, 2.82 ± 4.51, and 2.68 ± 4.16cm3, respectively. Mean CICT and path and CIPET and path were 0.31 and 0.65 (p value = 0.0352). Conclusions: Diagnostic superiority of PET/CT at an SUV threshold of 2.36 over

  11. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pets can add fun, companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for ... is each family member looking for in a pet? Who will take care of it? Does anyone ...

  12. A Novel SERRS Sandwich-Hybridization Assay to Detect Specific DNA Target

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Feuillie; Maxime Mohamad Merheb; Benjamin Gillet; Gilles Montagnac; Isabelle Daniel; Catherine Hänni

    2011-01-01

    International audience In this study, we have applied Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) technology to the specific detection of DNA. We present an innovative SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that allows specific DNA detection without any enzymatic amplification, such as is the case with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). In some substrates, such as ancient or processed remains, enzymatic amplification fails due to DNA alteration (degradation, chemical modification) or to ...

  13. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase as a potential anti-malarial target: inhibition studies using improved methods for enzyme production and assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopitthummakhun Kittipat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need for the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs. Thus, it is essential to explore different potential new targets that are unique to the parasite or that are required for its viability in order to develop new interventions for treating the disease. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is a potential target for such new drugs, but convenient methods for producing and assaying the enzyme are still lacking, hampering the ability to screen inhibitors. Methods Production of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum SHMT (PfSHMT and Plasmodium vivax SHMT (PvSHMT, using auto-induction media, were compared to those using the conventional Luria Bertani medium with isopropyl thio-β-D-galactoside (LB-IPTG induction media. Plasmodium SHMT activity, kinetic parameters, and response to inhibitors were measured spectrophotometrically by coupling the reaction to that of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD. The identity of the intermediate formed upon inactivation of Plasmodium SHMTs by thiosemicarbazide was investigated by spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. The active site environment of Plasmodium SHMT was probed based on changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum upon addition of amino acids and folate. Results Auto-induction media resulted in a two to three-fold higher yield of Pf- and PvSHMT (7.38 and 29.29 mg/L compared to that produced in cells induced in LB-IPTG media. A convenient spectrophotometric activity assay coupling Plasmodium SHMT and MTHFD gave similar kinetic parameters to those previously obtained from the anaerobic assay coupling SHMT and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; thus demonstrating the validity of the new assay procedure. The improved method was adopted to screen for Plasmodium SHMT inhibitors, of which some were originally designed

  14. Multi-laboratory evaluations of the performance of Catellicoccus marimammalium PCR assays developed to target gull fecal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigalliano, Christopher D.; Ervin, Jared S.; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C.; Badgley, Brian D.; Ballestée, Elisenda; Bartkowiaka, Jakob; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Gourmelon, Michèle; Griffith, John; Holden, Patricia A.; Jay, Jenny; Layton, Blythe; Lee, Cheonghoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Meijer, Wim G.; Noble, Rachel; Raith, Meredith; Ryu, Hodon; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Schriewer, Alexander; Wang, Dan; Wanless, David; Whitman, Richard; Wuertz, Stefan; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report results from a multi-laboratory (n = 11) evaluation of four different PCR methods targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium originally developed to detect gull fecal contamination in coastal environments. The methods included a conventional end-point PCR method, a SYBR® Green qPCR method, and two TaqMan® qPCR methods. Different techniques for data normalization and analysis were tested. Data analysis methods had a pronounced impact on assay sensitivity and specificity calculations. Across-laboratory standardization of metrics including the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), target detected but not quantifiable (DNQ), and target not detected (ND) significantly improved results compared to results submitted by individual laboratories prior to definition standardization. The unit of measure used for data normalization also had a pronounced effect on measured assay performance. Data normalization to DNA mass improved quantitative method performance as compared to enterococcus normalization. The MST methods tested here were originally designed for gulls but were found in this study to also detect feces from other birds, particularly feces composited from pigeons. Sequencing efforts showed that some pigeon feces from California contained sequences similar to C. marimammalium found in gull feces. These data suggest that the prevalence, geographic scope, and ecology of C. marimammalium in host birds other than gulls require further investigation. This study represents an important first step in the multi-laboratory assessment of these methods and highlights the need to broaden and standardize additional evaluations, including environmentally relevant target concentrations in ambient waters from diverse geographic regions.

  15. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.; Shively, John E.; Li, Lin

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  16. Development of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for detection of Vibrio tubiashii targeting the metalloprotease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Dima N; Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Häse, Claudia C

    2009-03-01

    Vibrio tubiashii has recently re-emerged as a pathogen of bivalve larvae, causing a marked increase in the mortality of these species within shellfish rearing facilities. This has resulted in substantial losses of seed production and thus created the need for specific as well as sensitive detection methods for this pathogen. In this project, quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers were developed and optimized based upon analysis of the V. tubiashii vtpA gene sequence, encoding a metalloprotease known to cause larval mortality. Standard curves were developed utilizing dilutions of known quantities of V. tubiashii cells that were compared to colony forming unit (CFU) plate counts. The assay was optimized for detection of vtpA with both lab-grown V. tubiashii samples and filter-captured environmental seawater samples seeded with V. tubiashii. In addition, the primers were confirmed to specifically detect only V. tubiashii when tested against a variety of non-target Vibrio species. Validation of the assay was completed by analyzing samples obtained from a shellfish hatchery. The development of this rapid and sensitive assay for quantitative detection of V. tubiashii will accurately determine levels of this bacterium in a variety of seawater samples, providing a useful tool for oyster hatcheries and a method to assess the presence of this bacterium in the current turbulent ocean environment.

  17. An image-based high-content screening assay for compounds targeting intracellular Leishmania donovani amastigotes in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Neto, Jair L; Moon, Seunghyun; Jang, Jiyeon; Yang, Gyongseon; Lee, Changbok; Moon, Hong Kee; Chatelain, Eric; Genovesio, Auguste; Cechetto, Jonathan; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a tropical disease threatening 350 million people from endemic regions. The available drugs for treatment are inadequate, with limitations such as serious side effects, parasite resistance or high cost. Driven by this need for new drugs, we developed a high-content, high-throughput image-based screening assay targeting the intracellular amastigote stage of different species of Leishmania in infected human macrophages. The in vitro infection protocol was adapted to a 384-well-plate format, enabling acquisition of a large amount of readouts by automated confocal microscopy. The reading method was based on DNA staining and required the development of a customized algorithm to analyze the images, which enabled the use of non-modified parasites. The automated analysis generated parameters used to quantify compound activity, including infection ratio as well as the number of intracellular amastigote parasites and yielded cytotoxicity information based on the number of host cells. Comparison of this assay with one that used the promastigote form to screen 26,500 compounds showed that 50% of the hits selected against the intracellular amastigote were not selected in the promastigote screening. These data corroborate the idea that the intracellular amastigote form of the parasite is the most appropriate to be used in primary screening assay for Leishmania. PMID:22720099

  18. An image-based high-content screening assay for compounds targeting intracellular Leishmania donovani amastigotes in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair L Siqueira-Neto

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a tropical disease threatening 350 million people from endemic regions. The available drugs for treatment are inadequate, with limitations such as serious side effects, parasite resistance or high cost. Driven by this need for new drugs, we developed a high-content, high-throughput image-based screening assay targeting the intracellular amastigote stage of different species of Leishmania in infected human macrophages. The in vitro infection protocol was adapted to a 384-well-plate format, enabling acquisition of a large amount of readouts by automated confocal microscopy. The reading method was based on DNA staining and required the development of a customized algorithm to analyze the images, which enabled the use of non-modified parasites. The automated analysis generated parameters used to quantify compound activity, including infection ratio as well as the number of intracellular amastigote parasites and yielded cytotoxicity information based on the number of host cells. Comparison of this assay with one that used the promastigote form to screen 26,500 compounds showed that 50% of the hits selected against the intracellular amastigote were not selected in the promastigote screening. These data corroborate the idea that the intracellular amastigote form of the parasite is the most appropriate to be used in primary screening assay for Leishmania.

  19. Novel Antibacterial Targets and Compounds Revealed by a High-Throughput Cell Wall Reporter Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Nayar, Asha S.; Dougherty, Thomas J.; Ferguson, Keith E.; Granger, Brett A.; McWilliams, Lisa; Stacey, Clare; Leach, Lindsey J.; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A.; Brown, Dean G.; McLeod, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    A high-throughput phenotypic screen based on a Citrobacter freundii AmpC reporter expressed in Escherichia coli was executed to discover novel inhibitors of bacterial cell wall synthesis, an attractive, well-validated target for antibiotic intervention. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of sulfonyl piperazine and pyrazole compounds, each with novel mechanisms of action. E. coli mutants resistant to these compounds display no cross-resistance to antibiotics of other classes. ...

  20. A targeted next-generation sequencing assay for the molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders with orodental involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Megana K; Geoffroy, Véronique; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Dumas, Michael; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Switala, Marzena; Gasse, Barbara; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Leheup, Bruno; Droz, Dominique; Dalstein, Amelie; Loing, Adeline; Grollemund, Bruno; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Minoux, Maryline; Jung, Sophie; Obry, Frédéric; Vogt, Vincent; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Kaiser, Anne-Sophie; Moog, Ute; Richard, Béatrice; Morrier, Jean-Jacques; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Odent, Sylvie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Rousset, Monique Marie; Merametdijan, Laure; Toutain, Annick; Joseph, Clara; Giuliano, Fabienne; Dahlet, Jean-Christophe; Courval, Aymeric; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Laouina, Samir; Soskin, Sylvie; Guffon, Nathalie; Dieux, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Feierabend, Stephanie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Benjamin; de la Dure Molla, Muriel; Alembik, Yves; Tardieu, Corinne; Clauss, François; Berdal, Ariane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Manière, Marie Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Background Orodental diseases include several clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that can present in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. Due to the vast number of genes implicated in these disorders, establishing a molecular diagnosis can be challenging. We aimed to develop a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay to diagnose mutations and potentially identify novel genes mutated in this group of disorders. Methods We designed an NGS gene panel that targets 585 known and candidate genes in orodental disease. We screened a cohort of 101 unrelated patients without a molecular diagnosis referred to the Reference Centre for Oro-Dental Manifestations of Rare Diseases, Strasbourg, France, for a variety of orodental disorders including isolated and syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), isolated and syndromic selective tooth agenesis (STHAG), isolated and syndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta, isolated dentin dysplasia, otodental dysplasia and primary failure of tooth eruption. Results We discovered 21 novel pathogenic variants and identified the causative mutation in 39 unrelated patients in known genes (overall diagnostic rate: 39%). Among the largest subcohorts of patients with isolated AI (50 unrelated patients) and isolated STHAG (21 unrelated patients), we had a definitive diagnosis in 14 (27%) and 15 cases (71%), respectively. Surprisingly, COL17A1 mutations accounted for the majority of autosomal-dominant AI cases. Conclusions We have developed a novel targeted NGS assay for the efficient molecular diagnosis of a wide variety of orodental diseases. Furthermore, our panel will contribute to better understanding the contribution of these genes to orodental disease. Trial registration numbers NCT01746121 and NCT02397824. PMID:26502894

  1. Value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma target delineation and radiotherapy boost%18F-FDG PET-CT在鼻咽癌靶区勾画及推量照射研究中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 冯彦林

    2011-01-01

    18F-FDG PET-CT has widely used in nasopharyngeal carcinoma diagnosis and staging in recent years, it's effecten target volume delineation has received great attention. The article lays stress on the clinical research progress of 18F-FDG PET-CT in the radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma improve the accuracy of target delineation, reduce the difference of target delineation, guide the dose painting and boost.%18F-FDG PET-CT已广泛应用于鼻咽癌的诊断及分期,近年来其对放疗靶区勾画的影响也引起人们的重视.该文着重探讨18F-FDG PET-CT在提高鼻咽癌放疗靶区勾画准确性、减少靶区勾画差异、指导剂量绘画及推量照射的临床研究价值.

  2. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a (18F-labeled high affinity NOTA conjugated bombesin antagonist as a PET ligand for GRPR-targeted tumor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Varasteh

    Full Text Available Expression of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in prostate cancer suggests that this receptor can be used as a potential molecular target to visualize and treat these tumors. We have previously investigated an antagonist analog of bombesin (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2, RM26 conjugated to 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid (NOTA via a diethylene glycol (PEG2 spacer (NOTA-P2-RM26 labeled with (68Ga and (111In. We found that this conjugate has favorable properties for in vivo imaging of GRPR-expression. The focus of this study was to develop a (18F-labelled PET agent to visualize GRPR. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F using aluminum-fluoride chelation. Stability, in vitro binding specificity and cellular processing tests were performed. The inhibition efficiency (IC50 of the [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 was compared to that of the (natGa-loaded peptide using (125I-Tyr(4-BBN as the displacement radioligand. The pharmacokinetics and in vivo binding specificity of the compound were studied. NOTA-P2-RM26 was labeled with (18F within 1 h (60-65% decay corrected radiochemical yield, 55 GBq/µmol. The radiopeptide was stable in murine serum and showed high specific binding to PC-3 cells. [(natF]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 showed a low nanomolar inhibition efficiency (IC50=4.4±0.8 nM. The internalization rate of the tracer was low. Less than 14% of the cell-bound radioactivity was internalized after 4 h. The biodistribution of [(18F]AlF-NOTA-P2-RM26 demonstrated rapid blood clearance, low liver uptake and low kidney retention. The tumor uptake at 3 h p.i. was 5.5±0.7 %ID/g, and the tumor-to-blood, -muscle and -bone ratios were 87±42, 159±47, 38±16, respectively. The uptake in tumors, pancreas and other GRPR-expressing organs was significantly reduced when excess amount of non-labeled peptide was co-injected. The low uptake in bone suggests a high in vivo stability of the Al-F bond. High contrast PET image was obtained 3 h p

  3. Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting the veA Gene for Quantification of Aspergillus carbonarius in Grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizis, Dimosthenis; Nychas, George-John E; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a SYBR Green I real-time PCR method has been developed for the detection and quantification of Aspergillus carbonarius in grapes by targeting the veA gene with a primer pair (veAF4/veAR4) that specifically amplifies a 91-bp PCR product. The quantification of the fungal DNA was performed by generation of standard curves for two A. carbonarius strains, using spectrophotometrically measured DNA quantities (Log) with a linearity range from 50 to 5 × 10(-4) ng of DNA. A high positive correlation (R(2) > 0.99) between exponential increases of DNA and real-time PCR threshold cycles showed a high amplification efficiency for the assay (E values 100.06 and 101.51%, respectively). Quantification of the fungal genomic DNA in grape samples artificially inoculated with A. carbonarius conidia was successfully performed with a minimum threshold of 10(4) conidia per g of grape berry. The assay developed would allow reliable, specific, and efficient detection and quantification of A. carbonarius in grapes.

  4. Susceptibility of adherent versus suspension target cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to cell-mediated cytotoxicity in rapid 51Cr-release assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of target cells from tissue culture lines which grow adherent to tissue culture vessels is often desirable for tests of cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC). In the present study the authors used cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to compare the merits of suspension vs. adherent target cells in short-term 51Cr-release assays. Cytotoxic activity of murine spleen cells sensitized in vitro against allogeneic spleen cells or syngeneic sarcoma cells was tested with fibroblast or sarcoma target cells. In parallel tests, aliquots of tissue culture lines were detached and used as either suspension or adherent target cells in CMC assays, matching the concentrations of suspension and adherent target cells. In both allogeneic and syngeneic combinations adherent target cells released less 51Cr spontaneously and were more susceptible to CMC than their suspension counterparts. (Auth.)

  5. Combining multiple FDG-PET radiotherapy target segmentation methods to reduce the effect of variable performance of individual segmentation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Many approaches have been proposed to segment high uptake objects in 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography images but none provides consistent performance across the large variety of imaging situations. This study investigates the use of two methods of combining individual segmentation methods to reduce the impact of inconsistent performance of the individual methods: simple majority voting and probabilistic estimation. Methods: The National Electrical Manufacturers Association image quality phantom containing five glass spheres with diameters 13–37 mm and two irregularly shaped volumes (16 and 32 cc) formed by deforming high-density polyethylene bottles in a hot water bath were filled with 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose and iodine contrast agent. Repeated 5-min positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired at 4:1 and 8:1 object-to-background contrasts for spherical objects and 4.5:1 and 9:1 for irregular objects. Five individual methods were used to segment each object: 40% thresholding, adaptive thresholding, k-means clustering, seeded region-growing, and a gradient based method. Volumes were combined using a majority vote (MJV) or Simultaneous Truth And Performance Level Estimate (STAPLE) method. Accuracy of segmentations relative to CT ground truth volumes were assessed using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the symmetric mean absolute surface distances (SMASDs). Results: MJV had median DSC values of 0.886 and 0.875; and SMASD of 0.52 and 0.71 mm for spheres and irregular shapes, respectively. STAPLE provided similar results with median DSC of 0.886 and 0.871; and median SMASD of 0.50 and 0.72 mm for spheres and irregular shapes, respectively. STAPLE had significantly higher DSC and lower SMASD values than MJV for spheres (DSC, p < 0.0001; SMASD, p= 0.0101) but MJV had significantly higher DSC and lower SMASD values compared to STAPLE for irregular shapes (DSC, p < 0.0001; SMASD, p= 0.0027). DSC was not significantly

  6. Targeted Peptide Measurements in Biology and Medicine: Best Practices for Mass Spectrometry-based Assay Development Using a Fit-for-Purpose Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Steven A.; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Ackermann, Bradley L.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Domon, Bruno; Deutsch, Eric W.; Grant, Russel; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Huttenhain, Ruth; Koomen, John M.; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; MacLean, Brendan; Mani, DR; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Neubert, Hendrik; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Reiter, Lukas; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi; Anderson, Leigh N.; Bethem, Robert; Blonder, Josip; Boja, Emily; Botelho, Julianne; Boyne, Michael; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Burlingame, Alma S.; Chan, Daniel W.; Keshishian, Hasmik; Kuhn, Eric; Kingsinger, Christopher R.; Lee, Jerry S.; Lee, Sang-Won; Moritz, Robert L.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Rifai, Nader; Ritchie, James E.; Rodriguez, Henry; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Townsend, Reid; Van Eyk , Jennifer; Whiteley, Gordon; Wiita, Arun; Weintraub, Susan

    2014-01-14

    Adoption of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to study biological and biomedical questions is well underway in the proteomics community. Successful application depends on the ability to generate reliable assays that uniquely and confidently identify target peptides in a sample. Unfortunately, there is a wide range of criteria being applied to say that an assay has been successfully developed. There is no consensus on what criteria are acceptable and little understanding of the impact of variable criteria on the quality of the results generated. Publications describing targeted MS assays for peptides frequently do not contain sufficient information for readers to establish confidence that the tests work as intended or to be able to apply the tests described in their own labs. Guidance must be developed so that targeted MS assays with established performance can be made widely distributed and applied by many labs worldwide. To begin to address the problems and their solutions, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health with representatives from the multiple communities developing and employing targeted MS assays. Participants discussed the analytical goals of their experiments and the experimental evidence needed to establish that the assays they develop work as intended and are achieving the required levels of performance. Using this “fit-for-purpose” approach, the group defined three tiers of assays distinguished by their performance and extent of analytical characterization. Computational and statistical tools useful for the analysis of targeted MS results were described. Participants also detailed the information that authors need to provide in their manuscripts to enable reviewers and readers to clearly understand what procedures were performed and to evaluate the reliability of the peptide or protein quantification measurements reported. This paper presents a summary of the meeting and

  7. Rational design of a redox-labeled chiral target for an enantioselective aptamer-based electrochemical binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Julie; Challier, Lylian; Lalaoui, Noémie; Mavré, François; Noël, Vincent; Limoges, Benoît; Schöllhorn, Bernd; Fave, Claire

    2014-03-01

    A series of redox-labeled L-tyrosinamide (L-Tym) derivatives was prepared and the nature of the functional group and the chain length of the spacer were systematically varied in a step-by-step affinity optimization process of the tracer for the L-Tym aptamer. The choice of the labeling position on L-Tym proved to be crucial for the molecular recognition event, which could be monitored by cyclic voltammetry and is based on the different diffusion rates of free and bound targets in solution. From this screening approach an efficient electroactive tracer emerged. Comparable dissociation constants Kd were obtained for the unlabeled and labeled targets in direct or competitive binding assays. The enantiomeric tracer was prepared and its enantioselective recognition by the corresponding anti-D-Tym aptamer was demonstrated. The access to both enantiomeric tracer molecules opens the door for the development of one-pot determination of the enantiomeric excess when using different labels with well-separated redox potentials for each enantiomer. PMID:24519626

  8. PET Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer Patients to Monitor Treatment Response: A Future Role for EGFR-Targeted Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Boerman, O.C.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50,000 new cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are diagnosed worldwide each year and subsequently treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and/or targeted therapy. The heterogeneity of the patient population in terms of treatment response drives the search f

  9. Diabetic Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health or management, contact your veterinarian. In addition, diabetic pets should be monitored for long-term complications such as cataracts, which commonly develop in diabetic dogs and cats. Other problems that can occur ...

  10. Senior Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Future AVMA Meeting Dates Meetings & CE Calendar Symposiums & Summits Pet Health Awareness Events About AVMA Who We ... and small dogs are generally considered “senior” at seven years of age. Larger breed dogs tend to ...

  11. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  13. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  15. Gene-targeted radiation therapy mediated by radiation-sensitive promoter in lung adenocarcinoma and the feasibility of micro-PET / CT in evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness in small animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐昊平

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the combined anti-tumor effect of radiation therapy and gene-targeted suppression of tumor neovasculature in lung adenocarcinoma in vivo,and to explore the feasibility of micro-PET/CT in dynamic evaluation of treatment effectiveness.Methods Thirty5-6 week old male BALB/c nude mice were used in this study.The mouse models of xenotransplanted human

  16. A new fluorescence/PET probe for targeting intracellular human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) using Tat peptide-conjugated IgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung Oh; Youn, Hyewon; Kim, Seung Hoo; Kim, Young-Hwa; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key

    2016-08-26

    Despite an increasing need for methods to visualize intracellular proteins in vivo, the majority of antibody-based imaging methods available can only detect membrane proteins. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is an intracellular target of great interest because of its high expression in several types of cancer. In this study, we developed a new probe for hTERT using the Tat peptide. An hTERT antibody (IgG or IgM) was conjugated with the Tat peptide, a fluorescence dye and (64)Cu. HT29 (hTERT+) and U2OS (hTERT-) were used to visualize the intracellular hTERT. The hTERT was detected by RT-PCR and western blot. Fluorescence signals for hTERT were obtained by confocal microscopy, live cell imaging, and analyzed by Tissue-FAXS. In nude mice, tumors were visualized using the fluorescence imaging devices Maestro™ and PETBOX. In RT-PCR and western blot, the expression of hTERT was detected in HT29 cells, but not in U2OS cells. Fluorescence signals were clearly observed in HT29 cells and in U2OS cells after 1 h of treatment, but signals were only detected in HT29 cells after 24 h. Confocal microscopy showed that 9.65% of U2OS and 78.54% of HT29 cells had positive hTERT signals. 3D animation images showed that the probe could target intranuclear hTERT in the nucleus. In mice models, fluorescence and PET imaging showed that hTERT in HT29 tumors could be efficiently visualized. In summary, we developed a new method to visualize intracellular and intranuclear proteins both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27317485

  17. System a amino acid transport-targeted brain and systemic tumor PET imaging agents 2-amino-3-[18 F]fluoro-2-methylpropanoic acid and 3-[18 F]fluoro-2-methyl-2-(methylamino)propanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Amino acid based radiotracers target tumor cells through increased uptake by membrane-associated amino acid transport (AAT) systems. In the present study, four structurally related non-natural 18 F-labeled amino acids, (R)- and (S)-[18 F]FAMP 1 and (R)- and (S)-[18 F]MeFAMP 2 have been prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo for their potential utility in brain and systemic tumor imaging based upon primarily system A transport with positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: The transport of enantiomers of [18 F]FAMP 1 and [18 F]MeFAMP 2 was measured through in vitro uptake assays in human derived cancer cells including A549 (lung), DU145 (prostate), SKOV3 (ovary), MDA MB468 (breast) and U87 (brain) in the presence and absence of amino acid transporter inhibitors. The in vivo biodistribution of these tracers was evaluated using tumor mice xenografts at 15, 30, 60 and 120 min post injection. Results: All four tracers showed moderate to high levels of uptake (1–9%ID/5 × 105 cells) by the cancer cell lines tested in vitro. AAT cell inhibition assays demonstrated that (R)-[18 F]1 and (S)-[18 F]1 entered these tumor cells via mixed AATs, likely but not limited to system A and system L. In contrast, (R)-[18 F]2 and (S)-[18 F]2 showed high selectivity for system A AAT. Similar to the results of in vitro cell studies, the tumor uptake of all four tracers was good to high and persisted over the 2 hours time course of in vivo studies. The accumulation of these tracers was higher in tumor than most normal tissues including blood, brain, muscle, bone, heart, and lung, and the tracers with the highest in vitro selectivity for system A AAT generally demonstrated the best tumor imaging properties. Higher uptake of these tracers was observed in the pancreas, kidney and spleen compared to tumors. Conclusions: These preclinical studies demonstrate good imaging properties in a wide range of tumors for all four amino acids evaluated with (R)-[18 F]2 having the

  18. Methodologies for localizing loco-regional hypopharyngeal carcinoma recurrences in relation to FDG-PET positive and clinical radiation therapy target volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Anne Kirkebjerg; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Tomé, Wolfgang;

    2010-01-01

    Focal methods to determine the source of recurrence are presented, tested for reproducibility and compared to volumetric approaches with respect to the number of recurrences ascribed to the FDG-PET positive and high dose volumes.......Focal methods to determine the source of recurrence are presented, tested for reproducibility and compared to volumetric approaches with respect to the number of recurrences ascribed to the FDG-PET positive and high dose volumes....

  19. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including protein markers, pathogens and cellular debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.; Grace, Karen M.; Grace, Wynne K.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of a biological target is described including injecting a biological target-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, with the recognition ligands adapted for binding to selected biological targets, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between selected biological targets within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting the fluorescent-label in any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  20. Development of quantitative PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA genes of Enterococcus spp. and their application to the identification of enterococcus species in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hodon; Henson, Michael; Elk, Michael; Toledo-Hernandez, Carlos; Griffith, John; Blackwood, Denene; Noble, Rachel; Gourmelon, Michèle; Glassmeyer, Susan; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2013-01-01

    The detection of environmental enterococci has been determined primarily by using culture-based techniques that might exclude some enterococcal species as well as those that are nonculturable. To address this, the relative abundances of enterococci were examined by challenging fecal and water samples against a currently available genus-specific assay (Entero1). To determine the diversity of enterococcal species, 16S rRNA gene-based group-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and evaluated against eight of the most common environmental enterococcal species. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 439 presumptive environmental enterococcal strains were analyzed to study further the diversity of enterococci and to confirm the specificities of group-specific assays. The group-specific qPCR assays showed relatively high amplification rates with targeted species (>98%), although some assays cross-amplified with nontargeted species (1.3 to 6.5%). The results with the group-specific assays also showed that different enterococcal species co-occurred in most fecal samples. The most abundant enterococci in water and fecal samples were Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, although we identified more water isolates as Enterococcus casseliflavus than as any of the other species. The prevalence of the Entero1 marker was in agreement with the combined number of positive signals determined by the group-specific assays in most fecal samples, except in gull feces. On the other hand, the number of group-specific assay signals was lower in all water samples tested, suggesting that other enterococcal species are present in these samples. While the results highlight the value of genus- and group-specific assays for detecting the major enterococcal groups in environmental water samples, additional studies are needed to determine further the diversity, distributions, and relative abundances of all enterococcal species found in water.

  1. Pet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  2. Integration of Affinity Selection-Mass Spectrometry and Functional Cell-Based Assays to Rapidly Triage Druggable Target Space within the NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutilek, Victoria D; Andrews, Christine L; Richards, Matthew P; Xu, Zangwei; Sun, Tianxiao; Chen, Yiping; Hashke, Andrew; Smotrov, Nadya; Fernandez, Rafael; Nickbarg, Elliott B; Chamberlin, Chad; Sauvagnat, Berengere; Curran, Patrick J; Boinay, Ryan; Saradjian, Peter; Allen, Samantha J; Byrne, Noel; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Ford, Rachael E; Hall, Dawn L; Kornienko, Maria; Rickert, Keith W; Sharma, Sujata; Shipman, Jennifer M; Lumb, Kevin J; Coleman, Kevin; Dandliker, Peter J; Kariv, Ilona; Beutel, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    The primary objective of early drug discovery is to associate druggable target space with a desired phenotype. The inability to efficiently associate these often leads to failure early in the drug discovery process. In this proof-of-concept study, the most tractable starting points for drug discovery within the NF-κB pathway model system were identified by integrating affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) with functional cellular assays. The AS-MS platform Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS) was used to rapidly screen 15 NF-κB proteins in parallel against large-compound libraries. ALIS identified 382 target-selective compounds binding to 14 of the 15 proteins. Without any chemical optimization, 22 of the 382 target-selective compounds exhibited a cellular phenotype consistent with the respective target associated in ALIS. Further studies on structurally related compounds distinguished two chemical series that exhibited a preliminary structure-activity relationship and confirmed target-driven cellular activity to NF-κB1/p105 and TRAF5, respectively. These two series represent new drug discovery opportunities for chemical optimization. The results described herein demonstrate the power of combining ALIS with cell functional assays in a high-throughput, target-based approach to determine the most tractable drug discovery opportunities within a pathway. PMID:26969322

  3. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindh Magnus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit and after 10 days (follow-up visit. Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days. The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202 of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204 (P = 0.005 of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202 in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204 in the delayed result group (P

  4. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with pet allergy do better with a dog that has short hair or sheds less. Question 2 Pet allergies are triggered by the hair on a pet. True False False: Pet allergies are caused by an allergen found on the pet’s skin (dander), saliva or urine. Question 3 Symptoms of pet allergy ...

  5. [¹⁸F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk of atheros......[(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk...... of atherosclerosis-related disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. With excellent reproducibility, (18)FDG PET can be a surrogate end point in clinical drug trials, improving trial efficiency. This article summarizes key findings in the literature, discusses limitations of (18)FDG PET imaging...... of atherosclerosis, and reports recommendations to optimize imaging protocols....

  6. TH-E-BRF-11: Dynamic Treatment of Clinical Margins Beyond the PET-Avid Target in Emission Guided Radiation Therapy: A Retrospective Patient Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanduri, A; Mazin, S [RefleXion Medical, Burlingame, CA (United States); Fan, Q [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yang, J; Graves, E; Loo, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Yamamoto, T [UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Emission guided radiation therapy (EGRT) is a new modality that uses PET emissions for direct real-time tumor tracking. Radiation beamlets are delivered along PET lines of response (LOR's) by a fast rotating PET-Linac closed ring gantry. In this work, we develop a scheme to treat clinical margins defined proximal to the moving PET-avid tumor, while maintaining EGRT's inherent real-time tracking ability. Methods: The principle of EGRT is to deliver radiation along PET emission paths to concentrate dose in the PET-avid gross tumor volume (GTV). To account for adjacent non- PET avid regions in the clinical volume (CTV) a method was developed that expands the set of radiation beamlet responses to include the effective margin extension from the GTV to the CTV. An LOR detection may now Result in multiple beamlet responses: one along the original LOR, and others that are adjacent to it in the direction of margin extension. Evaluation studies were performed on a 4D digital patient as well as a clinical breast cancer patient with moving lung tumors. Emission data were obtained using GATE and a commercial PET scanner. Dose delivery was simulated using VMC++. For the patient study, Philips Pinnacle was used for planning and Mirada RTx was used for deformable dose registration across multiple breathing phases. Results: Compared with IMRT, the EGRT margin extension method achieved a 25.3% and 9.0% relative increase in dose to 95% of the CTV for the digital and clinical patients, respectively. The corresponding CTV dose increases without margin extension were 9.7% and 1.4%. The organs at risk doses were kept similar or lower for EGRT in both cases, with tumor tracking preserved. Conclusions: With the capability of accurate treatment of the moving CTV, EGRT has the potential to enable a practical and effective implementation of 4D biologically guided radiation therapy. Authors SRM and AN are stockholders of RefleXion Medical.

  7. TH-E-BRF-11: Dynamic Treatment of Clinical Margins Beyond the PET-Avid Target in Emission Guided Radiation Therapy: A Retrospective Patient Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Emission guided radiation therapy (EGRT) is a new modality that uses PET emissions for direct real-time tumor tracking. Radiation beamlets are delivered along PET lines of response (LOR's) by a fast rotating PET-Linac closed ring gantry. In this work, we develop a scheme to treat clinical margins defined proximal to the moving PET-avid tumor, while maintaining EGRT's inherent real-time tracking ability. Methods: The principle of EGRT is to deliver radiation along PET emission paths to concentrate dose in the PET-avid gross tumor volume (GTV). To account for adjacent non- PET avid regions in the clinical volume (CTV) a method was developed that expands the set of radiation beamlet responses to include the effective margin extension from the GTV to the CTV. An LOR detection may now Result in multiple beamlet responses: one along the original LOR, and others that are adjacent to it in the direction of margin extension. Evaluation studies were performed on a 4D digital patient as well as a clinical breast cancer patient with moving lung tumors. Emission data were obtained using GATE and a commercial PET scanner. Dose delivery was simulated using VMC++. For the patient study, Philips Pinnacle was used for planning and Mirada RTx was used for deformable dose registration across multiple breathing phases. Results: Compared with IMRT, the EGRT margin extension method achieved a 25.3% and 9.0% relative increase in dose to 95% of the CTV for the digital and clinical patients, respectively. The corresponding CTV dose increases without margin extension were 9.7% and 1.4%. The organs at risk doses were kept similar or lower for EGRT in both cases, with tumor tracking preserved. Conclusions: With the capability of accurate treatment of the moving CTV, EGRT has the potential to enable a practical and effective implementation of 4D biologically guided radiation therapy. Authors SRM and AN are stockholders of RefleXion Medical

  8. Development of a robust DNA quality and quantity assessment qPCR assay for targeted next-generation sequencing library preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jennifer; Mendez, Pedro; Lee, Sharon; Kim, James W.; Yoon, Jun-Hee; Kim, Thomas W.; Sailey, Charles J.; Jablons, David M.; Kim, Il-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is becoming a standard for genetic analyses of clinical samples. DNAs retrieved from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens are commonly degraded, and specimens such as core biopsies are sometimes too small to obtain enough DNA for NGS applications. Thus, it is important to measure both the DNA quantity and quality accurately from clinical samples. However, there is no standard method for DNA quantity and quality analyses for NGS library preparation. We tested four different methods (PicoGreen, Qubit® fluorometry, TaqMan and SYBR-Green-based qPCR assay) and compared each to RNase P TaqMan as a reference control. We found that SYBR-Green-based qPCR assay provides a consistent and accurate DNA quantification while keeping its cost relatively low and the throughput high. We designed a dual-probe SYBR-Green qPCR assay for DNA quantity and quality assessment for targeted NGS library preparation. This assay provides a Dscore (degradation score) of the interrogated DNA by analyzing two different sizes of amplicons. We show an example of a clinical sample with a very high Dscore (high degradation). With a regular DNA quantification, without considering the degradation status, no correct NGS libraries were obtained. However, after optimizing the library condition by considering its poor DNA quality, a reasonably good library and sequencing results were obtained. In summary, we developed and presented a new DNA quantity and quality analysis qPCR assay for the targeted NGS library preparation. This assay may be mostly efficient for the clinical samples with high degradation and poor DNA quality. PMID:27511764

  9. PET Molecular Probes Targeting Folate Receptor%靶向叶酸受体的正电子分子探针研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹吉林; 王成; 王欣璐

    2016-01-01

    叶酸能与多种肿瘤细胞膜表面的叶酸受体(FR)特异性结合,通过FR介导的内吞作用进入细胞,为放射性核素选择性载带提供良好的途径。基于受体和配体间的高度亲和性,可将多种放射性核素与叶酸分子及其衍生物偶联,制备核医学显像探针。本文主要对非金属正电子核素(18 F、124 I)和金属正电子核素(68 Ga、44 Sc、152 Tb)标记的叶酸及其衍生物PET显像探针与炎症PET显像探针进行综述,并展望其临床前景。%Folic acid can combine specifically with folate receptors (FRs) which are over‐expressed on the epithelial cells of the tumor .The FRs are confirmed to be the tumor‐associated antigens that bind folate and folate conjugates with very high affinity and shuttle these bound molecules inside cells via an endocytic mechanism .The FR‐αis a tar‐get of critical value for nuclear imaging through using folate‐based radiotracers as it is expressed on several tumor types .Moreover ,employment of folate radiopharmaceuti‐cals for imaging of inflammatory diseases by targeting at FR‐βon activated macrophages holds promise as a further field of application .Based on these ,more and more resear‐ches focus on folate conjugates labeled with radionuclides for nuclear medicine imaging (including single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT ) and positron emis‐sion tomography (PET ) .These folate molecular probes are applied not only in cancer imaging but also in inflammation imaging .Hence ,folate‐based imaging agents may be useful for selection of patients w ho could profit from such new therapy concepts and for monitoring response to a particular treatment .This review was focused on the prepara‐tion and preclinical biological evaluation of the molecular probes which were labeled by positron nuclides (18 F ,124I ,68Ga ,44Sc ,152 Tb) ,and the clinical application of these molecular probes were discussed .

  10. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L.; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A.; D’Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N.; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J.; González, Iveth J.

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs); ii) storage conditions at 0–40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii) operational conditions of 5–40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv) minimal sample collection needs (50–100μL, capillary blood). This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide product development, and enable targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions. PMID:27559728

  11. Development of a Targeted Multi-Disorder High-Throughput Sequencing Assay for the Effective Identification of Disease-Causing Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Delio; Kunjan Patel; Alex Maslov; Marion, Robert W.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Cadoff, Evan M.; Aaron Golden; Greally, John M.; Jan Vijg; Bernice Morrow; Cristina Montagna

    2015-01-01

    Background While next generation sequencing (NGS) is a useful tool for the identification of genetic variants to aid diagnosis and support therapy decision, high sequencing costs have limited its application within routine clinical care, especially in economically depressed areas. To investigate the utility of a multi-disease NGS based genetic test, we designed a custom sequencing assay targeting over thirty disease-associated areas including cardiac disorders, intellectual disabilities, hear...

  12. Double Gene Targeting Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay Discriminates Beef, Buffalo, and Pork Substitution in Frankfurter Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M A Motalib; Ali, Md Eaqub; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Asing; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Mohd Desa, Mohd Nasir; Zaidul, I S M

    2016-08-17

    Beef, buffalo, and pork adulteration in the food chain is an emerging and sensitive issue. Current molecular techniques to authenticate these species depend on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays involving long and single targets which break down under natural decomposition and/or processing treatments. This novel multiplex polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay targeted two different gene sites for each of the bovine, buffalo, and porcine materials. This authentication ensured better security, first through a complementation approach because it is highly unlikely that both sites will be missing under compromised states, and second through molecular fingerprints. Mitochondrial cytochrome b and ND5 genes were targeted, and all targets (73, 90, 106, 120, 138, and 146 bp) were stable under extreme boiling and autoclaving treatments. Target specificity and authenticity were ensured through cross-amplification reaction and restriction digestion of PCR products with AluI, EciI, FatI, and CviKI-1 enzymes. A survey of Malaysian frankfurter products revealed rampant substitution of beef with buffalo but purity in porcine materials. PMID:27501408

  13. American Pet Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海焰

    2007-01-01

    In America you can find dogs,cats, horses,monkeys, snakes and even pigs in almost every family.They are their pets.Americans love pets and look on them as a part of the family.Sometimes pet owners dress their pets in fashionable clothes.They even buy toys for their pets.Americans love their pets as their children, sometimes even better.

  14. Evaluation and improvement of real-time PCR assays targeting lytA, ply, and psaA genes for detection of pneumococcal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria da Gloria S; Tondella, Maria Lucia; McCaustland, Karen; Weidlich, Luciana; McGee, Lesley; Mayer, Leonard W; Steigerwalt, Arnold; Whaley, Melissa; Facklam, Richard R; Fields, Barry; Carlone, George; Ades, Edwin W; Dagan, Ron; Sampson, Jacquelyn S

    2007-08-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pneumococcal disease has frequently been hampered not only by the difficulties in obtaining isolates of the organism from patient specimens but also by the misidentification of pneumococcus-like viridans group streptococci (P-LVS) as Streptococcus pneumoniae. This is especially critical when the specimen comes from the respiratory tract. In this study, three novel real-time PCR assays designed for the detection of specific sequence regions of the lytA, ply, and psaA genes were developed (lytA-CDC, ply-CDC, and psaA, respectively). These assays showed high sensitivity (<10 copies for lytA-CDC and ply-CDC and an approximately twofold less sensitivity for psaA). Two additional real-time PCR assays for lytA and ply described previously for pneumococcal DNA detection were also evaluated. A panel of isolates consisting of 67 S. pneumoniae isolates (44 different serotypes and 3 nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae isolates from conjunctivitis outbreaks) and 104 nonpneumococcal isolates was used. The 67 S. pneumoniae isolates were reactive in all five assays. The new real-time detection assays targeting the lytA and psaA genes were the most specific for the detection of isolates confirmed to be S. pneumoniae, with lytA-CDC showing the greatest specificity. Both ply PCRs were positive for all isolates of S. pseudopneumoniae, along with 13 other isolates of other P-LVS isolates confirmed to be non-S. pneumoniae by DNA-DNA reassociation. Thus, the use of the ply gene for the detection of pneumococci can lead to false-positive reactions in the presence of P-LVS. The five assays were applied to 15 culture-positive cerebrospinal fluid specimens with 100% sensitivity; and serum and ear fluid specimens were also evaluated. Both the lytA-CDC and psaA assays, particularly the lytA-CDC assay, have improved specificities compared with those of currently available assays and should therefore be considered the assays of choice for the detection of pneumococcal DNA

  15. Evaluation and Improvement of Real-Time PCR Assays Targeting lytA, ply, and psaA Genes for Detection of Pneumococcal DNA▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria da Gloria S.; Tondella, Maria Lucia; McCaustland, Karen; Weidlich, Luciana; McGee, Lesley; Mayer, Leonard W.; Steigerwalt, Arnold; Whaley, Melissa; Facklam, Richard R.; Fields, Barry; Carlone, George; Ades, Edwin W.; Dagan, Ron; Sampson, Jacquelyn S.

    2007-01-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pneumococcal disease has frequently been hampered not only by the difficulties in obtaining isolates of the organism from patient specimens but also by the misidentification of pneumococcus-like viridans group streptococci (P-LVS) as Streptococcus pneumoniae. This is especially critical when the specimen comes from the respiratory tract. In this study, three novel real-time PCR assays designed for the detection of specific sequence regions of the lytA, ply, and psaA genes were developed (lytA-CDC, ply-CDC, and psaA, respectively). These assays showed high sensitivity (<10 copies for lytA-CDC and ply-CDC and an approximately twofold less sensitivity for psaA). Two additional real-time PCR assays for lytA and ply described previously for pneumococcal DNA detection were also evaluated. A panel of isolates consisting of 67 S. pneumoniae isolates (44 different serotypes and 3 nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae isolates from conjunctivitis outbreaks) and 104 nonpneumococcal isolates was used. The 67 S. pneumoniae isolates were reactive in all five assays. The new real-time detection assays targeting the lytA and psaA genes were the most specific for the detection of isolates confirmed to be S. pneumoniae, with lytA-CDC showing the greatest specificity. Both ply PCRs were positive for all isolates of S. pseudopneumoniae, along with 13 other isolates of other P-LVS isolates confirmed to be non-S. pneumoniae by DNA-DNA reassociation. Thus, the use of the ply gene for the detection of pneumococci can lead to false-positive reactions in the presence of P-LVS. The five assays were applied to 15 culture-positive cerebrospinal fluid specimens with 100% sensitivity; and serum and ear fluid specimens were also evaluated. Both the lytA-CDC and psaA assays, particularly the lytA-CDC assay, have improved specificities compared with those of currently available assays and should therefore be considered the assays of choice for the detection of pneumococcal DNA

  16. Validation of Bacteroidales quantitative PCR assays targeting human and animal fecal contamination in the public and domestic domains in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagiri, Mitsunori; Schriewer, Alexander; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Wuertz, Stefan; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-01-01

    We compared host-associated Bacteroidales qPCR assays developed in the continental United States and Europe for the purpose of measuring the effect of improved sanitation on human fecal exposure in rural Indian communities where both human and animal fecal loading are high. Ten candidate Bacteroidales qPCR assays were tested against fecal samples (human, sewage, cow, buffalo, goat, sheep, dog and chicken) from a test set of 30 individual human, 5 sewage, and 60 pooled animal samples collected in coastal Odisha, India. The two universal/general Bacteroidales assays tested (BacUni, GenBac3) performed equally well, achieving 100% sensitivity on the test set. Across the five human-associated assays tested (HF183 Taqman, BacHum, HumM2, BacH, HF183 SYBR), we found low sensitivity (17 to 49%) except for HF183 SYBR (89%), and moderate to high cross-reactivity with dog (20 to 80%) and chicken fecal samples (60 to 100%). BacHum had the highest accuracy (67%), amplified all sewage samples within the range of quantification (ROQ), and did not cross-react with any fecal samples from cows, the most populous livestock animal in India. Of the ruminant- and cattle-associated assays tested (BacCow, CowM2), BacCow was more sensitive in detecting the full range of common Indian livestock animal fecal sources, while CowM2 only detected cow sources with 50% sensitivity. Neither assay cross-reacted with human sources. BacCan, the dog-associated assay tested, showed no cross-reactivity with human sources, and high sensitivity (90%) for dog fecal samples. Overall, our results indicate BacUni, BacHum, HumM2, BacCan and BacCow would be the most suitable MST assays to distinguish and quantify relative amounts of human-associated and livestock/domestic animal-associated contributions to fecal contamination in Odisha, India.

  17. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A; D'Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J; González, Iveth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  18. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Tadesse, Birkneh Tilahun; Moussy, Francis; Chua, Arlene; Zorzet, Anna; Tängdén, Thomas; Dolinger, David L; Page, Anne-Laure; Crump, John A; D'Acremont, Valerie; Bassat, Quique; Lubell, Yoel; Newton, Paul N; Heinrich, Norbert; Rodwell, Timothy J; González, Iveth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP). To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i) time-to-result development, and enable targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions. PMID:27559728

  19. ASSESSING POSSIBLE ECOLOGICAL RISKS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: GENE EXPRESSION ASSAYS AND GENETIC MONITORING OF NON-TARGET ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread planting of genetically modified crops with the Bt transgene pesticide has led to concern over non-target effects of Bt compounds in agroecosystems. While some research suggests that non-target organisms exposed to Bt toxin exhibit reduced fecundity and increased morta...

  20. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  1. Chemo-Predictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem-Like Cells in Patients Affected by Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Mathis, Sarah E.; Anthony Alberico; Rounak Nande; Walter Neto; Logan Lawrence; Danielle R McCallister; James Denvir; Gerrit A Kimmey; Mark Mogul; Gerard Oakley; Denning, Krista L.; Thomas Dougherty; Jagan V Valluri; Pier Paolo Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is associated with unnecessary toxicity and development of resistant clones. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) resist chemotherapy, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, development of a test that identifies the most effective chemotherapy management offers great promise for individualized anticancer treatments. We have developed an ex vivo chemotherapy sensitivity assay (ChemoID), which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as well as the bul...

  2. Chemo-predictive assay for targeting cancer stem-like cells in patients affected by brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Sarah E; Alberico, Anthony; Nande, Rounak; Neto, Walter; Lawrence, Logan; McCallister, Danielle R; Denvir, James; Kimmey, Gerrit A; Mogul, Mark; Oakley, Gerard; Denning, Krista L; Dougherty, Thomas; Valluri, Jagan V; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is associated with unnecessary toxicity and development of resistant clones. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) resist chemotherapy, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, development of a test that identifies the most effective chemotherapy management offers great promise for individualized anticancer treatments. We have developed an ex vivo chemotherapy sensitivity assay (ChemoID), which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as well as the bulk of tumor cells to a variety of chemotherapy agents. Two patients, a 21-year old male (patient 1) and a 5-month female (patient 2), affected by anaplastic WHO grade-III ependymoma were screened using the ChemoID assay. Patient 1 was found sensitive to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab, which resulted in a prolonged disease progression free period of 18 months. Following recurrence, the combination of various chemotherapy drugs was tested again with the ChemoID assay. We found that benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) greatly increased the chemosensitivity of the ependymoma cells to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. After patient 1 was treated for two months with irinotecan, bevacizumab and supplements of cruciferous vegetable extracts containing BITC, we observed over 50% tumoral regression in comparison with pre-ChemoID scan as evidenced by MRI. Patient 2 was found resistant to all treatments tested and following 6 cycles of vincristine, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin in various combinations, the tumor of this patient rapidly progressed and proton beam therapy was recommended. As expected animal studies conducted with patient derived xenografts treated with ChemoID screened drugs recapitulated the clinical observation. This assay demonstrates that patients with the same histological stage and grade of cancer may vary considerably in their clinical response, suggesting that ChemoID testing which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as

  3. Chemo-predictive assay for targeting cancer stem-like cells in patients affected by brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Mathis

    Full Text Available Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is associated with unnecessary toxicity and development of resistant clones. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs resist chemotherapy, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, development of a test that identifies the most effective chemotherapy management offers great promise for individualized anticancer treatments. We have developed an ex vivo chemotherapy sensitivity assay (ChemoID, which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as well as the bulk of tumor cells to a variety of chemotherapy agents. Two patients, a 21-year old male (patient 1 and a 5-month female (patient 2, affected by anaplastic WHO grade-III ependymoma were screened using the ChemoID assay. Patient 1 was found sensitive to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab, which resulted in a prolonged disease progression free period of 18 months. Following recurrence, the combination of various chemotherapy drugs was tested again with the ChemoID assay. We found that benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC greatly increased the chemosensitivity of the ependymoma cells to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. After patient 1 was treated for two months with irinotecan, bevacizumab and supplements of cruciferous vegetable extracts containing BITC, we observed over 50% tumoral regression in comparison with pre-ChemoID scan as evidenced by MRI. Patient 2 was found resistant to all treatments tested and following 6 cycles of vincristine, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin in various combinations, the tumor of this patient rapidly progressed and proton beam therapy was recommended. As expected animal studies conducted with patient derived xenografts treated with ChemoID screened drugs recapitulated the clinical observation. This assay demonstrates that patients with the same histological stage and grade of cancer may vary considerably in their clinical response, suggesting that ChemoID testing which measures the sensitivity

  4. Detection of Morganella morganii, a prolific histamine former, by the polymerase chain reaction assay with 16S rDNA-targeted primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; An, Haejung; Field, Katharine G; Wei, Cheng-I; Velazquez, Jorge Barros; Ben-Gigirey, Begoña; Morrissey, Michael T; Price, Robert J; Pitta, Thomas P

    2003-08-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of the most prolific histamine former, Morganella morganii, was developed. 16S rDNA targeted PCR primers were designed, and the primer specificity and sensitivity of the PCR assay were evaluated. The 16S rDNA sequence (1,503 bp) for M. morganii showed 95% identity to those for enteric bacteria, i.e., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., Hafnia alvei, Proteus spp., and Providencia spp. The unique primers for M. morganii were designed on the basis of the variable regions in the 16S rDNA sequence. The primers showed positive reactions with all M. morganii strains tested. However, PCR amplification was not detected when the primers were tested with other enteric or marine bacteria. When the sensitivity of the assay was evaluated, M. morganii was detected at levels ranging from 10(6) to 10(8) CFU/ml in albacore homogenate after the PCR amplification. The sensitivity of the assay was greatly improved with the enrichment of samples, and 9 CFU of M. morganii per ml of albacore homogenate was detected after 6 h of enrichment at 37 degrees C.

  5. Quantitative detection of pork in commercial meat products by TaqMan® real-time PCR assay targeting the mitochondrial D-loop region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miju; Yoo, Insuk; Lee, Shin-Young; Hong, Yeun; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2016-11-01

    The TaqMan® real-time PCR assay using the mitochondrial D-loop region was developed for the quantitative detection of pork in processed meat products. The newly designed primers and probe specifically amplified pork without any cross-reactivity with non-target animal species. The limit of detection of the real-time PCR assay was 0.1pg of heat-treated pork meat and 0.1% (w/w) pork meat in beef and chicken meat mixtures. The quantitative real-time PCR assay was applied to analyze the pork meat content in 22 commercial processed meat products including jerkies, press hams, sausages, hamburger patties and steaks, grilled short rib patties, and nuggets. The developed real-time PCR method was able to detect pork meat in various types of processed meat products that declared the use of pork meat on their label. All processed meat products that declared no use of pork meat showed a negative result in the assay. The method developed in this study showed sensitivity and specificity in the quantification of pork meat in commercial processed meat products. PMID:27211626

  6. A Study on Pet Owners' Intention to Purchase Pet Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Chiehwei Hung; Yen-Shan Chuang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the impacts of consumers¡¦ characteristics, pet feeding habits, pet spending and insurance conditions of pet owners on the intention to purchase a pet insurance policy. Our results reveal that family income, average monthly spending on pets, and experience of purchasing medical insurance are the significant determinants of a pet owner¡¦s intention to purchase pet insurance. Pet owners who have higher family income, higher pet spending, and who have previously purchased...

  7. Comparison of target volumes in radiotherapy defined on scanner and on PET-T.D.M. with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. in the frame of head and neck cancers; Comparaison des volumes cibles en radiotherapie definis sur scanner et sur TEP-TDM au 18F FDG dans le cadre des cancers de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques De Figueiredo, B.; Barret, O.; Allard, M.; Fernandez, P. [Service de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Pellegrin, Bordeaux, (France); Demeaux, H.; Maire, J.P.; Lagarde, P. [service de radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Andre, Bordeaux, (France); Kantor, G.; Richau, P. [departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, Bordeaux, (France); De Mones Del Pujol, E. [service d' ORL, hopital Pellegrin, Bordeaux, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The objective is to study in a prospective way, in the frame of head and neck cancers, the impact of the positron computed tomography with {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-F.D.G.) on the limitation of target volumes in radiotherapy. In conclusions, the gross tumor volume (G.T.V.) defined on PET is smaller than this one defined on scanner, that could be interesting in radiotherapy, in the perspective of a dose escalation. In addition, areas of discordance exist between the clinical target volumes (C.T.V.70 and C.T.V.50) defined on PET and on scanner. These discordances, synonyms of under or over estimation of target volumes, could have important clinical consequences in term of local control and toxicity. (N.C.)

  8. PET studies of stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET already has been helpful in ischemic stroke disease. It has given us new data on physiological events occurring after a stroke; PET indices of blood flow and metabolism have provided the basis for staging the severity of tissue injury and predicting outcome, and PET has shown alterations in tissue function in response to therapy. Experience with PET in hemorrhagic disease is more limited, but initial results suggest a useful role for PET in the evaluation of nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage as well [Ackerman et al., 1983a]. This brief review discusses general problems in the study of stroke disease using PET and then the contribution of PET to the stroke field

  9. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects.

  10. Gene-targeted embryonic stem cells: real-time PCR assay for estimation of the number of neomycin selection cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancini Cecilia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the preparation of transgenic murine ES cells it is important to verify the construct has a single insertion, because an ectopic neomycin phosphortransferase positive selection cassette (NEO may cause a position effect. During a recent work, where a knockin SCA28 mouse was prepared, we developed two assays based on Real-Time PCR using both SYBR Green and specific minor groove binder (MGB probes to evaluate the copies of NEO using the comparative delta-delta Ct method versus the Rpp30 reference gene. We compared the results from Southern blot, routinely used to quantify NEO copies, with the two Real-Time PCR assays. Twenty-two clones containing the single NEO copy showed values of 0.98 ± 0.24 (mean ± 2 S.D., and were clearly distinguishable from clones with two or more NEO copies. This method was found to be useful, easy, sensitive and fast and could substitute for the widely used, but laborious Southern blot method.

  11. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  12. Multi-laboratory evaluations of the performance of Catellicoccus marimammalium PCR assays developed to target gull fecal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report results from a multi-laboratory (n=11) evaluation of four different PCR methods targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium used to detect fecal contamination from birds in coastal environments. The methods included conventional end-point PCR, a SYBR...

  13. The morpho-PET with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. improves the definition of the target volume for the radiotherapy of child Hodgkin disease; Le morpho-TEP au 18F-FDG ameliore la definition du volume cible pour la radiotherapie des maladies de Hodgkin de l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metwally, H.; Courbon, F.; David, I.; Blouet, A.; Izar, F.; Rives, M.; Filleron, T.; Vial, J.; Laprie, A. [Institut Claudius-Regaud, Toulouse, (France); Robert, A. [CHU Toulouse, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The objective is to study the impact of PET-T.D.M. images re-timing before chemotherapy with these ones of dosimetric scanner ( post chemotherapy) on the target volume determination and their inter observers variability among children receiving a closing radiotherapy for a Hodgkin disease. Conclusions: the inter observers variability for the clinical target volume (C.T.V.) definition is significantly reduced by the re-timing of initial PET-T.D.M. images on the ballistic scanner. This study illustrates the interest of the multidisciplinary cooperation between nuclear doctor and radiotherapist for the radiotherapy optimization. (N.C.)

  14. Design, Synthesis, and Validation of Axl-Targeted Monoclonal Antibody Probe for microPET Imaging in Human Lung Cancer Xenograft

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shuanglong; Li, Dan; Guo, Jiacong; Canale, Nicolette; Li, Xiuqing; Liu, Ren; Krasnoperov, Valery; Gill, Parkash S.; Conti, Peter S.; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence indicates that overexpression of the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase, Axl, plays a key role in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of various types of cancer. The objective of this study is to design a novel imaging probe based on the monoclonal antibody, h173, for microPET imaging of Axl expression in human lung cancer. A bifunctional chelator, DOTA, was conjugated to h173, followed by radiolabeling with 64Cu. The binding of DOTA-h173 to the Axl receptor wa...

  15. Targeting post-infarct inflammation by PET imaging: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-citrate and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE with {sup 18}F-FDG in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, James T. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Division of Molecular and Translational Cardiology, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Hannover (Germany); Bankstahl, Jens P.; Walte, Almut; Wittneben, Alexander; Bengel, Frank M. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Wang, Yong; Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Wollert, Kai C. [Hannover Medical School, Division of Molecular and Translational Cardiology, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-12

    Imaging of inflammation early after myocardial infarction (MI) is a promising approach to the guidance of novel molecular interventions that support endogenous healing processes. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been used, but may be complicated by physiological myocyte uptake. We evaluated the potential of two alternative imaging targets: lactoferrin binding by {sup 68}Ga-citrate and somatostatin receptor binding by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE. C57Bl/6 mice underwent permanent coronary artery ligation. Serial PET imaging was performed 3 - 7 days after MI using {sup 68}Ga-citrate, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, or {sup 18}F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of myocyte glucose uptake. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by {sup 13}N-ammonia PET and cardiac geometry by contrast-enhanced ECG-gated CT. Mice exhibited a perfusion defect of 30 - 40 % (of the total left ventricle) with apical anterolateral wall akinesia and thinning on day 7 after MI. {sup 18}F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression demonstrated distinct uptake in the infarct region, as well as in the border zone and remote myocardium. The myocardial standardized uptake value in MI mice was significantly higher than in healthy mice under ketamine/xylazine anaesthesia (1.9 ± 0.4 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1). {sup 68}Ga images exhibited high blood pool activity with no specific myocardial uptake up to 90 min after injection (tissue-to-blood contrast 0.9). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE was rapidly cleared from the blood, but myocardial SUV was very low (0.10 ± 0.03). Neither {sup 68}Ga nor {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE is a useful alternative to {sup 18}F-FDG for PET imaging of myocardial inflammation after MI in mice. Among the three tested approaches, {sup 18}F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of cardiomyocyte uptake remains the most practical imaging marker of post-infarct inflammation. (orig.)

  16. High-throughput Assays for MicroRNA Target Genes%MicroRNA靶基因的高通量鉴定方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈灵锋; 张均平; 王明席

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs(miRNAs)are a class of endogenous non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs play pivotal roles in cell growth, development and disease pathogenesis. Therefore, to identify and validate miRNAs target genes regulated is essential to understand the functions of miRNAs in disease. miRNAs bind the complementary sequences of target mRN As to mediate translational repression or target degradation and gene silencing, both computer-aided predication and biological experimental screening can be used for target identification. The former may produce a large number of miRNA target genes with higher false positive genes to be further excluded by the biological experiments. The latter approaches can be further greatly facilitated with high-throughput multiple target screening assays, such as microarray, proteome analysis, or RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The applications involving these assays were summarized and compared, together with the discussion on the further development of related technologies.%MicroRNAs (miRNAs)是一类内源性非编码小RNA,可在转录后水平调节基因的表达,在细胞生长、发育、疾病发生等过程中发挥着重要作用.明确miRNAs所调控的靶基因对阐明miRNAs的功能及在各种生命过程和疾病发生机制的角色非常关键.目前,鉴定miRNAs的靶基因的方法主要计算机预测方法和生物学实验方法.前者对miRNA靶基因的寻找作出巨大贡献,但常存在很多假阳性,必须通过生物学实验方法加以验证.后者涉及单靶基因鉴定技术和高通量多靶基因鉴定技术,高通量技术又包括基因芯片分析技术、蛋白质组学分析技术、RNA连接酶介导的cDNA末端扩增技术和生物化学法等.本文主要对这些高通量技术的应用、优劣进行归纳,并对其改进方向予以讨论.

  17. Non FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, C., E-mail: cristina.nanni@aosp.bo.i [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Fantini, L.; Nicolini, S.; Fanti, S. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    2- [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the radiopharmaceutical most frequently used for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). However, FDG cannot be used for many oncological, cardiological, or neurological conditions, either because the abnormal tissue does not concentrate it, or because the tissues under investigation demonstrate high physiological glucose uptake. Consequently, alternative PET tracers have been produced and introduced into clinical practice. The most important compounds in routine practice are {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-choline, mainly for the evaluation of prostate cancer; {sup 1}C-methionine for brain tumours; {sup 118}F-DOPA ({sup 18}F- deoxiphenilalanine) for neuroendocrine tumours and movement disorders; {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC (tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid-[1-Nal3]-octreotide) and other somatostatin analogues for neuroendocrine tumours; 11C-acetate for prostate cancer and hepatic masses and 18F-FLT (3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine) for a number of malignant tumours. Another impetus for the development of new tracers is to enable the investigation of biological processes in tumours other than glucose metabolism. This is especially important in the field of response assessment, where there are new agents that are targeted more specifically at angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis and other processes.

  18. FDG PET imaging dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia

  19. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  20. Tumour targeting and radiation dose of radioimmunotherapy with {sup 90}Y-rituximab in CD20+ B-cell lymphoma as predicted by {sup 89}Zr-rituximab immuno-PET: impact of preloading with unlabelled rituximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muylle, Kristoff [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, MIMA Research Group, Brussels (Belgium); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Flamen, Patrick; Guiot, Thomas; Ghanem, Ghanem; Meuleman, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Pierre; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Vaes, Melanie; Bron, Dominique [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Vugts, Danielle J.; Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van [VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Everaert, Hendrik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, MIMA Research Group, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To compare using immuno-PET/CT the distribution of {sup 89}Zr-labelled rituximab without and with a preload of unlabelled rituximab to assess the impact of preloading with unlabelled rituximab on tumour targeting and radiation dose of subsequent radioimmunotherapy with {sup 90}Y-labelled rituximab in CD20+ B-cell lymphoma. Five patients with CD20+ B-cell lymphoma and progressive disease were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent three study phases: initial dosimetric phase with baseline {sup 89}Zr-rituximab PET/CT imaging without a cold preload, followed 3 weeks later by a second dosimetric phase with administration of a standard preload (250 mg/m{sup 2}) of unlabelled rituximab followed by injection of {sup 89}Zr-rituximab, and a therapeutic phase 1 week later with administration of unlabelled rituximab followed by {sup 90}Y-rituximab. PET/CT imaging and tracer uptake by organs and lesions were assessed. With a cold rituximab preload, the calculated whole-body dose of {sup 90}Y-rituximab was similar (mean 0.87 mSv/MBq, range 0.82-0.99 mSv/MBq) in all patients. Without a preload, an increase in whole-body dose of 59 % and 87 % was noted in two patients with preserved circulating CD20+ B cells. This increase in radiation dose was primarily due to a 12.4-fold to 15-fold higher dose to the spleen without a preload. No significant change in whole-body dose was noted in the three other patients with B-cell depletion. Without a preload, consistently higher tumour uptake was noticed in patients with B-cell depletion. Administration of the standard preload of unlabelled rituximab impairs radioconjugate tumour targeting in the majority of patients eligible for radioimmunotherapy, that is patients previously treated with rituximab-containing therapeutic regimens. This common practice may need to be reconsidered and further evaluated as the rationale for this high preload has its origin in the ''prerituximab era''. (orig.)

  1. Development of three multiplex PCR assays targeting the 21 most clinically relevant serogroups associated with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infection in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sánchez

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli serogroups O5, O15, O26, O45, O55, O76, O91, O103, O104, O111, O113, O118, O121, O123, O128, O145, O146, O157, O165, O172, and O177 are the O-antigen forms of the most clinically relevant Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC serotypes. In this study, three multiplex PCR assays able to specifically detect these 21 serogroups were developed and validated. For this purpose, the O-antigen gene clusters of E. coli O5 and O76 were fully sequenced, their associated genes were identified on the basis of homology, and serogroup-specific primers were designed. After preliminary evaluation, these two primer pairs were proven to be highly specific and suitable for the development of PCR assays for O5 and O76 serogroup identification. Specific primers were also designed for serogroups O15, O45, O55, O91, O104, O113, O118, O123, O128, O146, O157, O165, O172, and O177 based on previously published sequences, and previously published specific primers for serogroups O26, O103, O111, O121, and O145 were also included. These 21 primer pairs were shown to be specific for their target serogroup when tested against E. coli type strains representing 169 known O-antigen forms of E. coli and Shigella and therefore suitable for being used in PCR assays for serogroup identification. In order to validate the three multiplex PCR assays, 22 E. coli strains belonging to the 21 covered serogroups and 18 E. coli strains belonging to other serogroups were screened in a double-blind test and their sensitivity was determined as 1 ng chromosomal DNA. The PCR assays developed in this study could be a faster, simpler, and less expensive strategy for serotyping of the most clinically relevant STEC strains in both clinical microbiology and public health laboratories, and so their development could benefit for clinical diagnosis, epidemiological investigations, surveillance, and control of STEC infections.

  2. Advances in establishment and analysis of three-dimensional tumor spheroid-based functional assays for target validation and drug evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinci Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is overwhelming evidence that in vitro three-dimensional tumor cell cultures more accurately reflect the complex in vivo microenvironment than simple two-dimensional cell monolayers, not least with respect to gene expression profiles, signaling pathway activity and drug sensitivity. However, most currently available three-dimensional techniques are time consuming and/or lack reproducibility; thus standardized and rapid protocols are urgently needed. Results To address this requirement, we have developed a versatile toolkit of reproducible three-dimensional tumor spheroid models for dynamic, automated, quantitative imaging and analysis that are compatible with routine high-throughput preclinical studies. Not only do these microplate methods measure three-dimensional tumor growth, but they have also been significantly enhanced to facilitate a range of functional assays exemplifying additional key hallmarks of cancer, namely cell motility and matrix invasion. Moreover, mutual tissue invasion and angiogenesis is accommodated by coculturing tumor spheroids with murine embryoid bodies within which angiogenic differentiation occurs. Highly malignant human tumor cells were selected to exemplify therapeutic effects of three specific molecularly-targeted agents: PI-103 (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG (heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 inhibitor and CCT130234 (in-house phospholipase C (PLCγ inhibitor. Fully automated analysis using a Celigo cytometer was validated for tumor spheroid growth and invasion against standard image analysis techniques, with excellent reproducibility and significantly increased throughput. In addition, we discovered key differential sensitivities to targeted agents between two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures, and also demonstrated enhanced potency of some agents against cell migration

  3. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  4. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang-Moo; Hong, S. W.; Choi, C. W.; Yang, S. D.; Choi, J. S.; Kweon, O. J. et al. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    PET gives various metabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 1,327 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 829,770,000won. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18} in a day. Manpower should be added for the second PET operation and RI production. 10 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  5. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Murray, Shauna A; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r=0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r=0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms. PMID:26231652

  6. The application of PET imaging in psychoneuroimmunology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannestad, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a research tool that allows in vivo measurements of brain metabolism and specific target molecules. PET imaging can be used to measure these brain variables in a variety of species, including human and non-human primates, and rodents. PET imaging can therefore be combined with various experimental and clinical model systems that are commonly used in psychoneuroimmunology research.

  7. Detection of Salmonella in Shellfish Using SYBR Green™ I-Based Real-Time Multiplexed PCR Assay Targeting invA and spvB

    KAUST Repository

    Gangwar, Maulshree

    2012-09-23

    A SYBR Green™ I-based real-time multiplexed PCR assay was developed targeting invA and spvB for the detection of Salmonella strains in shellfish after both hns and invA genes were identified in all Salmonella strains. Simultaneously, the 16S rRNA gene was used as a PCR internal amplification control (IAC). All 89 Salmonella strains tested in this study exhibited amplification of invA, whereas only 21 (23. 6 %) were PCR positive for spvB. The sensitivity of detection of all three targeted genes was 1 ng, which is equivalent to approximately 105 colony-forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella enterica. The analysis showed specific PCR products that were identified by reproducible melt temperature profiles (invA, 84. 27 ± 1. 7 °C; spvB, 88. 76 ± 1. 0 °C; and 16S rRNA gene, 87. 16 ± 0. 8 °C). The sensitivity of detection was 10 pg purified DNA (invA) or 105 CFU in 1 mL pure culture of S. enterica ATCC 14028. The above molecular detection method for Salmonella strains was successfully applied to the oyster homogenates (food matrix). An initial inoculum of 106 and 102 CFU Salmonella in 1 ml seeded oyster tissue homogenate was detected by multiplexed PCR for all three genes after 5 and 24 h of enrichment, respectively. Natural oysters isolated from Gulf of Mexico during the winter months exhibited negative PCR amplification results suggesting the absence of Salmonella. In contrast to conventional PCR, real-time multiplex PCR assay developed in this study is rapid and sensitive and will help Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference undertake appropriate measures to monitor Salmonella in oysters, thereby preventing disease outbreaks and consequently protecting consumer health. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Particle Accelerators for PET radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost-effectively achie......The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost...... different manufacturers will be discussed the light of what is actually needed for a given PET site operation. Alternatives to the conventional cyclotron have been proposed and tested but have at present very limited use. These alternatives will be discussed, as well as the future possibilities of supplying...... point of demand tracer production with very small cyclotrons of energy well below 10 MeV. The authors best advice at present for new PET sites is to negotiate for conventional cyclotron solutions from experienced manufacturers. It is the combined performance of cyclotron and target in terms of available...

  9. A comparison of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays using hybridization probes targeting either 16S ribosomal RNA or a subsurface lipoprotein gene for detecting leptospires in canine urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilini, Fabio; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Zambon, Elisa; Turba, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    Leptospires are excreted in the urine of infected animals, and the prompt detection of leptospiral DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is increasingly being used. However, contradictory data has emerged concerning the diagnostic accuracy of the most popular PCR assays that target either the 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) or the subsurface lipoprotein (LipL32) genes. In order to clarify the effect of the gene target, a novel hydrolysis probe-based, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the LipL32 gene was developed, validated, and then compared directly to the previously described rrs hydrolysis probe-based qPCR using a convenience collection of canine urine samples. The novel LipL32 qPCR assay was linear from 5.9 × 10(6) to 59 genome equivalents per reaction. Both the LipL32 and the rrs qPCR assays showed a limit of detection of 10 target copies per reaction indicating an approximately equivalent analytical sensitivity. Both assays amplified all 20 pathogenic leptospiral strains tested but did not amplify a representative collection of bacteria commonly found in voided canine urine. When the field samples were assayed, 1 and 5 out of 184 samples yielded an amplification signal in the LipL32 and rrs assays, respectively. Nevertheless, when the limit of detection was considered as the cutoff for interpreting findings, the 4 discordant cases were judged as negative. In conclusion, our study confirmed that both LipL32 and rrs are suitable targets for qPCR for the detection of leptospiral DNA in canine urine. However, the rrs target requires the mandatory use of a cutoff value in order to correctly interpret spurious amplifications.

  10. Importance of PET/CT for imaging of colorectal cancer; Stellenwert der PET/CT zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, F.G.; Schramm, N.; Graser, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Rist, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Haug, A.R. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) has emerged as a very useful imaging modality in the management of colorectal carcinoma. Data from the literature regarding the role of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis, staging, radiotherapy planning, response monitoring and surveillance of colorectal carcinoma is presented. Future directions and economic aspects are discussed. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET for colorectal cancer and endorectal ultrasound for rectal cancer. Combined FDG-PET/CT. While other imaging modalities allow superior visualization of the extent and invasion depth of the primary tumor, PET/CT is most sensitive for the detection of distant metastases of colorectal cancer. We recommend a targeted use of PET/CT in cases of unclear M staging, prior to metastasectomy and in suspected cases of residual or recurrent colorectal carcinoma with equivocal conventional imaging. The role of PET/CT in radiotherapy planning and response monitoring needs to be determined. Currently there is no evidence to support the routine use of PET/CT for colorectal screening, staging or surveillance. To optimally exploit the synergy between morphologic and functional information, FDG-PET should generally be performed as an integrated FDG-PET/CT with a contrast-enhanced CT component in colorectal carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Die Fluordesoxyglukose-Positronenemissionstomographie/Computertomographie (FDG-PET/CT) hat in den letzten Jahren zunehmende Bedeutung zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms erlangt. In diesem Beitrag stellen wir den Stand der Literatur zur Rolle der PET/CT bei Screening, Staging, Bestrahlungsplanung, Beurteilung eines Therapieansprechens und Nachsorge des kolorektalen Karzinoms dar. Zudem wird auf gesundheitsoekonomische Aspekte und zukuenftige Entwicklungen eingegangen. CT, MRT, FDG-PET, beim Rektumkarzinom zusaetzlich endorektaler Ultraschall. Kombinierte FDG-PET/CT. Waehrend

  11. Prospective evaluation of early treatment outcome in patients with meningiomas treated with particle therapy based on target volume definition with MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Habermehl, Daniel; Rieken, Stefan; Dittmar, Jan-Oliver; Kessel, Kerstin; Debus, Juergen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate early treatment results and toxicity in patients with meningiomas treated with particle therapy. Material and methods: Seventy patients with meningiomas were treated with protons (n = 38) or carbon ion radiotherapy (n = 26). Median age was 49 years. Median age at treatment was 55 years, 24 were male (34%), and 46 were female (66%). Histology was benign meningioma in 26 patients (37%), atypical in 23 patients (33%) and anaplastic in four patients (6%). In 17 patients (24%) with skull base meningiomas diagnosis was based on the typical appearance of a meningioma. For benign meningiomas, total doses of 52.2-57.6 GyE were applied with protons. For high-grade lesions, the boost volume was 18 GyE carbon ions, with a median dose of 50 GyE applied as highly conformal radiation therapy. Nineteen patients were treated as re-irradiation. Treatment planning with MRI and 68-Ga-DOTATOC-PET was evaluated. Results: Very low rates of side effects developed, including headaches, nausea and dizziness. No severe treatment-related toxicity was observed. Local control for benign meningiomas was 100%. Five of 27 patients (19%) developed tumor recurrence during follow-up. Of these, four patients had been treated as re-irradiation for recurrent high-risk meningiomas. Actuarial local control after re-irradiation of high-risk meningiomas was therefore 67% at six and 12 months. In patients treated with primary radiotherapy, only one of 13 patients (8%) developed tumor recurrence 17 months after radiation therapy (photon and carbon ion boost). Conclusion: Continuous prospective follow-up and development of novel study concepts are required to fully exploit the long-term clinical data after particle therapy for meningiomas. To date, it may be concluded that when proton therapy is available, meningioma patients can be offered a treatment at least comparable to high-end photon therapy.

  12. Advances in PET Physics and Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technologies are under investigation to substantially enhance PET's molecular sensitivity. If successful, this novel imaging system technology advances, together with new probe molecules that target specific molecular processes associated with disease will continue to increase PET's role in the study of disease and development of novel treatments. (author)

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT for Monitoring the Response of Breast Cancer to miR-143-Based Therapeutics by Targeting Tumor Glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ying; Zhang, Ling-fei; Guo, Rui; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Min; Shi, Shuo; Shang-Guan, Cheng-fang; Liu, Mo-fang; Li, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a hallmark of cancer, and tumor metabolism is emerging as anticancer target for therapeutic intervention. Triple-negative breast cancers TNBC are highly glycolytic and show poor clinical outcomes. We previously identified hexokinase 2, the major glycolytic enzyme, as a target gene of miR-143 in TNBC. Here, we developed a therapeutic formulation using cholesterol-modified miR-143 agomir encapsulated in a neutral lipid-based delivery agent that blocked tumor growth and glucose metabolism in TNBC tumor-bearing mice when administered systemically. The antioncogenic effects were accompanied by a reduction in the direct target hexokinase 2 and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Treatment with miR-143 formulation has minimal toxic effects and mice tolerated it well. Thus, we demonstrated that miR-143 is a robust inhibitor of the Warburg effect and an effective therapeutic target for TNBC. In addition, 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be used to specifically monitor the response of TNBC to miR-143-based therapeutics by targeting tumor glycolysis. PMID:27574783

  14. Salmonella: Dry Pet Foods and Pet Treats (FAQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guides Reports Salmonella: Dry Pet Foods and Pet Treats (FAQ) Originally posted August 9, 2010; Updated August ... as a result of the outbreak. “Natural” pet treats , such as pig ears and dehydrated/dried beef ...

  15. Laboratory utility of coproscopy, copro immunoassays and copro nPCR assay targeting Hsp90 gene for detection of Cryptosporidium in children, Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghallab, Marwa M I; Aziz, Inas Z Abdel; Shoeib, Eman Y; El-Badry, Ayman A

    2016-09-01

    Cryptosporidium is a significant cause of diarrhea worldwide especially in children. Infection may end fatally in immunocompromised patients. Multi-attribute analysis was used to determine the lab utility of 4 diagnostics; coproscopy of AF stained fecal smear, fecal immunoassays by ICT and ELISA and copro-nPCR assay targeting Hsp90 gene, for detection of Cryptosporidium in stool of 250 Egyptian children (150 diarrheic and 100 non-diarrhaeic children). Also, to determine Cryptosporidium molecular prevalence. Cryptosporidium was an important enteric pathogen among both diarrheic and non-diarrheic study children with a clearly high prevalence of 16.4 % (n = 41). Conventional methods had perfect specificity (100 %) but couldn`t be used as a consistent single detection method due to their lowered sensitivities. Multi-attribute analysis ranked nPCR the highest test for lab use. Being the test with the best diagnostic yield, nPCR is a reliable diagnostic test and is going to replace conventional methods for reliable detection of Cryptosporidium. PMID:27605806

  16. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  18. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  19. Molecular detection and confirmation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urogenital and extragenital specimens using the Abbott CT/NG RealTime assay and an in-house assay targeting the porA pseudogene.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, A

    2011-04-01

    Culture for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) is being replaced by molecular assays, but difficulties are observed with false positive and negatives results, especially for extragenital samples. This study evaluates the Abbott CT\\/NG Real-Time assay and a real-time porA pseudogene assay. Samples (n = 600) from a mixed prevalence Irish population include 164 male urines with corresponding urethral swabs, 58 endocervical swabs, 173 male pharyngeal swabs, 205 male rectal swabs, 36 NG clinical isolates and 26 commensal Neisseria species isolates. There was a 100% concordance between the Abbott CT\\/NG Real-Time and the porA assay. The positivity rate was 1.2%, 1.7%, 8.1% and 5.8% for FVU\\/urethral swabs, endocervical, pharyngeal and rectal swabs, respectively. These results were compared to culture and discrepancies were found with nine pharyngeal and three rectal swabs. Seven of the 12 discrepant positive samples were sequenced and were confirmed "true positives". The sensitivity and specificity of the molecular assays was 100%. The sensitivity of the culture-based testing was 100% for urogenital samples but 36% and 75% for pharyngeal and rectal swabs, respectively. The combined Abbott CT\\/NG and porA assays provide a valuable alternative to culture and also generate a significant increase in the diagnosis of pharyngeal and rectal NG infection.

  20. Results of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay for Specimens Yielding “Target Not Detected” Results by the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 Test▿

    OpenAIRE

    Babady, N. Esther; Germer, Jeffrey J.; Yao, Joseph D. C.

    2009-01-01

    No significantly discordant results were observed between the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay and the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Test (CTM) among 1,190 unique clinical plasma specimens obtained from laboratories located in 40 states representing all nine U.S. geographic regions and previously yielding “target not detected” results by CTM.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of real-time PCR assays targeting 16S rRNA and lipL32 genes for human leptospirosis in Thailand: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janjira Thaipadungpanit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid PCR-based tests for the diagnosis of leptospirosis can provide information that contributes towards early patient management, but these have not been adopted in Thailand. Here, we compare the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of two real-time PCR assays targeting rrs or lipL32 for the diagnosis of leptospirosis in northeast Thailand. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-control study of 266 patients (133 cases of leptospirosis and 133 controls was constructed to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity (DSe & DSp of both PCR assays. The median duration of illness prior to admission of cases was 4 days (IQR 2-5 days; range 1-12 days. DSe and DSp were determined using positive culture and/or microscopic agglutination test (MAT as the gold standard. The DSe was higher for the rrs assay than the lipL32 assay (56%, (95% CI 47-64% versus 43%, (95% CI 34-52%, p<0.001. No cases were positive for the lipL32 assay alone. There was borderline evidence to suggest that the DSp of the rrs assay was lower than the lipL32 assay (90% (95% CI 83-94% versus 93%, (95%CI 88-97%, p = 0.06. Nine controls gave positive reactions for both assays and 5 controls gave a positive reaction for the rrs assay alone. The DSe of the rrs and lipL32 assays were high in the subgroup of 39 patients who were culture positive for Leptospira spp. (95% and 87%, respectively, p = 0.25. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Early detection of Leptospira using PCR is possible for more than half of patients presenting with leptospirosis and could contribute to individual patient care.

  2. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  3. Supplemental transmission method for improved PET attenuation correction on an integrated MR/PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although MR image segmentation, combined with information from the PET emission data, has achieved a clinically usable PET attenuation correction (AC) on whole-body MR/PET systems, more accurate PET AC remains one of the main instrumental challenges for quantitative imaging. Incorporating a full conventional PET transmission system in these machines would be difficult, but even a small amount of transmission data might usefully complement the MR-based estimate of the PET attenuation image. In this paper we explore one possible configuration for such a system that uses a small number of fixed line sources placed around the periphery of the patient tunnel. These line sources are implemented using targeted positron beams. The sparse transmission (sTX) data are collected simultaneously with the emission (EM) acquisition. These data, plus a blank scan, are combined with a partially known attenuation image estimate in a modified version of the maximum likelihood for attenuation and activity (MLAA) algorithm, to estimate values of the linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) in unknown regions of the image. This algorithm was tested in two simple phantom experiments. We find that the use of supplemental transmission data can significantly improve the accuracy of the estimated LAC in a truncated region, as well as the estimate of the emitter concentration within the phantom. In the experiments, the bias in the EM+sTX estimate of emitter concentrations was 3–5%, compared to 15–20% with the use of EM-only data. Highlights: • MR-based PET attenuation correction (AC) on MR/PET scanners remains problematic. • We propose a supplemental sparse transmission (sTX) system to improve MR-AC. • The sTX sources were implemented very practically using targeted positron beams. • A novel MLAA-like algorithm was developed to reconstruct these data. • We show that sTX leads to more accurate emission images in two phantom studies

  4. Usage of Recycled Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ebru Tayyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bottles are commonly used in beverage industry and can be reused after physical and chemical recycling processes. Usage areas of recycled PET have been developed rapidly. Although recycled PET is used in plastic industry, composite industry also provides usage alternatives of recycled PET. Textile is a suitable sector for recycling of some plastics made of polymers too. In this study, the recycling technologies and applications of waste PET bottles have been investigated and scientific works in this area have been summarized.

  5. PET and PET/CT for imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article provides an overview of the current literature data regarding the value of PET and PET/CT for imaging of prostate cancer. Most widely used PET tracers for prostate cancer imaging are 11C-acetate and 11C- or 18F-labeled choline. Available literature data on the performance of PET and PET/CT in the detection of the primary malignancy as well as local or distant metastases are presented and discussed. In addition, our own preliminary results regarding the diagnostic efficacy of 11C-choline PET and PET/CT in 43 patients with suspected prostate cancer are provided. The prevalence of prostate cancer in this patient sample was 55.8%. PET and PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 88% with a specificity of 63% in the detection of the primary prostate cancer. The sensitivity in the detection of metastatic spread was 77% and no false-positives were found. The possible value and limitations of combined PET/CT systems when compared to stand alone PET scanners are discussed. PET and PET/CT is at present the single imaging modality providing functional information not only regarding the primary malignancy but also its metastases. This unique feature distinguishes PET from MRI complemented with magnetic resonance spectroscopy - a competing procedure. Our own results as well as the still limited literature data suggest, that PET and PET/CT may prove to be useful methods for imaging of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  6. A cultivation-independent PCR-RFLP assay targeting oprF gene for detection and identification of Pseudomonas spp. in samples from fibrocystic pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Antonio; Agaras, Betina; Bettiol, Marisa P; Gatti, Blanca M; Valverde, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    Species-specific genetic markers are crucial to develop faithful and sensitive molecular methods for the detection and identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa). We have previously set up a PCR-RFLP protocol targeting oprF, the gene encoding the genus-specific outer membrane porin F, whose strong conservation and marked sequence diversity allowed detection and differentiation of environmental isolates (Agaras et al., 2012). Here, we evaluated the ability of the PCR-RFLP assay to genotype clinical isolates previously identified as Pa by conventional microbiological methods within a collection of 62 presumptive Pa isolates from different pediatric clinical samples and different sections of the Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica" from La Plata, Argentina. All isolates, but one, gave an oprF amplicon consistent with that from reference Pa strains. The sequence of the smaller-sized amplicon revealed that the isolate was in fact a mendocina Pseudomonas strain. The oprF RFLP pattern generated with TaqI or HaeIII nucleases matched those of reference Pa strains for 59 isolates (96%). The other two Pa isolates (4%) revealed a different RFLP pattern based on HaeIII digestion, although oprF sequencing confirmed that Pa identification was correct. We next tested the effectiveness of the PCR-RFLP to detect pseudomonads on clinical samples of pediatric fibrocystic patients directly without sample cultivation. The expected amplicon and its cognate RFLP profile were obtained for all samples in which Pa was previously detected by cultivation-dependent methods. Altogether, these results provide the basis for the application of the oprF PCR-RFLP protocol to directly detect and identify Pa and other non-Pa pseudomonads in fibrocystic clinical samples. PMID:25960432

  7. Comparison of the guaranteed analysis with the measured nutrient composition of commercial pet foods

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Richard C.; Choate, Christina J; Scott, Karen C.; Molenberghs, Geert

    2009-01-01

    Objective-To compare guaranteed and measured concentrations of nutrients in commercial pet foods. Design-Cross-sectional study. Sample Population-Annual inspection reports of pet food analyses from 5 states. Procedures-Guaranteed and measured concentrations of crude protein (CP), crude fat (CF), crude fiber (CFb), moisture, and ash in pet foods were compared. The concentration difference for each nutrient was compared among types of food, target species, target life stages, manufacturers, and...

  8. Combined imaging approach to neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 99mTc-HYNIC TOC SPECT/CT and 18F FDG PET/CT-implications for targeted peptide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A combined imaging approach using FDG PET (GLUT expression) and SRS (somatostatin Receptor expression) is necessary in order to stratify patients of NET's, for appropriate treatment planning. Aim: 1) To study the variable expression of somatostatin and GLUT receptors in pathologically proven neuroendocrine tumors at primary and metastatic sites. 2) To identify the subgroups and suitability for peptide therapy. Materials and Methods: 72 patients (age - 18-72 years) with a known diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor were prospectively studied. SRS using 99mTc- HYNIC TOC SPECT/CT and GLUT imaging with FDG PET/CT study were performed in all the patients. The SPECT and PET results were interpreted independently by 2 nuclear medicine physicians and the corresponding studies were compared lesion by lesion for the final analysis. The findings were validated using available histological, imaging and follow up findings. Results: 49 patients had positive findings on both SRS and FDG PET/CT studies.12 patients showed a positive SRS study and negative FDG PET study. 11 patients had a positive FDG PET study and a negative SRS study. A total of 120 lesions were detected on SRS and 131 lesions detected on FDG PET.14 patients had solitary lesions on both the modalities. Neither FDG PET nor SRS added any incremental value in identifying additional sites in patients with solitary lesions. Conclusion: 1) 68% of the patients showed variable expression of somatostatin and GLUT receptors and thus were unsuitable for standalone radio peptide therapy and thus necessitated a combination therapy. The aim would be to control progression or palliation. 2) Only 29% of the patients showed lone somatostatin expression who could benefit from standalone somatostatin or radio peptide therapy with a curative intent

  9. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  10. Comparative Study of a Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting senX3-regX3 versus Other Molecular Strategies Commonly Used in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Sanjuan-Jimenez

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid amplification tests are increasingly used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis. We undertook a comparative study of the efficiency and diagnostic yield of a real-time PCR senX3-regX3 based assay versus the classical IS6110 target and the new commercial methods.This single-blind prospective comparative study included 145 consecutive samples: 76 from patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis (86.8% pulmonary and 13.2% extrapulmonary tuberculosis: 48.7% smear-positive and 51.3% smear-negative and 69 control samples (24 from patients diagnosed with non-tuberculous mycobacteria infections and 45 from patients with suspected tuberculosis which was eventually ruled out. All samples were tested by two CE-marked assays (Xpert®MTB/RIF and AnyplexTM plus MTB/NTM and two in-house assays targeting senX3-regX3 and the IS6110 gene.The detection limit ranged from 1.00E+01 fg for Anyplex, senX3-regX3 and IS6110 to 1.00E+04 fg for Xpert. All three Xpert, senX3-regX3 and IS6110 assays detected all 37 smear-positive cases. Conversely, Anyplex was positive in 34 (91.9% smear-positive cases. In patients with smear-negative tuberculosis, differences were observed between the assays; Xpert detected 22 (56.41% of the 39 smear-negative samples, Anyplex 24 (61.53%, senX3-regX3 28 (71.79% and IS6110 35 (89.74%. Xpert and senX3-regX3 were negative in all control samples; however, the false positive rate was 8.7% and 13% for Anyplex and IS6110, respectively. The overall sensitivity was 77.6%, 85.7%, 77.3% and 94.7% and the specificity was 100%, 100%, 90.8% and 87.0% for the Xpert, senX3-regX3, Anyplex and IS6110 assays, respectively.Real-time PCR assays targeting IS6110 lack the desired specificity. The Xpert MTB/RIF and in-house senX3-regX3 assays are both sensitive and specific for the detection of MTBC in both pulmonary and extrapulmonary samples. Therefore, the real time PCR senX3-regX3 based assay could be a useful and complementary tool in the

  11. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, T.; El-Ali, H.H.; Skovgaard, D.;

    2011-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However, with this achie...... small animal PET/CT for studies of muscle and tendon in exercise models. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.......Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However, with this...... this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume...

  12. PET Imaging in Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussakis, Andreas-Antonios; Piccini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To date, little is known about how neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation propagate in Huntington’s disease (HD). Unfortunately, no treatment is available to cure or reverse the progressive decline of function caused by the disease, thus considering HD a fatal disease. Mutation gene carriers typically remain asymptomatic for many years although alterations in the basal ganglia and cortex occur early on in mutant HD gene–carriers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional imaging technique of nuclear medicine which enables in vivo visualization of numerous biological molecules expressed in several human tissues. Brain PET is most powerful to study in vivo neuronal and glial cells function as well as cerebral blood flow in a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and HD. In absence of HD–specific biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, previous PET studies in HD were merely focused on the study of dopaminergic terminals, cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in manifest and premanifest HD–gene carriers. More recently, research interest has been exploring novel PET targets in HD including the state of phosphodiesterse expression and the role of activated microglia. Hence, a better understanding of the HD pathogenesis mechanisms may lead to the development of targeted therapies. PET imaging follow–up studies with novel selective PET radiotracers such as 11C-IMA–107 and 11C-PBR28 may provide insight on disease progression and identify prognostic biomarkers, elucidate the underlying HD pathology and assess novel pharmaceutical agents and over time. PMID:26683130

  13. Your Pet's Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Animal/Species Browse by Topic Browse by Discipline Resources VMA Resource Center Tools for K-12 ... infection because giving the preventive to a heartworm-positive pet will not treat the infection and could ...

  14. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Cold Weather Pet Safety Client Handout Available for download ... in hot cars , but did you know that cold weather also poses serious threats to your pets’ ...

  15. Clinical application of PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomena, Francisco [Hospital Clinico Villarroel, Barcelona (Spain). Nuclear Medicine]. E-mail: flomena@clinic.ub.es; Soler, Marina [CETIR Grup Medic. Esplkugues de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain). PET Unit

    2005-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption by the different organs and tissues of the mammalian body. Fluorodeoxyglucose-F 18 (FDG) PET has been proven to be a tracer adequate for clinical use in oncology and in many neurological diseases, with an excellent cost-efficiency ratio. The current PET-CT scanners can come to be the best tools for exploring patients who suffer from cancer.(author)

  16. Clinical application of pet

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Lomeña; Marina Soler

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption ...

  17. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy;

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology......This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  18. The fluorescent two-hybrid assay to screen for protein-protein interaction inhibitors in live cells: targeting the interaction of p53 with Mdm2 and Mdm4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurlova, Larisa; Derks, Maarten; Buchfellner, Andrea; Hickson, Ian; Janssen, Marc; Morrison, Denise; Stansfield, Ian; Brown, Christopher J; Ghadessy, Farid J; Lane, David P; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Zolghadr, Kourosh; Krausz, Eberhard

    2014-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are attractive but challenging targets for drug discovery. To overcome numerous limitations of the currently available cell-based PPI assays, we have recently established a fully reversible microscopy-assisted fluorescent two-hybrid (F2H) assay. The F2H assay offers a fast and straightforward readout: an interaction-dependent co-localization of two distinguishable fluorescent signals at a defined spot in the nucleus of mammalian cells. We developed two reversible F2H assays for the interactions between the tumor suppressor p53 and its negative regulators, Mdm2 and Mdm4. We then performed a pilot F2H screen with a subset of compounds, including small molecules (such as Nutlin-3) and stapled peptides. We identified five cell-penetrating compounds as potent p53-Mdm2 inhibitors. However, none exhibited intracellular activity on p53-Mdm4. Live cell data generated by the F2H assays enable the characterization of stapled peptides based on their ability to penetrate cells and disrupt p53-Mdm2 interaction as well as p53-Mdm4 interaction. Here, we show that the F2H assays enable side-by-side analysis of substances' dual Mdm2-Mdm4 activity. In addition, they are suitable for testing various types of compounds (e.g., small molecules and peptidic inhibitors) and concurrently provide initial data on cellular toxicity. Furthermore, F2H assays readily allow real-time visualization of PPI dynamics in living cells. PMID:24476585

  19. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [18F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  1. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine and concurrent (gemcitabine radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanzel Sven

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. Methods 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patients were assessable for evaluation of toxicity and tumor response. Treatment included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1200 mg/m2 and vinorelbine (30 mg/m2 at day 1, 8 and 22, 29 followed by concurrent radiotherapy (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every two weeks at day 43, 57 and 71. Radiotherapy planning included [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET based target volume definition. 10 patients were included in the phase I study with an initial gemcitabine dose of 300 mg/m2. The dose of gemcitabine was increased in steps of 100 mg/m2 until the MTD was realized. Results MTD was defined for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m2 due to grade 2 (next to grade 3 esophagitis in all patients resulting in a mean body weight loss of 5 kg (SD = 1.4 kg, representing 8% of the initial weight. These patients showed persisting dysphagia 3 to 4 weeks after completing radiotherapy. In accordance with expected complications as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, we defined the MTD at this dose level, although no dose limiting toxicity (DLT grade 3 was reached. In the phase I/II median follow-up was 15.7 months (4.1 to 42.6 months. The overall response rate after completion of therapy was 64%. The median overall survival was 19.9 (95% CI: [10.1; 29.7] months for all eligible patients. The median disease-free survival for all patients was 8.7 (95% CI: [2.7; 14.6] months. Conclusion

  2. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine) and concurrent (gemcitabine) radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patients were assessable for evaluation of toxicity and tumor response. Treatment included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1200 mg/m2) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m2) at day 1, 8 and 22, 29 followed by concurrent radiotherapy (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every two weeks at day 43, 57 and 71. Radiotherapy planning included [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) based target volume definition. 10 patients were included in the phase I study with an initial gemcitabine dose of 300 mg/m2. The dose of gemcitabine was increased in steps of 100 mg/m2 until the MTD was realized. MTD was defined for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m2 due to grade 2 (next to grade 3) esophagitis in all patients resulting in a mean body weight loss of 5 kg (SD = 1.4 kg), representing 8% of the initial weight. These patients showed persisting dysphagia 3 to 4 weeks after completing radiotherapy. In accordance with expected complications as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, we defined the MTD at this dose level, although no dose limiting toxicity (DLT) grade 3 was reached. In the phase I/II median follow-up was 15.7 months (4.1 to 42.6 months). The overall response rate after completion of therapy was 64%. The median overall survival was 19.9 (95% CI: [10.1; 29.7]) months for all eligible patients. The median disease-free survival for all patients was 8.7 (95% CI: [2.7; 14.6]) months. After induction chemotherapy, the maximum tolerated dose

  3. Mass effect of injected dose in small rodent imaging by SPECT and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, M.-P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States) and Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2005-10-01

    This paper discusses the effect of mass (chemical quantity) of injected dose on positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Commonly, PET or SPECT imaging study uses a 'no-carrier added' dose, which contains a small amount of radioactive imaging agent (in picogram to microgram). For small animal (rodent) imaging studies, specifically targeting binding sites or biological processes, the mass (chemical quantity) in the dose may significantly modify the binding, pharmacokinetics and, ultimately, the imaging outcome. Due to differences in size and other physiological factors between humans and rodents, there is a dramatic divergence of mass effect between small animal and human imaging study. In small animal imaging studies, the mass, or effective dose (ED{sub 50}), a dose required for 50% of receptor or binding site occupancy, is usually not directly related to binding potential (B {sub max}/K {sub d}) (measured by in vitro binding assay). It is likely that dynamic interplays between specific and nonspecific binding in blood circulation, transient lung retention, kidney excretion, liver-gallbladder flow, soft tissue retention as well as metabolism could each play a significant role in determining the concentration of the tracer in the target regions. When using small animal imaging for studying drug occupancy (either by a pretreatment, coinjection or chasing dose), the mass effects on imaging outcome are important factors for consideration.

  4. FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and radiotherapy treatment planning of head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has a potential improvement for staging and radiation treatment planning of various tumor sites. We analyzed the use of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/computed tomography (CT) images for staging and target volume delineation of patients with head and neck carcinoma candidates for radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients candidates for primary radiotherapy, who did not receive any curative surgery, underwent both CT and PET/CT simulation. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was contoured on CT (CT-GTV), PET (PET-GTV), and PET/CT images (PET/CT-GTV). The resulting volumes were analyzed and compared. Based on PET/CT, changes in TNM categories and clinical stage occurred in 5/22 cases (22%). The difference between CT-GTV and PET-GTV was not statistically significant (p = 0.2) whereas the difference between the composite volume (PET/CT-GTV) and CT-GTV was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). PET/CT fusion images could have a potential impact on both tumor staging and treatment planning

  5. PET/CT in radiation therapy planning; PET/CT in der Strahlentherapieplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, A.L. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Krause, B.J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Nestle, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy PET offers advantages in terms of tumor delineation and the description of biological processes. To define the real impact of this investigation in radiation treatment planning, following experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analysis are required. FDG-PET has a significant impact on GTV and PTV delineation in lung cancer and can detect lymph node involvement and differentiation of malignant tissue from atelectasis. In high-grade gliomas and meningiomas, methionine-PET helps to define the GTV and differentiate tumor from normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, cervix cancer and prostate cancer the value of FDG-PET for radiation treatment planning is still under investigation. For example, FDG-PET can be superior to CT and MRI in the detection of lymph node metastases in head and neck, unknown primary cancer and differentiation of viable tumor tissue after treatment. Therefore, it could play an important role in GTV definition and sparing of normal tissue. For other entities like gastro-intestinal cancer, lymphomas, sarcoma etc., the data of the literature are yet insufficient. The imaging of hypoxia, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis and gene expression leads to the identification of different areas of a biologically heterogeneous tumor mass that can be individually targeted using IMRT. In addition, a biological dose distribution can be generated, the so-called dose painting. However, systematical experimental and clinical trials are necessary to validate this hypothesis. (orig.)

  6. Novel PET sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis and evaluation of novel molecular sensors that utilize the phenomena of Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET). PET design can be incorporated into molecules to allow them to selectively bind certain guest molecules. PET works by the modulation of electron potentials within a molecule. Binding events between a host and guest can, if designed suitably, change these potentials enough to cause a transfer of electronic charge within the molecular sensor. This event can be accurately and sensitively monitored by the use of ultra violet or fluorescence spectroscopy. A sensor molecule can be constructed by matching the guest to a suitable receptor site and incorporating this into a molecule containing a fluorophore with the correct electron potential characteristics. By using existing synthetic routes as well as exploiting new pathways these sensor molecules C n be constructed to contain a fluorophore separated from a guest receptor(s) by suitable spacers units. When put together these facets go to creating molecules that by design are sensitive and selective for certain guest molecules or functional groups. This methodology allows the synthetic chemist to rationally design and synthesise PET sensors, tailored to the needs of the guest. In this thesis the synthesis and evaluation of a novel PET sensors for D-glucosamine, disaccharides and fluoride is presented. It is believed that the novel sensors using the PET phenomenon presented in this thesis are a worthwhile extension of previous works undertaken by other groups around the world and shows new pathways to increasingly complex and sophisticated sensor molecular design. (author)

  7. Using a non-image-based medium-throughput assay for screening compounds targeting N-myristoylation in intracellular Leishmania amastigotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paape

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have refined a medium-throughput assay to screen hit compounds for activity against N-myristoylation in intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania donovani. Using clinically-relevant stages of wild type parasites and an Alamar blue-based detection method, parasite survival following drug treatment of infected macrophages is monitored after macrophage lysis and transformation of freed amastigotes into replicative extracellular promastigotes. The latter transformation step is essential to amplify the signal for determination of parasite burden, a factor dependent on equivalent proliferation rate between samples. Validation of the assay has been achieved using the anti-leishmanial gold standard drugs, amphotericin B and miltefosine, with EC50 values correlating well with published values. This assay has been used, in parallel with enzyme activity data and direct assay on isolated extracellular amastigotes, to test lead-like and hit-like inhibitors of Leishmania N-myristoyl transferase (NMT. These were derived both from validated in vivo inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei NMT and a recent high-throughput screen against L. donovani NMT. Despite being a potent inhibitor of L. donovani NMT, the activity of the lead T. brucei NMT inhibitor (DDD85646 against L. donovani amastigotes is relatively poor. Encouragingly, analogues of DDD85646 show improved translation of enzyme to cellular activity. In testing the high-throughput L. donovani hits, we observed macrophage cytotoxicity with compounds from two of the four NMT-selective series identified, while all four series displayed low enzyme to cellular translation, also seen here with the T. brucei NMT inhibitors. Improvements in potency and physicochemical properties will be required to deliver attractive lead-like Leishmania NMT inhibitors.

  8. Clinical application of pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lomeña

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption by the different organs and tissues of the mammalian body. Fluordeoxyglucose-F18 (FDG PET has been proven to be a tracer adequate for clinical use in oncology and in many neurological diseases, with an excellent cost-efficiency ratio. The current PET-CT scanners can come to be the best tools for exploring patients who suffer from cancer.A tomografia por emissão de pósitrons (PET é uma técnica de diagnóstico por imagem que fornece informação sobre o metabolismo e funcionamento dos tecidos, diferente de outras técnicas de imagens como tomografia computadorizada (TC e ressonância magnética (RM, as quais fornecem informações estruturais ou anatômicas. O PET alcançou seu desenvolvimento em investigação biomédica devido à sua capacidade de usar traçadores análogos a muitas substâncias endógenas e de medir in vivo e de forma não invasiva seu consumo em diferentes órgãos e tecidos dos mamíferos 18Fluordesoxiglicose (FDG PET tem provado ser uma exploração de uso clínico com excelente relação custo benefício em oncologia e em muitas doenças neurológicas. Os atuais tomógrafos por PET-CT podem chegar a ser a melhor ferramenta de diagnóstico nos pacientes que sofrem de câncer.

  9. PET-CT application and influence on IMRT target delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer%PET-CT在局部晚期非小细胞肺癌调强放疗靶区勾画中的应用及其影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞岑明; 葛琴; 蔡晶; 吴建亭; 杨百霞; 成国建; 赵季忠

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the value of PET⁃CT image fusion to delineate the target of intensity modulated radiation therapy( IMRT) in locally advanced non⁃small cell lung cancer( NSCLC) , and the impact on target volume and dose of normal lung tis⁃sue. Methods Thirty NSCLC patients of clinical stageⅢA andⅢB were randomly selected. Target and organ at risk were delineated on the same fixed position according to enhanced CT images and fusion images of PET/CT and CT, respectively. Then the volume of gross tumor volume( GTV) and planning target volume( PTV) under these two status were compared. Moreover, the percent of the total lung volume exceeding 5 Gy( V5 ) , percent of the total lung volume exceeding 20 Gy( V20 ) , mean dose of lung irradiated( MLD) in two different conformal IMRT plans were observed when the dosage of PTV was up to 60 Gy/30 f. Results The GTV volume on fusion im⁃ages of PET⁃CT/CT was (248�39±94�80)cm3, less than (311�22±99�16)cm3 on the enhanced CT images in 30 cases. The difference was statistically significant(P<0�05). PTV, extended from GTV, in fusion images of PET⁃CT/CT was (356�68±92�73) cm3, while in the enhanced CT images were (433�58±107�89 cm3) with significant difference(P<0�01). The V5, V20 and MLD of whole lung in the two plans were compared. In fusion images of PET⁃CT/CT program, V5, V20 and MLD was (51�26±10�50)%, (25�71±5�17)% and (1595�27±148�24) cGy, remarkly less than (56�41±9�55)%, (29�09±4�10)% and (1693�59±100�60) cGy in the enhanced CT program with significant difference( P<0�05) . Conclusion Application of PET⁃CT/CT fusion image to delin⁃eate the targets of IMRT can improve the accuracy of target delineation volume and reduce the dose of normal lung tissues.%目的:探讨局部晚期非小细胞肺癌( NSCLC)调强适形放疗( IMRT)中应用PET⁃CT融合图像勾画靶区对靶体积及正常肺组织受照剂量

  10. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing as a Reliable Diagnostic Assay for the Detection of Somatic Mutations in Tumours Using Minimal DNA Amounts from Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leng, Wendy W J; Gadellaa-Van Hooijdonk, Christa G.; Barendregt-Smouter, Françoise A S; Koudijs, Marco J.; Nijman, Ies; Hinrichs, John W.J.; Cuppen, Edwin; van Lieshout, Stef; Loberg, Robert D.; De Jonge, Maja; Voest, Emile E; De Weger, Roel A.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Langenberg, Marlies H G; Sleijfer, Stefan; Willems, Stefan M.; Lolkema, Martijn P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Targeted Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) offers a way to implement testing of multiple genetic aberrations in diagnostic pathology practice, which is necessary for personalized cancer treatment. However, no standards regarding input material have been defined. This study therefore aimed

  11. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin;

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  12. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a prototype PET detector which is compatible with a clinical MRI system to provide simultaneous PET and MR imaging. This single-slice PET system consists of 48 2x2x10mm3 LSO crystals in a 38 mm diameter ring configuration that can be placed inside the receiver coil of the MRI system, coupled to three multi-channel photomultipliers housed outside the main magnetic field via 4 m long and 2 mm diameter optical fibres. The PET system exhibits 2 mm spatial resolution, 41% energy resolution at 511 keV and 20 ns timing resolution. Simultaneous PET and MR phantom images were successfully acquired. (author)

  13. Imaging large vessel vasculitis with fully integrated PET/MRI: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einspieler, Ingo; Pyka, Thomas; Eiber, Matthias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Thuermel, Klaus; Wolfram, Sabine; Moog, Philipp [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nephrology, Munich (Germany); Reeps, Christian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Essler, Markus [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of hybrid [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI in patients with large vessel vasculitis (LVV) by comparing visual and quantitative parameters to that of PET/CT. Furthermore, the value of PET/MRI in disease activity and extent of LVV was assessed. A total of 16 [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI and 12 [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/CT examinations were performed in 12 patients with LVV. MRI of the vessel wall by T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences was used for anatomical localization of FDG uptake and identification of morphological changes associated with LVV. In addition, contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed. The vascular FDG uptake in the vasculitis group was compared to a reference group of 16 patients using a four-point visual score. Visual scores and quantitative parameters [maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background ratio (TBR)] were compared between PET/MRI and PET/CT. Furthermore, correlations between C-reactive protein (CRP) and quantitative PET results, as well the extent of vasculitis in PET, MRI/CE-MRA and combined PET/MRI, were analysed. TBRs, SUV{sub max} values and visual scores correlated well between PET/MRI and PET/CT (r = 0.92, r = 0.91; r = 0.84, p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between both modalities concerning SUV{sub max} measurements and visual scores. In PET/MRI, PET alone revealed abnormal FDG uptake in 86 vascular regions. MRI/CE-MRA indicated 49 vessel segments with morphological changes related to vasculitis, leading to a total number of 95 vasculitis regions in combination with PET. Strong and significant correlations between CRP and disease extent in PET alone (r = 0.75, p = 0.0067) and PET/MRI (r = 0.92, p < 0.0001) in contrast to MRI/CE-MRA only were observed. Regarding disease activity, no significant correlations were seen between quantitative PET results and CRP, although there

  14. Use of PET/CT for staging and radiation therapy planning in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Manus, M P

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and more recently PET/computed tomography (CT) scanning represent major advances in the imaging of lung cancer and have an especially high impact on the management of patients who are candidates for potentially curative or "radical" radiotherapy (RT). This article reviews the current status of PET and PET/CT for staging patients before RT and considers the use of PET and PET/CT images for target volume definition. The relevant literature on the use of PET for staging lung cancer is reviewed and placed in the context of patients who are candidates for RT. Research that specifically considers the use of PET for RT planning is considered critically and some promising areas for future research are discussed. The available literature is almost exclusively devoted to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with few relevant studies of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The primary PET radiopharmaceutical shown to have value for staging and RT planning is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). In prospective studies where PET imaging was used to stage radical RT candidates, 25-30% of patients were excluded from radical therapy because of PET detected advanced disease. In all studies where "PET-assisted" and conventional target or treatment volumes were compared, there were major differences between PET and conventional volumes. Because PET-assisted staging is proven to be significantly more accurate than conventional staging and because all studies show major differences between PET-assisted and conventional treatment volumes in NSCLC, routine use of PET/CT for RT planning is recommended.

  15. A novel photoinduced electron transfer (PET) primer technique for rapid real-time PCR detection of Cryptosporidium spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothikumar, N., E-mail: jin2@cdc.gov; Hill, Vincent R.

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Uses a single-labeled fluorescent primer for real-time PCR. •The detection sensitivity of PET PCR was comparable to TaqMan PCR. •Melt curve analysis can be performed to confirm target amplicon production. •Conventional PCR primers can be converted to PET PCR primers. -- Abstract: We report the development of a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide primer that can be used to monitor real-time PCR. The primer has two parts, the 3′-end of the primer is complimentary to the target and a universal 17-mer stem loop at the 5′-end forms a hairpin structure. A fluorescent dye is attached to 5′-end of either the forward or reverse primer. The presence of guanosine residues at the first and second position of the 3′ dangling end effectively quenches the fluorescence due to the photo electron transfer (PET) mechanism. During the synthesis of nucleic acid, the hairpin structure is linearized and the fluorescence of the incorporated primer increases several-fold due to release of the fluorescently labeled tail and the absence of guanosine quenching. As amplicons are synthesized during nucleic acid amplification, the fluorescence increase in the reaction mixture can be measured with commercially available real-time PCR instruments. In addition, a melting procedure can be performed to denature the double-stranded amplicons, thereby generating fluorescence peaks that can differentiate primer dimers and other non-specific amplicons if formed during the reaction. We demonstrated the application of PET-PCR for the rapid detection and quantification of Cryptosporidium parvum DNA. Comparison with a previously published TaqMan® assay demonstrated that the two real-time PCR assays exhibited similar sensitivity for a dynamic range of detection of 6000–0.6 oocysts per reaction. PET PCR primers are simple to design and less-expensive than dual-labeled probe PCR methods, and should be of interest for use by laboratories operating in resource

  16. PathogenMip Assay: A Multiplex Pathogen Detection Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Akhras, Michael S.; Sreedevi Thiyagarajan; Villablanca, Andrea C.; Davis, Ronald W; Pål Nyrén; Nader Pourmand

    2007-01-01

    The Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) assay has been previously applied to a large-scale human SNP detection. Here we describe the PathogenMip Assay, a complete protocol for probe production and applied approaches to pathogen detection. We have demonstrated the utility of this assay with an initial set of 24 probes targeting the most clinically relevant HPV genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. Probe construction was based on a novel, cost-effective, ligase-based protocol. The ...

  17. First-in-human uPAR PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene;

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive...... of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with (64)Cu...... for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment...

  18. FDG PET/CT imaging as a biomarker in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Paris-Est Creteil University, LYSA Imaging, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Gallamini, Andrea [Nice University, Research, Innovation and Statistic Department, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Scientific Research Committee, S. Croce Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Younes, Anas [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Lymphoma Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FDG PET/CT has changed the management of FDG-avid lymphoma and is now recommended as the imaging technique of choice for staging and restaging. The need for tailoring therapy to reduce toxicity in patients with a favourable outcome and for improving treatment in those with high-risk factors requires accurate diagnostic methods and a new prognostic algorithm to identify different risk categories. New drugs are used in relapsed/refractory patients. The role of FDG PET/CT as a biomarker in this context is summarized in this review. New trends in FDG metabolic imaging in lymphoma are addressed including metabolic tumour volume measurement at staging and integrative PET which combines PET data with clinical and molecular markers or other imaging techniques. The quantitative approach for response assessment which is under investigation and is used in large ongoing trials is compared with visual criteria. The place of FDG in the era of targeted therapy is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food and treats might include dry dog or cat food, dog biscuits, pig ears, beef hooves, and rodents ... after your pet, and before eating or preparing foods. Make sure to remove your ... contain dog or cat feces to prevent the spread of roundworms and ...

  20. I Love Petting Zoos!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-23

    This Kidtastics podcast helps children learn about how to stay safe and healthy when visiting petting zoos and other animal exhibits.  Created: 3/23/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/23/2010.

  1. Polyesteramides based on PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Krista

    1999-01-01

    Engineering plastics have good mechanical, thermal and electrical properties, and can be easily processed. Typical engineering plastics include polyamides (PA6,6, PA6, PA4,6) and polyesters (PBT, PET). Compared to polyesters of a similar structure, polyamides have a high glass transition (Tg) and me

  2. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.;

    2015-01-01

    February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, the conclusion of last year's meeting "the real work has just started" still holds true....

  3. PET CT and lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about Tc and lymphomas. Classification and clinical cases of various cancer such as gastro duodenal or ulcer, mama, medullary, lymph and neck, leukemia, nodular sclerosis. Metabolic information, anatomical nature of lymphoma and its clinical presentation determine the extent that PET should be used in the patient.

  4. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma; PET y PET/CT en melanoma maligno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J.R. [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  5. Choosing a Pet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    THE capital boasts countless markets of all kinds,but some of its insect,bird and pet markets immortalize Beijing culture and folkloric traditions.Don’t miss it! The Huasheng Tianqiao Market,south of the famous Panjiayuan Antique Market, was moved a few years ago and rebuilt in the

  6. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-01

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  7. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-01

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  8. Targeted next generation sequencing as a reliable diagnostic assay for the detection of somatic mutations in tumours using minimal DNA amounts from formalin fixed paraffin embedded material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W.J. de Leng (Wendy); C.G.M. Gadellaa-Van Hooijdonk (C. G M); F.A.S. Barendregt-Smouter (Françoise A.S.); M.J. Koudijs (Marco J.); I. Nijman (Ies); J.W.J. Hinrichs (John W.J.); E. Cuppen (Edwin); S. van Lieshout (Stef); R.D. Loberg (Robert D.); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); E.E. Voest (Emile); R.A. de Weger (Roel); N. Steeghs (Neeltje); M.H. Langenberg (Marlies); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); S.M. Willems (Stefan Martin); M.P. Lolkema (Martijn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Targeted Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) offers a way to implement testing of multiple genetic aberrations in diagnostic pathology practice, which is necessary for personalized cancer treatment. However, no standards regarding input material have been defined. This study ther

  9. Development and evaluation of a four-tube real time multiplex PCR assay covering fourteen respiratory viruses, and comparison to its corresponding single target counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.R. Jansen; J. Schinkel; S. Koekkoek; D. Pajkrt; M. Beld; M.D. de Jong; R. Molenkamp

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex real time PCR is increasingly used to diagnose respiratory viruses and has shown to be superior to traditional methods, like culture and antigen detection. However, comprehensive data on sensitivity, specificity and performance of the multiplex PCR compared to the single target PCR's is li

  10. Development of a robust cell-based high-throughput screening assay to identify targets of HIV-1 viral protein R dimerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zych, Courtney; Dömling, A.; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2013-01-01

    Targeting protein-protein interactions (PPI) is an emerging field in drug discovery. Dimerization and PPI are essential properties of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 proteins, their mediated functions, and virus biology. Additionally, dimerization is required for the functional interaction of H

  11. Use of DNA melting simulation software for in silico diagnostic assay design: targeting regions with complex melting curves and confirmation by real-time PCR using intercalating dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saint Christopher P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA melting curve analysis using double-stranded DNA-specific dyes such as SYTO9 produce complex and reproducible melting profiles, resulting in the detection of multiple melting peaks from a single amplicon and allowing the discrimination of different species. We compare the melting curves of several Naegleria and Cryptosporidium amplicons generated in vitro with in silico DNA melting simulations using the programs POLAND and MELTSIM., then test the utility of these programs for assay design using a genetic marker for toxin production in cyanobacteria. Results The SYTO9 melting curve profiles of three species of Naegleria and two species of Cryptosporidium were similar to POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations, excepting some differences in the relative peak heights and the absolute melting temperatures of these peaks. MELTSIM and POLAND were used to screen sequences from a putative toxin gene in two different species of cyanobacteria and identify regions exhibiting diagnostic melting profiles. For one of these diagnostic regions the POLAND and MELTSIM melting simulations were observed to be different, with POLAND more accurately predicting the melting curve generated in vitro. Upon further investigation of this region with MELTSIM, inconsistencies between the melting simulation for forward and reverse complement sequences were observed. The assay was used to accurately type twenty seven cyanobacterial DNA extracts in vitro. Conclusion Whilst neither POLAND nor MELTSIM simulation programs were capable of exactly predicting DNA dissociation in the presence of an intercalating dye, the programs were successfully used as tools to identify regions where melting curve differences could be exploited for diagnostic melting curve assay design. Refinements in the simulation parameters would be required to account for the effect of the intercalating dye and salt concentrations used in real-time PCR. The agreement between the melting

  12. An update on novel quantitative techniques in the context of evolving whole-body PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Hess, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    Since its foundation PET has established itself as one of the standard imaging modalities enabling the quantitative assessment of molecular targets in vivo. In the past two decades, quantitative PET has become a necessity in clinical oncology. Despite introduction of various measures...... for quantification and correction of PET parameters, there is debate on the selection of the appropriate methodology in specific diseases and conditions. In this review, we have focused on these techniques with special attention to topics such as static and dynamic whole body PET imaging, tracer kinetic modeling...

  13. Immuno-PET Imaging of HER3 in a Model in which HER3 Signaling Plays a Critical Role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Yuan

    Full Text Available HER3 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including colorectal cancer (CRC, which is associated with poor prognosis, and is involved in the development of therapy resistance. Thus, an in vivo imaging technique is needed to evaluate the expression of HER3, an important therapeutic and diagnostic target. Here, we report successful HER3 PET imaging using a newly generated anti-human HER3 monoclonal antibody, Mab#58, and a mouse model of a HER3-overexpressing xenograft tumor. Furthermore, we assessed the role of HER3 signaling in CRC cancer tissue-originated spheroid (CTOS and applied HER3 imaging to detect endogenous HER3 in CTOS-derived xenografts. Cell binding assays of 89Zr-labeled Mab#58 using the HER3-overexpressing cell line HER3/RH7777 demonstrated that [89Zr]Mab#58 specifically bound to HER3/RH7777 cells (Kd = 2.7 nM. In vivo biodistribution study in mice bearing HER3/RH7777 and its parent cell xenografts showed that tumor accumulation of [89Zr]Mab#58 in HER3/RH7777 xenografts was significantly higher than that in the control from day 1 to day 4, tending to increase from day 1 to day 4 and reaching 12.2 ± 4.5%ID/g. Radioactivity in other tissues, including the control xenograft, decreased or remained unchanged from day 1 to day 6. Positron emission tomography (PET in the same model enabled clear visualization of HER3/RH7777 xenografts but not of RH7777 xenografts. CTOS growth assay and signaling assay revealed that CRC CTOS were dependent on HER3 signaling for their growth. In PET studies of mice bearing a CRC CTOS xenograft, the tumor was clearly visualized with [89Zr]Mab#58 but not with the 89Zr-labeled control antibody. Thus, tumor expression of HER3 was successfully visualized by PET with 89Zr-labeled anti-HER3 antibody in CTOS xenograft-bearing mice, a model that retains the properties of the patient tumor. Non-invasive targeting of HER3 by antibodies is feasible, and it is expected to be useful for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  14. A facile, sensitive, and highly specific trinitrophenol assay based on target-induced synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer towards DNA-templated copper nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyin; Chang, Jiafu; Hou, Ting; Ge, Lei; Li, Feng

    2016-11-01

    Reliable, selective and sensitive approaches for trinitrophenol (TNP) detection are highly desirable with respect to national security and environmental protection. Herein, a simple and novel fluorescent strategy for highly sensitive and specific TNP assay has been successfully developed, which is based on the quenching of the fluorescent poly(thymine)-templated copper nanoclusters (DNA-CuNCs), through the synergetic effects of acid induction and electron transfer. Upon the addition of TNP, donor-acceptor complexes between the electron-deficient nitro-groups in TNP and the electron-donating DNA templates are formed, resulting in the close proximity between TNP and CuNCs. Moreover, the acidity of TNP contributes to the pH decrease of the system. These factors combine to dramatically quench the fluorescence of DNA-CuNCs, providing a "signal-off" strategy for TNP sensing. The as-proposed strategy demonstrates high sensitivity for TNP assay, and a detection limit of 0.03μM is obtained, which is lower than those reported by using organic fluorescent materials. More significantly, this approach shows outstanding selectivity over a number of TNP analogues, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), 3-nitrophenol (NP), nitrobenzene (NB), phenol (BP), and toluene (BT). Compared with previous studies, this method does not need complex DNA sequence design, fluorescent dye labeling, or sophisticated organic reactions, rendering the strategy with additional advantages of simplicity and cost-effectiveness. In addition, the as-proposed strategy has been adopted for the detection of TNP in natural water samples, indicating its great potential to be applied in the fields of public safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:27591641

  15. An update on technical and methodological aspects for cardiac PET applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presotto, Luca; Busnardo, Elena; Gianolli, Luigi; Bettinardi, Valentino

    2016-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is indicated for a large number of cardiac diseases: perfusion and viability studies are commonly used to evaluate coronary artery disease; PET can also be used to assess sarcoidosis and endocarditis, as well as to investigate amyloidosis. Furthermore, a hot topic for research is plaque characterization. Most of these studies are technically very challenging. High count rates and short acquisition times characterize perfusion scans while very small targets have to be imaged in inflammation/infection and plaques examinations. Furthermore, cardiac PET suffers from respiratory and cardiac motion blur. Each type of studies has specific requirements from the technical and methodological point of view, thus PET systems with overall high performances are required. Furthermore, in the era of hybrid PET/computed tomography (CT) and PET/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems, the combination of complementary functional and anatomical information can be used to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Moreover, PET images can be qualitatively and quantitatively improved exploiting information from the other modality, using advanced algorithms. In this review we will report the latest technological and methodological innovations for PET cardiac applications, with particular reference to the state of the art of the hybrid PET/CT and PET/MRI. We will also report the most recent advancements in software, from reconstruction algorithms to image processing and analysis programs. PMID:27611711

  16. Stable Extended Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Coiled Coil as an Effective Target in an Assay for High-Affinity Fusion Inhibitors▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Lifeng; Balogh, Edina; Gochin, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 coiled-coil domain is an important target for fusion inhibitors, including the peptide T20, which has been approved as a drug against HIV-1. Research into nonpeptide fusion inhibitors has focused primarily on a hydrophobic pocket located within the coiled coil and has so far yielded compounds with relatively weak fusion inhibitory activity. Here, we describe metal ion-assisted stabilization of an extended 39-residue construct of gp41, which...

  17. Simultaneous 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/MRI for IMRT Treatment Planning for Meningioma: First Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning based on simultaneous positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) of meningioma. Methods and Materials: A meningioma patient was examined prior to radiotherapy with dedicated planning computed tomography (CT), MRI, PET/CT with gallium-68-labeled DOTATOC (68Ga-DOTATOC), and simultaneous 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/MRI. The first gross target volume (GTV) was defined based on a combination of separate MR and 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT imaging (GTVPET/CT+MR). Then, the simultaneous PET/MR images were used to delineate a second GTV (GTVPET/MR) by following exactly the same delineation strategy. After an isotropic expansion of those volumes by a 4-mm safety margin, the resulting planning target volumes (PTVs) were compared by calculating the intersection volume and the relative complements. A cross-evaluation of IMRT plans was performed, where the treatment plan created for the PTVPET/CT+MR was applied to the PET/MR-based PTVPET/MR. Results: Generally, target volumes for IMRT treatment planning did not differ between MRI plus 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT and simultaneous PET/MR imaging. Only in certain regions of the GTV were differences observed. The overall volume of the PET/MR-based PTV was approximately the same as that obtained from PET/CT data. A small region of infiltrative tumor growth next to the main tumor mass was better visualized with combined PET/MR due to smaller PET voxel sizes and improved recovery. An IMRT treatment plan was optimized for the PTVPET/CT+MR. The evaluation of this plan with respect to the PTVPET/MR showed parts of the target volume that would not have received the full radiation dose after delineation of the tumor, based on simultaneous PET/MR. Conclusion: This case showed that differences in target volumes delineated on the basis of separate MR and PET/CT and simultaneous PET/MR may be observed that can have significant consequences for an effectively applied

  18. 靶向G蛋白偶联受体的高通量药物筛选方法%High-throughput screening assays for G-protein-coupled receptors-targeted drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 谢欣

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) , also known as 7 trans-membrane receptors, are the largest family of cell surface receptors. GPCR mediate many important physiological functions and are among the most successful therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. These receptors are the targets of > 50% of the current therapeutic agents on the market. Therefore, GPCR assay development and GPCR ligand screening remain the major focus of drug discovery research worldwide. In this review, we summarize the most widely used GPCR assays and recent advances in high-throughput screening technology for GPCR drug discovery.%G蛋白偶联受体( G-protein-coupled receptors,GPCR)是一类具有7次跨膜结构的膜蛋白.GPCR介导多种重要的生理功能,与很多疾病密切相关,是最重要的现代药物靶点家族.目前市场上有近50%的药物是以GPCR为靶点的.因此,GPCR分析方法和GPCR配体筛选方法的研究是当今世界新药研究的重点和热点.本文归纳介绍了近年来被广泛使用的GPCR药物发现方法,以及靶向GPCR高通量筛选技术的最新研究进展.

  19. 18F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTVCT to GTVFUSED was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  20. Are Pets Good For Us?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢连香

    2006-01-01

    A pet animal keeps us feel happy.Pets can staywith us when we are left by ourselves,and pets in-vite us to love and be loved.Often a cat or dog cankeep us easy at time when human words don’t help.Pets also keep us get close to the more natural animalworld.Learning to care for a pet helps a child to growup into a loving man or woman who feels responsible(有责任的) towards those dependent (依靠) on him.A pet dog can make us believe in others for we cansee faithfulness (忠诚) in the dog.In fact,we keeppets not only fo...

  1. Usage of Recycled Pet

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ebru Tayyar; Sevcan Üstün

    2010-01-01

    The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bot...

  2. PET studies in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis (18F-F-DOPA) and for (11C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs

  3. Identification of Antiviral Agents Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Promoter from Extracts of Indonesian Marine Organisms by a Novel Cell-Based Screening Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Atsuya; Fujimoto, Yuusuke; Tamaki, Mayumi; Setiawan, Andi; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Toyama, Masaaki; Baba, Masanori; de Voogd, Nicole J; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Junichi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-11-01

    The current treatments of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) face a limited choice of vaccine, antibody and antiviral agents. The development of additional antiviral agents is still needed for improvement of CHB therapy. In this study, we established a screening system in order to identify compounds inhibiting the core promoter activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV). We prepared 80 extracts of marine organisms from the coral reefs of Indonesia and screened them by using this system. Eventually, two extracts showed high inhibitory activity (>95%) and low cytotoxicity (66% to 77%). Solvent fractionation, column chromatography and NMR analysis revealed that 3,5-dibromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 1) and 3,4,5-tribromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 2), which are classified as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were identified as anti-HBV agents in the extracts. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HBV core promoter activity as well as HBV production from HepG2.2.15.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50 values of compounds 1 and 2 were 0.23 and 0.80 µM, respectively, while selectivity indexes of compound 1 and 2 were 18.2 and 12.8, respectively. These results suggest that our cell-based HBV core promoter assay system is useful to determine anti-HBV compounds, and that two PBDE compounds are expected to be candidates of lead compounds for the development of anti-HBV drugs. PMID:26561821

  4. PET and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sevencan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water, fruit juice, alcoholic beverage, and food packing films. By the increasing interest on the environmental effects of plastic wastes, concerns on the recyclable packing materials also grew up. Also the daily use of recyclable containers consisting PET have increased. There are five steps for recycling of plastics. These steps are; using large amounts of plastics, collecting them in a big center, classifying and sorting the plastics, reproducing the polymers and obtaining new products with melted plastics. Providing a healthy recycling of plastics, the consumers should have knowledge and responsibility. The consumer should know what he/she has to do before putting the plastics in the recycling containers. Recycling containers and bags should be placed near the sources of plastic wastes. Consequently, the plastic wastes and environmental problems they cause will be on the agenda in future. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 307-312

  5. PET radiopharmaceuticals for neuroreceptor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Routine clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals for the noninvasive imaging of brain receptors, transporters,and enzymes are commonly labeled with positron emitting nuclides such as carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Certain minimal conditions need to be fulfilled for these PET ligands to be used as imaging agents in vivo. Some of these prerequisites are discussed and examples of the most useful clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals that have found application in the central nervous system are reviewed.

  6. Pet Overpopulation: An Economic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Coate, Stephen; Knight, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of pet overpopulation. It develops a tractable dynamic model whose positive predictions square well with key features of the current U.S. market for pets. The model is used to understand, from a welfare economic perspective, the sense in which there is \\overpopulation" of pets and the underlying causes of the problem. The paper also employs the model to consider what policies might be implemented to deal with the problem. A calibrated example is developed to i...

  7. Client services for geriatric pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals. PMID:2646816

  8. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  9. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K m) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors

  10. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  11. RPC PET: Status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, M.; Blanco, A.; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fonte, P.; Lopes, L.

    2007-10-01

    The status of the resistive plate chamber (RPC)-PET technology for small animals is briefly reviewed and its sensitivity performance for human PET studied through Monte-Carlo simulations. The cost-effectiveness of these detectors and their very good timing characteristics open the possibility to build affordable Time of Flight (TOF)-PET systems with very large fields of view. Simulations suggest that the sensitivity of such systems for human whole-body screening, under reasonable assumptions, may exceed the present crystal-based PET technology by a factor up to 20.

  12. Extended suicide with a pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases. PMID:24051598

  13. A novel 18F-labeled two-helix scaffold protein for PET imaging of HER2-positive tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-helix scaffold proteins (∝ 5 kDa) against human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) have been discovered in our previous work. In this research we aimed to develop an 18F-labeled two-helix scaffold protein for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of HER2-positive tumors. An aminooxy-functionalized two-helix peptide (AO-MUT-DS) with high HER2 binding affinity was synthesized through conventional solid phase peptide synthesis. The purified linear peptide was cyclized by I2 oxidation to form a disulfide bridge. The cyclic peptide was then conjugated with a radiofluorination synthon, 4-18F-fluorobenzyl aldehyde (18F-FBA), through the aminooxy functional group at the peptide N terminus (30% yield, non-decay corrected). The binding affinities of the peptides were analyzed by Biacore analysis. Cell uptake assay of the resulting PET probe, 18F-FBO-MUT-DS, was performed at 37 C. 18F-FBO-MUT-DS with high specific activity (20-32 MBq/nmol, 88-140 μCi/μg, end of synthesis) was injected into mice xenograft model bearing SKOV3 tumor. MicroPET and biodistribution and metabolic stability studies were then conducted. Cell uptake assays showed high and specific cell uptake (∝12% applied activity at 1 h) by incubation of 18F-FBO-MUT-DS with HER2 high-expressing SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. The affinities (KD) of AO-MUT-DS and FBO-MUT-DS as tested by Biacore analysis were 2 and 1 nM, respectively. In vivo small animal PET demonstrated fast tumor targeting, high tumor accumulation, and good tumor to normal tissue contrast of 18F-FBO-MUT-DS. Biodistribution studies further revealed that the probe had excellent tumor uptake (6.9%ID/g at 1 h post-injection) and was cleared through both liver and kidneys. Co-injection of the probe with 500 μg of HER2 Affibody protein reduced the tumor uptake (6.9 vs 1.8%ID/g, p 18F-based PET probes. (orig.)

  14. PET/CT scanners: a hardware approach to image fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, David W; Beyer, Thomas; Blodgett, Todd M

    2003-07-01

    New technology that combines positron tomography with x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) is available from all major vendors of PET imaging equipment: CTI, Siemens, GE, Philips. Although not all vendors have made the same design choices as those described in this review all have in common that their high performance design places a commercial CT scanner in tandem with a commercial PET scanner. The level of physical integration is actually less than that of the original prototype design where the CT and PET components were mounted on the same rotating support. There will undoubtedly be a demand for PET/CT technology with a greater level of integration, and at a reduced cost. This may be achieved through the design of a scanner specifically for combined anatomical and functional imaging, rather than a design combining separate CT and PET scanners, as in the current approaches. By avoiding the duplication of data acquisition and image reconstruction functions, for example, a more integrated design should also allow cost savings over current commercial PET/CT scanners. The goal is then to design and build a device specifically for imaging the function and anatomy of cancer in the most optimal and effective way, without conceptualizing it as combined PET and CT. The development of devices specifically for imaging a particular disease (eg, cancer) differs from the conventional approach of, for example, an all-purpose anatomical imaging device such as a CT scanner. This new concept targets more of a disease management approach rather than the usual division into the medical specialties of radiology (anatomical imaging) and nuclear medicine (functional imaging). PMID:12931321

  15. Identification of Antiviral Agents Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Promoter from Extracts of Indonesian Marine Organisms by a Novel Cell-Based Screening Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuya Yamashita

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The current treatments of chronic hepatitis B (CHB face a limited choice of vaccine, antibody and antiviral agents. The development of additional antiviral agents is still needed for improvement of CHB therapy. In this study, we established a screening system in order to identify compounds inhibiting the core promoter activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV. We prepared 80 extracts of marine organisms from the coral reefs of Indonesia and screened them by using this system. Eventually, two extracts showed high inhibitory activity (>95% and low cytotoxicity (66% to 77%. Solvent fractionation, column chromatography and NMR analysis revealed that 3,5-dibromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy-phenol (compound 1 and 3,4,5-tribromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy-phenol (compound 2, which are classified as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, were identified as anti-HBV agents in the extracts. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HBV core promoter activity as well as HBV production from HepG2.2.15.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50 values of compounds 1 and 2 were 0.23 and 0.80 µM, respectively, while selectivity indexes of compound 1 and 2 were 18.2 and 12.8, respectively. These results suggest that our cell-based HBV core promoter assay system is useful to determine anti-HBV compounds, and that two PBDE compounds are expected to be candidates of lead compounds for the development of anti-HBV drugs.

  16. A new PET tracer specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Kashefi, Amir; He, Lina; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) expression could be a valuable tool for evaluation of patients with a variety of malignancies, and particularly for monitoring those undergoing antiangiogenic therapies that block VEGF/VEGFR-2 function. The aim of this study was to develop a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer. The D63AE64AE67A mutant of VEGF{sub 121} (VEGF{sub DEE}) was generated by recombinant DNA technology. VEGF{sub 121} and VEGF{sub DEE} were purified and conjugated with DOTA for {sup 64}Cu labeling. The DOTA conjugates were tested in vitro for VEGFR-2 specificity and functional activity. In vivo tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics of {sup 64}Cu-labeled VEGF{sub 121} and VEGF{sub DEE} were compared using an orthotopic 4T1 murine breast tumor model. Blocking experiments, biodistribution studies, and immunofluorescence staining were carried out to confirm the noninvasive imaging results. Cell binding assay demonstrated that VEGF{sub DEE} had about 20-fold lower VEGFR-1 binding affinity and only slightly lower VEGFR-2 binding affinity as compared with VEGF{sub 121}. MicroPET imaging studies revealed that both {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-VEGF{sub 121} and {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-VEGF{sub DEE} had rapid and prominent activity accumulation in VEGFR-2-expressing 4T1 tumors. The renal uptake of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-VEGF{sub DEE} was significantly lower than that of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-VEGF{sub 121} as rodent kidneys expressed high levels of VEGFR-1 based on immunofluorescence staining. Blocking experiments and biodistribution studies confirmed the VEGFR specificity of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-VEGF{sub DEE}. We have developed a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer, {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-VEGF{sub DEE}. It has comparable tumor targeting efficacy to {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-VEGF{sub 121} but much reduced renal toxicity. This tracer may be translated into the clinic for imaging tumor angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic treatment efficacy. (orig.)

  17. Cost-effectiveness of PET and PET/Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Hermansson, Ronnie; Hess, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    measure by means of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when considering the replacement of the standard regimen by a new diagnostic procedure. This article discusses economic assessments of PET and PET/computed tomography reported until mid-July 2014. Forty-seven studies on cancer and noncancer...

  18. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Jiliu; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  19. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D{sub 1} receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. [{sup 11}C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D{sub 2} receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D{sub 2} occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D{sub 2} receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D{sub 2}, dopamine D{sub 1} receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors have been studied with [{sup 11}C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [{sup 11}C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly

  20. Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  1. Get Set for a Pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, Bill

    1987-01-01

    Describes a game in which students deal with some of the factors involved in being a responsible pet owner. Includes a list of the materials needed for the game and provides the game board and the game pieces, along with a fold-out poster about neutering and spaying pets. (TW)

  2. Welfare assessment in pet rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, F.; Koene, P.; Beerda, B.

    2009-01-01

    One million pet rabbits are kept in The Netherlands, but there are no data available on their behaviour and welfare. This study seeks to assess the welfare of pet rabbits in Dutch households and is a first step in the development of a welfare assessment system. In an internet survey, housing systems

  3. Non-Target Effects of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP-Derived Double-Stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP Used in Honey Bee RNA Interference (RNAi Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis M. F. Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference has been frequently applied to modulate gene function in organisms where the production and maintenance of mutants is challenging, as in our model of study, the honey bee, Apis mellifera. A green fluorescent protein (GFP-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP is currently commonly used as control in honey bee RNAi experiments, since its gene does not exist in the A. mellifera genome. Although dsRNA-GFP is not expected to trigger RNAi responses in treated bees, undesirable effects on gene expression, pigmentation or developmental timing are often observed. Here, we performed three independent experiments using microarrays to examine the effect of dsRNA-GFP treatment (introduced by feeding on global gene expression patterns in developing worker bees. Our data revealed that the expression of nearly 1,400 genes was altered in response to dsRNA-GFP, representing around 10% of known honey bee genes. Expression changes appear to be the result of both direct off-target effects and indirect downstream secondary effects; indeed, there were several instances of sequence similarity between putative siRNAs generated from the dsRNA-GFP construct and genes whose expression levels were altered. In general, the affected genes are involved in important developmental and metabolic processes associated with RNA processing and transport, hormone metabolism, immunity, response to external stimulus and to stress. These results suggest that multiple dsRNA controls should be employed in RNAi studies in honey bees. Furthermore, any RNAi studies involving these genes affected by dsRNA-GFP in our studies should use a different dsRNA control.

  4. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  5. Preparation and biocompatibility of grafted functional β-cyclodextrin copolymers from the surface of PET films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan, E-mail: yan_jiang_72@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Hongwen [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Weiwei [College of Life Science, Agriculture and Forestry, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006, Heilongjiang (China); Tu, Shanshan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-08-01

    The hydrophobic inert surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film has limited its practical bioapplications, in which case, better biocompatibility should be achieved by surface modification. In this work, the copolymer of functional β-cyclodextrin derivatives and styrene grafted surfaces was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on initiator-immobilized PET. The structures, composition, properties, and surface morphology of the modified PET films were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that the surface of PET films was covered by a thick targeted copolymer layer, and the hydrophobic surface of PET was changed into an amphiphilic surface. The copolymer-grafted surfaces were also shown good biocompatibility on which SGC-7901 A549 and A549/DDP cells readily attached and proliferated, demonstrating that the functional copolymer-grafted PET films could be a promising alternative to biomaterials especially for tissue engineering. - Highlights: • The PET film was grafted by functional β-CD copolymers, which owns amphiphilicity. • The surface of grafted PET film by copolymers enhanced the cell adhesion and growth. • The biocompatible PET film may be used in tissue engineering and cell cultivation.

  6. Migration measurement and modelling from poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) into softdrinks and fruit juices in comparison with food simulants

    OpenAIRE

    Welle, Frank; Franz, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) bottles are widely used for beverages. Knowledge about the migration of organic compounds from the PET bottle wall into contact media is of interest especially when post-consumer recyclates are introduced into new PET bottles. Using migration theory the migration of a compound can be calculated if the concentration in the bottle wall is known. On the other hand, for any given specific migration limits or maximum target concentration for o...

  7. Evaluation of two novel {sup 64}Cu-labeled RGD peptide radiotracers for enhanced PET imaging of tumor integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Czerwinski, Andrzej; Valenzuela, Francisco [Peptides International, Inc., Louisville, KY (United States); Chakravarty, Rubel; Yang, Yunan; England, Christopher G. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Our goal was to demonstrate that suitably derivatized monomeric RGD peptide-based PET tracers, targeting integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3}, may offer advantages in image contrast, time for imaging, and low uptake in nontarget tissues. Two cyclic RGDfK derivatives, (PEG){sub 2}-c(RGDfK) and PEG{sub 4}-SAA{sub 4}-c(RGDfK), were constructed and conjugated to NOTA for {sup 64}Cu labeling. Their integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3}-binding properties were determined via a competitive cell binding assay. Mice bearing U87MG tumors were intravenously injected with each of the {sup 64}Cu-labeled peptides, and PET scans were acquired during the first 30 min, and 2 and 4 h after injection. Blocking and ex vivo biodistribution studies were carried out to validate the PET data and confirm the specificity of the tracers. The IC{sub 50} values of NOTA-(PEG){sub 2}-c(RGDfK) and NOTA-PEG{sub 4}-SAA{sub 4}-c(RGDfK) were 444 ± 41 nM and 288 ± 66 nM, respectively. Dynamic PET data of {sup 64}Cu-NOTA-(PEG){sub 2}-c(RGDfK) and {sup 64}Cu-NOTA-PEG{sub 4}-SAA{sub 4}-c(RGDfK) showed similar circulation t{sub 1/2} and peak tumor uptake of about 4 %ID/g for both tracers. Due to its marked hydrophilicity, {sup 64}Cu-NOTA-PEG{sub 4}-SAA{sub 4}-c(RGDfK) provided faster clearance from tumor and normal tissues yet maintained excellent tumor-to-background ratios. Static PET scans at later time-points corroborated the enhanced excretion of the tracer, especially from abdominal organs. Ex vivo biodistribution and receptor blocking studies confirmed the accuracy of the PET data and the integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3}-specificity of the peptides. Our two novel RGD-based radiotracers with optimized pharmacokinetic properties allowed fast, high-contrast PET imaging of tumor-associated integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3}. These tracers may facilitate the imaging of abdominal malignancies, normally precluded by high background uptake. (orig.)

  8. Role of PET and PET/CT in the assessment of response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    noninvasive, whole-body imaging modality can even surpass biopsy by detecting previously unknown tumor sites (e.g. detection of bone marrow metastases in the spine after a normal iliac crest bone marrow biospy). New imaging probes like tumor-specific peptides targeting receptors or antigenic sites may reach (nearly) similar specificity as a tissue specimen taken for histological analysis. Clinical results: 18F-FDG PET has been used extensively in monitoring response to chemotherapy in lymphoma, lung cancer, breast cancer and colorectal cancer. In patients with aggressive NHL, 18FFDG PET provides a more accurate response classification than International Workshop Criteria (IWC) alone3. In the revised response criteria for malignant lymphoma, 18F-FDG PET is recommended as essential for the assessment of response in diffuse large B-cell NHL (DLBCL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma. 18F-FDG PET is useful for monitoring chemotherapy response in lung cancer and PET/CT has high value in the assessment of response to induction chemotherapy in stage IIIA-N2 disease. A multicentre study has shown that a simple visual assessment of mediastinal lymph node status on the PET scan predicted outcome whereas CT did not. In breast cancer patients, 18F-FDG PET was able to predict response to chemotherapy as early as after the first course. Conventional imaging (CI) has been found to be inferior to 18F-FDG PET in predicting outcome after completion of chemotherapy with positive and negative predictive values of 93% and 84% for 18F-FDG PET, versus 85% and 59%, respectively for CI. Systemic chemotherapy has been shown to double the survival of patients with advanced colorectal cancer as compared to untreated controls. Early response assessment of this highly potent and potentially toxic chemotherapy is necessary in order to increase its effectiveness without causing too much economic burden. 18F-FDG PET and 18F-FU PET can help oncologists and surgeons better manage colorectal cancer patients. In sharp

  9. Neuropsychiatry: PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional brain imaging with PET and SPECT have a definitive and well established role in the investigation of a variety of conditions such as dementia, epilepsy and drug addiction. With these methods it is possible to detect early rCBF (regional Cerebral Blood Flow) changes seen in dementia (even before clinical symptoms) and differentiate Alzheimer's disease from other dementias by means of the rCBF pattern change. 18-F-FDG PET imaging is a useful tool in partial epilepsy because both rCBF and brain metabolism are compromised at the epileptogenic focus. During the seizure, rCBF dramatically increases locally. Using SPECT it is possible to locate such foci with 97% accuracy. In drug addiction, particularly with cocaine, functional imaging has proven to be very sensitive to detect brain flow and metabolism derangement early in the course of this condition. These findings are important in many ways: prognostic value, they are used as a powerful reinforcement tool and to monitor functional recovery with rehabilitation. There are many other conditions in which functional brain imaging is of importance such as acute stroke treatment assessment, trauma rehabilitation and in psychiatric and abnormal movement diseases specially with the development of receptor imaging (au)

  10. Live-cell luciferase assay of drug resistant cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    To date, multiplexing cell-based assay is essential for high-throughput screening of molecular targets. Measuring multiple parameters of a single sample increases consistency and decrease time and cost of assay. Functional assay of living cell is useful as a first step of multiplexing assay, because live-cell assay allows following second assay using cell lysate or stained cell. However, live-cell assay of drug resistant cells that are highly activated of drug efflux mechanisms is sometimes u...

  11. Impact of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT on staging and irradiation of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paskeviciute, Brigita; Boelling, Tobias; Brinkmann, Markus; Rudykina, Ganna; Ernst, Iris; Willich, Normann; Koenemann, Stefan [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Muenster (Germany); Stegger, Lars; Schober, Otmar; Weckesser, Matthias [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Muenster (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    To investigate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on planning of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, a total of 36 patients with LARC underwent a retroprospective PET/CT study for radiotherapy-planning purposes. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined in a retrospective analysis by a blinded reader. The hypothetical boost volume was defined primarily on CT alone, and afterwards on the fused PET/CT dataset. The CT- and PET/CT-based GTVs were quantitatively compared and percentage of overlap (OV%) was calculated and analyzed. The impact of PET/CT on radiation treatment planning and overall patient management was evaluated. PET/CT-GTVs were smaller than CT-GTVs (p < 0.05). PET/CT imaging resulted in a change of overall management for three patients (8 %). In 16 of 35 patients (46 %), PET/CT resulted in a need for modification of the usual target volumes (CT-PTV) because of detection of a geographic miss. FDG-PET/CT had significant impact on radiotherapy planning and overall treatment of patients with LARC. (orig.)

  12. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  13. PET i prekirurgisk evaluering av epilepsi

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    PET in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Background: Today, at Rikshospitalet PET medical center, FDG is used as a tracer in the PET investigations during the presurgical evaluation of patients with epilepsy. The purpose of this paper is to see if FGD-PET gives additional information compared with EEG and MR. Another purpose was to find out whether there is a need for new ligands, and which ones. Material and methods: All epilepsy order forms to FDG-PET at Rikshopitalet, during 2007...

  14. Scintillation crystals required for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In PET, inorganic scintillator crystals are used to record γ rays produced by the annihilation of positrons emitted by injected tracers. The ultimate performance of the camera is strongly tied to both the physical and scintillation properties of the crystals. For this reason, researchers have investigated virtually all known scintillator crystals for possible use in PET. Despite this massive research effort, only a few different scintillators have been found that have a suitable use. Two recently developed scintillator crystals (LSO and GSO), appears to surpass all previously used materials in most respects and promises to be the basis for the next generation of PET cameras. (authors)

  15. PET Imaging of Integrin αVβ3 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambros J. Beer, Horst Kessler, Hans-Jürgen Wester, Markus Schwaiger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PET imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression has been studied intensely by the academia and recently also by the industry. Imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression is of great potential value, as the integrin αvβ3 is a key player in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Therefore PET imaging of this target might be a suitable in-vivo biomarker of angiogenesis and metastatic potential of tumors. In this manuscript, the various strategies for PET imaging of the integrin αvβ3 will be summarized, including monomeric and multimeric radiolabelled RGD peptides and nanoparticles. While most experiments have been performed using preclinical tumor models, more and more clinical results on PET imaging of αvβ3 expression are available and will be discussed in detail. However, while a multitude of radiotracer strategies have been successfully evaluated for PET imaging of αvβ3, the ultimate clinical value of this new imaging biomarker still has to be evaluated in large clinical trials.

  16. XPS characterisation of plasma treated and zinc oxide coated PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At first, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of reference and carbon dioxide plasma treated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were carried out. Significant chemical modifications were outlined in the treated PET surface in comparison with the reference one. The formation of new oxygenated groups was evidenced. These modifications heighten the level of interactions between the polymer substrate and the deposited coating. In a second stage, zinc oxide thin films were elaborated by r.f. magnetron sputtering from a ceramic target and with a reactive gas (mixture of argon-1% oxygen) under optimised conditions on CO2 plasma treated PET. The interfacial chemistry between the plasma treated PET and the zinc oxide was also studied by XPS. The line shape changes in the high-resolution core level spectra of carbon C1s, oxygen O1s, and zinc (Zn2p3/2, Zn3p), with the progressive deposition of zinc oxide coatings being recorded. The obtained spectra were fitted to mixed Gaussian-Lorentzian components using XPS CASA software. An interaction scheme between the zinc oxide thin layer and its polymer substrate, in the first stage of deposition, was proposed and checked by corroborating the findings of the different XPS spectra and their decompositions. It suggests the formation of Zn-O-C complexes at the interface, which are promoted by an electron transfer from zinc to oxygen in oxygenated species, mainly alcohol groups, generated by the CO2 plasma treatment of PET.

  17. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  18. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy.

  19. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with 18F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy

  20. PET/TAC in Oncology; PET/TAC en Oncologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez V, A.M. [Especialista en Medicina Nuclear, Profa. Depto. Radiologia de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    From this presentation of PET-TAC in oncology the following advantages on the conventional PET are obtained: 1. More short study and stadium in one session. 2. It adds the information of both techniques. 3. Better localization of leisure: affected organ, stadium change (neck, mediastinum, abdomen). 4. Reduction of false positive (muscle, brown fat, atelectasis, pneumonias, intestine, urinary vials, etc.). 5. Reduction of negative false. 6. Reduction of not conclusive. 7. More understandable for other specialists. 8. Biopsies guide. 9. Planning radiotherapy.

  1. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG PET/CT is able to detect active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and can be helpful for staging and assessing therapy response, but no standard interpretation criteria have been proposed for the evaluation of FDG PET/CT in MM. A group of Italian nuclear medicine physicians and haematologists met to propose new visual interpretation criteria to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe; IMPeTUs) and the reproducibility of these criteria was tested. This Italian multicentre protocol was set up as a subprotocol of EMN02, an international prospective multicentre trial of the European Myeloma Network. The criteria were agreed at multidisciplinary consensus meetings. They include a description of the metabolic state of the bone marrow (BM), number and site of focal PET-positive lesions, the number of osteolytic lesions, and the presence and site of extramedullary disease, paramedullary disease and fractures. A visual degree of uptake was defined for the target lesion and extramedullary lesions according to modified Deauville criteria. MM patients who had undergone FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET-0), after induction (PET-AI) and at the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were enrolled. The patients had been prospectively enrolled in EMN02 and their PET scans were a posteriori reinterpreted in a blinded independent central review process managed by WIDEN registered. Five expert nuclear medicine physicians scored the scans according to the new criteria. A case was considered read when four out of the five reviewers completed the report. Concordance among reviewers on different metrics was calculated using Krippendorff's alpha coefficient. A total of 17 consecutive patients were enrolled. On PET-0, the alpha coefficients for the BM score, the score for the hottest focal lesion, the number of focal lesions and the number of lytic lesions were 0.33 and 0.47, 0.40 and 0.32, respectively. On PET-AI, the alpha coefficients

  2. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Hematology, Bologna (Italy); Versari, Annibale [IRCSS, Nuclear Medicine, S. Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Chauvie, Stephane [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Cuneo (Italy); Bianchi, Andrea [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Cuneo (Italy); Rensi, Marco [AOU S.Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Udine (Italy); Bello, Marilena [AO Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Nuclear Medicine, Torino (Italy); Gallamini, Andrea [A Lacassagne Cancer Center, Research and Innovation Department, Nice (France); Patriarca, Francesca [Udine University, Hematologic Clinic, Udine (Italy); Gay, Francesca [University of Torino, Myeloma Unit, Division of Hematology, Torino (Italy); Gamberi, Barbara [IRCCS, Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    FDG PET/CT is able to detect active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and can be helpful for staging and assessing therapy response, but no standard interpretation criteria have been proposed for the evaluation of FDG PET/CT in MM. A group of Italian nuclear medicine physicians and haematologists met to propose new visual interpretation criteria to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe; IMPeTUs) and the reproducibility of these criteria was tested. This Italian multicentre protocol was set up as a subprotocol of EMN02, an international prospective multicentre trial of the European Myeloma Network. The criteria were agreed at multidisciplinary consensus meetings. They include a description of the metabolic state of the bone marrow (BM), number and site of focal PET-positive lesions, the number of osteolytic lesions, and the presence and site of extramedullary disease, paramedullary disease and fractures. A visual degree of uptake was defined for the target lesion and extramedullary lesions according to modified Deauville criteria. MM patients who had undergone FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET-0), after induction (PET-AI) and at the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were enrolled. The patients had been prospectively enrolled in EMN02 and their PET scans were a posteriori reinterpreted in a blinded independent central review process managed by WIDEN registered. Five expert nuclear medicine physicians scored the scans according to the new criteria. A case was considered read when four out of the five reviewers completed the report. Concordance among reviewers on different metrics was calculated using Krippendorff's alpha coefficient. A total of 17 consecutive patients were enrolled. On PET-0, the alpha coefficients for the BM score, the score for the hottest focal lesion, the number of focal lesions and the number of lytic lesions were 0.33 and 0.47, 0.40 and 0.32, respectively. On PET-AI, the alpha coefficients

  3. PET/CT in cancer: moderate sample sizes may suffice to justify replacement of a regional gold standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Bouchelouche, Kirsten;

    2009-01-01

    of metastasized prostate cancer. RESULTS: An added value in accuracy of PET/CT in adjacent areas can outweigh a downsized target level of accuracy in the gold standard region, justifying smaller sample sizes. CONCLUSIONS: If PET/CT provides an accuracy benefit in adjacent regions, then sample sizes can be reduced...

  4. 10 "Poison Pills" for Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health 10 "Poison Pills" for Pets Anyone who takes medication prescribed ... of all phone calls to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) are about human medications. Your ...

  5. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect the cat's immune system. This puts your cat at risk of other infections that may be spread to humans. Feed your pet only commercially prepared food and treats. Animals can get sick from undercooked ...

  6. Disaster Preparedness for Your Pet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do not let your pet interact with other animals Use disinfectant to clean the cage and litter box Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease found in the urine of infected animals that can cause kidney damage and affect other ...

  7. Innovations in PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin Klausen, T; Høgild Keller, S; Vinter Olesen, O;

    2012-01-01

    impressive anatomical details. PET/CT designs are facing many challenges such as the conversion of CT numbers to attenuation coefficients, giving rise to artefacts due to the presence of high Zeff material. Patient motion during scans degrades image quality and subsequent analysis, and is a challenge......There has been a longstanding interest in positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with computed tomography (CT). Mostly because of the lack of structural information in PET which makes it difficult to assess the precise location of tissue with metabolic uptake, whereas CT can provide...... especially as spatial resolution improves. Software based image fusion remains a complex issue outside the brain. State of the art image quality in a modern PET/CT system includes incorporation of point spread function (PSF) and time-of-flight (TOF) information into the reconstruction leading to the high...

  8. Selecting Safe Pets (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's ... pets. If you're interested in rabbits, the House Rabbit Society is an excellent resource — visit its ...

  9. Preventing Ticks on Your Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tickborne diseases abroad Borrelia miyamotoi Borrelia mayonii Preventing ticks on your pets Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... your cats without first consulting your veterinarian! Kill Ticks on Dogs A pesticide product that kills ticks ...

  10. PET/CT and PET - application in pediatric oncology; PET/CT und PET - Einsatz in der paediatrischen Onkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzius, C.; Lang, K.; Schober, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Wormanns, D. [Inst. fuer klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Vormoor, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin - Paediatrische Haematologie und Onkologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    PET-CT is a new imaging technology with a high capability to improve oncologic imaging. Introduction into clinical practise started approximately 3 years ago. Consequently, the available literature data are preliminary. There are no studies concerning PET-CT in pediatric patients. Nevertheless, it can already be supposed that the synthesis of structural and metabolic information improves the accuracy of staging and has the realistic potential to change patient management in a relevant percentage rate in pediatric patients. In this article, the advantages and special features of the application of PET-CT in young oncologic patients are pointed out. Potential clinical applications of PET-CT in this patient group include Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Ewing tumors, osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas and neuroblastomas. (orig.)

  11. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin; PET y PET/CT en tumor de origen indeterminado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J.R. [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  12. Rise of the machines : cyclotrons and radiopharmaceuticals in the PET-CT-MR golden age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One particularly inspiring narrative in the evolution of medical imaging over 35 years begins with the introduction of quassi-routine production of 18F, enabled by advances in reliability of (medical) cyclotrons; invention of the 'molecule of the century' [18F]FOG and its robust synthesis; comprehending betrayal of major tumour-cell types by their glucose avidity; astounding advances in PET scanners (recently, time-of-flight); and marriage of anatomic with functional 3-D imaging as PET/CT or (recently) PET/MR. Though the explosion in PET is identified historically with diagnostic oncology plus quantitation of nuclear medicine, plus the collateral leverage of advances in CT and MR, other potentially transformative opportunities (pre-diagnosis or quantifying treatment response) are emerging in dementia and diabetes-as exemplars of PET-addressable mass afflictions-driven by advances in specificity/sensitivity of targeting molecules. PET delivers femto-M functional sensitivity (e.g.; receptor-targeting)-several magnitude-orders of narrow-context superiority over MR or CT-exemplified by the rapid rise of solid-targetry metallo-PET (64Cu, 89Zr), and concomitantly, preclinical radioimmuno micro-PET/CT/SPECT imaging. Though [11C] PET has elucidated brain, prostate and other cell +/- tumour mechanisms, realistic clinical rollout demands longer halflife [18F]-labelling. [18F] innovations beyond [18F]FDG elucidate numerous metabolisms, including choline, hypoxia, apoptosis and amino-acid, and notably will soon provide a routine-clinical [18F]-alternative to [11 C] based beta-amyloid dementia diagnosis. Frontier PET is constrained by cost/dose, shackled to 'twentieth century' technologies-cyclotron, hotcell and synthesis unit. Example is [18F] bone scintigraphy; acknowledged as clinically superior to [99mTc]MOP, its widespread implementation awaits cheaper isotope, accessible PET/CT scanners, and maybe 'true' shortage of [99mTc]. Generator-sourced 68 Ga-PET is

  13. PET/TAC in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From this presentation of PET-TAC in oncology the following advantages on the conventional PET are obtained: 1. More short study and stadium in one session. 2. It adds the information of both techniques. 3. Better localization of leisure: affected organ, stadium change (neck, mediastinum, abdomen). 4. Reduction of false positive (muscle, brown fat, atelectasis, pneumonias, intestine, urinary vials, etc.). 5. Reduction of negative false. 6. Reduction of not conclusive. 7. More understandable for other specialists. 8. Biopsies guide. 9. Planning radiotherapy

  14. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (874), P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogen, Frank J.A. van den [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A.W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Slootweg, Piet J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (Node{sub CT}) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PET{sub VIS}), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PET{sub SUV}), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both Node{sub CT} and PET{sub VIS} showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PET{sub VIS}. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PET{sub SUV} was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  15. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system. PMID:23493530

  16. FDG-PET/CT response evaluation during EGFR-TKI treatment in patients with NSCLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthijs; H; van; Gool; Tjeerd; S; Aukema; Koen; J; Hartemink; Renato; A; Valdés; Olmos; Houke; M; Klomp; Harm; van; Tinteren

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years,[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography acquired together with low dose computed tomography(FDG-PET/CT)has proven its role as a staging modality in patients with non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).The purpose of this review was to present the evidence to use FDG-PET/CT for response evaluation in patients with NSCLC,treated with epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors(TKI).All published articles from 1November 2003 to 1 November 2013 reporting on 18FFDG-PET response evaluation during EGFR-TKI treatment in patients with NSCLC were collected.In total 7studies,including data of 210 patients were eligible for analyses.Our report shows that FDG-PET/CT responseduring EGFR-TKI therapy has potential in targeted treatment for NSCLC.FDG-PET/CT response is associated with clinical and radiologic response and with survival.Furthermore FDG-PET/CT response monitoring can be performed as early as 1-2 wk after initiation of EGFR-TKI treatment.Patients with substantial decrease of metabolic activity during EGFR-TKI treatment will probably benefit from continued treatment.If metabolic response does not occur within the first weeks of EGFR-TKI treatment,patients may be spared(further)unnecessary toxicity of ineffective treatment.Refining FDG-PET response criteria may help the clinician to decide on continuation or discontinuation of targeted treatment.

  17. PET AND PET-CT: PHYSICAL PRINCIPLE AND MEDICAL APLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Rusu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a noninvasive imaging method that can “see” the metabolisms inside the living cells. It involves the acquisition of functional images based on the detection of radiation coming from the positron emission of a radiotracer administered to the patient. This radiotracer can be a metabolic analog, like is the case of glucose analog 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG, the most commonly used PET radiotracer. PET images of the human body are used to evaluate a variety of diseases, most often to detect cancer and to examine the effects of cancer therapy by characterizing cell viability and biochemical changes in the cell. It is potentially useful in cancer imaging because the increased metabolism of tumor cells leads to increased uptake of glucose, and, therefore, uptake of 18FDG, also. PET-CT is the fusion of functional and anatomic information acquired almost simultaneously, that lets us see both the structural anatomy and the functional data on the same image. They complete each other: if PET scan is powerful in evaluating the functional characteristics of the tissues, CT is a powerful structural resolution imaging method. The highly sensitive PET scan detects the metabolic signal of actively growing cancer cells in the body and the CT scan provides a detailed picture of the internal anatomy that reveals sites, size and shape of cancer tissue. Alone, each imaging test has particular benefits and limitations but when the results of PET and CT scans are "fused" together, the combined image provides complete information on cancer location and metabolism.

  18. Longitudinal monitoring adipose-derived stem cell survival by PET imaging hexadecyl-4-124I-iodobenzoate in rat myocardial infarction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We developed a safe, simple and appropriate stem cell labeling method with 124I-HIB. • ADSC survival can be monitored with PET in MI model via direct labeling. • Tracking of ADSC labeled with 124I-HIB was possible for 3 days in MI model using PET. • ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by 124I-HIB labeling. • Survival of ADSC in living bodies can be longitudinally tracked with PET imaging. - Abstract: This study aims to monitor how the change of cell survival of transplanted adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) responds to myocardial infarction (MI) via the hexadecyl-4-124I-iodobenzoate (124I-HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo. Stem cells have shown the potential to improve cardiac function after MI. However, monitoring of the fate of transplanted stem cells at target sites is still unclear. Rat ADSCs were labeled with 124I-HIB, and radiolabeled ADSCs were transplanted into the myocardium of normal and MI model. In the group of 124I-HIB-labeled ADSC transplantation, in vivo imaging was performed using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for 9 days. Twenty-one days post-transplantation, histopathological analysis and apoptosis assay were performed. ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by 124I-HIB labeling. In vivo tracking of the 124I-HIB-labeled ADSCs was possible for 9 and 3 days in normal and MI model, respectively. Apoptosis of transplanted cells increased in the MI model compared than that in normal model. We developed a direct labeling agent, 124I-HIB, and first tried to longitudinally monitor transplanted stem cell to MI. This approach may provide new insights on the roles of stem cell monitoring in living bodies for stem cell therapy from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials

  19. Longitudinal monitoring adipose-derived stem cell survival by PET imaging hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate in rat myocardial infarction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pandya, Darpan [Department of Molecular Medicine, BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Noh Won; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Eom, Ki Dong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Wha [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joo Hyun [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine, BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Jin, E-mail: yjlee@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We developed a safe, simple and appropriate stem cell labeling method with {sup 124}I-HIB. • ADSC survival can be monitored with PET in MI model via direct labeling. • Tracking of ADSC labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB was possible for 3 days in MI model using PET. • ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. • Survival of ADSC in living bodies can be longitudinally tracked with PET imaging. - Abstract: This study aims to monitor how the change of cell survival of transplanted adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) responds to myocardial infarction (MI) via the hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate ({sup 124}I-HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo. Stem cells have shown the potential to improve cardiac function after MI. However, monitoring of the fate of transplanted stem cells at target sites is still unclear. Rat ADSCs were labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB, and radiolabeled ADSCs were transplanted into the myocardium of normal and MI model. In the group of {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSC transplantation, in vivo imaging was performed using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for 9 days. Twenty-one days post-transplantation, histopathological analysis and apoptosis assay were performed. ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. In vivo tracking of the {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSCs was possible for 9 and 3 days in normal and MI model, respectively. Apoptosis of transplanted cells increased in the MI model compared than that in normal model. We developed a direct labeling agent, {sup 124}I-HIB, and first tried to longitudinally monitor transplanted stem cell to MI. This approach may provide new insights on the roles of stem cell monitoring in living bodies for stem cell therapy from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials.

  20. Fluorine-18 labeled tracers for PET studies in the neurosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    This chapter focuses on fluorine-18, the positron emitter with the longest half-life, the lowest positron energy and probably, the most challenging chemistry. The incorporation of F-18 into organic compounds presents many challenges, including: the need to synthesize and purify the compound within a 2--3 hour time frame; the limited number of labeled precursor molecules; the need to work on a microscale; and the need to produce radiotracers which are chemically and radiochemically pure, sterile and pyrogen-free, and suitable for intravenous injection. The PET method and F-18 labeling of organic molecules are described followed by highlights of the applications of F-18 labeled compounds in the neurosciences and neuropharmacology. It is important to emphasize the essential and pivotal role that organic synthesis has played in the progression of the PET field over the past twenty years from one in which only a handful of institutions possessed the instrumentation and staff to carry out research to the present-day situation where there are more than 200 PET centers worldwide. During this period PET has become an important scientific tool in the neurosciences, cardiology and oncology. It is important to point out that PET is by no means a mature field. The fact that a hundreds of different F-18 labeled compounds have been developed but only a few possess the necessary selectivity and sensitivity in vivo to track a specific biochemical process illustrates this and underscores a major difficulty in radiotracer development, namely the selection of priority structures for synthesis and the complexities of the interactions between chemical compounds and living systems. New developments in rapid organic synthesis are needed in order to investigate new molecular targets and to improve the quantitative nature of PET experiments.

  1. Fluorine-18 labeled tracers for PET studies in the neurosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter focuses on fluorine-18, the positron emitter with the longest half-life, the lowest positron energy and probably, the most challenging chemistry. The incorporation of F-18 into organic compounds presents many challenges, including: the need to synthesize and purify the compound within a 2--3 hour time frame; the limited number of labeled precursor molecules; the need to work on a microscale; and the need to produce radiotracers which are chemically and radiochemically pure, sterile and pyrogen-free, and suitable for intravenous injection. The PET method and F-18 labeling of organic molecules are described followed by highlights of the applications of F-18 labeled compounds in the neurosciences and neuropharmacology. It is important to emphasize the essential and pivotal role that organic synthesis has played in the progression of the PET field over the past twenty years from one in which only a handful of institutions possessed the instrumentation and staff to carry out research to the present-day situation where there are more than 200 PET centers worldwide. During this period PET has become an important scientific tool in the neurosciences, cardiology and oncology. It is important to point out that PET is by no means a mature field. The fact that a hundreds of different F-18 labeled compounds have been developed but only a few possess the necessary selectivity and sensitivity in vivo to track a specific biochemical process illustrates this and underscores a major difficulty in radiotracer development, namely the selection of priority structures for synthesis and the complexities of the interactions between chemical compounds and living systems. New developments in rapid organic synthesis are needed in order to investigate new molecular targets and to improve the quantitative nature of PET experiments

  2. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Aide, Nicolas; Visser, Eric P.; Lheureux, Stéphanie; Heutte, Natacha; Szanda, Istvan; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the num...

  3. PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buonincontri, Guido, E-mail: gb396@cam.ac.uk [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Box 65, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Sawiak, Stephen J. [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Box 65, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T. [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Box 65, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-21

    Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment.

  4. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based (CB) PET. CBPET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CBPET in operation than cPET in the USA. CBPET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  5. PET and PET/CT in oncology: the key of diagnostic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation authors present use of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology. This lecture is divided to the following parts: (1) Assessment of treatment response; (2) Treatment monitoring by PET: clinical examples; (3) PET for early response assessment; (4) Use of PET in Radiotherapy planning

  6. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  7. PET for Staging of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.H.Hoelscher

    2004-01-01

    FDG-PET is of clinical value especially for detection of distant metastases or recurrent esophageal cancer. For the staging of primary tumor or locoregional lymph node metastasis PET is currently not suitable.

  8. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian;

    2013-01-01

    described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision......Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... Medicine & PET at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen we installed an integrated PET/MRI in December 2011. Here, we describe our first clinical PET/MR cases and discuss some of the areas within oncology where we envision promising future application of integrated PET/MR imaging in clinical routine. Cases...

  9. 7 CFR 500.10 - Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.10 Pets. Pets brought upon USNA property must have proper vaccinations and, except assistance trained animals, must be kept on leash at...

  10. Children's drawings and attachment to pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, A H; Kidd, R M

    1995-08-01

    To help confirm the concept that distances placed between the self and other figures in children's drawings represent emotional distances, 242 pet-owning and 35 nonpet-owning kindergartners through eighth graders drew pictures of themselves, a pet, and/or a family member. Owners drew pets significantly closer than family-figures although the younger the child, the greater the distance between self and pet. Older children drew themselves holding pets significantly more often, but younger children placed the family-figure between the self and the pet significantly more often. There were no significant gender differences in self-figure/pet-figure distances, but cats, dogs, caged animals, and farm animals were placed significantly closer to self-figures than were fish. Over-all, owners were clearly emotionally closer to pets than to family members, but nonowners were as close emotionally to family members as were owners. PMID:7501763

  11. 18 F-FDG PET/CT 确定局部晚期非小细胞肺癌加量放疗靶区的可行性%A feasibility study for boost target delineation using 18 F-FDG PET/CT in local advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高昂; 王世江; 付正; 孙新东; 于金明; 孟雪

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether during-radiotherapy or post-radiotherapy 18 F-FDG uptake locations within tumour can be identified by a pre-radiotherapy scan for non-small cell lung cancer,and to explore the optimal biological sub-volume of the primary tumor for dose escalation.Methods 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed at pre-radio-therapy,during-radiotherapy (40 Gy)or post-radiotherapy.The region of interests were auto-delineated using the 40%-70% maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax )thresholds using pre-radiotherapy scan.Overlap fractions between pre-radiotherapy scan and during-radiotherapy or post-radiotherapy scan were calculated.Then,a Spearman correlation was used to analyze the correlations between the volumes of the region of interests and sensitivities of radiotherapy. Results The 50% SUVmax-delineated region of interests had large overlap fractions with the 40% SUVmax-delineated and manual-delineated regions of high uptake at during-radiotherapy,with the values being (74.3 ±15.9)% and (84.4 ±15.3)%,respectively.The overlap fractions of 50% SUVmax-delineated region of interests and the 80% SUVmax-delineated regions of high uptake at post-radiotherapy were more than 72%.The volume of 50% SUVmax-delineated region of interests was smaller than the gross tumor volume (GTV),with the value of being (29.4 ±12.3)%.However, the 50% SUVmax-delineated region of interests had no correlations with the sensitivities of radiotherapy.Conclusion A 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan at pre-radiotherapy can identify the high 18 F-FDG uptake regions at during-radiotherapy and post-radiotherapy.The 50% SUVmax-delineated volume may be a suitable region for dose boosting.%目的:评价局部晚期非小细胞肺癌患者,放疗前18 F-FDG 高代谢区能否识别放疗中及放疗后高代谢区,并探讨局部加量的最佳生物学亚靶区。方法在放疗前、放疗中(40 Gy)和/或放疗后,分别行18 F-FDG PET/CT扫描。利用放疗前原发灶内40

  12. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions...

  13. PET imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumours with {sup 68}Ga-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Franssen, Gerben M.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Yim, Cheng-Bin [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Utrecht University, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schuit, Robert C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Luurtsema, Gert [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Liu, Shuang [Purdue University, School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Due to the restricted expression of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} in tumours, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-binding characteristics of {sup 68}Ga-labelled monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric RGD peptides were determined and compared with their {sup 111}In-labelled counterparts. A monomeric (E-c(RGDfK)), a dimeric (E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}) and a tetrameric (E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2}) RGD peptide were synthesised, conjugated with DOTA and radiolabelled with {sup 68}Ga. In vitro {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-binding characteristics were determined in a competitive binding assay. In vivo {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeting characteristics of the compounds were assessed in mice with subcutaneously growing SK-RC-52 xenografts. In addition, microPET images were acquired using a microPET/CT scanner. The IC{sub 50} values for the Ga(III)-labelled DOTA-E-c(RGDfK), DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} and DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2} were 23.9 {+-} 1.22, 8.99 {+-} 1.20 and 1.74 {+-} 1.18 nM, respectively, and were similar to those of the In(III)-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides (26.6 {+-} 1.15, 3.34 {+-} 1.16 and 1.80 {+-} 1.37 nM, respectively). At 2 h post-injection, tumour uptake of the {sup 68}Ga-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides (3.30 {+-} 0.30, 5.24 {+-} 0.27 and 7.11 {+-} 0.67%ID/g, respectively) was comparable to that of their {sup 111}In-labelled counterparts (2.70 {+-} 0.29, 5.61 {+-} 0.85 and 7.32 {+-} 2.45%ID/g, respectively). PET scans were in line with the biodistribution data. On all PET scans, the tumour could be clearly visualised. The integrin affinity and the tumour uptake followed the order of DOTA-tetramer > DOTA-dimer > DOTA-monomer. The {sup 68}Ga-labelled tetrameric RGD peptide has excellent characteristics for imaging of {alpha}{sub v} {beta}{sub 3} expression with PET. (orig.)

  14. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  15. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  16. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  17. The rise and fall of PET and PET/CT. A German perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET is being considered a diagnostic commodity in clinical practice worldwide and thus receives increasing attention by health insurances and governmental organizations. In Germany, however, neither PET nor PET/CT are subject to reimbursement. This renders clinical PET and PET/CT imaging a challenge both in general hospital environment and in private practice. This article describes briefly these challenges, which are not solely related to turf battles and associated costs. (orig.)

  18. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on th

  19. 36 CFR 13.1234 - Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 13.1234 Section 13.1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... § 13.1234 Pets. Possessing a pet in the BCDA is prohibited....

  20. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E;

    2014-01-01

    be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...

  1. Saying Goodbye: Pet Loss and Its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Thelma

    2005-01-01

    Pets can be loyal, loving, and entertaining members of a family. Their deaths are generally experienced as painful losses by the people who love them, even though the grief experience is often culturally disenfranchised. In this manuscript, we discuss the role that pets can play in a person's life; the effects that pet loss can have on the people…

  2. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  3. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called “diabodies”, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  4. F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Hellwig, Dirk [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Kremp, Stephanie [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Grgic, Aleksandar [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Groeschel, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine V, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Kirsch, Carl-Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Nestle, Ursula [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Clinic for Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Freiburg (Germany); Ruebe, Christian, E-mail: christian.ruebe@uks.eu [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The integration of fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the process of radiotherapy (RT) planning of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may improve diagnostic accuracy and minimize interobserver variability compared with target volume definition solely based on computed tomography. Furthermore, irradiating only FDG-PET-positive findings and omitting elective nodal regions may allow dose escalation by treating smaller volumes. The aim of this prospective pilot trial was to evaluate the therapeutic safety of FDG-PET-based RT treatment planning with an autocontour-derived delineation of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stages II-III inoperable NSCLC, and simultaneous, platinum-based radiochemotherapy was indicated. FDG-PET and computed tomography acquisitions in RT treatment planning position were coregistered. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the FDG-PET-defined primary tumor, which was autodelineated with a source-to-background algorithm, plus FDG-PET-positive lymph node stations. Limited by dose restrictions for normal tissues, prescribed total doses were in the range of 66.6 to 73.8 Gy. The primary endpoint was the rate of out-of-field isolated nodal recurrences (INR). Results: As per intent to treat, 32 patients received radiochemotherapy. In 15 of these patients, dose escalation above 66.6 Gy was achieved. No Grade 4 toxicities occurred. After a median follow-up time of 27.2 months, the estimated median survival time was 19.3 months. During the observation period, one INR was observed in 23 evaluable patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET-confined target volume definition in radiochemotherapy of NSCLC, based on a contrast-oriented source-to-background algorithm, was associated with a low risk of INR. It might provide improved tumor control because of dose escalation.

  5. Assess results of PET/CT in cancer diagnosis, follow up treatment and simulation for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET/CT (Positron Emission Computed Tomography) has been studied and established as routine at the Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Bach Mai hospital. From 8/2009 to 5/2015, 6223 patients have been undergone PET/CT scan. Among them, diagnostic and simulation PET/CT scan for cancer patients accounted to 5833 (93.8%). Researches about value of PET/CT for most common cancers have been done. Results: PET/CT can help the primary tumor diagnosis, metastases detection, staging, simulation for radiation therapy, response to treatment assessment, and relapses after treatment identification. Percentage accordance between PET / CT and histopathology was 96% (esophagus cancer), 94.7% (lung cancer). Average maxSUV value of primary tumor of the esophagus cancer, colorectal cancer, nasopharynx cancer, lung cancer, and NHL respectively 9.50, 9.78, 11.08, 9.17, 10.21. MaxSUV value increased with histological grade and tumor size. After undergone PET / CT, stage of disease changed in 28% esophagus cancer; 22.7% colorectal cancer; stage of disease increased in 23.5% of NHL, 32.0% of lung cancer, and 25.0% of nasopharynx cancer. PET / CT simulation for radiation therapy target volume reduced in 28% of nasopharynx cancer, which helped the radioactive dose concentrate exactly in the target lesions, minimize effect to healthy tissues, improved the effectiveness of treatment and reduced complications. (author)

  6. Imaging and PET-CT evaluation of Gi tract cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging plays a pivotal role in the management of G.I. tract cancers for diagnosis, characterization, locoregional staging, metastatic work-up and follow-up during and after curative or palliative treatment. The imaging protocols should be optimized and reproducible because of their impact on therapy. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT is the cornerstone of the imaging work-up, optimized and reproducible because of their impact on therapy. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT is the cornerstone of the imaging work-up, optimized and tailored to the specific G.I. segment involved, requiring good G.I. tract distension. Image interpretation of native axial and reformatted multiplanar images is routinely performed. In specific cases, additional targeted imaging with the US or MRI or whole body imaging with PET/CT or MRI may be valuable. PET/CT is a complement to morphological imaging. PET allows detection of lesions otherwise undetected on morphological imaging, usually due to poor contrast with surrounding tissues, and characterization of known lesions. PET/CT is best used as an integral part of a comprehensive imaging work-up. Radiologist and nuclear medicine specialists provide complementary information. each must be familiar with the clinical questions at hand and related stakes, and advantages and limitations of each modality to optimize treatment as part of a multidisciplinary management approach. (authors)

  7. Design of a small animal MR compatible PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, the authors have designed a small animal MR compatible PET (McPET) scanner for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of mice and rats in vivo. The scanner consists of one ring of 480 LSO crystals arranged in 3 layers with 160 crystals per layer. The crystal dimensions are 2 x 3 x 7.5 mm3. This was based on a target resolution of 2.5 mm and simulations showing that a depth of 7.5 mm avoided significant depth of interaction effects across the desired field of view. The system diameter of 11.2 cm is large enough to accommodate the animal positioned inside a stereotactic frame. Each crystal will be coupled through 2 mm diameter optical fibers to multi-channel PMT's which reside outside the main magnetic field. Through 50 cm of optical fiber, a photopeak is clearly seen and the measured energy resolution is 25%. Prototype optical fiber connectors have been tested to increase the flexibility of the system and result in a light loss of only 6%. The proposed system will have adequate resolution and sensitivity for a number of applications in small animals and will be the first practical device for simultaneous in vivo imaging with PET and MR

  8. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, R G

    1994-01-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that prod...

  9. Tumor 18 F-FDG heterogeneity assessed by PET image texture analysis and its impact on target delineation for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma%食管鳞癌18F-FDG PET图像异质性及其对放疗靶区勾画影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴培培; 胡善亮; 房玉芝; 董鑫哲; 邢力刚; 孙晓蓉; 尹勇; 于金明

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨18氟-氟代脱氧葡萄糖(18F-fluorodeoxyglueose,18F-FDG) PET图像异质性对食管癌放疗靶区勾画的影响.方法:28例经病理确诊为食管鳞癌初治患者治疗前行18F-FDG PET/CT扫描.通过视觉法和三维图像纹理参数(能量和熵)分析获得FDG摄取异质性.CT图像上勾画出肿瘤靶区(GTVcT).PET图像上肿瘤靶区采用自动勾画法,分别采用40% SUVmax阈值勾画(GTVPET40%)和标准化摄取值(standardized uptake value,SUV)=2.5绝对值阈值勾画(GTVPET2.5).分析FDG摄取异质性与不同方法勾画肿瘤靶区体积差值间的相关性.结果:3种方法获得的肿瘤靶区差异有统计学意义,GTVCT为(45.00±43.40) cm3明显大于GTVPET40%的(20.42±16.12) cm3和GTVPET2.5 (35.88±36.33) cm3,其中GTVcT与GTVPET40%差异有统计学意义,t=4.34,P=0.00;GTVCT与GTVPET2.5差异有统计学意义,t=4.80,P=0.00;GTVPET40%与GTVPET2.5:差异有统计学意义,t=3.59,P=0.00.肿瘤摄取异质性与传统代谢参数SUVmax和SUVmean及靶区体积间存在相关性,丨r丨 =0.41,P≤0.03.GTVPET40%和GTVPET2.5之间的差异与熵呈正相关,r=0.41,P=0.029;与能量负相关,r=-0.39,P=0.04.视觉评分与GTVPET40%和GTVPET25之间的百分率差值也存在相关性,r=0.59,P=0.001.结论:PET图像上靶区勾画受到FDG摄取异质性的影响,特别是异质性较大的肿瘤.PET精确靶区勾画方法需要考虑到肿瘤异质性的影响.%OBJECTIVE:To evaluate new PET image parameters,FDG uptake heterogeneity defined by texture analysis or visual scoring,and its impact on target volume delineation for squamous cell esophageal cancer (SCEC).METHODS:Patients with newly diagnosed and pathologically proved SCEC (n =28) were received whole body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scanning before treatments.Intra-tumor 18F_FDG uptake heterogeneity was accessed by visual scoring and three-dimensional image texture feature (entropy and energy).Tumor volumes were delineated on the CT (GTVcT) and PET

  10. PET and SPECT studies in children with hemispheric low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Csaba; Bosnyák, Edit

    2016-10-01

    Molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in the pretreatment evaluation of low-grade gliomas. While glucose positron emission tomography (PET) can be helpful to differentiate low-grade from high-grade tumors, PET imaging with amino acid radiotracers has several advantages, such as better differentiation between tumors and non-tumorous lesions, optimized biopsy targeting, and improved detection of tumor recurrence. This review provides a brief overview of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies followed by a more detailed review of the clinical applications of glucose and amino acid PET imaging in low-grade hemispheric gliomas. We discuss key differences in the performance of the most commonly utilized PET radiotracers and highlight the advantage of PET/MRI fusion to obtain optimal information about tumor extent, heterogeneity, and metabolism. Recent data also suggest that simultaneous acquisition of PET/MR images and the combination of advanced MRI techniques with quantitative PET can further improve the pretreatment and post-treatment evaluation of pediatric brain tumors. PMID:27659825

  11. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  12. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  13. The MiniPET: a didactic PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, R.; Silva, J.; Gurriana, L.; Silva, J. M.; Maio, A.; Soares Augusto, J.

    2013-03-01

    The MiniPET project aims to design and build a small PET system. It consists of two 4 × 4 matrices of 16 LYSO scintillator crystals and two PMTs with 16 channels resulting in a low cost system with the essential functionality of a clinical PET instrument. It is designed to illustrate the physics of the PET technique and to provide a didactic platform for the training of students and nuclear imaging professionals as well as for scientific outreach. The PET modules can be configured to test for the coincidence of 511 keV gamma rays. The model has a flexible mechanical setup [1] and can simulate 14 diferent ring geometries, from a configuration with as few as 18 detectors per ring (ring radius phi=51 mm), up to a geometry with 70 detectors per ring (phi=200 mm). A second version of the electronic system [2] allowed measurement and recording of the energy deposited in 4 detector channels by photons from a 137Cs radioactive source and by photons resulting of the annihilation of positrons from a 22Na radioactive source. These energy spectra are used for detector performance studies, as well as angular dependency studies. In this paper, the mechanical setup, the front-end high-speed analog electronics, the digital acquisition and control electronics implemented in a FPGA, as well as the data-transfer interface between the FPGA board and a host PC are described. Recent preliminary results obtained with the 4 active channels in the prototype are also presented.

  14. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  15. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  16. Application of PET/CT Orientation Gamma Knife in the Body Position%PET/CT在体部γ刀定位中应用体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建国; 聂青; 康静波; 张丽萍; 齐文杰

    2009-01-01

    Obiective To elaborate the application of PCT/CT orientation Gamma Knife in the body.Methods From May, 2007 to May, 2008, PET/CT equipment was used on 120 cases with gamma knife body positioning and image fusion, Re-sults The PET/CT scan may not have iodine in the contrast agent to enhance the effective conduct of tumor imaging and CT position provides more simple and more accurate image information to guide target(GTV) of the outline. Conclusion The PET/CT in the gamma knife treatment can improve in the positioning accuracy of GIN, and improve treatment opportunity for iodine allergy patients.%目的:阐述PCT/CT在体部γ刀定位中的应用.方法:2007-05-2008-05,利用PET/CT设备对120例患者进行俸部γ,刀定位及图像融合.结果:用PET/CT扫描可在不用碘造影剂增强情况下进行肿瘤有效显像.较单纯CT定位获得更丰富和准确的图像信息,有助于指导靶区(GTV)的勾画.结论:PET/CT在γ,刀治疗定位中明显提高了GTV的定位精度,增加了碘过敏患者的治疗机会.

  17. Implementation of a solid target production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochon-Danguy, H. J.; Poniger, S. S.; Sachinidis, J. I.; Panopoulos, H. P.; Scott, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The desire to utilize long-lived PET isotopes in Australia has significantly increased over the years and several research projects for labelling of peptides, proteins and biomolecules, including labelling of recombinant antibodies has been restricted due to the limited availability of suitable isotopes. This need has led to the recent installation and commissioning of a new facility dedicated to fully automated solid target isotope production, including 24I, 64Cu, 89Zr and 86Y at the Austin Health Centre for PET.

  18. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-12

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. PMID:24819419

  19. Diseases Transmitted by Less Common House Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B

    2015-12-01

    Beside dogs and cats, the most common pets worldwide, an increasing number of pocket pets and exotic pets are making their way to more and more households, especially in North America and Europe. Although many of these animals make appropriate pets, they also can be a source of many zoonotic diseases, especially in young children and immunocompromised individuals. Some of these diseases can be life threatening, such as rabies, rat bite fever, and plague. Some others are quite common, because of the frequency of the pathogens harbored by these species, such as salmonellosis in reptiles and amphibians. Appropriate knowledge of the zoonotic agents carried by these "new" pet species is strongly recommended prior to acquiring pocket or exotic pets. Furthermore, adopting wildlife as pets is strongly discouraged, because it is always a risky action that can lead to major health issues. PMID:27337276

  20. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    This thesis concerns application specific 3D head tracking. The purpose is to improve motion correction in position emission tomography (PET) brain imaging through development of markerless tracking. Currently, motion correction strategies are based on either the PET data itself or tracking devices...... images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution...... of a few millimeters. Stateof- the-art hardware and software solutions are integrated into an operational device. This novel system is tested against a commercial tracking system popular in PET brain imaging. Testing and demonstrations are carried out in clinical settings. A compact markerless tracking...

  1. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...

  2. Diagnostic imaging of exotic pets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic, ultrasonographic, and computed tomographic (CT) imaging are important diagnostic modalities in exotic pets. The use of appropriate radiographic equipment, film-screen combinations, and radiographic projections enhances the information obtained from radiographs. Both normal findings and common radiographic abnormalities are discussed. The use of ultrasonography and CT scanning for exotic small mammals and reptiles is described

  3. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  4. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-09-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  5. [68Ga]-DOTATOC-PET/CT for meningioma IMRT treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamberg Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The observation that human meningioma cells strongly express somatostatin receptor (SSTR 2 was the rationale to analyze retrospectively in how far DOTATOC PET/CT is helpful to improve target volume delineation for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Patients and Methods In 26 consecutive patients with preferentially skull base meningioma, diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and planning-computed tomography (CT was complemented with data from [68Ga]-DOTA-D Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (DOTATOC-PET/CT. Image fusion of PET/CT, diagnostic computed tomography, MRI and radiotherapy planning CT as well as target volume delineation was performed with OTP-Masterplan®. Initial gross tumor volume (GTV definition was based on MRI data only and was secondarily complemented with DOTATOC-PET information. Irradiation was performed as EUD based IMRT, using the Hyperion Software package. Results The integration of the DOTATOC data led to additional information concerning tumor extension in 17 of 26 patients (65%. There were major changes of the clinical target volume (CTV which modify the PTV in 14 patients, minor changes were realized in 3 patients. Overall the GTV-MRI/CT was larger than the GTV-PET in 10 patients (38%, smaller in 13 patients (50% and almost the same in 3 patients (12%. Most of the adaptations were performed in close vicinity to bony skull base structures or after complex surgery. Median GTV based on MRI was 18.1 cc, based on PET 25.3 cc and subsequently the CTV was 37.4 cc. Radiation planning and treatment of the DOTATOC-adapted volumes was feasible. Conclusion DOTATOC-PET/CT information may strongly complement patho-anatomical data from MRI and CT in cases with complex meningioma and is thus helpful for improved target volume delineation especially for skull base manifestations and recurrent disease after surgery.

  6. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis.

  7. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis. PMID

  8. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient’s survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI.

  9. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient's survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI. PMID:27656421

  10. Pet insurance--essential option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, J D

    2000-08-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day! PMID:10945132

  11. Barcoded microchips for biomolecular assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Jiashu; Zou, Yu; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-20

    Multiplexed assay of analytes is of great importance for clinical diagnostics and other analytical applications. Barcode-based bioassays with the ability to encode and decode may realize this goal in a straightforward and consistent manner. We present here a microfluidic barcoded chip containing several sets of microchannels with different widths, imitating the commonly used barcode. A single barcoded microchip can carry out tens of individual protein/nucleic acid assays (encode) and immediately yield all assay results by a portable barcode reader or a smartphone (decode). The applicability of a barcoded microchip is demonstrated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoassays for simultaneous detection of three targets (anti-gp41 antibody, anti-gp120 antibody, and anti-gp36 antibody) from six human serum samples. We can also determine seven pathogen-specific oligonucleotides by a single chip containing both positive and negative controls.

  12. PET in cerebrovascular disease; PET bei zerebrovaskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik der Univ. Koeln (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Tissue viability is of particular interest in acute cerebral ischemia because it may be preserved if reperfusion can be achieved rapidly, e.g. by acute thrombolysis. Measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen consumption by PET can assess tissue viability, and they have substantially increased our knowledge of th pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and the associated penumbra. Widerspread clinical application in acute stroke, however, is unlikely because of the large logistic and personnel resources required. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, measurement of regional CBF and glucose metabolism, which is usually coupled, provide detailed insights in disturbance of cortical function, e.g. due to deafferentiation, and contribute to differentiation of dementia types. Chronic misery perfusion, i.e. reduced perfusion that does not match the metabolic demand of the tissue, can be demonstrated by PET. It may be found in some patients with high-grade arterial stenoses. Less severe impairment of brain perfusion can be demonstrated by measurement of the cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The most frequent clinical situations can be assessed by less demanding procedures, e.g. by SPECT. In conclusion, PET has its role in cerebrovascular disease primarily within scientific studies, where high resolution and absolute quantitation of physiological variables are essential. (orig.). 65 refs. [Deutsch] Beim akuten ischaemischen Insult ist die Vitalitaet des Gewebes von besonderem Interesse, da sie durch rasche Reperfusion, z.B. durch Thrombolyse, erhalten bleiben kann. Messungen der zerebralen Durchblutung und des Sauerstoffumsatzes mittels PET geben darueber wesentliche Aufschluesse, und sie sind wichtig fuer das Verstaendnis der Pathophysiologie ischaemischer Infarkte und der Penumbra mit kritischer Perfusion beim Menschen. Ihre breitere Anwendung in der klinischen Patientenversorgung kommt allerdings wegen des hohen Aufwandes derzeit kaum in Betracht. Bei

  13. Symmetric solid target transport system

    OpenAIRE

    Tomov, D.; Lawrence, L; Gaehle, G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The expansion of our PET isotope production with a new TR-19 cyclotron necessitated a suitable solid target transport system. None of the known existing and proposed solid target transport systems (STTS) was able to meet the technical and budget requirements of the MIR cyclotron facility [5]. A unique carrier design allowed us to develop a fully automated 50.8 mm inner diameter pneumatic tube STTS with an in-hot-cell compact form factor receiving station. The cyclotron or v...

  14. Controlled in situ formation of polyacrylamide hydrogel on PET surface via SI-ARGET-ATRP for wound dressings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We grow poly(acrylamide) (PAM) hydrgol from a polymer surface in a controlled way. • Divinyl crosslinker doesn't compromise the control chain growth feature of ARGET-ATRP. • ATR-FTIR-FPA images (spatial resolution 220 nm) reveal a uniform grafting of PAM. • PAM grafted wound dressing can be dual functional: low-adherent and antibacterial. - Abstract: Well-defined polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel was synthesized on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film via surface-initiated activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ARGET-ATRP). Following the deposition of an ATRP initiator (2-bromoisobutyrylbromide) on PET film, PAM hydrogel was grafted from the functionalized PET surface via ARGET-ATRP. XPS and FTIR-ATR confirmed that PAM hydrogel was successfully grafted on the PET surface. Results from AFM, SEM, and FTIR-FPA microscopic investigations showed that PAM hydrogel uniformly covers the surface of PET film. The grafting yield increases linearly with increasing reaction time, indicating that the growth of PAM hydrogel on the surface of PET is well controlled. In a cell adhesion assay, PAM hydrogel grafted PET films (PAM hydrogel-g-PET) showed low adhesion to keratinocyte cells. To impart PAM hydrogel-g-PET with antibacterial function, AgNPs were self-assembled along the amide side chains of PAM hydrogel. AgNPs loaded-PAM hydrogel-g-PET shows 99% reduction in the number of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 3 h contact

  15. Controlled in situ formation of polyacrylamide hydrogel on PET surface via SI-ARGET-ATRP for wound dressings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari Pour, Sedigheh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ghugare, Shivkumar V. [Department of Textile Science, Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Wiens, Richard; Gough, Kathleen [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Liu, Song, E-mail: Song.Liu@umanitoba.ca [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Textile Science, Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Biosystems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We grow poly(acrylamide) (PAM) hydrgol from a polymer surface in a controlled way. • Divinyl crosslinker doesn't compromise the control chain growth feature of ARGET-ATRP. • ATR-FTIR-FPA images (spatial resolution 220 nm) reveal a uniform grafting of PAM. • PAM grafted wound dressing can be dual functional: low-adherent and antibacterial. - Abstract: Well-defined polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel was synthesized on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film via surface-initiated activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ARGET-ATRP). Following the deposition of an ATRP initiator (2-bromoisobutyrylbromide) on PET film, PAM hydrogel was grafted from the functionalized PET surface via ARGET-ATRP. XPS and FTIR-ATR confirmed that PAM hydrogel was successfully grafted on the PET surface. Results from AFM, SEM, and FTIR-FPA microscopic investigations showed that PAM hydrogel uniformly covers the surface of PET film. The grafting yield increases linearly with increasing reaction time, indicating that the growth of PAM hydrogel on the surface of PET is well controlled. In a cell adhesion assay, PAM hydrogel grafted PET films (PAM hydrogel-g-PET) showed low adhesion to keratinocyte cells. To impart PAM hydrogel-g-PET with antibacterial function, AgNPs were self-assembled along the amide side chains of PAM hydrogel. AgNPs loaded-PAM hydrogel-g-PET shows 99% reduction in the number of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 3 h contact.

  16. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  17. Present and future aspects of PET examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PET examination gives the body distribution image of a compound labeled with the positron emitter manufactured by cyclotron. Recently, PET with F18-deoxyglucose (FDG) attracts considerable attention because the imaging is particularly useful for cancer detection. Since the technique was authorized by the United States (US) official health insurance in 1998, the number of the examination is increasing, which is also under similar situation in Japan due to the latest partial authorization for some malignant tumors. In Japan, about 30,000 examinations per year are carried out, half of which, in private hospitals. Their purpose is increasingly for cancer detection. For future PET examination, awaited are improvement of PET camera and development of a novel imaging agent. PET/CT imaging is for the former and F18-α-methyltyrosine, for the latter. Miniaturization of cyclotron, FDG delivery system, improved FDG synthetic method, popularization of PET/CT, development of PET camera for health examination, clinical trial of a novel imaging agent, and spread of PET health examination and operation of PET Center, are expected for future progress of PET technique. (N.I.)

  18. PET/MRI and PET/CT in advanced gynaecological tumours: initial experience and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Freiwald-Chilla, Bianka [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Hauser, Nik [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Gynaecology, Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and PET/CT for staging and re-staging advanced gynaecological cancer patients as well as identify the potential benefits of each method in such a population. Twenty-six patients with suspicious or proven advanced gynaecological cancer (12 ovarian, seven cervical, one vulvar and four endometrial tumours, one uterine metastasis, and one primary peritoneal cancer) underwent whole-body imaging with a sequential trimodality PET/CT/MR system. Images were analysed regarding primary tumour detection and delineation, loco-regional lymph node staging, and abdominal/extra-abdominal distant metastasis detection (last only by PET/CT). Eighteen (69.2 %) patients underwent PET/MRI for primary staging and eight patients (30.8 %) for re-staging their gynaecological malignancies. For primary tumour delineation, PET/MRI accuracy was statistically superior to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Among the different types of cancer, PET/MRI presented better tumour delineation mainly for cervical (6/7) and endometrial (2/3) cancers. PET/MRI for local evaluation as well as PET/CT for extra-abdominal metastases had therapeutic consequences in three and one patients, respectively. PET/CT detected 12 extra-abdominal distant metastases in 26 patients. PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT for primary tumour delineation. No differences were found in detection of regional lymph node involvement and abdominal metastases detection. (orig.)

  19. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  20. Preclinical PET Neuroimaging of [11C]Bexarotene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Benjamin H; Placzek, Michael S; Krishnan, Hema S; Pekošak, Aleksandra; Collier, Thomas Lee; Wang, Changning; Liang, Steven H; Burstein, Ethan S; Hooker, Jacob M; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Activation of retinoid X receptors (RXRs) has been proposed as a therapeutic mechanism for the treatment of neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We previously reported radiolabeling of a Food and Drug Administration-approved RXR agonist, bexarotene, by copper-mediated [(11)C]CO2 fixation and preliminary positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging that demonstrated brain permeability in nonhuman primate with regional binding distribution consistent with RXRs. In this study, the brain uptake and saturability of [(11)C]bexarotene were studied in rats and nonhuman primates by PET imaging under baseline and greater target occupancy conditions. [(11)C]Bexarotene displays a high proportion of nonsaturable uptake in the brain and is unsuitable for RXR occupancy measurements in the central nervous system. PMID:27553293

  1. PET imaging biomarkers in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Differding, Sarah; Gregoire, Vincent [Universite Catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, and Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology (MIRO), Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Brussels (Belgium); Hanin, Francois-Xavier [Universite Catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, and Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology (MIRO), Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    In locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), the role of imaging becomes more and more critical in the management process. In this framework, molecular imaging techniques such as PET allow noninvasive assessment of a range of tumour biomarkers such as metabolism, hypoxia and proliferation, which can serve different purposes. First, in a pretreatment setting they can influence therapy selection strategies and target delineation for radiation therapy. Second, their predictive and/or prognostic value could help enhance the therapeutic ratio in the management of HNSCC. Third, treatment modification can be performed through the generation of a molecular-based heterogeneous dose distribution with dose escalation to the most resistant parts of the tumour, a concept known as dose painting. Fourth, they are increasingly becoming a tool for monitoring response to therapy. In this review, PET imaging biomarkers used in the routine management of HNSCC or under investigation are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Targeting Amino Acid Metabolism for Molecular Imaging of Inflammation Early After Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Bankstahl, Jens P; Wang, Yong; Wollert, Kai C; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Acute tissue inflammation after myocardial infarction influences healing and remodeling and has been identified as a target for novel therapies. Molecular imaging holds promise for guidance of such therapies. The amino acid (11)C-methionine is a clinically approved agent which is thought to accumulate in macrophages, but not in healthy myocytes. We assessed the suitability of positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-methionine for imaging post-MI inflammation, from cell to mouse to man. Uptake assays demonstrated 7-fold higher (11)C-methionine uptake by polarized pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages over anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes (ptranslation of novel image-guided, inflammation-targeted regenerative therapies. PMID:27570549

  3. A quantitative comet infection assay for influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Stephen M.; Timm, Andrea; Yin, John

    2011-01-01

    The virus comet assay is a cell-based virulence assay used to evaluate an antiviral drug or antibody against a target virus. The comet assay differs from the plaque assay in allowing spontaneous flows in 6-well plates to spread virus. When implemented quantitatively the comet assay has been shown to have an order-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to antivirals than the plaque assay. In this study, a quantitative comet assay for influenza virus is demonstrated, and is shown to have a 13-fold in...

  4. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT in Adrenal Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choi, Duck Joo; Lee, Min Kyung; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Adrenal tumors are increasingly detected by widespread use of anatomical imaging such as CT, MRI, etc. For these adrenal tumors, differentiation between malignancy and benignancy is very important. In diagnostic assessment of adrenal tumor, {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT have been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very excellent performance in evaluation of adrenal metastasis in the oncologic patient. In cases of adrenal incidentalomas, {sup 18}F-FDG PET or PET-CT is helpful if CT or chemical-shift MRI is inconclusive. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT may be applied to the patients with MIBG-negative pheochromocytomas. In summary, {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT are expected to be effective diagnostic tools in the management of adrenal tumor.

  5. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boellaard, Ronald; O'Doherty, Mike J; Weber, Wolfgang A;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography......-computed tomography (PET/CT) and is provided to help the physician and physicist to assist to carrying out,interpret, and document quantitative FDG PET/CT examinations,but will concentrate on the optimisation of diagnostic quality and quantitative information....

  6. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian;

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...... that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations....

  7. Critical Care of Pet Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey Rowe

    2016-05-01

    Successful care of the critical pet bird patient is dependent on preparation and planning and begins with the veterinarian and hospital staff. An understanding of avian physiology and pathophysiology is key. Physical preparation of the hospital or clinic includes proper equipment and understanding of the procedures necessary to provide therapeutic and supportive care to the avian patient. An overview of patient intake and assessment, intensive care environment, and fluid therapy is included. PMID:27131161

  8. Pet Store Loyalty in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Leong, Yuen Yee

    2010-01-01

    Loyalty is open studied topic within the retailing and marketing discipline. A strong and profitable base of loyal customers is an asset to any organization, and is one of the epitomes of success for a company. The flourishing of large, specialty niche retailers like Starbucks, Victoria Secret and Barnes & Noble are stellar success stories that thrive on their troop of staunch followers. Pet retailing is a niche market which has its own interesting market characteristics. The emergence of ...

  9. Joint PET-MR respiratory motion models for clinical PET motion correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F.; Wan, Simon; McClelland, Jamie; Barnes, Anna; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Atkinson, David

    2016-09-01

    Patient motion due to respiration can lead to artefacts and blurring in positron emission tomography (PET) images, in addition to quantification errors. The integration of PET with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in PET-MR scanners provides complementary clinical information, and allows the use of high spatial resolution and high contrast MR images to monitor and correct motion-corrupted PET data. In this paper we build on previous work to form a methodology for respiratory motion correction of PET data, and show it can improve PET image quality whilst having minimal impact on clinical PET-MR protocols. We introduce a joint PET-MR motion model, using only 1 min per PET bed position of simultaneously acquired PET and MR data to provide a respiratory motion correspondence model that captures inter-cycle and intra-cycle breathing variations. In the model setup, 2D multi-slice MR provides the dynamic imaging component, and PET data, via low spatial resolution framing and principal component analysis, provides the model surrogate. We evaluate different motion models (1D and 2D linear, and 1D and 2D polynomial) by computing model-fit and model-prediction errors on dynamic MR images on a data set of 45 patients. Finally we apply the motion model methodology to 5 clinical PET-MR oncology patient datasets. Qualitative PET reconstruction improvements and artefact reduction are assessed with visual analysis, and quantitative improvements are calculated using standardised uptake value (SUVpeak and SUVmax) changes in avid lesions. We demonstrate the capability of a joint PET-MR motion model to predict respiratory motion by showing significantly improved image quality of PET data acquired before the motion model data. The method can be used to incorporate motion into the reconstruction of any length of PET acquisition, with only 1 min of extra scan time, and with no external hardware required.

  10. Validation of peneloPET simulations of the Biograph PET/CT scanner with TOF capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Abushab, K. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Vicente, E.; España, Samuel; Vaquero, Juan José; Udías, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for optimizing detector design and acquisition protocols, and for developing and assessing corrections and reconstruction methods. PeneloPET is a Monte Carlo code for PET simulations with basic components of detector geometry, acquisition electronics and material and source definitions. The purpose of the present study was to validate the simulations of the Siemens Biograph PET/CT scanner with TOF ...

  11. Joint PET-MR respiratory motion models for clinical PET motion correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F; Wan, Simon; McClelland, Jamie; Barnes, Anna; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Atkinson, David

    2016-09-01

    Patient motion due to respiration can lead to artefacts and blurring in positron emission tomography (PET) images, in addition to quantification errors. The integration of PET with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in PET-MR scanners provides complementary clinical information, and allows the use of high spatial resolution and high contrast MR images to monitor and correct motion-corrupted PET data. In this paper we build on previous work to form a methodology for respiratory motion correction of PET data, and show it can improve PET image quality whilst having minimal impact on clinical PET-MR protocols. We introduce a joint PET-MR motion model, using only 1 min per PET bed position of simultaneously acquired PET and MR data to provide a respiratory motion correspondence model that captures inter-cycle and intra-cycle breathing variations. In the model setup, 2D multi-slice MR provides the dynamic imaging component, and PET data, via low spatial resolution framing and principal component analysis, provides the model surrogate. We evaluate different motion models (1D and 2D linear, and 1D and 2D polynomial) by computing model-fit and model-prediction errors on dynamic MR images on a data set of 45 patients. Finally we apply the motion model methodology to 5 clinical PET-MR oncology patient datasets. Qualitative PET reconstruction improvements and artefact reduction are assessed with visual analysis, and quantitative improvements are calculated using standardised uptake value (SUV(peak) and SUV(max)) changes in avid lesions. We demonstrate the capability of a joint PET-MR motion model to predict respiratory motion by showing significantly improved image quality of PET data acquired before the motion model data. The method can be used to incorporate motion into the reconstruction of any length of PET acquisition, with only 1 min of extra scan time, and with no external hardware required. PMID:27524409

  12. FDG-PET imaging in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, L; Badve, C; Avril, S; Herrmann, K; Faulhaber, P; O'Donnell, J; Avril, N

    2016-07-01

    The majority of aggressive lymphomas is characterized by an up regulated glycolytic activity, which enables the visualization by F-18 FDG-PET/CT. One-stop hybrid FDG-PET/CT combines the functional and morphologic information, outperforming both, CT and FDG-PET as separate imaging modalities. This has resulted in several recommendations using FDG-PET/CT for staging, restaging, monitoring during therapy, and assessment of treatment response as well as identification of malignant transformation. FDG-PET/CT may obviate the need for a bone marrow biopsy in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. FDG-PET/CT response assessment is recommended for FDG-avid lymphomas, whereas CT-based response evaluation remains important in lymphomas with low or variable FDG avidity. The treatment induced change in metabolic activity allows for assessment of response after completion of therapy as well as prediction of outcome early during therapy. The five-point scale Deauville Criteria allows the assessment of treatment response based on visual FDG-PET analysis. Although the use of FDG-PET/CT for prediction of therapeutic response is promising it should only be conducted in the context of clinical trials. Surveillance FDG-PET/CT after complete remission is discouraged due to the relative high number of false-positive findings, which in turn may result in further unnecessary investigations. Future directions include the use of new PET tracers such as F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT), a surrogate biomarker of cellular proliferation and Ga-68 CXCR4, a chemokine receptor imaging biomarker as well as innovative digital PET/CT and PET/MRI techniques. PMID:27090170

  13. PET-CT imaging in pediatric oncology

    OpenAIRE

    McCarville, M. Beth

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) is emerging as a valuable tool for assessing a wide variety of pediatric malignancies, including lymphomas, soft-tissue tumors, and bone sarcomas. PET-CT may provide information that is not apparent on conventional imaging performed to stage these diseases and monitor their response to treatment. The use of PET-CT in children requires an awareness of the technical and logistical issues unique to this patient population. In a...

  14. PET/MR: a paradigm shift

    OpenAIRE

    Gaertner, Florian C.; Furst, Sebastian; Schwaiger, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract More than a decade ago, multimodality imaging was introduced into clinical routine with the development of the positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) technique. Since then, PET/CT has been widely accepted in clinical imaging and has emerged as one of the main cancer imaging modalities. With the recent development of combined PET/magnetic resonance (MR) systems for clinical use, a promising new hybrid imaging modality is now becoming increasingly available. The co...

  15. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Melissa G; Bogue, Kelsey; Rohrbaugh, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006) which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons. PMID:26487162

  16. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Rohrbaugh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pet ownership has historically been one of the biggest risk factors for evacuation failure prior to natural disasters. The forced abandonment of pets during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 made national headlines and led to the passage of the Pet Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS, 2006 which mandated local authorities to plan for companion animal evacuation. Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast of the United States in 2011, providing an excellent opportunity to examine the impact of the PETS legislation on frequency and ease of evacuation among pet owners and non-pet owners. Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during the hurricane and symptoms of depression, PTSD, dissociative experiences, and acute stress. Pet ownership was not found to be a statistical risk factor for evacuation failure. However, many pet owners who failed to evacuate continue to cite pet related reasons.

  17. Preparation and biocompatibility of grafted functional β-cyclodextrin copolymers from the surface of PET films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Hongwen; Zhang, Weiwei; Tu, Shanshan

    2014-08-01

    The hydrophobic inert surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film has limited its practical bioapplications, in which case, better biocompatibility should be achieved by surface modification. In this work, the copolymer of functional β-cyclodextrin derivatives and styrene grafted surfaces was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on initiator-immobilized PET. The structures, composition, properties, and surface morphology of the modified PET films were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that the surface of PET films was covered by a thick targeted copolymer layer, and the hydrophobic surface of PET was changed into an amphiphilic surface. The copolymer-grafted surfaces were also shown good biocompatibility on which SGC-7901 A549 and A549/DDP cells readily attached and proliferated, demonstrating that the functional copolymer-grafted PET films could be a promising alternative to biomaterials especially for tissue engineering. PMID:24907730

  18. PET for molecular imaging of cancer: a tool for tailored therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of personalised medicine has led to a need for improved phenotyping as well as prediction of treatment response early after therapy initiation. Most of the molecular biology methods used today need tissue sampling for in vitro analysis. In contrast, molecular imaging allows for non-invasive studies at the molecular level in living, intact organisms. Accordingly, molecular imaging with PET has been one of the most successful techniques in such phenotyping and response prediction using FDG. In addition, recent development of new PET tracers has further improved the value of PET in tumor characterization. Such new PET tracers allow for visualization of tumor specific receptors and tissue characteristics such as ability to metastasize. Furthermore, PET has a high sensitivity and allows for quantification and is not prone to sampling error as seen with biopsies. We will present examples of development of probes targeting the somatostatin receptor type 2, over-expressed in neuroendocrine tumors, including our first-in-man studies of 64Cu-DOTATATE. Also development in probes for visualization of the invasive phenotype will be presented. Finally, with the most recent development of true integrated PET/MRI scanners it has now become possible to add information from MRI. The value of such hybrid imaging will also be briefly discussed. (author)

  19. Interest of PET with F.D.G. in the follicular lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the follicular lymphomas, the PET is not in the systematic medical evaluation when it cannot be ignored in the evaluation of high grade non hodgkin lymphomas because it allows to make a complete extension evaluation and especially to help to define the target volume when the radiotherapy is indicated. The fixation of F.D.G. in follicular lymphomas was studied. We showed that the follicular lymphomas present in PET under the form of hypermetabolic injuries. It seems possible to consider the use of PET to help at the definition of target volumes when the radiotherapy is indicated. The intensity of fixation seems to have a predictive value for the therapy response in case of immunotherapy. The measurement of the active tumoral volume seems to have a predictive value for the response to the treatment that is worth being specified on a more important population. (N.C.)

  20. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions, and approaches for data evaluation are discussed. PMID:24312147

  1. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation). PMID:27593250

  2. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs.

  3. The role of PET in thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Yeo Jeong [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-01

    The role of PET in the diagnosis and management of thyroid cancer is discussed. The major role of F-18 FDG PET is in patients with discordant negative I-131 scan and a positive serum thyroglobulin values. F-18 FDG PET scan localized metastatic sites in I-131 scan-negative thyroid carcinoma patients with high accuracy. F-18 PET is also valuable in medullary thyroid cancer with high calcitonin level. Focal thyroid uptake in patients with non-thyroidal disease has high likelihood of thyroid cancer.

  4. Dynamic observation by PET in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before the era when positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged, much controversy has existed concerning regional cerebral blood flow in partial epilepsy. In 1979, PET revealed that cerebral blood flow is decreased during the interictal period, but is remarkably increased in the intraictal phase. In this paper, historical process of dynamic observation in epilepsy is reviewed. Potential use and limitations of PET in the clinical setting are discussed in view of the scanning methods and the relationships between PET and electroencephalograms, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical treatment. (N.K.) 106 refs

  5. PET-Computed Tomography in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Elissa K

    2016-05-01

    PET/CT is an advanced imaging modality that is becoming more commonly used in veterinary medicine. It is most commonly used to image patients with cancer, and the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical is F-18 FDG. F-18 FDG is a glucose analog that highlights areas of increased glucose metabolism on the PET images. CT images provide excellent anatomic depiction and aid in interpretation of the PET data. Many types of cancer are hypermetabolic on PET/CT scans, but normal structures and areas of inflammation are also hypermetabolic, so knowledge of normal imaging and cytologic or histopathologic evaluation of lesions is essential.

  6. Evaluation of 3-Ethyl-3-(phenylpiperazinylbutyl)oxindoles as PET Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT7 Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias M; Andersen, Valdemar L; Hansen, Hanne D;

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated several oxindole derivatives in the pursuit of a 5-HT7 receptor PET ligand. Herein the synthesis, chiral separation, and pharmacological profiling of two possible PET candidates toward a wide selection of CNS-targets are detailed. Subsequent (11)C-labeling and in vivo evaluat...... evaluation in Danish landrace pigs showed that both ligands displayed high brain uptake. However, neither of the radioligands could be displaced by the 5-HT7 receptor selective inverse agonist SB-269970....

  7. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pet dogs in Kunming, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Gang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, which infects almost all warm-blooded animals, including humans, with a worldwide distribution. However, little is known of T. gondii seroprevalence in pet dogs in Kunming, the capital of Yunnan Province, southwest China. The objective of this investigation was to estimate the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in pet dogs in this area. Methods A total of 611 serum samples were collected from 7 pet hospitals in Kunming, and assayed for T. gondii antibodies by the indirect haemagglutination (IHA using a commercially-marked kit. Results 132 (21.6% pet dogs were positive for T. gondii antibodies, and the seroprevalence ranged from 17.3% to 34.7% among different sampling regions, the difference was statistically significant (P T. gondii seroprevalence in female and male dogs were 20.8% and 22.4%, respectively, the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. The seroprevalence ranged from 17.5% to 23.6% among different age groups, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05, and there were no interactions in statistics (P > 0.05 between gender and age of pet dogs in the region. Conclusions The findings of the present survey indicate high T. gondii seroprevalance in pet dogs in Kunming, southwest China, posing significant public health concern. It is necessary to enhance integrated strategies and measures to prevent and control T. gondii infection in pet dogs in this area.

  8. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    stem cell imaging is proposed to circumvent the major limitation of in vitro radiolabeling – the eventual radiolabel decay. Stable transduction of stem cells in vitro would allow for the selection of high quality stem cells with optimal functional parameters of the transduced reporter systems. The use of a long-lived radioisotope 124I to label a highly specific reporter gene probe will allow for ex vivo labeling of stem cells and their imaging immediately after injection and during the following next week. The use of short-lived radioisotopes (i.e., 18F) to label highly specific reporter gene probes will allow repetitive PET imaging for the assessment of to stem cell migration, targeting, differentiation, and long-term viability of stem cell-derived tissues. Qualifications of the research team and resources. An established research team of experts in various disciplines has been assembled at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) over the past two years including the PI, senior co-investigators and collaborators. The participants of this team are recognized internationally to be among the leaders in their corresponding fields of research and clinical medicine. The resources at MDACC are exceptionally well developed and have been recently reinforced by the installation of a microPET and microSPECT/CT cameras, and a 7T MRI system for high resolution animal imaging; and by integrating a synthetic chemistry core for the development and production of precursors for radiolabeling.

  9. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    is proposed to circumvent the major limitation of in vitro radiolabeling - the eventual radiolabel decay. Stable transduction of stem cells in vitro would allow for the selection of high quality stem cells with optimal functional parameters of the transduced reporter systems. The use of a long-lived radioisotope 124I to label a highly specific reporter gene probe will allow for ex vivo labeling of stem cells and their imaging immediately after injection and during the following next week. The use of short-lived radioisotopes (i.e., 18F) to label highly specific reporter gene probes will allow repetitive PET imaging for the assessment of to stem cell migration, targeting, differentiation, and long-term viability of stem cell-derived tissues. Qualifications of the research team and resources. An established research team of experts in various disciplines has been assembled at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) over the past two years including the PI, senior co-investigators and collaborators. The participants of this team are recognized internationally to be among the leaders in their corresponding fields of research and clinical medicine. The resources at MDACC are exceptionally well developed and have been recently reinforced by the installation of a microPET and microSPECT/CT cameras, and a 7T MRI system for high resolution animal imaging; and by integrating a synthetic chemistry core for the development and production of precursors for radiolabeling.

  10. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET/CT in Burkitt's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanis, Dimitrios, E-mail: dkarantanis@nuclmed.ne [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Durski, Jolanta M.; Lowe, Val J.; Nathan, Mark A.; Mullan, Brian P. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Johnston, Patrick B. [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To explore the value of {sup 18}F fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in Burkitt's lymphoma. Methods: All Burkitt's lymphoma patients referred for FDG PET or FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) exams at our institution from June 2003 to June 2006 were included. Selected patients were followed and clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Results from FDG PET-PET/CT, as blindly reviewed by a consensus of two experienced readers, were compared with the status of the disease as determined by other laboratory, clinical and imaging exams and clinical follow-up. FDG PET-PET/CT results were classified as true positive or negative and false positive or negative. The degree of FDG uptake in the positive lesions was semiquantified as maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). Results: Fifty-seven FDG PET-PET/CT exams were done in 15 patients. Seven exams were done for initial staging, 8 during and 14 after the completion of therapy, and 28 for disease surveillance. For nodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 8, true negative in 47 and false positive in 2 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 96%). For extranodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 6, true negative in 48 and false positive in 3 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%). The mean SUVmax for the positive nodal lesions was 15.7 (range 6.9-21.7, median 18.5) and for extranodal lesions was 14.2 (range 6.2-24.3, median 12.4). Conclusions: FDG PET-PET/CT is sensitive for the detection of viable disease in Burkitt's lymphoma. Affected areas demonstrated high degree of uptake that was reversible upon successful implementation of treatment.

  11. An investigation of selected chemical contaminants in commercial pet foods in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elhakim, Yasmina M; El Sharkawy, Nabela I; Moustafa, Gihan G

    2016-01-01

    Our study aimed to identify the levels of various contaminants in both wet and dry commercial pet foods in Egypt. A total of 20 local and imported pet food products (3 samples each) were screened for heavy metals by atomic absorption spectroscopy, for mycotoxins by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and for nitrate and nitrite levels by nitrate-nitrite spectrophotometry. Cat food, on average, had greater concentrations of the metals cadmium, chromium, lead, and tin than dog food. Of the investigated metals, only tin concentration exceeded the safe level compared with the standards of the National Research Council and the European Commission for the dog and cat. According to the guidelines of the Association of American Feed Control Officials for canned pet foods, the nitrate and nitrite contents of examined foods greatly exceeded the recommended level. No total aflatoxins were detected in the surveyed samples. None of the samples analyzed had levels above international limits established by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations for ochratoxin, and only 1 sample exceeded the level for aflatoxin B1. Of the 20 samples analyzed for zearalenone, 4 samples had higher levels than the FAO maximum tolerable levels. These results indicate that pet foods marketed in Egypt, especially cat foods, occasionally contain contaminants that could result in adverse effects in pets. PMID:26754825

  12. Demons versus level-set motion registration for coronary 18F-sodium fluoride PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubeaux, Mathieu; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Fletcher, Alison; Motwani, Manish; Thomson, Louise E.; Germano, Guido; Dey, Damini; Berman, Daniel S.; Newby, David E.; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2016-03-01

    Ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaques commonly cause acute myocardial infarction. It has been recently shown that active microcalcification in the coronary arteries, one of the features that characterizes vulnerable plaques at risk of rupture, can be imaged using cardiac gated 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) PET. We have shown in previous work that a motion correction technique applied to cardiac-gated 18F-NaF PET images can enhance image quality and improve uptake estimates. In this study, we further investigated the applicability of different algorithms for registration of the coronary artery PET images. In particular, we aimed to compare demons vs. level-set nonlinear registration techniques applied for the correction of cardiac motion in coronary 18F-NaF PET. To this end, fifteen patients underwent 18F-NaF PET and prospective coronary CT angiography (CCTA). PET data were reconstructed in 10 ECG gated bins; subsequently these gated bins were registered using demons and level-set methods guided by the extracted coronary arteries from CCTA, to eliminate the effect of cardiac motion on PET images. Noise levels, target-to-background ratios (TBR) and global motion were compared to assess image quality. Compared to the reference standard of using only diastolic PET image (25% of the counts from PET acquisition), cardiac motion registration using either level-set or demons techniques almost halved image noise due to the use of counts from the full PET acquisition and increased TBR difference between 18F-NaF positive and negative lesions. The demons method produces smoother deformation fields, exhibiting no singularities (which reflects how physically plausible the registration deformation is), as compared to the level-set method, which presents between 4 and 8% of singularities, depending on the coronary artery considered. In conclusion, the demons method produces smoother motion fields as compared to the level-set method, with a motion that is physiologically

  13. The clinical value of PET/CT in therapeutic management of the malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of hybrid PET/CT in therapeutic management of the malignant tumor. Methods: 69 patients with malignant tumor without accepting any treatment, who were diagnosed by either pathology (24 patients) or clinical data (45 patients), were analyzed in this study. The age of the 20 females and 49 males ranged between 26 and 99 years (mean 63 years). PET/CT scans were performed using Discovery LS-PET/CT system (GE Discovery LS, CT attenuation correction, OSEM reconstruction), after injection of 5.55 MBq/kg FDG 40 minutes. Results: l. PET/CT showed 18 patients with single lesion and 51 patients with multiple lesions. while in CT imaging showed 47 patients with single lesion before PET/CT scanning. 29 (61.7%) patients were changed the clinical stage and therapeutic scheme after PET/CT performing. 2. Offered biological target orientation to radiotherapy or operation extension to surgery: radiotherapy doctors used PET/CT fusion imaging to direct radiotherapy orientation to 29 patients who were fit for radiotherapy. Five of them, who had treated by MM50 for one period of treatment, reexamined PET/CT after one month later, the former tumor was disappeared or shirked and the metabolism of glucose returned to normal. 10 patients were operated after the doctor confirmed the operation extension and operation path according to the PET/CT fusion images. The pathological results showed no carcinoma cell implicated or soakage in surgery cutting margins. The metastasis lymph nodes were completely removed. One patient, her operation was failed, was diagnosed primary lung cancer with hilus and lymph nodes metastases by PET/CT which indicated that the operation was not suitable for this patient. Conclusion: Hybrid PFT/CT imaging may offer an important tool in therapeutic management of the malignant tumor. One, it can provide more accurate diagnosis for clinical stage of the malignant tumor and assistant doctor's to draw the therapeutic scheme. Two, it

  14. A proposal of an open PET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Minohara, Shinichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inadama, Naoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Lam, Chih Fung [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-02-07

    The long patient port of a PET scanner tends to put stress on patients, especially patients with claustrophobia. It also prevents doctors and technicians from taking care of patients during scanning. In this paper, we proposed an 'open PET' geometry, which consists of two axially separated detector rings. A long and continuous field-of-view (FOV) including a 360 deg. opened gap between two detector rings can be imaged enabling a fully 3D image reconstruction of all the possible lines-of-response. The open PET will become practical if iterative image reconstruction methods are applied even though image reconstruction of the open PET is analytically an incomplete problem. First we implemented a 'masked' 3D ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) in which the system matrix was obtained from a long 'gapless' scanner by applying a mask to detectors corresponding to the open space. Next, in order to evaluate imaging performance of the proposed open PET geometry, we simulated a dual HR+ scanner (ring diameter of D = 827 mm, axial length of W = 154 mm x 2) separated by a variable gap. The gap W was the maximum limit to have axially continuous FOV of 3W though the maximum diameter of FOV at the central slice was limited to D/2. Artifacts, observed on both sides of the open space when the gap exceeded W, were effectively reduced by inserting detectors partially into unnecessary open spaces. We also tested the open PET geometry using experimental data obtained by the jPET-D4. The jPET-D4 is a prototype brain scanner, which has 5 rings of 24 detector blocks. We simulated the open jPET-D4 with a gap of 66 mm by eliminating 1 block-ring from experimental data. Although some artifacts were seen at both ends of the opened gap, very similar images were obtained with and without the gap. The proposed open PET geometry is expected to lead to realization of in-beam PET, which is a method for an in situ monitoring of charged particle therapy, by

  15. Enhancing hydrophilicity and water permeability of PET track-etched membranes by advanced oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Zdorovets, Maxim V.; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present results on the application of advanced oxidation systems for effective and non-toxic oxidation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) to improve their wettability and water transport properties. Two oxidizing systems: H2O2 under UV irradiation (H2O2/UV) and Fenton system under visible light (Fenton/H2O2/Vis) were compared. The surface of functionalized PET TeMs was characterized by using colorimetric assay, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results clearly showed that water permeability of PET TeMs treated with H2O2/UV was improved by 28 ± 5% compared with etched-only membrane, the same parameter was found to increase by 13 ± 4% in the case of Fenton/H2O2/Vis treatment. The proposed oxidation technique is very simple, environment friendly and not requiring special equipment or expensive chemicals. The surface hydrophilicity of the membranes stored for 360 days in air between paper sheets was analyzed by contact angle test, colorimetric assay to measure concentration of carboxylic groups on the surface with toluidine blue and XPS analysis. The hydrophilic properties of oxidized PET TeMs were found to be stable for a long period of time.

  16. Folate-Based Radiotracers for PET Imaging—Update and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Müller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The folate receptor (FR is expressed in many tumor types, among those ovarian and lung cancer. Due to the high FR affinity of folic acid, it has been used for targeting of FR-positive tumors, allowing specific delivery of attached probes to the malignant tissue. Therefore, nuclear imaging of FR-positive cancer is of clinical interest for selecting patients who could benefit from innovative therapy concepts based on FR-targeting. Positron emission computed tomography (PET has become an established technique in clinical routine because it provides an increased spatial resolution and higher sensitivity compared to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. Therefore, it is of critical importance to develop folate radiotracers suitable for PET imaging. This review article updates on the design, preparation and pre-clinical investigation of folate derivatives for radiolabeling with radioisotopes for PET. Among those the most relevant radionuclides so far are fluorine-18 (t1/2: 110 min, Eavβ+: 250 keV and gallium-68 (t1/2: 68 min, Eav β+: 830 keV. Recent results obtained with new PET isotopes such as terbium-152 (t1/2: 17.5 h, Eβ+: 470 keV or scandium-44 (t1/2: 3.97 h, Eav β+: 632 keV are also presented and discussed. Current endeavors for clinical implementation of PET agents open new perspectives for identification of FR-positive malignancies in patients.

  17. Positron emission tomography (PET) in psychiatry. PET in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung und Neurologische Klinik der Universitaet Koeln (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    Currently, clinical PET is mainly useful in psychiatry and related areas for differential diagnosis of dementia. In dementia of Alzheimer type reductions of glucose metabolism are found mainly in the temporoparietal assocaiton cortex, in Pick's disease mainly in the frontal cortex, and in Huntington's disease in the striatum. Other demential diseases usually show less toposelective metabolic impairment. In the future, new diagnostic possibilities may arise from analysis of functional stimulation of specific brain areas and from the use of ligands for specific neurotransmitter systems. (orig.)

  18. PET-guided dose escalation tomotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Andrei; Dell' Oca, Italo; Pasetti, Marcella; Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fiorino, Claudio; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics; Gianolli, Luigi [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2011-11-15

    To test the feasibility of salvage radiotherapy using PET-guided helical tomotherapy in patients with progressive malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). A group of 12 consecutive MPM patients was treated with 56 Gy/25 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV); FDG-PET/CT simulation was always performed to include all positive lymph nodes and MPM infiltrations. Subsequently, a second group of 12 consecutive patients was treated with the same dose to the whole pleura adding a simultaneous integrated boost of 62.5 Gy to the FDG-PET/CT positive areas (BTV). Good dosimetric results were obtained in both groups. No grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC) acute or late toxicities were reported in the first group, while 3 cases of grade 3 late pneumonitis were registered in the second group: the duration of symptoms was 2-10 weeks. Median overall survival was 8 months (1.2-50.5 months) and 20 months (4.3-33.8 months) from the beginning of radiotherapy, for groups I and II, respectively (p = 0.19). A significant impact on local relapse from radiotherapy was seen (median time to local relapse: 8 vs 17 months; 1-year local relapse-free rate: 16% vs 81%, p = 0.003). The results of this pilot study support the planning of a phase III study of combined sequential chemoradiotherapy with dose escalation to BTV in patients not able to undergo resection. (orig.)

  19. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of prolonged febrile states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaruskova, M.; Belohlavek, O. [Na Homolce Hospital, PET Center, Prague 5 (Czech Republic)

    2006-08-15

    The role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients whose main symptom is prolonged fever has not yet been defined. We addressed this topic in a retrospective study. A total of 124 patients (referred between May 2001 and December 2004) with fever of unknown origin or prolonged fever due to a suspected infection of a joint or vascular prosthesis were included in the study. The patients underwent either FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT scanning. Sixty-seven patients had a negative focal FDG-PET finding; in this group the method was regarded as unhelpful in determining a diagnosis, and no further investigation was pursued. We tried to obtain clinical confirmation for all patients with positive PET findings. Fifty-seven (46%) patients had positive FDG-PET findings. In six of them no further clinical information was available. Fifty-one patients with positive PET findings and 118 patients in total were subsequently evaluated. Systemic connective tissue disease was confirmed in 17 patients, lymphoma in three patients, inflammatory bowel disease in two patients, vascular prosthesis infection in seven patients, infection of a hip or knee replacement in seven patients, mycotic aneurysm in two patients, abscess in four patients and AIDS in one patient. In eight (16%) patients the finding was falsely positive. FDG-PET or PET/CT contributed to establishing a final diagnosis in 84% of the 51 patients with positive PET findings and in 36% of all 118 evaluated patients with prolonged fever. (orig.)

  20. PET and PET/CT imaging for the earliest detection and treatment of colorectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Kevin [Michigan State Univ., Pontiac, MI (United States). POH Medical Center; Kotlyarov, Eduard [Michigan State Univ., Pontiac, MI (United States). POH Medical Center; Georgetown Univ. (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Approximately 150,000 new cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed each year with the life time risk of developing colon caner in developed nations being 4.6% in men and 3.2% in women. Screening patients is essential early detection of colon carcinoma to aid in complete resection. Unfortunately current screening methods carry with them poor patient compliance. PET and PET/CT may be a significant part of this screening solution. The authors reviewed and analyzed the English language articles and case reports identified on Medline during the last 10 years. PET and PET/CT results for colorectal carcinoma were tabulated and presented for the fifth Scientific Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Though most studies have been retrospective analysis in using PET for staging for other malignant processes the cases that have identified additional uptake in the colon are important. The accuracy when utilizing PET and PET/CT in this screening method has a sensitivity between 65 and 90% with a specificity of 84 to 90% and a positive predictive value 71 to 78%. Early stages of malignancies and pre-cancerous polyps avidly accumulates F-18 Deoxyfluoro glucose allowing us to conclude that whole body PET and PET/CT is an essential component in the work up, staging or treatment monitoring in colon carcinoma. We have to continue to accumulate data for possible introduction for whole body PET and PET/CT scanning for colon carcinoma and precancerous polyps.(author)

  1. Standard Operating Procedures for PET/CT: A Practical Approach for Use in Adult Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of operating procedures for FDG-PET/CT imaging in adult oncology patients. The text is based on consensus and agreement among the authors, following a systematic approach of relying on personal experience and the available scientific evidence on all the subjects included. Due to the evolving nature of PET/CT imaging, which is a rapidly growing technology, this publication will undoubtedly need to be updated on a regular basis. It may well be that each PET/CT centre will have to modify the recommendations provided here to suit its own particular circumstances, according to, inter alia, the type of scanner, patient population, use of intravenous contrast, availability of FDG, professional staff experience, local regulations and preferences of referring physicians. The information provided here is felt to be important in the light of the growing need to standardize and optimize the way PET/CT scans are performed, not only to enable trials using FDG-PET/CT in different institutions to be compared and correlated, but also to allow for more accurate comparisons of scans performed on the same patient at different points in time at a single institution. This is important when assessing the response to cancer therapy, and especially so when this evaluation is performed early and after using novel targeted treatments that very often only produce changes in metabolic activity and not in lesion/tumour size. This is the reason why strictly following a correct imaging protocol is crucial. The reliability of the PET/CT imaging information in cancer patients depends on trustworthy and consistently applied protocols. This issue has current relevance in drug discovery and development, where PET/CT imaging with FDG and other radiotracers is viewed by the pharmaceutical industry as potentially useful for shortening the process of clinical validation of new drugs

  2. Inventarisatie van ontwikkelingen van PET-CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard H; LSO; mev

    2011-01-01

    De Nederlandse ziekenhuispraktijk heeft de relatief nieuwe PET-CT-technologie omarmd: het aantal PET-CT-scanners en hun toepassingen nemen snel toe. De toepassingen in de medische praktijk lopen voor op de richtlijnen uit 2007. Voor deze richtlijnen wordt daarom een frequentere update aanbevolen. Vo

  3. Quantitative Techniques in PET-CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Sandip; Zaidi, Habib; Holm, Soren; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of hybrid PET/CT scanners has made quantitative whole body scanning of radioactive tracers feasible. This paper deals with the novel concepts for assessing global organ function and disease activity based on combined functional (PET) and structural (CT or MR) imaging techniques, their

  4. Integrating Pet Therapy into Daily School Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brous, Miriam T.

    2010-01-01

    Stories abound in literature of the ways that people and their pets have fostered and created valuable relationships. More recently, research has shown a strong impact from the pet relationship in health-related settings. Positive changes have been seen in people developing resilience, self-reliance, and in making progress in treatment. Children…

  5. A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay based on strand displacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Vary, C P

    1987-01-01

    A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay which is conducted in solution and requires no separation steps is described. The assay is based on the concept of strand displacement. In the strand displacement assay, an RNA "signal strand" is hybridized within a larger DNA strand termed the "probe strand", which is, in turn, complementary to the target nucleic acid of interest. Hybridization of the target nucleic acid with the probe strand ultimately results in displacement of the RNA signal ...

  6. Effects of Withania somnifera and Tinospora cordifolia extracts on the side population phenotype of human epithelial cancer cells: toward targeting multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliyakkal, Naseer; Appadath Beeran, Asmy; Balaji, Sai A; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Ranganath Pai, Sreedhara; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2015-03-01

    Recent reports suggest the existence of a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells, termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which bear functional and phenotypic resemblance with the adult, tissue-resident stem cells. Side population (SP) assay based on differential efflux of Hoechst 33342 has been effectively used for the isolation of CSCs. The drug resistance properties of SP cells are typically due to the increased expression of ABC transporters leading to drug efflux. Conventionally used chemotherapeutic drugs may often leads to an enrichment of SP, revealing their inability to target the drug-resistant SP and CSCs. Thus, identification of agents that can reduce the SP phenotype is currently in vogue in cancer therapeutics. Withania somnifera (WS) and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) have been used in Ayurveda for treating various diseases, including cancer. In the current study, we have investigated the effects of ethanolic (ET) extracts of WS and TC on the cancer SP phenotype. Interestingly, we found significant decrease in SP on treatment with TC-ET, but not with WS-ET. The SP-inhibitory TC-ET was further fractionated into petroleum ether (TC-PET), dichloromethane (TC-DCM), and n-butyl alcohol (TC-nBT) fractions using bioactivity-guided fractionation. Our data revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM, but not TC-nBT, significantly inhibited SP in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, flow cytometry-based functional assays revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM significantly inhibited ABC-B1 and ABC-G2 transporters and sensitized cancer cells toward chemotherapeutic drug-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, the TC-PET and TC-DCM may harbor phytochemicals with the potential to reverse the drug-resistant phenotype, thus improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25549922

  7. Effects of Withania somnifera and Tinospora cordifolia extracts on the side population phenotype of human epithelial cancer cells: toward targeting multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliyakkal, Naseer; Appadath Beeran, Asmy; Balaji, Sai A; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Ranganath Pai, Sreedhara; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2015-03-01

    Recent reports suggest the existence of a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells, termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which bear functional and phenotypic resemblance with the adult, tissue-resident stem cells. Side population (SP) assay based on differential efflux of Hoechst 33342 has been effectively used for the isolation of CSCs. The drug resistance properties of SP cells are typically due to the increased expression of ABC transporters leading to drug efflux. Conventionally used chemotherapeutic drugs may often leads to an enrichment of SP, revealing their inability to target the drug-resistant SP and CSCs. Thus, identification of agents that can reduce the SP phenotype is currently in vogue in cancer therapeutics. Withania somnifera (WS) and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) have been used in Ayurveda for treating various diseases, including cancer. In the current study, we have investigated the effects of ethanolic (ET) extracts of WS and TC on the cancer SP phenotype. Interestingly, we found significant decrease in SP on treatment with TC-ET, but not with WS-ET. The SP-inhibitory TC-ET was further fractionated into petroleum ether (TC-PET), dichloromethane (TC-DCM), and n-butyl alcohol (TC-nBT) fractions using bioactivity-guided fractionation. Our data revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM, but not TC-nBT, significantly inhibited SP in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, flow cytometry-based functional assays revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM significantly inhibited ABC-B1 and ABC-G2 transporters and sensitized cancer cells toward chemotherapeutic drug-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, the TC-PET and TC-DCM may harbor phytochemicals with the potential to reverse the drug-resistant phenotype, thus improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Application of PET and PET/CT imaging for cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential application of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer screening in asymptomatic individuals. Methods: The subjects consisted of 3631 physical check up examinees (1947 men, 1684 women; mean age ±SD, 52.1±8.2 y) with non-specific medical histories. Whole-body FDG PET (or PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers were performed on all patients. Focal hypermetabolic areas with intensities equal to or exceeding the level of FDG uptake in the brain and bladder were considered abnormal and interpreted as neoplasia. Follow-up periods were longer than one year. Results: Among the 3631 FDG PET (including 1687 PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers examinations, malignant tumors were discovered in 47 examinees (1.29%). PET findings were true-positive in 38 of the 47 cancers (80.9%). In addition, 32 of the 47 cancers were performed with the PET-CT scan. PET detected cancer lesions in 28 of the 32 examinees. However, the CT detected cancer lesions in only 15 of 32 examinees. Conclusion: The sensitivity of FDG PET in the detection of a wide variety of cancers is high. Most cancer can be detected with FDG PET in a resectable stage. CT of the PET/CT for localization and characteristics of the lesion shows an increased specificity of the PET scan. Using ultrasound and tumor markers may complement the PET scan in cancer screening for hepatic and urologic neoplasms. (authors)

  9. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  10. Two-dimensional electrophoretic mobility shift assay: identification and mapping of transcription factor CTCF target sequences within an FXYD5-COX7A1 region of human chromosome 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetchinova, Anna S; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-07-01

    An approach for fast identification and mapping of transcription factor binding sites within long genomic sequences is proposed. Using this approach, 10 CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding sites were identified within a 1-Mb FXYD5-COX7A1 human chromosome 19 region. In vivo binding of CTCF to these sites was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CTCF binding sites were mapped within gene introns and intergenic regions, and some of them contained Alu-like repeated elements. PMID:16701069

  11. Can pets function as family members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan Phillips

    2002-10-01

    This exploratory study investigated how clients of a large urban veterinary center viewed the role of their pet in the famil and how they compared this role to that of humans. In Phase 1, randomly selected clients (N = 201) completed a questionnaire containing scales delineating family relationships and pet attachment. Being either a man or a college graduate was associated with lesser feelings of psychological kinship and intimacy, both with pets and people. Neither living with a partner norhaving a child affected the strength of pet relationships. In Phase 2, 16 participants from Phase I completed a social network instrument and answered questions about family roles and boundaries. Thirteen of the 16 respondents said that there were circumstances in which they would give a scarce drug to their pet in preference to a person outside the family. PMID:12365764

  12. Molecular imaging of cancer with radiolabeled peptides and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vāvere, Amy L; Rossin, Raffaella

    2012-06-01

    Radiolabeled peptides hold promise for diagnosis and therapy of cancer as well as for early monitoring of therapy outcomes, patient stratification, etc. This manuscript focuses on the development of peptides labeled with 18F, 64Cu, 68Ga and other positron-emitting radionuclides for PET imaging. The major techniques for radionuclide incorporation are briefly discussed. Then, examples of positron-emitting peptides targeting somatostatin receptors, integrins, gastrin-releasing peptide receptors, vasointestinal peptide receptors, melanocortin 1 receptors and others are reviewed. PMID:22292762

  13. Preliminary study of the detectability of coronary plaque with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of coronary plaque vulnerability could be of great diagnostic value in cardiology. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a good candidate due to its ability to quantify micromolar concentrations of targeted drugs. However, the detectability of sub-voxel targets such as coronary plaque is limited by partial volume effects and by cardiorespiratory motion. The goal of this paper is to investigate the impact of these factors in the detectability of plaque uptake. Radioactive markers were implanted on the epicardium of a pig and in vivo scans were performed. This was complemented with phantom measurements to determine the minimum detectable uptake as a function of background activity. Simulations were used to evaluate the effect of cardiorespiratory motion on the reconstructed lesions. Despite cardiorespiratory motion of up to 7 mm, the markers were detectable in the in vivo scans even after the injection of background. A lower limit of 250 Bq was found for a target to be detectable. Motion reduced the contrast of the reconstructed lesions to 23% of their static counterpart. Respiratory gating improved this to 49% of the static value. The results suggest that coronary plaque evaluation with PET is possible, provided that sufficient plaque-to-myocardium uptake contrast (50 to 100) can be achieved. This requirement increases exponentially for lesions with uptake below 250 Bq. The described experiments provide a means of estimating the minimum uptake and contrast required to ensure the detectability of plaque lesions.

  14. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  15. Up-dating the Cholodny method using PET films to sample microbial communities in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Kordium V. A.; Dello Sterpaio P.; Koza A.; Moshynets O. V.; Spiers A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the use of PET (polyethylene terephtalate) films as a modern development of Cholodny’s glass slides, to enable microscopy and molecular-based analysis of soil communities where spatial detail at the scale of microbial habitats is essential to understand microbial associations and interactions in this complex environment. Methods. Classical microbiological methods; attachment assay; surface tension measurements; molecular techniques: DNA extraction, PCR;...

  16. Detection and compensation of organ/lesion motion using 4D-PET/CT respiratory gated acquisition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the degradation effects produced by respiratory organ and lesion motion on PET/CT images and to define the role of respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques to compensate for such effects. Methods: Based on the literature and on our own experience, technical recommendations and clinical indications for the use of RG 4D PET/CT have been outlined. Results: RG 4D-PET/CT techniques require a state of the art PET/CT scanner, a respiratory monitoring system and dedicated acquisition and processing protocols. Patient training is particularly important to obtain a regular breathing pattern. An adequate number of phases has to be selected to balance motion compensation and statistical noise. RG 4D PET/CT motion free images may be clinically useful for tumour tissue characterization, monitoring patient treatment and target definition in radiation therapy planning. Conclusions: RG 4D PET/CT is a valuable tool to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy and to assess and measure organ and lesion motion for radiotherapy planning.

  17. Disseminated osteomyelitis or bone metastases of breast cancer. 18F-FDG-PET/CT helps unravel an unusual presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a case wherein striking 18F-FDG-PET/CT findings initially considered consistent with recurrent disseminated skeletal metastases of breast cancer were later identified as an unusual presentation of disseminated chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis with Staphylococcus aureus and warneri identified on microbiological culture. A 76-year-old female with previous history of breast cancer presented with a 6-month history of pyrexia, myalgia and weight loss. Besides neutrophilia and elevated C-reactive protein, other blood indices, cultures and conventional imaging failed to identify the cause of pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO). 18F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated multiple widespread foci of intense FDG uptake in lytic lesions throughout the skeleton. Coupled with previous history of malignancy, findings were strongly suggestive of disseminated metastases of breast cancer. Through targeting an FDG avid lesion, 18F-FDG-PET/CT aided CT-guided biopsy, which instead identified the lesions as chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis. Following prolonged antibiotic therapy, repeat 18F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated significant resolution of lesions. This case demonstrated an unusual presentation of disseminated osteomyelitis on 18F-FDG-PET/CT and highlighted the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT as a trouble shooter in PUO but demonstrated that unusual presentations of benign or malignant pathologies cannot always reliably be differentiated on imaging alone without aid of tissue sampling. Furthermore, this case highlights the potential role 18F-FDG-PET/CT could provide in assessing response to antibiotic therapy. (author)

  18. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  19. Clinical Applications of FDG PET and PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Al-Ibraheem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET plays an increasing role in diagnosis and management planning of head and neck cancer. Hybrid PET/CT has promoted the field of molecular imaging in head and neck cancer. This modality is particular relevant in the head and neck region, given the complex anatomy and variable physiologic FDG uptake patterns. The vast majority of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT applications in head and neck cancer related to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical applications of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in head and neck cancer include diagnosis of distant metastases, identification of synchronous 2nd primaries, detection of carcinoma of unknown primary and detection of residual or recurrent disease. Emerging applications are precise delineation of the tumor volume for radiation treatment planning, monitoring treatment, and providing prognostic information. The clinical role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in N0 disease is limited which is in line with findings of other imaging modalities. MRI is usually used for T staging with an intense discussion concerning the preferable imaging modality for regional lymph node staging as PET/CT, MRI, and multi-slice spiral CT are all improving rapidly. Is this review, we summarize recent literature on 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT imaging of head and neck cancer.

  20. Distribution of prostate nodes: a PET/CT-derived anatomic atlas of prostate cancer patients before and after surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    each other. More than one-third of the PET positive lymph nodes in patients with no prior treatment and in postoperative patients would not have been treated adequately using the RTOG CTV. To reduce geographical miss, image based definition of an individual target volume is necessary

  1. Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortuin, Ansje S., E-mail: A.Fortuin@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meijer, Hanneke J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital' s, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J. [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

  2. A practical process for the preparation of [32P]S1P and binding assay for S1P receptor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are important regulators of vascular permeability, inflammation, angiogenesis and vascular maturation. Identifying a specific S1PR PET radioligand is imperative, but it is hindered by the complexity and variability of current for binding affinity measurement procedures. Herein, we report a streamlined protocol for radiosynthesis of [32P]S1P with good radiochemical yield (36–50%) and high radiochemical purity (>99%). We also report a reproducible procedure for determining the binding affinity for compounds targeting S1PRs in vitro. - Highlights: • Streamlined [32P]S1P production process with reproducible radiochemical yield. • Simplified assay of binding affinity for S1P receptors using [32P]S1P. • Reliable and repeatable IC50 values can be obtained by the reported method

  3. Challenges in integrating 18FDG PET-CT into radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, P; Partridge, M; Kazi, R; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Newbold, K

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy forms one of the major treatment modalities for head and neck cancers (HNC), and precision radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy require accurate target delineation to ensure success of the treatment. Conventionally used imaging modalities, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging are used to delineate the tumor. Imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET)-CT, which combines the functional and anatomic modalities, is increasingly being used in the management of HNC. Currently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radioisotope, which is accumulated in areas of high glucose uptake, such as the tumor tissue. Because most disease recurrences are within the high-dose radiotherapy volume, defining a biological target volume for radiotherapy boost is an attractive approach to improve the results. There are many challenges in employing the PET-CT for radiotherapy planning, such as patient positioning, target edge definition, and use of new PET tracers, which represent various functional properties, such as hypoxia, protein synthesis, and proliferation. The role of PET-CT for radiotherapy planning is ever expanding and more clinical data underlining the advantages and challenges in this approach are emerging. In this article, we review the current clinical evidence for the application of functional imaging to radiotherapy planning and discuss some of the current challenges and possible solutions that have been suggested to date.

  4. Novel Strategy for Preparing Dual-Modality Optical/PET Imaging Probes via Photo-Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Xing, Wei; Gai, Yongkang; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-05-18

    Preparation of small molecule based dual-modality probes remains a challenging task due to the complicated synthetic procedure. In this study, a novel concise and generic strategy for preparing dual-modality optical/PET imaging probes via photo-click chemistry was developed, in which the diazole photo-click linker functioned not only as a bridge between the targeting-ligand and the PET imaging moiety, but also as the fluorophore for optical imaging. A dual-modality AE105 peptidic probe was successfully generated via this strategy and subsequently applied in the fluorescent staining of U87MG cells and the (68)Ga based PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG xenograft. In addition, dual-modality monoclonal antibody cetuximab has also been generated via this strategy and labeled with (64)Cu for PET imaging studies, broadening the application of this strategy to include the preparation of macromolecule based imaging probes.

  5. A Prospective Study of {sup 18}FDG-PET With CT Coregistration for Radiation Treatment Planning of Lymphomas and Other Hematologic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Schöder, Heiko [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kowalski, Alexander; McCann, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lim, Remy; Turlakov, Alla [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gonen, Mithat [Department of Statistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Barker, Chris; Goenka, Anuj; Lovie, Shona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective single-institution study examined the impact of positron emission tomography (PET) with the use of 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and computed tomography (CT) scan radiation treatment planning (TP) on target volume definition in lymphoma. Methods and Materials: 118 patients underwent PET/CT TP during June 2007 to May 2009. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on CT-only and PET/CT studies by radiation oncologists (ROs) and nuclear medicine physicians (NMPs) for 95 patients with positive PET scans. Treatment plans and dose-volume histograms were generated for CT-only and PET/CT for 95 evaluable sites. Paired t test statistics and Pearson correlation coefficients were used for analysis. Results: 70 (74%) patients had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 10 (11%) had Hodgkin lymphoma, 12 (10%) had plasma-cell neoplasm, and 3 (3%) had other hematologic malignancies. Forty-three (45%) presented with relapsed/refractory disease. Forty-five (47%) received no prior chemotherapy. The addition of PET increased GTV as defined by ROs in 38 patients (median, 27%; range, 5%-70%) and decreased GTV in 41 (median, 39.5%; range, 5%-80%). The addition of PET increased GTV as defined by NMPs in 27 patients (median, 26.5%; range, 5%-95%) and decreased GTV in 52 (median, 70%; range, 5%-99%). The intraobserver correlation between CT-GTV and PET-GTV was higher for ROs than for NMPs (0.94, P<.01 vs 0.89, P<.01). On the basis of Bland-Altman plots, the PET-GTVs defined by ROs were larger than those defined by NMPs. On evaluation of clinical TPs, only 4 (4%) patients had inadequate target coverage (D95 <95%) of the PET-GTV defined by NMPs. Conclusions: Significant differences between the RO and NMP volumes were identified when PET was coregistered to CT for radiation planning. Despite this, the PET-GTV defined by ROs and NMPs received acceptable prescription dose in nearly all patients. However, given the potential for a marginal miss, consultation with an experienced PET

  6. Attenuation correction for small animal PET tomographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Patrick L [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-04-21

    Attenuation correction is one of the important corrections required for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). This work will compare the quantitative accuracy of attenuation correction using a simple global scale factor with traditional transmission-based methods acquired either with a small animal PET or a small animal x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. Two phantoms (one mouse-sized and one rat-sized) and two animal subjects (one mouse and one rat) were scanned in CTI Concorde Microsystem's microPET (registered) Focus{sup TM} for emission and transmission data and in ImTek's MicroCAT{sup TM} II for transmission data. PET emission image values were calibrated against a scintillation well counter. Results indicate that the scale factor method of attenuation correction places the average measured activity concentration about the expected value, without correcting for the cupping artefact from attenuation. Noise analysis in the phantom studies with the PET-based method shows that noise in the transmission data increases the noise in the corrected emission data. The CT-based method was accurate and delivered low-noise images suitable for both PET data correction and PET tracer localization.

  7. Comparing life cycle energy and GHG emissions of bio-based PET, recycled PET, PLA and man-made cellulosics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the environmental profiles of petrochemical PET, (partially) bio-based PET, recycled PET, and recycled (partially) bio-based PET, and compare them with other bio-based materials, namely PLA (polylactic acid, a bio-based polyester) and man-made cellulose fibers

  8. Tryptophan PET predicts spatial and temporal patterns of post-treatment glioblastoma progression detected by contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Robinette, Natasha L; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid PET is increasingly utilized for the detection of recurrent gliomas. Increased amino acid uptake is often observed outside the contrast-enhancing brain tumor mass. In this study, we evaluated if non-enhancing PET+ regions could predict spatial and temporal patterns of subsequent MRI progression in previously treated glioblastomas. Twelve patients with a contrast-enhancing area suspicious for glioblastoma recurrence on MRI underwent PET scanning with the amino acid radiotracer alpha-[(11)C]-methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT). Brain regions showing increased AMT uptake in and outside the contrast-enhancing volume were objectively delineated to include high uptake consistent with glioma (as defined by previous studies). Volume and tracer uptake of such non-enhancing PET+ regions were compared to spatial patterns and timing of subsequent progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, as defined by serial surveillance MRI. Non-enhancing PET+ volumes varied widely across patients and extended up to 24 mm from the edge of MRI contrast enhancement. In ten patients with clear progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, the non-enhancing PET+ volumes predicted the location of new enhancement, which extended beyond the PET+ brain tissue in six. In two patients, with no PET+ area beyond the initial contrast enhancement, MRI remained stable. There was a negative correlation between AMT uptake in non-enhancing brain and time to subsequent progression (r = -0.77, p = 0.003). Amino acid PET imaging could complement MRI not only for detecting glioma recurrence but also predicting the location and timing of subsequent tumor progression. This could support decisions for surgical intervention or other targeted therapies for recurrent gliomas.

  9. Detection of cranial meningiomas: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Haberkorn, Uwe; Haufe, Sabine; Kratochwil, Clemens [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [DKFZ, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany); Podlesek, Dino [University Hospital of Dresden, Department of Neurosurgery, Dresden (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael [DKFZ, Department of Radiopharmacy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    PET imaging with somatostatin receptor ligands, such as {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, is a well-established method for detection and target volume definition of meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Since DOTATOC PET delivers a higher contrast between meningiomas and surrounding tissues than MRI, we conducted a retrospective analysis to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with cranial meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Over a period of 6 years, 134 patients (20-82 years of age, 107 women and 27 men) underwent cranial CE-MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. To compare the two methods, the lesions considered typical of meningiomas visually were counted and analysed with respect to their location and SUVmax. In the 134 patients investigated by both modalities, 190 meningiomas were detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and 171 by CE-MRI. With knowledge of the PET/CT data, the MRI scans were reinvestigated, which led to the detection of 4 of the 19 incidental meningiomas, resulting in an overall detection rate of 92 % of the meningioma lesions that were found by PET/CT. Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrated an improved sensitivity in meningioma detection when compared to CE-MRI. Tumours adjacent to the falx cerebri, located at the skull base or obscured by imaging artefacts or calcification are particularly difficult to detect by MRI. Therefore {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT may provide additional information in patients with uncertain or equivocal results on MRI or could help to confirm a diagnosis of meningioma based on MRI or could help to confirm MRI-based diagnosis of meningiomas in cases of biopsy limitations. It is possible that not only radiotherapy and surgical planning, but also follow-up strategies would benefit from this imaging modality. (orig.)

  10. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate;

    2003-01-01

    Children are not just small adults-they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use...... and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments......, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine....

  11. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate; Hoejgaard, Liselotte [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2003-10-01

    Children are not just small adults - they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine. (orig.)

  12. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  13. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children are not just small adults - they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine. (orig.)

  14. Pet Ownership and Evacuation Prior to Hurricane Irene

    OpenAIRE

    Nick Rohrbaugh; Kelsey Bogue; Hunt, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Ninety pet owners and 27 non-pet owners who lived in mandatory evacuation zones during the 2011 Hurricane Irene were surveyed about whether or not they evacuated and about their experiences during the hurricane. Although pet-ownership was not statistically associated with evacuation failure, many pet owners who chose not to evacuate still claimed that they did not evacuate because of difficulties with evacuating their pet. These findings suggest that more work needs to be done ...

  15. Revising Intramolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) from First-Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Daniel

    2016-09-20

    fluorescent probes, including proton, cation and anion targets. Furthermore, this mechanism provides a general picture of the fluorescence quenching which englobes intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT), ratiometric quenching, and those radiationless mechanisms believed to be originated by PET. Finally, this Account provides for the first time a computational protocol to quantitatively estimate this phenomenon and provides the ingredients for the optimal design of fluorescent probes from first principles. PMID:27575871

  16. Revising Intramolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) from First-Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Daniel

    2016-09-20

    fluorescent probes, including proton, cation and anion targets. Furthermore, this mechanism provides a general picture of the fluorescence quenching which englobes intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT), ratiometric quenching, and those radiationless mechanisms believed to be originated by PET. Finally, this Account provides for the first time a computational protocol to quantitatively estimate this phenomenon and provides the ingredients for the optimal design of fluorescent probes from first principles.

  17. The Heritage of Radiotracers for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J. S.; Wolf, A. P.

    1988-05-01

    The history of PET research clearly demonstrates that it is advances in chemistry coupled with a detailed examination of the biochemistry of new radiotracers which has allowed the PET method to be applied to new areas of biology and medicine. Radiotracers whose regional distribution reflects glucose metabolism, neutrotransmitter activity and enzyme activity have all required the development of rapid synthetic methods for the radiotracers themselves and the characterization of their biochemical behavior. This article traces some of the advances in the production of labeled precursors and in radiotracer synthesis and evaluation which have shaped the rapidly expanding application of PET to problems in the neurosciences, in cardiology and in oncology.

  18. Recent progress of PET in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na NIU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the current elderly population. PET can detect pathophysiological changes in Alzheimer's disease with different radiotracers. This paper will focus on evaluating the value of 18F-FDG, amyloid and tau protein PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease. PET has been demonstrated to play an important role in the research of etiology, early diagnosis, differential dignosis, prognosis and medical treatment of Alzheimer's disease. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.007

  19. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the number of groups that will be imaged, and the expected intra-animal variability for a given tracer. We also review how high-throughput studies can be performed in dedicated small-animal PET, high-resolution clinical PET systems and planar positron imaging systems by imaging more than one animal simultaneously. Customized beds designed to image more than one animal in large-bore small-animal PET scanners are described. Physics issues related to the presence of several rodents within the field of view (i.e. deterioration of spatial resolution and sensitivity as the radial and the axial offsets increase, respectively, as well as a larger effect of attenuation and the number of scatter events), which can be assessed by using the NEMA NU 4 image quality phantom, are detailed. (orig.)

  20. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen Cedex (France); Caen University, BioTICLA team, EA 4656, IFR 146, Caen (France); Visser, Eric P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lheureux, Stephanie [Caen University, BioTICLA team, EA 4656, IFR 146, Caen (France); Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Clinical Research Unit, Caen (France); Heutte, Natacha [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Clinical Research Unit, Caen (France); Szanda, Istvan [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the number of groups that will be imaged, and the expected intra-animal variability for a given tracer. We also review how high-throughput studies can be performed in dedicated small-animal PET, high-resolution clinical PET systems and planar positron imaging systems by imaging more than one animal simultaneously. Customized beds designed to image more than one animal in large-bore small-animal PET scanners are described. Physics issues related to the presence of several rodents within the field of view (i.e. deterioration of spatial resolution and sensitivity as the radial and the axial offsets increase, respectively, as well as a larger effect of attenuation and the number of scatter events), which can be assessed by using the NEMA NU 4 image quality phantom, are detailed. (orig.)

  1. Experimental validation of gallium production and isotope-dependent positron range correction in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, L. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Udías, J. M.; Cal-González, J.; Corzo, P. M. G.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Picado, E.; Vicente, E.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Positron range (PR) is one of the important factors that limit the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) preclinical images. Its blurring effect can be corrected to a large extent if the appropriate method is used during the image reconstruction. Nevertheless, this correction requires an accurate modelling of the PR for the particular radionuclide and materials in the sample under study. In this work we investigate PET imaging with 68Ga and 66Ga radioisotopes, which have a large PR and are being used in many preclinical and clinical PET studies. We produced a 68Ga and 66Ga phantom on a natural zinc target through (p,n) reactions using the 9-MeV proton beam delivered by the 5-MV CMAM tandetron accelerator. The phantom was imaged in an ARGUS small animal PET/CT scanner and reconstructed with a fully 3D iterative algorithm, with and without PR corrections. The reconstructed images at different time frames show significant improvement in spatial resolution when the appropriate PR is applied for each frame, by taking into account the relative amount of each isotope in the sample. With these results we validate our previously proposed PR correction method for isotopes with large PR. Additionally, we explore the feasibility of PET imaging with 68Ga and 66Ga radioisotopes in proton therapy.

  2. Role of FDG-PET in the Definition of Involved-Field Radiation Therapy and Management for Pediatric Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) influences in involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) field design in pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Materials and Methods: From June 2003 to February 2008, 30 pediatric HL patients were treated at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) and Emory University Department of Radiation Oncology with both chemotherapy and IFRT. Diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT and PET-CT were coregistered using image fusion software. Both were reviewed for all potential sites of involvement and correlated to determine concordance and discordance. They were used in IFRT planning to determine the influence of PET-CT on target volumes and field design. Results: There were 546 regions analyzed by both PET and CT modalities. Image sets were concordant in 468 regions and discordant in 78, yielding 86% concordance overall. Analysis by weighted κ statistic showed 'intermediate to good' fit overall and for nodal sites, but 'poor' agreement for extranodal sites. If discordant, a site was most likely PET+/CT-. Integration of PET information caused a change in staging in 15 (50%) patients, 7 upstaged and 8 downstaged. The IFRT volumes were adjusted on the basis of initial PET-CT finding in 21 (70%) patients, with 32 sites added and 15 excluded. There were four relapses, only one outside IFRT fields, but all were successfully salvaged. Conclusion: PET-CT represents an important tool in the management of pediatric patients with HL and has a substantial influence on both initial staging and radiation treatment target definition and field design.

  3. Accuracy assessment of an automatic image-based PET/CT registration for ultrasound-guided biopsies and ablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Wood, Bradford J.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Dalal, Sandeep; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    The multimodal fusion of spatially tracked real-time ultrasound (US) with a prior CT scan has demonstrated clinical utility, accuracy, and positive impact upon clinical outcomes when used for guidance during biopsy and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, the combination of CT-guided procedures with positron emission tomography (PET) may not only enhance navigation, but add valuable information regarding the specific location and volume of the targeted masses which may be invisible on CT and US. The accuracy of this fusion depends on reliable, reproducible registration methods between PET and CT. This can avoid extensive manual efforts to correct registration which can be long and tedious in an interventional setting. In this paper, we present a registration workflow for PET/CT/US fusion by analyzing various image metrics based on normalized mutual information and cross-correlation, using both rigid and affine transformations to automatically align PET and CT. Registration is performed between the CT component of the prior PET-CT and the intra-procedural CT scan used for navigation to maximize image congruence. We evaluate the accuracy of the PET/CT registration by computing fiducial and target registration errors using anatomical landmarks and lesion locations respectively. We also report differences to gold-standard manual alignment as well as the root mean square errors for CT/US fusion. Ten patients with prior PET/CT who underwent ablation or biopsy procedures were selected for this study. Studies show that optimal results were obtained using a crosscorrelation based rigid registration with a landmark localization error of 1.1 +/- 0.7 mm using a discrete graphminimizing scheme. We demonstrate the feasibility of automated fusion of PET/CT and its suitability for multi-modality ultrasound guided navigation procedures.

  4. Endoparasite Infections in Pet and Zoo Birds in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Papini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Faecal samples were individually collected from pet (=63 and zoo (=83 birds representing 14 orders and 63 species. All the samples were examined by faecal flotation technique. In a subgroup of samples (=75, molecular assays were also used to detect Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts. Overall, 35.6% of the birds harboured parasites (42.2% of zoo birds and 27% of pet birds, including Strongyles-Capillarids (8.9%, Ascaridia (6.8%, Strongyles (5.5%, G. duodenalis Assemblage A (5.3%, Coccidia (4.1%, Cryptosporidium (4%, Porrocaecum (2.7%, Porrocaecum-Capillarids (2%, and Syngamus-Capillarids (0.7%. The zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblage A and Cryptosporidium were exclusively found in Psittaciformes, with prevalences of 10.3% and 7.7% within this bird group. Zoo birds were more likely to harbor mixed infections (OR = 14.81 and symptomatic birds to be parasitized (OR = 4.72. Clinicians should be aware of the public health implications posed by zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblages and Cryptosporidium species in captive birds.

  5. Endoparasite Infections in Pet and Zoo Birds in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Roberto; Girivetto, Martine; Marangi, Marianna; Mancianti, Francesca; Giangaspero, Annunziata

    2012-01-01

    Faecal samples were individually collected from pet (n = 63) and zoo (n = 83) birds representing 14 orders and 63 species. All the samples were examined by faecal flotation technique. In a subgroup of samples (n = 75), molecular assays were also used to detect Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts. Overall, 35.6% of the birds harboured parasites (42.2% of zoo birds and 27% of pet birds), including Strongyles-Capillarids (8.9%), Ascaridia (6.8%), Strongyles (5.5%), G. duodenalis Assemblage A (5.3%), Coccidia (4.1%), Cryptosporidium (4%), Porrocaecum (2.7%), Porrocaecum-Capillarids (2%), and Syngamus-Capillarids (0.7%). The zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblage A and Cryptosporidium were exclusively found in Psittaciformes, with prevalences of 10.3% and 7.7% within this bird group. Zoo birds were more likely to harbor mixed infections (OR = 14.81) and symptomatic birds to be parasitized (OR = 4.72). Clinicians should be aware of the public health implications posed by zoonotic G. duodenalis Assemblages and Cryptosporidium species in captive birds. PMID:22536128

  6. Seroprevalence and genotype of Chlamydia in pet parrots in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N-Z; Zhang, X-X; Zhou, D-H; Huang, S-Y; Tian, W-P; Yang, Y-C; Zhao, Q; Zhu, X-Q

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are one of the most popular pet birds in China, and can harbour Chlamydia which has significance for human and animal health. We investigated, by indirect haemagglutination assay, the seroprevalence of Chlamydia infection in four species of parrots, namely budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria) that were collected from Weifang and Beijing cities, North China and explored the association between potential risk factors and chlamydial seropositivity. We further determined the genotype of Chlamydia in 21 fresh faecal samples based on the ompA sequence by reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Of the 311 parrots examined, 35·37% (95% confidence interval 30·06-40·68) were seropositive, and species, gender, age, season and geographical location were identified as risk factors. Two PCR-positive samples represented Chlamydia psittaci genotype A. The occurrence of C. psittaci genotype A in the droppings of two pet parrots in China suggests potential environmental contamination with Chlamydiaceae and may raise a public health concern.

  7. PET with a dual-head coincidence gamma camera in head and neck cancer: A comparison with computed tomography and dedicated PET; Stellenwert der PET mit Koinzidenz-Gammakameras bei Kopf-Hals-Tumoren: Vergleich mit Computertomographie und dedizierter PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimny, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography with {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG PET) is a promising imaging tool for detecting and staging of primary or recurrent head and neck cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate a dual-head gamma camera modified for coincidence detection (KGK-PET) in comparison to computed tomography (CT) and dedicated PET (dPET). 50 patients with known or suspected primary or recurrent head and neck cancer were enrolled. 32 patients underwent KGK-PET and dPET using a one-day protocol. The sensitivity for the detection of primary/ recurrent head and neck cancer for KGK-PET and CT was 80% and 54%, respectively, specificity was 73% and 82%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lymph node metastases based on neck sides with KGK-PET was 71% (CT: 65%) and 88% (CT: 89%) respectively. In comparison to dPET, KGK-PET revealed concordant results in 32/32 patients with respect to primary tumor/recurrent disease and in 55/60 evaluated neck sides. All involved neck sides that were missed by KGK-PET were also negative with dPET. These results indicate that in patients with head and neck cancer KGK-PET reveals information, that are similar to dPET and complementary to CT. (orig.) [German] Die Positronenemissionstomographie mit {sup 18}F-Fluor-Deoxyglukose (FDG-PET) ist ein viel versprechendes Verfahren zur Detektion und zum Staging von primaeren und rezidivierenden Malignomen der Kopf-Hals-Region. Ziel der Studie war die Evaluation einer koinzidenzfaehigen Doppelkopf-Gammakamera (KGK-PET) im Vergleich zur Computertomographie (CT) und dedizierten Ring-PET (dPET). Untersucht wurden 50 Patienten mit Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Vergleichsuntersuchungen mit dPET erfolgten bei 32 Patienten. Die Sensitivitaet von KGK-PET zur Erkennung von Primaertumoren/Rezidiven betrug 80% bei einer Spezifitaet von 73%. Fuer CT berechnete sich eine Sensitivitaet von 54% und eine Spezifitaet von 82%. Bezueglich einer zervikalen Lymphknotenmetastasierung errechnete

  8. Development of robotic plasma radiochemical assays for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, D.L.; Shea, C.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S.J.; Schlyer, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-01

    A commercial laboratory robot system (Zymate PyTechnology II Laboratory Automation System; Zymark Corporation, Hopkinton, MA) was interfaced to standard and custom laboratory equipment and programmed to perform rapid radiochemical analyses for quantitative PET studies. A Zymark XP robot arm was used to carry out the determination of unchanged (parent) radiotracer in plasma using only solid phase extraction methods. Robotic throughput for the assay of parent radiotracer in plasma is 4--6 samples/hour depending on the radiotracer. Robotic assays of parent compound in plasma were validated for the radiotracers [{sup 11}C]Benztropine, [{sup 11}C]cocaine, [{sup 11}C]clorgyline, [{sup 11}C]deprenyl, [{sup 11}C]methadone, [{sup 11}C]methylphenidate, [{sup 11}C]raclorpride, and [{sup 11}C]SR46349B. A simple robot-assisted methods development strategy has been implemented to facilitate the automation of plasma assays of new radiotracers.

  9. Development of robotic plasma radiochemical assays for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial laboratory robot system (Zymate PyTechnology II Laboratory Automation System; Zymark Corporation, Hopkinton, MA) was interfaced to standard and custom laboratory equipment and programmed to perform rapid radiochemical analyses for quantitative PET studies. A Zymark XP robot arm was used to carry out the determination of unchanged (parent) radiotracer in plasma using only solid phase extraction methods. Robotic throughput for the assay of parent radiotracer in plasma is 4--6 samples/hour depending on the radiotracer. Robotic assays of parent compound in plasma were validated for the radiotracers [11C]Benztropine, [11C]cocaine, [11C]clorgyline, [11C]deprenyl, [11C]methadone, [11C]methylphenidate, [11C]raclorpride, and [11C]SR46349B. A simple robot-assisted methods development strategy has been implemented to facilitate the automation of plasma assays of new radiotracers

  10. Ligand Specific Efficiency (LSE) Index for PET Tracer Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auberson, Yves P; Briard, Emmanuelle; Sykes, David; Reilly, John; Healy, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Ligand efficiency indices are widely used to guide chemical optimization in drug discovery, due to their predictive value in the early steps of optimization. At later stages, however, as more complex properties become critical for success, indices relying on calculated, rather than experimental, parameters become less informative. This problem is particularly acute when developing positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents, for which nonspecific binding (NSB) to membranes and non-target proteins is a frequent cause of failure. NSB cannot be predicted using in silico parameters. To address this gap, we explored the use of the experimentally determined chromatographic hydrophobicity index on immobilized artificial membranes, CHI(IAM), to guide the optimization of NSB. The ligand specific efficiency (LSE) index was defined as the ratio between affinity (pIC50 or pKd ) and the logarithmic value of CHI(IAM). It allows for quantification of binding affinity to the target of interest, relative to NSB. Its use was illustrated by the optimization of PET tracer candidates for the prostacyclin receptor. PMID:27193393

  11. The PET / cyclotron facility at Putrajaya Hospital - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaysia desire to have a cyclotron for nuclear medical use came into realisation recently with the establishment of a PET/Cyclotron Facility at Putrajaya Hospital. The testing and commissioning of the cyclotron, hot cells, QC equipment and PET/CT started on March 27, culminating in the first patient to be injected on May 10 2006. Three other patients were to be followed on May 15. The patients from both the Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya Hospital were pre-selected by physicians from these hospitals. The 18 MeV cyclotron is capable of generating 16.4 MeV protons and 8.4 MeV deuterons. The cyclotron at Putrajaya has three targets (2 liquid and 1 gas) and is capable of producing 18F-FDG and 18F-DOPA. To complement this, the facility has 2 modules for FDG synthesis, 1 for F-DOPA and 1 for nucleophilic synthesis. The facility will be GMP compliant. For the first production for human use, the water-18 target was irradiated for 50 minutes at 20 mA to produce 1.3 Ci of F-18. At the end of synthesis, the activity of the FDG obtained was 600 mCi. The product was then injected to a 26-year-old female, with a suspected adenocarcinoma. (Author)

  12. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  13. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  14. Feasibility study for PET - The right choice for establishing PET in emerging countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: PET represents a new step forward in evaluating function of internal organs and has proven to be very useful in Oncology, Cardiology, Neurology and in the field of infection and inflammation. In response to growing interest in the PET technology IAEA Department of the Technical Cooperation and the Institute of Pathophysiology and Nuclear Medicine from Skopje, Macedonia initiated a feasibility study for evaluation of local conditions for PET implementation in Macedonia as a part of the new project cycle (2007-2009). This paper potentially will be contribute to the challenges of establishing PET in emerging countries, because Macedonia is a part of the Members States who are still in the planning stage of acquiring clinical PET. For the purposes of this feasibility study, ''Importance of establishing PET facilities in Republic of Macedonia'' several options were evaluated, and the workframe were created. The main points of this study are: - to create a strategy for the provision of positron emission tomography in the country, including Basic principles of PET, Clinical application of PET and International status of PET; - to evaluate the current status in Macedonia and relevant health statistics for the project; - to indicate all recommendation for the further evaluation (technological and scientific issues, raw materials and supplier); - economic evaluation of diagnostic imaging technologies, including price of PET and costeffectiveness analysis; - to analyze location, infrastructural and environmental conditions, work space, organization and overhead costs; - to create the implementation scheduling and the budget for the project with financial analysis and investment evaluation; - to see current problems and their solutions; - to evaluate optimal clinical indications for PET imaging; - to estimate reimbursement for PET. Conclusion: the importance of this feasibility study is: - to show the interest for the PET implementation in republic of Macedonia

  15. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (NodeCT) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PETVIS), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PETSUV), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both NodeCT and PETVIS showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PETVIS. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PETSUV was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  16. Business administration of PET facilities. A nationwide survey for prices of PET screening and a cost analysis of three facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the business administration of positron emission tomography (PET) facilities based on the survey of the price of PET cancer screening and cost analysis of PET examination. The questionnaire survey of the price of PET cancer screening was implemented for all PET facilities in Japan. Cost data of PET examination, including fixed costs and variable costs, were obtained from three different medical institutions. The marked price of the PET cancer screening was yen111,499 in average, and the most popular range of prices was between yen80,000 and yen90,000. Costs of PET per examination were accounted for yen110,675, yen79,158 and yen111,644 in facility A, B and C, respectively. The results suggested that facilities with two or more PET/CT per a cyclotron could only secure profits. In Japan, the boom in PET facility construction could not continue in accordance with increasing number of PET facilities. It would become more essential to analyze the appropriate distribution of PET facilities and the adequate amount of PET procedures from the perspective of efficient utilization of the PET equipments and supply of PET-related healthcare. (author)

  17. Processing and characterization of extruded PET and its r-PET and MWCNT nanocomposite thin films by spin coating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arvind R Singh; Vineeta D Deshpande

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was basic understanding of the formation of thin film morphology by spin coating using reorganized polyethylene terephthalate (r-PET) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as fillers in PET. A study of the correlation between physical properties of the PET films and its surface morphology was carried out using atomic force microscopy-based power spectral density (PSD) analysis. No significant work of surface analysis, using PSD of thin films of PET has been reported till date. Dilute solution of PET, PET with 3 wt% (r-PET) and PET with 3 wt% (2 wt% r-PET + 1 wt% MWCNT) filler were prepared using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as a solvent and thin films were fabricated on glass substrate by the optimized spin coating technique. Preparation of r-PET and r-PET+ MWCNT fillers was obtained by the precipitation method using TFA as a solvent and acetone as an antisolvent. The samples before spin coating were extruded and for comparison, a film of non-extruded PET was also prepared. Structural studies by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction show higher degree of crystallinity in r-PET and decrease in chain entanglements. Owing to the crystallizing behaviour of r-PET, it allows better dispersion of MWCNT in the polymer matrix as compared with PET. The samples with fillers of MWCNT show more compact and unique mesh-like globular structure, indicating application for electromagnetic shielding foams and fibres.

  18. Bacterial Zoonoses Transmitted by Household Pets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Broens, E.M.; Chomel, B.B.;

    2016-01-01

    The close contact between household pets and people offers favourable conditions for bacterial transmission. In this article, the aetiology, prevalence, transmission, impact on human health and preventative measures are summarized for selected bacterial zoonoses transmissible by household pets. Six...... zoonoses representing distinct transmission routes were selected arbitrarily based on the available information on incidence and severity of pet-associated disease caused by zoonotic bacteria: bite infections and cat scratch disease (physical injuries), psittacosis (inhalation), leptospirosis (contact...... with urine), and campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis (faecal–oral ingestion). Antimicrobial resistance was also included due to the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria of zoonotic potential in dogs and cats. There is a general lack of data on pathogen prevalence in the relevant pet population...

  19. FDG PET/CT in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henrik; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Madsen, Poul Henning;

    2016-01-01

    use of PET/CT in the RSD with these recommendations. This article summarizes the results. METHODS: A Work Group appointed a professional Subgroup which made Clinician Groups conduct literature reviews on six selected cancers responsible for 5,768 (62.6 %) of 9,213 PET/CT scans in the RSD in 2012......-recommendable" indications, respectively. RESULTS: Of 11,729 citations, 1,729 were considered for review, and 204 were included. The evidence suggested usefulness of PET/CT in lung, lymphoma, melanoma, head and neck, and colorectal cancers, whereas evidence was sparse in gynaecological cancers. The agreement between actual...... use of PET/CT and literature-based recommendations was high in the first five mentioned cancers in that 96.2 % of scans were made for grade A or B indications versus only 22.2 % in gynaecological cancers. CONCLUSION: Evidence-based usefulness was reported in five of six selected cancers; evidence...

  20. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we highlight the use of position emission tomography (PET) scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge. (author)

  1. Cardiovascular physiology and diseases of pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pees, Michael; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Avian cardiac disease in pet birds occurs more often than previously assumed. The article focuses on anatomic peculiarities of the avian cardiovascular system and common diseases. Diagnostic possibilities are demonstrated, and therapeutic measures are discussed.

  2. Quantitative analysis of PET measurements in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron emission tomograhpy (PET) has been used for the evaluation of the characteristics of various tumors. The role of PET in oncology has been evolved from a pure research tool to a methodology of enormous clinical potential. The unique characteristics of PET imaging make sophisticated quantitation possible. Several quantitative methods, such as standardized uptake values (SUV), simplifield quantitation method, Patlak graphical analysis, and Sokoloff's glucose metabolism measurement, have been used in the field of oncology. However, each quantitative method has limitations of its own. For example, the SUV has been used as a quantitative index of glucose metabolism for tumor classification and monitoring response to treatment, even though it depends on blood glucose level, body configuration of patient, and scanning time. The quantitative methods of PET are reviewed and strategy for implementing these methods are presented

  3. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Greenwood

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein–protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression.

  4. The establishment of the Rossendorf PET Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the newly established Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Center at the Institut of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry in Rossendorf are described, referring to medical research, development of tracers and radiochemicals developments, biochemistry and future prospects of PET in Rossendorf. The layout of the center is also described considering the cyclotron and targetry, the transport system, the radiopharmaceutical laboratories and the tomograph. A schedule for project development is going. (BBR)

  5. The history of cerebral PET scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnow, Leah H.; Vaillancourt, David E.; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the discoveries underpinning the introduction of cerebral PET scanning and highlight its modern applications. Background: Important discoveries in neurophysiology, brain metabolism, and radiotracer development in the post–World War II period provided the necessary infrastructure for the first cerebral PET scan. Methods: A complete review of the literature was undertaken to search for primary and secondary sources on the history of PET imaging. Searches were performed in PubMed, Google Scholar, and select individual journal Web sites. Written autobiographies were obtained through the Society for Neuroscience Web site at www.sfn.org. A reference book on the history of radiology, Naked to the Bone, was reviewed to corroborate facts and to locate references. The references listed in all the articles and books obtained were reviewed. Results: The neurophysiologic sciences required to build cerebral PET imaging date back to 1878. The last 60 years have produced an evolution of technological advancements in brain metabolism and radiotracer development. These advancements facilitated the development of modern cerebral PET imaging. Several key scientists were involved in critical discoveries and among them were Angelo Mosso, Charles Roy, Charles Sherrington, John Fulton, Seymour Kety, Louis Sokoloff, David E. Kuhl, Gordon L. Brownell, Michael Ter-Pogossian, Michael Phelps, and Edward Hoffman. Conclusions: Neurophysiology, metabolism, and radiotracer development in the postwar era synergized the development of the technology necessary for cerebral PET scanning. Continued use of PET in clinical trials and current developments in PET-CT/MRI hybrids has led to advancement in diagnosis, management, and treatment of neurologic disorders. PMID:23460618

  6. Pathophysiology of movement disorders studied using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET radiotracer methods can measure various biochemical features ol brain tissue in the living human brain. Here, local brain energy consumption and striatal dopaminergic function will be discussed in the light of the neurodegenerative processes underlying Parkinson's disease. Particularly. disease progression and its consequences for protective and restorative strategies will be outlined. Also, an example will be given to demonstrate how the effect of neurotrophic factors on the striatal dopaminergic system can be monitored by PET tracer methods. (author)

  7. PET/MRI. Methodology and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Pau (Spain). Dept. Medicina Nuclear; Ros, Pablo (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Case, Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Provides detailed information on the methodology and equipment of MRI-PET. Covers a wide range of clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Written by an international group of experts in MRI and PET. PET/MRI is an exciting novel diagnostic imaging modality that combines the precise anatomic and physiologic information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the molecular data obtained with positron emission tomography (PET). PET/MRI offers the promise of a simpl